Issuu on Google+

Letters ........................... 3 Opinion/Streetalk ........... 5 Sheila Leslie ................... 6 Brendan Trainor............. 7 News ............................. 8 Green ........................... 11 Feature ........................ 13 Arts&Culture ............... 16 Art of the State ............ 19

Foodfinds .................... 20 Film............................. 22 Musicbeat ................... 23 Nightclubs/Casinos ...... 24 This Week ....................27 Advice Goddess .......... 28 Free Will Astrology ...... 30 15 Minutes .................... 31 Bruce Van Dyke ........... 31

It’s just lip service see left Foot Forward, page 6.

Stacking the deck for

corporate cardsharks see News, page 8.

PuttIng the

‘x’ iN ted see Arts&culture, page 16.

a weak second half see Film, page 22.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE 19, issuE 51

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fEbRuaRy 6–12, 2014


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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Fun and taxes

Leave Amanda alone

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I had the best weekend. Those are going to start slowing down, as the school year grinds back to a cruising speed, but it’s sure good while it lasts. First, I skipped lunch on Friday, so I could go home early and get to work on my taxes. Well, of course, I had almost everything I needed—my mortgage company failed to send me my 1098/99, and I couldn’t figure out how much I spent on car registration taxes. (It’s right here: https:// dmvapp.nv.gov/dmv/vr/vr_estimate/vrestimationinput. aspx .) Those facts alone would be enough to irritate some people out of a great weekend, but it just allowed me to get to dig into a geeky project I’ve been working. “Dig in” included hundreds of paper documents and my new document scanner. The scanner only cost me $308, and it scans about 25 pages a minute to pdf for the ultimate in nerdy instant gratification. I simply can’t calculate the hours upon hours I’ve spent trying to get representations of paper documents into my computer. Since I have tried many high-speed document scanners, I don’t really want to endorse this one, but I will say there are a good variety of them on Amazon.com And it wasn’t just nerdy fun, I was also able to do some regular fun stuff. I finally broke down and bought a used elliptical machine because it seemed like I was never going to get to the gym again, so I burned in the neighborhood of 1,200 calories on Friday and Saturday. I even got to see the awesome 12 Years a Slave at an actual theater. While I thought the movie was really well done, it was more disturbing than entertaining. In fact, between that and the fact that my honey and I have been re-watching Game of Thrones, my dreams have been pretty crazy the last few days. Finally, bright and early Monday morning, the mortgage company came through with my tax documents, and I was able to TurboTax my filing in.

If you look up kangaroo court in the dictionary the abbreviation would be the Italian justice system. This system tried Amanda Knox on public opinion only, the courts did not show one shred of real evidence against her. Thank god the Italian public did not accuse her of witchcraft—she would have been burned at the stake. It is time those idiots leave this American citizen alone. They have tormented her enough. Cecelia Soper Reno

Don’t fence it in What is going on at San Raphael Park? There is construction of a high barrier black fence which makes no sense, is aesthetically ugly, and restricts public movement within the park. Part of this expensive boondoggle can be seen already from N. Sierra Street. Why? This writer asked a park ranger on Sunday, Jan. 26, and was told it was to keep the homeless out. What homeless? I live across the street from the park, and there are no hordes of homeless camping out at the park. Could the stealing of plaques from the park have instigated this ill-conceived move? The fence does not seem to be around memorials, but there is evidence that something with them is planned as there are markers around some of them. This project, which must cost many tens of thousands of dollars, is being funded by the May Foundation which runs the Arboreum at the park. But what will a high black fence accomplish? It will visually restrict the public viewing areas, it will physically restrict the public, and it will detract from the beauty of the park. What it will not do is keep the phantom homeless from the park or vandals from abusing the memorials. More police patrols would be better. While it might

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

be argued a fence along Sierra Street might curtail entrance to the park after hours, an interior fence is ill-conceived, and will prove to be counterproductive. The fence is being erected by Artistic Fences. The fence is neither artistic or fitting. It is an eyesore and a horrible idea. Your investigative services are invited on this that the public be made aware of what is happening to their park. Samuel Margolies Reno

Attitude problem? I have gone to the Reno Bike Project on several different occasions for the sole reason that my bike was in dire need of a simple repair [to a problem] that occurred while I was out handling business. Since my bicycle is my means of transportation in and around Reno, without the use of my bicycle, it becomes very difficult to get anywhere in a timely manner. My latest run in with the Reno Bike project on Fourth Street has me very disturbed and questioning their community ties and what they are really about. It all started when I was given a bike by a friend who had not ridden it in years and just wanted to get rid of it. I aired the tires and proceeded to make the three-mile ride home. After riding a half mile or so, the handle bars became very loose, so I dug through my tool kit only to realize that I did not have the right size Allen wrench with me. With the realization that I would never make it home without leaving part of my skull on the pavement, I decided to go the Reno Bike Project to get my handle bars tightened. What would that take, all of about 15 seconds with the right tool? How wrong I was. The greeting along with the attitude made it very unpleasant, and I was almost sorry that I had asked for a little help. As I pushed my bike through the door I could feel it: “No help here, go away” from the two guys behind the counter. When I asked to borrow an Allen

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Staff writer Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Laura Davis, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office Manager/Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

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wrench and told them the bike was given to me 30 minutes earlier, I was told that I must request the use of a booth and would not be able to use any tools until my request was granted. Spinning my bike around and pointing it toward the door while taking a couple of steps to leave, I turned, copped an attitude, and said to the person who had approached me earlier, “So what you are saying is that you are going to let me ride out of here with the possibility of my handle bars becoming detached and my head smashing into the pavement.” His response was, “No, that is not what I am saying,” so I asked, “Then what is it that you are saying?” That is when he grabbed my bike and proceeded to pull a wrench from his tool belt and tightened the bolt. This took all of about 15 seconds. I thanked him and told him that I felt much safer riding home—only to have him turn his back to me and walk away with an attitude. This is the second time I have been treated like this in an emergency situation where my bike was in need of a very simple repair. Both times I had to cop an attitude and raise my voice in order to get the simplest of help from the bike shop that prides itself on community efforts. I hope that I will not have to raise my voice the next time I need help from the Reno Bike Project in order to make it home safely on my bike. On the other hand, let’s give those Morris Burners a high five. On one of my many bike rides past the Morris Burner Hotel, I was distracted by the cute blonde Burner and her two male companions who were setting up a table with cold weather gear for the homeless. Nice job, Burners, those jackets you passed out a week later were much appreciated by the homeless as well. Rick Carter Reno

Distribution Manager Valerie Mets Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Ron Large, Joe Medeiros, Andy Odegard, Jesse Pike, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Gary White, Joseph White, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

Don’t sabotage diplomats From the agreement to eradicate Syria’s chemical weapons to the deal to limit Iran’s nuclear program, 2013 will be remembered as a year of historic diplomatic accomplishments. I hope 2014 is not the year the U.S. Senate passes sanctions that sabotage our diplomats’ achievements. I hope my senators, Sens. Reid and Heller, will oppose the Menendez-Kirk-Schumer legislation that would increase sanctions on Iran and encourage Israel to launch a preemptive attack on Iran. If these sanctions passed, it would violate the first-step nuclear deal and likely lead to the collapse of the negotiations with Iran, which is why the White House has issued a veto threat. The Senate should heed advice from a recent U.S. Intelligence Community assessment which stated that “new sanctions would undermine the prospects for a successful comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran.” The Friends Committee on National Legislation has more on how Congress can support, not sabotage, diplomacy with Iran: fcnl. org/iran. Debbie Thomas Reno

Correction Re “A job left undone II,” (News, Jan. 30): A sentence quoted Rancho San Rafael arboretum official Linda Nelson on the response of Reno casinos to plans for a grove memorializing the victims of the 1985 Galaxy plane crash. That quote should have been attributed to memorial planner Doris Isaeff. The error has been corrected online. We apologize for any confusion caused by our error.

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or email classifieds@ newsreview.com

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover & Feature story design: Hayley Doshay

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by Dennis Myers

This Modern Wo r ld

by tom tomorrow

Have you ever had your heart broken? Asked at Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. Patti Meals Administrator

Probably. I block out those memories. So, don’t remember, but I’m sure I have. A bad experience like that, you just put it in the past, you block it out, you move forward.

Alyson Redmond Waitress

Absolutely. And I learned that you can’t be selfish in a relationship, because if you date someone who is, you’re just going to get hurt.

Autumn Maillous Apartment manager

Protect the children The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has been given new powers by Congress to regulate anti-smoking efforts in the United States. One of the first public examples of its new authority is an up to $600 million advertising campaign designed to reach the most vulnerable to smoking’s suicidal appeals—children ages 12-17. And it intends to target those children by appealing not to their inquisitive, agile minds but to their vanity. There are a couple of ways to look at that. First, it would be great if our government had the respect for our youth to make a convincing intellectual argument. Second, the government is right to recognize that intellectual arguments are ineffective against addictions. Third, entities that base their arguments on the way they wish things would be, instead of the way things are, fail. So kudos to the FDA for going for effectiveness rather than “political” objectivity and wishful thinking. Cigarettes may kill only up to 440,000 people a year, but it makes tens of millions look like morons. Research shows that if people don’t start smoking before they’re 26, they will never start. And while statistics vary, if they do start, something in the neighborhood of three out of four will die smokers. The ad campaign will target tobacco’s short-term effects, like rotting gums and causing teeth discoloration and loss. It will talk about how smoking causes minute wrinkles in the skin around the eyes and around the lips, causing the appearance of premature aging. It will go after fragile egos by conflating

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Yes. A high school crush. It was fun to have a crush. It was joyful. And even though it was heartbreaking, life goes on.

cigarettes with bullies, suggesting that cigarettes cause that same loss of control and low self esteem. One thing these ads can’t do is overcome the rebellious nature of the act of smoking: “This is my life—you can’t tell me what to do.” Children who want to act like adults—or adults who want to act like children—have no easier method than to do the things that adults do that children are legally forbidden to do. And the only way to attack that is to establish connections between the drug nicotine and the people who actually use it so that young people will look elsewhere to express their individuality, because who is it who smokes? The willfully ignorant, the erectilely dysfunctional, those who can’t control their lives, the smelly, the unattractive—basically your average human beings. And teenagers who take up smoking want to appear anything but average. They want the flip side of what smoking represents, the aspects they believe the behavior bestows on them—coolness, dangerousness, hipness, boldness. As the United States moves forward in the war against this killing substance, we need to fully recognize that the battles should be fought not on the fields of how we wish things were—that people would quit smoking through intellectual persuasion—but into realms of self-preservation, exclusion and prohibition of smoking in public places. And the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, that bastion of intellectualism, will be a great place to start. Ω

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William Peterson Bartender

Yes. Multiple times. You just have to put your heart out there, I guess, and then hope it doesn’t get broken. Mainly it’s been with pets, lately. Other than that, I’m married with children, so my heart doesn’t get broken quite as often.

Ali Longballa Waitress

We all have our heart broken, right? You don’t know what real love is until you get your heart broken. You grow up and move on, and learn how to bounce back the next time.

