Issuu on Google+

Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 18 Art.of.the.State............. 21

Foodfinds..................... 23 Film.............................. 24 Musicbeat.....................27 Nightclubs/Casinos........29 This.Week.....................35 Advice.Goddess............36 Free.Will.Astrology....... 38 15.Minutes.....................39 Bruce.Van.Dyke............39

Dem Blues see News, page 8.

knock on wood see Green, page 11.

Hold Your Horses see Arts&Culture, page 18.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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Stomping Out Foot Problems If you experience foot pain, you’re not alone. One in six Americans has foot problems and more than one-third of them believe their conditions warrant medical attention.* Common risk factors that contribute to foot conditions include age, lifestyle, diet, weight and wearing ill-fitting shoes.

Six Common Foot Problems The most common foot conditions include: 1. Plantar fasciitis – inflammation of a fascia band on the sole of the foot, extending from the heel to the toes. 2. Hammertoe – the bending of one or both joints of the second, third, fourth or fifth toe that can be corrected by surgery. 3. Sprained ankle – an injury that results when ligaments are stretched beyond their normal range. 4. Bunions – firm, fluid-filled pad overlying the inside of the joint at the base of the big toe, usually a result of structural deformity of the great toe bone and joints. 5. Achilles tendonitis/tendonosis – persistent pain, tenderness and/or stiffness in the tendon connecting the heel bone to the calf muscle. 6. Calluses and corns – thickened skin caused by frequent rubbing or pressure. When the thickened skin is on the bottom of the foot, it’s called a callus and when it is on the top, it’s called a corn.

See your doctor if you or a loved one experien experiences nce ces any of these conditions, ditions, as well as: • Foot pain following owing an injur injury ury y • Sudden, severe re foot pa pain • Foot pain if you ou uh have diabetes or peripheral vascular disease ase • An open foot sore or ulcer • Joint redness or swelling • No relief despite pite self-care Remember … Many ny foot conditions can be b prevented from worsening with early arly treatment, so tal talk a k to your doctor.

Common risk factors that contribute to foot conditions include age, lifestyle, diet, weight and wearing ill-fitting shoes. Timothy M. Mooney, DPM, FACFAS, DABPS Board Certified, Podiatric Surgery

Dr. Mooney grew up right here in Sparks and was named one of Nevada’s Top Doctors in 2012 by Nevada Business Magazine. After graduating from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, he went on to graduate magna cum laude from Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. He completed his residency rotations at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Fairfax, Virginia and Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C. and was awarded the John D. Grad Memorial Award for “Excellence in Podiatric Education by a Resident.” Dr. Mooney treats patients of all ages in the office, operating room and emergency department. In his free time, he enjoys endurance and long-distance running, backpacking, hiking, and spending time with his wife and three sons.

To schedule a consultation with Dr. Mooney, call 775-356-4888. Medicare and most of the area’s health plans are accepted.

Exceptional People. Exceptional Quality. Experience the Difference. 2385 E. Prater Way, Suite 205 | Sparks, NV | 356-4888 | nnmg.com Information is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to constitute medical advice or to be relied upon for the treatment of any particular condition. If you have concerns or questions about specific symptoms that may affect your health, please contact your healthcare provider. * American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Don’t hesitate

Secrecy of independents

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Last Friday, June 13, I went over to the 3rd Street bar to catch a stand-up comedy event. My friend P. K. Hutchinson was one of the performers. The comedians were great— and many of the local jokers were just as funny as the touring headliner. After the comedy was over, a few of us hopped into a cab and headed over to Lincoln Lounge to catch the Funk Assassination, the fellas from the Mark Sexton Band and some players from the local jazz scene laying down nasty grooves as a very receptive audience danced, hooted and hollered. Next morning, we went down to the Positively Fourth Street block party, and had a great brunch at Mark Estee’s pop-up restaurant in Cuddleworks. We goofed around at Reno Instagrammy’s photo booth in the Under the Rose brewery, and then chatted with friends at the Reno Bike Project and the Holland Project’s temporary record store. All of these were fun events, with lively, not-giving-a-fuck crowds, and just a sampling of the many events going on around downtown Reno that weekend and every weekend— way more fun than whatever the people who think downtown Reno is a dead, scary place are doing with their miserable, sanitized summers. Don’t forget to vote in our Best of Northern Nevada readers’ poll: www.newsreview. com/reno/ballot/bestofreno14. And if your pick for the best, say, hot dog or tequila selection or whatever doesn’t appear in the autocomplete list, don’t hesitate to write it in. Of course, try your best to spell correctly. We here at the RN&R understand better than most that spelling errors happen, but it can affect the results if, say, no one notices that the "New Ma Tick Dinner" is probably supposed to be the "Pneumatic Diner." Vote! We’re hoping for better participation in our readers’ poll than last week’s piddling turnout for the actual primary election.

Re “Ready for my tax breaks, Mr. Nevada” (feature story, June 5): While incentives are a good idea to spur on the film industry here in Nevada, there is one caveat that will kill it for indies—the public hearing. As an indie filmmaker, I rely on the kindness of vendors, the passion of actors, and ability to shoot on a dime. Having to publicly share what I pay cast and crew is not an option. In fact, it’s specifically forbidden in our contracts. That is one reason why I moved my reality TV show, designed to showcase Reno as an awesome place to film, to Los Angeles. Budget-wise, without the incentives and local support, it made no sense to force the production here, when shooting in LA was far easier. Reno lost a great branding opportunity because of this little snafu with the rules. Will I bring the show back to Reno if they fix the issue? At this point, we are now firmly entrenched in LA. The way to get projects here is to welcome and nurture them. That is not what I have experienced since living here. It feels as if the only films that are welcome are from big studios and that local filmmakers are only in the way. Adryenn Ashley Reno

Word from Kansas What would make someone still support embryonic stem-cell research seeing how it has failed greatly over the years? Not only this, but it is unethical in that it kills human embryos in the process. What adds to this utter madness is that adult stemcell research, which is ethical, has proven fruitful, yet for some reason, is not supported by many! Michael Rachiele Prairie Village, Kan.

Missing case Re “Top 10 worst Supreme Court decisions” (feature story, March 8, 2012):

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

This list is a joke for its partisanship. Any list that does not include Buck v. Bell is just not serious. Daniel Duckworth Scottsdale, Arizona Editor’s note: Buck v. Bell was a ruling that approved forced sterilization of the unfit and disabled. The majority opinion was written by Oliver Wendell Holmes. In the issue immediately at hand, the object of the proposed sterilization, Carrie Buck, was a rape victim and it is a subject of debate whether she was actually mentally disabled.

Story idea A lot of the time, the Reno News & Review is more geared to the younger/ college aged community, so I was wondering why there have not been any stories on that lawyer who did the Eddie Lorton case? There have been articles on Lorton and candidates and stuff but not really anything about the lawyer. I am interested because I think she is like 20-something years old. I saw an article in a Los Angeles newspaper that said she wasn’t even 30. I thought that was interesting. Can you even be a lawyer that young? Anyway, that may be inaccurate information but we have heard very little about the person or people who believed in Mr. Lorton enough to take his case. If it is someone who is very young, then I think we should hear about it. Stuff like that motivates other young people like myself and others. I talked about this stuff with friends, too. Or maybe if the Best of Reno is coming up that could be a way to talk to her? Or however you guys do that. Alysha McNaughton by email

I was curious why the letters from May 22 are not online as I cited one “Bundy has a point” in a paper for my TMCC class and now have no proof. I would appreciate it if this was resolved and posted. Thank you. Al Pink by email

—Brad Bynum

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Serene Lusano, Kyle Shine, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office Manager/Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

bradb@ ne wsreview . com

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Bush still takes the rap Re “Change in the weather” (Right Hook, Sept. 15, 2005): [On columnist Michael Lafferty’s column on Hurricane Katrina:] OK, I agree with everything you said. True, people should’ve left when they were told to evacuate, but you have to remember we have been down this road a few times—hurricanes Betsy, Camille, Andrew—that we were told to evacuate and stayed. My mother and sisters evacuated, but my dad and brothers stayed. It scared the crap out of my brothers and myself, but we stayed because of looting afterwards. I was too young to know any better or I would have gone with the girls. What I didn’t appreciate was Bush calling us refugees on national television. Refugees, if I’m not mistaken, are from another country. My mom and dad, brother and sisters, were born and raised in New Orleans and yes, we have some incompetents and imbeciles for politicians in Louisiana and Washington, D.C. And to let people set out in a blistering sun for four days without water or anything was totally incompetent. Thank God for Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee. They came to the rescue before the government could ever respond. Now, that’s sad. We respond quicker to other countries’ needs than we do to our own needs. Don Puzzio Murrieta, Calif.

Go-carts vs. health care

It’s Clive’s fault

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Staff writer Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Editor’s note: The problem is now corrected. We apologize and will happily write a note to your teacher if needed.

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Re “Health care isn’t free” (Letters, May 29): I first paid FICA tax when I was 14. So I was giving “free” health care to old people, when I could have been acquiring private property with that money—Mad Magazine and go-carts. I’ve been paying FICA and/ or self-employment tax ever since. I’ve never felt resentful that other Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Andy Odegard, Clayton Porter, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Matt Veach, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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people benefit from my contribution. Are you jealous when someone else hits the cancer “bingo!” and gets to collect on your premiums? Our health care system has long been a convoluted mess. Providers and payment schemes of every size and kind, working at less than 50 percent cost efficiency and with second-rate outcomes. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act added some access for those on the outside, and made private insurance slightly less predatory. That’s progress, and yes, it is constitutional per the wildly conservative Roberts Court. We can tax ourselves! Is that news to you? In Sweden, government pays for 97 percent of all health care. There’s local control and a modest co-pay. Better outcomes with less than half our spending, and no one’s left out. And they still manage to have more billionaires per capita than we do. Are they magic? Maybe they just have a natural immunity to Ayn Rand’s Disease. C.G. Green Reno

Review of Grimm review Re “Cruising for a bruising” (Film, June 12): Yo, Bob. With few exceptions, you haven’t steered me wrong yet! Heading for the multiplex this weekend. There’s just something about enjoying a flick on the ginormous screen, with superb sound and the company of other movie enthusiasts! And if you keep a sharp lookout, you can occasionally score the better part of one of those big containers of popcorn. Don’t know why folks buy them if they aren’t going to eat it all. Just be sensitive to the feelings of your companions. For some reason, many people find this disgusting. Finally, your Bill Paxton reference cracked me up! Does anyone even remember Aliens anymore? BTW, I find my crazy eyes are safer in the underwear drawer. Steve Walco Carson City

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalinn Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Brian Breneman

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by Dennis Myers

ThIS MoDeRn WoRlD

by tom tomorrow

Climate change— true or false? Asked at Positively Fourth Street festival Travis Miller Solar electrician

True. The science is in, right? It’s about as proven as anything can be proven, I think.

Ray Hill Bicycle repair person

False, because I don’t think there’s enough data, and historically we’ve had climate change, regular climate change without the existence of man for millenniums.

Bryon Jacobs Disabled

No kid gloves for them In the bipartisan agreement that averted a national government shutdown over the winter, one component was a military pension cut to cost of living increases down to a percentage point below the inflation rate. That prompted a furious fight in Congress this year as veterans’ leaders beat up on Congress for mistreating “our troops.” As always, “our troops” were treated with a hushed reverence, as though they are not subject to scrutiny along with the rest of government. It’s always risky when certain groups are considered untouchables in public debate, because it leads to policies slipping through that haven’t been fully scrutinized. It was not an attitude that even the troops and veterans themselves relished. Some questioned why they were being treated so well and suggested veterans’ lobbyists were overreaching. Retired lieutenant colonel Tom Slear wrote a Washington Post essay headlined, “I’m an Army veteran, and my benefits are too generous.” It’s true that members of today’s army do not scrape by as once was true. Those who served during the Vietnam era, even if not in Vietnam, will recall the news stories about soldiers’ families on food stamps. But when the draft ended and Congress and the Pentagon had to start paying servicemembers decently to recruit an all-volunteer military, things changed. Pay and benefits are now generous. It’s now possible for servicemembers who enter out of high school to retire at 38 and begin second careers while drawing full pensions. One observer asked why so many were assuming that servicemembers would not be willing to pitch in and help during hard times as other public employees have done, particularly since the February repeal of the pension cut was paid for by a 2 percent cut to Medicare OPINION

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True. Global warming—it’s all the exhaust from cars. Look at the weather. Why would we have a hot winter when there’s no winter? If it wasn’t for all these cars, it wouldn’t be like this.

reimbursements. Still another commentator pointed out that while servicemembers were being treated so well, some of their hometown counterparts—police and fire—were not. It is, indeed, interesting to contrast the kid-gloves treatment between the military with the treatment of firefighters and police officers, who have been beaten up all around the nation during these hard times. In Reno, City Councilmember Dwight Dortch has been leading the fight against local firefighters, who have taken pay cuts in order to allow other—in some cases less critical—city workers to continue working. The firefighters have taken more than 7 percent in cuts since 2011and are now asking for an 8 percent increase. Even that won’t bring them even, since the inflation rate since 2011 was 6.8 percent. Reno police, meanwhile, are struggling just as hard, taking pay cuts in the past and working without a contract for more than a year as the city tries to end retirement health benefits entirely for new officers, making Reno less competitive in recruitment. We’re a little surprised police and fire are asking for so little from a city government that has handed out incentives to businesses like a drunken sailor—think Cabela’s and the Reno Aces—and that provides automatic pay hikes to its city council. It’s crazy that the city can offer a tax break for attracting tourists to a company that doesn’t attract tourists yet is unwilling to treat people who face hostile fire—both literal and figurative fire—with greater concern. We are particularly disappointed that the new members of the city council have not kept a tighter leash on city administrative officials who want to crack down on police and fire benefits. Ω |

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Natalie Handler Restaurant manager

True, because scientists say it’s so, and I believe in science. I know that there’s a lot of information out there and it’s science-based. I’m not a scientist, but I’ll let scientists do that for me.

