Issuu on Google+

letters ........................... 3 opinion/Streetalk ........... 5 Sheila leslie ................... 6 Brendan trainor............. 7 news ............................. 8 Green ........................... 11 Feature ........................ 13 arts&Culture ............... 18 art of the State ............ 21

Foodfinds .................... 22 Film............................. 24 Musicbeat ....................27 nightclubs/Casinos ...... 28 this Week .................... 31 advice Goddess .......... 32 Free Will astrology ...... 34 15 Minutes ....................35 Bruce Van Dyke ...........35

gimme a shot

See Let Freedom Ring, page 7.

Tax dollars used for poliTical purposes See News, page 8.

Walk on the wild side See Arts&Culture, page 18.

300 Times 2 See Film, page 24.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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maRCH

13–19,

2014


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March 13, 2014


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Nothing matters

Armed or dangerous

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Yesterday was “spring foward,” which is one of my favorite days of the year. My girlfriend hates it. She feels she loses an hour of sleep. In fact, she generally despises daylight saving time. And if you were to believe the complaints you see on the internet, she’s in the majority, which is fine by me. I begin to question my mental acuity when I agree with the masses. For me, I just love getting off from work and having it be broad daylight, and I look forward to the spring mornings when I can sit on the deck and watch the dawn. In fact, I count down the daily minutes as we approach daylight saving time. Some may not be aware of this, but as the planet wobbles south in the spring, we pick up a couple of minutes of sunlight at a regular rate every day. But can I at least dispute the concept that seems so prevalent on the internet, that we somehow “lose” an hour of time when we switch to daylight saving? Time is not what passes on the clock. Clocks are a more or less accurate measurement of the passage of time, but they are not time. Time is a dimension, and it exists whether we measure it or not. I suppose the whole concept of subjective time has a place in this, but in the scope of a human life, subjectivity changes with the moment of perception, therefore that ticking clock is the only one that matters—and even then, it only matters in the long haul. Look at it this way. You’re going to get a certain number of hours in your life. What it says on the clockface is irrelevant to the amount of time you have. You could wear a broken watch for your whole life, and your life would be neither longer nor shorter because of it, although it might be a little bit kookier and richer if you wear a broken watch for 70 years or so. (And I’d just like to point out, if it’s digital, it won’t be right twice a day.) But I’m a bit OCD, and I enjoy spending that part of the morning twice a year making sure all four clocks in the kitchen show the exact same moment in time.

Re “Who watches the Watchers?” (Feature story, Feb. 27): I am so glad that you wrote this article. I have been trying to encourage local media to cover these stories for two years! There was a police homicide in south Reno a year or so ago, and no one would ever answer the simplest question, “Was the man armed?” Also, I have met quite a few people downtown that have been physically assaulted by officers, but they do not know how to file a complaint, or they are too scared to. I am really looking forward to more articles. Katie Colling Reno

Salty sunshine

Here’s the money! Re “Show me the money!” (Feature story, March 6): The story about paying college athletes neglected to consider another, much more desirable option. The purpose of colleges and universities are to train the minds of our citizens to think clearly, logically and to always pursue truth, wherever that path should take us. I love athletics, but we have lost our sense of priorities. Many fine schools have no varsity athletics at all; some are Division III (no scholarships) and some just have unfunded club sports. Nevada schools should abandon varsity athletics and devote the resources and facilities to supporting the core function of colleges; research and teaching. Our citizens and students could get just as much joy from cheering for club teams, like our University of Nevada Lacrosse team, without all the ridiculous political intrigue created by the NCAA, federal intervention on behalf of women athletics or the greedy sports industry. Your article lacked details about the actual costs versus benefits of maintaining Division I level programs here in Nevada. It is propaganda that D-I sports are a

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

money maker for colleges. That is only true at a few major market teams. We could spend twice as much and double tuition—which is probably the long range plan—yet most Americans will still consider Nevada a good place to dump nuclear waste, or just another “flyover” state. I think that Mackay Stadium and the associated athletic facilities should be razed and biological and engineering research facilities should take their place. Then, Americans would know Nevada as a center for top research and where many of the problems that face our society would be getting solved. Clairese Chennault Reno

Re “A place in the sun” (Notes from the Neon Babylon, March 6): Aside from reducing our carbon footprint and thus being generally good for old Mother Earth, the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project has got to be good for the local economy, too. For example, with 600 or so construction workers camped out there on the desert, the “bunny ranches” have got to be doing a bang-up business. (Yeah, OK, pun intended.) Gary Robertson Janesville, Calif.

Don’t tell me what to eat Re “Goosed” (Green, March 6): Why should anyone dictate what I can or can’t eat? Citing the shining California example as proof of the wisdom of the ban is hardly a supportable argument given our state is being populated by refugees from the great California lifestyle. Anyone arguing for such a food ban has obviously never seen a slaughter house, a fish farm, the raising of veal or the processing of poultry.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Staff writer Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Laura Davis, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office Manager/Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

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If these zealots who want to tell me what I can or can’t eat want to make this a better world, they should focus on the starving children around the globe and less on ducks. And shame on the museum for bowing to the objections of such fringe groups that desire to undermine our simple freedoms by dictating our gastronomic habits. Jason Katz Reno

Tortured decisions Re “Goosed” (Green, March 6): The concern with foie gras is not about limiting or infringing upon people’s choices about what to eat. The concern with foie gras is about animal suffering and torture. It’s about inflicting unnecessary pain on ducks (Hudson Valley foie gras) for a gourmet delicacy. Forcefeeding ducks by shoving metal pipes down their throats and pumping in large quantities of corn-lard mixture up to several times a day is cruel. Many ducks don’t survive this harsh treatment. The ducks that do survive are subjected to two or three weeks of force-feeding and sheer misery while their livers enlarge to up to 10 times their normal size. Liver enlargement causes the ducks to be very sick as other organs are crowded in their bodies and they can’t breathe well. They are subjected to this torture, become very, very, sick and then they are killed. Do we really need to torture ducks to obtain their enlarged liver so we have something to pair with black truffles? Juliana Harris Reno

If I had a hammer Re “Who watches the Watchers?” (Feature story, Feb. 27): As long as our police are now hired based on their aggressive profiles, made to look military, given military training, military protocols, and military tools, a military response can be expected

Distribution Manager Valerie Mets Distribution Drivers Trevor Bexon, Sandra Chhina, Ron Large, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Andy Odegard, Jesse Pike, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Gary White, Joseph White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

for almost anything. And this is becoming the public’s expectation of our police forces—police are the hammer, and everything looks like a nail. This expectation causes an immediate escalation of situations in the minds of both innocent and guilty citizens in tense situations that would otherwise never occur. Thus, their disposition is often provoked into a desperate or aggressive one as soon as a single police officer is visible. And often, police arrive in swarms—it’s procedure/protocol. The argument, “they were just following protocol” is used often by police officials in fatal shootings or abuse cases. These protocols need to change! Whoever are the wizards of these protocols are designing them as if the citizenry were the enemy, and our neighborhoods are a battlefield. SWAT-equipped police have no good sense or reason to be used to serve warrants. The purpose of local police forces has been perverted into something Orwellian. Thomas Hoops Reno

Lies lead to addiction Re “Drug Prohibition Fuels Society’s Ills,” Feb. 20): Cannabis (marijuana) prohibition and its conspirers increase hard-drug addiction rates. Government claims heroin is no worse than cannabis and that methamphetamine and cocaine are less harmful by insisting cannabis is a Schedule I substance alongside heroin, while methamphetamine and cocaine are only Schedule II substances. How many citizens tried cannabis and realized it is not nearly as dangerous as claimed and believed other substances must not be either only to find themselves addicted to hard drugs? Can the message from cannabis prohibitionists be any worse for vulnerable citizens? Stan White Dillon, Colo.

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or email classifieds@ newsreview.com

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover design: Brian Breneman

MARCH 13, 2014

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special aDVeRTising secTion

special aDVeRTising secTion

It’s happen ing in ACTIVITIES RENO SKI & RECREATION CLUB

The Reno Ski and Recreation Club holds its general meeting. Hear the most current information about the Reno Ski & Recreation Club’s activities. Second Tu of every month, 6PM. Free. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave.(775) 356-6262

CROCHET CONNECTION

Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs. (775) 424-1800

EZ PICK BAREROOT FRUIT TREES

Presented by James Sho and L.E. Cooke. You can have an orchard in even the smallest areas with these specially trained varieties. Learn how to... Sa, 3/15, 11AM & 1PM. free Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way. (775) 3551551

SPARKS SHAMROCK SHUFFLE 5K FUN RUN

Presented by Pawl Hollis. Learn pruning and general care of all types of roses for beautiful blooms for years to come. Sa, 3/22, 11AM & 1PM. free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way. (775) 355-1551

GETTING CONTROL OF PESTS EARLY Presented by Pawl Hollis. Learn the most up-to-date information on how to control insects, rodents and weeds in your yard. Sa, 3/22, 11AM & 1PM, free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way. (775) 355-1551

SCHEELS RUNNING CLUB

Run with expert pacers and enjoy running in a group as we join the Reno Running & Fitness Tuesday night group runs. Tu, 6:30PM through 12/9. free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr., (775) 331-2700

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP

Jean Peters guides this class for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

A St. Patrick’s Day celebration run in downtown Sparks. Wear your best leprechaun outfit, paint yourself green, or just show off the “Irish” in you! Sa, 3/15, 1PM, $30 adults, $25 for youth age 19 and younger. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave., Sparks

WOMEN’S DEFENSIVE TACTICS

SCHEELS KIDS KLUB: LEPRECHAUN LUCK!

CONVERSATION CORNER

Join the Scheels crew as they magically turn kids into leprechauns! We will create crafts and follow the rainbow to a pot of gold. M, 3/17, 6PM free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr., (775) 331-2700

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March 13, 2014

Designed to build confidence through the knowledge gained by training in such techniques as Jeet Kune Do and Judo. Tu, 7-8:30PM through 12/31, $25 a month. Osk Training, 636 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 343-2526 Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that the average person encounters. W, 4:30-6PM. free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB

HOT ROD FRANKENSTEIN & RUMBLE

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC

BIG E APPRECIATION PARTY: ELECTRIC WONDERLAND

The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

LIVE MONDAYS WITH TANY JANE

Rockabilly good time with HRF & Rumble St.Paddy’s Day weekend! Come join the fun! Sa, 3/15, 8:30PM. no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

Su, 3/16, 3PM. no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

Open mic night every Monday at 8PM, hosted by Tany Jane. M, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

KEVIN TOKARZ

ERIKA PAUL

THE KARAOKE BAR

Enjoy Louisiana-style food and the soulful, breathtaking jazz sounds of Erika Paul on keyboards and vocals. No cover. Th, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

BLACK AND BLUES JAM

Tu, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

OPEN JAM WITH TAZER AND FRIENDS

W, 8PM. no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

BILL DAVIS

W, 3/19, 6PM. no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 Wi-Fi Jukebox. Karaoke starts at 9PM on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. doors 6PM. Happy hour from 6 to. F-Su through 12/31, No cover. The Karaoke Bar, 2140 Victorian Ave. (775) 313-2772

LIVE JAZZ

Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM through 12/27, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr.(775) 657-8659

KARAOKE

Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677

Sa, 6PM. no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

STRANGEWORLD

Sa, 3/15, 9:30PM. no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

THis secTion is pRoViDeD as a pUBlic seRVice BY THe Reno neWs & ReVieW anD is noT FUnDeD oR aFFiliaTeD WiTH THe ciTY oF spaRKs


by Dennis Myers

ThiS Modern World

by tom tomorrow

When do you start paying attention to the election? Asked at Overlook Restaurant at UNR Devin Baird Student

I’m not really interested in elections. I’m not really interested in politics. I might get interested later, but I don’t know if I’m registered yet.

Devin Ballard Student

Closer to the dates [of the elections], but now that the candidates are being selected, I like to know who we’re going to be looking at. But until that is over, I don’t feel like I have a lot of say in what’s happening.

Tom Rennie Seismology analyst

Don’t expect a cakewalk Well, well, well. Let us say up front that the Nevada Supreme Court’s decision on whether termed-out Reno City Council members could run for mayor was affirming. We didn’t need anyone to tell us what the law said or to read the city charter for us, but it would be difficult to count the times people told us we were wrong and stupid since we first wrote about the issue on Jan. 12, 2012, http://bit.ly/1i9koIq. People should know that words have meaning, and words can hurt. Now that the schadenfreude is expressed, and the “I told you so’s” are satisfied, let us tell you what we’re looking for in a mayor. It’s way to early to say if any of the citizens who’ve thrown their hats in the ring have these qualities. We can say it appears some should have thrown in the towel before registration began. First thing we’re looking for in a mayoral candidate in 2014 is independence. Some of these candidates have aleady shown that they don’t have an independent bone in their body. They’ve been tools for the people with money and political power in this community, and their willingness to tow the company line is the very reason term limits got voted in. Others have had many opportunities in the past to step forward independently, to offer their own ideas in the public sphere, but chose not to. Again, while we’re looking forward to examining all the candidates’ accomplishments and ideas, it’s hard to imagine us endorsing someone who hasn’t shown an iota of leadership in the last 20 years. Some are only stepping forward because they think they see an opportunity to be monarch, which shows they’re completely unqualified for the job.