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Women won’t step backward in time It’s hard to see how the Growth and Opportunity Project is going to succeed. As Republicans gear up for the mid-term election cycle, there have been many reports of their rebranding plan, a national effort designed to make the party more appealing to groups that have largely abandoned by it in the voting booth. Women, in Sheila Leslie particular, seem to be losing their patience with the Republicans’ obsession with controlling women’s personal health decisions as every news cycle seems to show the Project’s words don’t add up. Consider Rep. Steve Pearce’s, R-NM, memoir released last month that asserts a wife “is to voluntarily submit” to her husband. No worries, though, because he will “show up during the times of deep stress, take the leadership role and be accountable for the outcome, blaming no one else.” What a modern world he lives in. Then there are the comments from former Republican governor of Arkansas’ Mike Huckabee at the winter meeting of the Republican

National Committee, apparently trying to convince women their interests are better served when Republicans control the political landscape. Huckabee proclaimed in a luncheon speech that “Democrats want to insult the women of America by making them believe that they are helpless without ‘Uncle Sugar’ coming in and providing for them a prescription each month for birth control because they cannot control their libido or reproductive system without the help of the government…” He said Democrats view women as “helpless” while his party seeks to empower women to “be something other than victims of their gender.” Huckabee insisted his comments were misunderstood and taken out of context. He said he isn’t against birth control, just the “Democrats treating women as though they are somehow incapable of being able to function unless the Democrats and particularly the government comes in to rescue them.” Here’s a hint about the outrage

from women of both parties over your remarks, governor—women want their reproductive health needs to be included in their health plans just like men’s sexual health needs are provided for. You want Viagra. We want birth control. In Nevada, we still recoil at the “caveman radio” segment last fall when Washoe GOP leaders led a panel discussion on the role of women in the home and the workforce, seeming to blame a long list of societal problems on women neglecting their home life. Women in Nevada’s Legislature have long endured the dubious honor of working twice as hard to be taken half as seriously as many male legislators, no matter which party they represented. At Assemblywoman Vivian Freeman’s memorial recently, someone told the story of her groundbreaking mining reclamation bill that was taken away from her and given to a male legislator because it was far too important to entrust to a woman. Yet, the contrast between the two parties of women in leadership

was never more apparent than in the 2013 session when Republicans could boast of just one woman in the Senate, their senior member, who was given minor committee assignments and routinely ignored while the Assembly was led by the second female Speaker in the last six years, a Democrat. Meanwhile, one of Nevada’s most venerable and respected Republican women, former senator and lieutenant governor, Sue Wagner, left her party last week to become a registered nonpartisan voter. She told Ray Hagar of the Reno Gazette-Journal the party no longer represented her because “It’s grown so conservative and tea-party oriented and I just can’t buy into that. … I did it as a symbol, I guess, that I do not like the Republican Party and what they stand for today.” Neena Laxalt, another prominent Republican woman, followed her lead a few days later. Instead of attracting new voters, it seems the Growth and Opportunity Project and its elected representatives might be driving them away. Ω

Were Huckabee’s comments taken out of context? You decide: www. realclearpolitics.com/ video/2014/01/23/ huckabee_dems_ think_women_cant_ control_libido.html

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Who’s fracking whom? Bob Fulkerson of the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada was finishing his testimony in November before the Nevada Land Management Task Force when he nearly screamed, “And now there is fracking in Nevada!” Yes, there is one exploratory by Brendan well near Elko. Nevada is not known Trainor for its oil, as only a handful of low grade wells are pumping. If this new fracking technology shows promise ... well, Nevada could be the site of a major natural gas boom such as the Dakotas are enjoying. With Nevada’s unemployment rate what it is, any kind of boom would appear welcome. But PLAN says—not if it’s caused by fracking! The left’s own EPA has given fracking a passing grade. Why are so many environmentalists opposed to fracking? Perhaps they hate it so because fracking has been the major force in lowering greenhouse gas emissions over the last 10 years. Fracking has done more to accomplish the goals of the greens on their critical issue of

reduction of greenhouse gases than all the cap-and-trade, regulate-anddelay, inspect-and-fine tactics they love to pursue. It is simply a free market miracle. Because of fracking, the U.S. has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions to 1990s levels. The green left was for fracking before it was against it. They envisioned fracking only as a “bridge” to renewable energy. They believed the state would heavily subsidize solar and wind energy, while energy production would slowly convert from King Coal to natural gas. This would marginally improve things for a while, until their beloved renewable technologies would arise like butterflies from their tax-funded cocoons. Then there would be no more need for the nasty job of sticking pipes into Gaia and injecting water and sand and a small amount of chemicals into her writhing body ... sorry—environmental fantasies can get kinky. But soon it became apparent that renewables were nowhere near capable of competing with natural

gas for the foreseeable future. What if they never could compete? The progressive vision of a world run by highly educated technocrats in charge of enormous bureaucracies that can do the proper cost benefit analysis and produce the correct five-year plan is in danger of being out-innovated, out-produced, out-performed environmentally by just lowly, relatively free, markets? Without a photo-op? That is dangerous libertarian thinking! Could Adam Smith have been right that individuals and firms acting for their own self interest cannot help but produce benefits for society? Could Ludwig von Mises have been right that government can’t calculate? Because government cannot calculate the free choices of millions of individuals, it cannot possibly do a complete cost/benefit analysis. No government agency has the knowledge necessary to calculate all the opportunity costs associated with regulatory controls. For example, the European Union caps on oil have only forced them

to import more dirty coal from the U.S.! Now the E.U. is poised to embrace fracking. Et tu, Europa? The best way to determine costs and benefits and allocate resources is through the process of free markets operating within well defined property rights negotiating win-win opportunities. The fracking phenomenon suggests we could eliminate all the time, energy and money invested in political lobbying and allow free markets to produce the best possible outcomes. The green left is doomed to constantly produce far less than optimal results, and often quite negative results, because of its marriage to centralized big government. Henry Thoreau, the father of American environmentalism, believed the government that governs best, governs least. The environmental movement needs to take Thoreau’s ideas back to heart or risk continued irrelevance in the 21st century. Ω

Lots of fun stuff about climate change here: http://350.org.

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Photo/Dennis Myers

Members of the Land Management Task Force  met on January—in the offices of the Nevada  Association of Counties.

Not so open Nevada does a poor job of disclosing the corporate welfare it hands out, according to a state-by-state comparison. Good Jobs First (GJF), a D.C. organization that tracks subsidies given to business in various forms (tax credits, exemptions, incentives, etc.), released a study of their transparency on Jan. 29. It ranked Nevada in a tie for 45th place in the nation (Hawaii shared the slot). “While Nevada readily responds to open records requests for subsidy recipient information and has scored well in our previous research on job quality standards and enforcement, the state’s online disclosure barely qualifies for our study,” the GJR report said. “There exists a legislative report with company-specific disclosure information for some of the below-listed programs, but as this is not a regularly issued report it does not qualify for scoring.” As if to make GJF’s point, the Nevada report—“Report on tax abatements, tax exemptions, tax incentives for economic development and tax increment financing in Nevada” by the fiscal division of the Nevada Legislature—is stale. It was released in February 2009 and has not been updated since. So information on the past five years is unavailable in a single location. The GJF is at www.goodjobsfirst.org/showusthesubsidizedjobs. And Nevada’s 2009 list of handouts can be found at http://tinyurl. com/mo64ylu.

Wagner steps out Former Nevada lieutenant governor Sue Wagner last week ended a lifetime as a Republican, saying the party has become too extreme. Born in Portland, Maine, in a traditional Republican family—her father was active in the Maine GOP—she was raised in Arizona and moved to Reno when her scientist husband Pete Wagner took a position with the Desert Research Institute. He was killed on a cloud seeding research flight in 1980. Wagner was elected first to the Nevada Assembly, then the Senate, then to the lieutenant governorship. During her 1990 campaign for lieutenant governor she was seriously injured in a plane crash in Churchill County but was elected and took office on schedule. Her productive legislative record and moderate votes made her one of the most popular Republicans in the state. In 1994 she declined to run for reelection as lieutenant governor but made it clear she was not leaving elective office for good, just taking a hiatus. “I’ll be back,” she said flatly. She was subsequently appointed a state gambling regulator and ran the legislative intern program in Carson City. After U.S. Rep. Barbara Vucanovich announced her retirement from the northern U.S. House seat, Wagner was widely expected to run. But after exploring the race, Wagner said Congress had become too extreme and uncivilized and she chose not to run. So her decision last week to leave the party was not entirely a surprise.

Taber steps down Washoe County Republican chair Tom Taber lasted 205 days in his job before resigning. The county party has been roiled by the same divisions as other county GOPs and the state party, but Taber said his departure is for personal reasons unrelated to those problems. The GOP in Nevada has experienced stresses since Ron Paul supporters became a strong force in 2008. Their influence became even greater in 2012 when they gained full control of the state party machinery. Their support for presidential nominee was considered by longstanding party leaders to be so lukewarm that a sort of party government in exile called Team Nevada to maintain a traditional party role and support Romney. Shortly afterward, the Washoe County Republican Party declared its independence from the Paulists running the state organization and filed with the Federal Elections Commission as a free-standing entity. Taber became Washoe county chair last July after defeating a candidate supported by some Republican officials in elective office. His photo remains the first thing seen on the Washoe GOP website.

--Dennis Myers

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Asking the barber State panels formed around agendas Some political figures are pointing at two state panels as examples of the way the political process can be worked to by screen out unwelcome viewpoints. Dennis Myers A state task force drafting regulations to deal with fracking appears to be, with one exception, composed of current or former mining executives. And a study committee on land issues has been turned lock, stock and barrel over to a lobby organization and is composed only of members with a predilection for some policy positions.

“Counties have been empire building since 1864.” Fred Lokken Political scientist The memberships of the panels are written into statutes, and those memberships virtually guarantee the outcome of their deliberations. So all of what follows is entirely legal.

Landing a big one The Nevada Land Management Task Force is a temporary body, created by the 2013 Nevada Legislature “to conduct a study addressing the transfer of public lands in Nevada from the Federal Government to the State of Nevada.” It is the latest manifestation of efforts that in the 1970s and ’80s were called the Sagebrush Rebellion and in the 1990s were called the County Supremacy Movement.

The Sagebrush Rebellion was launched in 1979 with passage by the Nevada Legislature of Assembly Bill 413, sponsored by Sen. Dean Rhodes, who then represented most of Elko County. The bill was an effort to wrest control of federally managed lands in the state from the federal government. Other states joined the effort in subsequent months. The Rebellion ended up a victim of its publicity—it was on the cover of Newsweek—plus the election of Ronald Reagan as president. As more Nevadans became aware of the implications of the state controlling vast swaths of range and forest land, the urban character of the state came into play politically. While the rural counties were anxious to get their hands on the land, reaction to the notion was more tepid where the population was, in Clark and Washoe counties. Reagan’s election and his appointment of Interior Department officials more in sympathy with Rebellion leaders helped satisfy some of their demands, but made urbanites more concerned than ever. It became clear that additional legislation from later sessions of a Nevada Legislature dominated by urban legislators would be hard to come by. In the end, the expected lawsuits against the feds never came. Supporters of the movement had to be content with whatever gains they made administratively. The County Supremacy Movement had less support from state governments and was shorter lived than the Rebellion but more militant. (Rhodes

resisted the use of the term Sagebrush Rebellion by the new group.) In a climate of discontent with the Clinton administration and the impact of drought, Nye County Commissioner Dick Carver inspired advocates by winning passage of a local ordinance claiming ownership of public land and illegally built a road on Forest Service land with a bulldozer. The illegality was expanded on by others as a Forest Service office in Carson City and the home of a Forest Service official were bombed. That effort dwindled out. Then last year lawmakers created the Land Management Task Force. It was done more quietly, to avoid arousing opposition, and the panel is structured so only county officials serve. The Legislature created a body appointed by county commissions, most of which chose their own members. This deft maneuver virtually guarantees the recommendations— asking a county commissioner if he wants land from the federal government is like a customer asking a barber if he needs a haircut. It also makes the panel look like the legislature before One Person/One Vote became the law. The two counties where 85.8 percent of the residents live have two members and the remaining 14.2 percent have 15 members. Unlike some such panels, members of the public are not invited to apply for seats. The Committee on Industrial Programs, for example, has four legislative members and five public members. More remarkable is a clause in the legislation saying the task force will be administered not by the legislative staff but by counties and the Nevada Association of Counties (NACO), a private group that represents the interests of counties. Last year NACO had four lobbyists at the Legislature. Assemblymember David Bobzien said it was done that way because the bill creating the panel would not have passed otherwise. “It was pretty well decided that the fiscal cost of this was not something worth undertaking.” So a lobbying organization was given control of the panel—which, Bobzien argues, distorts the process. “But the fact that the organization that staffed the study has a bias skews its deliberations,” he said. Assemblymember John Ellison, sponsor of the bill creating the task force, said the county orientation is because that “is closest to the people—city councils and county commissioners. That’s the only reason we did it that way, that and who can pay for the study.” Task force chair Demar Dahl more or less confirmed that the county orientation tilts in favor of one viewpoint: “That may be the case, all right,