Larisa Ediss Interior designer

True. In the science, the polar caps melting. I think there’s a lot of evidence, isn’t there?

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Primary election thins the field Pulses were racing in the establishment Republican caucus last Tuesday as news of Eric Cantor’s unceremonious dumping lit up Twitter on primary day in Virginia and Nevada. While pundits gleefully dissected the unexpected and unprecedented primary defeat of the majority leader of the House by of Representatives, local reporters Sheila Leslie instantly speculated on whether a similar surprise awaited Nevada in a few hours when our polls closed. Nope. Establishment candidates handily won their races. The power of incumbency carried the day as even “I’d vote for slavery if my constituents wanted me to” Assemblyman Jim Wheeler easily defeated Governor Gibbons’ chief of staff, Robin Reedy, by more than 25 points. Legislative incumbents all won, perhaps because they took the threat of a primary opponent seriously, spending ridiculous amounts of money to ensure victory. An incumbent official even won the crowded Reno mayor’s race, with Councilmember Hillary Schieve earning 26 percent of the

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primary vote, followed by the incumbent mayor’s choice, Ray Pezonella, with 18 percent. The most embarrassing victory was the Democratic choice for governor, none of the above, providing fodder for many a national joke at Nevada’s expense. Thirty percent of Democratic primary voters protested the lack of a viable candidate by choosing the non-candidate option for governor, the fifth time in Nevada’s history that “None” has won. Despite the embarrassment, it’s understandable why the Democratic party neglected the race. It’s an old Nevada tale, really. Once the purveyors of significant campaign cash land on a candidate (think casinos, mining conglomerates, big business), there’s not much opportunity for an insurgent to raise enough money to be competitive. (See the book The Anointed One by Jon Ralston to learn more about NV Inc.) People with enough name recognition, experience, and deep pockets to run a statewide race against a popular governor are few and far between.

This year, no credible candidate wanted to compete, leaving the primary field to eight unknown Democrats with a yen to be governor. But the media ignored them and they lacked resources to get any sort of message out to the voters. “None of the above” seemed like a reasonable choice under those circumstances. Looking ahead to the next five months of the 2014 campaign we can expect to see a lively contest for lieutenant governor between Lucy Flores and Mark Hutchison. Flores has already demonstrated a knack for energizing voters and appears animated and intelligent in televised interviews. She has a compelling life story and, most importantly, a united base of supporters in the Democratic party. Hutchison has the governor’s endorsement and the governor’s willingness to fund-raise, since he hardly needs more money for his re-election anointment. But half-term State Senator Hutchison demonstrated a remarkably short fuse during primary season, appearing arrogant, angry and

frustrated when needled by his opponent. He’ll need to quickly grow a thicker skin and accept that in the real world, i.e. where the sycophant lobbyists aren’t in charge, his wonderfulness may not be fully appreciated. Reno voters are relieved to be able to focus on just two candidates for mayor after the overwhelming 18 choices during primary season. While some see the race as an ongoing proxy war between Mayor Cashell and former councilmember Jessica Sferrazza, the two candidates must stand on their own ideas now. Reno will have two competitive City Council races with strong candidates. Unfortunately, the winners will be chosen by the entire city, meaning high-turnout and wealthier areas like Ward 1 will likely decide who the Ward 2 and 4 representatives will be. It seems like a long time until November, but the candidates will be busy. And when you’re tempted to complain about them knocking on your door, remember, that knock is the sound of grassroots democracy. Open the door and engage. Ω


Election could turn on Affordable Care Act Obamacare is now past its first enrollment period. San Francisco’s Nancy Pelosi said we have to wait to see what's in it. We now know. We know it took 600 million dollars to produce a federal exchange website that didn’t work. It was not a total disaster for enrollments, but bad by Brendan enough that insurance companies Trainor will likely get a bailout. Nevada’s state-run health exchange is down, at least for the next enrollment year. So is Oregon’s, Maryland’s and others. Obama said using the exchanges would be as easy as booking a flight on Travelocity. Admittedly, he didn’t realize insurance was so complicated. Like all major government interventions in the markets, Obamacare produced initial winners and losers. Some like their plans, and think it better than what was available before. Many were not so lucky. They discovered they

had no plan because the insurance company didn’t offer the full range of mandatory coverage required so they were switched to a much more expensive plan with higher deductibles. Others complain they lost their favorite doctor or access to the hospital they had. Proponents said public approval would grow once they experienced the benefits. Instead it has declined. The Republicans can just bash it to win big in November. The House will probably not vote on an alternative but will talk about piecemeal reforms. The Republicans have never really put forth a clear alternative program for health reform, but maybe that is just as well. Sure, the Heritage Foundation proposed an individual mandate, and Romneycare utilized it in the most liberal state of all, Taxachusetts. It was never a big policy push for Republicans. If anything, the party has beaten the tort reform drum but that only reinforces their image as the party of rich people.

Just a couple of years ago, the Democrats and their pundit machine were praising the Veterans Administration as an example of how well government run (socialized) medicine was. How quickly the worm turns! It has instead been revealed to be just the government bureaucracy it always was. Long waits for care, resulting in unnecessary pain and death, are now shown to be systemic. Not only that, but documents were falsified or destroyed so that many VA facilities could be nominally in compliance with the goal of two weeks maximum wait time for care. Just like in the Soviet Union! And Canada! Only a small number of politicians will talk of a radically different approach to public policy and health care. Some Republicans, like U.S. Rep. Joe Heck of Nevada, even want to keep some of the law. Ted Cruz was right—it was worth a government shutdown to try to stop Obamacare.

Nevada would seem to be the place for a real debate on health care. The state has thought outside the health care box before. It is a haven for alternative medical practitioners. Government involvement in health care goes back to the Progressive Era when it made the American Medical Association the gatekeeper for medical orthodoxy. Government payments have dictated a hospital-centered crazy quilt of subsidies and red ink. No one wants to be a primary care physician any more. Health care, like any service, is a meeting of supply and demand. The consumer in a free market is the ultimate employer of all who work to meet their needs. It is the big government regulation game itself that has distorted medical care. Life is not so simple that if you pass a law, or 12,000 laws, everything will just fall right into line. We need to put the consumer, not the state, back in the saddle. Ω

“I only smoke five cigarettes a day” HE COULD STILL HAVE AN ANEURYSM ONE CIGARETTE IS ONE TOO MANY

MADE POSSIBLE WITH FUNDING FROM THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. ©2012 The City of New York, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. All Rights Reserved.

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Photo/Dennis Myers

On primary election night at Washoe Democratic  headquarters, U.S. House nominee Kristen Spees  chatted with a party supporter while waiting for  election returns to come in.

Clues For those seeking political tea leaves on the state cannabis medication program in primary election returns, the Lyon County sheriff’s race may offer some hints in a jurisdiction that includes bedroom communities for Reno and Carson. That county’s incumbent sheriff, Allen Veil, took one of the more extreme postures around the state, successfully seeking a local ordinance to ban the voter-approved program and talking about how organized crime and money laundering will come to Lyon County if medical dispensaries are allowed. Veil is retiring from office, and four candidates are seeking to replace him. Of those four—Steven Adams, Greg Kantz, Al McNeil and Albert Torres—it’s possible from their stated positions to gauge where they stood on dispensaries, while acknowledging that other issues no doubt came into play. Torres opposes cannabis medication entirely and is closest to Veil’s position, opposing any dispensaries in the county at all. McNeil and Kantz seemed to try to walk a tightrope between positions, Kantz saying medical marijuana was a persistent issue with the public but in the end opposing dispensaries, and McNeil challenging the sheriff’s claim of increased crime accompanying dispensaries but then also claiming they would foster money laundering. Adams seemed most supportive of patients’ rights, saying they should be treated if they had medical need and the support of their physicians, though he didn’t directly address the question of medical dispensaries. In the primary election, here is how they placed: McNeil 34.45 percent; Torres 31.54; Adams 23.42; Kantz 10.59.

Q&A The new “Miss USA,” a Nevada woman named Nia Sanchez, sparked some debate during the portion of the pageant devoted to topical questions. She got a pretty serious one, a query on why she thinks some colleges sweep their rape problems “under the rug.” “I believe that some colleges may potentially be afraid of having a bad reputation, and that would be a reason it could be swept under the rug, because they don’t want that to come out into the public,” Sanchez said. “But I think more awareness is very important so women can learn how to protect themselves. Myself, as a fourth-degree black belt, I learned from a young age that you need to be confident and be able to defend yourself. And I think that’s something that we should start to really implement for a lot of women.” Sanchez got credit for not crashing and burning as contestants have sometimes done in the past, but there was considerable discussion of her approach. Alexandra Petri of the Washington Post wrote, “This is not a bad answer, although the problem of prevention isn’t a simple question of confident women learning self defense techniques against Stranger Danger (Sanchez’s professed specialty). For one, it usually isn’t a stranger. For another, the onus shouldn’t have to be on women to become self defense experts. It’s on everyone to establish a baseline of consent.” Amanda Marcotte at Slate wrote, “The implication, though Sanchez likely didn’t intend it this way, is that women who do suffer rape are not confident and are insufficiently interested in their own safety. ... Teaching women that self defense is the key to avoiding rape has many drawbacks, not the least being that it is no guarantee against an attacker who likely has a size advantage and the element of surprise on his side.” One writer closer to the campus scene supported Sanchez. “Will learning [self defense] save my life if I am attacked?” wrote TheCollegeFix.com associate editor Jennifer Kabbany. “Maybe. I sure have a better fighting chance than women with zero training. You have no idea what you didn’t know about self defense until you take these classes. It will open your mind to a whole new level of protection.” The question, of course, dealt with how campus administrations handle the issue, not with how targets of rape should handle their attackers.

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Democrats opt out Getting voters to the polls, always tough, gets tougher Former Nevada economic development director Robert Goodman is the Democratic nominee for governor and attorney by Kristen Spees is the Democratic Dennis Myers nominee for the northern U.S. House seat. Whether those nominations mean much is likely to be decided in the next few days. What is certain is that, in the north, at least, it is the weakest top-of-the-ticket Democrats have fielded in many years. “I think they [Goodman and Spees] need to show some substantial signs of life right away, or it’s over,” said one Democratic leader.

“There’s no spark, no interest.” Fred Lokken Political scientist “I don’t know that it’s that dire, but I presume they [Democratic Party leaders] are having one heck of a lot of conversations these days,” political scientist Fred Lokken said. He said a lack of familiar names at the top of the ticket gives Democrats little reason to go to the polls. “At a time when, demographically, they are in the ascendancy, there’s no spark, no interest,” he said. In January, Democratic leader Harry Reid said that “obviously the [governor’s] race isn’t going to be determined only by money.” He turned out to be dead wrong. In spite

of weaknesses in Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval record as governor, including the second highest unemployment rate in the nation, all major Democrats were scared out of the race by his campaign treasury, which is past the $3 million mark. The failure to field a serious Democratic candidate means that unless things change, Sandoval will be free to use all that money to help other Republican candidates—particularly state legislative candidates. In 1976, when Nevada’s Democratic U.S. Sen. Howard Cannon was leading his GOP opponent by two to one, he passed his campaign money out to other Democratic candidates around the state. Legislative candidates received $50 each—$201.90 in 2013 dollars. The signs aren’t good. Anyone interested in helping Goodman’s campaign who calls the phone number listed on both his campaign website and the Nevada secretary of state’s website as his contact number would get a recording—“This phone does not accept incoming calls,” which may be a first in political campaign outreach. And it turned out that at the time of his primary victory, he was on the other side of the world. In an email message, he wrote that he was traveling in Asia “on a trade and tourism private mission to seek to attract tourism, investment and international trade opportunities for Nevada, something I’ve been doing for years.” He also said he would present “my platform

and my policies in due course.” If, after the buildup the Sandoval administration has given it, the 6,500job Tesla Motors plant goes to another state, it will be a substantial setback to Sandoval that Goodman, as a former state economic development director, would be well positioned to exploit— if he has the political know-how. Democrats may have done a lot to empower the Republican governor. Lokken said of the primary election, “It does wonders for Sandoval.” He said the GOP has been split between Paulists and other Republicans so seriously that it has undercut Sandoval as a party leader. The failure of the Democrats to run a strong candidate against the governor and Sandoval’s success in pushing through his own candidate for lieutenant governor strengthens him and his GOP faction, Lokken believes. “I think Sandoval needs some of these kinds of boosts from the election to return the party to greater normalcy,” he said. “Mitt Romney having to fund his own campaign structure” because the state party organization fell into Ron Paul hands, Lokken said, was an enormous setback for Sandoval. “This is not the way you have a sitting governor treated,” Lokken said. If Sandoval has in fact been fortified and uses his money to turn the legislature his way, Democrats may find the price of ignoring the governors race higher than they expected.

Homework For Kristen Spees in her U.S. House race, winning in northern Nevada for a Democrat means winning in western Nevada. U.S. Sen. Harry Reid has urged Democrats to reach out to rural areas, but one candidate who took his advice—2006 Democratic nominee for governor Dina Titus—regretted it. “If I had it to do over again, I would attend the obligatory events in rural Nevada, like the parades and the cowboy poetry event, and spend the rest of my time in the urban areas,” Titus later said (“No sale,” RN&R, Aug. 28, 2008). The small counties, particularly relatively populous Elko, are rock ribbed conservative. Indeed, there have been instances in which Democrats came in third, behind the far right Independent American Party. Democratic issues, particularly the environment, do not play well there. While Democratic registrations outnumber the IAP six to one in Elko County, there have been years when there were no Democrats running in most races and IAP candidates were


actually elected. In 2010, the only Democrat on the ballot in Elko County was an Assembly candidate who came in third, behind the Republican winner and IAP nominee Janine Hansen. Hansen, as a matter of fact, has a role in this year’s U.S. House race. She is the IAP candidate and in a competitive race the votes she drains away from Amodei could hurt. So far, though, there is not yet any indication that she will be a factor. Like Goodman, Spees is not yet up to speed. Asked if she has identified issues in incumbent Mark Amodei’s record that she finds lacking, she said she has not. “I’m looking into it,” she said. “I actually voted for Mark Amodei in the last election, but I feel like he hasn’t held up to all of his promises. You know, he’s done a lot of things that I do like, but I think it’s time for some change, time to get some fresh ideas, and get a younger person in there, a new generation.” Amodei turned 56 two days after the primary election. Spees will turn 28 in October. That kind of halfhearted attitude is reminiscent of Spees’ predecessor as the Democrat running in this House district. On winning the Democratic nomination exactly two years before Spees’ comments, Samuel Koepnick said, “Amodei makes it a bit tougher. As you say, he’s got the war chest. But in my perfectly honest opinion, he’s not a bad representative, either. He really doesn’t have any weak points to attack.” Koepnick lost in a landslide, trailing Amodei by 21 percentage points.

