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letters ........................... 3 Opinion/Streetalk ........... 5 Sheila leslie ................... 6 Brendan Trainor............. 7 News ............................. 8 Green ........................... 11 Feature ........................ 13 Arts&Culture ............... 16 Art of the State ............ 19

Foodfinds .................... 20 Film............................. 22 Musicbeat ....................25 Nightclubs/Casinos .......27 New Year’s Eve ............ 31 Advice Goddess .......... 34 Free Will Astrology ...... 38 15 Minutes ....................39 Bruce Van Dyke ...........39

TrusT violaTed See News, page 8.

With Luck, the PLanning commission is in deniaL See Green, page 11.

Blu Movies

See Arts&Culture, page 16.

occupy wall sTreeT See Film, page 22.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE 19, issuE 45

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DECEmBER 26, 2013-JaNuaRy 1, 2014


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December 26, 2013


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Takin’ care of business

Forward thinking

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I hope you all had a great winter solstice and will have a healthy and happy new year. I got a letter from a reader, J. Tyler Ballance, who suggested some interesting ideas. I guess I find them interesting because they’re along the lines of my thinking for 2014. Basically, my mantra for 2014 is this: Fix things that are broken; in the meantime, don’t break things that work. I just decided to run Ballance’s whole email on this page, so I won’t bother repeating what he has to say, but let me tell you where I’m coming from. Since I moved into my house more than 10 years ago, people in the shower get scalded every time somebody flushes a toilet, waters the dogs or runs the dishwasher. I’m going to have a tempering valve installed. Once it’s fixed, it will probably never be broken again. My house is 50 years old; it’s about time. At this newspaper, our user interface with our calendar system has been screwed up since its creation. We should have the best online calendar in the city, but it’s horrible. People use it, but I hear complaints about it at least two or three times a month. Start the countdown, by Dec. 31, 2014, I intend to use all my influence to get it fixed and usable. If I learned anything this semester, it’s about the ramifications of not making things work for the people who want to use them. I’ve got a closet in my guest bedroom more than half-filled with books in boxes. They’ve been in those boxes for a couple of years. Time to either put them on the shelves at my house or at the library. I’ll bet everybody has some of these sorts of things. This year, I’m going to spend a bit of time identifying a few. Maybe I’ll write a list to myself, or maybe I’ll publish it, so I can be mocked for my failures. As I look at the above drivel, it occurs to me I came dangerously close to making a new year’s resolution. Right now, lets just call it “hope.”

these new residents how to be good Nevadans. Help start citizenship classes through work, school and your church. However, the best way to teach good citizenship is by your own example. Never leave litter anywhere—not on the ground, on store shelves, not anywhere. Always take the time to find a trash can and use it. Speak up when you see others littering and explain how this hurts our community and drives away jobs. Stop running red lights. Speeding up as a yellow light changes not only places you at risk, you could kill someone’s father, mother or child. No matter how eager for it to be your turn, do not cut in lines, don’t butt into other conversations and if something truly is threatening life or limb, preface your interruption with, “excuse me.” Smile more, look your fellow citizen in the eye and say, “howdy.” Howdy is a great, universal greeting. You don’t even need to know what time it is, as you do for good morning, good afternoon or good night. There should be giant alarms over every restroom door that would sound an alarm every time someone exits without washing their hands. Seriously, folks, we can dramatically reduce the amount and severity of most disease, by thoroughly washing our paws every time we use the restroom. Add thorough hand washing to covering coughs and sneezes with a handkerchief (or at least your sleeve), and we will greatly reduce the spread of many common diseases. While we are thinking about public restrooms, etching initials into the mirrors makes only one kind of name for you, STUPID! If you want people to know your name, or know where you are from, then do something noteworthy for this community, so that people will recall your name for the good that you have done. Make that your goal; to do such good work here that your name will be lauded on street names,

Now is about the time when news organizations produce filler copy to take the place of real news [editor’s note: or run really long letters], so that everyone can take more time off for Christmas. Those sorts of editions are just a rehash of the main headlines from the nearly completed year. Pretty lame stuff, especially with regard to 2013. I want to offer you an alternative to that backward looking approach. Challenge your readers to describe what we all can do in 2014 to make this a better place to live. Here are some examples (in no particular order) that you are welcome to use with or without attribution, as you wish: When you are out shopping, put the carts in the cart corrals. No, the curb does not count. If there is no cart corral, take the time to walk the cart back to where it belongs at the store. Taking shopping carts from stores means that we all must pay higher prices to replace all of the stolen carts (some cost over $400). If you walk to the store and back, buy a pull behind cart for yourself to use. We will have a cleaner community and lower prices at the stores. Buy locally as much as possible. Dollars spent locally have a multiplying effect on the local economy that just can’t be matched when you buy from the big corporate stores. Take a look at where the products come from. Try harder to buy Made in the USA goods. When you find goods from Communist China, return the item to the shelves, with the, Made in China label facing outwards to warn other shoppers. Teach children and others to put things back where they belong. This applies to shops, schools, work and the home. We have a lot of new immigrants here. Our borders are like a sieve, and the current government will do nothing to stop the invasion. Our only alternative is to help teach

