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june 12, 2014


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Number of the best

The next war

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Regular readers might recall that RN&R editor D. Brian Burghart is on vacation this month, which means that news editor Dennis Myers, staff writer Sage Leehey and I will cover his duties the next few weeks. That means, among other things, that I get to be the guy to meet you here at the door. So, hey, come on in and make yourself comfortable. Here’s something I’m excited about: Voting is now live for our annual Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada contest. You can log in and vote here: www. newsreview.com/reno/ballot/ bestofreno14. This is a chance to commend your favorite local restaurants, bars, casinos, stores, artists, events, teachers and scandals. A lot of local people and businesses take this contest very seriously and campaign hard for votes and recognition. And we love that. So feel free to rally your friends on social media. However, if we catch you ballotstuffing—and it seems like every year we catch somebody—we will hunt down and destroy whatever ballot-stuffing robot monstrosities you have created. There’s an autocomplete list that will pop up whenever you start typing. That’s drawn from past winners and is there to help you, and to help us when it comes time to tally votes by eliminating some of the erratic misspellings—which really slows vote counting—but please don’t feel inhibited by it. We’re not trying to coax you into a vote. Feel free to vote for names that don’t appear in the autocomplete list. And if you don’t use autocomplete, please try to provide a correct spelling. Also, feel free to suggest categories for future contests using the freestyle feature in the ballot. We add and subtract categories annually, and we take those suggestions very seriously. Finally, every year we choose a different aspect of Northern Nevada to focus on with a special section of categories. This year, it’s women. It’s an opportunity for all of us to honor the women leaders in the arts, business and politics of our community.

My suggestion would be “Time to Celebrate.” As we plan on leaving Afghanistan at the end of this year, instead of demonstrating, I feel it’s time to stage performances in stadiums across the country, providing leadership more time to figure out more hatred and fear so we can pay for another unnecessary war! Besides, after being granted a son after 19 years of feeble attempts, my son is coming home from his fifth deployment in Afghanistan the end of this year. Jeannie Jackson Reno

Still towering

Intergenerational thoughts While listening to some pop music from the ’60s and ’70s, tears came to my eyes when I thought about where we are today socially and economically. The lyrics were about freedom and loss of identity. I thought of my 15-year-old daughter and how the newer generations don’t really know what freedom is. Today everything from birth to death is “gamed” for the profit of big power structures. It’s a covert form of indentured slavery (unwritten contracts). My daughter thinks I rant a lot and that I get overly excited and upset over social/political issues. I just feel like I’m doing my American duty in trying to keep our lives free from extortion and our individual identities intact. This is something my father risked his life for in WWII and Korea, yet today’s generation seems to just give this freedom away and accept the future as an ever escalating glott of extortions and corruptions—business as usual. I come from possibly the last generation willing to voice their opinions in a blunt and, some would say, revolutionary manner. To do so today too loudly can put the mark of extremist or domestic terrorist on your forehead. I guess that would include the authors of the Declaration of Independence and the framers of our long forgotten Constitution.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

I say firstly and foremost vote, not blindly nor just along a party line but rather with some depth of thought and conscience. I feel sorry for my daughter and her generation as they have never experienced the freedoms we older Americans have, nor understand their costs. “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants”—Thomas Jefferson. I told her I could explain the differences to her intellectually but that’s different than feeling it in your soul. It was a grand experiment. Too bad the tree’s been eaten away by parasites. John Bogle Reno

Re “Towering wealth” (Letter to the editor, May 29): How about this example? You cash your paycheck on Friday. Imagine having the teller count out 2,000 hundred dollar bills, a stack about 12 inches high of slightly used bills. Last you until next Friday? Could you fit that money in your purse? That’s the weekly pay of the McDonald’s CEO. C.G. Green Reno

A pat for Grimm Re “Marks the spot,” (Film, May 29): Hey—great review on the new X-Men! Gotta’ have more Quicksilver. Robert Jones Birmingham, Ala.

Forward to the past Interesting that Harry Reid is trying to strip freedom of speech out of the First Amendment. He calls it restoring democracy to the American people, which, to him, means preventing the Koch brothers from using their own money to support their political preferences. “Shady money” Harry calls it. I’ll resist the temptation to comment on the delicious irony here.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Staff writer Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

—Brad Bynum

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Serene Lusano, Kyle Shine, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office Manager/Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

bradb@ ne wsreview . com

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If Harry Reid really wants to clean up politics, he could start by introducing an amendment to repeal the 17th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Our founders originally wrote the Constitution so that U.S. senators were appointed by their state legislatures. That made them ambassadors from their state to the federal government. Pretty ingenious—no question about who they represented and where their loyalties lie. The 17th amendment, ratified in 1913, changed senator selection from appointments to popular votes. Over time that opened the door to external influences that affect Senate loyalties. No better example exists than our very own Harry Reid. Isn’t it time to accept that the founders had it right the first time? Harry, let’s repeal the 17th amendment. Robert R. Kessler Las Vegas

Ready for his breaks Re “Ready for my tax breaks, Mr. Nevada” (feature story, June 5): Dennis Myers’s informative but biased article on the film industry in Nevada included the line “Someone didn’t do his homework before committing pen to paper.” Although Mr. Myers can be forgiven for not telling the whole story, the whole story indeed is missing. The issue of tax incentives is a wide one. But since we do have tax incentives for film in place, we should not forget the immensely positive impact these incentives will have in Northern Nevada. Chief among these is the development of Northern Nevada Film Studios and its collaboration with Sierra Nevada Guitar, myself as classical guitarist and composer, and innovative electric guitarist and composer Julian Forest. Northern Nevada Film Studios is currently in production on a new film called Sign of the Sun. In addition to an amazing script and top notch regional music and acting talent, this film will revolutionize the entire film industry with a proprietary new technology that will change the film-going experience. Sign of the Sun will set the stage for a greater renaissance of arts

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Andy Odegard, Clayton Porter, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Matt Veach, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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and economic development throughout northern Nevada. If incentives help this grown-in-Nevada initiative it will only be a good thing. Larry Aynesmith Incline Village

Another precinct heard from Re “Ready for my tax breaks, Mr. Nevada” (feature story, June 5): Thanks to Dennis Myers for his article “Ready For My Tax Breaks.” The film industry is one example of a major problem that the politicians have dropped on the citizens of Nevada. Other examples include redevelopment districts, STAR bonds, and the depreciation rule. One group receives maximum financial benefits while the majority pay the full rate. We should not only correct these injustices, but we must act to prevent them from happening in the future. We need the public and the journalists to expose these blatant acts of malfeasance before they become law. Unfortunately, deals such as the Apple giveaway are performed behind closed doors without public scrutiny and those who are involved in the giveaways are long gone from office before the ramifications are felt down the road. Mark Glenn Reno

Health vote Re “Historic vote cast” (Upfront, June 5): [On the U.S. House voting to cut off funding for enforcement of federal medical marijuana ban on dispensaries where medical marijuana is legal:] The money will always be spent if it is there, no matter what the cause or effect. At least half of Congress knows how the American bureaucracy works. Its nice that our House members were not the dummies. Shaun Gilbert Reno

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalinn Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Brian Breneman

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june 12, 2014


by Dennis Myers

ThiS Modern World

by tom tomorrow

Is summer changing? Asked at Java Jungle, 246 W. First St.

Mike Douglas Sports book writer

Not in my opinion, no. I think they’re about the same. It’s just as hot as ever. I moved out here from the Bay Area a few years ago. To me, I like it hot.

Orland Outland Writer

Yes, definitely. Maybe I’m getting older and it’s getting more uncomfortable for me, but when I was a kid I never remember feeling the heat the way I do now. I don’t remember the hundred degree days like now, and I grew up here.

Meredith Benz Print broker

A judicial outrage

I think the weather patterns are changing, and I do think it’s warmer.

court’s previous ruling in Roth v. United States], then it can With little notice last week, Nevada District Judge Patrick hardly be doubted that the constitutional guarantee has its Flanagan told a political candidate what he could not say, and got away with it. No civil libertarian, no editorialist, no fullest and most urgent application precisely to the conduct of campaigns for political office.” first amendment advocate spoke or wrote to object. And what’s with Kieckhefer, who calls himself a Gary Schmidt, a Republican candidate for the Nevada conservative, running to a judge for a little judicial activSenate, put a campaign spot on the air that said his oppoism to bail him out instead of standing up to Schmidt and nent, fellow Republican Ben Kieckhefer, had supported making his case to the voters and letting them decide the Democrat Harry Reid’s reelection in 2010. Kieckhefer truth? Kieckhefer calls himself a first amendment advocate, asked Flanagan to order Schmidt to take the spot off the which begs the question of why he censored his opponent. air. Flanagan heard the case, concluded that Schmidt’s Under the law, television and radio stations can refuse charge was false, and issued the requested order. to accept political advertising—all The law in this case could not be Judge Flanagan’s political advertising. But if they do more clear. Political candidates can accept it, they cannot cherry-pick ruling was an insay anything they want, true or false. among candidate commercials, running It’s between them and the voters, and kind contribution some and refusing others. Nor can they government has no authority to get in to the Kieckhefer change those ads. the way. The voters, not government, And local municipal or state court judge whether a candidate is telling the campaign. judges have no authority to overrule truth. Judges have no authority to judge federal law. Put them in charge of accuracy, taste, intent or anything else a candidate wants to judging content and they’ll be taking a lot of candidate tell the voters. commercials off the air. Should the voters decide how to In one famous case, Georgia bigot J.B. Stoner, who react to Dukakis in a tank or a little girl plucking a daisy, or considered Hitler too soft and demonized Jews, made a should a Reno judge shield them from the sights? despicable television commercial in a 1972 run for office On top of all that, there is a second legal impediment to that attacked African Americans using the term “nigger.” Flanagan’s order. This is the United States. Prior restraint The Federal Communications Commission, acting on the of free expression has been held by the U.S. Supreme case law, ordered Georgia stations to broadcast the spots Court to be illegal except in an urgent national emergency. exactly as Stoner made them. Ben Kieckhefer being a weenie doesn’t qualify as urgent. In Monitor Patriot Co. vs. Roy (1971), the U.S. Whether Gary Schmidt was telling the truth or not Supreme Court said, “And if it be conceded that the First was for the voters to decide. Instead, Flanagan intervened Amendment was ‘fashioned to assure the unfettered with an outrageous in-kind contribution to the Kieckhefer interchange of ideas for the bringing about of political and campaign that is miles beyond his authority. Ω social changes desired by the people,’ [a quote from the OPINION

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Bruce Bassard Job seeker

I think it’s gotten a little warmer. It’s about second, third years we had hundred-plus degrees. We got one summer we had 115 degrees. That’s pretty unusual. Another summer, 106 to 108 degrees. That’s pretty hot.

Cheryl Leith Store clerk

Yes. I’ve been here four years and it’s warmer than it was four years ago.

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There are millions on the streets It’s a start.

the mental health budget, reminiscent of many other times in Nevada’s sad history when budget cuts have targeted those with the smallest voice in the lobbying corps. Still, it’s a start. Legislators from both parties have been working for decades on improving the legal hold process to open up inpatient facilities more quickly to those deemed a danger to self or others. The lack of competitive pay for state psychiatrists and the low daily rate for hospitalization have been brought forward by agency officials for at least that long, but every session there is a “worthy project” more in need of state funding. And the ratio of psychiatric beds to the state’s population is scandalous. The council suggests a “SuperUser Project” to focus intensive case management services on “frequent flyers” who show up repeatedly in hospital emergency rooms, detox facilities, homeless shelters, and jail. Perhaps the best illustration of this expensive repetitive cycle is found in Malcolm Glidewell’s New Yorker article, “Million Dollar Murray,” http://

After the Sacramento Bee exposed the Southern Nevada practice of busing severely mentally ill patients out-of-state and out-of-mind, Gov. Brian Sandoval created a Behavioral Health and Wellness Council to recommend specific solutions for Nevada’s troubled mental health system. The council recently released 16 recommendations for short-term fixes. The chairman of the council immediately lowered expectations by telling the Las Vegas ReviewJournal that the governor “believes in mental health”—don’t we all?—but the Legislature will have to decide what to fund. Understating Nevada’s poorly resourced state budget, Dr. Joel Dvoskin, said what everyone always says, “There’s lots of worthy projects that are competing for funding.” The recommendations are hardly previously overlooked reforms. Components like supported housing have actually been increased in recent years, before the recession led Sandoval and lawmakers to slash

by

Sheila Leslie

gladwell.com/million-dollar-murray, which focused on the trials and tribulations of Murray Barr, as chronicled by former Reno police officers Patrick O’Bryan and Steve Johns. By providing housing, medication management, and a mental health worker unafraid to leave the office and check up on a “super-user,” huge savings can be generated while allowing mentally ill people an opportunity for stability and a better quality of life. The council’s recommendations were unanimous but that’s not so unusual either. The treatment community has long recognized what makes a mental health system successful. But it’s easy to sign off on a recommendation to help such obviously tormented souls cope with an illness that often manifests in strange behaviors and public suffering. It’s something else entirely to find the money, or the political will to generate needed revenue, to make the system work. There are two elements this time that may make a difference. One is the national embarrassment of the busing scandal, especially for a popular

governor with higher aspirations. If Sandoval can’t fix Nevada’s broken mental health system, his rising star may begin to fade. The other, surprisingly, is Obamacare, specifically the expansion of Medicaid to include childless adults. The extra revenue from federal Medicaid funds may alleviate the need for millions in state dollars. This “worthy project” may not have to compete with items such as corporate subsidies if the state is able to bill Medicaid for the expanded services. There is also an opportunity to redesign Nevada’s mental health system and expand its scope to include substance abuse and other co-occurring disorders. A regional approach would incorporate outreach services to rural areas desperately in need of psychiatric and emergency care. As Officer O’Bryan, now retired and living in New Mexico, told Glidewell: “It cost us $1 million not to do something about Murray.” Just imagine how many Murrays are out there on the street today. Ω

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Squeeze it down Scotland’s vote to secede from England and destroy “Great Britain” would be only one of many signs that government consolidation is over. Venice has voted to secede from Italy, and Sardinia may be next. Northern Spain is likely to break up into two states, Catalonia and Basque. by Brendan In Belgium, the Dutch-speaking Trainor north wants to split from the French south. The Crimea is already split from Ukraine, and other regions may follow. Russia is trying to centralize but only to retake what territory it has recently lost. In Canada, the French speakers have been bribed from seceding by subsidies from Ottawa, but the oil rich Western provinces are tired of being the ones taxed to pay the bribes and may secede. Conservative Texas has threatened to secede and so has liberal Vermont.

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ARTS&CULTURE

Closer to home, Incline Village has talked of secession from Washoe County. The differences between populous Las Vegas and northern and rural Nevada has led to talks of a split. Northern California wants to be called the State of Jefferson, and some Nevadans wonder if we could invite Nevada City to become part of Nevada. The agricultural central valley from Stockton to Temecula resents the urban coast. The Western States are trying to take back the federal public lands. Three Colorado counties want to split off. Some believe there are as many as eight separate cultural and economic regions of the US and wonder how long they will hang together. One reason is lack of representation. It has been many years since the founders’ ideal of 30,000 souls per U.S. House member has been exceeded. It is now over 500,000 people per member. Washington, D.C. seems either indifferently distant or boorishly overbearing.