Since this U.S. House district was created in 1981, it has never elected a Democrat. In 2006 and 2008 Democrat and university regent Jill Derby broke her pick trying to win the same U.S. House seat. She mounted major campaigns and got substantive support from national groups without coming close to winning in either campaign, losing by 5.41 percent

“I actually voted for Mark Amodei in the last election.” Kristen Spees nevada Democrat

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the first time and 10.38 the second. Party leaders say that groups like the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which backed Derby with money and other resources, now consider the district unwinnable. While the district was redrawn in a court-imposed redistricting plan, the likelihood is that it just became more conservative, because the small counties constitute a larger percentage of the overall voting populace than in the previous configuration. As Lokken said, Nevada’s demographics have been turning Democratic. One of Spees’ Democratic opponents zeroed in on the challenge for Democrats as he watched his own candidacy fail at county Democratic headquarters on election night. Washoe has gone Democratic in the last two presidential elections, Brian Dempsey said, “and we’re trying to figure why it’s going red for Congress and for Senate.” Ω

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Wood stove replacement program to reduce emissions If you have an old, wood burning stove in Washoe County, you may be eligible for incentives to replace it with a new, more efficient stove. Wood stoves that are eligible for this program are mostly pre-1992 and by Sage Leehey are missing a secondary combustion chamber, emitting more particulate matter into the air than newer stoves. s age l@ The University of Nevada, Reno’s Business Environmental Program news review.c om (BEP) applied with Washoe County Health District Air Quality Management Division to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) last fall to receive funds for this program. The funds were made available after a Utah-based company selling aftermarket parts for trucks to boost power—and ultimately, emissions, too—was asked to pay a fine or pay for a program to help lower particulate matter emissions because of their air quality violation. They chose to pay for a program, and this was chosen. If the homeowner is in one of the 11 eligible zip codes with a wood stove to replace, they essentially receive a discount on their new stove. The program money is then given to the dealer selling the new stove. “If they purchase a wood stove, they’d get $600 [off],” BEP pollution prevention projects manager John Handzo said. “If it was a pellet stove, it was $800 because it’s less polluting than the wood. And if they convert to natural gas or propane, then it would be $1000 they would be eligible for.” The program began in March and has had nine participants so far. Stoves aren’t the first thing on homeowners’ minds at this time of year, but the program will only last until 157 stoves have been replaced. And it’s first come, first served. For more information “This is a slow time of year for people,” Handzo said. “I mean, who about this program, wants to think about a wood stove right now when it’s 90 degrees outside? visit www.unrbep. But we anticipate in July, August, it’ll start picking up again, and definitely org/homeownerAugust through November, that’s their big time.” information. BEP director Christopher Lynch said this program is beneficial to the entire community. Washoe County currently has higher levels of particulate matter emissions that EPA standards. “We’re trying to let people know that it’s an opportunity for them, and it directly relates to the inversions we have here in the winter when we get the smog held down,” Lynch said. “The wood stoves that people burn do contribute to that, so this can help clean the air here in the basin.” Washoe County already has regulations in place that if a real estate transaction occurs, these older wood stoves must be removed from the home. This program can help homeowners get rid of their old stoves, give them a discount on their new one and take care of the recycling of the old one, too. The recycling is a great benefit to the community as well because many people do not properly dispose of old appliances when they handle it themselves, illegally dumping them or selling them on Craigslist. “The stoves are actually being removed and destroyed at a recycling operation,” Handzo said. “So it’s not like they’re going to be put somewhere else and continue polluting out there. They’re going to metals recycling. So considering the age, it’s probably good quality steel, so it’s helping everybody out from that aspect, too.” Ω

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ACTIVITIES KIDS KLUB: FISHING 101

Join the Scheels fishing expert to learn how to catch your very own fish! Meet in the fishing department. All kids will receive a free ride on the Scheels Ferris Wheel. M, 6/23, 6PM, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr (775) 331-2700

US OPEN OF WATERCROSS

The ninth annual event has traveled from coast to coast attracting the best watercross riders throughout the United States and the world, including Australia, Columbia, Kuwait, and Indonesia. F-Su through 6/29. Opens 6/27, free admission. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Dr (775) 353-2376

SHIRLEY’S FARMERS’ MARKET

This 22nd annual farmers’ market features fresh local produce, arts and crafts, specialty foods, prepared foods and children’s activities. Th, 3-8PM through 7/24 and Th, 3-8PM through 8/21, free. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave

RENO SKI AND RECREATION CLUB

The Reno Ski and Recreation Club holds its general meeting. Hear the most current information about the Reno Ski & Recreation Club’s upcoming activities. Second Tu of every month, 6PM, free. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave (775) 356-6262

CROCHET CONNECTION

Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway (775) 424-1800

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through 12/9, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

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The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

CONVERSATION CAFE

The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC

june 19, 2014

Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 6578659

Th, 6/19, 7PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

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JASON KING BAND

We’re in our second decade of jamming! For individuals, bands, duos. Bring your instrument, sticks or just yourself down to the best sounding bar around! Tu, 8:30PM through 7/7, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

OPEN JAM WITH TAZER & FRIENDS

W, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

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The annual hot rod show and celebration of rockabilly music and culture includes contests, drag races, entertainment, vendors, poker walk and the Rockabilly Beer Crawl. Th-Su through 6/29. Opens 6/26 John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Open mic night every Monday at 8PM, hosted by Tany Jane. M, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

Get out and check out these up and coming bands! The Fifth Fire, We are Saviors & Religion of Tomorrow. Sa, 6/21, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

12 

RENO ROCKABILLY RIOT

Bring you, your instrument and your song. We look forward to hearing and seeing you there! Th, 8PM through 12/18, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

LIVE MONDAYS WITH TANY JANE

ARNOLD MITCHEM

This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

Run with expert pacers and enjoy running in a group Tu, 6:30PM

F, 6/27, 8PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

A SINGERS-SONGWRITERS SHOWCASE

Get out and have some mid-week fun! W, 6/25, 8:30PM, no cover.

M-Su, 5PM and F, Sa, 11PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Th-Sa, 7PM., no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

ERIKA PAUL

Enjoy Louisiana-style food and the soulful, breathtaking jazz sounds of Erika Paul on keyboards and vocals. Th, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE

Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 355-8281

KARAOKE

Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677


C

B Y

S A G E

limate change is often talked about on a large, global scale, but it affects each of us individually, too. Here in Northern Nevada, it could mean extended droughts, blazing temperatures, rampant wildfires and homeless wildlife. Kelly Redmond is the regional climatologist for the western states, including Alaska and Hawaii, and monitors climate in this region for a number of reasons. “What we care about is what’s happening in our backyard,” Redmond said. “You probably don’t make your decisions today based on what’s happening in Tibet or Bolivia, although those places may, in the long run, be affecting you.” It’s also important to note that climate is constantly changing regardless of the larger issue of global climate change, so what climatologists like Redmond and others look at are larger trends within these time periods. The main culprit behind climate change and the overall warming of the global temperature is carbon dioxide. There are other gases that contribute, like methane, but carbon dioxide makes up about two thirds of the greenhouse gases that absorb radiation and heat the atmosphere. “What’s causing climate change is emission of gases into the atmosphere, predominantly CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels, from around the world,” said director Maureen McCarthy of Nevada’s Academy for the Environment. “The rate of warming in the atmosphere has been accelerating since the Industrial Revolution for 150 years.” Human contributions to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere come from many different places—like our cars and energy production. In order to slow the rate of climate change, we need to start decreasing these emissions—an easy concept to understand, but a not-so-easy thing to do.

L E E H E Y

Air The overall average annual temperature for the western United States has risen since around the beginning of the 20th century and rose more steeply from the mid 1970s on. Between the mid ’70s and mid ’90s the annual average rose about two degrees. “And since then, it’s kind of leveled off,” Redmond said. “It hasn’t risen very much over the past 15 years or so. It’s gone up and down, and it continues to go up and down from year to year with that general rise. We went through a series of about four years where it cooled back off about halfway back to what it was before, but then 2012 came along. It was really, really warm, and 2013 was a little bit on the less warm side. And so far this year, we’ve been kinda on the warm side again because we had a warm and sort of rainless winter.” One thing to note is that these are the average temperatures in this area, making the data helpful to identify long-term trends but not necessarily the best picture of all changes. Every season acts differently than others, but the average can’t show that. Winter temperatures haven’t risen very much in the last 60 to 70 years here, but the other seasons have behaved differently. “Spring temperatures have come up starting about the mid ’80s,” Redmond said. “And summer temperatures weren’t doing very much until about the year 2000, and they’ve come up quite a lot in the summer months. And then in the autumn, they started out a little bit on the warmer side and cooled off a little bit and then warmed up again in recent years.” This warming is also expected to create more heat waves—hotter days and hotter nights overall. A strange thing about temperatures in Northern Nevada, and Reno specifically, is that there has been more change in nighttime temperatures than there has been in daytime temperatures. Both have risen, but nighttime temperatures have risen more than those in the daytime. Redmond said that they’re not quite sure why. Reno’s nighttime temperatures generally cool down from the day. Before recent years, the city very rarely had minimum temperatures as high as 60 degrees at night. “Well, I noticed just in the last few days the overnight low at Reno was 60,” Redmond said. “We’re still in early June. We’re not in the hottest part of summer yet. Reno first saw a 70 degree minimum a few years ago, and I think the highest reading it’s had overnight was where the coolest time of [night] was 77. This was in recent years. This is like things you might expect in Las Vegas.” Redmond says that he and other climatologists prefer “ I t ’S GE t t ING to observe the effects HO T IN HE RE ” of climate change in more rural areas than continued on page 14 Reno to get an idea of

C L I M AT E C H A n G E I S A G L O B A L PRO BLEM, An D IT’S HAPPE n I n G H E R E I n n O R T H E R n n E vA D A , T O O P H O T O S

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“ I t ’S GE t t ING HO T IN HE RE ” continued from page 13

what’s happening in Northern Nevada as a whole. The population growth in Reno is most likely behind some local warming, so other less urban, more “podunk” areas are preferable for observations.

Earth Temperature affects just about everything on our planet, which is why the overall rise in temperature resulting from climate change is such a big deal. There has been an increase in the amount of insects in recent years because many bugs are more active at higher temperatures. Mosquitoes that may carry disease and invasive species that hurt or destroy native vegetation, thrive more in our region as temperatures rise, too. “Northern Nevada is sort of in a tenuous position because we’re very much in the desert,” McCarthy said. “Small changes in precipitation, small changes in the availability of water supplies, drier, hotter summers causing fires, and allowing invasive species to survive when they didn’t used to be able to will have a big impact on life in Northern Nevada.” Redmond agrees that there will be many different effects on the way we live beyond the weather. “It affects diseases, it affects animals and plants, and the way that they grow and their competitive advantage of one species over another,” Redmond said. “It has some consequences for human health, too.” Higher temperatures may cause crop loss as well. Redmond believes that humans will be able to adapt to climate change more quickly and effectively than other residents of our planet. “The antelope and the sagebrush and all those things that we think of in Northern

Nevada, they don’t have the luxury that we do or the capability to adapt really,” Redmond said. “They can only adapt really by changing where they grow, by maybe moving further north. And how does a sagebrush get further north? And animals are a little bit more portable, so to speak, so they can move, but they have to move with their habitat and food supply.” Ultimately, climate change can have massive effects on the ecosystems that we and other living things depend on for survival because animals and plants evolved to live in certain climes. With those changing, they’ll either have to find a way to adapt, move to an area with that climate or die.

Wat E r Effects on our water supply from climate change are the primary concern of researchers. And we’ve begun to see some of these effects in recent years with the current drought and less snowfall than the area is accustomed to. Both of these are expected to continue and worsen with current climate change projections. Although we haven’t seen much change in the average annual precipitation in the region, there is still reason to worry. The overall effects of climate change are more difficult to observe in precipitation. “It’s really, really hard to detect that because precipitation varies a lot more than temperature does,” Redmond said. “It’s just bouncing up and down all the time, so we’re looking for relatively small changes in precipitation. And in order to see those we have to have a fairly long record before the trend starts to appear on the noisy signal that we’re given.” Again, averages can make it hard to see climate change. “If the average amount of precipitation doesn’t change much, that doesn’t tell you a lot about what will happen in Northern

Nevada because in Northern Nevada, we’re very concerned that we have a constant supply of water in the dry season,” McCarthy said. “Our dry seasons are getting longer and drier, but our snow pack is getting smaller and running off faster.” The most troublesome part of the temperature rise is the effect on snowfall. We depend on our precipitation to come in the form of snow during the winter so that it melts later on in the year, giving us water at those times. But recently that precipitation is coming in the form of rain instead of snow. “The whole agricultural system of western United States, including Northern Nevada, is all built on taking precipitation in the form of snow and moving it in streams and rivers where you need it in the growing season, in the spring and the summer,” McCarthy said. “So when we get precipitation in the form of rain in the wintertime, it is not available as runoff in the spring. … And our whole way of life from urban centers to agriculture is all based on having a gradual runoff of water supplies from melting snowpack in the spring that used to run until July or August, and now it’s disappearing in May and June.” And then the heat and dryness exacerbates the water supply situation further by causing the demand for water to increase because of faster evaporation. The higher temperatures are also expected to allow the atmosphere to hold more moisture, which would affect extremes in the weather and precipitation. “There’s some thought that maybe increased moisture in the air would promote more extreme or bigger thunderstorms or day-by-day storms because if the atmosphere has more moisture in it, it can rain more out,” Redmond said. Extreme weather patterns can be seen now and are expected to continue if nothing is done to curb our greenhouse gas emissions drastically. “The drought periods are likely to get longer over the next probably 20 to 40

years,” McCarthy said. “You’re likely to see, as we’re already seeing now, more of our winter storms coming with very large amounts of precipitation over very short periods of time, so not a gradual drop of snow but more large storms that dump a lot of precipitation and those are getting warmer. So you saw this winter, we had rain in the mountains in February at 8,000 feet.” The extreme changes in precipitation types and availability during the dry season will mean that our current water regulation policies—created about 150 years ago—will not be effective for the future. They were created when the climate was much more predictable and less extreme.