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I’m always interested, because it could affect everybody. Politics is going to give you your taxes. It’s going to give you your social programs. It’s going to take care of your roads, everything. So government’s important.

The second thing we’re looking for is someone who wants to work hard. In the days after the Supreme Court’s announcement, the RN&R did some informal polling to find out who might be running, and the reasons people were not running were telling. The mayoral position is largely ceremonial. While the real governance work is being done behind the scenes, the mayor is out front accomplishing little, but getting the credit for much. One candidate said all those ceremonial duties make doing real work impossible and therefore would not be running. So the best candidates won’t run. Irony noted. The third thing we want is a candidate who is responsive to press inquiries and who possesses a sound public records policy. This community needs someone to prioritize and actuate a plan to bring Reno government into the 21st century with internet access for the public to all public documents. We need an administration that welcomes the scrutiny of public inquiry and wants to reduce the ridiculous size of the city’s public relations operation. Bureaucrats are trustees, not owners, and government is mandated with protection and dissemination of public documents. Government shouldn’t hide behind lawyers. Here’s to all of the candidates who’ve signed up to run for Reno mayor. We look forward to taking a close look at your ideas and your platforms. But beware, yours is just one race in 2014, and we’ll be looking at how your friendships in other races inform your independence. Should be a hell of a year. Ω

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Nancy Moody Agency director

I don’t know. I pay attention to the presidential or the governor’s race. But I rely on getting the information from the press. So I haven’t clicked in. Maybe in September or October.

Karen Enslin Administrative assistant

I pay attention pretty much the whole year. I love CNN. My husband and I are pretty addicted to watching that channel, so we pay attention all through the year.

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Everything is awesome! The gems legislators produced last year on race-related topics would be hard to invent. Some of the things they said were unbelievably offensive such as Assemblyman Jim Wheeler, R-Gardnerville, telling a Republican group he’d vote to reinstitute slavery if his constituents wanted it. by Others were so crass one was Sheila Leslie tempted to remind them of the century they’re living in, such as Assemblyman Pat Hickey, R-Reno referencing his “yellow wife” as proof that he wasn’t racist after proclaiming 2014 would be a great year for Republicans since youth and minorities wouldn’t vote like they do in a presidential election year. Despite those provocative statements that attracted national attention, when the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada (PLAN) released its biennial legislative Report Card on Racial Equity, the overall score for the State Assembly actually improved four points over 2011 scores. Wheeler scored a 48 percent in the report card, while Hickey topped out at 55 percent.

PLAN scored the legislators by reviewing individual voting records and the impact of legislation on minorities in six areas: civic engagement, access to justice, health equity, economic opportunity, civil rights and education equity. Thirty-eight bills were scored, ranging from the diversity of court interpreters to ward voting to driver authorization cards for undocumented immigrants to voting rights. Scores for other local Assembly members featured an 86 percent for David Bobzien, 82 percent for Teresa Benitez-Thomson, 80 percent for Skip Daly and Mike Sprinkle, and 48 percent for Randy Kirner. Washoe County’s Ira Hansen had the lowest score in the chamber at 42 percent while the highest score of 96 percent was earned by Dina Neal, D-Las Vegas. The state Senate experienced an even greater improvement over ratings from the 2011 session, with the average score rising from 64 to 75. Once again, Washoe County had the Senator with the lowest score, Republican Don Gustavson, with 54

percent, and Las Vegas had the highest scorer in Democrat Tick Segerblom at 92 percent. Ratings for other local Senators included Debbie Smith, 83 percent, and Greg Brower and Ben Kieckhefer with 70 percent. Gov. Brian Sandoval scored 80 points, a significant improvement over his 2011 score of 53 percent. Why do these report cards matter? We’re told loudly and often by the self-proclaimed “job creators” that legislators who are pro-business should be supported since the economy is dependent upon the private sector for jobs and economic prosperity. They lecture us that what’s good for business is good for the entire community, especially when benefits ‘trickle down’ the economic ladder. They don’t seem to understand that there’s not much of a trickle-down from a minimum-wage or part-time job with few benefits. As PLAN’s report shows, the lopsided protectionism for those at the top of the economic ladder has pushed Nevada’s communities of color to the margins in seemingly every aspect of

life. As our state continues to grow more diverse, racially equitable policies are key to our economic success and democratic health. Holding legislators accountable for their voting records is one way we can insist that disparities in high school graduation rates, health care, and unemployment are addressed in a meaningful way. The business lobby has made sure every regulation in our state is subject to an assessment of its impact on “small” businesses of 150 employees or less. It’s time to look at policies for their racial impacts as well. All Nevadans can use this report card as a guide to understanding where their representatives excel in this regard and where they have significant room to improve. We can call for stronger stands on these issues on the campaign trail and push for more inclusive laws at the Legislature. If our elected officials shrug their shoulders at these responsibilities, we should return the favor the next time their name appears on the ballot. Ω

Here’s a link to download the report: http://bit.ly/1cuOYME.

Help us celebrate 52 years of jazz ~1962-2014!

Always the best in JAZZ —

concerts, competitions & clinics! Thursday, April 10 Trumpeter Avishai Cohen with The Collective 7:30 p.m., Nightingale Concert Hall

Friday, April 11 Festival Competition and Clinics

WALK TO CREATE A WORLD FREE OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

8 a.m.- 6 p.m., University campus

Kneebody

7:30 p.m., Lawlor Events Center

Jazz Fan Pass!

Saturday, April 12 Festival Competition and Clinics

Provides entrance to all festival events. Call (775) 784-4278 to order.

Festival Showcase and Awards Ceremony

Want to earn a free concert ticket? Be a jazz volunteer! For details call (775) 762-4858 or email jazzvolunteer@unr.edu.

8 a.m.- 5 p.m., University campus 6:30 p.m., Lawlor Events Center

Festival and Ticket Information:

(775) 784-4046

jazz@unr.edu www.unr.edu/rjf 6   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 13, 2014

WALK MS: RENO/SPARKS

General $60 / Senior $50

Saturday, May 3, 2014 Idlewild Park Terrace

Be a jazz volunteer!

Funded in part by a grant from the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency,; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; and the City of Reno.

Southern California & Nevada 2014 Presented by

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2014-Walk MS_Square.indd 1

2/12/14 11:22 AM


Take two. They’re small. The Centers for Disease Control is a government agency. A progressive institution, it is premised on the belief that a large centralized agency staffed by experts will act in the public good. Unfortunately, year after year it distorts science to encourage the public to waste money on flu by Brendan vaccines that do not do what they Trainor are said to do. The media never questions these inaccuracies, and the pharmaceutical companies and medical professionals are also willing accomplices in the statistical shell game. It starts by hyping a death in a faraway country, usually China, that is used to predict a very dangerous flu strain that is about to leap across the animal /human barrier and cause a deadly “pandemic.” You see, for the CDC, every year is 1918, when the horrific conditions in World War I gave birth to a real pandemic that devastated the troops and then America as well. Only, these new pandemics never actually happen.

Next comes the inflation of the death totals due to flu. The CDC says annually up to 50,000 Americans die from the flu. One has to read the actual sources of these statistics to discover that nearly all these deaths are from pneumonia, not the flu. The real death totals due to the flu are reduced down to the hundreds, mostly seniors and infants. The flu shot does nothing about pneumonia. In fact, peer reviewed studies show flu vaccination does nothing to protect seniors and infants! CDC never discusses how the flu shot is designed every year. There can be only three flu strains in any national flu shot, and they are chosen by guesswork and by what strain may have been active last year. There is no telling if the flu strains chosen for the vaccine are the same as the flu strains that will be

present this year. There are at least 200 viruses that can cause influenzalike illness. The CDC disinformation campaign gets worse. They use one of the oldest statistical tricks: presenting the percentage of effectiveness instead of the absolute effectiveness of the vaccine. Here is how it works. Suppose they set up a study of two groups of 100 people in each group. One group gets the vaccine, and one does not. Now six people in the group that did not get the vaccine come down with the flu, while two people in the vaccinated group do. If you look at it as relative risk, then the flu vaccine was 60 percent effective, which is what the CDC trumpets. If you look at actual risk, however, you would say there is a 4 percent chance of getting the flu (8/200) and that risk is reduced to a 3 percent chance, (6/200), or a reduction of 1 percent! Now, which statistic is more likely to produce a turnout for the

hit it

big!

vaccine? Relative risk statistics tell us nothing about actual risk. There is a one-in-a-million chance of a serious reaction to a flu shot. Would you accept that for 1 percent reduction of risk? I am not anti-vaccine. Rather, I am against politicized science and medicine. Many trust a large centralized bureaucracy to be more reliable and truthful than competing private for-profit enterprises. I would suggest that competition dependent on free choice is more likely to provide truthful and efficient solutions than a public bureaucracy that is nominally non profit but actually works to further its own interests without the constraints of competition and free consumer choice. Ω

Before Jenny McCarthy became an internationally renowned, antivaccine autism scientist, she was a model (NSFW): www. huffingtonpost.com/ tag/jenny-mccarthyplayboy.

NOW OVER $220,000* *Progressive amount as of March 6, 2014

big lady antebellum Reno events center

MARCH 14

Kenny Rogers

nights!

Aaron Lewis

MARCH 21

MARCH 28

big appetites rejoice! Reno’s most awarded restaurant serves up fine steaks and seafood in a classic steakhouse atmosphere.

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Our classic oyster bar has a whole new look and a number of bold new dishes.

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silverlegacy.com

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Photo/Dennis Myers

State government’s new business newsletter contains a statement opposing a ballot initiative petition.

Hit group hits Miller

draft.” That version was rewritten to remove the advocacy material, he said. “We posted the wrong version.” That version will now be replaced with the correct version online. Breslow’s attitude is in contrast with that of some officials who have been accused of using taxfunded facilities or resources for political purposes. He didn’t try to defend it. They did.

An D.C.-based political organization is trying to cut short the political career of a rising Nevada Democratic figure before he becomes too much of a threat. The State Government Leadership Foundation has launched a half-million dollar campaign to attack Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, who is running for state attorney general. SGLF’s television spot target’s Miller’s alleged lifestyle, using photos of Miller and celebrities that the organization lifted from Miller’s websites. “Fancy parties, exclusive sporting events,” the narrative goes. “Posing with celebrities, even Playmates. Ah, one can dream, but for politician Ross Miller, it’s reality.” This is intended to outrage Nevadans. Despite its staid name, SGLF has been active for more than a decade in attacking Democrats around the nation. Last year ProPublica used the Freedom of Information Act to obtain SGLF tax documents showing its previously secret finances. It was founded mostly with money from Exxon, Pfizer, Time Warner and other corporations.

Equal time?

Boulder City opts out On a unanimous vote, the Boulder City Council banned medical marijuana dispensaries from its territory, choosing for the town’s 30 patients with marijuana cards to rely on dispensaries in Henderson or in Clark County territory. BC councilmembers told residents the town, population 15,000, is not set up to handle such an operation. They did not specify what would be burdensome about it, though audience members raised speculative issues. There are already at least five pharmacies in the town. Boulder City is a former company town, a federal reservation for Hoover Dam workers. In its early days, gambling and liquor were banned, and these practices bled over into self-government after the dam was finished. Liquor did not become legal until 1969. Gambling is still illegal there, though it is available outside city limits. Meanwhile, the marijuana effort spreads outside Nevada. Seventeen state legislatures are considering outright legalization and regulation, in addition to Colorado and Washington, which already have it. Twelve states are considering decriminalizing, and D.C. has just eliminated jail time for use. That’s in addition to the 16 states— Nevada among them—that have decriminalized it in various ways. Another 14 states are considering enacting medical marijuana laws. Twenty already have, counting Nevada’s halting, 13-year efforts.

Burners ready to govern? New Yorker magazine: “As 2013 wound to a close and dismal year-end assessments poured in on the performance of the Obama Administration—the N.S.A. surveillance scandal, the botched Obamacare rollout—the president was looking for idea men. His move was to fly in a cadre of brainy Silicon Valley types. But he might have also dropped by Harlem, where a fund-raiser for the Burning Man Project, the nonprofit spinoff of the annual arts festival and bacchanal in the Nevada desert, had taken on a chin-stroking air. “You know what I’m really interested in?” Larry Harvey, the festival’s founder, asked, in his remarks onstage. ‘Governance.’ “Burning Man is no Model U.N., but as a congregation of selfappointed outliers in silly hats, it was a forerunner of the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street. … [It has an] airport, law enforcement, emergency services, and electrical grid. … Burners [claim they] have helped revitalize downtown Las Vegas and met with members of the Australian government. We’re planning for a hundred years,” Harvey told the crowd. “If we can govern the way we want, then what we’ve all experienced”—at Burning Man—“will be a very common experience. But what wisdom could our government take from Burning Man right now? … When it came to Obamacare, the writer Julia Allison offered a bit of advice: ‘If people took self-reliance [a Burning Man principle] as a central tenet of health, we’d have people taking really good care of themselves. Since I’ve been to Burning Man, I haven’t gotten sick.’ … “Burning Man doesn’t have all the answers when it comes to social organization. The festival is plagued by the same problems that plague American society.”