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It can’t seem to get anything right except to make its denizens rich. People are tired of being taxed to subsidize others. The modern nation state system was created in 1648 in Germany after 30 years of religious wars. The idea was that centralized states were better than the old feudal system. In the process, they created entities that have a monopoly on the legitimate use of force within their borders and can also set the price of their power and decide conflicts about their power. The Civil War was the beginning of centralization in the US. That consolidation continued with only brief pauses in the 1920’s and 1980’s. Many people still believe in central planning, but the contradictions are producing huge cracks in the consensus. The major contradiction is that government exists to provide protection for lives and property but does so by theft of property through taxes and regulations and claims lives through heavy handed military and police

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action. It seems you always have to destroy the village in order to save it. The economies controlled by central banking have been powerless to avoid a world recession or find its cure. Russia, China, Brazil, India and others are rising to counterbalance the power of the United States and Europe. As Yeats wrote, “the centre cannot hold.” Freedom lovers would like secession to reach all the way down to the individual level. In other words, as information and production technology advances, monopoly government will become more and more obsolete. It is time to look ahead to the next generations. By 2099, individuals and families may have many choices to contract for services that only the increasingly authoritarian states now provide. Advances like 3-D printing, Bitcoin, social media, genetic and nano technology are pointing the way. Bill Clinton said it, and it will take a while, but the era of big government is indeed over. Ω

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Photo/Dennis Myers

U.S. Sen. Dean Heller is taking a prominent role  in trying to end net neutrality.

Redress of grievances Online petitions are circulating to try to save Lincoln Hall, the picturesque residence hall on the University of Nevada, Reno campus, which is reportedly facing demolition. The 1896 building is one of 13 campus structures that make up the University of Nevada Historic District. According to Amanda Buell at RenoHistorical.org, “It and neighboring VINTAGE POSTCARD OF  Manzanita Hall are the oldest continuMORRILL HALL ously operating residence halls in the western United States, and the two dorms, along with Morrill Hall, comprise the only three remaining buildings on campus built before the turn of the 20th century. Between 1942 and 1946, the men of Lincoln Hall moved to either the gymnasium or Manzanita Hall to make room for the pre-flight Cadets of the United States Army-Air Corps who attended the university while waiting for the call to duty for their country or while in basic training.” A petition is posted at http://tinyurl.com/n8uv4vj Another petition circulating around town seeks to stop construction of a traffic roundabout at a five-way intersection Hunter Lake and Mayberry Drives near a Raley’s store and Hunter Lake Elementary School. The roundabout was proposed by the Regional Transportation Commission. “Firefighters, teachers, parents, residents, motorists, bicyclists, pedestrians and citizens adamantly oppose the roundabout,” it reads in part. “”We strongly urge our governmental officials to soundly reject RTC’s proposal. The project is located right next to an elementary school, Reno Fire Station No. 5, plus numerous other businesses. Businesses in the area will be impacted by narrower lanes and blocked driveways. Fire Department control of the intersection with Opticoms will be eliminated. Responses times will be slowed. … Large trucks, RVs, and vehicles with trailers will have a harder time negotiating the intersection.” We could not find an online petition on this issue.

Reid appointments scrutinized The Wall Street Journal this week reported that U.S. Sen. Harry Reid’s efforts to shape the membership of the obscure Federal Energy Regulatory Commission “have roiled an agency that, like other federal regulatory bodies, is supposed to be independent from Congress and the executive branch.” FERC, formerly chaired by Nevadan Jon Wellinghoff, oversees utility transmission tariffs and is a source of concern to renewable energy firms Reid is trying to herd to Nevada. Democrat Reid was caustic when a WSJ reporter asked him about his efforts to pack the commission with members friendly to Nevada. “Wow, that is amazing, that a majority leader who has a responsibility of selecting people would have some opinion as to who he suggests to the White House,” he said.

Welcome, Micky The Sparks Nugget put Mickey Gilley’s name and photo on a billboard to announce his appearance. And just to welcome him properly as he approaches the Nugget on the offramp that leads to the new club bearing his name, his name on the billboard is misspelled.

—Dennis Myers

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Nettled Nevadans battle over regulating internet U.S. Sens. Dean Heller and Harry Reid are both key players in the battle over net neutrality, but their home state seems by unmoved by the issue. Dennis Myers “Not off the top of my head,” said Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada director Bob Fulkerson, when asked if he knew of anyone involved in the issue. Net neutrality is a governing principle that governments and internet service providers and governments should handle all data equally, without imposing higher prices or otherwise treating anyone different for different methods of data

“Net neutrality goes against years of sound internet policy.” U.S. Sen. Dean Heller nevada republican delivery. It is net neutrality that has prevented providers from speeding up or slowing down content or blocking it, with some users getting preferential treatment—and also prevented providers from charging for faster delivery speed. When the web is neutral, a homemaker’s information travels at the same speed as Citicorp’s. And neutrality requires regulation—on an unregulated web, service providers can discriminate and provide different speeds at different prices. Critics of net neutrality call an unregulated

internet “open.” If a proposal by the Federal Communications Commission is approved equality of rates could change and service providers could jack up rates. The FCC says it will keep the internet “open” by not allowing service providers to block or slow access—that’s the sweetener that precedes the but—and then renders that pledge meaningless by also saying that it will allow service providers to charge more for being in a fast lane instead of a slow lane. This is called “paid prioritization” in order to keep the process as puzzling as possible to the ordinary customer. At a time when information is a commercial commodity—one of the most important, in fact—discriminating on who gets what information when can determine a lot for users. The late Nelson Mandela said that “eliminating the distinction between the information-rich and informationpoor is also critical to eliminating economic and other inequalities.” Heller opposes net neutrality and wants the net completely unregulated, which would free up providers to charge more speed. He defined his position in a Nov. 9, 2011 statement: “Net neutrality goes against years of sound internet policy, led by both Democrats and Republicans, to leave the internet virtually unregulated that has ushered in an era of wonderful innovation and billions in private investment in infrastructure.”

Last month, Sen. Dean Heller and fellow Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin said the FCC should butt out of regulating the web except to the extent permitted by Congress: “For the third time in less than a decade, the FCC is trying to regulate the internet in some fashion. Many are discussing whether the proposal the FCC chairman has outlined does enough to regulate the internet. This is misguided. The conversation should focus on if we need any regulation at all, especially without a demonstrated market failure. ... The FCC should respect its regulatory limits and Congress should do its job to address these concerns. In the meantime, any policy adopted by the FCC should continue to respect the ‘light touch’ regime that has led to industry investment and a thriving Internet ecosystem.” According to OpenSecrets.org, Heller has received at least $86,000 from contributors in the communications/electronics sector. In 2011, Reid and Heller voted on opposite sides of a move to prohibit an FCC net neutrality rule from taking effect. The rule prohibited broadband service providers from blocking content or applications. Reid voted no, Heller yes.

Leader? When Reid, the Democratic floor leader, first took that post, he spent considerable time cultivating the blogosphere, which tends to support neutrality. But in more recent years he has neglected that constituency, which now is concerned about whether he stands with them. Reid can decide whether or not to allow a vote on the issue in the Senate. Reid’s opposite number in the House, Nancy Pelosi, is regarded as more forceful in seeking to preserve net neutrality—which isn’t saying a great deal, because Pelosi is no barn burner on the issue, either. “Democrats, by and large, have been stronger supporters of net neutrality, although Pelosi isn’t exploiting her leadership position to galvanize support for the cause,” reported Venture Beat last week. “[Reid] has largely avoided wading into tech policy so far,” the Washington Post reported last week. “To the extent that he’s gotten involved, it’s been to help undermine legislation on patents. And Congress is already lagging behind on a number of other tech issues, so it’s unlikely a net neutrality bill of any kind, for or against, will get to the president’s desk this year. There are other challenges,


too. It’s an election year, which makes compromise even more difficult in an already divided Congress. And asking Reid to weigh in rhetorically on net neutrality is largely an indirect form of pressure, as the FCC is an independent agency.” A number of supporters of neutrality, including Credo long distance service, MoveOn, and Daily Kos sent a letter to Reid last week: “We are writing to you today to urge you to join House Minority Leader Pelosi, more than a dozen members of the Senate Democratic caucus, dozens of members of the House of Representatives, hundreds of technology companies, non-profits, and activism organizations, as well as millions of Americans in demanding that the Federal Communications Commission reclassify broadband and implement strong Net Neutrality rules. We should treat the Internet as the public utility that it is—like water, telephones and electricity.” According to the Center for Public Integrity in 2010, “Reid’s most generous backer over the years, with at least $133,650 in contributions, is AT&T Inc. This includes contributions from the corporate PACs of companies now part of AT&T, such as BellSouth, Cingular and SBC. The telecommunications giant has good reason to like the Senate majority leader.” Last month AT&T said that if its $48 billion AT&T-DirecTV deal goes through, it will abide by net neutrality for only three years—that’s assuming the FCC proposal takes effect.

As for U.S. Rep. Mark Amodei, net neutrality is not an issue on which he has spoken out. A reader recently posted this message on his Facebook page: “In addition to posing for photo-ops could you perhaps sponsor legislation to force internet service providers to be classified as common carriers? Net neutrality has consistently been demonstrated to be important to your constituents, of which I am one, and this is not a partisan issue, at least based on existing party platforms (unless they’ve changed lately).”

“Weshouldtreatthe internetasthepublic utilitythatitis—like water,telephones,and electricity.” Net neutrality supporters Letter to U.s. sen. harry reid According to Open Secrets, of $145,300 Amodei has received in political action committee money in 2013-2014, $17,500 has come from the communications/electronic sector, or 12 percent of the total. Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden is reminding neutrality supporters that in 2012 they managed to kill two pieces of legislation—the Stop Online Piracy Act and PROTECT IP Act—by generating widespread opposition through internet activism. Ω

Seasonal reminder Photo/Dennis Myers

s tax Paygistneoredsinale California! if re r fees! Pay no buye GOVERNMENT AUTO AUCTIONS

Buy Direct...Open to the Public Sedans, Trucks, SUVs, Vans and More

Third Friday every month @ Brasher’s Sacramento Auto Auction

An animal control officer checked on the well being of a dog alone in a car at the Redfield Promenade center. Windows were partly rolled down but the aggrieved barks of the dog brought several concerned merchants to check on it and call Washoe County Regional Animal Services.

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ART OF THE STATE

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www.autoactions.gsa.gov • www.gsaauctions.gov www.brasherssac.com

www.autoactions.gsa.gov • www.brasherssac.com FILM

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JUNE 12, 2014

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42 MPG HWY.

DUMP THE PUMP! Thursday, June 19

RIDE the bus FREE on June 19. Save Gas & Money & Help the Environment. Win Prizes.*

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*Register at: www.rtcwashoe.greenride.com This is Your RTC.

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• Bike • Walk


Photo/Sage Leehey

University of Nevada, Reno faculty and students work together on cyber infrastructure for the Solar Nexus Project.

Elevate Your Palate July 11-12, 2014 Wine Tastings Cooking Competition Wine Dinners Food & Wine Seminars Live & Silent Auctions Burger Battle (405 vs. the 395)

Solar plans Statewide research project into solar energy With recent news that it might just be too late to stop Antarctic ice from melting, renewable energy has become even more important. And Nevada’s higher education entities are currently working on a large project to research and by Sage Leehey develop better solar panels. The Solar Nexus Project focuses on research and development within s age l@ the solar energy field and is funded by the National Science Foundation’s news review.c om Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). It has three main components: scientific research into solar energy, cyber infrastructure research and development and finally, education and workforce development. Last year—year one of the project—was used mainly for implementation, hiring and getting those involved acclimated to the project, according to EPSCoR director Lori Brazfield. “The mission of the Nexus project is to advance knowledge and discovery through research on solar energy generation technology, its environmental impacts and associated water issues, and accelerate this research by developing new capabilities in cyber infrastructure,” Brazfield said. Researchers are working to reduce the need for water in solar panels in order to try to conserve water in a desert state and to make panels more efficient and advanced. The project will also bring a new solar facility to Nevada where extensive research can be done. “What that will have is a hands-on laboratory with real time solar panels that students can work on and develop and hone the skills that are needed for the future to then sustain these solar panels to be used throughout the nation,” Brazfield said. “And international collaborations can come to this site to do research to then develop other countries and opportunities for solar power.” The cyber infrastructure piece of the project handles data—from collecto learn more, visit tion to processing—and development of tools for this technology and data http://nvsolarnexus. collection. Sergiu Dascalu, Ph.D. is the principal investigator and leader for org. the University of Nevada, Reno for cyber infrastructure in this project. “We collect the data,” Dascalu said. “The data is stored in our databases, which are located here on campus at UNR, and we have servers that process the data because data in itself is very precious. It’s like the gold for the miners, but you have to dig it to find out what it means, what forecasting can be done with it, what if scenarios. So computer science is about data collection, transport, storage, curation because we have to maintain data, label data, trace where it comes from, and then process it with visual analytics.” The data comes from towers around the state that collect data like wind speeds, temperatures and soil moisture, according to Fred Harris, Jr., co-leader for cyber infrastructure at UNR. The project uses the Nevada Seismology Lab’s mountaintop towers for transmission of the data. As for the education portion of the project, there are summer research opportunities available for community college students, academic opportunities throughout the school year for university students, a 12-week series that brings scientists to speak to high school students each fall about their fields and the data is available to teachers—mostly middle school because of their curriculum—to use in their classrooms. Brazfield also has funding to reach out to the solar energy industry to provide paid internships for students. Ω OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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Use CODE RNR20 at checkout—Receive $20 off items $100 or more thru June 20!

ARE YOU

OR

?

Whether you are Even or Odd, it is always important to know when to water. See below for your three watering days per week, according to your address. For information on how to care for your landscaping, go to www.tmwa.com/oddeven.

FILM

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Hot Days, Hotter Nights by br ad bynum, sage leehe y and dennis myers

A dAy-by-dAy cAlendAr for your summer summer is right around the corner, and we’ve put together a calendar with something for you to do every day in the reno /tahoe area. most of these suggestions don’t actually need to be done on the day they’re listed. try as many as you can and have a great summer.

July 2

take a hike For a real hike, try walking the Jumbo Grade from New Washoe City to Virginia City. If you make it to the top, before starting down into VC, you’ll be able to see a panorama of nearly all the Comstock Lode communities.

July 3

listen to local music Every once in a while, we’ll bump into some jackass who can’t name a single local musical artist or band. These people say dumb things like, “There’s a music scene here?” If this is you, you need to get down and get with it. No matter what kind of music you like—hip-hop, punk rock, dubstep, folk, jazz, whatever— there are top-notch groups in the local scene. Just poke around on the internet a bit on sites like Facebook and Bandcamp to discover stuff. Or, you know, read the RN&R.

July 4

set oFF some Fireworks June 21

Float down the truckee river A local tradition—but, geez, the water level is looking low. You’ll probably end up bruising your backside on a rock or two.

June 22

apply For a medical marijuana prescription You know what can really put a cramp in your summer? Actual physical cramps. Or cancer, glaucoma, AIDS, post-traumatic stress disorder, or any medical condition that causes significant weight loss, persistent muscle spasms, seizures, severe nausea or pain. Don’t let physical ailments debilitate your summer. You know what will make your summer more enjoyable? Weed.

June 23

read a nevada book Visiting our area is all well and good, but read about it, too. Start with some recent Nevada titles available at Sundance Books at the corner of Sierra Street and California Avenue: Atomic Comics by Ferenc Morton Szasz, At Pyramid Lake by Bernard Mergen, Seeing Underground by Eric C. Nystrom, Saving Lake Tahoe by Michael J. Makley, The Main Event by Richard O. Davies.

June 24

Go To The Black Rock Desert if you’ve only ever been to the bl ack rock deser t during burning man, you’ve mis sed how amazing the pl ace is the res t of the year. al so, it makes the bright ins anit y of burning man seem more impres sive when you’ve al so experienced the deser t as an empt y c anvas.

June 26

If there are Nevada book titles you can’t find at Sundance, turn to the Nevada Historical Society at 1650 N. Virginia St., whose store includes a lot of Nevada books. While there, take in the museum’s current and permanent exhibits. State government budget cuts have reduced its hours, but it’s still open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

JUNE 12, 2014

June 29

have a laugh

mow the lawn

Humorist David Sedaris will speak and sign his book Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls at Sundance Books, 121 California Avenue, Thursday, June 26 at 6:30 p.m.