FirE The overall warming and drying of the region will also raise the likelihood of wildfires. “When it’s warmer, fire loves that,” Redmond said. “When it’s drier, fire loves that. If it happens to be a little bit windier, fire loves that. This might change the situation from being relatively good for fire to being extremely good for fire.” The acreage of areas burned in the Western United States over approximately the last 15 years has gone up dramatically, and seven western states have had the biggest single fire in their histories in that time period. “Why are they all concentrated now instead of uniformly dispersed throughout the last hundred years or so?” Redmond said. “Is that just some big accident or something systematic going on? And a couple of those states have set an all-time record for a fire size and then later gone on, just in that little brief time, to even exceed that fire. Extreme fire behavior is something that’s been really noticeable of late.” Redmond also said that firefighters in the region say that fires are behaving

“ I t ’S GE t t ING HO T IN HE RE ” continued on page 16

This lake at Cold Springs, like other bodies of water in the region, could be drastically affected by climate change in the near future.

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“ i t ’S ge t t ing HO T in he re” continued from page 14

differently than in the past and are more extreme now than ever. “It burns completely into the ground and kills everything below the ground in some number of cases, and also they’re much bigger,” Redmond said.

Forever changes Humans may be able to adapt to some changes in climate more easily than plants and animals, but there are some environmental changes that even we cannot withstand, like life without fresh water. “People are pretty adaptable,” Redmond said. “We can build better air conditioners. We can escape from heat and so forth. We’re pretty clever, but the rest of the world isn’t that way. But we can’t ultimately escape from the lack of water.” Climate changes will affect quality of life and the economy in general, but businesses like ski resorts will be especially affected. “The snow level on their slopes might go down, it might introduce a year every now and then where they don’t have a very good snow season, which if they don’t have snowmaking equipment, then they lose that business over the winter,” Redmond said. “Some ski areas are situated that they could get through one bad year, but so many bad years—like two or more—might knock them under. So there’s

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“ Sm a l l ch a ngeS in p recipi tat ion, Sm a l l ch a ngeS in t he ava il a bil i t y of wat er Suppl ieS, drier, ho t t er SummerS c auSing fireS ... w il l h av e a big impac t on l ife in nor t hern ne va da.” M aureen Mccarthy director oF the academy For the environment University oF nevada, reno

some interesting recreational things as well. Skiing is obviously one of them, but anything that depends on the natural resources in our area would be affected.” If climate change continues at the pace projected by current emissions, it will be extremely difficult for human beings to endure and close to impossible for the natural world. There are certain things that are too late to fix. The melting of the Antarctic ice and the corresponding ocean level rise may be one of these, according to Thomas P. Wagner in a New York Times article, “Scientists Warn of Rising Oceans from Polar Melt.” “This is really happening,” Wagner said. “There’s nothing to stop it now. But you are still limited by the physics of how fast the ice can flow.” This ocean level rise won’t have much, if any, effect directly on Northern Nevada because we’re not on the coast and we’re at a relatively

high elevation. But the ongoing Antarctic ice melt demonstrates that we’ve already committed a certain amount of climate change because of our actions. “Carbon dioxide, once it goes into the atmosphere, it is really hard to come out under natural processes,” Redmond said. “It’s sort of more or less there for … several hundred years to a few thousand years. You can’t put this genie back in the bottle. In terms of getting carbon dioxide out of the air, plants are good at that, but we’d need a lot more plants.” Redmond said humans need to slow the ongoing rate of climate change. “It gives us less time, it gives us less wiggle room,” Redmond said. “As we try to figure out what to do, it’s always better to have more time than less time. … If we just go on unabated, we start cutting out some of the options we might have in our little tool kit. If we have to respond quickly, the disturbances it

causes in economic terms, in cultural things, in business, or just in the natural world, they’re harder to deal with and people might be hurt more than if it would happen more slowly. … An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in this case.” Changing the sources of our energy production to emit less CO2 is a huge part of slowing the rate of climate change on a global scale and, in turn, in Northern Nevada. “And it’s not just the United States,” McCarthy said. “We need to be leaders in the world to make sure that we have a viable energy future that doesn’t continue to cause the problem.” But in Northern Nevada, water supplies, and planning for conservation, and changes are the biggest things to worry about in the near future. McCarthy believes there needs to be more dialogue between the urban community, agricultural producers and water managers so that water can be managed and changes will be gradual. “We need an approach to resiliency,” McCarthy said. “We need to understand that we may have much bigger changes in our water supply. We may have to adjust to having a much more robust, dangerous fire season.” Because this is a human created problem, the solution will have to be—and can be—a human one, too. “If we can make this happen, we can make it un-happen,” Redmond said. “It’s no accident that there’s seven and a half billion of us living on the planet now. So I think just trying to incorporate a better sense of the connection is really where it starts. It’s fostering in your own being and living, a sense of connection to the rest of the world.” Ω


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Photo/GeorGia Fisher

Trainer Kenny Parker hugs horse Jasper. Jasper hugs him back.

diverse crowd of horse fans has gathered for an auction at the Northern Nevada Correctional Center. The morning sun is already glaring on the bleachers, so people shade their eyes and leaf through paperwork while they wait. Soon an Alan Jackson song blasts onto the PA system. Someone yips in approval. “Well, way down yonder on the Chattahoochee …” Seventeen horses and riders zip into the NNCC’s arena. Some bear flags, and every human and animal on display moves and bends as if he’s part of a single, graceful organism. There’s a fast trot, then a tight, choreographed canter. “... it gets hotter than a hoochie coochie.” The lyrics would sound ridiculous, per usual, if the visuals weren’t so damned beautiful. Meaningful, too. For inmates who’ve dedicated themselves to the art of training mustangs and burros, every auction is show time—a day to flaunt all they’ve learned and taught in the last three months, and a chance to place their equine companions in caring homes. Among other things, the men say they’ve soaked up a remarkable sense of patience. Horses don’t take any bull, you know. “They keep you honest,” says trainer Timothy Verdugo. “They really do. If you lie to a horse and cheat on your groundwork, it’s going to show. And if you’re in a bad mood, he’s going to know.” May 31 was Verdugo’s last day with Sunset, a sleek chestnut gelding with a platinum mane and tail, and the sort of looks that would prompt any red-blooded kid to beg for a pony. Verdugo didn’t

name him, but says that if he had, the horse would have been called Malibu, for Barbie-esque reasons. Sunset brought the day’s top bid—$2,800—but that’s not what counts. The saddle-horse program fosters an obvious win-win scenario: displaced animals get homes, and inmates reap intangible benefits. “It’s changed a lot of us,” says trainer Roland Moore. “Whatever energy you have is the energy the horse is going to have.” The mustang initiative began at Warm Springs Correctional Center, and in 2008 moved to the NNCC, a lower-security facility that’s better known as an honor camp. The camp boasts a beef and dairy farm, even a dairy-processing plant, and it’s also a holding area for upwards of 2,000 horses, including the 80 or so who enter the training program each year. Program director Hank Curry decides which ones he’ll take for the inmates. The men need certain qualities, too. “We want people who are willing to work,” says Curry, a respected horseman who grew up on the rodeo circuit. “I want to know what they’ve done in their lifetimes.” Construction workers make great riders and trainers, he says, because they’ve done hard labor. Guys who have played team sports are also apt to fit in. Each horse is “green-broke” by the men, who start barn duties at the crack of dawn, then train and ride—or learn to ride, in most cases—until mid-afternoon. Everything they use, from their jeans to their saddles, has been donated. In the end, Verdugo says, “I’ve seen [the horses] go to nice ranches, working


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Back at the auction, inmates pull out all the stops to get bidders’ attention, cajoling their mounts into fancy sidesteps, rope work, and the sort of tricks that make a crowd laugh and cheer. One guy actually does a flip off his horse’s back. Hollie Sattler, a rancher, wins a little horse named Jasper. She’ll put him to work, she says, “in the same desert he came out of.” “We’re going to take our time and get acquainted, and not be really fast and spooky,” she tells Jasper’s doting trainer, Kenny Parker. “But we’re gonna be a team. “ Trainer Martin Zatko works with Constantine, a freckled gray gelding who’s smooth in the arena and as endearing as a family dog when he meets people. Put a hand under his muzzle, and he’ll kiss you every time. Like the other 16 horses and one fuzzy burro who’ll get new owners today, Constantine is nothing but mellow amid swarms of strangers —more humans than he’s ever seen at once. He trusts his trainer. That’s all there is to it. “Overall he’s just a loving, docile, sweet horse,” says Zatko, who hails from Slovakia. The bond is forged “one step at a time. He aims to please, but you can’t get mad at him if he’s not producing the way you want him to. It has a lot to do with control and patience.” Funny thing is, this job has always been a dream for Zatko. “It’s a harsh reality to say that I had to come to prison to do this,” he admits, “but it was on my bucket list to train a horse, or at least to ride one.” As for Constantine getting a new life, well, “he definitely deserves it. I know I want to go home.” Ω

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Nevada is home to half of the country’s roughly 40,000 wild horses and burros. Their rangeland is limited, so to ensure that they can find enough food and water—and that grazing areas can regenerate—the Bureau of Land Management rounds some of them up, explains bureau spokesman John Axtell. But nonprofits like the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign argue that the government’s helicopter roundups are cruel, pandering to private interests, and in violation of the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burros Act, which protects mustangs as living symbols of the west. In December, the Nevada Farm Bureau Federation and Nevada Association of Counties filed suit against the BLM, imploring the bureau to increase roundups and “auction, sell or otherwise properly dispose of ” horses in holding pens. AWHPC director Suzanne Roy called the move “yet another meritless legal assault on federally protected wild horses and burros by ranchers who view these national icons as competition for cheap, taxpayer-subsidized grazing on our public lands.” It’s a controversial issue, and a sad one. But it’s no longer slaughterhouse-sad. “People keep saying the BLM kills horses,” Axtell says. “The BLM doesn’t kill any healthy horses. If there’s a horse with a broken leg or something, they’ll euthanize it, but as far as a healthy horse, it either gets adopted or goes to long-term holding.” The Palomino Valley National Adoption center is a long-term fix for some mustangs, as is the

Home on the range

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correctional center. A new method of horsey birth control is also being tested in the area. The holding facilities are maxing out, however, and so is the agency’s budget. By the BLM’s math, some 8,000 excess wild horses and burros are adding to an already hungry, thirsty desert population. “There’s only enough money to remove a couple thousand horses bureau-wide this year,” Axtell says, “which is going to cause problems, because it’s another drought year, and we’re way over [capacity]. “

Saturday, June 21 ‡ Noon – 4pm

cattle ranches. Other people have used them as lawn ornaments, but they still work with them.” Still others take them for military and police jobs, parades—you name it. So is it hard to say goodbye? “Well, I don’t want to sound like a softie,” Verdugo says with a sad smile. He looks resigned as he gives Sunset a little pat. “It makes you feel good that they’re going to a new home,” he says, “and that somebody’s going to take care of them. But you don’t want to let them go. You’re with them 40 to 60 hours a week. You create a friendship.”

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Photo/Eric Marks

Room with a view

Cindy Gunn is one of the many artists participating in this year's NadaDada Motel art festival.

NadaDada Motel An artist walks a fine line between work and life. Many artists seek to eliminate that line altoby gether, and make their life their work, and Ashley live right smack in the middle of it. Such Hennefer is the philosophy of NadaDada Motel, an annual art show celebrating its eighth anniversary. NadaDada Motel consists of artists taking up residency in downtown motels and using their room to stage an art exhibit. It’s a fitting concept for Reno, where motels are in abundance, and the city’s legacy is entwined with tourism and lodging. As the NadaDada Motel website reads, “Art and absurdity live in Reno.” For more information, Since NadaDada’s inception, more than visit www.nadadada 400 artists have participated. The name, motel.weebly.com. references the philosophies of Dadaism but has come to refer specifically to the Reno-based collaborative art group. (There’s even a Wikipedia page about it.) The concept for the show arose as a response to Artown, when several artists wanted a more informal, communal way to showcase art without restriction. In true Dada fashion, the movement is essentially leaderless but organized by a dedicated group of artists.

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NadaDada was held at the El Cortez Hotel on West Second Street until one particularly rowdy year several years ago that involved underage drinking and general debauchery, according to artist Cindy Gunn. After that, the event was no longer permitted there, and instead occurs in several downtown motels including the Town House Motor Lodge, El Ray Motel, Keno Motel, City Center Motel, Wildflower Village and the Morris Burner Hotel. This year, there are more than 30 artists participating, and more than 50 rooms will be filled with art around the theme “Less Art Sprawl.” This can be interpreted however the artist sees fit. Attendees can come and tour the rooms from June 19 to June 22. The rooms are open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and “Dadamayor” Erik Holland—who recently ran for the real mayorial seat in Reno—will speak at the kickoff event at the Town House Motor on the evening of June 19. A full map can be viewed on the website, and locations participating in the event will

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have the colorful NadaDada Motel banners mounted visibly. For Gunn, who's an illustrator, the theme has an environmental meaning, where “sprawl” pertains to the waste and energy consumed by humans. She has participated in “all but the very first NadaDada,” she says. Her room this year—room 214 at the Town House Motor Lodge—is a statement about an individual’s carbon footprint. The idea came to her last year.