Mining the law The Commission on Mineral Resources is a permanent body, its members appointed by the governor. Often its duties are administrative, like selecting the director of the Minerals Department. These days the commission is writing regulations dealing with the controversial practice of hydraulic fracking—forcing a water/ chemical/sand mix into rock fissures. The statute reads, “The Governor shall appoint: (a) Two persons who are familiar with large-scale mining; (b) One person who is familiar with the production of oil and gas; (c) One person who is familiar with

exploration for and development of minerals; (d) One person who is familiar with the situations unique to small-scale mining and prospecting; (e) One person who is familiar with the development of geothermal resources; and (f) One member to represent the general public.” Fred D. Gibson Jr., is one member, best known as president of Pacific Engineering Production Company of Nevada when its Henderson plant exploded in 1988, killing two people and injuring 350. He is the representative of the public. Another, Dennis Bryan, is senior vice president of development of Western Lithium Corporation. Richard DeLong is a geologist, member of the board of Terraco Gold and president of Enviroscientists, Inc., a development company. John Mudge is a Newmont Mines vice president and former chair of the Nevada Mining Association. David Parker is manager of geological services at Freeport McMoRan Copper and Gold, Inc. John H. Snow is CEO of Standard Steam Trust. Arthur Henderson is registered with the state as president of Alisseth Inc. and Alisseth Management Inc., the nature of which are not known. He is also a member of the Nevada Petroleum and Geothermal Society. Lokken said giving executives with such a direct interest in matters before the commission a role in deciding those matters is a “flaw in the law.” Ω

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because the counties and the commissioners are the ones that are closest to that issue, as far as living with the presence of the federal agencies or state agencies or whoever.” Political scientist Fred Lokken called it a “highly flawed, intentionally biased structure, and I question whether its recommendations will have any credibility,” he said. The RN&R first started tracking this when a citizen told us he had been unable to find a list of members. That list was not posted online until a few days ago—after the sixth meeting of the task force since last June. None of the task force information—agendas, minutes, etc.—is posted on the legislative website, the usual site for panels created by the lawmakers. It’s all on the NACO site, hardly the first place citizens would look. When we asked the legislative staff why, we received a circuitous 316-word explanation.

‘My Big Brother helps me follow my dreams. Sometimes, I feel like he is my real brother!’

Day at the museum

Ross (Big) and Omero (Little) just celebrated their three-year match anniversary. Omero has said he wants to be like his Big Brother when he grows up, and Ross just loves introducing his Little Brother to new things.

Photo/Dennis Myers

Change a child’s life for the better, forever. Become a mentor today. Visit BBBSNN.org or call 352-3202.

Two local students, Nikolai Oh, left, and Scott Wado, toured the mining museum at the Mackay School of Mines last weekend during the opening reception for a yearlong exhibit at the museum, “Earthquakes, Chukars and Millionaires: The Mackay Mines Story.” OPINION

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9th Annual

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Enjoy the crystal-clear skies of Pershing County, and watch these colorful and graceful balloons glide along sweeping wind currents. Balloons launch from MacDougall Sports Complex at approximately 8am Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. And don’t forget to lock your love at Loverslock Plaza!! Thursday 5 pm Light up the Night (tethered balloons are inflated on Main Street) Friday 8 am Balloon launch – Media Day Saturday 8 am Balloon launch – Ribbon Race Sunday 8 am Balloon launch – Hare & Hound For a complete list of all events, please visit loverslock.com Times may change and event is weather dependent, so please check our website for updates. For more information, please call 775-273-7213

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Courtesy photo

Fairfield Ranch straddles the west Walker River for about three river miles.

Easing into protection Conservation easement to protect sage-grouse and landowners The dwindling numbers of sage-grouse (known to Nevadans as sage hen) is a common discussion topic in Nevada and much of the West. The bi-state population of sage-grouse in California and Nevada was listed as a threatened by Sage Leehey species earlier this year, and the decision on the listing of the greater sage-grouse will come in the fall of 2015. sage l@ There could be economic consequences if nothing is done to prepare for a newsreview.c om listing of the species, so government groups, conservation groups, and others are working to not only save this species but also prepare the economy. Working toward this, the Nature Conservancy (TNC), with state and federal agencies and the owners of Fairfield Ranch in Douglas County, have recently placed a conservation easement on that ranch land. “Conservation easements preserve open space, and they protect property rights,” said Duane Petite, project director of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Program of TNC. “When you own private property, you own a bundle of rights such as access rights, use rights, water rights and grazing rights and development rights. And what a conservation easement does is it lets a property owner sell or donate one piece of their bundle of rights—their development rights—and preserve all their other property rights.” Fairfield Ranch occupies a little more than 3,800 acres in the north end of Antelope Valley. The property straddles the West Walker River for about three river miles. Petite said conservation easements are important tools for protecting property and the environment. “You’re not only protecting the open space—the fresh water, the incredible vistas—but you’re also, on a working ranch like Fairfield, you’re preserving traditional land uses and you’re conserving our ranching heritage,” Petite said. This land contains habitat for the bi-state population of sage-grouse and protecting it with a conservation easement ensures that there will be no habitat fragmentation on this chunk of property. “It will prevent any inappropriate development,” Petite said. “That area was slated for subdivision, hundreds and hundreds of houses, for example. In its place, you’ll continue the traditional uses of ranching and the property owners use it for fly fishing, they hunt on the location. They retain all the rights to use the property in those ways.” Because the easement allows the land to remain in private hands, Petite believes this benefits the economy. It keeps the land productive as a ranch, providing things like jobs and property taxes, whereas other forms of envito learn more about ronmental protection may take the land out of private ownership. This type of conservation easesolution may help support the economy when or if the greater sage-grouse is ments in Nevada, visit http://bit.ly/1fed1hJ. listed under the Endangered Species Act next year. Since the conservation easement was put in place on Fairfield Ranch, Petite has heard from several other ranchers in the area inquiring about conservation easements on their properties and he hopes this continues. “We’re helping protect critical habitat, but we’re also demonstrating to other property owners one means of protecting their property while they keep it in traditional land uses,” Petite said. “And we’re hoping that what [the Fairfield Ranch property owners] have done will extend beyond their property and serve as a model to other property owners in the area.” Ω OPINION

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Our First

2014 WE’ll bE accEPting EntriEs noW through FEbruary 28 once more into the breach, my friends. the reno news & review is hosting a poetry contest.

One submission per person. Entrants must live within 50 miles of the Reno News & Review’s office. There will be a panel of judges from both inside and outside the newspaper; we won’t announce who they are until publication of the winners to prevent lobbying. We’ll only accept emailed entries. The poem must be in the body of the email; no attachments, please. Include full name, address and phone

in your email. Nom de plumes will not be accepted. Poems must be less than 500 words and must be submitted in a publishable form, e.g., no 1-line, 499-word poems. We’ll be mindful of intentional line breaks and word placement, yet reserve the right to change if needed, so stay away from unusual fonts or formatting. We will presume all spellings and punctuation are intentional and we won’t copy-

edit. Email to: renopoetry@newsreview.com with “Poetry 2014” in the subject line. Deadline for entries is 5PM, 2/28/2014. Winners will be published on 4/3/2014. The person who strips names from submissions will not be part of the judging team. We reserve the right to reject any submission at the editors’ discretion.

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aT


he first time I contacted a girl because I had a crush on her was in third grade. Her name was Jenny, and she had long, golden hair. I think that’s what I liked about her, or maybe it was just because she didn’t pick her nose. At some point in our budding romance I passed her a note professing my affection—“I like you.” That’s all I remember of this inaugural crush. I do remember that she and her family moved away that school year, so I doubt that the relationship progressed much further.

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A few years later, a girl named Nicole telephoned my parent’s house. It was a wrong number, but since we were both in sixth grade and entering puberty, we ended up talking. We talked every night for a couple of weeks, and at some point we decided to meet. She lived in a different school district, but there was a roller skating rink midway so we met there. All the time we had talked, I didn’t know what she looked like. I remember her being cute when we finally did meet, or at least cute enough to make out with behind the building. I met her a couple times after that and made out with her again, but I don’t remember how our fling ended. One of us probably met someone new during the snowball skate. Several years and girlfriends later, I encountered Tracy in the first class of my first year in college. It was 1991. She sat in front of me and had long, curly red hair. That alone was enough to get my attention, but she was beautiful, all around. By chance, she also worked at a coffee shop near campus that I frequented and one night, early in the semester, I stopped in, and she was at the register. I ordered and struck up a conversation. For the next

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three years we dated intermittently but she was never into me as much as I was into her. And I was very into her. College, ideally, should upend the world and make you reconsider in a good way your place in it. Throw in a mostly unrequited love and you can really spin into introspection, though not always in a good way. Indeed, I remember friends at that time who ventured down the rabbit hole of “nobody understands my pain; woe is me” for far too long. Thankfully, I never did anything too annoyingly navel-gazing, other than pen some bad love songs. In fact, early into my infatuation, I remember telling myself to redirect toward my courses the energy I was expending on my love-induced existential angst. About a year into the heartbreak, I started getting straight As. That’s not the only upside to the story, though, for Tracy also introduced me to the internet as a means of communication. It was 1993. She told me we could “talk” via our computers and a dial-up connection. One evening we both signed into a chat room-type platform and started sending messages. I’m sure most of the exchange was pretty banal; this was new technology, after all, so just writing and receiving a “hello” was novel enough. I was tentative in my assertions toward her, anyway, given the imbalance of the relationship. I do remember writing at one point that I felt strongly for her. I then stared at those words on the screen for what felt like an eternity, waiting for a response. When it finally came, she gently replied that the chemistry was not there for her. No matter. I was a college kid brimming with the arrogance of youth, and I remained smitten. The “relationship” ended when she moved 14   |  RN&R   | 

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away after college, with the boyfriend whom she had been seeing the whole time I was also in pursuit.