—Dennis Myers 8 | RN&R |

MARCH 13, 2014

It’s starting again Political use of tax-funded resources has been chronic problem A state agency has taken sides on the merits of a ballot measure that was placed on the November ballot by voters’ by signatures. Dennis Myers In the first issue of its new newsletter, the Advocate (also the title of the nation’s leading gay publication), the Nevada Business and Industry Department included an item that reads in part: “Passage of this tax will alter the view of businesses looking to relocate to our state, place a financial burden on home-grown businesses and open the door to a spike in unemployment. For these reasons and more, the Department of Business and Industry is joining prominent members and supporters of the business community to encourage you to help defeat this job killing tax.”

“So we will not do this again.” Bruce Breslow Department of Business and industry The reference is to an initiative petition circulated by the Nevada State Education Association. It calls the initiative the Education Tax. The business community calls it the margin tax. No language from supporters of the tax was included in the item in the newsletter, which also claims

that the measure “would create a new bureaucracy” and it provides to readers the website address of one of the groups opposing the tax. Nevada Revised Statute 281A.520 reads in part that “a public officer or employee shall not request or otherwise cause a governmental entity to incur an expense or make an expenditure to support or oppose: (a) A ballot question. (b) A candidate.” Bruce Breslow is the director of the department, appointed by Gov. Brian Sandoval. In 2004, as attorney general, Sandoval criticized the conduct of White House “drug czar” John Walters, who refused to file the required campaign disclosure reports after he used federal funds to campaign in Nevada against a ballot measure (“Tax-funded campaigns,” RN&R, Oct. 12 2006). Breslow said the newsletter should not have emerged in that form. “They should never take a position on either side on something like that,” Breslow said when contacted. “You’re not supposed to use state funds on a ballot question. This was the first-ever newsletter. So we will not do this again.” He said the department’s Las Vegas office produced the newsletter, and he didn’t expect the content to take sides on the tax. After checking with his staff, he added, “That was posted in error. Our staff accidentally posted the initial

In 2006, the Committee to Regulate and Control Marijuana (CRCM) sought an injunction against the use of tax-funded resources by Washoe County District Attorney Richard Gammick, Clark County commissioners, the members of the Nevada Board of Regents, and Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department spokesperson Stan Olsen, all of whom had used official facilities to attack a marijuana initiative petition. This is an issue that rises chronically in political campaigns, and though state district judges have supported the officials’ use of tax-funded resources, no one has yet taken the issue to the Nevada Supreme Court, the only state appeals court. Support for the notion that officials can use their official offices in courthouses or other official facilities for political purposes is usually found in interpretation of the statute, not in its actual language. In 2006, Gammick responded to the CRCM court action by saying, “Yeah, it’s all bullshit. That’s not what the law says.” He was accused of using official space in the courthouse for news conferences to attack the ballot measure instead of obtaining space outside. He contended that the statutory restriction applies only to the use of public funds for political advertising. The complaint against the officials read in part, “Mr. Gammick’s conduct is the latest in a mounting effort by certain public officials who oppose Question 7 to push their private views and agendas … all at the expense of the integrity of their respective offices. … As long as these officials believe they can interfere with Nevada’s legislative process, they will continue to do so.” Subsequently, District Judge David Wall avoided the issue of tax-funded campaigning, instead


ruling on a freedom of speech issue, saying Gammick and the others had a right to speak on issues affecting their official functions. The head of CRCM pointed out that Wall had ducked the issue of campaigning on “public time and the taxpayer dime,” but because Wall had waited to rule within days of the election, the case was never taken to the Nevada Supreme Court. That same year, the Washoe Regional Transportation Commission posted material on its tax-funded website on a ballot measure dealing with eminent domain and sought to get around the law by including material on both sides of the issue. But that raised the issue of whether the commission could have the role of selecting the material posted, posting strong arguments for its own side and weak ones for the other side. Moreover, the statute does not distinguish between one-side and two-sided material. It bars tax-funded efforts “to support or oppose.” Since then the statute has been revised and moved to a different chapter (“Chapter 281A - Ethics in government”) of the statutes, but the language remains essentially the same. The statute provides two exceptions, but neither covers political campaigning.

Breslow said that even before the dispute over the newsletter arose, he was checking to see if it would be permissible to have a forum at a state-sponsored conference in September at which both sides would be represented. One of the exceptions in the law is for a television forum at which both sides are represented.

“A public officer or employee shall not ... incur an expense or make an expenditure to support or oppose: (a) A ballot question.” Nevada statute “It’s going to be one of the hot topics of the year and we’d like to have a break-out session on it,” he said. But whatever the legal opinions on that issue are, he said, there will be no more advocacy by his department. “I’ll take steps to make sure it doesn’t happen in the future.” Ω

Ladies’ night Photo/Dennis Myers

Deirdre Robinette and Caitlin Golding dance, with Cherish the Ladies backing them up. Seventy people were in the audience for the Cherish concert in the Sparks Library conference room.

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Photo/Sage Leehey

Marie Gibson has extensive experience with ranching, business, animal science and agricultural economics.

Now on draft. Another way to find your beach.

Barn raising Workshop for agricultural business planning Small farms and ranches are sprinkled all over northern Nevada. Some keep their products for their families, some sell to restaurants, some sell to farmers’ markets—there are about as many different business plans as there are farms. by Sage Leehey The Center for Economic Development at the University of Nevada, Reno is hosting an Agricultural Business Plan Development workshop on sage l@ March 22 at Western Nevada College’s Fallon campus. It’s from 9 a.m. to 3 newsreview.c om p.m., and participants will leave with their new business plan in hand. Marie Gibson is the speaker and will be working hands-on with participants to get their plan nailed down. Additional goals will be assigned weekly for four weeks after the workshop to make sure the plan is complete. “You don’t just sit and listen to me yada yada—I’m good at yada yada— but it’s a class where we have workbooks, and we actually work through worksheets, budgets, all kinds of marketing ideas, we work through a lot,” Gibson said. “It’s a full day of intense planning, so they better come prepared to be tired.” The workshop is meant for new and existing farmers who want to expand or change up their style. It will be customized to fit the needs of those who attend. She wants to show farmers they can make a profit and the different options they have for selling their products. “What are your options to sell something?” Gibson said. “Where are you going to sell it? We’ll explore those. Some farmers haven’t even really zeroed in on who they want to be when they grow up. What does it look like for them? What’s their vision? Do they want to stay small? Do they want to to register for the workshop, visit grow large? Do they want to have what’s called agritourism, where people bit.ly/1fenPbv. come to their farms? Is their purpose to specifically be an organic farm? Is Register by Saturday it just to provide food for themselves and for a few close friends? Is it where for a reduced price they actually want to make money? Do they know how much that is?” of $35. It will be $45 after March 15. Gibson helps farmers develop business plans often and has come across two common obstacles in this process. One of these is that hobby farmers don’t seem to think it’s right for them to make a profit. “It’s OK to make money off of something you enjoy doing,” Gibson said. “We always think farming is this great, esoteric thing and farmers are always going to be poor—well, why? Why don’t we say that it’s OK for farmers to earn a healthy return on their investment of money and time and effort and energy and anguish?” The other obstacle is that many farmers don’t know the costs behind their crops and sell them for less than their cost. Gibson said developing a business plan helps eliminate that. Even with the many farms existent in this area, Gibson believes there’s plenty of business out there for each to make a profit with correct planning. “Healthy eating, healthy lifestyle choices, healthy food—whether it’s organic or non-organic, whatever you choose—there’s never going to be enough of it,” Gibson said. “There’s always room for farmers and farming to grow.” Ω

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY DENNIS MYERS

Nevada made medical marijuaNa legal iN 1979. it lasted 8 years.

A 1979 pro-marijuana demonstration at the Nevada Legislature.

In

1971, a young Florida fellow named Robert Randall moved to Washington, D.C., hoping to make his way as a political speechwriter. He would end up making more history than most of the politicians in D.C. Troubled by difficulty focusing his eyes in 1972—he was not yet 25—he went to an ophthalmologist who told him he had advanced open angle glaucoma—pressure inside the eyeball that pinches the optic nerve. The doctor told him he had “three to five years of remaining sight” and would be blind at age 30. Randall began taking prescribed medications. They did not stave off haloes around light sources, milky vision, and periods of temporary blindness. Then suddenly Randall’s condition improved dramatically. His doctor could not explain it. Randall did not tell him that he had, on 13   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 13, 2014

a friend’s recommendation, begun smoking pot. The friend gave him a joint and Randall smoked it one night. Walking from living room to kitchen a few minutes later, he glanced out a window. “What I saw stopped me in my tracks,” he later wrote. “Actually, it was what I didn’t see that stopped me. The haloes around the nearby streetlight were gone.” He resisted the idea that marijuana is medicine. It went against everything he had heard from government all his life. He stopped using marijuana. The symptoms returned. He started smoking it again. The symptoms dwindled. By 1974 trial and error convinced him. (Randall always continued legal medication along with the marijuana therapy.) Obtaining marijuana was a problem, with a return of pain and near sightlessness accompanying lack of supply. He began growing four plants at home and was prosecuted. Randall could have paid a fine and moved on but decided to fight, pleading innocent on grounds of medical necessity. His lawyer told him to prove it.

Randall’s quest for proof determined the trajectory of the rest of his life and made the federal government very sorry. An acquaintance gave him the names of several federal officials in the health field. When he contacted them, most knew of the health benefits of marijuana, including reduction of pressure within the eye. Some even congratulated him on finding out the truth. One gave him an annual report to Congress, Marijuana and Health Report, for 1974, that spelled it all out. Randall was infuriated. “Without marijuana I would go blind,” he later wrote of this experience. “Hell, the entire drug control bureaucracy knew that.” Repeatedly over the years, that bureaucracy by its actions, and members of Congress by their votes, told Randall and other sufferers: Go blind. “It was understandable that a pro-pot lobby would make whatever claims possible,” he wrote. “But to find that federal agencies knew, had known for five years, was staggering.”

At times Randall went off marijuana, relying solely on legal medication as part of research for which he was recruited at the University of North Carolina and University of California, Los Angeles. The result of new drugs was always negative. Sometimes a drug’s effect was exactly what it was intended to prevent— periods of total blindness. The findings of the scientists became a part of the court record. Randall won his case. The judge, who had gone deeply into marijuana research, ruled, “The evil he sought to prevent, blindness, is greater than that he performed to accomplish it, growing marijuana in his residence in violation of D.C. Code.”

The nexT phase Randall petitioned for marijuana from the federal farm in Mississippi. After jumping through all the hoops, he was grudgingly approved to receive legal marijuana and became the only legal pot smoker in the United States.