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“I had people answer a questionnaire about how much carbon they use,” she says. “I calculated that we’re using two and a half times what we should be using. It would take two and a half planets to get our resources done.” Her exhibit will feature hand-made footprints to demonstrate these facts. This builds upon work she’s done previously, including photographing gas stations and adding footprints as overlay. In past years, she’s tackled environmental topics, including a 2010 exhibit on overfishing, in which she turned her room into a beach. In the years she’s been involved, Gunn says “not much has changed” other than the location. “It’s a really fun event. We hope to get a good crowd.” For artists interested in exhibiting, the process is fairly straightforward—just contact the organizers and reserve a space. There’s a reason the motto of NadaDada is, “Get a room, make a show.” The openness is intended to break down the expectations of what an art show should entail. “There are no rules about what you can show,” says Gunn. “That’s the NadaDada way.” Ω

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CRIMES AGAINST NATURE at the CA STATE FAIR July 11 - 27, 2014

THE GOOD NEWS - No brutal farrowing crates this year (due to the porcine virus sweeping the country), and no hermit crabs sold as pets (but only because no one applied for a booth). Both are still possible in 2015 and beyond. THE BAD NEWS - Despite major public outcry, the 2014 Fair again plans to allow vendors to give away goldfish as “prizes” -- a reported 15,000 of these unfortunate creatures at the 2013 Fair. There’s still time to stop the mayhem. Many fish will suffocate in those tiny plastic bags, be illegally dumped into local waters, or simply flushed down the toilet, treated as mere “expendables”. A terrible message to send to impressionable young children. State law (Penal Code 599) prohibits the awarding of poultry and rabbits as prizes. Why not ALL animals? CalEXPO needs to adopt a permanent, written policy banning all these abuses. Failing that, state legislation is in order. HOW YOU CAN HELP - Contact Rick Pickering, CEO, and the Board of Directors, at CalEXPO & State Fair, 1600 Exposition Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; email calexpoboard@calexpo.com; tel. 916-263-3010. Senator Darrell Steinberg and Assemblymember Roger Dickinson are both ex-officio Fair Board members. They need to hear from us, too: All legislators may be written c/o The State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814. INFO: COMMITTEE FOR A MORE HUMANE STATE FAIR - Sacramento SPCA, Oakland/East Bay SPCA, SPCA of Monterey County, Peninsula Humane Society, Marin Humane Society, Ohlone Humane Society (Fremont), Humane Society Silicon Valley, Humane Farming Association, In Defense of Animals, Animal Place. P.E.A.C.E., Animal Legal Defense Fund, and many individuals, c/o ACTION FOR ANIMALS, P.O. Box 20184, Oakland, CA 94620; email - afa@mcn.org

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Better than par David’s at Red Hawk 6600 N. Wingfield Parkway, 626-6000 Country club dining is usually reserved for members only, but that’s not the case at this comfortable bistro in northeast by Dave Preston Sparks. It might be a bit of a drive, but worth the effort if you’re looking for a bucolic setting and worthy fare. Facing the 18th green, the room has warm woods and forest colors inviting you into this club-like room with a full bar, where you can eat, or the dining room beyond or—more inviting—the shelter terrace outside with seating for 60. Photo/AllisoN YouNg

It was a meal within itself, with a thick, savory, tomato-rich puree sitting atop freshly chopped and slightly seasoned avocados. This combined in my mouth with the textures of the shrimp and avocados coming together with the sauce and finishing with just a hint of heat tantalized the taste buds, calling for an encore. I had a signature entree, panroasted center cut French pork loin chop ($19), with butter-glazed Fuji apple, candied bacon both covered with apple brandy-infused Bordelaise leaning on Peruvian mashed potatoes—special order potatoes from Peru yielding a creamier, mild, almost buttery texture—and the vegetable was delta asparagus, yellow and orange baby carrots. This chop had the bone in and was cooked to perfection, moist on the inside, and the flavor profile with the chef’s sauce was better than a holein-one. From the grilled Fuji apples to the candied bacon spouting from the potatoes, there were sweet, robust and savory textures—a lot going on to easily satisfy. The veggies were al dente with perfect seasoning. I tasted the wild arugula and steak salad ($14). It was a grilled top sirloin with chef’s homemade pickled red onions atop, with a side of polenta sprinkled with Parmesan. Champagne vinaigrette topped the wild, organic baby arugula. The meat was grilled to medium rare. The polenta melted in my mouth and the tart salads with the course texture was tamed with the dressing complementing the entire offering. The wine list is modest with a proper selection ($22-$85) with just about everything by-the-glass ($6-$12.75). I chose a glass of the 2011 Tabott Sleepy Hollow Pinot Noir Vineyard located in the Santa Lucia Highlands on the central coast of California. It’s barrel-aged 10 months in French oak, which gives it a full-bodied, rich texture with flavors of Bing cherry and red plum leading to a long finish with vanilla oak and lively acidity. It complemented the pork and that amazing sauce exceptionally well. A piece of warm white chocolate bread pudding ($7) with French vanilla ice cream snuck up on me, and now I know what it would feel like to win the Masters—if only my golf game was that good. Ω

Executive Chef Rene Preciado has managed the menu for three years and spent time working in other local kitchens honing his craft. Along with restaurant manager Anthony Annand, he brings his own interpretation of American cuisine to life in the kitchen. Pizzas ($9-$13), burgers and sandwich ($10-$15), pastas ($13-$25), salads ($4-$15), and certified Angus beef—prime rib and steaks ($16-$29)—make this a very complete menu and all of it prepared with a lot of flair. This is a breakfast ($9-$14), lunch ($4-$15) and dinner ($6-$29) operation, seven days a week. The service is friendly and professional, and the wait staff is great at getting the job done without being too noticeable. They make you feel very comfortable. Annand points out that “There’s a lot of support from the Wingfield community,” and that keeps the place vibrant and creative. I was there for dinner and had shrimp a la diabla ($12) as a starter: four jumbo prawns (tiger prawns—huge), chipotle sauce, and radish avocado relish on toast points.

Executive chef Rene Preciado plating the pan-roasted center cut French pork loin chop, with caramelized apple glaze, mashed Peruvian potatoes, carrots, asparagus and bacon.

For more information, visit www.resort atredhawk.com.

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RHEMA CHRISTIAN CHURCH

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I totally lost it during 22 Jump Street. There’s a pivotal scene in this always funny sequel that had me laughing to the point where tears were coming out of my eyes and I couldn’t breathe. As I literally suffered through a DEFCON 1 level laughing fit, I noticed that a lot of folks around me were having the same problem. I won’t tell you the scene. You’ll know by what I’m talking about when it happens. I will Bob Grimm tell you that this is a sequel that’s as good as the film that birthed the franchise, which was b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m based on another franchise that starred that Depp guy before he became a Keith Richards clone pirate. Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum, an unlikely duo if there ever was one, basically repeat the same steps of the very funny 21

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Jump Street, and they do it in a way that keeps things fresh while knowingly recycling the same plot. And by knowingly, I mean this film acknowledges what it is, a run-of-the mill sequel, for its entire running time. It’s a selfmocking technique that works well, thanks to its stars and the deft comic direction of returning directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, who are on a roll, having directed this year’s The Lego Movie, as well. This one picks up where the first film left off, with Captain Dickson (Ice Cube in serious comic overdrive) assigning Schmidt (Hill) and Jenko (Tatum) to college. In college, they’ll do exactly what they did undercover in the first movie: Infiltrate the dealers, find the supplier. Once they show up in college and put their stylin’ beanbag chair in their dorm room, Schmidt and Jenko set about making friends and looking for the new drug of choice, WHYPHY. Of course, the duo ingest the drug at some point, which leads to a hilarious trip where Schmidt ends up in some sort of hell

where Creed plays on the loudspeakers, while Jenko has a more pleasant time involving rainbow colors and getting tickled. Schmidt continues to be the only one getting lucky in the Jump Street universe, this time scoring with Maya (Amber Stevens), who, much to his surprise, happens to be related to somebody prominent in his universe. Jenko definitely has a better time in college than his “loser” time in high school, hitting it big with Zook (Wyatt Russell, son of Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell), the football team’s quarterback. Jenko becomes a star athlete while Schmidt has girl problems and eventually finds himself ostracized. Some of the films best gags involve any moment when Ice Cube is on the screen, and a bit involving Maya’ roommate Mercedes (Jillian Bell) and her hilariously deadpan observations after having to endure neighboring sex noises all night. Comedy duo the Lucas Brothers play twins Keith and Kenny Yang, Schmidt and Jenko’s odd neighbors across the dormitory hall, who marvel at sharing the same thoughts and are responsible for Schmidt and Jenko’s surprise WHYPHY trip. As for cameos, Rob Riggle makes a triumphant return as Mr. Walters, who lost a very important piece of his anatomy in the first movie, and Dave Franco as Eric the drug dealer, living a life of pure hell as Mr. Walters’s cell block husband. Stick around for all of the credits for a final joke involving them, as well as a short cameo by Richard Grieco as Booker, a vet of the 21 Jump Street TV show. Nothing beats Johnny Depp’s cameo in the first movie, but Riggle and Franco come close. Some of the film’s biggest laughs occur during the credits, where Schmidt and Jenko keep getting assigned to new schools—Magic School, Dancing School, etc.—accompanied by cheesy fake movie posters. I’m hoping there are more Jump Street movies, but it seems as if the post credit future premise jokes exhaust all ideas for new installments. Please don’t let this be true. I want more Schmidt and Jenko movies. Ω


5

Edge of Tomorrow

In the future, Earth is fighting a crazed, vicious alien force that’s shredding our armies with little effort. Tom Cruise plays Cage, an armed forces officer who serves more as a public relations man than anybody who belongs on a battlefield. After a publicity tour, he sits down with a hard-nosed general (a cold Brendan Gleeson) and finds out that he is going into battle. Cage is justifiably terrified, and his first taste of battle doesn’t go well, and he’s killed in especially gruesome fashion. For reasons I won’t give away, he instantly wakes up after his death, transported back to a moment shortly after his meeting with the general, and before the battle that will take his life. Cage is in a seriously messed up situation. He starts repeating the same day, and dying every time. He does his best to change that outcome, but he always winds up meeting a grisly death and waking up in the same place. He eventually comes into contact with Rita (Emily Blunt), the military’s poster girl for the perfect soldier. By repeating days with Rita, Cage starts to build himself up as a soldier, discover secrets about the enemy, and increasing life longevity chances for himself and mankind. The film’s handling of this situation is thrilling and even funny, thanks to Cruise’s strong performance and nice direction by Doug Liman (Swingers, The Bourne Identity). It will easily stand as one of 2014’s best.

5

The Fault In Our Stars

I will not lie to you. Sometimes, I walk into a movie theater with drooping shoulders, generally uninterested in what a movie might offer due to advance trailer previews or press that failed to generate my excitement. I walked into this one feeling that way, fearing I was in for a sap-fest. Boy, was I wrong. Shailene Woodley is downright incredible as Hazel, a 16 year-old struggling with thyroid cancer. After being sent to a support group by her mother (Laura Dern—I just love her) she meets Augustus Waters (Ansel Elgort—so charming it’s almost disgusting) a basketball player who lost his leg to cancer, but sure as hell hasn’t lost his lust for life. The two hit it off, and the result is the best teen romance since The Spectacular Now, which also starred Woodley. The film handles its subject matter with enough grace for a thousand movies. When Gus, Hazel and her mom travel to Amsterdam to meet Hazel’s favorite author (Willem DaFoe—on freaking fire), their meeting will stand as one of the best scenes of 2014. Much praise goes to director Josh Boone for making a supremely entertaining film, and to author John Green, who wrote the 2012 novel the film is based on. You could call it a tearjerker, but that seems a little insulting to me. There’s nothing manipulative about Boone’s direction, or the performances by Woodley, Elgort, Dern, Nat Wolff and everybody else in the cast. They all won me over in a big way.

4

Godzilla

This movie tramples the other Godzilla movies underfoot like Godzilla trampling a water tower with cheesy dolls meant to be humans hanging on it. Director Gareth Edwards captures that summer blockbuster vibe of yesteryear, when building suspense and perhaps just a touch of human drama took precedent over wall-to-wall CGI fireworks. He also manages to capture some of that old school Toho Godzilla goofiness to go with the film’s mostly serious tone. Even though this film’s Godzilla is CGI, there are some monster gestures that have a nice man-in-suit quality to them. It’s pretty obvious that Edwards is saluting the all time blockbuster king, Mr. Steven Spielberg, with this movie. Bryan Cranston and Aaron Taylor-Johnson play a father and son team with a last name of Brody, just like Roy Scheider’s character in Jaws. Many of the initial Godzilla shots include glimpses of those jagged Godzilla back points cutting through the surface of the ocean like a shark’s dorsal fin. Cranston’s slightly crazed, obsessed, gloriously overacting scientist dad rings of Richard Dreyfuss’s mashed potato sculpting kook in Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Everything builds up to a huge fight between Godzilla and some other monsters in San Francisco, and the city takes a major ass kicking. This is bound to be one of the summer movie season’s more exciting movies, and it beckons to be seen on an IMAX screen. When Godzilla roars, it peels the skin off of your face.

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Maleficent

2

A Million Ways to Die in the West

4

X-Men: Days of Future Past

Angelina Jolie plays the title character, the infamous horned villain from Sleeping Beauty. There’s a little bit of revisionist history here, with Maleficent portrayed as more of a fallen angel rather than a straight up baddie. The whole thing almost works because Jolie is damned good in this film, especially when the script allows for her to bellow curses and just act devilish. It gets a little sleepy at times when it deals with, well, Sleeping Beauty (Elle Fanning), the young woman who stands to have a very bad 16th birthday thanks to a Maleficent curse. Jolie has a creepy getup that I thought would bother me, but I kind of liked looking at it after a while. It’s the world surrounding her that I found a bit pedestrian. Director Robert Stromberg worked as a production designer on films like Alice in Wonderland, Avatar and Oz the Great and Powerful. I didn’t like any of those movies and, in the end, I don’t really like this one. At this point in watching Stromberg’s work, I’m just not taken by his weird visual worlds. They put me off for some reason, and have a choppy pop-up book feel to them. On the plus side, it is better than Alice and Oz, and perhaps even Avatar. On the negative side, it’s still not all that good.