You know what would look great on you? So I have been around long enough to experience a sea change in romantic connectivity: from passing paper notes and talking on a landline, to chatting on a nascent internet, to the ubiquitous online communications of today. Now, in the quest for a potential mate, you can join a dating site and do preliminary research on numerous prospects before ever reaching out to any of them. You can scan their images for physical attraction, peruse their descriptions for mutual lifestyle connections, and even watch for quirks in their photographs or writings that hint at a deeper, mystical chemistry. Once you’ve identified a good prospect (or many) you can email them, and if they reply, you can be assured that at least they’re interested enough in you to do that. From there, you can continue to email, or text, and deepen your connection, all before you even meet in person. Or, if you

do meet someone in person somewhere, you can likely later find them on Facebook. If they friend you, the amorous trajectory is similar to that of the dating sites. In short, you can not only locate potential mates easily and efficiently using today’s technology, you can also learn a lot about them prior to meeting them in person. Thus when you do meet face-to-face, you are well ahead of the game. Indeed, I have younger friends who I occasionally regale with “when I was your age” dating stories. How it used to be that if you met a potential mate somewhere and you did not get their phone number, your only hope was to run in to them again someplace else. How twists of fate were therefore much more crucial. How today, if you meet someone and you get their name, you can likely make an online connection with relative ease. I would have gotten laid a lot more in my younger years if I’d had Facebook, I lament to them. In a similar vein, I tell them I envy their easy access to another romantically themed material: porn. When I was young, we had to go to great lengths to get that stuff. It was a fantastic day when, at around 11 years old in the early 1980s, I found two Penthouse magazines in a neighbor’s trash. By the early 1990s, I was struggling to catch sight of a boob in a late-night scrambled cable channel. Even in

the late 1990s, you were still forced to furtively visit the backroom of the video store. Now, any type of porn you can imagine is at the tip of your fingers at any time. Orgies? Facials? Japanese tentacles? All and any can be found on YouPorn or Red Tube, and for free. But I recently discovered a downside to this easy access. A Gen Xer friend of mine had been dating a younger man, but they had broken up over sex. The Millennial could rarely get it up, which surprised me given his age and her hotness. Apparently, he had become so addicted to porn that sex with a real woman was no longer exciting enough. He had spent his late-childhood, adolescent, and college years developing a habit in which he always needed to find new, more intense porn to get off. The easy access to any kind of sexually stimulating material imaginable during his formative years had wired the pleasure centers of his brain in a truly sad and scary way, where a real woman in the flesh had become not titillating enough in comparison to furry gangbangs or bukkake fests. My friend’s situation was echoed by a recent AlterNet.org article titled “Did Porn Warp Me Forever? Like other boys my age, I grew up with unlimited access to smut. At 23, I wonder if it’s totally screwed me up.”

It’s not you, it’s me Like the downside of internet porn, a recent relationship has me rethinking my envy of romance in the internet age. I met Maria in a conventional way, at a party of a mutual friend. We had a number of shared interests and I


chatted with her much longer than I often do with a new acquaintance at a party. She was funny, smart, and physically attractive enough, but I did not think about her romantically at that point. A few days later, I received a Facebook friendship request from her and in the next few weeks, she would occasionally like one of my photos or briefly comment on one of my posts—just enough to remind me of our online friendship. Eventually, she sent me a message asking if I would be interested in meeting for a drink. I replied with my cell phone number, which led to a few drinks one night at a bar. We again hit it off, but we parted that evening only with a hug. I received a text from her early the next day. “Good morning,” she wrote, “what’s on your schedule?” I replied with my humdrum workday plans, and she replied with hers. Shortly after this exchange I looked at her Facebook OPINION

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page. I noticed that we both liked Beats Antique and decided that she certainly looked good in several selfies. A couple of hours later another text: “Back from lunch and wanna nap. How you feeling?” I could also use a nap, I replied, but who couldn’t? “Meth addicts,” she answered. No doubt she had a good wit. I looked at her page again and noticed that she, too, liked film noir. A few hours later: “About to drive home. Hope traffic isn’t heavy. Hate that.” I agreed and, once again, I looked at her page. Does she really like Lee Brice? Then later that night: “Reading a book and dozed off. LOL, I think I need my bed.” I too was reading and was about to go to bed, I responded. But before I did, I had one last look at her page. I was a bit surprised to learn that she was a fan of several New Age sites. Over the next week or so she would text every morning, and we would carry on an

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work as well. Other than a very few places— the shower, the movies, driving, sleeping—we are rarely unable to answer our phones, and thus always expected to take a call from our partner, or at the very least, call them right back. Likewise with caller ID. It is still an effective way to screen calls, but now your main squeeze knows you know it’s them. “I know you had your phone, and you knew it was me,” they will ask, “so why didn’t you answer?” And if you fabricate an excuse, you better make sure that it’s not contradicted on Facebook. “How could you have been sleeping when I texted? Your friend posted a picture of you at the bar!” I can only imagine the difficulty of avoiding a partner in the near future, when they are able to send a drone to track you down. With Maria, the more I pulled away, the more she would text or call my smartphone, which she knew I always had with me. Without the excuses facilitated by land lines, I would always reply. Maybe I just haven’t yet figured out how to adroitly circumvent the constant contact of today’s technology, but I knew that any excuse I offered would ring false. Plus, not responding made me feel guilty in a way that I never felt when I didn’t answer a land line (again likely due to the paucity of excuses). One morning I woke up to find two texts that she had sent the night before, after I had gone to bed. I decided that for both of our sakes this had to stop. So I didn’t reply to any of the texts that she sent me that day, nor the next few days after that. She tried to contact me through Facebook, but I ignored those messages, as well. I don’t know if she knew that I was intentionally avoiding her or not, but when I finally did answer, she acted like nothing had changed. I thought about how to best end it with her. A text? An email message? In the end, I deemed these modern-day “Dear John” letters weasel ways to break up. All the internet searches I conducted on “how to break up with your girlfriend” agreed. Instead, they counseled that I “man up” and meet her face-to-face. So I met her at a coffee shop one afternoon. We had a nice chat and as we left, I pulled her aside to an isolated corner of the building and told her it wasn’t working for me. She didn’t show much emotion at the time, only nodding occasionally, seemingly in a daze. I’m still not sure how upset she was over the breakup. We are still friends on Facebook, although I haven’t heard from her since. My latest girlfriend/break up experience demonstrates to me that that regardless of the all the new technology, there are still certain universal truths about romance. No matter how much or how often you can stay in contact, or how much you learn about someone via their Facebook page, if the chemistry isn’t there, it’s not going to work. And when you realize it’s not working, even though you can send a break up text or email, the only honorable thing to do is to end it face-to-face. The only question I have now is, do I unfriend Maria on Facebook? Ω

exchange throughout the day and evening. I also kept exploring her Facebook page. Thus when we did meet in person at a restaurant for our second “real date” I felt I knew her well. Consummating the relationship after dinner at my place was the next logical step. We were now a couple, especially to her. With all the background communications via texting and the internet, this was perhaps the easiest entrance into a relationship that I had ever had. Except there was one nagging problem: from the start, I wasn’t sure I was that into her. Just like Tracy with me, the chemistry felt off with Maria. Maybe it was the differences in our tastes and outlooks. I hate the corporate country of Lee Brice, and I have no religious faith, much less anything to do with crystals and zodiac signs. Or maybe it was physical. She was pleasing but had a different look than the women to which I am normally attracted. Maybe it was simply because I hadn’t dated anyone in a while and was out of the habit of compromise. For whatever reason, the longer we dated, the more my feelings for her lessened instead of deepened. After several months together, I decided that the fairest thing for both of us would be for me to break up with her. I liked Maria and wanted to mitigate any emotional distress that she might experience from the break up, so I began to slowly pull away from her. I would decline every third or so time she wanted to meet, citing previous commitments. When she would text I would wait to reply, keeping my answers short and not reciprocating her pet names for me. In general, I stopped initiating contact with her, be it texts or sex. This is a tried and true method to begin a break up. Ideally, the breakee senses the aim of the breaker and in a preemptive strike ends the relationship. The former thus retains feelings of control and self-respect while the latter gets what they want, with relative ease. This ideal, however, rarely occurs. Instead, as the breaker pulls away, the breakee usually redoubles his or her efforts. If the former neglects texts and phone calls and does not initiate dates and sex, the latter will increase these. At the very least, the breakee will hopefully become frustrated with the unreliability of the breaker and will begin to detach emotionally, even if they do not sense a coming split. Before the internet and smart phones, this gradual pulling away was easier to do. When the main means of non-face-to-face communication was land line phones, you simply did not answer calls. If your insignificant other left you messages, you would ignore them. When you finally did talk with them you could always come up with a valid excuse. You were out running errands or listening to music in headphones or taking a nap or simply away from the phone. When caller ID became available it was even better, because you could now screen the calls and pick up if it was someone else.

Better friends than lovers Today, because most of us are never without our smart phones, the old excuses no longer |

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FILES The university’s recent lecture event sold out in three hours BY GEORGIA FISHER

Elizabeth Smart speaking at  UNR’s recent TEDx event. 

Y For more information, visit www. tedxuniversityofnevada. org.

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ou know the old adage about wanting to write a shorter letter, but not having the time? Same goes for speeches. “It’s much easier to fill an hour than it is to fill a tight, 12-minute talk,” said Bret Simmons, a UNR management professor who launched the school’s instantly popular TEDx program last year. “There’s no waste of words. You have to grab [listeners] in the first 60 seconds, or they’ll really check out.” A word about grabbing: If a love of TED talks—the internationally renowned Technology, Entertainment and Design series—is what brought your attention to this story, we’re not on the same page. Not exactly, anyway. TED has regularly inspired heady discussions since 1990, and plenty of

buzz surrounded the second annual TEDxUniversityofNevada, which sold out in less than three hours, and ran on Jan. 24. But a TEDx event isn’t a TED event, per se. While it shares certain branding and ideology with its famous parent, the “x” means a given program is independently organized, locally focused, and—per the official website—“TED-like.” Hell, Reno alone is home to three. Apart from UNR’s, there’s TEDxReno coming in June, and a new one in the works from the Davidson Academy of Nevada. (The latter event’s founder, a high school senior, “is hoping to expose his fellow students to new perspectives, different ideas, and people that they may not be familiar with or have access to,” said academy spokeswoman Melissa Lance.)

Attendees hopefully are made aware of the whole TED/TEDx distinction from the get-go. Many TEDx websites include a polite disclaimer, for instance, asking that journalists “be respectful of the difference between the TED and TEDx brands,” as “any headline or text which implies ‘TED’ is coming … is misleading.” No doubt this helped at a recent TEDx conference in San Diego, where college professor Benjamin Bratton took the mic and slammed TED events as being “middlebrow megachurch infotainment.” Ouch. The roughly 7-foot-tall, bright red “X” at the corner of the stage at UNR’s Joe Crowley Student Union helped clarify things locally, as did the day’s $100 price tag—a sliver of the bill to attend this year’s TED extravaganza in Vancouver (think

$3,750 for a basic, annual membership that requires an application. A five-year “patron” membership sets you back a cool $125,000). Simmons said, “I’m pretty certain they know what they’re getting.” He capped his volunteer-run show at fewer than 200 people, in light of seating limitations. Many were friends and family of local speakers, or connected to the school in other ways. “They set their alarm clocks,” Simmons added with a chuckle. “We were sold out by 9 a.m.”

Speakers of the house In a nod to the organizers’ connection to UNR’s business program, the 21-speaker lineup was well stacked with folks from the corporate world.


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On October 24th, 2013, a settlement fund was established to compensate persons with disabilities who encountered unlawful discrimination in connection with an assistance animal at Rosewood Park Apartments in Reno, Nevada. The Fair Housing Act requires that a landlord grant reasonable accommodation requests to persons with disabilities. This includes granting requests from persons with disabilities who rely on assistance animals to waive pet rules and “no pet” policies. An assistance animal is an animal that does work or performs tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability or provides emotional support or other assistance that alleviates one or more symptoms or effects of a person’s disability.