“Failed experiment” continues on page 14


“Failed experiment” continueD FRoM page 13 Prohibition of marijuana is a relatively patients would be using marijuana under the recent development. It was enacted by Congress guise of research—most states used a similar in 1937 over the objections of the American subterfuge—along with all kinds of regulation Medical Association. The bill contained an and bureaucracy that, as it turned out, kept the exception for medical use, but gradually the program from working well. The bill established feds leaned on the medical community—which “a program to research the therapeutic effects yielded—to stop using it as medicine, mainly of marihuana on certain patients; establishing then an analgesic. Subsequently, research demon- a board of review for the program; requiring strated additional uses for marijuana in treating ... regulations for the program; establishing maladies from glaucoma to cholera, though the requirements for admission in the program; United States—given its prohibition—was not authorizing the health division to contract to until recently on the cutting edge of that kind of receive marihuana.” (Until the Reagan adminresearch. Just this year, Science Direct published istration, the federal government perversely a paper by Chinese and New York scientists spelled marijuana’s name with an H, and state that found cannabis “can prevent acute alcohollegislatures had to follow suit.) Research in induced liver steatosis” in laboratory animals. marijuana had been stymied by the federal The climate of the 1970s was congenial government for decades. Soon more than 25 to Randall’s activism. Richard Nixon, who states put on their scientist caps and got in the launched his own drug war, was gone, though his business—though few scholarly papers resulted. legacy—increased drug use as a result of accelerIn something of a mockery of the serious ated enforcement of prohibition—lingered on. needs of patients, approval of the Nevada President Gerald Ford adopted a saner approach measure was fueled not just by the science to drugs, leaving a White House drug “czar” and the efficacy of the drug but by two politioffice created by Congress vacant. He deemcians who opposed marijuana until their own phasized enforcement in favor of treatment. He personal interests became engaged. Conservative was followed into the White House by Jimmy Democrat and state court judge Keith Hayes and Carter, who followed a conservative Republican similar softer policy until he and former state sena“Who, but a needed some political cover, tor James Slattery had whereupon Carter staffed the little use for the drug bureaucrat, drug office and got tough. until Hayes contracted Randall set about cancer and Slattery’s wife Would be dumb helping fellow glaucoma developed glaucoma. enough to give a patients, then victims “However, if it appeared of other maladies as to [be] medically approprivomiting patient he learned more about ate, I would consider marijuana’s wider value as smoking it, but it would be a pill?” a virtual wonder drug. He a cultural departure for me,” RobeRt Randall immersed himself in the Hayes told reporter Tricia Author/glaucoma patient issue of medical marijuana, White. He said his changed becoming something of a view was driven by the lay expert, producing half agony of chemotherapy. a dozen books like Muscle Spasm, Pain, and The two men became lobbyists for medical Marijuana Therapy (Galen Press, 1991). marijuana. Unfortunately, they were unsophisRandall joined a petition to the Drug ticated about it. At an April 27 hearing, asked Enforcement Administration for reclassification if the bill would allow pot smoking, Hayes told of marijuana. As in the case of his criminal trial, the legislators that the medicine used would he found that if someone could be coaxed into ideally be in tablet form, if such was available. examining the research with an open mind, the This was a notion federal drug warriors— verdict was assured. DEA administrative law desperate to block the spread of medical marijudge Francis Young spent two years holding juana—had been pushing, that THC (an active hearings and studying the research, then ruled ingredient in marijuana) could be made into a in 1988, “Marijuana in its natural form is one pill. Drug companies had no interest in distributof the safest therapeutically active substances ing it for the feds and approval through the Food known to man. ... Uncontroverted evidence in and Drug Administration moved slowly, but the this record indicates that marijuana was being big problem was that it didn’t work effectively. used therapeutically by mankind 2000 years It was eventually approved for several uses, before the Birth of Christ. … [T]he marijuana including nausea and vomiting of patients plant … has a currently accepted medical use undergoing chemotherapy. But its effect hit in the United States.” The DEA ignored it. the body with a jolt compared to the gradual Along the way, Randall was tireless. Early absorption of smoked marijuana that patients on, in the late 1970s and early ’80s, a number could control, a critical problem for an antiof states made medical use of marijuana legal. nausea drug. Randall was fond of saying, “Who, New Mexico was the first, in 1978, and Randall but a bureaucrat, would be dumb enough to was deeply involved, as he was in other states, give a vomiting patient a pill?” This was an either in person or on paper. He was like the anti-nausea medication that could cause nausea, Johnny Appleseed of medical marijuana. a neat match for that anti-glaucoma medicine Then the effort moved to Nevada. that had temporarily blinded Randall. Hayes was not speaking for informed patients but Silver State trial lawmakers were responsive to him (he had previously chaired Assembly Judiciary). The measure was Senate Bill 470 of the 1979 As it happened, at that same hearing where Nevada Legislature. No one was brave enough to Hayes spoke, a letter from Randall—who sponsor it, so it was given a committee introduccould not attend in person—was presented tion. To provide further political protection, to the committee, and it warned against 14   |  RN&R   |  MARCH 13, 2014

Some of the books penned  by Robert Randall.

exactly the technique Hayes promoted. “The only flaw in the [Nevada bill’s] approach is, I think, in the proposed legislation’s neglect of organic cannabis preparations in favor of synthetic marijuanalike substances,” Randall wrote. “I cannot emphasize enough the dangers which reliance on synthetic cannabis poses. … Delta-9-THC, the preparation of synthetic marijuana now available … is not marijuana’s most therapeutically active substance, but merely its most psycho-active. …Evidence suggests Delta-9-THC is effective in some cases. This is also true for both glaucoma control and as an anti-emetic. Yet the evidence also indicates that the oral preparations of Delta-9-THC are inferior to marijuana in smoked form. In a recent study conducted by the National Cancer Institute, 15 cancer chemotherapy patients were tested. Initially, all were placed on oral Delta-9THC. At the conclusion of the study, however, all patients had been transferred to smoked marijuana. In effect, Delta-9-THC became ineffective while the federally-developed, dose controlled cigarettes continued to offer relief.” Randall enclosed a Cancer Institute memo on the issue and also urged the lawmakers to protect patients from “the Hobson’s choice between medical relief and criminality.” The Nevada Medical Association, a Clark County prosecutor, and others endorsed the legislation. It was approved by both houses— both had Democratic majorities—and signed by Republican Gov. Robert List. The final legislation was silent on how the treatment was to be applied, by pill or joint, and it allowed the Nevada Board of Health to extend the program beyond cancer and glaucoma if it chose.

ObStacleS The program went into effect with a budget of less than $32,000, most of it for start-up costs

like new office furniture and travel to states with similar programs for planning purposes. No state workers were added and the program was housed in the already existing state Health Division. The program was swaddled in bureaucracy designed to further protect the legislators, with the result that patients were discouraged from using it. The process of qualifying for the program was complicated, so using traditional access to marijuana was simpler and faster—and pain or blindness doesn’t wait. Just as detrimental was the election of Ronald Reagan as president the year after the Nevada program was created. Since Virginia City enacted the nation’s first anti-drug law in 1876 as a result of racism, bad journalism, and political exclusion of health professionals, manufacturing anti-drug hysterias had become a United States tradition, and in the 20th century evolving public relations techniques took those panics national. The Hearst press and federal official Harry Anslinger—the J. Edgar Hoover of drug prohibition—had been the biggest ringmasters, but in the second half of the century, presidents launched scares—first Lyndon Johnson, who had moderate success; then Richard Nixon, who popularized the term “war on drugs”; then Reagan; and finally the first George Bush. The result was that each time drug scares died down and more sensible policies came to the fore, another hysteria was launched, and the real experts were driven into the background. Initially, after Reagan took office, the spread of medical marijuana continued—more than 30 states were on board. But the notion that Reagan was as benign on drugs as Ford and Carter ended on Oct. 2, 1982. The skills of his handlers in manipulating public opinion created the most damaging hysteria to date. A month


before the midterm elections, with his poll numbers sagging and Republicans speculating he might not run for a second term, Reagan revived the drug war in a radio address: “We’re making no excuses for drugs—hard, soft or otherwise. Drugs are bad, and we’re going after them. As I’ve said before, we’ve taken down the surrender flag and run up the battle flag. And we’re going to win the war on drugs.” The power of a president to influence public opinion was never more apparent. What followed was an orgy of attacks on rights. Democrats cowered, the press offered no scrutiny, and the courts winked as Congress passed and the president signed measures that weakened private property rights and allowed the military to be employed inside the nation in combating drugs. Hoary and discredited fables about drugs like the marijuana gateway theory came roaring back. Legislatures stopped approving medical marijuana programs. Surveys showed parents willing to turn in their children for drug offenses. Employers drug-tested workers. In this punitive environment, few people wanted to sign up for state marijuana programs and state governments had no interest in publicizing them. Few people knew Nevada had one. It’s not clear whether even Slattery or Hayes used it. In 1987 the Nevada Legislature repealed the program as part of a larger bill dealing with pharmacies and drugs. The repeal received little attention. State pharmacy board lobbyist Joe Midmore told an Assembly committee, “There is a new drug on the market which is a synthetic form of marihuana, so statutes dealing with legal use of it are no longer required. … [T]he doctor had to present a case to a special board, which either approved or

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denied the request. After discussing this with [the] state health officer and others, it was decided to request repeal of this law.” (This is a characterization of Midmore’s remarks in the minutes, not a direct quote.) He did not identify who made that decision or who engaged in the discussion. Nor did he or anyone else tell the lawmakers of the problems with THC pills. Before a Senate committee, Midmore called the bill merely a “housekeeping bill.” No legislator in either house asked any questions. Gov. Robert Miller signed it on June 11. When Reagan left office, his successor

“This is crack cocaine,” Bush said in his Sept. 5 speech. “[It was] seized a few days ago in a park across the street from the White House. … It could easily have been heroin or PCP.” (It was later learned that the seller actually operated elsewhere but was lured by agents to Lafayette Park to make the buy more dramatic.) A new attack on rights began. The military’s role was expanded. Political candidates urinated in bathrooms and emerged to display their samples for cameras, a ritual known as “jar wars.” If under Reagan parents were willing to turn in their children, under Bush children

“The evil he soughT To prevenT, blindness, is greaTer Than ThaT he performed ... growing marijuana in his residence.” Francis Young Drug Enforcement Administration judge

George H.W. Bush stepped up. The Reagan hysteria was child’s play compared to the madness unleashed by the new president, and Democrats and journalists were even more culpable this time. The White House advanced an approaching nationally televised speech by telling journalists its topic, and the television industry took over from there. In the two and a half weeks before the speech, the networks ran about three drug stories a night, with four stories a night the week before the speech. None of these scrutinized the value of punitive policies. By the time Bush spoke, the public was primed.

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turned in their parents. Extreme and racist sentencing was made mandatory. Democrats as an opposition simply melted, with Sen. Joe Biden calling Bush soft on drugs—“not tough enough, bold enough, or imaginative enough.” The drug war went on, under Clinton and the second George Bush, neither of whom offered alternatives to punitive enforcement. Juries began refusing to convict and voters began asserting themselves. In 2000, Nevadan voted to create a medical marijuana program. The new program, too, posed as a research effort. For several years, state

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legislators dragged their feet at implementing the law by making the substance difficult to obtain. When the legislature finally got on board, local officials became the problem. Whether voters will prevail is still to be decided. Over the course of the Reagan-Bush/ Republican-Democratic efforts against drugs, illicit drugs became a major industry. Rights that were hard won over the centuries from Runnymede (Magna Carta) to Federal Hall in New York (Bill of Rights) were damaged. Only when, as in the case of alcohol prohibition, the public began reasserting itself did the drug war slow. The hysterias set off by presidents with the support of the press and the acquiescence of the opposition made it clear that more sensible drug policies can be reversed at any time by another manipulative president, a collaborationist Congress, and weak journalism and judges. This is one of those periods of relative sanity and prohibition opponents should not assume it will continue. They need to be ready to provide the opposition the political system does not. There are now 20 states with votercreated medical marijuana programs, though some had have to pass them twice to overcome the resistance of politicians. Randall died June 2, 2001, in Florida. He is now sometimes called the founding father of the medical marijuana movement. But many politicians are still telling such patients: Go blind. Suffer. Drop dead. Ω

To read the decision by Drug Enforcement Administration judge Francis Young, go to www.druglibrary.org/olsen/medical/young/young1.html

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The NMA celebrATes The 50Th ANNiversAry of Where The Wild ThiNgs Are

W

here the Wild Things Are, a picture book written and illustrated by Maurice Sendak, was first published in 1963. It tells the story of Max, a boy who likes to dress and act like a wolf. After terrorizing the family dog and making “mischief,” Max gets in trouble and is sent to his room without supper. From his bedroom, presumably on waves of imagination, he sails off to an island inhabited by strange quasi-mythical beasts. Max intimidates the beast and is declared king of the wild things. Max parties with the beasts for a time—a “wild rumpus”—before heading back home, where he discovers his mother left supper for him after all. It’s a short, simple story, bolstered by the book’s iconic, unforgettable illustrations. For the last 50 years, it has been loved by generations of children and anyone who feels a periodic need to go out and get wild, to purge themselves of their anger and other wolfish feelings, before they can return and appreciate the quiet pleasures of home. The story has been adapted into an opera, an animated film, a video game and, in 2009, a critically acclaimed live-action film directed by recent Oscar-winner Spike Jonze. Although Wild Things is the anchor of Sendak’s legacy, he illustrated more than a hundred other books, including Else Holmelund Minarik’s Little Bear and Tony Kushner’s Brundibár, and he wrote a couple of dozen more, including In the Night Kitchen and Outside Over There. All told, as a children’s book author and illustrator, Sendak, who died in 2012, has an influential legacy that rivals Dr. Suess.

The Nevada Museum  of Art is Where the  Wild Things Are. 

Into the wIld by brAd byNUM

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To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Where the Wild Things Are, Steven Brezzo, former


15773 Wine Dinner RNR 4.9x11.5 2.27.14.pdf

director of the San Diego Museum of Art and Sendak’s personal friend curated the touring exhibition Maurice Sendak: 50 Years, 50 Works, which is now on display at the Nevada Museum of Art. Organized from private collections and Sendak’s personal archive, the exhibition includes original illustrations from Sendak’s books and many original illustrations of Wild Things characters drawn by Sendak in response to fan letters. There are also Sendak’s concept drawings for the opera based on the story, as well as concept art by Constantine Sekeris for the 2009 film. There are also items from Sendak’s personal collection of pre-1935 Disney ephemera. Unusually for the NMA, the exhibition is presented by the museum’s education department. “We wanted to present an exhibition from the point of view of learning and teaching, and do so in a way that was welcoming and specifically inviting to families and kids,” says Colin Robertson, the museum’s director of education. The exhibition has a lot of related events programming, including guest lectures by illustrators and story time readings of Sendak books in the Robert Z. Hawkins Wild Rumpus Room, featured in the gallery. Everything in the exhibition was hung seven inches lower than normal than most NMA exhibitions to better accommodate younger museum visitors. Robertson says that it’s unusual for a fine art museum to embrace an illustration exhibition, and some of his favorite works in the show are the ones that launched Sendak’s interest in an illustration career: illustrated panels from a 10th grade school project about Shakespeare’s Macbeth, which the shy Sendak made in lieu of a stand-and-deliver class presentation. The 1943 illustrations are like a missing link between William Blake’s religious illuminations and early Marvel Comics.