Seth MacFarlane’s second feature directorial effort after the breezy and hilarious Ted is a lumbering, only sporadically funny enterprise. It’s not awful, and it does have its share of giggles, but it can’t be classified as anything near a good movie. That’s a kick in the balls, because some slicker editing and “Whoa, Nellie!” pulling back on the grossout reins could’ve kept this thing closer to 90 minutes instead of nearly two hours and gotten rid of the moments that go too far in a bad way. Like Mel Brooks before him with the classic Blazing Saddles, MacFarlane tries to make a satiric Western that truly looks and feels like a Western. He gets the shots right via decent cinematography, but his tempo is way off. While Blazing Saddles had the exuberance of a grand western, MacFarlane’s dependence on comic violence and often slow pacing feels like he’s trying to make something like Clint Eastwood’s Unforgiven in a funny way. It just doesn’t work. MacFarlane plays Albert, a snarky, ahead-ofhis-time sarcastic guy trying to survive in the great American West. He’s trying to make a go of it as a sheep farmer, but he’s terrible at it. He’s always getting into trouble with his wise mouth, and his inability to stand up for himself in manly gunfights has earned the ire of his girlfriend, Louise (Amanda Seyfried). Charlize Theron is a nice presence as the new girl in town who gets Albert smiling again, but she isn’t enough to make this worth seeing.

Director Bryan Singer returns to the X-Men franchise with this ingenious chapter that includes both the main X-Men casts, time travel and Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine holding everything together. The movie starts in the future, where robotic monsters called the Sentinels are giving the Mutants a truly hard time in a post-apocalyptic world. All hope seems to be lost until Charles Xavier/ Professor X (Patrick Stewart) and his crew figure out a way to time travel. The hope is to cease the production of the Sentinels, which were created by Dr. Bolivar Trask (the always excellent Peter Dinklage) and take Raven/ Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) off a dangerous destructive path. Jackman’s Logan makes the trip the 1970s, where he wears a cool leather coat and still has bone claws. The action is terrific, especially in a sequence where Peter/ Quicksilver (Evan Peters) foils a gun attack, and another where young Magneto (Michael Fassbender) uses an entire baseball stadium for nefarious purposes. The cast’s true standout would be James McAvoy as young Charles, still messed up after the events of X-Men: First Class. He adds a truly dramatic dimension to the proceedings. Having Singer back proves to be a good thing. The franchise surely suits his talents.

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One love Reggae Festival Guide Reggae Festival Guide, an annual, international magazine focused on reggae music festivals throughout the United by Brad Bynum States and Canada, is based in Reno and recently celebrated its 20th b radb@ anniversary. newsre view.c om The magazine was started in the mid 1990s by a young reggae fan named Kaati. (She goes by a mononym, like Madonna, Cher or Prince.) She’s originally from the Bay Area and had worked in her family’s business, publishing boating and yachting magazines. “Because it was a family business, I could say, ‘Oh, I want to try circulation,’ and do that for a year and then try something else,” she said “So, I learned all aspects of magazine publishing.” PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

held the post for seven years. He’s a familiar fixture to many local music fans. He has hosted reggae-oriented shows on local radio stations and played in local reggae bands, like Keyser Soze and Jahzilla. “He brought it to a whole other level,” said Kaati about Postman. “Our editorial [content] has gone way up, in my opinion. I’m proud of our editorial.” “One of the areas that I tried to do was to bring in some outreach, to feature people and organizations that are just doing good in their community, raising awareness both within the reggae community and the wider community at large,” said Postman. “It’s where people involved in reggae try to reach out into the world, try to make the world a better place.” For Postman, social consciousness is the “real lifeblood of reggae music.” Recent stories have focused on things like members of the band Rootz Underground promoting environmental awareness among children in places like Jamaica and Costa Rica. Author Rogers Steffens, one of the world’s foremost reggae historians and Bob Marley archivists, wrote a profile of Errol Brown, a live sound and recording engineer who worked with Marley. “Roger is brilliant in his knowledge because the feature is about Errol Brown, but it touches on a lot of the early producers of Jamaican reggae music,” said Postman. Postman said many of the writers that he works with regularly, like Jake Homiak, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institute, and book editor Chuck Foster, take a more historically oriented view of reggae music, placing the music in its historical context and exploring the social, political and spiritual messages of the music. “That’s one of the biggest things that I hoped to bring in, was a little bit more of a focus on the spiritual movement that has informed reggae music since its inception, which is of course the movement of Rastafari,” said Postman. “A lot of people—young people— get into reggae because of Bob Marley and because of herb,” said Kaati. “They don’t really know much about reggae, so if they pick up a reggae magazine and they see the depth. … We don’t care why they come in. They might come for the weed, but leave with a little bit of knowledge. We’re hoping to turn people on to the history and culture.” Ω

Editor Anthony Postman and publisher Kaati at the world headquarters of the Reggae Festival Guide magazine.

She got involved with the Sierra Nevada World Music festival, which was then called Gathering of the Vibes, and because of her experience in the publishing world, she was in charge of creating printed programs for the event. And what started as a guide to a single festival quickly expanded to a guide to festivals all over California, and then all across the continent. The magazine does annual press runs of 100,000 issues every May distributed all around the U.S. and Canada. The free periodical is supported by advertising including record labels, hydroponics companies and clothing labels. Additionally, the magazine’s website attracts more than 30,000 viewers. And 12 years ago, Kaati began publishing a second magazine, Blues Festival Guide, which serves a similar function for a different style of music. In recent years, according to Kaati, the editorial content of the magazine has improved, which she credits to editor Anthony Postman, who has

For more information, visit www.reggae festivalguide.com.

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sponsored By

Join us for a celebr ation of our nation’s ind e p e nd e n c e o n J uly 4t h at W in g fie l d pa rk ! - Watermelon and apple pie eating contests - live performance from extraordinary local vocalist Jakki ford - aWard Winning BBQ food from famous dave’s - cold Beverages and island ice cones - live music from local Band Jake’s garage - triBute to veterans and veterans Honor Wall sponsored By

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THURSDAY 6/19

FRIDAY 6/20

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Jason King, 9:30pm, no cover

5 STAR SALOON

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

DJ Boogi, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

3RD STREET

132 West St., (775) 329-2878

THE ALLEY

SATURDAY 6/21

Watson, Thursday Knights Out, KnappSacc, The Business, The Attack, Old Glory, Out Fighting the Future, Anomali, 7pm, $10 For War, Self Inflicted Mess, 8pm, $10-$12

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

SUNDAY 6/22

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/23-6/25 DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

DJ Boogi, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

Open Mic w/Steve Elegant, 7pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover

Screeching Weasel, The Phenomenauts, Boats, The Shames, 7pm, $22-$25

Music Trivia w/Chris Payne, 9pm, Tu, no cover Whiskey Sirens burlesque show, 8pm, W, $10

BAR-M-BAR

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

The Stone Foxes

CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL

Buck Ford, 9pm, $5

The Stone Foxes, 9pm, $5

CBQ

Spur Crazy, 9pm, no cover

Spur Crazy, 9pm, no cover Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

1330 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 359-1109

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

COMMA COFFEE

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

The McAlindin Brothers vs. Sean McAlindin, 6pm, no cover

Nautical Nation, 9:30pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

Moon Gravy, 6pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

June 21, 9 p.m. Cargo 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, 9pm, Tu, Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no cover

Nautical Nation, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, W, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Sophie, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

THE GOLDEN ROSE CAFE AT WILDFLOWER VILLAGE 4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 747-8848

The Writer’s Block Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Arnold Mitchem, 7pm, no cover

Jeff Rowan, 8pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Jason King Band, 8pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover DJ and karaoke, 9pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

#6 Best Fireworks Display in the Country - AOL Travel

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Brian Dunkleman, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Jason Resler, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Allen Havey, Leslie Ann Thompson, Th, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30, Daryl Lenox, Dan Gabriel, W, 9pm, $25

Wildflower Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

Comedy

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Carla Rea, F-Sa, 8:30pm, $12, $15

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

#11 Overall Independence Day Celebration - MSN Travel

July 5th

July 4th 200th Anniversary Of The StarSpangled Banner With The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra 8:00pm ~ 10:00pm / Village Green ~ Don’t

miss the finest Fourth of July Celebration at Lake Tahoe as the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra and music director Laura Jackson perform Chesapeake: Summer of 1814, a salute to the 200th Anniversary of The Star- Spangled Banner. Plus, America the Beautiful, 1812 Overture, and other patriotic favorites – set to one of the Nation’s top fireworks displays.

Wine & Dine In The Grove

Billy Ray Cyrus Concert and Benefit 7:00pm ~ 9:00pm / Village Green

Don’t miss this very special night as American Country music star extends a personal commemoration to Michael Landsberry - a fallen local American hero - and shares his new Collection CD, among other top Billboard-rated hits during this fundraising concert.

Beer & Brats BBQ 4:00pm ~ 6:30pm / Aspen Grove ~ Let the sizzle of summer continue as you sip some of the top micro-brews of the region with a BBQ Brat in hand.

5:00pm ~ 7:30pm / Aspen Grove ~ A New Twist for This Favorite Annual Event! Enjoy

a lovely summer afternoon sipping fine wines and gourmet food prepared by Chef Chris Daniel of Big Water Grille ~ complemented with live classical music.

tICKEtS ON SAlE NOW!! For event information and ticket pricing, please visit RedWhitetahoeBlue.org. OPINION

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THURSDAY 6/19

FRIDAY 6/20

SATURDAY 6/21

SUNDAY 6/22

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/23-6/25

HIMMEL HAUS

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Paige Anderson & The Fearless Kin, Farewell Belladonna, Mason Frey, 8pm, $5

Wild Moth, TV Covered Walls, 8pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Pookie & the Poodlez, Primitive Hearts, Encounters, 8pm, W, $5

JAVA JUNGLE

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

2) The Show Ponies, My Acoustic Heart, 8pm, $3

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Bar Room

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

The Phenomenauts

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover 1) 2nd annual Bump ’n’ Grind National Go Skate Day, 4pm, $10

Undead Summer Massacre w/Soultorn, Deadlands, White Knuckle Riot, 8pm, $5

Comedy Night: Richard Hunter, Marc Yaffe, 8:30pm, $8

MOODY’S BISTRO BAR & BEATS

Andy Frasco and the U.N., 8:30pm, no cover

Andy Frasco and the U.N., 8:30pm, no cover

Saturday in the Park Block Party, 6pm, $20

THE POINT NITE CLUB

Karaoke w/Gina Jones & Haas, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Gina Jones & Haas, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Gina Jones & Haas, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688 1601 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

June 21, 7 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

1) Blazin Mics!, 10pm M, no cover 2) Yelsa, Nautical Nation, 7pm, Tu, $4

RED DOG SALOON

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Verbal Kint June 25, 6 p.m. Wild River Grille 17 S. Virginia St. 284-7455

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SE7EN TEAHOUSE/BAR

Bluegrass/Americana Open Performance Jam, 7pm, no cover

148 West St., (775) 284-3363

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

The Fifth Fire, We Are Saviors, Religion of Tomorrow, 9:30pm, no cover

Tuesday Jam and Open Mic, 8:30pm, Tu, Frealane, 8:30pm, W, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Milton Merlos, 7pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Livitz Livitz CD Release Party w/Dope Called Glory, 9pm, $5

An Evening With Todd Ballowe and Friends, 7:30pm, no cover

Tristan Selzler, 7pm, no cover

Eric Anderson, 7pm, no cover

Colin Ross, 2pm, Tyler Stafford, 6pm, no cover

Eric Andersen, 7pm, Milton Merlos, 7pm, Tu, Verbal Kint, 7pm, W, no cover

FinAl WEEKEnd

You don’t come to Rapscallion for dinner, you come to

dine!