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

buildings, parks and in the hearts of your fellow citizens. Graffiti and other vandalism just means that you are a moron. We all want a bustling, successful business community, but we also want clean, quiet and friendly neighborhoods. We can make cleaner neighborhoods by starting beautification projects that involve young people and newcomers, thereby teaching pride in each of our neighborhoods. We can have more peace by taking barking dogs inside, or better still, opting not to own one of those yappy nuisances. Car entry devices can be set on silent entry and exit. You needn’t announce to everyone when you come and go. By the way the beep, honk or chirp, sometimes sounds, but the door locks did not engage. With silent entry, you can actually hear the doors all lock. Let this be the year that you make your voice be heard by our elected representatives! Join and contribute to a political campaign. Work hard to throw every incumbent out of office. The folks who held office in 2013, clearly did not work on your behalf. Everything continues to decline, except the cost of living and taxes, so throw them out. Throw the bums out! Throughout the upcoming campaign season, the first question that we must ask every candidate is, “What have you done so far and what will you do, to enhance our liberty?” For the few who feel you have been wronged by someone, and you have exhausted all legal remedies, the right answer is not to shoot your enemies, then dutifully shoot yourself as soon as some armed responder arrives. The right approach is show that you have the power to forgive the transgression. At the very least, resolve to learn from that bad experience, and go forward with your life, living in such an exemplary honorable,

prosperous way, that the offense by your enemy will become terribly small by comparison. I am sure that your team and our fellow citizens will come up with many other valuable suggestions. This is just a start to help us look forward and to try and become a better community in 2014. J. Tyler Ballance Reno

Pay to play Re “Some nukes is good nukes” (Let Freedom Ring, Dec. 19): Having lost a parent from direct Iodine-131 exposure (resulting in terminal leukemia 19 years following her work as a WAC assigned to the Corps of Engineers working on the Manhattan Project based at Hanford, Wash., in 1945, processing the plutonium for the Nagasaki bomb), I speak with some familial consequence/experience regarding nuclear power and nuclear energy. Folks say we have so much new knowledge now on how to deal with the waste—oops. How’s that working out at Hanford, a site from 68-plus years ago? It’s the No. 1 or 2 superfund site with a radioactive hydrogen plume headed for the Columbia River. What do we do with the waste from nuclear energy? Is any other question necessary? On the other hand, if Nevada (my home state) is to become the nuclear repository, [Nevadans should] study carefully the Alaska Permanent Fund. I fly airplanes up there for a living. Wouldn’t it be nice if every citizen of the state of Nevada who had been a resident of this state for two or more years got a cut--maybe $2,000 a year or more of the money coming into this state from the “service”we do for our country and the huge capitalism involved in this industry? Jody Everett Peterson Carson City

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Ron Large, Joe Medeiros, Jesse Pike, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Gary White, Joseph White, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover & Feature story design: Brian Breneman

OPINION

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FOODFINDS

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by Dennis Myers

ThiS ModErn World

by tom tomorrow

Your favorite Christmas? Asked at Overlook Restaurant, 1664 N. Virginia St. Annette Pymm Accountant

When I was 10 years old, when my mother’s grandparents were still alive, because we had all the family over there—like 30 people. And we were just little kids at that time. I think that’s pretty special.

Anthony Allen Cashier

I’d have to go back to—I think I was 12—and I got my first radio. Me and my little brother opened up all the Christmas presents before my mom and dad could watch us open them.

Jennifer O’Niel Academic advisor

Up your participation in 2014

I was probably 6 or 7, and I was from a big family, and the best part was there were zillions of presents under the tree. And it was never as good after you opened them. But imagining what the presents were, that was always really great.