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2:35 PM

Wild, Wild life Perhaps the most unique thing about the NMA’s presentation of the Sendak exhibition is an original artwork: a replica of Max’s boat from the story, made by local artist Tim Conder with help from fellow artists Nick Larsen and Anthony Arevalo. “In many art museums, the exhibitions are presented in fairly sterile, white-cube environments,” says Robertson. “Because of its content and because of the purpose it’s serving in our exhibition and programming efforts, we wanted it to be more of an environment that’s akin to the environment created in the narrative of the story.” Conder says he was excited about the opportunity when the museum staff approached him about the project. “I think Maurice Sendak was pretty important as a person and an author, because he changed the way that children’s literature and children’s illustration were done,” says Conder. “He gave kids a voice, made them multidimensional and layered people, which was kind of revolutionary.” “Until Where the Wild Things Are, children’s literature, as a form and as a genre, had always been this romanticized, idealized, whitewashed, often sanitized kind of story about perfect families, perfect children and very traditional values,” says Robertson. “And when Where the Wild Things Are was published, it caused a huge uproar because it’s about a kid who’s being disciplined by his mom. He gets sent to bed without his dinner. He’s being rude. He’s being difficult. And then he is isolated in his bedroom for a time, and that’s where the imaginative force takes over the story. … The publication changed the direction of what was appropriate for children’s literature as a subject matter.” Sendak wrote about the real emotions that children and the rest of us often feel, emotions like anger, fear and the simple desire to act out, to dance and hoot and holler, the need to get wild. Ω

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For more information, including a complete schedule of events related to the Sendak exhibition, visit nevadaart.org.

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Ryan’s Saloon & Broiler

40 Years reno’s original

St. Patrick’s Day Party!

A St. Paddy’s Tradition – Stop By!

Corn Beef & Cabbage Irish Shots & Beer

ST. PaTrick’S Day ParTy

in reno!

open 9A m

irish stew

Home of the Giant Sandwiches & Irish Coffee.

The BeST Live Music with SuSPectS ZeRO corned Beef & cabbage Drink Specials

SlotS • Pool • Food

1455 S WellS Ave • Reno, nv 89502 • 775-324-9432

180 W. Peckham Lane

Reno

(In the Old Town Shopping Center)

Open 11am-3am

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7 days a week

join us

Celebrate

St. patrick’S weekend!

for our

b Abby’s Hwy 40!

st Patrick’s Day Celebration

SAtuRdAy, mARCH 15tH At 9:30pm

Festivities starts at 12pm

Scotty West

Live music starting at 2pm

Green Beer

Car Bombs

Guiness & jameson shot specials

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622 -3208

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www.filthyreno.com

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REV. DATE

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PLEASE NOTE ANY CORRECTIONS FOR YOUR AD, SIGN AND FAX BACK TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW BY ________ TODAY, Peckham OTHERWISE THE AD WILL RUN ASLane SHOWN.

ACCT. EXEC.

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:: Open for Lunch 11:30am :: :: Live Music :: :: Irish Stew :: :: Corn Beef & Cabbage ::

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Join us for Reno’s Biggest & Best St. Patrick’s Day Party

Happy St. Patrick’s Day from the RN&R!

1. Abby’s Highway 40 2. Ceol Irish Pub 3. Filthy McNasty’s 4. Ryan’s Saloon

5. Rapscallion Seafood House & Bar 6. Lucke’s Salon 7. Murphy’s Law

Use the FREE RIDE from RTC on St. Patrick’s Day!

7 ❑

APPROVED “AS-IS”, NO CORRECTIONS

SIGNATURE

APPROVED WITH CORRECTIONS AS NOTED

SIGNATURE

Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW!

On March 17th, RIDE free after 4 pm and enjoy a safe celebration.

RTC RIDE, RTC RAPID & RTC SIERRA SPIRIT will be extended until midnight. 18 

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March 13, 2014

Mac’s Bail Bonds 775-329-7888

Please don’t drink & drive!

PLEASE SIGN & FAX BY __________ TODAY TO: 775.324.4572

775-348-RIDE

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Free St. Patrick’s Day Safe RIDE Program is fully sponsored by...

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Photo/Alison Young

Getting catty

Rita Lyons (Kathy Welch) talks redecorating with her dying husband, Ben (Tom Plunkett).

The Lyons The Lyons are like wild animals. They feed off each other’s misery, scratch and bite without by warning and attack when provoked. But Jessica during a preview performance of Brüka’s Santina latest production, I loved spending time with this dysfunctional family of sour, miserable people. The Lyons is the latest from the master of caustic black comedies about dysfunction, Nicky Silver (The Food Chain, Fat Men in Skirts), whom a New York Times writer once said could be the progeny of Brüka theatre, 99 n. Neil Simon and Edward Albee. His latest Virginia st., presents brings us into the—pardon the pun—lions’ the lyons on March den—in this story, a hospital room—to 13, 14, 15, 19, 20, watch Ben Lyons’ family gather around his 21, 22 at 8 p.m. death bed and claw at each other, proving tickets: (in advance) $20 general and $18 that death brings out the worst in people. students/seniors in Tom Plunkett plays Ben Lyons, the advance or $25 at the patriarch whose body is riddled with cancer, door. For tickets or and has been for a while. His “Lyoness” of more information, visit www.bruka.org or call a wife, Rita (Kathy Welch), is a stereotypi323-3221. cal, passive-aggressive, belittling Jewish mother who seems wholly unaffected by her husband’s impending death. As the play opens, she sits near Ben’s hospital bed

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flipping through home decorating magazines, torturing him with ideas for how she’ll redecorate their living room, with its carpets “matted down with resignation,” when he’s gone. At first, it’s not clear whether she’s in complete denial or is just plain cruel in her utter disregard for the gravity of the situation. She offers up unsolicited criticism in little barbs disguised as love. To Ben’s plaintive “I’m dying, Rita,” her retort is, “I know, dear, but try to be positive!” Ben’s plenty ferocious himself, though. His cancer seems to seep through his pores as he spews hostility and four-letter words at his unaffected wife, and it’s hard to know where our sympathies ought to lie. Now at the 11th hour, Rita has finally called their grown children, Curtis (Bryce Keil) and Lisa (Sandra Brunell-Neace), to their father’s bedside. Until this point, Ben’s cancer seems to have slipped her mind. It’s been awful having these people as parents. Soon after Lisa arrives, Rita asks if Lisa has had her son tested, because he seems “just a little bit retarded.” And

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homophobic Ben refuses to even acknowledge Curtis, his openly gay son. All this acrimony has had disastrous effects on the young Lyons: Lisa, an avowed alcoholic since fourth grade, is considering reuniting with her abusive ex-husband, while Curtis’ own seemingly healthy relationship contains a seriously creepy secret. Nicky Silver’s writing crackles with hilarious, cutting one-liners, so that even in the darkest moments of revelation we laugh and even cheer for them. Though each family member’s deep, dark secrets surface, they never completely lose their humanity. They never fully become monsters—we understand why they are the way they are,

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screwed up as they may be, and can find a way to love them, anyway. By far the meatiest performances come from the Lyons ladies. Kathy Welch’s Rita is scathing in her bluntness, yet manages to appear completely nonthreatening even as she’s luring her prey into the vicious attack to come. And Sandra Brunell-Neace, Brüka’s playwright-in-residence, seems far too natural and relatable as Lisa to be merely a fictional character on stage. Lisa has been an easy target for her parents, and Neace’s authentic portrayal shows how that can manifest in dangerous ways, even when things seem quite normal, or even laughable, on the surface. As Brüka’s producing artistic director Mary Bennett indicated to me a couple of months ago, this latest play by Silver is semi-autobiographical. Remembering this as I watched the Lyons tear into each other, I laughed and shuddered all at once. Ω

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Sea list Rapscallion Seafood House & Bar 1555 S. Wells Ave., 323-1211 Rapscallion Seafood House & Bar has a great wood-burning fireplace, mostly hardwood dining booths, a few by Dave tables, and a great mahogany bar Preston giving it an old English pub feel. It’s a big place that will hold a couple hundred folks and has a great outside patio in warm weather. And after 36 years, it’s fair to say it has become a staple for food and grog in Reno. Photo/AlliSon Young

Complimentary Know your rights & marijuana Dui Class saturDay, marCh 22nD, 5:30 pm

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The menus are inviting for both lunch ($7-$29) and dinner ($6-$56), and there’s a small plates menu served in the bar ($8-$15) with wine and drink specials nightly. The bar serves several cocktails made with fresh fruit juice, a nice touch. The wine list, starting at $30 a bottle, is one of the best—250 bottles—for a stand-alone restaurant in the area, with a very proper selection of French topping out with legends like a 1949 Chateau Lafite Rothschild Pauillac for $6K or a ’90 Petrus for $7,200. They also offer 36 wines by-the-glass ($7-$15.75), primarily new world wines. Executive Chef Dan Bauer has been at the helm for about a year. A Chicago native, Bauer has an impressive resume. A graduate of the prestigious Johnson and Wales Culinary School in Providence, R.I., Bauer made his way to northern Nevada about six years ago starting at Thunder Canyon Country Club down

in Washoe, heading the Steakhouse at the Atlantis and now showing his talent at the Rap. After an extensive tour of the menu, out came the food. Clam Chowder, New England style ($4 cup or $6 bowl), was thick enough to stand a spoon upright. Plenty of fresh clam meat and potatoes added at the last minute to keeping them from turning to mush— creamy rich with an opulent clamsavory flavor. The chef wanted me to try one of the small plates, so he sent out the swordfish nuggets ($5). I’m not much for deep fried foods, but these had a light Panko breading and were served with three dipping sauces: barbecue, sweet pineapple chile and ranch. The fish bites were firm yet moist, and the flavor profiles were true to the dipping sauces. They were not bad for deep fried, and I’d recommend them. Chef also sent out the ahi tuna tartare ($9). Only a couple of other places offer this in town, and this one is a contender. Fresh ahi from Sierra Gold Seafood, a local, family owned company, atop fresh avocado drizzled in a sauce of scallions, cilantro, ponzu—a Japanese-style tart, thin sauce—a little wasabi and ginger. Scoop them with crispy wontons and a creamy, seafood flavor with bright accents of a little heat from the ginger and wasabi to a savory tart finish leaving the taste buds begging for more. Finally, I had one of the signature dishes at the Rap, their pan-seared day boat scallops ($29). Think silver dollar sized, about an inch thick, times three. This is the only place in these parts you’ll find these large delights. Sit them atop portobello mushrooms and create a creamy lobster bisque sauce with scallions and roasted red peppers. They were fresh and very mild—not too fishy—with a sweet taste and the rich sauce with the delicate scallions added a savory, almost butter-like quality which highlighted these treasured, food-worthy mollusks. The menu does broaden out to pastas, and certified Angus beef steaks, but the seafood gets my vote. Since it’s their 36th year in business, they offer a $36, three course, anniversary menu, too. The dining room is both ageless and renewed, a tribute to a restaurant that reflects a genteel past and transforms it into a culinary destination that celebrates the future. Ω


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Ab normal 300: Rise of an Empire A good, nasty central villain performance and some decent visuals keep 300: Rise of an Empire from being truly awful. In the end, it’s just marginally bad. Director Noam Murro takes over for Zack Snyder, who has a reduced role of co-writer and producer this time out. Murro’s take on the exposed-belly ancient warrior thing lacks by any real dramatic tension. His film is a bunch Bob Grimm of boat fights mixed with people in togas emoting slowly on soundstages. b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m . It’s a little bit of a prequel to 300 in that we see the origins of Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro), the golden god Persian warrior that gave Gerard Butler (who appears in reused footage from 300) such a hard time in the last film. As far as storytelling goes, the Xerxes prologue is easily the most compelling part

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5 excellent

of the movie. Too bad it only accounts for a few minutes. Later in the film, we realize the events of 300 are going on at the same time as this movie, creating that Back to the Future Part II effect. The main plot involves Greek general Themistokles, played by Sullivan Stapleton. Stapleton is basically Gerard Butler with a slightly less impressive BMI. (He’s got a little more around the belly button.) He’s basically tasked here with delivering an always-determined face and shouting a lot. In short, he’s been asked to do what Butler had to do in the last film, with perhaps a little less airbrushing on the abs.