PLUG & PLAY 8PM Whiskey Wednesday Your Guitar, Your Talent Our Volume. Play 1 - 3 Songs IF the Crowd Likes You Play More! We’ve Got Your Liquid Courage: $2 off all Whiskey! 538 S. Virginia St. @ California Ave. ceolirishpub.com

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$20 - sTudEnTs/sEnioRs $22 - gEnERAl Admission $25 - All TicKETs (AT THE dooR)

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 6/19

FRIDAY 6/20

SATURDAY 6/21

SUNDAY 6/22

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 8pm, no cover

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 4pm, Joey Carmon Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 4pm, Joey Carmon Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Joey Carmon Band, 8pm, no cover

2) After Dark, 8pm, no cover

2) After Dark, 8pm, no cover 3) Eddie Money, 8pm, $60

2) Michael Furlong, 6pm, no cover

2) Terraplane, 10pm, no cover

2) Kinetix, 10pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, $25.95-$39.95 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, $25.95-$39.95 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Rock River, 10pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, 9:30pm, 1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, $25.95-$39.95 $25.95-$39.95 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover no cover 4) Rock River, 10pm, no cover

1) Masters of Magic, 8pm, $10-$20 2) Salsa Night w/DJ XM Fredie, 9pm, no cover 3) Honky Tonk Thursday w/Jaime G, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Gerald Albright, Chris Standring, 2) DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, no cover 1) Masters of Magic starring Michael Petri Hawkins Byrd, 9pm, $30.80-$63.80 Grandinetti and David Goldrake, 3) Boots and Daisy Dukes w/DJ Jamie G, 3) County Social Saturdays w/DJ Jamie 8pm, $10-$20 10pm, no cover 5) Shine, 6pm, $45-$55 G, 10pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

2) After Dark, 7pm, no cover 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

Sarah McLachlan June 24, 8 p.m. Harveys Lake Tahoe 18 Highway 50 Stateline (775) 588-6611

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 4) Stadium Bar

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: Th, 7pm, no cover

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub

1) The Yardbirds, 8pm, $49.50

2) DJ Rick Gee, DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

HARRAH’S RENO

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, $17.20-$47.20 2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, $17.20-$47.20 2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover 4) Super Huey, 7pm, no cover

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 8pm, $17.20-$47.20 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

Hangar Bar, 10603 Stead Blvd., Stead, 677-7088: Karaoke Kat, Sa, 9pm, no cover

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE

Murphy’s Law Irish Pub, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Steve Starr Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

Ponderosa Saloon, 106 South C St., Virginia City, 847-7210: Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, F, 7:30pm, no cover West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, live music, 7pm,

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 no cover 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose Ballroom 3) Gilley’s

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Expo 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura

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JUNE 19, 2014

1) Masters of Magic starring Michael Grandinetti and David Goldrake, 8pm, Tu, W, $10-$20

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, M, $17.20-$47.20

1) Lee Greenwood, 8pm, $39 3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm, live music, 7pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Double Standyrd, 6pm, no cover

2) Double Standyrd, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Three Dog Night, 9pm, $45-$55 3) The Male Room, 8pm, $23

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 2) Thom Shepherd, 7pm, no cover

345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Poolside

RN&R

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm, live music, 7pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, Tu, W, $25.95-$39.95 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Garage Boys, 10:30pm, W, no cover 3) Live piano, 4:30pm W, no cover

1) Sarah McLachlan, 8pm, Tu, $39-50-$89.50

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

|

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, $17.20-$47.20

18 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) Outdoor Arena

2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge

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2) Michael Furlong, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Sports Book 4) Cantina 5) The Beach

Karaoke

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/23-6/25

2) Bonzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia, 8pm, no cover 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover

2) Thom Shepherd, 8pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, 2) Thom Shepherd, 8pm, no cover DJ Chris English, DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20 1) John Dawson Band, 8pm, no cover

1) John Dawson Band, 8pm, no cover

1) Dennis Miller, 8pm, $44.50-$59.50 2) Chris Gardner, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no cover

2) Chris Gardner, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5

1) Blue Haven, 7pm, W, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, Country-Rock Bingo w/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no cover


PRESENTS

JUNE 27, 2014 4:00PM-9:00PM

Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater at Bartley Ranch General Admission: $35 in advance and $45 at the door. Includes a bacon-focused meal, 2 beverages of

choice and great music.

VIP: $50/Advance only. Includes all of the above, an extra drink ticket, access to the VIP bar and VIP seating. TO PURCHASE TICKETS, visit www.carechest.org or call 829-2273. Sample culinary creations built around bacon and created by local food trucks: Gourmelt, Battle Born, Mellow Yellow, Lazy Sundae and Island Ice Enjoy the best in local brews from Great Basin Brewing Co., The Brewer’s Cabinet, Under the Rose Brewery and Pigeon Head Brewery. Sample a variety of fine bourbons provided by Wirtz Beverage and samples from 7 Troughs Distilling Co. Live music Kent & Kennedy and Contraband

SPONSORS: The Robert Z. Hawkins Foundation, First Independent Bank, McKesson, NV Energy,

Allegra, AT&T, Calvada Food Sales, Chez Vous, Dolan Auto Group, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, Dreams Realty, ESI Security, Hammon Photography, Red Rock Spring Water, Reno News & Review, Road Shows, Sala Family Dentistry, Swire Coca-Cola, The Arbors Memory Care, The Gem Gallery, US Foods, Wirtz Beverage

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

|   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   june 19, 2014 

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RN&R  

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june 19, 2014


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

GET A

weekly PIcks

ROPE

Adventure Sports Week The outdoor lifestyle event features competitive events in triathlon, trail running, stand-up paddle boarding, swimming, mountain biking and other sports. There will also be guided hikes, clinics, film screenings, live music, kids’ activities and more. The festivities kick off on Thursday, June 19, and continue through Sunday, June 29, at various venues in Tahoe City. Visit www.adventuresportsweektahoe.com for details.

Speak Your Mind Hip Hop Art Festival The annual music festival features hip hop artists from both coasts. Headliners include Apprentice, Black Rock City Allstars, Scarub from Living Legends, C-Rayz Walz, Z-Man, Kosha Dillz, among other acts. The all-ages event also features a vendor village, food, an art stroll and other attractions. The festival takes place from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday, June 22, at Wingfield Park, First Street and Arlington Avenue in downtown Reno. Admission is free. Visit www.facebook.com/symfestival.

Great Eldorado BBQ, Brews and Blues Festival The Eldorado Resort Casino’s 19th annual barbecue block party, micro-brew tasting event and music festival features a variety of grilled treats, cold beers and performances by John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band and Friends, Tommy Castro & The Painkillers, Mobility, Shane Dwight, Eric Sardinas, Maxx Cabello Jr., Delta Wires, Jason King Band, Carolyn Dolan Blues Band, Rick Hammond Blues Band and Buddy Emmer Blues Band. The festival takes place from from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, June 20, and from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 21, outside the Eldorado, 345 N. Virginia St. in downtown Reno. Admission is free. Call 786-5700 or visit www.eldoradoreno.com.

Nevada Humanities Chautauqua Festival In celebration of Nevada’s sesquicentennial, Nevada Humanities 23rd annual Chautauqua event explores the theme “Battle Born: Making Nevada.” Chautauquan performers will portray characters that have influenced the growth and development of our state, including Reno civil rights activist Alice Smith, Las Vegas entrepreneur Howard Hughes and Comstock journalist and writer Dan DeQuille. Evening shows begin on Tuesday, June 24, and will run through Thursday, June 26, at the Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater at Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road. Local musical performances will open up each day’s event at 6 p.m., followed by Chautauqua presentations at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10-$25. Admission is free for children age 12 and younger. The festival also features workshops, roundtable discussions and other daytime events at various venues. Call 784-6587 or visit www.nevadahumanities.org.

Reno Rodeo The 95th annual “Wildest, Richest Rodeo in the West” gets underway this Thursday, June 19, with the Xtreme Bull Riding show, which features 40 of the country’s best professional bull riders who will ride some of the toughest bulls in the sport to compete for a purse of $40,000. Another highlight of the nine-day event is the Reno Rodeo Parade through downtown Reno on Saturday, June 21. The rodeo also features OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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team roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing, bronc riding and mutton bustin’, as well as carnival rides and the Double R Marketplace. The Reno Rodeo runs through Saturday, June 28, at the Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, 1350 N. Wells Ave. Tickets range from $7 to $25. Call 329-3877 or visit www.renorodeo.com.

ART OF THE STATE

—Kelley Lang

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 19, 2014

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RN&R

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This Weekend // Liam Kyle Cahill

& Friends Leify Green, DirtyPretty, My Acoustic Heart Saturday, June 21 // Doors open 7pm / Show Starts 8pm 21+ $10 advance / $15 at the door // Raffle / Prize Drawing and Silent Auction for Niko's cancer battle

Think

Free

36   |  RN&R   | 

JUNE 19, 2014

Bridle party I’m going to a friend’s bachelor party in Vegas, which includes a strip club visit. My girlfriend said I have to sit that out. She believes going could lead me to cheat on her. I assured her that I have no intention of cheating— ever—and strippers have no interest in me anyway. Well, she’s adamant. I caved, agreeing to skip the strip club, but my friends’ teasing will be merciless. What if I just go and fib to my girlfriend to keep everyone happy? Regarding your caving to her demand, you should un-cave. Go to that club with your friends. Not secretly. Openly. In other words, tell her you’re doing it, because an adult shouldn’t get to control another adult’s behavior, and being in a relationship doesn’t change that. Also, allowing her to give you orders sets a really bad precedent. What will she object you out of doing next? And how soon before she fits you for a leash and a bark collar? A bachelor party is a male friendship ritual. While women tend to share their feelings Oprah’s couch-style, men often bond through drinking, ribbing and humiliation, like forcing their soon-to-be-married buddy to get onstage on his hands and knees to be spanked by a stripper. Your girlfriend seems to have given no thought to the social repercussions of you telling the guys your governess is making you stay in your hotel room and watch a movie. (Would Fried Green Tomatoes work for her or would she prefer you watch something on the Lifetime channel?) And sure, sex for pay is easily findable in Vegas.

However, a typical bachelor party visit to a Vegas strip club takes place not at some seedy, out-of-the way joint where anything goes but at a ginormous corporate warehouse of stripping where some 6’8” genetic experiment of a man makes sure no male paws wander anywhere on the dancer they aren’t supposed to. The strippers at these places can make 100K a year just dancing, and they aren’t looking to the crowd for sex or boyfriends. Their primary job isn’t even dancing but stripping men of their money. You could have reassured her about all of this if you each hadn’t taken the emotionally easy way out. Instead of talking about her fears, she went all ayatollah on you, and instead of standing up for yourself, you figured you’d just lie to her. Problem-avoiding—rather than laying out your feelings and problem-solving—tends to bode poorly for a relationship’s survival. Backtrack and try a little adult conversation. You just might convince her that looking isn’t the gateway drug to cheating— much as ogling a Porsche doesn’t lead to grand theft auto. And when you leave for the weekend, she might be more likely to say, “Bye, have a ball” than “Bye, I have your balls.” Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   june 19, 2014  |  

RN&R  

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IT’S TIME TO

VOTE

by rob brezsny

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for your favorite people, businesses and things in the RN&R’s Best of Northern Nevada reader survey! As the region’s most credible and most thorough survey of its kind, we once again have lots of categories! Look through these and come up with some ideas on who you’ll vote for, then go online to www.newsreview.com/reno and click on the “Best of Northern Nevada” icon to vote!

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Best 4th of July fireworks Best animal shelter Best art gallery Best mural Best charity race or walk Best church Best day trip Best dog park Best drag queen Best independent art gallery Best kept secret Best local band Best local band album Best dance instructor Best local dance company Best local theater company Best monthly event Best neighborhood Best non-casino thing to do downtown Best place to meet gay singles Best place to meet straight singles Best place to people watch Best radio station Best talk show host Best scandal Best reason to live in Reno Most environmentally conscious company Best local farm Best non-profit group Best green event Best green store Best special event in downtown Reno Best special event in downtown Sparks

Food & drink Best cooking school Best hot dog Best frozen yogurt Best French fries Best smoothie Best chicken wings Best salad Best salad bar Best Mexican Best Italian Best Indian Best Basque Best Japanese Best Greek Best Thai Best Chinese Best Salvadoran Best sandwich shop Best French restaurant Best Vietnamese Best sushi Best vegetarian Best burger Best doughnuts/pastries Best bagel Best bakery Best fresh bread Best coffee Best coffee roaster Best seafood Best steak Best pizza parlor Best breakfast Best business lunch Best greasy spoon Best Reno restaurant Best Carson restaurant Best Truckee restaurant Best Sparks restaurant Best Tahoe restaurant Most romantic restaurant Best new restaurant Best fine dining Best wine list Best wine bar Best cheap eats Best dessert Best martini Best Margarita Best solo dining Best outdoor dining Best late-night dining Best food truck Best ambience Best restaurant view

38   |  RN&R   | 

Best restaurant worth the long wait Best chef Best server Best tequila selection Best vodka selection Best whiskey/bourbon/Scotch selection Best Bloody Mary Best local beer Best barbecue restaurant Best catering company Best appetizers Best soups Best place to eat when drunk Best juice Best fondue Best produce

Casinos & GamblinG Best casino Best casino hotel Best casino restaurant Best casino bar Best casino arcade games Best female casino bartender Best male casino bartender Best casino buffet Best casino comedy club Best casino game dealer Best casino dance club Best casino promotion Best casino show Best casino band Most eco-friendly casino Best sportsbook Best poker room Best place to cash your check Best customer service Best casino wedding planning Best casino to hear quiet music Best casino spa Best casino security Best casino-hotel for romantic getaway Best casino color scheme Best casino carpet

Best place to get pierced Best shoe selection Best boutique clothing store Best hotel for a romantic getaway Best bank Best credit union Best mortgage company Best grocery store Best specialty ice cream store Best pet store Best pet supply store Best pet boarding Best skateboard store Best wireless phone service coverage Best brothel Best motorcycle dealer, shop Best new car dealership Best used car dealership Best place for photo prints Best photography supply store Best Pilates studio Best Pilates instructor Best yoga studio Best yoga instructor Best outdoor outfitter Best optical shop Best hospital Best doggy daycare Best athletic shoe selection Best business Facebook page Best independent bookstore Best independent CD music store Best independent coffee shop Best independent computer store Best independent grocery store Best independent used bookstore Best local non-casino business Best new business Best newspaper Best outdoor gear selection Best place for music lessons Best place to buy playa garb Best print shop Best public relations agency Best publication (that’s not us) Best selection of local art Best spectator sport Best sunglasses selection Best wedding event planner Best wedding reception site Best workout wear selection Best independent hardware store Best veterinarian Best Pawnbroker

Best beer selection Best bowling alley Best club DJ Best comedy club Best concert venue Best dance club Best dive bar Best gay hangout Best happy hour Best karaoke Best microbrewery Best neighborhood bar Best open-mic night Best place for a first date Best place for live music Best place to buy sexy underwear Best place to cure your hangover Best place to have sex in public Best place to hear loud music Best place to hear quiet music Best place to see a concert Best place to watch Monday Night Football Best place to watch movies Best sports bar Best strip club Best trivia night Most romantic bar

JUNE 19, 2014

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “My music is

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio nov-

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Best golf course Best local hot springs Best mountain biking Best outdoor beer garden Best picnic spot Best place to ride a personal watercraft Best place to swim Best ski resort Best skiing Best snowboarding Best spot to hike Best spot to run around naked Best spot to smooch under the stars