But you live in an apartment, you say? You have no lawn to mow? Well, there are fat and lazy folks among us—even here at the RN&R headquarters—who would love it if you just called us up and said, “Hey man, I’m in the mood to do some yard work. Think I can come over to your place and do some chores?” Yep, that’s a phone call we’d love to receive.

June 27

go to the rodeo Reno’s rodeo runs from June 19 to 28 this year with rodeo events, drinking and carnival fun throughout the day and evening each day. It starts at 4 p.m. throughout the week and 12 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

June 28

more books

12   |  RN&R   | 

june 25

visit saFe embrace Safe Embrace, a program for domestic abuse victims, holds an open house at its headquarters at 1570 Linda Way on Sat. June 28 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. See the unveiling of Safe Embrace’s new logo, enjoy appetizers and activities, and enter a raffle.

June 30

learn about sparks history The Sparks Museum & Cultural Center— formerly the Sparks Heritage Museum at the corner of Victorian and Pyramid—celebrates the rail city. Its current exhibit is “One Is Silver, the Other Is Gold: Celebrating 25 Years of Nevada Folklife Apprenticeships,” but its permanent exhibits are also interesting.

July 1

go to an artown event Artown takes over the Reno/Sparks area for the entire month of July. It’s become a huge event with hundreds of thousands of attendees each year. For a complete listing of this year’s events, visit www.renoisartown.com.

It’s the Fourth of July, and shooting off colorful explosions into the sky is super fun. It’s illegal to set off unsanctioned fireworks in Washoe County, so head elsewhere. Or be careful.

July 5

walking tours The Historic Reno Preservation Society has 28 walking tours, dealing with topics from the city’s mob past to its churches to the notable works of prominent architects. Info is at www. HistoricReno.org.

July 6

take a drive If you’re into “Sunday drive”-type outings, one of the most gorgeous drives is a less familiar route to Lake Tahoe from Minden to Woodfords to Meyers. Take a camera.

july 7

Go To Pyramid Lake tahoe is for poseurs. real nevadans l ove tahoe’s weirder, spookier sis ter l ake at the other end of the truckee river. it ’s on tribal l and, so you hel p out the p yramid l ake paiute tribe with ever y day use pas s ( $ 6 ) or f ishing l icense ( $ 9 for one day ). visit pl pt.nsn.us for more info.


July 8

actually really fun. Or rally a posse to go day drinking at the local watering holes and then pose for Wild West dress-up pictures. Plus, it’s usually about 10 degrees cooler up at V.C.

July 14

Go to a farmers’ market

Go to the Water park

Sparks stakes its claim with several. The Sparks United Methodist Church farmers’ markets started on June 4 and will run every Tuesday morning through September 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The downtown farmers’ market is held every Thursday evening during the summer starting June 12, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Head over to Wild Island Family Adventure Park for a day of fun with the family. The water park is open daily from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at this time—as long as the weather doesn’t turn. There’s also bowling inside, indoor and outdoor mini golf, a lazer maze and other activities.

July 10

Wander around midtoWn

If you’re looking to skate, arguably the best skate park in Nevada is located at 1324 Waterloo Lane in Gardnerville. It’s just about an hour outside of Reno.

July 29

play in the children’s fountain

July 22

Get Naked

There’s an overabundance of homeless pets at shelters and otherwise in the area. Visit the Nevada Humane Society, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or another shelter or rescue and take home your own furry family member.

eat in the street

A gem in downtown Sparks is the Children’s Fountain in front of the downtown Century Sparks 14 movie theaters. If you have children, they’ll love playing in the streams of water that shoot up out of the ground.

July 30

Visit Berlin-ichthyosaur state park

July 17

Hit up the food trucks at Reno Street Food and grab some quick, yummy local grub. They’re at Idlewild Park every Friday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

July 12

Walk the truckee There is an unbroken—well, perhaps that’s too strong a word; there are a few jogs and shimmies—walk along the Truckee River from west Reno to east Sparks. If you walk with a friend, it may involve arranging car placement at each end of the route. As an alternative, take municipal bus routes 16 or 3 from downtown Reno to their westernmost points and start your hikes from there—McCarran Boulevard in the case of 3, Idlewild Park on 16. Then walk along the river to McCarran in Sparks, where you will be near route 18, which can take you back to downtown Reno. Bus schedules and maps are at www.rtcwashoe.com/ public-transportation-88.

July 13

Go to the flea market

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FEATURE STORY

Go hang around Nevada’s state fossil—the ichthyosaur. The highest concentration of them is at this park.

try a neW food It’s all too easy to get set in your ways as far as food goes, consistently eating the same dishes, dining out at the same handful of restaurants, ordering the same things, never attempting anything more exotic than adding cheese to your burger. But there’s a whole world of food out there, and there is a surprising number of options here in Reno. For example, did you know that Reno has an Ethiopian restaurant? Yep, it’s Zagol, 855 E. Fourth St., 786-9020.

July 23

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July 31

Visit squaW Valley

take a nap

Squaw Valley was the site of a Winter Olympics back in the day when those events could be held without destroying the environment, so on a trip there for lunch, you’ll find that it is a beautiful valley. There are special events during the summer, plus a scenic tram, tennis, hiking.

July 18

Go outside. Put on the sunscreen, flop down in a hammock or on a picnic blanket, and just doze off.

August 1

read in the quad

July 24

try an aWful aWful

eat at campo

Since we have a regionally well-known burger, take advantage of it. The Awful Awful is available at four locations—Carson Nugget, Reno Nugget, Sparks Nugget, and the Wolf Den in Reno. For a guide to the Awful Awful, see “The Awful Awful truth” at www.newsreview.com/ reno/PrintFriendly?oid=10376879.

Grab some Italian grub here and then meander around the Riverwalk. It’s lively and fun this time of year. Campo is at 50 N. Sierra St., 737-9555.

Pick up a camera—any one you’ve got lying around will do, even if it’s just your phone— and take pictures. Life looks different through the lens.

The Riverwalk District puts on Wine Walks every third Saturday of each month. Get out and get tipsy with your friends. For dates and more information, visit www.renoriver.org.

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Reno’s been known for quick and easy “I dos” for many years, and there are still a number of chapels in town and up at Lake Tahoe that are great for inexpensive nuptials.

Not all the art in Reno is in museums. A notable sculpture is the Basque monument “Bakardade” (“Solitude”) north of the McCarran ring road, and northwest of the intersection of McCarran Boulevard and Virginia Street. The rendering of a Basque shepherd and his lamb by Nestor Basterrechea was dedicated on August 29, 1989 after a public fundraising campaign in the U.S. and Europe. Some folks have lunch in the area. For a look at another piece of

There are wacky events, like camel races, outhouse races, and Civil War reenactments, at Virginia City throughout the summer, but it’s a fun place to visit even when there’s not an event. Take the kids and stroll the boardwalk, eating fudge and cotton candy, and explaining the dumb jokes on the tacky T-shirts at the tourist trap shops. That’s |

Get married!

see the Basque monument

Go to VirGinia city

ARTS&CULTURE

August 3

July 26

July 20

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August 2 Start the evening by stopping down the street at 1356 Prater Way for dinner at the drive-in. Scoopers Drive-In started its life as an A&W but for almost 30 years it has been locally owned.

take some photos

attend a Wine Walk

If you’re craving a more relaxing day, grab a good book and take a seat in the big green quad at the University of Nevada, Reno. You can make a day of it with a friend and pack a picnic, too.

Go to the driVe-in

July 25

July 19

If you want to find some fun weird stuff—black velvet paintings of Elvis, back issues of Penthouse, or stereo systems with built-in 8-track players—then El Rancho Drive-In, 555 El Rancho Drive, Sparks, is the spot. You can find great bargains: 20 steak knifes for $2, or a microwave for $5, or an unopened Region 4 DVD copy of Iron Man 3 for $1. And come back in the evening for a double bill of movies. But the best thing about this flea market is that, with its international ambiance, you’ll swear you’re actually somewhere far and distant from Reno. And you know what? You’ll be right. Sparks, son!

GREEN

it ’s going to be hot out side. is there real ly any reason to wear cl othes ?

adopt a pet

July 11

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July 28

skate it out

July 16

Midtown boasts good restaurants, like Süp, good retail spots, like Recycled Records, and good watering holes, like Chapel Tavern—all in walking distance. It's an area of town to just wander around and have a good time. Way better than a trip out to one of those hellish suburban malls.

NEWS

There’s something calming about being in a library. Take a break, read some books you normally wouldn’t or just people-watch.

It’s a great day to be outside. Power off the cell phone and other electronics, take a hike, ride your bike, lay out—just get out and away from the constant ring ring.

For an overnight on the Comstock, you could stay at the Gold Hill Hotel, which puts you smack in the middle—Silver City on one side of you, Virginia City on the other. Even if you don’t stay at the hotel, its restaurant and longtime lecture and entertainment series make for nice evening trips. The schedule of the lecture series is at www.GoldHillHotel.net.

No-brainer. It’s become an essential Reno summer activity. Side question: Is it weird to love the Aces but hate their Major League affiliate, the Diamondbacks?

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Go to the liBrary

poWer off

Go to the Gold hill hotel

Go to an aces Game

OPINION

July 27

July 21

July 15

July 9

Basterrechea’s work, head down the hill to the library at the University of Nevada, Reno, where his “Orreaga” sits.

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“Hot Days, Hotter Nights” continued on page 15 |

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“Hot Days, Hotter Nights”

August 9

continued from page 13

August 4

eat at t’s mesquite rOtisserie

write sOmething

and the railrOad museum

Go swimming in Tahoe, work up a healthy appetite, and then stop off at this place for a burrito. It’s at 901 Tahoe Blvd, Incline Village.

A sonnet is 14 lines of 10 syllables each, usually alternating stressed and unstressed syllables. A haiku is a line of five syllables, a line of seven syllables and a line of five syllables. Or write a good, old fashioned handwritten letter to your grandmother or to a prison pen pal, or to your friendly neighborhood weekly newspaper. Just put pen to paper.

Of course, if you want to get really serious about railroads, there’s the Nevada Railroad Museum in Carson City. There are 65 pieces of rolling stock in the collection, many of which appeared in movies and television series.

August 10

…Or tOss the ring And if your marriage didn’t quite work out, you can toss your ring to the fish of the Truckee from the Virginia Street Bridge on Virginia Street between Court and First streets. There’s a legend that women used to throw their rings into the river after getting a divorce at the courthouse down the street.

August 5

Visit the mining museum

let the dOgs Out The Reno area is full of great dog parks and trails for your four-legged friend. Summer is a great time to get them out of them out to see the world behind your neighborhood. For a guide to some of these parks and trials, read “Fun with Fido” at http:// www.newsreview.com/reno/fun-with-fido/ content?oid=13390660.

August 6

August 26

August 19

gO tO deer Park

eat at JaCk’s Café

dOnate ClOthing

A Sparks landmark is Jack’s Café, 2200 Victorian Ave., which we like to keep mentioning because it’s one of the few places in the valley that offers a fried egg sandwich.

We’ve all heard of spring cleaning, but why not some summer cleaning? Go through your closet and donate some of your duds to a local charity.

August 27

Play frisbee

Visit ZePhyr COVe resOrt

Because it’s there. If that seems too strenuous, you might try Rattlesnake.

We can’t think of a better place to be than out on the water when the temperature climbs. Wakeboarding and skiing are good ways to have fun—and stay in shape—during your summer days.

On the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe, visit the Zephyr Cove Resort for lunch and swimming. If you’re up for an overnight, there are 28 cabins for rent, which will make it easier to take an evening cruise to Emerald Bay aboard the Tahoe Queen or the M.S. Dixie II, which dock at the resort.

it ’s summer, so it ’s time to work on that t an. there are tons of beaches, bal conies, roof s and l awns that are great for jus t hanging out and get ting bronzed in the area.

August 13

Visit an adult stOre

set new gOals While you have some time to reflect in the summer sun, think about what you want to do in the next weeks, months, years, etc. Write it down to keep yourself accountable.

Visit Virginia lake Park

OPINION

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In 1937, the New Deal built Virginia Lake, 1980 Lakeside Drive, in south Reno. It was made five-and-a-half feet deep for safe swimming and wading, which officialdom now bans, but it serves nicely for round-the-lake walks, feeding the ducks—another thing the city disapproves of—and fishing.

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FILM

If you haven’t been paying attention, the beer scene in Reno has really blown up in the last couple of years. Longstanding staples like Silver Peak and Great Basin have been joined by upstarts like Brewer’s Cabinet, Brasserie St. James and Under the Rose. At least one other new brewery, Pigeon Head, is opening sometime this summer. Track down some poor sap to be your DD and try to sample all the local brews. Remember to drink water as well as beer.

August 29

learn a new language

Visit sand mOuntain

Maybe learning a whole language is a bit much, but pick up a book on the language you’ve been meaning to learn and just start learning.

It’s really kind of amazing—you’re driving along Highway 50 in Churchill County and suddenly there’s a mountain of sand alongside the road. If you happened to drive back past it a few hours later, you discover that it has shifted shape dramatically in just that period of time. Sand Mountain is about 600 feet high and a couple of miles long. It’s a federal recreation area. Details at http://tinyurl.com/ mh5f48b.

There are children’s railroads in Mills Park in Carson City and Idlewild Park in Reno. In both cases, while you’re at the parks, there are also other facilities available—a skateboard park in Carson, for instance, and a rose garden in Idlewild. In Reno, the railroad adjoins a Lions Club children’s park.

Drive out to the middle of nowhere with a blanket and some friends or a lover, pull out a laptop and watch an old favorite.

ART OF THE STATE

On the California side of Lake Tahoe, the Hellman-Ehrman estate was built in the days when rich folks created graceful summer homes with broad lawns, outlying buildings, boats and other trappings like tennis courts. Today it is Sugar Pine Point State Park and there are campsites, a picnic area, beach and dock. One caution: Bears have recently been frequenting the place, so use of the sealable food lockers provided is required. Details at www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=510.

gO tO Children’s railrOads

watCh a mOVie under the stars

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gO On a lOCal brewery tOur

August 23

August 16

ARTS&CULTURE

August 28

Visit sugar Pine POint state Park

August 22

August 15

GET A TAN

There’s a Frisbee golf course up at Rancho San Rafael. Or, you can play Ultimate Frisbee just about anywhere. There’s a cabbie in Reno, Russ Lopez, who has developed a new Frisbee game played on a baseball diamond. Give him a call at 240-7454 next time you need a lift and let him explain the rules on the way to the airport. Or you can just toss a Frisbee to your son, your dad, your labradoodle or whatever.

August 21

We talk a lot about supporting local businesses, but don’t talk enough about supporting the sexy establishments. Suzie’s, 195 Kietzke Lane, 786-8557, is a perennial favorite among RN&R readers. Now’s as good a time as ever to buy a new vibrator or a porno movie. Spend the rest of the day masturbating. You’ve earned it.

August 14

august 8

Deer Park at the corner of Prater and Rock is one of the gems of downtown Sparks. There are picnic tables, tall trees, grills, and a swimming pool.

August 20

gO wakebOarding Or skiing

Learn about Western Nevada history at the tribal museum at Nixon. There are exhibits on archeology, natural history, Native American women, heroic tribal members. Arts and crafts are available for sale.

While in Carson City, stop in at Mom & Pop’s Diner, the kind of restaurant that the term diner suggests. The eggs Benedict is highly recommended. 224 S. Carson St., Carson City, 884-4411.

Summer is a great time to be in the sun and drinking beer. Get your family or friends together for some drunken bonding.

Climb mOunt rOse

Visit the tribal museum in nixOn

eat at mOm & POP’s diner

hOst a beer POng tOurnament

August 12

August 7

August 25

August 18

August 11

The Mackay School of Mines at UNR has a mining museum that will show you more than rocks. There are antique maps, vintage photos, actual mining equipment. And if you DO like rocks, well, there are surely plenty of them.