The main nemesis, besides Xerxes, would be Artemisia, played wickedly by Eva Green. Green makes for a memorable badass in a somewhat unmemorable film. Her character’s backstory does a nice job of showing us why she just wants to kill everybody, and that’s a vibe that always exists behind Green’s eyes. She has a violent and awkward sex scene with Stapleton that I happened to see in 3-D IMAX. I think that was my first 3-D IMAX sex scene. I felt so dirty. There are many battles set on the sea, with boats crashing into each other and warriors sinking to their deaths below the surface courtesy of underwater POV. These moments are impressive the first couple of times, but they all start to blend together after awhile. Much of the movie’s action feels redundant. I was actually experiencing déjà vu, and the memories I was reminded of had occurred just minutes before in the same movie. So, in essence, this movie rips itself off, if that makes sense. It probably doesn’t. I’ll move on. Because Butler is off making crap movies like the Point Break remake and Olympus Has Fallen, he couldn’t really be bothered to participate fully in this one. So, Santoro and Lena Headey, who played Butler’s wife in the previous film, are left to represent for the original 300 lovers. Headey gets a chance to swing a sword near film’s end, and looks respectable chopping people up. The gore in this movie is quite comical, with CGI blood spurting everywhere. The action scenes range from serviceable to overkill. I did like the POV shot of Xerxes swinging his ax at Butler’s head and a soldier jumping off a wall with the camera tracking him down as he pounces on a victim. The cool moments wind up getting lost in a sea of repetition and diminishing returns. The way the story ends leaves things open for a sequel, so I’m guessing we will be seeing Mr. Xerxes again. 300: Rise of an Empire is slightly better than, say, your average direct-to-video sequel or prequel. Without Butler starring or Snyder directing, the product is ultimately inferior to the first movie, and that first movie wasn’t all that great to begin with. Ω


2

3 Days to Kill

Well, shucks. Kevin Costner and Hailee Steinfeld deliver good performances as father and daughter in this hot mess from sloppy director McG. Costner plays a Secret Service Agent who finds out he’s dying of cancer, and he wants to make his last days on Earth count. So he reconnects with his daughter (Steinfeld) and his ex-wife (Connie Nielsen) in Paris while taking on one last assignment. That last assignment is giving him a lot of money, and an experimental drug that only exists in the movies that could extend his life. Costner is on his game here, and Steinfeld holds her own in the scenes they share together. Unfortunately, the movie is all over the place tonally. Sometimes it’s a thriller, sometimes it’s a comedy, and so on. There’s also terrible editing choices and lousy sound editing to boot. Amber Heard shows up as Costner’s boss trying to pull off some sort of femme fatale routine that feels as if it should be in another movie. Only Costner and Steinfeld save this thing from being totally awful.

3

Frozen

I have to admit I was more into the strange Mickey Mouse short that precedes this musical adaptation of Hans Christian Anderson’s “The Snow Queen” than the actual feature. It features retro Mickey busting out of a black and white film and becoming 3-D as he battles a bad guy kidnapping Minnie. It���s worth the price of admission. As for the actual feature movie, Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel have wonderful voices, and the visuals are fun to behold in this middle-of-the-road Disney fare. It has a lot of music—some of it quite good, some of it, well, not—and a beautiful look to it. For recent Disney animation, my vote goes to Tangled for best, but that’s not to say this one is a letdown. It’s OK. Just OK. It’s about on par with Pixar’s latest, Monster’s University. It’s fun to watch, but not altogether memorable.

3

Grand Piano

Elijah Wood, a.k.a. Frodo, also a.k.a. one of the movie stars who tazed Samberg in the butthole in the “Threw it On the Ground” video, plays pianist Tom Selznick. Selznick is making his grand return to concert performing five years after botching up a rendition of his mentor’s “most unplayable piece.” While standing offstage ready to go, a mild-mannered security guard (played by Alex Winter of Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure) hands him his charts, which he had forgotten, and disappears. Tom glances at them, only to see that somebody has written some strange notes in red sharpie on the pages. Those red notes are the setup for a rather clever gimmick that has Tom playing some extremely difficult piano pieces while somebody out in the distance alternately aims a rifle at him and his wife up in the balcony. The notes include the distinct warning that if he plays one bad note, he will die. None of this bodes well for Tom’s stage fright. Tom is also forced to put an earpiece in, so his possible assassin speaks to him while he’s trying to play. That voice is supplied by the one and only John Cusack. I won’t tell you why the Cusack character is torturing Tom on stage. I will tell you that the more I think about it, the more ridiculous the whole setup is. Wood does a respectable job of miming piano playing and making us feel sorry for him, while Cusack’s sinister vocals help things along. The movie is totally illogical, but passable fun. (Available for rent on Amazon.com and iTunes during a limited theatrical run.)

4

The Lego Movie

Fast paced, frequently hilarious, and visually fun, this is the sort of movie we’ve come to expect from Pixar, one that appeals to both kids and adults on many levels. It’s also notable that it isn’t a Pixar film, but a product of the still formidable but inconsistent Warner Brothers animation wing. The plot follows Emmet (Chris Pratt), a “generic” builder as he goes about his homogenized life, building structures under strict deadlines, listening to the same song (Tegan and Sara’s terrific “Everything is Awesome”) every minute of the day, and following the rules of the omnipotent President Business (Will Ferrell). President Business demands conformity in a decidedly socialistic way, but he keeps everybody at bay by promising Taco Tuesdays. Things change instantly when Emmet meets Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks), who reveals to Emmet that he’s living in a pre-programmed world, and there’s the possibility for real life beyond its walls (echoes of The Matrix and Terry Gilliam’s Brazil). Emmet joins forces with Wildstyle and her extremely

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cool boyfriend, Batman (Arnett) to take down the establishment and restore freewill. The Lego Movie is a bit exhausting at times, but at least the constant stream of activity is laced with super intelligence rather than bombastic, vapid visuals. It’s a cliché, but I’ll say it: “Fun for the whole family!”

3

The Monuments Men

Director George Clooney’s war epic about historians racing to save art from the Nazis looks and feels like it was just taken out of a time capsule buried in 1958. It’s quite breezy for a war movie, peppered with laughs provided by a strong cast including Clooney, Matt Damon, Bill Murray, Jean Dujardin, Bob Balaban and John Goodman as men trying to thwart Hitler’s plan for a giant museum. It has one of those whistle-infused soundtracks, and it doesn’t hurt that Clooney and Dujardin look like Errol Flynn and Gene Kelly. The movie moves briskly, and is perhaps a bit too weightless for a movie of such heavy subject matter. It also has a useless subplot involving Damon and Cate Blanchett. Still, Clooney has great command of the camera here, the ensemble (especially Murray and Goodman) shines, and it’s fun to watch. This is an interesting piece of World War II history, and it’s good that somebody has made a decent movie to cover this chapter of Hitler insanity.

3

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Non-Stop

Liam Neeson plays Bill Marks, an alcoholic US Air Marshal doing a gig on a transatlantic flight … A TRANSATLANTIC FLIGHT THAT IS GOING TO BE TAKEN!!! Shortly after taking a drink and boarding the plane, Marks starts getting texts on his secure network informing him that people on the plane will die unless a lot of money is handed over. The twist is that the hijacker tormenting Marks eventually makes it look like Marks is the one hijacking the plane. The movie has a screw loose, but somehow manages to be stupid fun thanks to Neeson’s stalwart presence and a mystery that does a good job keeping viewers in the dark. Julianne Moore delivers good supporting work as the understanding passenger who is there to help … OR IS SHE? Again, the film has a pretty good mystery at its core, and that makes it a lot of fun even if it is dumber than a bag of hammers.

1

Pompeii

If ever there was a good setting for a decent movie featuring lots of lava, I would think the story of how Mount Vesuvius blew would be intriguing. However, if you put Paul W.S. Anderson in charge of such a movie, well, you will probably end up with a pile of crap. Anderson has a way of destroying interesting premises with his sloppy directorial hand. For prime examples of how he screws things up, see Alien vs. Predator, Resident Evil: Afterlife, The Three Musketeers or Death Race. Or, better yet, don’t see them. Anderson takes the historic eruption and makes it the basis for what he probably hoped would be his Titanic. He has a love story, he has a lot of people scurrying for their lives, and he even has mournful female vocals that sound a lot like Celine Dion. What he doesn’t have are magnetic stars, decent special effects or a sense of pacing or continuity. When the volcano finally erupts, people have time for serious conversation, various sword fights and whatnot. I don’t think so, fellas. It should be noted that this film contains the very worst Kiefer Sutherland performance ever put to film, so it accomplishes something in the end.

199

For 36 months on a new 2014 MINI Cooper Countryman. Includes credits and dealer contribution.

3

Robocop

MINI OF RENO

RoboCop is a remake that totally rewrites an original in a way that won’t piss off its legions of fans. Joel Kinnaman steps into the role of Alex Murphy (played in the late ’80s original by Peter Weller), a Detroit cop in the year 2028 who gets himself blown up after causing too much trouble for a criminal kingpin. Murphy, with the permission of his wife (Abbie Cornish) has his life saved by being placed into an armored endoskeleton with the purpose of making him a law enforcement superhero. In the original, Murphy (well played by Peter Weller) started his crime crusade not really knowing who he was, with memories suppressed. He eventually figured out his identity and solved his own murder. The new film drastically diverts from the original, having its Murphy freak out upon waking up as a robot, fully cognizant of who he is. It’s only when his emotional stability comes into question that his doctor (Gary Oldman) decides to mess with his brain and shoot him full of dopamine, turning him into a robot zombie. Paul Verhoeven’s original is a far superior film, but this one has its merits.

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All-wheel drive available on the MINI Cooper S Countryman ALL4 and MINI John Cooper Works Countryman ALL4. †MSRP does not include destination and handling charge of $795 and excludes license, registration, taxes, options and labor to install. Certain features maybe optional. Actual price determined by your authorized MINI dealer. 36-month closed-end lease offered to qualified customers by MINI Financial Services through participating MINI dealers. Lease rate and fees based on example of a new 2014 MINI Cooper Countryman with an MSRP of $24,145 which includes automatic transmission and destination & handling fee of $795. $750 You-ification Credit, $500 Lease Credit, $500 Loyalty Credit (available for returning MINI customers only) and $750 Dealer Contribution offset against the MSRP. Dealer contribution may affect terms. $2,050 cash due at signing is based on $0 first month payment up to $280 (customer will be billed for payment in excess of $280), $2,050 down payment, $0 acquisition fee, and $0 security deposit (not all customers will qualify for security deposit waiver). Tax, title and dealer fees are additional fees due at signing. Lessee responsible for insurance, excess wear and tear as defined in the lease contract, $0.20/mile over 10,000 miles per year and a disposition fee of $350 at lease end. Purchase option at lease end is $14,246. Subject to credit approval. Offer valid through 3/31/14 and may be combined with certain other offers. Qualified rate lock applicants must take delivery by 6/30/14. Offer not valid in Puerto Rico. Models pictured in advertisements may be shown with metallic paint and/or additional accessories. No Cost Maintenance for 3 years or 36,000 miles whichever comes first starting from the original in-service date. Visit your authorized MINI dealer for important details. © 2014 MINI USA, a division of BMW of North America, LLC. The MINI name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

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RNR_EDGE_Events_Terrace.pdf

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March 13, 2014

1

3/11/14

1:59 PM


Gray area Sinicle Musicians are notorious for presenting dramatic, eccentric and overthought themes of complicated intimacy in their by Jake Parker music and lyrics, sometimes starting as superficially as their name. Such is not the case with Sinicle, a Reno-born metal band currently located in L.A. “We thought it was an awesome name,” said Drew Zaragoza, guitarist and vocalist for the band. “I, for one, didn’t know the meaning nor correct spelling. We were 14!”

Filling “the gray area between heavy metal and rock ’n’ roll,” and ping-ponging between Reno and LA, Sinicle has been jamming in town, as well as the big city, since 2005. Zaragoza, James Gepner and Justin Miller all met at Vaughn Middle School, where Gepner and Zaragosa— bass and guitar, respectively, and both contributing vocals—began jamming and later recruited Miller while at Wooster High School, before moving their operation to Hollywood in 2008. “We initially moved down to Hollywood to attend [Musicians Institute] and get our degrees on our respective instruments,” said Zaragoza. “Much of the industry is based in LA, including many labels. But labels were never our main goal and still aren’t, even more so after learning how they work. Our goal has always been to be the best we can be for our fans.” That’s a goal that appears to be satisfied, considering the commitment from the band to stay independent, both in their sound and their business.

Prodigal sons Drew Zaragoza, James Gepner and Justin Miller of Sinicle return to Reno.