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best understood by children and animals,” said composer Igor Stravinsky. A similar statement could be made about you Tauruses in the coming weeks: You will be best understood by children and animals—and by all others who have a capacity for dynamic innocence and a buoyant curiosity rooted in emotional intelligence. In fact, those are the types I advise you to surround yourself with. For now, it’s best to avoid sophisticates who overthink everything and know-it-all cynics whose default mode is criticism. Take control of what influences you absorb. You need to be in the presence of those who help activate your vitality and enthusiasm.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Nikhedonia”

outdoors

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is an obscure English word that refers to the pleasure that comes from anticipating success or good fortune. There’s nothing wrong with indulging in this emotion as long as it doesn’t interfere with you actually doing the work that will lead to success or good fortune. But the problem is, nikhedonia makes some people lazy. Having experienced the thrill of imagining their victory, they find it hard to buckle down and slog through the gritty details necessary to manifest their victory. Don’t be like that. Enjoy your nikhedonia, then go and complete the accomplishment that will bring a second, even stronger wave of gratification.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): Boston’s

Personalities

Best athletic coach Best attorney Best barista Best thrift store Best bartender, female Best local place to work Best bartender, male Best landscaping company Best beard Best house cleaning service Best chiropractor Best video game store Best club doorman/bouncer Best gadget store Best cocktail server Best wine shop Best college instructor Best cheap liquor store innovations Best creative writer Best women’s clothing boutique Best local innovation: activism Best men’s clothing store Best local innovation: collaboration Best dentist Best children’s clothing boutique Best local innovation: living space Best elementary school teacher Best gynecologist Best place to buy a firearm Best local innovation: service Best high school teacher Best place to shoot firearms Best local innovation: technology Best interior designer Best jewelry store Best local innovation: working Best local actor/actress Best mall space Best local athlete Best tanning salon Most innovative local artist Best local columnist Best frame shop Most innovative local casino Best local comedian Best spa Most innovative local cocktails Best local filmmaker Best dry cleaners Most innovative local company Best local musician Best bookstore Most innovative local menu Best local politician Best place to get an auto smogged Most innovative local music Best local radio DJ or DJ team Best place to buy a musical Most innovative local nonprofit instrument Best local rapper Most innovative local promotion Best gym Best local songwriter Most innovative local startup Best place to buy CDs Best local TV news business Best specialty foods store Best local TV news anchor Most innovative local teacher Best adult-themed store Best local TV news hairstyle Best computer store Best massage therapist kids & Family Best place to buy vintage clothes Best arcade games Best middle school teacher Best used clothing store Best charter school Best minister/spiritual advisor Best antique store Best family outing Best muralist Best bicycle shop Best local library Best music teacher Best flower shop Best park Best naturopathic practioner Best beauty salon Best place to introduce kids Best pet groomer to nature Best hair stylist Best photographer Best place to picnic with kids Best aesthetician Best plastic surgeon Best place to take the kids Best nail technician Best police officer Best things to do on a Friday night Best politician Best barber Best toy store Best barber shop Best principal Best weekend activity Best garden nursery Best public figure to fantasize Best weeknight activity about Best car wash Most kid-friendly restaurant Best public relations professional Best home furnishings store Best real estate agent Best apartment complex Best social networker niGhtliFe Best place to get a car repaired Best visual artist Best tattoo parlor Best all-ages spot Best volunteer Best tattoo artist Best bar

Goods & serviCes

with the astrological omens, you are hereby granted a brief, one-time-only license to commit the Seven Deadly Sins. You heard me correctly, Libra. As long as you don’t go to extremes, feel free to express healthy amounts of pride, greed, laziness, gluttony, anger, envy and lust. At least for now, there will be relatively little hell to pay for these indulgences. Just one caveat: If I were you, I wouldn’t invest a lot of energy in anger and envy. Technically, they are permitted, but they aren’t really much fun. On the other hand, greed, gluttony and lust could be quite pleasurable, especially if you don’t take yourself too seriously. Pride and laziness may also be enjoyable in moderate, artful amounts.

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LIBRA (Sept. 13 23-Oct. 22): In accordance

tooth extracted, you might have called on a barber or blacksmith or wigmaker to do the job. (Dentistry didn’t become a formal occupation until the latter part of the 19th century.) Today, you wouldn’t dream of seeking anyone but a specialist to attend to the health of your mouth. But I’m wondering if you are being less particular about certain other matters concerning your welfare. Have you been seeking financial advice from your massage therapist? Spiritual counsel from your car-repair person? Nutritional guidance from a fast-food addict? I suggest you avoid such behavior. It’s time to ask for specific help from those who can actually provide it.

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Museum of Fine Arts has a collection of Japanese art that is never on display. It consists of 6,600 wood-block prints created by artists of the ukiyo-e school, also known as “pictures of the floating world.” Some are more than 300 years old. They are tucked away in drawers and hidden from the light, ensuring that their vibrant colors won’t fade. So they are well-preserved but rarely seen by anyone. Is there anything about you that resembles these pictures of the floating world, Cancerian? Do you keep parts of you secret, protecting them from what might happen if you show them to the world? It may be time to revise that policy. (Thanks to Molly Oldfield’s The Secret Museum for the info referred to here.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the next two

vote now!

Culture

ARIES (March 21-April 19): If13 you were 13 alive 150 years ago and needed to get a

weeks, I hope you don’t fall prey to the craze that has been sweeping Japan. More than 40,000 people have bought books that feature the photos of hamuketsu, or hamster bottoms. Even if you do manage to avoid being consumed by that particular madness, I’m afraid you might get caught up in trifles and distractions that are equally irrelevant to your long-term dreams. Here’s what I suggest: To counteract any tendency you might have to neglect what’s truly important, vow to focus intensely on what’s truly important.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Writing at Fast

Company, Himanshu Saxena suggests that businesses create a new position: chief paradox officer, or CPXO. This person would be responsible for making good use of the conflicts and contradictions that normally arise, treating them as opportunities for growth rather than as distractions. From my astrological perspective, you Virgos are currently prime candidates to serve in this capacity. You will continue to have special powers to do this type of work for months to come.

elist Kurt Vonnegut rebelled against literary traditions. His stories were often hybrids of science fiction and autobiography. Freeform philosophizing blended with satirical moral commentary. He could be cynical yet playful, and he told a lot of jokes. “I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over,” he testified. “Out on the edge 13 kinds of things you can’t see you see all the from the center.” He’s your role model for the next four weeks, Scorpio. Your challenge will be to wander as far as you can into the frontier without getting hopelessly lost.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Make a name for the dark parts of you,” writes Lisa Marie Basile in her poem “Paz.” I think that’s good advice for you, Sagittarius. The imminent future will be an excellent time to fully acknowledge the shadowy aspects of your nature. More than that, it will be a perfect moment to converse with them, get to know them better, and identify their redeeming features. I suspect you will find that just because they are dark doesn’t mean they are bad or shameful. If you approach them with love and tenderness, they may even reveal their secret genius.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Pet

mice that are kept in cages need to move more than their 13 enclosed space allows, so their owners often provide them with exercise wheels. If the rodents want to exert their natural instinct to run around, they’ve got to do it on this device. But here’s a curious twist: A team of Dutch researchers has discovered that wild mice also enjoy using exercise wheels. The creatures have all the room to roam they need, but when they come upon the wheels in the middle of the forest, they hop on and go for prolonged spins. I suggest you avoid behavior like that, Capricorn. Sometime soon you will find yourself rambling through more spacious places. When that happens, don’t act like you do when your freedom is more limited.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s tran-

sition time. We will soon see how skilled you are at following through. The innovations you have launched in recent weeks need to be fleshed out. The creativity you unleashed must get the full backing of your practical action. You will be asked to make good on the promises you made or even implied. I want to urge you not to get your feelings hurt if some pruning and editing are required. In fact, I suggest you relish the opportunity to translate fuzzy ideals into tidy structures. Practicing the art of ingenious limitation will make everything better.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s always

important for you to shield yourself against our culture’s superficial and sexist ideas about sex. It’s always important for you to cultivate your own unique and soulful understandings about sex. But right now this is even more crucial than usual. You are headed into a phase when you will have the potential to clarify and deepen your relationship with eros. In ways you have not previously imagined, you can learn to harness your libido to serve both your spiritual aspirations and your quest for greater intimacy.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Brad Bynum PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

Troubadour Reno singer-songwriter Liam Kyle Cahill’s record release party will double as a fundraiser for a local restaurateur battling cancer. The event is Sat., June 21, at Bodega Nightclub, 555 E. Fourth St., and will feature live performances by Cahill, with a full band, as well as Leify Green, DirtyPretty and My Acoustic Heart. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door. For more info, visit www. liamkylecahill.com.

Tell me about what you do. My name is Liam. I’m a folk rock artist— between folk rock and singer-songwriter. I work as a geologist, but what I’m trying to do is transition into doing music full time and being able to hit the road as a singersongwriter, playing my songs for people.

Tell me about the new album. The new album is called The Key to Happiness, and we got 23 different guest musicians from Reno to be part of the album. Basically, it’s just a collection of my favorite songs that I’ve ever written, and instead of just putting them out acoustically, like I tend to play them live, we really wanted to put together something bigger, something a little more commercial, so to speak.

Who played on it? Tim Snider, formerly of Sol Jibe, Eric Andersen from the Novelists, Mark Sexton from the Mark Sexton Band, Dave Berry

from Jelly Bread, Lucas Young from Lucas Young and the Wilderness, Mel Wade from the duo Wanders On, and numerous other musicians. ... I tried to basically get the names of all the different people who I have been listening to their music for years, people that I trust, people that I like what they do, and I wanted to incorporate them into what I was doing. So I just hand-picked all these people, and between [producer] Tom Gordon and I, we put together this cool team.

Watching the San Antonio Spurs give Team Lebron its lumps took me back in time. It was 27 years ago right now that I was moving from the Alamo City, having taken a new job in Denver. I remember some nice things about living down in Texas, which in recent times has seen its overall image taking a real beating with the help of lunkheads like Dubya, Rick Perry and the always lovely Louie Gohmert. Here are some of the things that come to mind about SA, as locals call it. First, don’t think of the place as some dry, dusty, cowboy town. Yeah, it’s got its share of ranches and cowboys for sure, but the area itself is quite green and quite wet. In fact, it’s pretty goddang handsome. It’s one of the few places I’ve lived where people don’t sweat the water supply, since it sits atop a gigantic aquifer. Situated just below the wondrous zone of Texas known as the Hill Country, SA gets a whole bunch of rain on an annual basis, often in the form of thunderstorms. And man, when you’re talking about t-storms down there, you’re talking about showtime. You get thunderstorms that make you pull OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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It’s your record release, but you also have a good cause and a bunch of different businesses coming together.

And you’ve got the record release event coming up?

Absolutely. It’s been kind of a double-edged sword because once we started doing this, it was like, this will get totally different eyes on it, people who wouldn’t have looked twice at a CD release show. Oh, it’s a benefit, I’m willing to check this out, but I never in my wildest dreams could have imagined how much work it was to raise all of that money and jump through all the hoops that we had to in order to be a legitimate organization raising funds for someone. But it’s been worth it. Ω

The event itself started out just as a CD release. I had it planned for this. I knew it was going to be in June. I started putting it together. A couple of months ago ... Nikos from Nikos Greek Kitchen was diagnosed with cancer for the second time. And when that happened, I switched gears and turned my CD release into a giant fundraiser. My girlfriend and I created a nonprofit called Reno for Nikos in order to create some legitimacy around what we were doing. Originally, I was just some bearded guy

Those San Antonio days

∫y Bruce Van Dye

off the road and wait it out. You get t-storms that make you crawl into a corner of your house and curl up in a fetal position. You get t-storms that will very likely force you to put your dog on Xanax. Those storms down there are capable of going on some serious rampages. They call ’em gully washers, sure. Also frog stranglers. The wildflower action was nothing short of stupendous. In the spring, you got these displays of bluebonnets, which are huge, gorgeous lupine-like blossoms, that go on for acres and acres. It really is quite something. In a good, wet spring, driving around the back roads searching for eyeballblasting floral displays was a terrific way to blow an afternoon. Another great way to blow an afternoon in the summer there was to float the rivers that flow out of the Hill Country down to the Gulf of Mexico. Rivers like the Guadalupe, the Frio, and yes, the Colorado. The other Colorado. I remember these rivers fondly; beautiful streams lined with impressive Texas live oaks and flowing through these limestone plateaus. When it’s Texas hot, there’s really no better place to be than on an

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

showing up to local restaurants and local business owners and saying, “Hey, I’m a singer-songwriter trying to raise money. Would you like to donate gift cards?” and they were like, “Who the heck is this guy?” Then I started working Reno Tahoe Tonight magazine, Shop Small Northern Nevada and once I got these names backing me and we got some official paperwork together—I got an official tax number and all that jazz—people started taking me a lot more seriously. We have over $5,000 worth of prizes to be raffled and silent auctioned at the event. … The main raffle prizes that people can win are a Martin acoustic guitar, a two-day studio time with Colin Christian at Wires & Noise [recording studio], Reno Tahoe Limousine put in a four-hour limousine ride. Guitar Center donated another guitar. … A local bike place donated a cruiser bike. And then just dozens and dozens of gift cards, from everything from Great Full Gardens to Burger Me to hair salons and whatever.

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ART OF THE STATE

inner tube with a cooler trailing behind, lazing down the river in simple, pleasant style. No rapids, no white water. Just aqua cruisin’. The city is now the seventh largest city in the U.S. The racial makeup remains the same as ’86, with San Antonio still being what we used to call Browntown. The Hispanic population is about 62 percent, with whites at 26 percent. One thing I thought I noticed: when whites are outnumbered, they tend to be much better behaved. One thing I loved about SA was all the dang Taco Cabanas in town. This is a chain of Mexican fast food joints that also served Coronas. What a concept. Think of a Taco Bell with beer. And much better food. I loved Taco Cabana, and dined there frequently, like about eight times a week. The Alamo? Yahoo. A little fort in the middle of town where the Mexicans killed Davy Crockett. Or was it Daniel Boone? David Bowie? Anyway, get over it, already. Ω |

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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JUNE 19, 2014

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