Meanwhile, corporate lawyer Andrew Sherman applied principles of conservation and recycling— figuratively speaking—to the business world. “We need to think [of] ourselves as entrepreneurial environmentalists and intellectual-capital agrarians,” he explained, using donut holes as an easy recycling example. “The thing already exists! The fruit is on the vine, ready to pick!” And it’s OK if you’re not the one who planted its proverbial seed. Take Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz. “You think Howard invented coffee?” Sherman asked an increasingly rapt crowd. “Nooo, he did not. What he did do is make us all want to drink more of it, and feel good about walking around with a $6 cup of latte, and feel smart about it.” Sherman jostled his heavyset frame as he held an imaginary cup of java, prompting giggles from the crowd. “Now, I could do that again,” he deadpanned, “but that would be twerking. And I promised my family I wouldn’t do that today.” He did deliver a fine speech, though, as did his fellow guests. But the school didn’t turn a profit. TEDx hosts aren’t allowed to. In fact, Simmons said, cheerfully enough, “We didn’t break even.” Speakers incur travel costs, attendees must be fed, and videography—a signature component of any TED or TEDx event—doesn’t come cheaply. “If the College of Business didn’t put money forward, we couldn’t put on the event we put on,” Simmons said. Someday, he’d like to bring in “a Medal of Honor wearer,” he said, sounding giddy at the prospect. Or a Hall of Famer. Or “someone sitting in a pinnacle of power, like Condoleezza Rice. My motto is ‘swing for the fences’ because all they can say is no.” That said, the prep work is no small task. “I was surprised, once I got into it, by what it was going to take,” admitted speaker Trish Shaffer, a Washoe County School District coordinator who made a solid case for social and emotional learning (“SEL”) methods in the classroom. “If anyone wants to challenge themselves as an individual,” she added good-naturedly, “do a TED talk.” TEDx. TEDx. Or maybe it doesn’t matter. “The premise is exactly the same,” said graduate student Aaron Smith. “It’s the exact same idea [as a TED conference], just maybe on a different scale.” Ω

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IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY AND HAVE AN ASSISTANCE ANIMAL, YOU MAY BE ENTITLED TO A MONETARY AWARD IF: You were denied the opportunity to live at Rosewood Park Apartments in Reno, Nevada because of a “no pets” policy. You were required to pay pet fees or a pet deposit for the assistance animal. You were required to live in a certain section of Rosewood Park Apartments.

If you believe you fall into one of these categories, or if you have information about someone else you believe falls into one of these categories, please contact the United States Department of Justice, no later than July 11th, 2014, at: 1-800-896-7743 and select menu option 8. You may also write to:

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Other guests’ talks were full of variety, such as that of boisterous South African sailor Neal Petersen, or Elizabeth Smart, the unwittingly famous Salt Lake City girl who was kidnapped from her bedroom in 2002. Smart is a poised young woman now, one who hopes other sexual abuse victims will tell their own stories. “When you are faced with a trial, don’t give up,” Smart said. “Don’t surrender. Move forward, because you never know what you’ll be able to do with it. You never know the lives you’ll be able to touch.” Texas native Jamie Amelio’s tale about starting a school system in Cambodia inspired its own form of gooseflesh and resolve. “Being bothered” by one issue or another “isn’t even the hard part,” Amelio repeated. “It’s staying bothered.” Find your cause, in other words, and stay mad enough to be productive. Bridget Park, a Bishop Manogue senior and author of a young-adult book about grief, recalled her brother’s suicide, and the fact that empty words of sympathy stung more than silence. Another young guest, UNR sophomore and Rubik’s Cube stud Tim Grunert, spoke of social networking’s social consequences. “It’s like our lives have almost become devoted to fishing for ‘likes’ and reposts,” he said, working the plastic puzzle in his hands. Soon the cube was a visual metronome, its walls of color setting the beat as Grunert drove each point home. “It’s the Rubik’s cube that shows us that progress couldn’t be made without twisting the gears,” the teen said, finally tossing his finished product into the air and catching it. The crowd went insane. Then there was Channel 2 anchor Wendy Damonte, whose raw, tearjerking account of losing her mother to breast cancer was wrought with caution—dense breast tissue, which obstructs standard mammograms and hides tumors, occurs in around 40 percent of women. Doctors tend to leave it unmentioned, but the cancer often isn’t a death sentence for patients who ask for the right tests. If only her mother had known. Painful subject matter aside, Damonte’s speech began with levity. “In the United States,” she chirped, “there [are] 157 million pairs of … these.” She gestured to her chest as onlookers chuckled incredulously. “Boobs!” Damonte exclaimed. The floor was hers.

United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division Housing and Civil Enforcement Section 1800 G Street, N.W., Suite 7002 Washington, DC 20006 Attn: DJ# 175-46-135 Your telephone message or letter must include your name, address, and, if possible, at least TWO telephone numbers where you may be reached.

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Every shade of brown

Kaitlin Bryson installs her multimedia piece “The Virtue of Dissolution” at the Holland Project.

Bathed in Sunshine, Covered in Dust What does it mean to be an artist in Reno? That question is at the heart of Bathed by in Sunshine, Covered in Dust: An Brad Bynum Introduction to Contemporary Art in Reno, Nevada, a group exhibition at the bradb@ news re view.c om Holland Project. The exhibition features a diversity of artists, including photographers, like Alisha Funkhouser and Emily Rogers, painters, like Jaxon Northon and Ahren Hertel, and sculptors, like Kyle Walker Akins and Michelle Laxalt. Bathed in Sunshine, The exhibition was co-curated by Covered in dust: Sarah Lillegard, Holland’s arts and gallery an Introduction to director, and Jen Graham, an artist and the Contemporary art in former curator of the Bibo Three Gallery. reno, nevada is at “We wanted to capture the kind of art the holland Project, 140 Vesta St., through that was happening here,” says Graham. Feb. 28. the opening “There’s something really special and reception is 5 to 7 unique, a different sort of aesthetic than p.m. on Sat., Feb. 8, what you might see elsewhere. I was feeling and will include a panel discussion featuring like we had a lack of a web presence. ... some of the artists Originally, the idea was to make something and essayists. For that we could present outside of Reno to more information, visit show what’s going on here.” www.hollandreno.org. “This is not a ‘best-of,’” says Lillegard. “This is not the only thing that exists in

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Reno. This is more like a jumping off point for a bigger conversation.” The curators say they intend the exhibition, and its accompanying online publication with essays by artists Tanya Goyer, Megan Kay and Jay Damron, to serve two purposes: to introduce Reno’s art scene to outsiders, and to initiate discussion among locals. The exhibition presents a vision of local art that’s distinct from the casino culture and largely disconnected from local institutions like the Nevada Museum of Art and the University of Nevada, Reno. (Though it was funded, in part, with a grant from Nevada Humanities.) The curatorial vision also avoids representations of Burning Man-affiliated art. “We specifically stayed away from that Burning Man idea, and I think that was because Reno is known for that, and it has received major national media coverage,” says Graham. The exhibition features a representation of Reno artwork that’s more beholden to curatorial evaluation, rather than the all-inclusiveness of the Burner perspective.

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The curators’ opening essay describes Reno as a city “encased by mountains, bathed in sunshine, and covered in dust.” “We noticed that was something that we really came across a lot—that kind of muted color palette, that desert-y feel where everything feels a little bit dried up, a little bit faded by the sun,” says Graham. “That’s something that will really come through when people outside of Reno see it.” That color palette—pale blues, muddy reds, a variety of tans and browns—is present in everything from Megan Berner’s flags, emblems of exploration, discovery and marking territory, to Funkhouser’s photographs documenting Sun Valley.

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“We weren’t saying everything needs to fit within these parameters,” says Lillegard. “We want it more to give a feeling, like you could look through, as a viewer, and start to make connections, maybe some of the connections we’re talking about, maybe totally separate ones. It’s like pairing it together and asking, what are you seeing here?” Kaitlin Bryson’s multimedia piece “The Virtue of Dissolution,” involves paintings, a sculptural installation, and a performance that will include her literally washing off her paintings during the opening reception. “I wanted it to fluctuate from order into disorder,” she says. “The end result is going to be complete disorder. … When things are in a state of disorder, there’s more potential for them to come together stronger.” “We like the idea of that kind of obsessive work,” says Graham. “It’s definitely a struggle to be an artist in a city like Reno. You have to really work hard and you have to really want it.” Ω

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Co-owner Ali Ghafary of Wrap It Up prepares the mixed shawarma wrap.

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unleavened flatbread (tortilla, lavash, pita), add some meat, veggies and sauce, then wrap it up and dig in. Simple, portable, satisfying. Wrap It Up, located in a southReno strip-mall, offers little by way of ambience. It’s a quick-service lunch and light-dinner business, clean and decorated in “yes, we have food and soda” signage, but nothing to write home about. The staff and owners are very friendly and hospitable, making for a perfectly acceptable “grab a quick bite to eat while shopping” spot. The menu states “Mediterranean,” which in this instance means a mashup of Lebanese, Greek, Turk and Arabic foods. I’ve enjoyed all of the above at various times in various places, so I was definitely interested in sampling a variety. Frankly, the best/worst thing about writing food reviews is my compulsion to sample

as much as I can in order to give a complete report. Vertical, rotating spit-roasted meat that is served thin-shaved has many names. gyros in Greece, doner kebab in Turkey, shawarma in the Levant, tacos al pastor in Mexico, etc. In Reno, it’s difficult to find a place that serves a related cuisine that actually employs the real deal. Most often I’ve been served “gyros” featuring microwaved, pre-packaged strips of hopefully-lamb-but-who-knows meat. My compliments to Wrap It Up for cooking their shawarma on a spit/ kebab the proper way, right in plain view as the gods intended. The mixed shawarma wrap ($8) was better than good—it was great. Seriously, I’d drive across town for another taste of it. Spit-roasted beef and chicken, crunchy-yet-tender veggies, and sauce resulting in a great blend of flavors. Definitely the best thing on the menu, and among the best of its kind in town. The gyro wrap ($7) was pretty tasty, though it consisted of marinated chicken breast rather than the moretraditional lamb (for a Greek-style gyro). The sauce was more Turkish cacik than Greek tzatziki, and the “pita” was the same non-pocket flatbread as other wraps on the menu (more akin to lavash). It didn’t make my Top 5 Best Gyros list, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. In addition to the wraps, my wife and I sampled some of the combo platters ($10-12), but weren’t as impressed. I love hummus—we make our own at home—and I’ve had some decent falafel, but this version was quite dry and the hummus was grainy and uninspiring. I’d say it was simply chickpeas and lemon juice, sans tahini, za’atar, garlic, seasoning, etc. The wedges of flatbread were thin and tough, doing nothing for the overcooked, thin squares of meat. However, the tabouli and shirazi salads were deliciously full of complex flavors, leaving me to wonder why the rest was so lacking. Stuffed grape leaves are something I’ve enjoyed in the past, but I really disliked the mushy blobs of bulgar and oil we were served. My wife liked the flavor more than I did, but agreed the mushiness was off-putting. On an up-note, the basmati rice with lentils and roasted potatoes were quite good. As the name implies, stick with those super-tasty shawarma wraps and you’ll leave happy. Ω


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Theatrical dysfunction That Awkward Moment That Awkward Moment, a new romantic comedy starring Zac Efron, Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan, has a promising start. It actually plays like a cool throwback to the romantic/ sex comedies of the ’80s, until somewhere around the midpoint of the movie. Then it takes a drastic downward turn towards comedic Hades and becomes a total by garbage party. Bob Grimm This assemblage of decent-to-great actors play Jason, Daniel and Mikey (Efron, Teller bgrimm@ newsreview.c om and Jordan respectively) as some New York City dwelling 20-somethings dealing with modern day romance in a time of Facebook, texting and infidelity. When Mikey finds out his wife is cheating, and he’s heading for divorce, the other two join him in a pact to avoid relationships and stay single. It’s dating and debauchery for the three, with no commitments allowed.

1

“What kinda movie have you gotten us into, Zac?”

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4

Is there a distinct moment where this film goes tragically bad? I’m not exactly sure, but I’d wager a guess it would be the moment where Efron shows up dressed as “Rock Out with Your Cock Out!” for a cocktail party. This is a moment so jarringly stupid, so unrelentingly inane, that I’m thinking the actors got whiplash from the violent tonal shift. Until this moment, the film actually feels a bit real, and has a certain, promising warmth. The three guys are funny together and convincing as a dude trio, and the main woman (the beguiling Imogen Poots) offers many reasons for Efron’s womanizing Jason to break his pact with the two buddies.