August 24

August 17

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.99 9 0 1 $

14 Unlimited 20 its is V rk pa Water for Ages 4+

Wild Island is more fun and a better value than ever before! In fact, a pass pays for itself in only four visits, is valid through September, and comes with tons of benefits including early park entry and cabana discounts. Get your pass today and check out our new eStore where it is easier than ever to purchase passes and manage them online.

r benefits! Many othe

Waterpark • Coconut Bowl

Laser Mazes • High Ballocity • Mini Golf • Go Karts

wildisland.com Passes, 2014 Summer Schedule and More

Season passes are valid only during normal operating hours. Pools, slides and all water attractions not accessible until 11 a.m. Prices and hours subject to change without notice. Wild Island does not issue rainchecks for inclement weather and maintains a No Refund Policy. Personal checks are not accepted.

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“Hot Days, Hotter Nights”

viSit tHe laSt reno arcH

continued on page 17

August 30

Go to Sierra Hot SprinGS Fun day trip if you’re in the mood for some hippie New Age restoration. Nice place to soak your bones in some hot and powerful spring water. You might have to make small talk about crystals, vegetarian food or Buddhism, but worth it. Visit www.sierrahotsprings.org for more info.

September 17

Book Gallery at 1203 Rock Blvd, Sparks, and, in Reno, Five Dog Books at 906 Holcomb Ave., and Grassroots Books at 660 E. Grove St.

September 4 Take a trip to Willits, a lumber town in northern California and see the Willits arch, which once read “BIGGEST LITTLE CITY IN THE WORLD” and now reads “GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS”. It was featured in the Hilary Swank/Jason Robards movie Heartwood. While in Willits, you can ride the Skunk Train from the 1915 depot through redwood forests to the coast and back, visit the ranch where Seabiscuit spent his retirement, and—should a Nevadan feel the need—visit a casino.

play Hide-and-Seek Grab some friends and play one of those games you haven’t played since you were a kid. Hideand-seek, sardines, capture the flag and tag games are great ways to treat your inner child.

September 9

learn to play an inStrument What better time is there to learn than now? Figure it out for yourself, grab a friend or catch some lessons.

September 18

Buy a StranGer a drink

September 10

And not because you want to bang them. Just to be friendly.

tHrow a HouSe party Don’t forget to invite the editors of the RN&R. We’re great at parties. Especially Dennis.

SeptemBer 19

Ride Your Bike

September 11

cook a full meal

pack a l unch or grab some piz z a from piz ano’s downtown. then make your way to the park and people watch while you enjoy your meal and the weather.

Take the time to plan out an entire meal to cook from scratch. It might sound like a lot of work, but food sure tastes better when you’ve spent your own time on it.

September 12

viSit carSon Hot SprinGS Carson Hot Springs, formerly Shaw’s Hot Springs, is on the north side of Carson City (1500 Hot Springs Road) and features a large outdoor pool and patio plus private rooms, the temperature of each room’s pool different. Massage is available. Details at www.carsonhotspringsresort.com.

auGuSt 31

Picnic Downtown September 1

Jump out of a plane Skydiving is one of those things that’s on most of our bucket lists. Cross that item off today. A quick Google search will turn up tons of companies and locations nearby that will help you set this up.

September 5

read city of tremBlinG leaveS

Sure, you’ve been to Wingfield. You know all about Rancho San Rafael and Idelwild Park. But have you been to Manzanita Park? Whitaker Park? Pah Rah Mountain Park? There are a bunch of great parks in the valley. Today’s a good day to visit one you’ve never been to before.

You live in Reno but you’ve never read by Walter Van Tilburg Clark’s famous book about the city?

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This little vegetarian haunt has been around for so long now that it’s easy to take it for granted. Back when it opened, back in 10 million BC or 1849 or 1988 or something, the idea of a mostly vegetarian restaurant was totally novel. It’s still worth a visit, especially when it’s hot outside and a cool drink is required. 501 W. First St., 786-8888.

The Fleischmann Planetarium on the UNR campus shows star shows and full-dome movies, great for a fun day under the stars.

September 22

try crack cocaine

September 16

Or maybe just get an ice cream cone. It’s up to you. It’s your life. It’s your summer.

take a day trip to a Gold ruSH community

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“Hot Days, Hotter Nights”

Grass Valley and Nevada City are among the most common daytrips for western Nevadans. The two gold rush communities offer upscale shopping and lodging. Restaurants, used book and record stores, wine tasting, art galleries, entertainment, are among the things offered.

The valley has suffered a loss of some of its used bookstores lately (Dharma Books, Zephyr Books, Subject Matter Books, and the Paperback Exchange), which makes those that remain all the more important. Check out the

ARTS&CULTURE

eat at pneumatic diner

viSit tHe planetarium

viSit a uSed Book Store

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September 15

September 8

For some of us, summer is all about smoke and meat. For others, it’s vegetarian shish kebab.

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watcH tHe miSfitS

You live in Reno but you’ve never heard Johnny Cash’s famous song that briefly mentions the city? That seems unlikely, but ponder one of life’s great mysteries: If he shot a man in Reno, then why is he serving time in a California prison?

BarBecue

OPINION

September 6

liSten to “folSom priSon BlueS”

September 3

Paint a plein art landscape, or assemble a found object sculpture, or coordinate a dance performance, or write a song. No artistic ambitions or creativity? Then buy a local artist’s work.

There are multiple places to show off your Elton John in downtown Reno on any given night. But here’s a tip: You might practice at home before you sing to a crowded bar. There’s nothing worse than on-a-whim deciding that you want to sing, say, Springsteen’s “Dancing in the Dark” and then getting up there and realizing that a.) you don’t really remember how it goes, and b.) you’re too drunk to read the teleprompter.

September 7

The Great Basin Film Society, now called Artemesia Moviehouse, has for many years entertained locals with fine films. While they seem to have reduced revivals on their schedule, there are still plenty of current serious movies. See the schedule at www. artemisiamovies.org/.

make Some art

SinG karaoke

You live in Reno but you’ve never seen John Huston’s famous movie set in the city?

See a film witH artemeSia movieHouSe

September 20

September 14

Go to a park

September 2

if you don’t have one al ready the reno Bike projec t c an hel p you out. they’re l oc ated at 5 41 e. 4th St.

September 13

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Su, 6/29, 8am-6pm. $30-$40. Circus Circus, 500 N. Sierra St., 323-9238, www.rage-con.com. RENO ROCKABILLY RIOT: The annual hot rod show and celebration of rockabilly music and culture includes contests, drag races, entertainment, vendors, poker walk and the Rockabilly Beer Crawl. Th-Su through 6/29. Opens 6/26. The Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave., 291-5008, www.renorockabillyriot.com.

Events Events 19TH ANNUAL BBQ, BREWS AND BLUES: The event is equal parts barbecue block party, a micro-brew tasting event and music festival. John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band and Friends, Tommy Castro & The Painkillers, and more will perform. F, 6/20, 2-8pm; Sa, 6/21, 11am-8pm. Free. Eldorado Resort Casino, 345 N. Virginia St., 786-5700, www.eldoradoreno.com.

BEST IN THE WEST NUGGET RIB COOK-OFF: Rib cookers from across the nation will compete for prizes and the title of the “Best in the West” at the annual cook-off. M, W-Su through 9/1. Opens 8/27. Free. Victorian Ave. 14th Street to Pyramid Way, Sparks, 356-3300, www.nuggetribcookoff.com. BURNING MAN: The annual social experiment and expression of art and counterculture culminates in the burning of the Man. M-Su through 9/1. Opens 8/25. $380. Black Rock Desert, Northeast Of Gerlach in Black Rock, (415)864-5263, www.burningman.com. HOT AUGUST NIGHTS: The classic car event features show 'n’ shines, drag races, concerts, a swap meet, sock hop, prom and classic car auction. Tu-Su 7/29 through 8/3. Opens 7/29.

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Free for most events. Locations vary. 356-1956, www.hotaugustnights.net.

LAKE TAHOE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL: The 2014 season commences with Shakespeare’s romantic comedy As You Like It. M-Su, 7:30pm 7/11 through 8/24.; Sa, 9/6, 6:30pm. $15-$200. Sand Harbor State Park, 2005 Hwy. 28, Incline Village, (800) 747-4697, laketahoeshakespeare.com.

RENO STREET FOOD: PARTY IN THE PARK: More than 20 food trucks gather at Idlewild Park for the weekly event. F, 5-9pm through 10/3. Idlewild Park, 1900 Idlewild Dr., 825-2665, www. facebook.com/RenoStreetFood.

NEVADA HUMANITIES CHAUTAUQUA FESTIVAL: Nevada Humanities presents the 23rd annual Chautauqua celebration. Gates open at 5pm music starts at 6pm, and Chautauqua presentations begin at 7 p.m. Tu-Th, 5pm 6/24 through 6/26. Opens 6/24. $10-$25 for evening performances. Free for children age 12 and younger. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Rd., 784-6587, www.nevadahumanities.org. PIRATE CRAWL: Join thousands of pirates downtown Reno at 20 participating bars. Sa, 7/12, 8pm. $5. Harrah’s Reno, 219 N. Center St., 3429565, piratecrawl.com. RAGECON GAMERS CONVENTION: Attendees can play, watch and take home a variety of board games. Games include board, card, role-playing and miniature tabletop games. F, 6/27, noon-midnight; Sa, 6/28, 8-midnight;

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SAMPLE THE SIERRA-FARM TO FORK FESTIVAL: The festival pairs local farmers with chefs who produce tasting samples, which are then paired with the appropriate wine or brew. Su, 8/31, 12-5pm. $30 in advance. Bijou Community Park, 1099 Al Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, (775) 588-1728 ext. 303, www.samplethesierra.com. STAR SPANGLED SPARKS: The region’s longest, most spectacular fireworks display is set off from the roof of the Nugget. F, 7/4, 4pm. Free. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave., 14th Street to Pyramid Way in Sparks, 356-3300, janugget.com. STEAMPUNK TAVERN STROLL: A new bar crawl in Midtown. There will be drink specials, actors representing Reno’s Victorian-era history, and more. Sa, 7/19, 8pm. $10 for a premium crawl mug. 1864 Tavern, 290 California Ave., (775) 342-9565.

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Art METRO GALLERY AT RENO CITY HALL: Behind the Scenes. Award-winning photographer Jeff Ross behind-thescenes looks at local, regional and international artists. M-F 6/16 through 8/1. Free. 1 E. First St., 334-2417. STREMMEL GALLERY: Wolf Kahn. M-Sa through 8/2. Opens 6/19. Free. 1400 S. Virginia St., 786-0558, www.stremmelgallery.com. NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Italian Baroque: Paintings from the Haukohl Family Collection, through 7/6. Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art, through 8/31. Chemigrams: Nolan Preece, through 8/10. Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez. Stephen Galloway: Place/No Place, through 7/6. Davey Hawkins: Eagle Brand, through 7/6. Helga Griffiths: Brainscape, through 9/28. Stellar Axis: Lita Albuquerque, 8/30 through 1/4. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., 3293333, www.nevadaart.org.

Music 24TH ANNUAL HIGH SIERRA MUSIC FESTIVAL: The music festival features Widespread Panic, Lauryn Hill, Beats Antique, Lord Huron, Del McCoury Band, Chris Robinson Brotherhood, The Budos Band, among others. 7/3-7/6, $75-$222.50, Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds, 204 Fairground Rd., Quincy, (530) 283-6272, www. highsierramusic.com.

ARTOWN PRESENTS LOS LONELY BOYS: Artown presents the

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American-Chicano rock trio. Th, 7/10, 7:30pm. $35-$45. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Rd., 322-1538, www.renoisartown. com. BIGGEST LITTLE MUSIC FESTIVAL: REDUX: This family-friendly concert features Moondog Matinee, Beatles Flashback, Slide Mountain Band, Kung Fu Sophie, Rock Shop, Electric Catfish the Band, Mason Frey, Nicole Oh, The NoteAbles, and more than 60 members of Note-Able Music Therapy Services’ programs. Sa, 7/5, 2pm. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., 324-5521. AN EVENING WITH DON MCLEAN: The singer-songwriter performs as part of Artown. Th, 7/31, 7:30pm. $35-$45. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Rd., 322-1538, www.renoisartown.com. AN EVENING WITH JUDY COLLINS: The folk singer performs as part of Artown. Th, 7/24, 7:30pm. $35-$45. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Rd., 322-1538, www.renoisartown.com. ROLLIN’ ON THE RIVER: The RN&R holds its annual concert series. F, 5:30pm 7/4 through 7/25. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., 324-4440.

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA RENO FACULTY JAZZ: Su, 7/20, 2:30pm. Free. St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, 341 Village Blvd., Incline Village, (775) 2980075, www.tahoechambermusic.org.

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Last month, our movie critic worked through his mommy issues. Now, it’s daddy time.

ouR FaTHeRs By Bob Grimm • bgrimm@newsreview.com

A

s I did with movie moms this past Mother’s Day, I have compiled a list of my favorite movie dads.

Again, I’m avoiding some of the obvious yet beloved ones—Darth Vader, The Godfather, John Ritter

Royal Tenenbaum (Gene Hackman) in The Royal Tenenbaums:

My all time favorite movie dad, this guy fakes cancer to get back into his children’s lives. His big mistake: Choosing stomach cancer as his staged affliction, then constantly gorging on cheeseburgers and fries.

lel and PalmeR

in the Problem Child movies—in

(Ray Wise) in Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me:

favor of some more fringe choices.

Leland was pretty naughty and a little scary on the TV show, but when David Lynch took the land of Twin Peaks to the big screen, Leland became the worst dad ever.

I do this with the hope that you will access some of these f ilms, watch, enjoy, and think of me. Or my dad. Yeah, go ahead and think about my dad. He’s still alive, and he took me to see a lot of these f licks. Dad, I salute you. Now stop eating all of that mayonnaise!

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Roy TuRneR (Vic Morrow) in The Bad News Bears:

Any kid who has played little league baseball has been up against the worst nemesis known to man—the overly competitive father. As the mean-assed coach of the Yankees, he smacked his kid on the mound in front of many spectators. He made Walter Matthau’s drunken coach look like a saint.

bendeR’s dad (voiced by Judd Nelson) in The Breakfast Club:

When reminiscing about his dear old dad during weekend detention, dirtbag John Bender (Nelson) comes up with some classic quotes. “Stupid, worthless, no good, goddamn, freeloading son a bitch. Retarded, big mouth, know-it-all asshole jerk.” And, of course, “Shut up bitch! Go fix me a turkey pot pie!” We never see the guy, but this pops is mighty memorable, and we do see the cigar burns he left on his kid’s arm.

God

in The Passion of the Christ and The Last Temptation of Christ:

This particular dad allowed his only begotten son to get a nasty scourging with a cat o’ nine tails followed by an amazingly bloody crucifixion in Mel Gibson’s torture porn. He also allowed that same son to get teased by Barbara Hershey as his pretend wife in Martin Scorsese’s controversial take on the Jesus story, just before suffering the same—if less intensely bloody— fate. Man, when my dad wanted to give me a good combination life lesson and scolding, he just took away the car keys.

Jack ToRR ance/ dad meiks (ax-wielding dads played by Jack Nicholson and Bill Paxton) in Frailty and The Shining: Nothing

sucks more than having to deal with a dad chasing your ass with an ax. Except, maybe, having to help your ax-swinging dad kill people he could just swear are demons.

Reese bobby (Gary Cole) in Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby:

While Will Ferrell has had some awesome movie moms, none of them are cooler than his dad in Talladega Nights, played by the immortal Cole. From putting mountain lions in his kid’s car, to scalping tickets to his son’s big race, this dad has the honor of being one of cinema’s great patriarch assholes.