Sinicle’s Still In Mind record release party is at 7 p.m. on March 22 at Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, 71 S. Wells Ave., with Dedvolt, Chon and She Has a Fashion Vice. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ Sinicle

OPINION

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NEWS

The band’s new album, Still in Mind, is all about community. “We don’t have fans we have fam—the Sinicle fam,” said Zaragoza. “We got their backs and they got ours and it grows daily. It is also important for us to stay true to ourselves and our sound. We don’t jump on musical trends, we would rather be organic.” Sticking to such organic sounds has proven successful for Sinicle as its members work to maintain the purity of their band’s nature while climbing the daunting ladder of success in the music industry. Rather than work with the swarm of music labels in LA, they have chosen to educate themselves on the production process in order to prevent from getting any mud in the water. “Record labels are a funny thing and have lost a lot of power in the last 10 years,” said Zaragoza. “Nonetheless, they can still wield great power. It is easier than ever for independent artists to take control of their own career. Justin and I both have degrees in audio engineering as well, and I am a certified Pro Tools Operator.” Their latest single, also called “Still in Mind,” is a fast-paced slap to the face with ripping guitar leads, strong bass lines and driving, forceful drums. “I like to describe it as the gray area between heavy metal and rock ’n’ roll with every one contributing vocals, we utilize harmonies, screams, whispers, etc. With strategized heavy riffs and arrangements to complement.” Growing up in Reno was of monumental influence to Sinicle, and they pay their respects dutifully by naming the city in some of their lyrics. “We owe our homage to Reno,” said Miller. “It has a great diverse musical scene, and we have built a strong following there. When we were growing up, there wasn’t a whole lot of direction, but over the past years the scene has really blossomed. The city has some great people and the nature is beautiful. Sure we can talk about the drugs, violence and troubled youth, but that’s all over America.” The band will return home for the release party of Still in Mind, playing at Jub Jub’s on March 22. Ω

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MARCH 13, 2014

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THURSDAY 3/13

FRIDAY 3/14

SATURDAY 3/15

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Audio Sky, 9:30pm, no cover

Aversion Therapy, 9pm, no cover

5 STAR SALOON

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

Six Mile Station, 8pm, $5

3RD STREET

132 West St., (775) 329-2878 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

BODEGA LIVE

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 378-4507 1) Main Room 2) Ultra Lounge

EOTO March 15, 9 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. 789-2000

St. Paddy’s Day Bash w/with Riptide Bandits, Green Jelly, Infecto Skeletons, Mary Jane Rocket, others, 8pm, $5 8pm, $10-$12 1) The Biggest Little Superstar Search w/ Karaoke Superstarz, 9pm, $5 cover or $15 participant fee

1) Platform, 9pm, $5 for 21+, $15 ages 18-20 Ciana, 9pm, no cover

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

COMMA COFFEE

Doldrum’s Blues, 7pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Matt Szlachetka, 7pm, no cover

George Souza, 7pm, no cover

George Souza, 7pm, no cover Takedown, 9:30pm, no cover

Comedy

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Dance party hosted by The Majestix, 9:30pm, no cover

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Jason King, 8pm, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Ryan Maher, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Wild Bill Simas, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Jackie Flynn, Kevin Flynn, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Ben Gleib, Lukas Seeley, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Utility Players, Th, 7:20pm, $12, $16; Paul Ogata, F, 8:30pm, Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $14, $17

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Whatitdo, Yelsa, Bazooka Zoo, 7:30pm, $5

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

2) The Kanes, 9pm, $5

1) VOLTAGE 2 w/Sceam, Teewrecks, Phasmo, CRVSH, Gerbal, 7pm, $10

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Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Hellbilly Hoedown, 7pm, M, karaoke, 9pm, Tu, open mic, 9:30pm, W, no cover

Bat Country, Farewell Belladonna, Magicians and Associates, Love Like Wes, 7:30pm, $5

JAVA JUNGLE

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

WE'RE HIRING!

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St. Patrick’s Day Party w/Clarke Brothers, Blarney Band, 5pm, M, no cover

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Bar Room

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Truckfighters, Crobot, Sisters Doom, 8pm, W, $10

West Wind, 8pm, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/17-3/19 DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover DJ Ricky Rick, 10pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, W, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

SUNDAY 3/16

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

1) Band Roulette, 8pm, no cover

1) Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover


THURSDAY 3/13

FRIDAY 3/14

SATURDAY 3/15

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Nick Waterhouse, Reno Jazz Syndicate, 8pm, $15-$30

Comedy Night w/Keon Polee, 8:30pm, $8

Club Sexy Movimiento, 10pm, $12

MOODY’S BISTRO BAR & BEATS

Jo Mama, 8:30pm, no cover

Graham Marshall Group, 8:30pm, no cover

Quartet Minus One, 8:30pm, no cover

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Suspect Zero, 9:30pm, no cover

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

MURPHY’S LAW IRISH PUB 180 W. Peckham Ln., (775) 823-9977

PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH PUB

SUNDAY 3/16

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/17-3/19

Suspect Zero, 9:30pm, M, no cover

Galactic

Hot Rod Frankenstein, Rumble, 8:30pm, no cover

906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 8:30pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 8:30pm, Tu, 9:15pm, W, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

St. Patty’s Day Party, 2pm, M, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, 7:30pm, no cover

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED DOG SALOON

Ciana, 12:30pm, no cover Ciana, 1pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

RED’S OLD 395 GRILL

Gairin, 4pm, M, no cover

1055 S Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-0395

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

March 16, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover Big E Appreciation Party: Electric Wonderland, 3pm, no cover

Strangeworld, 9:30pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

SIERRA TAP HOUSE

Truckfighters

Open Jam with Tazer and Friends, 8pm, W, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

252 W. First St., (775) 322-7678

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

Country In Lights w/Jake Houston, Charlotta Clutter, The Dowell Brothers, 8pm, $5

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Heart & Sole, 8pm, $5

Open Mic Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

WILD RIVER GRILLE

March 19, 8 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

WILDFLOWER VILLAGE

The Writer’s Block Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769

Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Larry Elliott & Limerick, 2pm, $10 donation, free for children

Wildflower Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

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CASH'D OUT

TOUR T OUR UR K KIC KI KICK ICK OFF OFF P OF PARTY ARTY

Thursday, Thur Th urs rsday, Ma March rch 1 13 3

Six xM Mile ile eS Station tation tat ion w w// The C Crux, rux, Dead Deadly dly d Gallo ows, Lucas ow Lucas You Y ng & The Wildern ness Gallows, Young Wilderness

ALBUM AL LBU BUM M FU F FUNDRAISING UNDRAISING DRA NG PA P PARTY RTY RT T

Friday, Fr iday ay, March Marc r h 14 14

AT THE KNITTING FACTORY, RENO ON APRIL 26TH!

The Th he e Riptide R Riipti ptide Bandits W/ W White Bulb Bulbs, bs, Mary Jane Rocket, Ma arryy J ane a n ne eR o ket, Reno We oc W Have eA Problem, Donkey Jaw

ST. PATRICKS DAY BASH!

Saturday, March 15

Green Jelly, Infecto Skeletons, Me Time, Part Of The Problem, Johnny Madcap and the Distractions

TRUCKFIGHTERS

Wednesday, March 19 Crobot And Sisters Doom

THE ALPHA COMPLEX

Thursday, March 20

Scattered, Residual Darkness, Aberance

MADE ENT. HIP HOP SHOW

Friday, March 21

Yan Doe, Knappsacc, Tae Breeze, Bossta, Prince Jay Dubb And More!

BATTLE BORN DERBY DAMES AUCTION AND PARTY!

Saturday, March 22

Fet. Bohemian Burlesque, Dj G3cko, Raffles, Photo Booth, Drag Queen Co Hosts, And Dates With The Girls!

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW: Mar. 13 Six Mile Station Tour Kick Off Mar. 15 GREEN JELLY Mar. 19 TRUCKFIGHTER Mar. 29 Guttermouth April 5 Toy Called God + Ripchain April 6 CHUCK RAGAN April 12 ABK + Big Hoodoo April 25 Kung Fu Vampire + Dirtbag Dan April 27 ANVIL

TO ENTER: · Send an e-mail to contest@newsreview.com · Put "CASH'D OUT" in the subject line · Include your full name, birth date and day phone · DEADLINE for entries is March 20, 2014 · Winners will be notifed by phone and e-mail OPINION

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TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

The Young Dubliners March 17, 10 p.m. MontBleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3533

THURSDAY 3/13

FRIDAY 3/14

SATURDAY 3/15

SUNDAY 3/16

2) Kick, 8pm, no cover

2) Kick, 4pm, Escalade, 10pm, no cover

2) Kick, 4pm, Escalade, 10pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Just Us, 7pm, no cover

2) Just Us, 8pm, no cover

2) Just Us, 8pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

1) Pretty Things Peep Show, 9pm, $12-$15

2) Wake of the Dead, 10pm, no cover

1) Galactic, Maggie Koerner, Brushy One String, 9pm, $30

1) Ring of Fire, 8pm, $24.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays , 10pm, $10

1) Ring of Fire, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Four Play Saturdays, 10pm, $10

1) Ring of Fire, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover

1) World Fighting Championships 18: Ryan McCarthy vs. Byron Cragg, 8pm, $25-$45

1) EOTO, The M Machine, SuperVision, 9pm, $33-$38.50

2) DJ Crisco Kidd, 10:30pm, $20

1) Pat Travers Band, 7:30pm, $38.50 2) Rick Gee, DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45 3) DJ Lucian, 8pm, no cover

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45 3) DJ Lucian, 8pm, no cover

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge

1) Ring of Fire, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub

Karaoke

HARRAH’S RENO

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F-Sa, 7pm; Tu, 6pm, no cover El Cortez Lounge, 235 W. Second St., 3244255: Daily, 9pm, no cover Hangar Bar, 10603 Stead Blvd., Stead, 677-7088: Karaoke Kat, Sa, 9pm, no cover West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Ballroom 3) Cabaret 4) Orozko

MONTBLEU RESORT

1) Sweet Talk: A Delicious Electro-Cirque Kiss, 8:30pm, $20

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

2) Ike & Martin, 7pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/17-3/19

2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Ring of Fire, 7pm, Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, W, no cover

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45

3) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover

3) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm W, no cover 4) Kevin Tokarz, 6pm, W, no cover

1) Sweet Talk: A Delicious Electro-Cirque Kiss, 8:30pm, $20

2) The Young Dubliners, 10pm, M, $30

2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

2) Anderson, Ackerson & Teran, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

1) Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no cover

345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Poolside

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

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3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Superbad, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Superbad, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

23rd Annual Rocky Mountain Oyster Fry More than 20 cooks will compete for fame and glory as one of the best Rocky Mountain oyster cooks in the West on Saturday, March 15. The “testicle festival” features bull fries served up in a variety of ways and plenty of beer to wash them down. If you can’t bring yourself to eat the snipped off parts of a bull calf, you can watch the St. Patrick’s Day Parade down C Street starting at noon. Or you can enjoy live Irish music at various venues along the town’s main drag. Festival goers age 21 and older can top off the day with the Leprechaun Bar Crawl. Tickets are $5-$10 for tastings and $10 for the bar crawl. A party-of-four package including tastings and bar crawl is $60. Call 847-7500 or visit www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

2nd Annual Leprechaun Crawl You don’t have to be Irish to attend the second annual St. Patrick’s Day-themed pub crawl; you just have to be of legal drinking age. Twenty-five bars and clubs in downtown Reno will offer no cover charge and $3 drink specials to participants wearing green. Just purchase a $5 commemorative cup and a map to the participating pub crawl venues in advance of the event at Junkee Clothing Exchange, 960 S. Virginia St. Or you can wait until the night of the crawl to purchase a cup at The Waterfall, 134 W. Second St., or Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., the two starting points of the crawl, which gets underway at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 15. Visit http://leprechauncrawl.com.

FAMILY SCIENCE EXPO The free event will feature dozens of hands-on, interactive science experiments, activities and demonstrations emphasizing concepts in geology, climate and weather, and astronomy. This year’s Science Expo theme is “Earth and Space Science.” Admission is free. The expo takes place from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 19, at the Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences, 291 Country Club Drive, Incline Village. Call 881-7560 or visit http://terc.ucdavis.edu.

2014 Nevada Poetry Out Loud State Finals Fifteen Nevada students will compete for the state title at the 2014 Nevada Poetry Out Loud State Finals. Poetry Out Loud is a contest that encourages the nation’s youth to learn about great poetry through memorization and recitation. This program helps students master public speaking skills, build self-confidence and learn about their literary heritage. The winner of the state title will move on to compete in the national finals in Washington D.C. in April. The free event begins at noon on Saturday, March 15, at the Siena Hotel Spa Casino, 1 S. Lake St. Visit http://nac.nevadaculture.org.

—Kelley Lang

Youth Art Month Family Festival VSA arts of Nevada’s festival features face painting, eight hands-on art creation stations and tours of the historic Lake Mansion. There will also be an art exhibit of children’s art created in 750 VSA arts of Nevada workshops in 65 elementary through high school special education classrooms in Washoe and Carson City schools districts. Children must be accompanied by an adult. The free event begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 15, at the Lake Mansion, 250 Court St. Call 826-6100 ext. 3 or visit www.vsanevada.org.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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W IN A FA MILY 4 - PA C K O F T I C K E T S T O T HE

“RICHES, ROGUES & RELICS” ExHIbIT AT THE WILbUR D. MAy CENTER!