Very Good

5 excellent

22 | RN&R |

FEBRUARY 6, 2014

The whole thing plays as if writerdirector Tom Gormican had half a decent script. Maybe Efron, Teller, Jordan and Poots (That actually sounds like a law firm, doesn’t it?) only read half the thing and gave their reps the go for their involvement. Then, perhaps a few weeks later, when their deals were done, they got around to reading the crappy second half and proceeded to have a communal vomit session. I sort of expect Efron to occupy the sort of banal, conventional posturing that occurs in this movie. He has some talent for sure, but his movies often stink to high Heaven. He plays a character in this movie whose behavior is irredeemably moronic. He’s the sort of guy who deserves to wind up sitting on park bench alone for the finale. But, he gets rewarded because he looks like Zac Efron. Teller, terrific in The Spectacular Now, is also no stranger to crap (Project X, 21 & Over, Footloose). Still, I was hoping Spectacular signaled an end to him showing up in emptyheaded party movies. Seeing him trying to pee in a toilet while suffering through a Viagra boner is not something I expected from a guy who gave one of 2013’s best performances. Jordan, so good in last year’s Fruitvale Station (for which he absolutely deserved an Oscar nomination but got snubbed) perhaps fares the best out of the bunch. His part of the movie, involving trying to reconcile a troubled marriage, is trite, but doesn’t involve the visual of him trying to pee with a boner. That honor goes to Efron and Teller. The fatal flaw of this movie is that, rather than sticking to a plan and being a true film about the perils of dating and relationships, it wants to be the new American Pie. Three talented guys riffing on relationships is interesting, and it could’ve stayed interesting without the boner jokes. Poots brings the film a certain amount of dignity as Ellie. Her work here deserved something better. So with this, the first month of the movie year closed out. Stuff like That Awkward Moment and I, Frankenstein hitting us in January means it can’t get worse for the other 11 months of the year, right? Oh, please God, tell me I’m right. Ω

4

American Hustle

David O. Russell continues his impressive directorial roll with this semi-comedic look at the notorious ’70s Abscam scandal. This is basically Russell shooting for Scorsese glory here, and while the style of the movie seems copied at times, there’s no denying the power of the ensemble cast. Bradley Cooper scores laughs as a pathetic FBI agent looking to make a name for himself, and Christian Bale looks great in a comb-over as the conman forced into an alliance with the law. Amy Adams gets one of the strangest roles of the year as a con artist pretending to be British, and she pulls it off quite nicely, while Jennifer Lawrence steals her every scene as a seemingly dim Long Island housewife. You also get stand up comic Louis C.K. as Cooper’s field boss. The film falls a little short of greatness due to its sometimes carbon copy feel, but the cast pulls it out of the fire. It also has the best use of Robert De Niro as a bad guy in many years.

4

Big Bad Wolves

Quentin Tarantino called Big Bad Wolves the best film of 2013. While I wouldn’t go that far, I will declare it last year’s best horror film, and a tremendous feat in filmmaking from directors Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado. It’s the sort of twisted, strangely funny and disturbing film I would expect to see atop a Tarantino list. The directors have figured out how to wring laughter out of a movie that features child abductions and murders, extreme torture and police beatings. When a girl goes missing and is eventually murdered, a cop turned vigilante (Lior Ashkenazi) and the girl’s father (Tzahi Grad) wind up taking matters into their own hands with a suspect (Rotem Keinan). The three partake in a grueling session of psychological and physical torture aimed at revealing the murderer of Gidi’s daughter and other children. Dror, Gidi and Micki all make for good, classic suspects in the child murders. Dror, a nebbish type with a young daughter of his own, seems too innocuous to be innocent. Gidi, a former member of the Lebanese army, is a little too sick in his torture methods to be completely exonerated of suspicion. Micki, although relatively good-natured and perhaps moral, has a sadistic side for sure. The whole film wouldn’t work if any of these actors were off by one beat. Keinan is especially good at garnering sympathy while possibly depicting one of the worst kinds of people to ever walk the planet. This is a film where the torturer who has lost his child and the cop trying to bring the murderer to justice are, more or less, the bad guys. (Available for rent on Amazon Instant Video and iTunes during its limited theatrical release).

3

Frozen

I have to admit I was more into the strange Mickey Mouse short that precedes this musical adaptation of Hans Christian Anderson’s “The Snow Queen” than the actual feature. It features retro Mickey busting out of a black and white film and becoming 3-D as he battles a bad guy kidnapping Minnie. It’s worth the price of admission. As for the actual feature movie, Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel have wonderful voices, and the visuals are fun to behold in this middle-of-the-road Disney fare. It has a lot of music—some of it quite good, some of it, well, not—and a beautiful look to it. For recent Disney animation, my vote goes to Tangled for best, but that’s not to say this one is a letdown. It’s OK. Just OK. It’s about on par with Pixar’s latest, Monster’s University. It’s fun to watch, but not altogether memorable.

1

I, Frankenstein

Aaron Eckhart, in a career move as fatal as the time Halle Berry said, “Sure, I’ll play Catwoman. What’s the worst that could happen?” plays Adam Frankenstein, a.k.a. Frankenstein’s Monster. Adam (I’m going to just call him Adam has led a lonely undead life for the hundreds of years since he was stitched together and brought to life by crazy science involving electric eels. He’s spent those years scowling a lot, and hitting demons with sticks like some sort of super ninja. His look has progressed from gothic longhaired badass to clean cut (but probably stinky) metrosexual, replete with a hoodie/trench coat that is just to die for. Really, Adam’s coat is the best thing about the movie, and I confess to wanting one. The film takes place in modern day England, where some sort of demon prince (Bill Nighy … of course!) is looking to create an army of

Frankenstein Monsters so that he may defeat some sort of gargoyle army that equates to the good guys in this movie. I’m not making this up … demons vs. gargoyles aided by a semi-reluctant Adam Frankenstein in a kickass jacket. That’s the plot. Stay away … dear God, at all costs, just stay away.

4

Lone Survivor

This is an explosive passion project from writer-director Peter Berg that takes an unrelentingly gruesome look at Operation Red Wings, the failed 2005 Afghanistan mission that claimed the lives of 19 American soldiers. Most of the movie centers on the four Navy SEALs dropped into hostile territory, and how an unfortunate civilian encounter and communications problems led to a massive gun battle of insurmountable odds. Mark Wahlberg plays Marcus Luttrell, the Navy SEAL who co-wrote the book this movie is based upon. Luttrell, along with Navy SEALs Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch), Danny Dietz (Emile Hirsch) and Matt Axelson (Ben Foster), were performing reconnaissance for a mission meant to capture or kill a notorious Taliban leader when a trio of goat herders stumbled upon their camp. The resultant ambush is filmed with many gory details, and will be a hard watch for some. The stuntmen who worked on this movie did an incredible job, and the cast is one of 2013’s strongest ensembles. This is a nice comeback for Berg after Battleship.

3

Nebraska

I can’t deny the wonderful acting work from the likes of Bruce Dern, Will Forte, Bob Odenkirk and especially June Squibb. They are all wonderful in this movie. What I can bemoan is the stupid, stupid story propelling that acting. Dern plays an old codger who becomes convinced that he’s won a million dollars because of a magazine subscription letter saying he’s a winner. So he starts walking from Montana to Nebraska, and his son (Forte) eventually helps him on his quest with an automobile. It’s a dumb idea to start, and the premise is too improbable for a serious comedy movie. Still, it does lay the groundwork for some decent father-son dynamic between Dern and Forte, and Odenkirk shows up as another son and knocks his part out of the park. Of the six Oscar nominations this film earned, I would call Squibb the most deserving for her work as Dern’s droll wife. The black and white cinematography is also quite nice. As for Best Screenplay, Best Picture and Best Actor, I wouldn’t go there. The movie is good in a peculiar way, but far from great. The premise annoyed me a bit the whole time I watched it.

4

Run & Jump

Will Forte follows up his strong dramatic turn in Nebraska with an even better performance in what turns out to be a better movie with Run & Jump. Forte plays Ted, an American doctor in Ireland studying Conor (Edward MacLiam) a relatively young stroke patient returning to his family after being in a coma. The stroke has rendered Conor childlike, with most of his motor skills but little memory of the man he was before. Ted lives with him and his family, videotaping Conor in his interactions with his very spirited wife Vanetia, played winningly by Maxine Peaks. Conor’s state has left him relatively useless as a father figure, husband and lover. His two kids are left confused, while Vanetia does her best to remain upbeat and good-natured. Slowly, Ted begins to step in as a friend to Vanetia, and a father figure to the children. Much credit goes to director and co-writer Steph Green for making this tough plot work. Ted remains a highly sympathetic character, rather than some selfish jerk who is moving in on an emotionally incapacitated stroke victim’s wife and family. The movie has touches of wonderful humor and weirdness to go with its justifiable sadness. Peake’s performance is a stunner as she traverses easily from humor to the tragic. She’s done a lot of TV work in her career, and she deserves big movie roles in her future. Forte is an actor who accomplishes much with his expressions. He has nice control over that face of his, and many of his best moments consist of him just standing and staring, with everything being conveyed in the eyes. He’s proving to be one of the more reliable SNL alumni. (Available for rent on iTunes and Amazon Instant Video during its limited theatrical release)


Soul survivors Failure Machine “Can I go on record and say that doughnuts are probably more important to me than my family?” asked Clint Philbin of by Katie Dow Failure Machine as we settled down inside of Jelly Donut to begin our interview. Failure Machine is Spencer Kilpatrick on guitar and Philbin on drums, two bros who love each other more than they love their girlfriends. The duo has worked together in the past in larger bands, like Reno funk-rock outfit The Big Bad and more recently Knowledge Lives Forever. They say that they’ve enjoyed working with groups, but in the end, it’s always the two of them together. Spencer explains that they work more efficiently and amiably Photo/Allison Young

with one another and that they tend to feel put-out by the larger group dynamic of other bands. Failure Machine has been an item since June, and they have been busy developing their style and writing new music to go with their reworked covers. When asked what kind of music they make, they say they shoot for garage soul. Otis Redding and The Temptations play a big part in the development of their sound. The duo’s recent untitled debut EP was released on their Bandcamp page, failuremachine.bandcamp.com, and their Facebook page on January 15. There are four original songs and a cover of a Temptations classic “I Wish It Would Rain.” The music was recorded, mixed and mastered independently in their basement, on a second-hand computer dubbed “Delilah.”The result is refined but intentionally lo-fi.

Spencer Kilpatrick and Clint Philbin, of Failure Machine, play above par.

For more information, visit failuremachine. bandcamp.com.