PeTe (Paul Rudd) in Knocked Up and This is 40:

This cupcake-eating, fantasy baseball-playing, Pixies-loving dad is probably the coolest movie father of the last 10 years.

loRd business (Will Ferrell) in The Lego Movie:

This time, Will Ferrell himself must be saluted as the dad. If you haven’t seen the movie, I can’t say any more because I will give too much away. It’s out on video now. Watch it, reread this paragraph, and then smack your palm on your forehead and scream “Eureka!”

deT. alonzo HaRRis (Denzel Washington) in Training Day:

I’m not quite sure about this, but I think Washington is the only actor to ever win an Oscar for playing a dad who uses his illegitimate son as a human shield.

biG daddy (Nicolas Cage) in Kick-Ass:

When we first meet Big Daddy, he’s shooting his kid (Chloe Grace Moretz) in her bulletproofed torso as a means of building her strength. Hey, the kid becomes Hit Girl, who is pretty much the definition of awesome, which makes Big Daddy awesome.


I’m not quite sure about this, but I think [Denzel] Washington is the only actor to ever win an Oscar for playing a dad who uses his illegitimate son as a human shield. Jerry LunDega arD

r ay FerrIer

(William H. Macy) in Fargo:

(Tom Cruise) in War of the Worlds:

This guy lets his kid’s mom get kidnapped so he can make quick cash. He also lets that kid hang “Accordion King” posters on his door, a sure bet to get the little man’s ass kicked at school if anybody should find out. We must also give props to the late Harve Presnell who played Jerry’s father-in-law, Wade Gustafson. The way those feathers flew out of his down jacket when he got shot during the ransom drop, and that “Oh, maybe this was a bad idea” groan he did moments after, were pure brilliance.

You have to love that fatherly moment when Cruise takes his daughter (played by Dakota Fanning) outside for a lightning storm, then joins her cowering under a table when it proves to be the start of an alien invasion.

DanIeL PL aInvIeW (Daniel Day Lewis) in There Will Be Blood:

Daniel Plainview, one of cinema’s very worst adoptive fathers, calls his deaf son “Just a bastard in a basket!” shortly before caving in a dude’s skull with a bowling pin.

FurIOus st yLes (Laurence Fishburne) in Boyz in the Hood:

One of cinema’s all-time great levelheaded dads. Guns and shit going off all around him, but Furious Styles just calmly eats barbecue while doling out sage advice to Cuba Gooding, Jr.

PhILIP stevens (James Stewart) in Airport ’77:

I know you might want me to cite Stewart’s George Bailey from It’s a Wonderful Life as a great dad, but that’s just too obvious. I’m going with the dad he played in this disaster film, where he played a dying millionaire who had to remain calm as his daughter and grandchild sank to the bottom of the Bermuda Triangle in a luxury 747.

DaD (Paul Dooley) in Breaking Away:

Yeah, I know, a lot of you haven’t seen this movie, but you should. Paul Dooley’s frank observations as his bicycling son pretends to be an Italian racer are classic.

nathan gr antham (Jon Lormer) in Creepshow:

While you may remember him as the dad who stole money from the elderly to send his daughter (Ione Skye) to college and get himself a vintage jukebox, I remember him as the dad who delivered a totally righteous rendition of Steely Dan’s “Rikki Don’t Lose That Number” after learning his kid got a fellowship.

Banging his cane on his chair and demanding his Father’s Day cake, this cranky dad met his end via a marble ash try swung by his daughter Bedelia (Viveca Lindfors). Having never gotten his damned cake, he comes back from the dead, crushes a young Ed Harris with a tombstone, and ultimately puts icing and candles on a decapitated head for celebratory causes. “It’s Father’s Day … and … I … got … my … cake! HAPPY… Ω FATHER’S DAY!!!”

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“I cut down to half a pack already.” SHE COULD STILL HAVE A STROKE ONE CIGARETTE IS ONE TOO MANY

MADE POSSIBLE WITH FUNDING FROM THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. ©2012 The City of New York, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. All Rights Reserved.

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Photo/Brad Bynum

Go Fourth

The Hunter family—Ayla, Cael, Julie and Cory—volunteered to paint benches for the Positively Fourth Street block party.

Positively Fourth Street East Fourth Street in Reno is an often misunderstood place. It’s an area of town that’s by sometimes negatively characterized as a Brad Bynum home for the homeless, a place where methheads, prostitutes and day drinkers wander and litter. However, for a few business owners, nonprofit organizations and volunteers, East Fourth Street is also the perfect place to throw a big, family-friendly party. Positively Fourth Positively Fourth Street, a block party Street will be held now in its second year, is one of those cool, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. increasingly common events happening on Saturday, June 14 on Fourth Street around Reno, collaborations that bring between Valley road together different segments of our increasand Elko avenue. For ingly diverse cultural community—the art more information, visit folks, the business folks, the tech folks, the www.positively 4thstreet.org. nonprofit folks, and the foodies. It’s a party that will include a farmers’ market, food trucks, kid-oriented activities like a dunk tank and a petting zoo, a performance by the String Beings string quartet, a variety of DJs, a pop-up record swap organized by the Holland Project, early evening performances by the bands Street

Eaters and Surf Curse, a backpack drive for homeless kids in Washoe County organized Volunteers of America, a bicycle swap organized by the Reno Bike Project, a pop up restaurant organized by Mark Estee of Campo, Heritage and Chez Louie, historical tours of Fourth Street organized by RenoHistorical.org, a cocktail bar tended by the organizers of the Reno Instagrammys, a beer garden featuring brews from brewery Under the Rose, and more. “This year it’s more about building a culture around the block, essentially showcasing the direction we would like to take it in the future,” says Scott Emond, the owner of Under the Rose, which is based on Fourth Street and had its grand opening during the event last year. A key part of the event this is the Better Block Project, which will temporarily transform the block of actual street between Valley Road and Elko Avenue into a better version of itself, complete with bike lanes, street trees and better signage. “The better block project is something that started in Dallas, Texas, and has gone

world wide, kind of a viral movement,” says Noah Silverman, director of the Reno Bike Project, which organized the Better Bike Project with help from the Regional Transportation Commission and the city of Reno. “It’s really about creating a snapshot of the future block we’d like to see.” The urban, industrial environment around Fourth Street means that the real estate is generally less expensive than in other up-and-coming Reno neighborhoods, like Midtown. “It’s brought in a really eclectic crew due to the price per square foot,” says Emond. “A lot of people who are like, ‘Hey, we’re on a budget, but we want to

work hard’ have come down here. And it’s turned into ‘Let’s keep working hard!” And it’s kind of formed into something of a movement.” But the organizers of the Positively Fourth Street event are quick to deflect claims that they’re trying to gentrify an urban area. “I think there’s a difference between gentrification and rejuvenation,” says Tim Conder, co-owner of Bootleg Courier Co. and the Cuddleworks artists studios, both based on Fourth Street. “Making the area nice for the people who already live there is a huge deal.” For instance, Conder says he has no desire to eliminate the homeless shelter in the neighborhood. “In my estimation, it would make sense if all the social services were on Fourth Street,” he says. “It would make sense to localize those. I have no interest in seeing that demographic leave the area. I just want to make it nice for them, for us, for everybody that’s already here.” Ω

Renegades Rewards include a VIP suite at the 18th Green, year-round networking events, plus a donation to EDAWN.

To sign up, contact Renegades@RenoTahoeOpen.com or call the Reno-Tahoe Open office at (775) 322-3900.

Reno-Tahoe Open 1 East First St., 16th Floor (City Hall) Reno, NV 89501 P 775.322.3900 F 775.322.1213

JULY 28-AUGUST 3 RENOTAHOEOPEN.COM OPINION

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Pushing the envelope Cafe de Manila 1575 Vassar St., 329-9900

Enjoy Wines with a View Saturday, June 21 Noon – 4pm Tickets $40 in advance $50 day of, cash only • rain or shine Includes 30 tasting locations wine glass • food • live music

Tickets online or at the following outlets: TAHOE CITY: James Harold Galleries • Tahoe Dave’s The Store • North Lake Tahoe Visitor Center • Uncorked IN TRUCKEE: Truckee River Winery • Uncorked

A marinated beef  steak dish at Cafe de  Manila, prepared with  onions, garlic and  citrus soy sauce.

For more information, visit www.cafemanilareno. com.

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The menu described pork menudo ($8.95) as pork meat stew with liver cubes, chickpeas, potatoes and tomato sauce. My wife took the leftovers for lunch and reported that it was similar in flavor to the adobo, though she couldn’t detect any liver. Under bright office lighting, the meat actually appeared to be chunks of hot dog, and there were raisins as well, very different from the menu’s description. Maybe they weren’t prepared for our large group and had to improvise. Pancit (noodle) dishes are a mainstay, and pancit palabok ($7.95) sounded amazing, with rice noodles, prawn, smoked fish flake, shrimp, sliced hard-boiled egg, crunchy chicharon and orange sauce. Yet, I couldn’t detect much—if any—shrimp or prawn, though there was plenty of fish flake, egg, chicharon (fried pork rind) and orange sauce. Not something I’d want every day, or week, but good enough that I’d like to try it from a different restaurant for comparison. Kare kare ($10.95), a stew of oxtail with mixed vegetables cooked in peanut sauce is something I’ve had better tastes of in the past. The texture of the veggies was odd, and the peanut sauce seemed “off.” Not terrible, but just not as good as I know it can be. Last of the entrees, dinuguan ($8.95), the pork meat stew basted in pork blood and serrano chiles colloquially known as “chocolate meat.” My wife found this to be “tasty, but rich. A few bites is enough, more would be too much.” To my eyes it looked like chunky, dark chocolate pudding, hence the nickname, with a livery smell. Folks who like organ meats enjoyed it, but I can’t say I’m a fan. Finally dessert, beginning with Ube Halaya ($4.99), a cake of mashed ube root (purple yam) cooked with brown sugar, and condensed/evaporated milks. My wife and I agreed it’s a pretty shade of purple, but it looks like Play-Doh and doesn’t taste much better. However, the Leche Flan ($4.99) was really outstanding. As with the Mexican variety, this custard is made of egg yolks and milk topped with caramel syrup, but we found Cafe de Manila’s rendition to be superior in both flavor and texture. A perfect end to this gastronomic adventure. Ω Photo/AlliSon Young

www.TahoeCityWineWalk .com

With its combination of Polynesian, Spanish, American, Chinese and other Asian influences, Filipino food can be a by Todd South challenge to the uninitiated. My wife and I recently joined a group of perhaps 30 for dinner at Cafe de Manila, providing a great opportunity to try a variety of flavors. Although it took a while to get the first orders out, the friendly staff did a pretty good job under the circumstances. First up, lumpia ($7.95), thin and crispy pork egg rolls served with a spicy-sweet chili sauce. I’ve enjoyed lumpia many times, and these did not disappoint. Following was tokwa’t baboy ($9.95), bite-sized pork belly and tofu chunks stacked together and deep-fried, served with a mixture of soy sauce and vinegar. If you love both bacon and Asian food, you’ll want this for breakfast. And lunch. And, well, you get the idea.

Next was something I just couldn’t abide, mangga at bagoong ($5.95), a paste of mashed mango and salted, fermented shrimp. No, no, no. Even the smell was bad enough that I had to move that bowl to an adjacent, empty table. An acquired taste, I presume. Thankfully, the next item was laing ($7.95), a delicious mess of shredded taro leaves cooked with coconut milk and ginger, akin to Indian saag. The leaves were a little tougher than most cooked greens, but the dish was one I’d order again. Even better was chicken adobo ($8.95), featuring chunks of chicken cooked in soy sauce, vinegar, bay leaf, garlic and whole peppercorns. My wife and I probably enjoyed this stew the best of all items sampled.


PRESENTS

ERIC BURDON AND THE ANIMALS Saturday, June 14

JUNE 27, 2014 4:00PM-9:00PM

Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater at Bartley Ranch

THE YARDBIRDS

General Admission: $35 in advance and $45 at the door. Includes a bacon-focused meal, 2 beverages of

Friday, June 20

choice and great music.

VIP: $50/Advance only. Includes all of the above, an extra drink ticket, access to the VIP bar and VIP seating. TO PURCHASE TICKETS, visit www.carechest.org or call 829-2273. Sample culinary creations built around bacon and created by local food trucks: Gourmelt, Battle Born, Mellow Yellow, Lazy Sundae and Island Ice

NATHAN OWENS’ MOTOWN LEGENDS

Enjoy the best in local brews from Great Basin Brewing Co., The Brewer’s Cabinet, Under the Rose Brewery and Pigeon Head Brewery. Sample a variety of fine bourbons provided by Wirtz Beverage and samples from 7 Troughs Distilling Co.

Saturday, June 28

Live music Kent & Kennedy and Contraband

SPONSORS: The Robert Z. Hawkins Foundation, First Independent Bank, McKesson, NV Energy,

Allegra, AT&T, Calvada Food Sales, Chez Vous, Dolan Auto Group, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, Dreams Realty, ESI Security, Hammon Photography, Red Rock Spring Water, Reno News & Review, Road Shows, Sala Family Dentistry, Swire Coca-Cola, The Arbors Memory Care, The Gem Gallery, US Foods, Wirtz Beverage

ABBACADABRA – THE ULTIMATE ABBA TRIBUTE THE MUSIC OF “MAMMA MIA!”

Saturday, July 5

SPYRO GYRA Saturday, July 12

THE MAGNIFICENT 7 Saturday, September 20 ON SALE THIS FRIDAY!

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR SOUTHSHOREROOM.COM. #TahoeConcerts See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2014, Caesars License Company, LLC.

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

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9:32 AM


Cruising for a bruising Edge of Tomorrow

Farmer’s Market 2014 Schedule TUESDAYS AT THE SUMMIT RENO S. Virginia St. and Mt. Rose Hwy // 9am-2pm June 10 - Sept 30

Tom Cruise must’ve been grinning that Risky Business grin from ear to ear when he first read through the script for Edge of Tomorrow. He had to know he had a magnificent movie in his hands. Watching Edge of Tomorrow is like watching James Cameron’s Aliens or J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek for the first time. It by provides many surprises, is often scary, has Bob Grimm a lot of laughs and always feels original. This is a science fiction movie that brings b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m something new to the genre. In the future, Earth is fighting a crazed, vicious alien force that is shredding our armies with little to no effort. Cruise plays Cage, an armed forces officer who serves more as a public relations man than anybody who belongs on a battlefield. After a publicity tour, he sits down with a hard-nosed general (a cold Brendan Gleeson) and finds out that he’s going into battle.

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WEDNESDAY @ LAZY 5 PARK SPARKS Pyramid Highway // 4pm-8pm June 25 – August 27

THURSDAYS SPARKS FARMERS MARKET Victorian Square // 3pm – 8pm June 12 – August 21 // Closed July 31

SATURDAYS AT VILLAGE CENTER RENO Calif. Ave and Booth St. // 8am-1pm June 7 – October 4

SATURDAYS AT THE SUMMIT RENO

“L. Ron Hubbard lights my way.”

1

S. Virginia St. and Mt.Rose Hwy // 9am-2pm

Poor

June 7 – October 4

2 Fair

SATURDAYS AT THE LAZY 5 PARK SPARKS Pyramid Highway // 7:30am – 12:30pm June 28 – August 30 // Closed August 16

3 Good

4 Very Good

Contact Shirley at 775.746.5024

www.ShirleysFarmersMarkets.com or like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/shirleysfarmersmarketsnv

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JUNE 12, 2014

5 excellent

Cage is justifiably terrified, and his first taste of battle doesn’t go well. While he does score a couple of decent hits, he is killed in especially gruesome fashion. For reasons I won’t give away, he instantly wakes up after his death, transported back to a moment shortly after his meeting with the general, and before the battle that will take his life. Cage is in a seriously messed-up situation. He starts repeating the same day, and dying every time. Cage does his best to change that outcome, but he always winds up meeting a grisly death and waking up in the same place. He eventually comes into contact with Rita (Emily Blunt), the military’s poster girl for the perfect soldier. By repeating days with Rita, Cage starts to build himself up as a soldier, discover secrets about the enemy, and increasing life longevity chances for himself and mankind.