July: Attend one cultural event. It’s Artown, how We all have things we tell ourselves we’re going to do, hard can this be? but we follow through far less than we’d like. In 2014, August: Make something. You may not believe you let’s make a plan to be better people in order to have a have an artistic bone in your body, but there is nothing better community. like the feeling that comes from being creative: Knit a January: Attend one live local music event. Reno’s scarf, draw a picture and put it in a nice frame, dig a got an awesome music scene, but all too often, audience garden, make a costume. You name it; if you take your participation is just not there. Be there in 2014. time, it will be better than you even imagined from your February: Attend one Reno City Council meeting. grade school art experience. Everyone should see exactly how this city’s sausage is September: Visit or write an elderly relative. And made. You’ll truly have a better understanding of your if you don’t have any elderly relatives, visit or write community. somebody else’s. It’s not as hard or as March: Volunteer one hour for In 2014, let’s weird as you’d think. the less fortunate. Cook some food October: Clean a public space. and take it down to Record Street. It You don’t need a group. Just drive doesn’t have to be fancy. The Loving make a plan to be 15 minutes out of town, find a side Hearts Club and Amber Lynn Dobson better people. road, grab a garbage bag, and fill it can always use the help. up. Better yet, scour a public park of April: Take one hike. There are cigarette butts. lots of short hikes around. Start with Galena at the foot November: Help get a good person elected locally. of Mount Rose. You know you’ll feel better. We’re not all that convinced that the system isn’t irreMay: Buy one piece of locally made art. Again, vocably broken at the federal level, but if you spend just pocket-book participation is the sincerest form of a minute getting to know the local candidates for office, appreciation. While there’s a ton of cool stuff out there you can make a real difference. Just one afternoon walkfor less than $50, why not buy a single focal piece for ing in your own neighborhood or stuffing envelopes or your living space? making phone calls may be enough to have a long-term June: Plant an organic tomato. You don’t have to beneficial effect on your city. wait til the snow is off Peavine. Just plant a tomato in a December: Shop in local stores. Can you believe clean five-gallon bucket, and bring it in if the weather it? It’s the holiday season already, and it’s going to gets threatening. be make-or-break season for a lot of local merchants. Spend your money where it does the most good. Ω

OPINION

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Catherine Pollock Student

I remember we were sitting around our Christmas tree with probably about 30 people from my mom’s side of the family. She has seven brothers, so they all have kids. And my grandpa read us “’Twas the Night Before Christmas,” which is pretty much our whole family’s favorite Christmas book. I was probably about 10.

Kim Boehner Events coordinator

When I was 11, and we got the first Nintendo, and that’s all we wanted and my grandmother forgot—she hid the present and then couldn’t remember where she hid it. ... And she had to find it. It turned up later that night, so it was almost like a present hunt. We had to find it. And I miss my grandmother a lot.

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The little guys may have won one Eastern Nevadans recently received wonderful news in the form of a judicial decision that validated their right to retain water needed to nurture a rural lifestyle of ranching, outdoor leisure, and the happiness of generations. While some in Southern Nevada sputtered that it was their right and by duty to grab the water needed to Sheila Leslie feed the insatiable growth of the Las Vegas Valley, many environmentalists and lovers of rural Nevada breathed a deep sigh of relief, albeit a temporary one, remembering the lessons of the Owens Valley whose water fed the sprawl now known as Los Angeles. Nevada has been facing its own rural water grab over the past 25 years as the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) has waged a multi-million dollar battle against rural residents and environmentalists over a 300-mile pipeline of water, now budgeted north of $15 billion. SNWA insists the water is needed to sustain Las Vegas, a city

dependent for its drinking water on the dwindling Colorado River, a source coveted by surrounding states as well. It must have seemed a lot easier to battle a handful of rural Nevadans than take on the legal behemoths of California or Arizona over who has the rights and deserves the water from the Colorado. But in a recent judicial decision, against all odds, the little guys prevailed. Judge Robert Estes of the 7th Judicial District rejected the pipeline plans in a ruling issued on Dec. 11, citing flaws in official findings from the state water engineer. He employed unusually strong language in his ruling, saying the state’s top water official was “arbitrary” and “capricious” in his findings, which were “not in the public interest.” The judge also expressed concerns that the pipeline would rob “future generations” of water resources, saying it’s clear that no one knows for sure how much damage the plan would inflict on the fragile basin and range ecosystem.