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Since the band is so new and has only recently been drawing crowds of its own, they plan to tour to develop rapport in the surrounding area as a way to book more shows in the future. Getting the record into the hands of potential fans and building name recognition are the first steps, followed by gigs that may actually pay in more than beer, or in some cases, literal peanuts. “Sometimes you get paid, sometimes you don’t, and sometimes you don’t know until you get there,” said Kilpatrick with a wry smile. “It’s more about making connections than making dollars at this point,” said Philbin. When they decided to work together on this project, Philbin was more familiar with keys and guitar and hadn’t really attempted the drums, but you wouldn’t know that from listening to them. Their excitement for the music is palpable onstage. Kilpatrick seems to sing from the bottom of his heart as he stomps and whips his mass of curls around in time with the music, while Philbin becomes zoned in, feeling every beat and soaking in the deft guitar work of his bandmate. They blend soul, rock ’n’ roll and funk together seamlessly and then blanket it in grunge, making what could be a familiar and even trite sound into something unique and exciting. Failure Machine also provides entertainment off stage. Their Facebook page is a great place to find the absurdist humor that has become a mainstay of their band persona in their shows and other projects. They regularly post video promos, sometimes for particular gigs, but more often just for fun. At the end of the interview, I asked, “if you were asked to make a list in order of importance of music, family, and doughnuts how would it go?” Spencer quickly responded with “Probably it goes doughnuts, music, then family.” He paused for a second and then finished with “Or doughnuts, music, soda, family.” Ω

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THURSDAY 2/6 3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

5 STAR SALOON 132 West St., (775) 329-2878

BODEGA NIGHTCLUB 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Toxic Holocaust, Exhumed, Ramming Speed, Cranium, 7pm, $13-$15

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE 312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Comedy 3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Ben Hague, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Dave Russo, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Brian Dunkleman, Avi Liberman, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Allan Havey, Jodi Borrello, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Make Me Laugh, Make Me Yours with Karith Foster, F, 8:30pm, Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $14, $17

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/10-2/12 DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

T-Club Party, 8pm, $TBA

Rhythm Rewind w/DJs RyOn and Rewind, 9pm, $7

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 378-4507

CEOL IRISH PUB

SUNDAY 2/9

DJ Ricky Rick, 10pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, W, no cover Shifty, Legitimate Cause, Wiked Troopz, DJ Blasphemy, 8pm, $5

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

Feb. 6, 7 p.m. Cottonwood Restaurant 10142 Rue Hilltop Truckee (530) 587-5711

SATURDAY 2/8

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

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FRIDAY 2/7

D.B.S., Seductive Rage, 10 Cent Mistake, Whiskey Haulers, 9:30pm, no cover 9:30pm, no cover

Sean McAlindin, Lost Whiskey Engine, 7pm, no cover

Danny Sturtevant, 7pm, no cover

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DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

THE GRID BAR & GRILL 8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HIMMEL HAUS

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Something About Machines, PostWar, Lucas Young & the Wilderness, Vague Choir, 7pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Cheap Art, Last to Leave, Vampirates, 7:30pm, W, $5

JAVA JUNGLE

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover Mile High Jazz Band, 8pm, Tu, $5

Open Mic Jam, 9:30pm, M, karaoke, 9:30pm, Tu, open mic, 9:30pm, W, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

For Reservations Call 775-322-7777

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JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Bar Room

THURSDAY 2/6

FRIDAY 2/7

2) Brian McPherson, Buckle Rash, Lonely River Drifters, 8:30pm, $5

1) A Tribute to The Hazards of Love, 1) A Tribute to The Hazards of Love, 7:30pm, $12-$15 2) Kevin Seconds, 7:30pm, $12-$15 My Acoustic Heart, Chris Fox, 9pm, $5-$15

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

MOODY’S BISTRO BAR & BEATS

Barbara Baxter, 8:30pm, no cover

10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

MURPHY’S IRISH PUB

Traditional Irish Celtic Night, 787 Emerald Bay Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 544-8004 7:30pm, no cover

SATURDAY 2/8

Excision, Dirtyphonics, ill.Gates, 8pm, $25-$50

Saturday Night Hip Hop Invasion, 7pm, $6

David Luning, 8:30pm, no cover

David Luning, 8:30pm, no cover Guest duos, 7pm, no cover

Feb. 7, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Open Mic Night, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

1433 U.S. Highway 395 North, (775) 782-5875 906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

1) A Tribute to The Hazards of Love, 2pm, $12-$15

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/10-2/12 1) This or the Apocalypse, Sworn In, Shai Halud, Sirens and Sailors, Twelve Gauge Facelift, 6pm, Tu, $15-$18

Excision

Mark Wilson and friends, 7:30pm, no cover

NEVADA UGLY PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH PUB

SUNDAY 2/9

Acoustic Wonderland, 8pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

Cupid C0-ED Passion Party w/DJs TV1, Tiger Bunny, 8pm, $2 singles, $1 couples

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

Davis Nothere, 9pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover We As Human, 9pm, W, $5

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

E.Rose, The Tripatronix, Gentle Jamie, Blaquelisted, DJ Reno Martini, 8pm, $8

Karaoke Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover Open Mic Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe Feb. 7-8, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

WILDFLOWER VILLAGE

Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769

Reno Music Project presents Whitney Myer Student Showcase, 6pm, no cover

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 2/6

FRIDAY 2/7

SATURDAY 2/8

2) Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) The Vegas Road Show, 7pm, no cover

2) The Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

2) The Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

1) Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Robert Walter, 9pm, $25-$45

1) Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Robert Walter, 9pm, $25-$45

1) Ring of Fire, 8pm, $24.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ Scene, Roni Romance, DJ Dragon, 10pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Ring of Fire, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Four Play Saturdays w/Roni Romance, DJ Dragon, 10pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

SUNDAY 2/9

2) Joey Carmon Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) Valley Sky Theatre

The Devil Makes Three Feb. 8, 9 p.m. MontBleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3353

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 5) Stadium Bar

2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Karaoke Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F-Sa, 7pm; Tu, 6pm, no cover El Cortez Lounge, 235 W. Second St., 324-4255: Daily, 9pm, no cover Ponderosa Saloon, 106 South C St., Virginia City, 847-7210: Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, F, 7:30pm, no cover West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

SILVER LEGACY

1) Sweet Talk: A Delicious Electro-Cirque Kiss, 8:30pm, $20

2) Mimic, 7pm, no cover 3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

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2) Michael Furlong, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Ring of Fire, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Ring of Fire, 7pm, Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Auto Replay, 10:30pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45 2) DJ I, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ Michael, 8pm, no cover

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45 2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover 3) JJ Sansaverino, 6pm, W, no cover 4) WCSD Honor Band, 7pm, W, $5

2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom

2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

26

1) Frank Marino’s Divas, 8pm, $35-$45 2) DJ I, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ Michael, 8pm, no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

2) Michael Furlong, 6pm, no cover

1) War, 7:30pm, $52.70 3) Rick Gee, DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

HARRAH’S RENO

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/10-2/12

1) The Devil Makes Three, The Brothers Comatose, 9pm, $27.50-$30 3) Boogie Nights, 8pm, no cover w/’70s’-’80s attire

2) Mimic, 8pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 2) Mimic, 8pm, no cover 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

2) Kyle Rea, 6pm, no cover

2) Kyle Rea, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Styx, 8pm, $57.50-$72.50 2) Jackson Michelson, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover

2) Jackson Michelson, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

T

he Galena Creek Visitor Center celebrates the 2014 Winter Olympics with a look back at the Olympic legacy in the Reno-Tahoe area. Local author David Antonucci will lead a winter guided hike through the park and talk about the 1960s Olympics in Squaw Valley, Calif. He will also talk about Reno’s failed 1955 bid for the same Olympic games. After the hike, Antonucci’s latest book will be available for purchase and signing. The event begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway. Admission is a $5 suggested donation per person which goes toward the guided hike program. The author will also lead an indoor presentation at the visitor center the following Saturday, Feb. 15, at 2 p.m. This will become a guided snowshoe hike, if there’s a sufficient amount of snow. The visitor center will have limited pairs of snowshoes to lend for this hike, so call to reserve a pair. Call 849-4948 or visit www.galenacreekvisitorcenter.org.

—Kelley Lang

A Note-Able Evening of Romance Note-Able Music Therapy Services presents its 10th annual Note-Able Evening of Romance. The show will feature the best music from the past 10 years of the event, including big band hits, music from the Roaring ’20s, Rat Pack tunes and selections from Broadway musicals performed by singer Cami Thompson, the Reno Jazz Orchestra and The Note-Ables. The soiree includes champagne, hors d’oeuvres, desserts and live and silent auctions. Attendees are encouraged to wear black and white attire. The event starts at 7:30 p.m., on Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Downtown Reno Ballroom, 401 N. Center St. Tickets are $45 in advance and $50 at the door. Proceeds benefit the music therapy programs of Note-Able Music Therapy Services. Call (775) 324-5521 or visit www.note-ables.org.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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Movie Musical Sing-A-Long: Moulin Rouge!

Rural Route Film Festival: Best of/ Shorts

4th Annual Reno Darwin Day Celebration

Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company presents its monthly musical sing-along event. This month’s feature is the 2001 film Moulin Rouge!, which was directed, produced and co-written by Baz Luhrmann. Set in the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France, the Academy Award-winning musical tells the story of a young English poet/writer, Christian (Ewan McGregor), who falls in love with the terminally ill star of the Moulin Rouge, the cabaret actress and courtesan Satine (Nicole Kidman). Audience members are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite character and enter the costume contest. All tickets are $10 and include a goodie bag full of props to use during the show. The screening begins at 7 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 9, at the GLM theater, 713 S. Virginia St. Call (775) 322-3716 or visit http://www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

Nevada Museum of Art hosts the local screening of the traveling film festival, which features 11 short films ranging from 3 to 22 minutes in length that explore themes of rural life and experiences. One of the films includes the local production of Derby Kings, a short film about the experience of two brothers from Pyramid Lake and Yerington. A talk with guest Valerie Bischoff, director of Derby Kings, follows the screening. Tickets are $7 general admission and $5 for NMA members. The event begins at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 9, at the NMA, 160 W. Liberty St. Call 329-3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

The Reno Skeptical Society, a.k.a. Reno Skeptics, hosts its fourth annual celebration of British naturalist Charles Darwin and his contributions to science. There will be presentations by local educators, researchers, students and science enthusiasts on a variety of subjects, including the life and works of Charles Darwin, biological evolution, science education, psychology, philosophy, the contributions and benefits of scientific discovery to humanity and current affairs related to science and technology. The event begins at noon on Sunday, Feb. 9, at the Downtown Reno Library, 301 S. Center St. Admission is free. Call 335-5505 or visit www.renoskeptics.org.

ARTS&CULTURE

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FEBRUARY 6, 2014

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27


Recycle this paper

Cower rangers I read your recent columns about guys who are too shy to ask women out. You seem to think it’s OK for women to make quick judgments about a shy man’s worth because his shyness is their first impression. Well, a man shouldn’t have to be loud, obnoxious and “in your face.” These women, with their snap judgments, don’t consider that there might be something really good under the surface of a shy guy and could miss out on a nice relationship. For instance, when I was younger and really shy, I had a huge crush on a girl but figured she was way out of my league. One day, we crossed paths unexpectedly and talked for a few minutes. I decided right then that I had to know “yes” or “no” and get it behind me. I mustered everything I had and asked her out as confidently as I could. She said yes, and we dated for over two years. Had she dismissed me just because I was shy, we both would have missed out. A guy doesn’t have to be loud, obnoxious and “in your face” to succeed with women, but he can’t be “in a fetal position behind furniture.” Typically, you get what you want in life by asking for it. I don’t think this is OK or not OK. It’s just how life works. When a guy sees a woman he wants, that’s his moment to hit on her, meaning do his best to chat her up and then follow through and ask her out. He might wish he could just sit there silently while she looks for “something really good under the surface”—getting his credit report and references from his neighbors, his grandmother, and his third-grade teacher, Mrs. DeMattia—but that’s not going 28   |  RN&R   | 

FEBRUARY 6, 2014

to happen. And think about it—would you recommend that getting a job should work in the same way? No need to send in a resume or cover letter or sell anybody on your merits in an interview. You would just hide under your bed, and the employers would sense what a great person you are and send out a search party. Hilariously, you follow up your complaint about how life “should” work for shy guys with a great example of how it can work—once they stop waiting for a woman to club them like a baby seal and drag them home. As you showed, a guy doesn’t have to be fearless to ask a woman out. He just needs to decide not to give in to his fears in the moment and then get to work fixing what’s broken in himself. In a shy guy, this is self-esteem that’s really “what other people think of me”-esteem and the paralyzing fear of rejection that ensues. The cool thing is, a guy doesn’t have to become some Mr. Smooth to get the girl. He can even be kind of awkward. People admire courage, even when it maybe stammers a little. Of course, a guy won’t always get the girl just because he tries, but trying and striking out will only leave him with a temporary boo-boo on his ego instead of the internal injuries he’d get from tucking his tail between his legs so fast that he bruises his spleen. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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29