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On a business trip, I drank way too much with some work friends and ended up kissing a random girl I met at a bar, despite my having a girlfriend I love very much. I feel horrible. Until now, I’d never cheated on a woman. Is it crazy to want to tell my girlfriend? It was kissing only, and I never saw the girl again. Plus, I barely remember it. I am planning on proposing soon and don’t want us to have any secrets. Honesty is not the best policy. Judicious honesty is. That’s the kind of honesty that keeps you from telling your girlfriend that her mom is a shrill harpy or that her best friend has amazing boobs. Ruining the drunken make-out fun is one of the evolutionary underpinnings of human society, our evolved fairness-monitoring system that made it possible for us to live cooperatively in groups. This system is basically an internal accounting department, tracking who owes what to whom and using our emotions as the enforcer. When somebody’s chumping us, say, by not putting in their fair share of work, we’re goaded into getting mad (and then getting things even). Conversely, we feel guilty and long to right the balance when we’re the one breaking some agreement (like by treating monogamy as if it comes with days off for national holidays). But is letting your girlfriend in on your lips’ browser history the right thing to do? Maybe; maybe not. Chances are, you tell yourself that you’d be confessing for your girlfriend’s benefit, that she deserves to know. Well, maybe she deserves to not know. Maybe what’s really driving your

desire to confess is the weight on your conscience and how telling will lessen your load. Sorry—you did the making out; maybe you should be hauling around the unsettling feeling about it. What should determine whether you tell your girlfriend is why you kissed the girl and whether the past is a harbinger of what’s to come. If you’re a bad bet for remaining faithful, disclose this so your girlfriend can decide whether it’s worth it to her to put herself in harm’s way. If, however, this was a drunken one-time thing, why cause her unnecessary worry and pain? Keep your big wandering yap shut and lighten your guiltload by doing what you would’ve if you had told her—making amends. Do kind acts for people in need and basically be a fantastic boyfriend to her. (Be careful not to go noticeably overboard. One dozen roses on some random Tuesday is “Oh, you shouldn’t have.” One hundred is “Wait—what the hell did you do?”) And finally, to ensure that this remains a one-time event, come up with some standards of bar-time engagement for yourself, like maybe that you need to switch to Shirley Temples after two beers. This way, you’ll be prepared to act like somebody’s boyfriend when temptation sidles up to you at the bar. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   march 13, 2014  |  

RN&R  

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33


Al

12th Annu

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “There was

another life that I might have had, but I am having this one.” So says a character in Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel The Unconsoled. At this juncture in your life story, Aries, it might be healing for you to make a similar declaration. Now is an excellent moment to say a final goodbye to plot twists that you wished would have happened but never did. To do so will free up stuck energy that will then become available for future projects. You may even awaken to exciting possibilities you haven’t imagined yet.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In May 2011,

two Nepali men reached the top of Mount Everest after a six-week climb. Lakpa Tsheri Sherpa and Sano Babu Sunuwar had prepared an unprecedented way to get back down off the mountain. Strapping themselves to a single parachute, they leaped off and paraglided for 45 minutes, landing near a Sherpa village thousands of feet below the summit. I suggest you look around for a metaphorical version of a shortcut like that, Taurus. Don’t do the next part of the journey the same way you did the previous phase. Take a more direct route. Enjoy an alternate adventure. Give yourself a fresh challenge.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Seeking

wisdom and chasing after pleasure are polar opposites, right? You must devote yourself to either one or the other, correct? You can be an enlightened servant of the greater good or else an exuberant hedonist in quest of joy, but not both. True? No. No. No. False. Wrong. Here’s the bigger truth: Now and then, grace periods come along when you can become smarter and kinder by exploring the mysteries of feeling really good. Can you guess when the next of these grace periods will arrive for you, Gemini? Here’s the answer: It’s here now!

2

$

00

OFF

General Admission Per Person! Good for up to 4 people! Excludes VIP Entry! March 22-23 Reno-Sparks Convention Center

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MARCH 13, 2014

Recycle this paper

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Humans

walked on the moon before anyone ever had the simple idea to put wheels on suitcases. Unbelievable, right? Until 1972, three years after astronauts first walked on the lunar surface, travelers in airports and train stations had to carry and drag wheelless containers full of their belongings. I suspect that a comparable out-of-sequence thing may be going on in your own life, Cancerian. In some ways you are totally up-to-date, and in other ways you are lagging behind. Now would be a good time to identify any discrepancies and start correcting them. Metaphorically speaking, I’d love you to have rolling luggage by the next time you take a journey.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you ever heard

of Sasquatch, also known as Bigfoot? You know, one of those big, hairy, humanoid beasts that walks upright and lives in dense forests? Scientists assure us that there is no such thing. But then they used to say the same thing about the platypus. It was a myth, they declared; a figment of explorers’ vivid imaginations. A duck-billed, egg-laying mammal simply could not exist. When the respected British zoologist George Shaw claimed there was indeed such a creature, he was mocked by his contemporaries. Eventually, though, the truth emerged, and Shaw was vindicated. I suspect that you Leos will soon experience an event akin to the discovery and confirmation that the platypus is real.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Kyoka is a Japanese word that means “a flower reflected in a mirror”. I suggest you use it as a metaphor to help you understand what’s happening in your life right now. Here are some clues to jump-start your ruminations. Are you more focused on the image of what you love than on what you love? If so, is there anything wrong with that, or is it perfectly fine? Are you more interested in ephemeral beauty that you can admire from afar than in tangible beauty you can actually touch? If so, is there anything wrong with that, or is it perfectly fine? Should you turn away from a dreamy surrogate and turn toward the real thing? If so, why?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A British

researcher poured 300 million facts into a computer program designed to determine the most boring day in history. The winner was April 11, 1954. It was selected because almost nothing important happened except an election in Belgium. I’m wondering if you Libras might reach that level of blah sometime soon. The astrological omens suggest it’s a possibility. And, frankly, I hope that’s exactly what happens. You need a break from high adventure and agitated activity. You would benefit from indulging in some downtime that allowed you to luxuriate in silence and stasis. The time has come to recharge your psychic batteries.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You won’t

be the recipient of good luck in the coming days. Nor will you experience bad luck or dumb luck or weird luck. No, Scorpio. The serendipitous slew of synchronicities that will slip and slide into your sphere requires a new word, which I have coined for this occasion. That word is “shluck.” Shluck is a cracked yet plucky sort of backward luck that provides you with an abundance of curious slack. Shluck slings your way a series of happy accidents and curious coincidences that give you experiences you didn’t even realize you needed. To take maximum advantage of shluck’s benefits, you have to dispense with your agendas and drop your expectations.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In

the old fairy tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” the poor woodcutter Ali Baba is collecting firewood in the forest when he spies a gang of thieves bragging about their exploits. Observing them from a hiding place, he hears them chant a phrase, “Open sesame.” This magically unseals the opening to a cave that happens to be full of their stolen treasure. Later, when the thieves have departed, Ali Baba goes to the cave and says “Open sesame” himself. The hocus-pocus works. He slips into the cave and steals a bag of gold from the robbers’ plunder. This story has resemblances to an adventure you could enjoy sometime soon, Sagittarius. I suspect you may discover your own version of “open sesame.” It will give you access to a less literal and more legitimate bounty.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your

ability to heal rifts and bridge gaps is unusually high. You could connect seemingly irreconcilable elements and forge apparently impossible links. Former allies who have become estranged might be moved to bond again through your compassionate intervention. I’m not promising amazingly miraculous feats of unification, but I’m not ruling them out, either. You have a sixth sense about how to create interesting mixtures by applying just the right amount of pressure and offering just the right kind of tenderness.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): My friend

Harry said he wanted to teach me to play golf. “Are you kidding?” I asked him incredulously. “The dullest game on the planet?” He tried to convince me that it would provide lots of interesting metaphors I could use in writing horoscopes. “Name one,” I challenged him. He told me that “Volkswagen” is a slang term that describes what happens when a golfer makes an awkward shot that nevertheless turns out to be quite good. “Hmm,” I replied. “That is exactly the theme I have decided on for the Aquarius horoscope.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do you

remember being in your mother’s womb? Probably not. But here’s what I know about that time: In the first few weeks after you were conceived, your body grew at a very rapid rate. Once you were born, if you had continued to expand and develop with that much vigor, you would literally have grown to be as big as a mountain by now. So let’s be thankful you slowed down. But I do want to sound an alert and let you know that you are currently in a growth spurt with some metaphorical resemblances to that original eruption. It’s basically a good thing. Just be aware that you may experience growing pains.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


Think Free

by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Banker Stan Wilmoth is president of Heritage Bank of Nevada, which recently moved its headquarters to a new facility.

It has changed. Not considerably changed. We have a number of people right now out to expand their businesses and borrowing money. You’re seeing now where they’re building their equity back into their personal net worth and are starting to get cash flow back in, the top end starting to increase, total revenue. Three years, four years ago, it was all about expense cutting and that’s all you saw was expense cutting. There wasn’t much growth in the top revenue. But today you’re starting to see growth and revenue growth. And all that expense control that they did over the last three or four or five years is starting to pay off.

I hear from a lot of people that they are just weary of hard times, that Nevada’s jobless rate is always the highest … that Nevada will never have a vigorous economy again. What does that do to confidence, and is confidence that important? Confidence is very, very important, because consumer spending drives the economy, and if we’re not spending money, then that’s an issue. The uncertainty that’s happening in Washington, D.C., in all areas, whether you’re a liberal or a conservative, it’s uncertainty. The polarization of the two parties in Washington is causing the consumer to be very uncertain. In Nevada, I think that the economy’s coming back to some degree. Unemployment’s a little bit lower than it was. We are starting to see some businesses migrate in from California. … Gaming is coming back some. It drove the economy in pre-recession days, but now we have other things that I think will help. Housing has recovered to some degree but there’s still a little concern that that shadow inventory [homes that could be foreclosed but haven’t been] is out there. [Bank of America], even though they’ve serviced the majority of the loans in Nevada, they still haven’t foreclosed on a lot of homes.

Is it all D.C.? Are there factors in your control at this level? Yes, I think the majority of it is in Washington. I think the Consumer Compliance Group, Dodd-Frank regulation and those kind of things are just slowing lending, and a lot of consumers are frightened about what’s going to happen, but I think mostly businesses are just frustrated about what’s going to happen in Washington, D.C. There’s a section of Dodd-Frank on qualified mortgages that is 800 pages long. That in itself is going to create uncertainty.

Well, that was quite the jackal storm! I refer to the spectacle of those super grumpy old Freax on Fox in the aftermath of Vlad the Imputinator’s move into Ukraine. Jesus, you’da thought that Russian tanks had just rumbled into Disney World, the way these Obamaphobes pounced on the president, regaling their viewers with a torrid torrent of sputtering sputum that could lead them to one and only one extremely sorry conclusion—that our current commanderin-chief is a very wimpy weiner of a superwuss. Well, what exactly was Obama supposed to do, crazed snarling pundits? Bomb somebody? Who, exactly? And over what, exactly? A peninsula that, truth be told, nobody in this country, including senile old codgers T. Rex McCain and John “Get Off My Lawn!” Bolton, gives two figs about? Allow me to speak for all us wimpy weiners out here in the fruited plain. I don’t mind one itsy bitsy teentsy weentsy fuckwad of an iota that

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How do you describe your personal level of confidence? I’m pretty confident that things will start to expand for us. … All we’re doing is providing loans to businesses and trying to get this engine working. We need to start driving jobs. Unemployment is for families that are really in need. It’s a great bridge. But you’ve got to get the bridge going to somewhere. And that bridge is a job. Most people don’t want to be on unemployment. They want a job. And we have to create a tax environment where people want to create jobs and not be so polarized. Ω

Four years ago—that would be three years into the recession— you told us, “I can’t remember the last time I saw an application for a new business. The issue isn’t that we aren’t loaning

Putin on the Ritz

∫y Bruce Van Dye of testosteriffic leadership, he was your guy. I’m sure he could’ve ridden topless all day next to bad Vlad in what would have surely been a hairy-chested photo shoot for the ages. But the point is, our cowboy prez gave the green light to go go go and roll roll roll with some rockin’ invasion action, an action that made Vlad’s look like chump change. It was a decision that had, I’m sure, every one of these gronkulated Republican power pundits smashing beer cans on his forehead in whooping approval. It was a decision that, we found out very quickly, sucked. And sucked big time. That anybody with even two neurons of memory left in his or her brain continues to listen to this reptilian cabal of encrusted dingleberries who are always wrong about everything is utterly beyond me. Ω

Obama is thoughtful, measured, deliberate, and yes, boringly predictable in dealing with these international pseudo-crises. That’s part of the reason I voted for the guy. I would much rather the United States be thoughtful and diplomatically oriented in foreign affairs, especially foreign affairs involving distant, weird spots of strange land filled with confusing people, because that’s the best way to make sure foreign affairs don’t become foreign misadventures. In case you raving howler monkeys in the peanut gallery have forgotten, we just recently had a president who was somewhat enthusiastically inclined toward foreign intervention. Inclined enough to rack up a body count in the six digit range, and flush a few trillion with a T dollars down the toilet. I mean, shit, if you like presidents who ride horseback topless, fearlessly flashing the firm, decisive pectorals

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

money. Nobody’s borrowing money. … It’s more difficult to find a business model that you can project revenue today and make a profit.” How has that changed?

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MARCH 13, 2014

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RN&R

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