Sure, it’s not cool to laugh when somebody dies. You will laugh at some of the ways Cage meets his end. Cruise embraces the comedic elements of the situation, but he and director Doug Liman (Swingers, The Bourne Identity) keep things far away from total silliness. At its core, Edge of Tomorrow is a well-oiled, sometimes horrific thrill machine that never stalls out and never missteps. When talking about modern science fiction, it’s worth noting that Cruise is becoming a major force in the genre. War of the Worlds, Minority Report, Oblivion— which I had some problems with but was generally well received—and now this movie have established the guy as a Sci-Fi force unto himself. The same can be said for Blunt, who had a major role in Looper, another terrific science fiction film. Cruise and Blunt are great onscreen together. Whether they are shooting each other in the head, or getting themselves irreparably bashed up during training sessions, they feed the film with unyielding professionalism and commitment. Besides the elements of suspense and horror the film provides, another factor that gives the movie a nice Aliens vibe is the presence of Bill “Game Over!” Paxton as Cage’s ruthless commanding officer. It’s a great role for Paxton, and it allows him to take the crazy eyes out of that box in his sock drawer. Remember how edgy Paxton used to be? This movie gives him back some of that edge. Edge of Tomorrow works on so many levels that I’m going to dare and call it a masterpiece of the science fiction genre. I’ll also step up and call it one of the year’s funniest movies, for sure. It’s not a comedy by definition, but when it gets laughs, it gets big ones. As for that ending, it might feel a little strange at first, but think about it on the way home. It’s actually quite brilliant, and a satisfying puzzler. If you are a Tom Cruise hater—bury that hate. See Edge of Tomorrow, and discover how a blockbuster can be smart, funny, thrilling and totally insane at the same time. Ω


5

The Fault In Our Stars

4

Godzilla

I will not lie to you. Sometimes, I walk into a movie theater with drooping shoulders, generally uninterested in what a movie might offer due to advance trailer previews or press that failed to generate my excitement. I walked into this one feeling that way, fearing I was in for a sap-fest. Boy, was I wrong. Shailene Woodley is downright incredible as Hazel, a 16 year-old struggling with thyroid cancer. After being sent to a support group by her mother (Laura Dern—I just love her) she meets Augustus Waters (Ansel Elgort—so charming it’s almost disgusting) a basketball player who lost his leg to cancer, but sure as hell hasn’t lost his lust for life. The two hit it off, and the result is the best teen romance since The Spectacular Now, which also starred Woodley. The film handles its subject matter with enough grace for a thousand movies. When Gus, Hazel and her mom travel to Amsterdam to meet Hazel’s favorite author (Willem DaFoe—on freaking fire), their meeting will stand as one of the best scenes of 2014. Much praise goes to director Josh Boone for making a supremely entertaining film, and to author John Green, who wrote the 2012 novel the film is based on. You could call it a tearjerker, but that seems a little insulting to me. There’s nothing manipulative about Boone’s direction, or the performances by Woodley, Elgort, Dern, Nat Wolff and everybody else in the cast. They all won me over in a big way.

This movie tramples the other Godzilla movies underfoot like Godzilla trampling a water tower with cheesy dolls meant to be humans hanging on it. Director Gareth Edwards captures that summer blockbuster vibe of yesteryear, when building suspense and perhaps just a touch of human drama took precedent over wall-to-wall CGI fireworks. He also manages to capture some of that old school Toho Godzilla goofiness to go with the film’s mostly serious tone. Even though this film’s Godzilla is CGI, there are some monster gestures that have a nice man-in-suit quality to them. It’s pretty obvious that Edwards is saluting the all time blockbuster king, Mr. Steven Spielberg, with this movie. Bryan Cranston and Aaron TaylorJohnson play a father and son team with a last name of Brody, just like Roy Scheider’s character in Jaws. Many of the initial Godzilla shots include glimpses of those jagged Godzilla back points cutting through the surface of the ocean like a shark’s dorsal fin. Cranston’s slightly crazed, obsessed, gloriously overacting scientist dad rings of Richard Dreyfuss’s mashed potato sculpting kook in Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Everything builds up to a huge fight between Godzilla and some other monsters in San Francisco, and the city takes a major ass kicking. This is bound to be one of the summer movie season’s more exciting movies, and it beckons to be seen on an IMAX screen. When Godzilla roars, it peels the skin off of your face.

2

Maleficent

Angelina Jolie plays the title character, the infamous horned villain from Sleeping Beauty. There’s a little bit of revisionist history here, with Maleficent portrayed as more of a fallen angel rather than a straight up baddie. The whole thing almost works because Jolie is damned good in this film, especially when the script allows for her to bellow curses and just act devilish. It gets a little sleepy at times when it deals with, well, Sleeping Beauty (Elle Fanning), the young woman who stands to have a very bad 16th birthday thanks to a Maleficent curse. Jolie has a creepy getup that I thought would bother me, but I kind of liked looking at it after a while. It’s the world surrounding her that I found a bit pedestrian. Director Robert Stromberg worked as a production designer on films like Alice in Wonderland, Avatar and Oz the Great and Powerful. I didn’t like any of those movies and, in the end, I don’t really like this one. At this point in watching Stromberg’s work, I’m just not taken by his weird visual worlds. They put me off for some reason, and have a choppy pop-up book feel to them. On the plus side, it is better than Alice and Oz, and perhaps even Avatar. On the negative side, it’s still not all that good.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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A Million Ways to Die in the West

4

Neighbors

4

X-Men: Days of Future Past

Seth MacFarlane’s second feature directorial effort after the breezy and hilarious Ted is a lumbering, only sporadically funny enterprise. It’s not awful, and it does have its share of giggles, but it can’t be classified as anything near a good movie. That’s a kick in the balls, because some slicker editing and “Whoa, Nellie!” pulling back on the grossout reins could’ve kept this thing closer to 90 minutes instead of nearly two hours and gotten rid of the moments that go too far in a bad way. Like Mel Brooks before him with the classic Blazing Saddles, MacFarlane tries to make a satiric Western that truly looks and feels like a Western. He gets the shots right via decent cinematography, but his tempo is way off. While Blazing Saddles had the exuberance of a grand western, MacFarlane’s dependence on comic violence and often slow pacing feels like he’s trying to make something like Clint Eastwood’s Unforgiven in a funny way. It just doesn’t work. MacFarlane plays Albert, a snarky, ahead-ofhis-time sarcastic guy trying to survive in the great American West. He’s trying to make a go of it as a sheep farmer, but he’s terrible at it. He’s always getting into trouble with his wise mouth, and his inability to stand up for himself in manly gunfights has earned the ire of his girlfriend, Louise (Amanda Seyfried). Charlize Theron is a nice presence as the new girl in town who gets Albert smiling again, but she isn’t enough to make this worth seeing.

Mac and Kelly (Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne), are happily adjusting to their new roles as parents to a baby daughter in a quiet suburban neighborhood. While in the midst of adjusting to their new sleep and sex schedules, a fraternity moves in next door. They don’t panic, figuring they are still cool enough to get along with college kids. An initial meeting with frat president Teddy (Zac Efron) goes well, and they even wind up joining the fray, baby monitor in hand, for a drugged-out, booze-drenched party, further establishing themselves as those possibly cool neighbors who just might be able to handle a party house next door. Mac and Teddy even develop a brotherly camaraderie, suggesting that if Mac were just a few years younger, he might’ve been a worthy frat brother. They even talk about getting walkie-talkies to communicate between their houses. They bond. The honeymoon doesn’t last for long. When a weeknight party keeps the baby up, Mac and Kelly transform from party happy neighbors into sleep-deprived malcontents, and they call the cops. Teddy takes this as a stab in the back from his new friends, and all out war is waged. There will be no walkie-talkies for Mac and Teddy. Rogen, Efron and Byrne are hilarious here, in a movie that has some great new jokes, along with making some old jokes funny again. Dave Franco and Lisa Kudrow get good laughs in supporting roles.

Director Bryan Singer returns to the X-Men franchise with this ingenious chapter that includes both the main X-Men casts, time travel and Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine holding everything together. The movie starts in the future, where robotic monsters called the Sentinels are giving the Mutants a truly hard time in a post-apocalyptic world. All hope seems to be lost until Charles Xavier/ Professor X (Patrick Stewart) and his crew figure out a way to time travel. The hope is to cease the production of the Sentinels, which were created by Dr. Bolivar Trask (the always excellent Peter Dinklage) and take Raven/ Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) off a dangerous destructive path. Jackman’s Logan makes the trip the 1970s, where he wears a cool leather coat and still has bone claws. The action is terrific, especially in a sequence where Peter/ Quicksilver (Evan Peters) foils a gun attack, and another where young Magneto (Michael Fassbender) uses an entire baseball stadium for nefarious purposes. The cast’s true standout would be James McAvoy as young Charles, still messed up after the events of X-Men: First Class. He adds a truly dramatic dimension to the proceedings. Having Singer back proves to be a good thing. The franchise surely suits his talents.

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

90 Auto Center Dr.

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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special aDVeRTising secTion

special aDVeRTising secTion

!

It’s happen ing in

ACTIVITIES

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC

SPARKS FARMERS’ MARKET

JASON KING

This 22nd annual farmers’ market features fresh local produce, arts and crafts, specialty foods, prepared foods and children’s activities. Th, 3-8PM through 7/24 and Th, 3-8PM through 8/21. Opens 8/7, free. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave.,

RENO SKI & RECREATION CLUB

The Reno Ski and Recreation Club holds its general meeting. Hear the most current information about the Reno Ski & Recreation Club’s upcoming activities. Second Tu of every month, 6PM, free. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave (775) 356-6262

CROCHET CONNECTION

Th, 6/12, 7PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co. 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-771

MICKEY GILLEY

Th, 6/12, 8PM, $39 John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

MIDNITE FIRE DUO

F, 6/13, 8PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co. 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

ELI YOUNG BAND

Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway (775) 424-1800

F, 6/13, 9PM, $50-$89. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP

Great rock ‘n’ roll here, folks! F, 6/13, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

SCHEELS RUNNING CLUB

Run with expert pacers and enjoy running in a group Tu, 6:30PM through 12/9, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB

The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

CONVERSATION CAFE

The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

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SUSPECT ZERO

VENTURA HIGHWAY

Sa, 6/14, 7PM Great Basin Brewing Co. 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks, NV 89431 / (775) 355-7711

TERRI CLARK & NEAL MCCOY

Sa, 6/14, 9PM, $35-$89. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

ARE YOU READY TO ROCK???

Two great bands, one great price…free!! That’s right two bands for free! Sa, 6/14, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

TINTABULATIONS HAND BELL ENSEMBLE FUNDRAISER

ERIKA PAUL

ANOTHER AMAZING FREE ROCK SHOW!

A SINGER-SONGWRITERS SHOWCASE

M, 6/16, 6PM, Donation. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

Get out and check out these up and coming bands! The Fifth Fire, We are Saviors & Religion of Tomorrow. Sa, 6/21, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

Enjoy Louisiana-style food and the soulful, breathtaking jazz sounds of Erika Paul on keyboards and vocals. No cover. Th, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

Bring you your instrument and your song. We look forward to hearing and seeing you there! Th, 8PM through 12/18, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

LIVE MONDAYS WITH TANY JANE

LIVE JAZZ

THE TUESDAY JAM AND OPEN MIC

BILL DAVIS

Open mic night every Monday at 8PM, hosted by Tany Jane. M, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

In our second decade of jamming! For individuals, bands, duos. Bring your instrument, sticks or just yourself down to the best sounding bar around! Tu, 8:30PM through 7/7, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

OPEN JAM WITH TAZER & FRIENDS

W, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

DJ/DANCING

M-Su, 5PM and F, Sa, 11PM. Opens 6/13, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

LIVE MUSIC

Th-Sa, 7PM. Opens 6/13, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks, NV 89441 (775) 657-8659

Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE

Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 355-8281

KARAOKE

Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way 775) 359-3677


Hard drive Sleepwalkr Sleepwalkr started out like many electronic music artists: with a Mac, GarageBand, and a whole lot of by Anna Hart free time. Nick Brewer is the man behind Sleepwalkr. Four years ago, after a snowboarding injury left him with a torn ACL and space in his schedule, Brewer started tinkering around on GarageBand, a digital audio workstation program, inevitably dedicating entire days to exploring the software and teaching himself the ins and outs of using it. Photo/AnnA hArt

on what works aurally. “I definitely go for audio stimulation first, and if feelings are brought up later on, then that’s the way it works.” Making his own music was a way for him to have freedom and control over his music experience. “I would listen to a song and think everything is perfect—except this one part, I wish I could change it,” says Brewer. “But when you start making music, you can do that. You can do whatever you want, because it’s your music.” Because it’s his own, he isn’t limited by genres and labels. He’s got a wide array of sounds, from the eerie, distorted witch house sound of his track “Coven,” to the tropical, buoyant ambient pop in “Island Lvfe.” Brewer’s other interests, like snowboarding has opened doors to more opportunities for his music making. He’s been able to make a song specifically for one snowboarding video and his song “Island Lvfe” was chosen to be used in another upcoming video. Sometimes Brewer sees a lack of formal musical training as a setback. “I don’t know what notes I’m playing” he says. “I think it definitely inhibits me. The hardest part is the mixing and mastering the track and making sure everything is in key.” On the other hand, it’s one of Brewer’s biggest strengths. “At the same time, I don’t ever go into [making music] with a mindset of how to make a song,” he says. While the rules of musical training might give an idea of what music making should be, Brewer looks at himself as a blank canvas, with the sky as the limit for what he can do and put into a song. The name Sleepwalkr was inspired “Sleep Walk,” a 1959 song by Santo & Johnny, a rock and roll duo. “It was my favorite song by them, so Sleepwalkr is an extension of that,” says Brewer. But the name also denotes how Brewer looks at his music making. “I like the fact that when you’re sleepwalking, physically your body is doing all these things, but in a lot of ways you don’t have control over it, because you’re sleepwalking,” he says. “Music for me is kind of like that.” Ω

Nick Brewer is the man behind the electronic music project Sleepwalkr.

While he started out emulating his favorite artists and toying around on GarageBand, Brewer’s software and knowledge improved, allowing him to make music of his own. There’s a huge array of influences that Brewer pulls from, like the moody lo-fi music of Crystal Castles, and the crisp, fast-paced trap music produced by Lex Luger, or the blurred, ambient, upbeat sound of Washed Out. Film also plays a part in the music of Sleepwalkr. Brewer takes inspiration from both the soundtracks and the movies themselves. He’s even sampled dialogue to play over tracks, using the likes of The Silence of the Lambs’ Hannibal Lecter and Clarice in one song and Scarface’s Tony Montana in another. While some music seeks to tell you something, Brewer’s goals with his music isn’t to touch your heartstrings, send a message, or to stick it to the man. It all starts out as creating an auditory sensory experience, generating a song based

For more information, visit sleepwakr. bandcamp.com.

OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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THIS WEEK

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THURSDAY 6/12 3RD STREET

FRIDAY 6/13

SATURDAY 6/14

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

5 STAR SALOON

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

DJ Boogi, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

Strip for Charity, 10pm, $5

King Of Tha City, 9pm, $5 cover, $20 to enter contest

Arsonists Get All The Girls, 8pm, $8-$10

Twilight Straggler, 7pm, no cover

132 West St., (775) 329-2878

THE ALLEY

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

Jelly Bread, 9pm, $7

Brownout, 9pm, $10

CBQ

Buddy Emmer Band, 9pm, no cover

Buddy Emmer Band, 9pm, no cover Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

1330 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 359-1109

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Matt Szlachetka & Jaime Kent, 6pm, no cover

Chris Miles, 6pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Comedy

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Corey Rodrigues, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Brian Dunkleman, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Henry Phillips, Quinn Dahle, Th, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30, Allen Havey, Leslie Ann Thompson, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Utility Players, Th, 7:30pm, $12, $16; Jackie Flynn, F, 8:30pm; Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $10, $14

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL 255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

June 13, 6 p.m. Wild River Grille 17 S. Virginia St. 284-7455

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/16-6/18 DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

BAR-M-BAR

Milton Merlos

SUNDAY 6/15

Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, 9pm, Tu, Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 747-8848

The Writer’s Block Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

The Lincoln Highways Revue, 1pm, $10-$15, free for children

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Jason King, 7pm, no cover

Midnite Fire Duo, 8pm, no cover

Ventura Highway, 7pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, W, no cover Karaoke with Miss Sophie, 9pm, Tu, no

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

THE GOLDEN ROSE CAFE AT WILDFLOWER VILLAGE

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Open Mic w/Steve Elegant, 7pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover

HACIENDA RESTAURANT AND BAR 10580 N. McCarran Blvd., (775) 746-2228

Wildflower Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover Tintabulations Hand Bell Ensemble Fundraiser, 6pm, M, donations

Tyler Stafford, 8pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

DJ and karaoke, 9pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

HIMMEL HAUS

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

July 4 & 5 Noon - 8 pm July 6 Noon - 6 pm

Dennis Miller

DOWNTOWN RENO

JUNE 20

CHICKEN WING & FOOD VENDORS STREET FAIRE ✴ AMATEUR WING EATING CONTEST “BOBBING FOR WINGS” CONTEST FREE LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Matt nathanson & gavin degraw JUNE 28

329-4777 30

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1 - 8 0 0 - M U ST- S E E

(6 8 7- 8 7 3 3)

silverlegacy.com

AMERICAN YOUNG

SATURDAY • JULY 5TH 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM


THE HOLLAND PROJECT 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

THURSDAY 6/12

FRIDAY 6/13

The Memories, Library Lady, Slothy Mane, 8pm, $5

Spanish Springs High School Rifle Team benefit w/Our Last of Days, Donkey Jaw, 8pm, $5

SATURDAY 6/14

SUNDAY 6/15

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/16-6/18 Tim Shaghoian, 7:30pm, Tu, no cover Jared Paul, 8pm, W, $5

JAVA JUNGLE

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Bar Room

1) Hollywood Trashed, 8pm, $3-$5

1) Evil Dead: The Musical Freak Show Fundraiser, 7pm, $7

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Neon Trees, Smallpools, Nightmare & The Cat, 8pm, $25-$55

School’s Out Foam Party w/Aviator, Kentot, Gasmik, 6:30pm, $15

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

MOODY’S BISTRO BAR & BEATS

Steven Roth Band, 8:30pm, no cover

Steven Roth Band, 8:30pm, no cover

Steven Roth Band, 8:30pm, no cover

THE POINT NITE CLUB

Karaoke w/Gina Jones & Haas, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Gina Jones & Haas, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Gina Jones & Haas, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688 1601 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

1) Blazin Mics!, 10pm, M, no cover Josiah Knight, Ben Allfree, Dangle Manatee, Mason Frey, Craig Prather, 7pm, Tu, $5

Neon Trees June 13, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SE7EN TEAHOUSE/BAR

Brownout

Bluegrass/Americana Open Performance Jam, 7pm, no cover

148 West St., (775) 284-3363

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Suspect Zero, 9:30pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

CRVSH, Flawless Flow, Teewrecks, 7pm, $5

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

VASSAR LOUNGE

Dimidium, The Institution, 9:30pm, no cover

Tuesday Jam and Open Mic w/Davis Nothere, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Jerry Bowden and the Soul Rockers, 8pm, $3 Karaoke w/Rock N’J Entertainment, 8pm, no cover

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

WILD RIVER GRILLE

T. Lee Walker & D. Lennon, 6pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Milton Merlos, 6pm, no cover

June 14, 9 p.m. Cargo 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

Koolwater Karaoke, 7pm, W, no cover Eric Andersen, 2pm, Colin Ross, 6pm, no cover

Erika Paul Carlson, 2pm, no cover

Wanders On, 6pm, M, John Graham, 6pm, Tu, Verbal Kint, 7pm, W, no cover

#6 Best Fireworks Display in the Country - AOL Travel

#11 Overall Independence Day Celebration - MSN Travel

July 5th

July 4th

Billy Ray Cyrus Concert and Benefit

200th Anniversary Of The StarSpangled Banner With The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra

7:00pm ~ 9:00pm / Village Green

Don’t miss this very special night as American Country music star extends a personal commemoration to Michael Landsberry - a fallen local American hero - and shares his new Collection CD, among other top Billboard-rated hits during this fundraising concert.

8:00pm ~ 10:00pm / Village Green ~ Don’t

miss the finest Fourth of July Celebration at Lake Tahoe as the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra and music director Laura Jackson perform Chesapeake: Summer of 1814, a salute to the 200th Anniversary of The Star- Spangled Banner. Plus, America the Beautiful, 1812 Overture, and other patriotic favorites – set to one of the Nation’s top fireworks displays.

Beer & Brats BBQ 4:00pm ~ 6:30pm / Aspen Grove ~ Let the sizzle of summer continue as you sip some of the top micro-brews of the region with a BBQ Brat in hand.

Wine & Dine In The Grove 5:00pm ~ 7:30pm / Aspen Grove ~ A New Twist for This Favorite Annual Event! Enjoy

a lovely summer afternoon sipping fine wines and gourmet food prepared by Chef Chris Daniel of Big Water Grille ~ complemented with live classical music.

tICKEtS ON SAlE NOW!! For event information and ticket pricing, please visit RedWhitetahoeBlue.org. OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 12, 2014

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 6/12

FRIDAY 6/13

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 2) Escalade, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 2) Rebekah Chase Band, 8pm, no cover 10pm, no cover 10pm, no cover

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, 10pm, no cover 3) Dustin Lynch, 7pm, $22.50-$28.50

2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, 10pm, no cover

2) Jonny Smokes, 6pm, no cover

2) Jonny Smokes, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Fruition, 10pm, no cover

2) The Congress, 10pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, $25.95-$39.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, $25.95-$39.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Tany Jane, 10pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, 9:30pm, $25.95-$39.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Tany Jane, 10pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, $25.95-$39.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Dance Inferno, 7pm, Tu, W, $25.95-$39.95 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, W, no cover 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, W, no cover

3) Honky Tonk Thursday w/Jaime G, 10:30pm, no cover

2) DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, no cover 3) Boots and Daisy Dukes w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, $17.20-$47.20 4) DJ I, 7pm, no cover

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, M, $17.20-$47.20

CARSON VALLEY INN

2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, 10pm, no cover 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

Eli Young Band

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

June 13, 9 p.m. John Ascuaga’s Nugget 1100 Nugget Ave. Sparks 356-3300

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 4) Stadium Bar

GRAND SIERRA RESORT 2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Sports Book 4) Cantina

Karaoke

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: Th, 7pm, no cover Hangar Bar, 10603 Stead Blvd., Stead, 677-7088: Karaoke Kat, Sa, 9pm, no cover Murphy’s Law Irish Pub, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Steve Starr Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover Ponderosa Saloon, 106 South C St., Virginia City, 847-7210: Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, F, 7:30pm, no cover West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

HARRAH’S RENO

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, $17.20-$47.20 2) DJ I, 8pm, no cover 3) Keith Allen Duo, 8pm, no cover

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 8pm, $17.20-$47.20 2) DJ I, 8pm, no cover 3) Keith Allen Duo, 8pm, no cover 4) DJ I, 7pm, no cover

1) Mickey Gilley, 8pm, $39 3) DJ, 5pm, 11pm, live music, 7pm, no cover

2) Eli Young Band, 9pm, $50-$89 3) DJ, 5pm, 11pm, live music, 7pm, no cover

2) Terri Young, Neal McCoy, 9pm, $35-$89 3) DJ, 5pm, 11pm, live music, 7pm, 3) DJ, 5pm, no cover no cover

2) Ike & Martin, 7pm, no cover

2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, 3) DJ Enferno, 10pm, $20 DJ Chris English, DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

1) Dirk Arthur’s Wild Magic, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 8pm, $17.20-$47.20 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Ballroom 3) Gilley’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL 345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Poolside

SILVER LEGACY

2) Bonzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia,

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 8pm, no cover 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

32

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JUNE 12, 2014

SUNDAY 6/15

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/16-6/18

1) Eric Burdon & The Animals, 7:30pm, $62.50 2) DJ Rick Gee, DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

SATURDAY 6/14

1) George Pickard, 7pm, no cover

1) George Pickard, 7pm, no cover

2) Superlicious, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no cover

2) Superlicious, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5

2) Milton Merlos, 6pm, no cover

3) DJ, 5pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Milton Merlos, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover 1) Jokers Wild Blues Band, 7pm, W, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, Country-Rock Bingo w/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no cover


PLAY GRAND

Masters of Magic

Gerald Albright

June 19–August 10

Saturday, June 21

Tuesdays–Sundays dark on select nights

Jazz Legend

World Fighting Championships 24 Saturday, June 28

O

SA N TU S A RD L AY E

O

SA N TU S A RD L AY E

Upcoming Entertainment

Peter Frampton

Merle Haggard

Saturday, Septemer 20

Friday, December 5

Grammy Award Winner

Country Legend

775.789.2000

grandsierraresort.com OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

|   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   june 12, 2014 

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For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno weekly PIcks

Boys Jus t Wa n t to H av e Fun: a n e v ening oF P oP Favorit es Nevada Gay Men’s Chorus presents its spring concert featuring pop favorites past and present ranging from the Bee Gees to Lady Gaga. The program begins at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 13, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave. Tickets are $18 for adults and $13 for seniors and students. Visit www.nevadagmc.org.

sPa rks Fa rmers ’ m a rk e t The biggest farmers’ market in the area kicks off its 22nd season on Thursday, June 12, in downtown Sparks. Local and regional farmers, growers and vendors will offer fresh produce, arts and crafts, specialty foods and prepared foods each Thursday through Aug. 21 (except for July 31 when Victorian Avenue shuts down for Hot August Nights events). The market takes place along Victorian Avenue and is open from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Admission is free. Visit www.shirleysfarmers markets.com.

e v il De aD: t He musica l Fre a k sHoW FunDr a iser Help a local theater company bring the cult hit musical to town during this fund-raising event featuring music, burlesque and other entertainment. Good Luck Macbeth Theater plans to present a production of Evil Dead: The Musical in October, but needs to raise about $5,000 to secure performance rights and to afford the props, sets, costumes, and live band, among other things, to bring the project to fruition. The rock musical is based on the Evil Dead cult horror films starring Bruce Campbell. Bohemian Burlesque, Xelena Empress of The Impossible, Lacey Mattison, Lee Edwards, Brandon Lara, Bernie Beauchamp, The Shames, Alphabet Cult, Pinky Polanski and other local performers will provide entertainment for the evening, which begins at 7 p.m. on Saturday, June 14, at Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, 71 S. Wells Ave. Tickets for the 21-andolder show are $7.

Discove r P a r k s S Yo u r u Evening mmer Wal k s Truckee Meadow s Parks pre

tive hike Foundati s at vario on leads June 12. us area weekly in parks be Explore tera new lo ginning T and cult c a hursday tion and ural histo , le a r r n y a o b f parks in about an out the n a hour or th tu e ral a r e a. Outing so, and d miles to s will las istances 2 miles. T t w ill r h a e n walks ta ge from every Th .5 ke place ursday th starting r o u g h Aug. 28. visit ww at 7 p.m. w.tmpar Call 453-0 ksfounda 698 or tion.org.

—Kelle

y Lang

oc ta ne Fes t The motorsports event combines dirt track racing, drag racing, freestyle motocross and monster trucks. The weekend event features the King of the West Sprint Cars, the Monster Truck Jamboree, truck and tractor pull, freestyle motocross jump show, the Ironman Challenge IMCA Dirt Track Racing and the RatFest Rumble Car Show. There will also be music, food and drink. The action starts on Friday, June 13, and runs through Sunday, June 15, at Churchill County Fairgrounds, 325 Sheckler Road, Top Gun Raceway, 15550 Schurz Highway, and Rattlesnake Highway, 2000 Airport Road, Fallon. Tickets are $5-$12. Go to http://visitfallonnevada.com/octanefest.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 12, 2014

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Think Free

All is not flossed I’ve gone out several times with a girl I really like, but her breath bothers me enough that I don’t want to kiss her until it improves. It smells like pepper and socks. She doesn’t smoke, eat stinky foods, or have an odd diet, beyond not eating red meat, so I’m not sure where this is coming from. I think her feelings might be hurt if I were to say something. What’s the best approach? When you read a book about the horrible chemical weapons used in World War I, you shouldn’t think, “Hey, that reminds me of kissing my girlfriend.” People will tell you that you can just give the girl a hint in the form of gum or a mint. And sure, Altoids can eliminate persistently bad breath—if the person who has it gets killed in an avalanche of them. But terrible breath that isn’t caused by something a person ate or eats regularly could point to dental problems, issues even “curiously strong mints” can’t fix, not even when combined with a really strong mouthwash, like Lysol Basin, Tub & Tile Cleaner. There’s a common misconception—held even by many doctors and dentists—that serious bad breath originates in the stomach, according to the health care research-vetting group the Cochrane Collaboration. In fact, only 9 percent of the cases at an “oral malodor” clinic were caused by things such as gastric imbalances, diet, and sinus infections. But 86 percent of

36   |  RN&R   | 

JUNE 12, 2014

the cases originated orally—most caused by gross microscopic critters relaxing and playing poker on a person’s tongue. Studies find that these microbe meetups can be shut down with tongue scraping, at least for a while, but you can’t just present this girl with a Tiffany’s box with a silver tongue scraper. (“Thinking of you …”) Sure, you may lose her if you say something, but if you don’t, you’ll almost definitely have to ditch her or have your sinuses filled with cement. To break the news, start positive: “I find you totally hot and an amazing person, but I have to tell you: There’s a sort of ongoing issue with your breath, and I’ve read that this can point to dental issues or a need for tongue scraping.” Assuming she isn’t so mortified that she dumps you, this news is likely to send her to the dentist and/or to the drugstore for a tongue scraper. This, in turn, should get you longing to kiss her—a far more enjoyable act once you’re no longer dating a woman who maybe looks like Xena the warrior princess but tastes like Xena’s horse after it licked the break room refrigerator. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   june 12, 2014  |  

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IT’S TIME TO

VOTE

by rob brezsny

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for your favorite people, businesses and things in the RN&R’s Best of Northern Nevada reader survey! As the region’s most credible and most thorough survey of its kind, we once again have lots of categories! Look through these and come up with some ideas on who you’ll vote for, then go online to www.newsreview.com/reno and click on the “Best of Northern Nevada” icon to vote!