Think Free

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “You know it’s

Saturday when you are wiping off vodka stains from your face with a marshmallow,” testifies the woman who writes the Tumblr blog French Fries Absinthe Milkshakes. I really hope you don’t even come close to having an experience like that this week, Aries. But I’m worried that you will. I sense that you’re becoming allergic to caution. You may be subconsciously wishing to shed all decorum and renounce self-control. To be clear, there’s nothing inherently wrong with relaxing your guard. I hope you will indeed give up some of your high-stress vigilance and surrender a bit to life’s sweet chaos. Just please try to find a playful and safe and not-too-insane way to do so.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What is the

single best thing you could do to fulfill your No. 1 desire? Is there a skill you should attain? A subject you should study? A special kind of experience you should seek or a shift in perspective you should initiate? This is a big opportunity, Taurus. You have an excellent chance to identify the specific action you could take that will lead you to the next stage of your evolution. And if you do manage to figure out exactly what needs to be done, start doing it!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When

songwriters make a “slant rhyme,” the words they use don’t really rhyme, but they sound close enough alike to mimic a rhyme. An example occurs in “The Bad Touch,” a tune by the Bloodhound Gang: “You and me baby ain’t nothing but mammals / So let’s do it like they do on the Discovery Channel.” Technically, “mammals” doesn’t rhyme with “channel.” I suspect that in the coming week you will have experiences with metaphorical resemblances to slant rhymes. But as long you don’t fuss and fret about the inexactness you encounter, as long as you don’t demand that everything be precise and cleaned up, you will be entertained and educated. Vow to see the so-called imperfections as soulful.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Almost,”

writes novelist Joan Bauer. “It’s a big word for me. I feel it everywhere. Almost home. Almost happy. Almost changed. Almost, but not quite. Not yet. Soon, maybe.” I’m sure you know about that feeing yourself, Cancerian. Sometimes it has seemed like your entire life is composed of thousands of small almosts that add up to one gigantic almost. But I have good news: There is an excellent chance that in the next 14 to 16 weeks you will graduate from the endless and omnipresent almost; you will rise up and snatch a bold measure of completeness from out of the ever-shifting flow. And it all kicks into high gear now.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): One of the chapter

$

249

titles in my most recent book is this: “Ever since I learned to see three sides to every story, I’m finding much better stories.” I’m recommending that you find a way to use this perspective as your own in the coming weeks, Leo. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s crucial that you not get stuck in an oppositional mode. It would be both wrong and debilitating to believe that you must choose between one of two conflicting options. With that in mind, I will introduce you to a word you may not know: “trilemma.” It transcends a mere dilemma because it contains a third alternative.

plus tax per month

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FEBRUARY 6, 2014

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1984, Don

Henley’s song “The Boys of Summer” reached the top of the Billboard charts. “Out on the road today, I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac,” Henley sings wistfully near the end of the tune. He’s dismayed by the sight of the Grateful Dead’s logo, an ultimate hippie symbol, displayed on a luxury car driven by snooty rich kids. Almost 20 years later, the band the Ataris covered “The Boys of Summer,” but changed the lyric to “Out on the road today, I saw a Black Flag sticker on a Cadillac.” It conveyed the same mournful contempt, but this time invoking the iconic punk band Black Flag. I offer this tale to you, Virgo, as an encouragement to update the way you think about your life’s mythic quest—to modernize your old storylines, to refresh and refurbish the references you invoke to tell people about who you are.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Food aficionado

Michael Pollan says that Americans “worry more about food and derive less pleasure from eating” than people in other countries. If you ask them what their association is with “chocolate cake,” they typically say “guilt.” By contrast, the French are likely to respond to the same question with “celebration.” From an astrological perspective, I think it’s appropriate for you to be more like the French than the Americans in the coming weeks—not just in your attitude toward delicious desserts, but in regards to every opportunity for pleasure. This is one of those times when you have a license to guiltlessly explore the heights and depths of bliss.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the Inuk-

titut language spoken among the Eastern Canadian Inuit, the word for “simplicity” is katujjiqatigiittiarnirlu. This amusing fact reminds me of a certain situation in your life. Your quest to get back to basics and reconnect with your core sources is turning out to be rather complicated. If you hope to invoke all of the pure, humble clarity you need, you will have to call on some sophisticated and ingenious magic.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“What is the purpose of the giant sequoia tree?” asked environmentalist Edward Abbey. His answer: “The purpose of the giant sequoia tree is to provide shade for the tiny titmouse.” I suggest you meditate on all the ways you can apply that wisdom as a metaphor to your own issues. For example: What monumental part of your own life might be of service to a small, fragile part? What major accomplishment of yours can provide strength and protection to a ripening potential that’s underappreciated by others?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “To

burn with desire and keep quiet about it is the greatest punishment we can bring on ourselves,” wrote the poet Federico García Lorca. I urge you to make sure you are not inflicting that abuse on yourself in the coming weeks, Capricorn. It’s always dangerous to be out of touch with or secretive about your holy passions, but it’s especially risky these days. I’m not necessarily saying you should rent a megaphone and shout news of your yearnings in the crowded streets. In fact, it’s better if you are discriminating about whom you tell. The most important thing is to not be hiding anything from yourself about what moves you the most.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Back in

2002, three young men launched YouTube, in part motivated by a banal desire. They were frustrated because they couldn’t find online videos of the notorious incident that occurred during the Super Bowl halftime show, when Janet Jackson’s wardrobe malfunction exposed her breast. In response, they created the now-famous website that allows people to share videos. I foresee the possibility of a comparable sequence for you, Aquarius. A seemingly superficial wish or trivial interest could inspire you to come up with a fine new addition to your world. Pay attention to your whimsical notions.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I believe

more in the scissors than I do in the pencil.” That’s what 20th-century author Truman Capote said about his own writing process. Back in that primitive pre-computer era, he scrawled his words on paper with a pencil and later edited out the extraneous stuff by applying scissors to the manuscript. Judging from your current astrological omens, Pisces, I surmise you’re in a phase that needs the power of the scissors more than the power of the pencil. What you cut away will markedly enhance the long-term beauty and value of the creation you’re working on.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart Photo/D. Brian Burghart

Word to the wise

My girl and I are big chocolate fans, and we stop in your place all the time. It’s all presented so beautifully. What made you choose a chocolate franchise instead of a frozen yogurt or fast food [franchise]?

Greg Zrinyi A word to the wise men: Valentine’s Day is around the corner. A word to the wise, women: Men like chocolate, too. A word to the single: Chocolate is good and will make you feel better about being single on this Hallmark holiday because it’s filled with oxytocin and anti-oxidants. Greg Zrinyi and Brita Ingstad own the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory. Zrinyi offered a word to the wise for those of us who always get stuck on Valentine’s Day, picking through the last four cards on the Scolari’s gift card shelf: Order early and be a hero. The store’s number is 787-1212.

Is it a heart-shaped box? Is it lovey-dovey?

March of 2008.

Yeah.

Are people still buying chocolates for their Valentine sweeties these days?

How did you get into chocolate making?

Do they favor a certain kind? Yes, they love chocolate-dipped strawberries. That’s the big hit with our store.

So, I’m not very good at Valentine’s myself. Do they order them in a box or something? How’s it work?

NEWS

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GREEN

No, we’re engaged. [It turns out they were business partners before they got engaged a year ago.]

So what are you getting her for Valentine’s Day? [spoiler alert] I’m getting her flowers, and I’ll probably get her clothes. She loves gifts like that.

But she probably gets enough chocolate at work?

Oh, so you learned the skill because you bought the franchise?

Yes, she gets plenty of that here. No need to go out for that. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

There are not many bona fide WWYW’s—Where Were You Whens, that is—moments that are almost universally recognized as “game changers,” when everyone alive at the time remembers where they were and what they were doing when “it” happened. In my lifetime, there have been but a handful. Where Were You When JFK got shot (Mrs. Hasler’s fifth grade class). WWYW when the twin towers fell (doing my morning show on the X and telling people, “Uh, you might want to turn on the TV”). WWYW Neil Armstrong walked on the moon (playing fast pitch baseball on a hot summer day). There’s one WWYW that’s unique, though, because we were all in same place when it happened. We were all at home watching this event transpire on television. We were watching what one could argue, in retrospect, was the one of the true starting points of the ’60s. It was Feb. 9, 1964, and we were watching the Beatles conquer America on The Ed Sullivan show. |

Cool. So did you eventually marry your fiancee?

I didn’t get into chocolate making. I’m a franchise operator. That means we have product that comes in out of Durango, Colorado. Durango, Colorado, is where our store headquarters is. Now I make some of the candies—about 60 percent are store-made, but some of our candy is made in Durango, Colorado, for us.

Get back

OPINION

My fiancee and I wanted to do something together, and it’s a perfect shop for a mom and pop opportunity. It’s nice little startup for two people. My fiancee grew up in Vail and was familiar with the Rocky Mountain name—it’s a really big franchise in Colorado, and we went up to the lake when they had their store there, and we did a walk-through together and found it to be a good fit for us, something we’d be interested in doing and trying, and we went after it.

Chocolate strawberries are individual pieces, so somebody will come in and either purchase one on up to 20 depending on what they want. We have different arrangements here. We have really nice packaging. We have packaging that can hold two strawberries on up to 16 strawberries.

When did you guys open?

Yes. Definitely, most definitely.

Yes, they train you on it. You buy into the franchise, and they train you up at the factory. So I did my training in Durango, Colorado, and I learned how to make the candies.

|

’63, this invisibility was totally understandable. And deserved. In March ’64, what happened at the Top 40 station in Fresno (KYNO!) was happening around the country. Beatlemania was in full tilt fever mode, climaxing in a way that radio folks could barely believe. In an unprecedented display of pure puerile popularity, The Effing Beatles had not just claimed the No. 1 spot on the charts (with their breakthrough single “I Want To Hold Your Hand”), they had also claimed the entire Top Five! To those of us music crazed 11-year-olds at the time, religious followers of the weekly Top 40, this was earth-shaking stuff. I mean, the top five? All Beatles? (the other four tunes—“I Saw Her Standing There,” “All My Loving,” “She Loves You,” “From Me To You”). What the heck was going on here? Was the world going absolutely bonkers? The answer, of course, turned out to be yes. Ω

The Van Dykes watched, you betcha. Mom, like millions of females of all ages, thought Paul was pretty darn dreamy. Dad didn’t say anything, so he obviously hated ’em. Little bro Tom drank the Kool-Aid on the spot and became an instant fan. I thought they were OK, but … I had reservations. I was horribly concerned that all the hoopla surrounding these funny looking cool cats was going to take major thunder away from my band, whom I had recently discovered and fervently adored— the Beach Boys. My premonition was dead on. The Beach Boys were indeed made irrelevant for a time in the musical tsunami that quickly followed the Beatles on Ed. All of a sudden, the British Invasion was on. Not just the Beatles, but the Stones, the Dave Clark Five, the Animals, the Yardbirds, the Searchers, the Zombies, the Kinks, the Who, Herman’s Hermits and more. Many more. All of a sudden, American pop groups were invisible. After a solid dose of Frankie Avalon, Fabian, Bobby Rydell, and Paul Anka from ’60 to

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W

e a r e a n e w c h u r c h i n r e n o.

we are passionate about reaching northern nevada with the Good news of Jesus christ, helping christians join in christ and serving others here and around the world.

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

he way

1100 KietzKe Ln. reno, nV

Baptist church www.thewayreno.com 775.721.3296

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 6, 2014

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RN&R

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