Culture

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Best 4th of July fireworks Best animal shelter Best art gallery Best mural Best charity race or walk Best church Best day trip Best dog park Best drag queen Best independent art gallery Best kept secret Best local band Best local band album Best dance instructor Best local dance company Best local theater company Best monthly event Best neighborhood Best non-casino thing to do downtown Best place to meet gay singles Best place to meet straight singles Best place to people watch Best radio station Best talk show host Best scandal Best reason to live in Reno Most environmentally conscious company Best local farm Best non-profit group Best green event Best green store Best special event in downtown Reno Best special event in downtown Sparks

Food & drink Best cooking school Best hot dog Best frozen yogurt Best French fries Best smoothie Best chicken wings Best salad Best salad bar Best Mexican Best Italian Best Indian Best Basque Best Japanese Best Greek Best Thai Best Chinese Best Salvadoran Best sandwich shop Best French restaurant Best Vietnamese Best sushi Best vegetarian Best burger Best doughnuts/pastries Best bagel Best bakery Best fresh bread Best coffee Best coffee roaster Best seafood Best steak Best pizza parlor Best breakfast Best business lunch Best greasy spoon Best Reno restaurant Best Carson restaurant Best Truckee restaurant Best Sparks restaurant Best Tahoe restaurant Most romantic restaurant Best new restaurant Best fine dining Best wine list Best wine bar Best cheap eats Best dessert Best martini Best Margarita Best solo dining Best outdoor dining Best late-night dining Best food truck Best ambience Best restaurant view

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Best restaurant worth the long wait Best chef Best server Best tequila selection Best vodka selection Best whiskey/bourbon/Scotch selection Best Bloody Mary Best local beer Best barbecue restaurant Best catering company Best appetizers Best soups Best place to eat when drunk Best juice Best fondue Best produce

Casinos & GamblinG Best casino Best casino hotel Best casino restaurant Best casino bar Best casino arcade games Best female casino bartender Best male casino bartender Best casino buffet Best casino comedy club Best casino game dealer Best casino dance club Best casino promotion Best casino show Best casino band Most eco-friendly casino Best sportsbook Best poker room Best place to cash your check Best customer service Best casino wedding planning Best casino to hear quiet music Best casino spa Best casino security Best casino-hotel for romantic getaway Best casino color scheme Best casino carpet

Best place to get pierced Best shoe selection Best boutique clothing store Best hotel for a romantic getaway Best bank Best credit union Best mortgage company Best grocery store Best specialty ice cream store Best pet store Best pet supply store Best pet boarding Best skateboard store Best wireless phone service coverage Best brothel Best motorcycle dealer, shop Best new car dealership Best used car dealership Best place for photo prints Best photography supply store Best Pilates studio Best Pilates instructor Best yoga studio Best yoga instructor Best outdoor outfitter Best optical shop Best hospital Best doggy daycare Best athletic shoe selection Best business Facebook page Best independent bookstore Best independent CD music store Best independent coffee shop Best independent computer store Best independent grocery store Best independent used bookstore Best local non-casino business Best new business Best newspaper Best outdoor gear selection Best place for music lessons Best place to buy playa garb Best print shop Best public relations agency Best publication (that’s not us) Best selection of local art Best spectator sport Best sunglasses selection Best wedding event planner Best wedding reception site Best workout wear selection Best independent hardware store Best veterinarian Best Pawnbroker

Best beer selection Best bowling alley Best club DJ Best comedy club Best concert venue Best dance club Best dive bar Best gay hangout Best happy hour Best karaoke Best microbrewery Best neighborhood bar Best open-mic night Best place for a first date Best place for live music Best place to buy sexy underwear Best place to cure your hangover Best place to have sex in public Best place to hear loud music Best place to hear quiet music Best place to see a concert Best place to watch Monday Night Football Best place to watch movies Best sports bar Best strip club Best trivia night Most romantic bar

JUNE 12, 2014

flowers every day. As it flaps its wings 70 times a second, zipping from meal to meal, it can fly sideways, backward or forward. If it so desires, it can also hover or glide upsidedown. It remembers every flower it visits, and knows how long it will take before each flower will produce a new batch of nectar. To some Spanish speakers, hummingbirds are known as joyas voladoras, or “flying jewels.” Now take everything I’ve just said, Aries, and use it as a metaphor for who you can be in the coming week.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1947, the

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impossibly wealthy Duke of Windsor went shopping in Paris to buy a gift for his wife, the Duchess. She already had everything she wanted, so he decided to get creative. He commissioned the luxury-goods manufacturer Hermes to build her a high-fashion black-leather wheelbarrow. I am not urging you to acquire something like that for yourself, Taurus. But I do like it as a symbol for what you need in your life right now: a blend of elegance and usefulness, of playful beauty and practical value, of artistry and hard work.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your brain

absorbs about 11 million pieces of information every second, but is consciously aware of less than .001 percent of all that richness. Or at least that’s usually the case. Having analyzed your astrological omens, I suspect that you might soon jack that figure up as high as .01 percent—a tenfold increase! Do you think you can handle that much raw input? Are you amenable to being so acutely perceptive? How will you respond if the world is ten times more vivid than usual? I’m pretty confident. I suspect you won’t become a bug-eyed maniac freaking out on the intensity, but rather will be a soulful, wonder-filled explorer in love with the intensity.

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outdoors Best golf course Best local hot springs Best mountain biking Best outdoor beer garden Best picnic spot Best place to ride a personal watercraft Best place to swim Best ski resort Best skiing Best snowboarding Best spot to hike Best spot to run around naked Best spot to smooch under the stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You have a

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Personalities

Best athletic coach Best attorney Best barista Best thrift store Best bartender, female Best local place to work Best bartender, male Best landscaping company Best beard Best house cleaning service Best chiropractor Best video game store Best club doorman/bouncer Best gadget store Best cocktail server Best wine shop Best college instructor Best cheap liquor store innovations Best creative writer Best women’s clothing boutique Best local innovation: activism Best men’s clothing store Best local innovation: collaboration Best dentist Best children’s clothing boutique Best local innovation: living space Best elementary school teacher Best gynecologist Best place to buy a firearm Best local innovation: service Best high school teacher Best place to shoot firearms Best local innovation: technology Best interior designer Best jewelry store Best local innovation: working Best local actor/actress Best mall space Best local athlete Best tanning salon Most innovative local artist Best local columnist Best frame shop Most innovative local casino Best local comedian Best spa Most innovative local cocktails Best local filmmaker Best dry cleaners Most innovative local company Best local musician Best bookstore Most innovative local menu Best local politician Best place to get an auto smogged Most innovative local music Best local radio DJ or DJ team Best place to buy a musical Most innovative local nonprofit instrument Best local rapper Most innovative local promotion Best gym Best local songwriter Most innovative local startup Best place to buy CDs Best local TV news business Best specialty foods store Best local TV news anchor Most innovative local teacher Best adult-themed store Best local TV news hairstyle Best computer store Best massage therapist kids & Family Best place to buy vintage clothes Best arcade games Best middle school teacher Best used clothing store Best charter school Best minister/spiritual advisor Best antique store Best family outing Best muralist Best bicycle shop Best local library Best music teacher Best flower shop Best park Best naturopathic practioner Best beauty salon Best place to introduce kids Best pet groomer to nature Best hair stylist Best photographer Best place to picnic with kids Best aesthetician Best plastic surgeon Best place to take the kids Best nail technician Best police officer Best things to do on a Friday night Best politician Best barber Best toy store Best barber shop Best principal Best weekend activity Best garden nursery Best public figure to fantasize Best weeknight activity about Best car wash Most kid-friendly restaurant Best public relations professional Best home furnishings store Best real estate agent Best apartment complex Best social networker niGhtliFe Best place to get a car repaired Best visual artist Best tattoo parlor Best all-ages spot Best volunteer Best tattoo artist Best bar

Goods & serviCes

(March 21-April 19):13 In its quest for 13ARIES nectar, a hummingbird sips from a thousand

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strong, intricate understanding of where you have come from. The old days and old ways continue to feed you with their mysterious poignancy. You don’t love every one of your past experiences, but you love ruminating about them and feeling the way they changed you. Until the day you die many years from now, your history will keep evolving, providing an endless stream of new teachings. And yet at this particular moment in your destiny, Cancerian, I think your most important task is to focus on where you are going to. That’s why I urge you to temporarily forget everything you think you know about your past and instead concentrate on getting excited about the future.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1928, Bobby Pearce

won a gold medal in rowing at the Summer Olympics in Amsterdam. An unforeseen event almost sabotaged his victory. As he rowed his boat along the Sloten Canal, a family of ducks swam leisurely from shore to shore directly across his path. He stopped to let them pass, allowing an opponent who was already ahead of him to gain an even bigger advantage. Yet he ultimately won the race, rowing with such vigor after the duck incident that he finished well ahead of his challenger. I foresee a comparable sequence in your life, Leo. Being thoughtful and expressing compassion may seem to slow you down, but in the end that won’t hinder you from achieving your goal—and may even help.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In one of

her “Twenty-One Love Poems,” Adrienne Rich talks about her old self in the third person.“The woman who cherished / her suffering is dead. I am her descendant. / I love the scar tissue she handed on to me, / but I want to go from here with you / fighting the temptation to make a career of pain.” With your approval, Virgo, I’d like to make that passage one of your keynotes in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will have an excellent opportunity to declare your independence from an affliction you’ve been addicted to. Are you willing to say goodbye to one of your signature forms of suffering?

LIBRA (Sept. 13 23-Oct. 22): “You should

be interviewing roses not people,” says a character in Anne Carson’s book Autobiography of Red. That’s sound poetic advice for you in the coming days, Libra. More than you can imagine, you will benefit from being receptive to and learning from nonhuman sources: roses, cats, dogs, spiders, horses, songbirds, butterflies, trees, rivers, the wind, the moon and any other intelligences that make themselves available to you. I’m not saying you should ignore the revelations offered by people. But your emphasis should be on gathering in wisdom from life forces that don’t communicate with words.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): William

Shockley was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who co-invented the transistor. He also helped launch the revolution in information technology, and has been called “the man who brought silicon to Silicon Valley.” Time magazine named him one of the hundred most influential people of the 20th century. On the other hand, Shockley became a controversial advocate of eugenics, which damaged his reputation, led many to consider him a racist, and played a role in his 13 from his friends and family. estrangement I suspect that you will have to deal with at least one Shockley-type phenomenon in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Will you overlook the bad stuff in order to take advantage of the good? Should you?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Novelist Herman Melville wrote that in order to create art, “unlike things must meet and mate.” Like what? “Sad patience” and “joyous energies,” for example; both of them are necessary, he said. “Instinct and study” are crucial ingredients, as well as humility and pride, audacity and reverence, and “a flame to melt” and a “wind to freeze.” Based on my interpretation of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, I believe you will soon need to meld opposites like these as you shape that supreme work of art—your life.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Haggis is a Scottish pudding. According to the gourmet 13 food encyclopedia Larousse Gastronomique, it has “an excellent nutty texture and delicious savory flavor.” And yet, to be honest, its ingredients don’t sound promising. To make it, you gather the lungs, liver, small intestine, and heart of a sheep, put all of that stuff inside the stomach of the sheep along with oatmeal, onions, salt, and suet, and then simmer the whole mess for three hours. I’m guessing that your work in the coming week may have a certain metaphorical resemblance to making haggis, Capricorn. The process could a bit icky, but the result should be pretty tasty.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Almost a

hundred years ago, world-famous comedian Charlie Chaplin decided to take part in a Charlie Chaplin lookalike contest in San Francisco. He did his best to imitate himself, but it wasn’t good enough. He didn’t come close to winning. But I think you would have a different fate if you entered a comparable competition in the coming weeks. There’s no question in my mind that you would be crowned as the person who most resembles you. Maybe more than ever before, you are completely yourself. You look like your true self, you feel like your true self, and you are acting like your true self. Congratulations! It’s hard work to be so authentic.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “The art of

medicine consists in amusing the patient while nature cures the disease,” said French philosopher Francois-Marie Voltaire. That principle will be useful for you to invoke in the coming weeks. You definitely need to be cured, although the “disease” you are suffering from is primarily psychospiritual rather than strictly physical. Your task will be to flood yourself with fun adventures, engaging stories and playtime diversions so that nature can heal you without the interference of your worries and kibitzing.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Sage Leehey Photo/Sage Leehey

Paint Tahoe blue

We see a couple really big issues in Nevada. One that’s looming, and we don’t know how this will develop. One thing is the state lands takeover of federal public lands by the state. There’s a commission working on that now. They’ll produce a report in August of this year to the state legislature. And depending on whether that gains any traction, we may have a big situation on our hands. We are always in favor of public lands and keeping lands public, and Nevada is blessed with a lot of public lands. … We may need some funds to have some experts look at this plan that the commission comes up and we may need some funds to do some state lobbying. That’s one thing. The other thing is the energy situation. We will do everything possible to keep Nevada in the forefront of the transition to clean and renewable energy, and Nevada should be in the forefront because we’re blessed with an abundance of solar energy, especially in the south, and an abundance of geothermal energy, especially here in the north. So we need to push the state to do things to make it attractive for people to do solar. We don’t have the best situation yet. … We will continue to push on that and that, too, takes state lobbying funds. Ω

You’re having a fundraiser? We’re doing a fundraiser up at Lake Tahoe on Sunday. Artists are coming up there. It’s a plein-air paint-in, and we’re calling it Paint Tahoe Blue. We’re expecting 15 or more artists to come up there and be painting during the day, and about 7 o’clock we’ll have an auction of the artists’ works. And we hope that goes really well, and this whole thing—the artists are being organized by Erik Holland. … He’s done this kind of thing before, so we think this will be a successful event. We’re hoping for a lot of people to turn out not just to help us but to help the artists.

And the proceeds go to whom? The proceeds go to the Toiyabe chapter of the Sierra Club [and the artists].

What will the funds be used for? The funds that we get are meant to protect Lake Tahoe. We’ve had a lot of expenses with trying to protect the lake

up there lately, mostly a lawsuit we filed in February of 2013, which we’ve now taken to an appeal to the Ninth Circuit Court. So we need to replenish our funds.

How do you expect the turnout to be? It looks like it’s going to be a beautiful day, but that’s eight days ahead in the forecast. People-wise, we’re hoping for a crowd on the order of 100. And we’ll be serving some wine and snack type foods and trying to keep people busy and happy. They can walk out and see what the artists are doing. The event is advertised as 4 to 8, but the artists will be up there all day. So people are welcome to come anytime.

And they’ll be painting Tahoe? Well, they’ll be painting what they see as the Lake. Yeah, it’s supposed to be Tahoe paintings.

Pronunciation alert Year in and year out, the Onion churns on, one of our great sources of modern political humor. A recent headline positively nailed it about as good as any one issue can be nailed in one headline. The topic was the recent shooting madness in Isla Vista, and the headline read “No Way to Prevent This, Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens.” • Every year, every spring, there will be an afternoon when it’s not windy, just maybe a light breeze at most, an afternoon when the light is perfect, the conditions are top notch, and I can see from my back patio about 40 miles to the south, to Slide Mountain and beyond. It’s on afternoons like these that I’m reminded as to just how completely goddamn gorgeous it is around here. Not just decent, not just acceptably pretty, but stone cold flat out beautiful. Which is nice. We have that going for us. A real nice chunk of geography in which to live. I’ll reflect on this lush wondrous meadow zone we’re in, and how it’s now home to what, 325-350,000 people? And I’ll invariably be thankOPINION

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What other things will the Toiyabe chapter be doing in the future?

David von Seggern is the chair of the Toiyabe chapter of the Sierra Club, which is hosting a fundraiser on Sunday, June 15 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Sand Harbor State Park.

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∫y Bruce Van Dye ful that it’s not double that number. Then, for some quirky, parochial reason, I’ll take comfort in the notion that Spanish Springs really does kick Pahrump’s ass. • Say the word “risk.” It’s easy, right? Not a prob. Now, say the word “aster.” As in the flower. Ass-ter. Again, simple. Right? So we’ve got these two very simple, very easy words to say. Nobody over the age of 7 who’s halfway competent with English really has any trouble with either of them. So why is it that when we take these two basic, elementary words and put them together, most of the population immediately proceeds to blow goat curds all over its chin. Asterisk. It’s a word that’s just as simple as the two words that construct it. Yet, most Americans, when confronted with “asterisk,” don’t even try to get it right. They don’t even try to come close to getting it right. They pretty much (1) melt down, (2) overload, (3) blow a fuse, (4) stab themselves in the head with a fork, and (5) spit out the word “aster-RICK” and hope

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ART OF THE STATE

nobody notices that they just got on the fast track to Bozoville. With just a minimum of practice, you can get it. You can bring this word into your speaking comfort zone. Will its mastery get you a job? Get you laid? Highly doubtful. No, if you say “asterisk” properly, that—and three bucks—will get you a latte at Starbuck’s. But you can enjoy instant smugness the next time you hear some oaf on the radio say “aster-ick,” knowing that you pretty much own his ass when it comes to vocabulary. Speaking of vocabulary, I want to finish this week by going on the record with this—the word “convo” will never be used in this space. Sorry. Can’t do it. I’d just as soon use all four syllables, thank you very much. Yes, it’s a lot more work, for sure, to go ahead with those extra two syllables, but what can I say? Must be my Puritan upbringing ... Ω

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