SNWA’s response was of the “trust us, we know what we’re doing” variety, despite the Owens Valley experience. Officials shrugged off the adverse decision, praising the judge for leaving many of their arguments in favor of the water grab intact. The ruling means the state water engineer will have to do more studies to calculate how much water can safely be pumped from the four valleys in Eastern Nevada without damaging the environment irreparably or diminishing the water rights of other holders, including those downstream in Utah. The Great Basin Water Network, an alliance of citizens, ranchers, local governments and other interested parties, was ecstatic with the victory against the seemingly unstoppable SNWA. In a press release, representatives called the ruling “a huge victory for the families and communities of these rural valleys in Nevada and Utah, and a vindication of our collective efforts to resist a massively misguided and

destructive project.” They called for SNWA to abandon the multibillion dollar project and look elsewhere for the water to quench Las Vegas’ thirst. Rob Mrowka, senior scientist for the Center for Biological Diversity, added his voice to the cry for SNWA to reconsider its position: “Rather than robbing the desert of its precious little water, we should be looking at sustainable ways for Las Vegas to live within its means without destroying the environment and rural communities.” SNWA is not going to give up, of course. But neither are the people of Eastern Nevada, who have a history of speaking truth to power. Consider the MX missile project driven by the military industrial complex that everyone said was inevitable. It wasn’t, thanks to many of the same people now resisting the pipeline. It’s certainly fair to describe the conflict over the water grab as a David vs. Goliath situation. But remember who won that one. Ω

To read the judge’s ruling, check out www.scribd.com/ doc/191076867/WaterRuling.

p To u s e T a ic if T r e gifT c o T f l e s r u o y TreaT

% 5 7 ! F F O

Visit www.newsreview.com gifT cerTificaTes froM resTauraNTs, Bars, cluBs, TaTToo, reTail, THeaTer, saloNs, spas, golf, VacaTioNs & More 6   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 26, 2013


Here’s to the little guys Victory belongs to the most persevering. —Napoleon Bonaparte

to specific new taxes. Any one tax increase may not seem like much, perhaps a few dollars at a time. These small increases add up, but it is easier, as the saying goes, to put a frog in water and turn the heat up slowly than to dump it into a cauldron of boiling water all at once. Before he knows what is happening, the tax-paying frog is slow cooked. In the last legislative session, AB 46 was passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Brian Sandoval. This bill authorized local county government to raise property and sales taxes, ostensibly for school construction, with only a majority vote by the legislators. The increase in property taxes would also be separate from the official property tax cap. Why have a cap when you can just create a new tax? The special interests who lobby for increases in government are usually well paid for their efforts. Numerous government and corporate entities have paid lobbyists

The Nevada Constitution was amended in 1996 by an initiative that passed with over 70 percent of the vote. It reads: “An affirmative vote of not fewer than two-thirds of the members elected to each House is necessary to pass a bill or joint resolution which creates, generates or increases any public revenue in any form, including but not limited to taxes, fees, assessments and rates, or changes in the computation bases for taxes, fees, assessments and rates. Art 4, sec 18.2.” Why was this amendment necessary? Because governments grow by means of concentrated benefits and diffuse costs. New taxes benefit some at the expense of others. Those who want the benefits organize and are called “special interests.” The public at large cannot organize for specific benefits, and bear the “diffuse costs.” Most people are too busy earning a living to be able to react

by

Brendan Trainor

in Carson City. Government employees are often given paid leaves from their jobs to lobby and demonstrate for more government. In Nevada, we have been fortunate to have a small but dedicated group of citizen lobbyists who forsake their personal lives and spend an enormous amount of time at the state Legislature to defend the rights of the citizen at large. For years these have included Janine Hansen and others associated with Nevada Families for Freedom. While I cannot agree with some of their positions—the families they defend are always very traditional and very well documented— it is wonderful to have Nevadans so committed to the principles of limited government. They can be relied on to testify eloquently against tax increases and for civil liberties. They alone opposed AB 46 at the legislative hearings. When AB 46 was passed it was immediately seen as an end run around the Nevada Constitution.

The grassroots networks that Nevada Families had created were alerted. The Washoe County Commission received the phone calls and emails that were needed to inform them of the people’s outrage over this blatant parliamentary maneuver. When Commissioner Kitty Jung made the motions Nov. 12 to implement AB 46 and raise taxes, she was met with complete silence. Not a single commissioner seconded the motion. We must congratulate the courage of Commissioners David Humke, Bonnie Weber, Marsha Berkbigler, and Vaughn Hartung in defying the Legislature and the governor. But most of all, we have to be grateful that there are those Nevadans whose names are not on a plaque in front of a government chair but who care about the eternal battle waged by government power against freedom. This time they have persevered. Ω

Lots of fun stuff on the Nevada Families for Freedom website: http://tinyurl.com/ pm6pgk2

SHEEP DIP SHOW WIN TICKETS TO THE 50TH ANNUAL

ON JANUARY 17TH!

Just nominate a public figure for this year’s “People’s Choice Shaft Award”! Each year, we choose someone whose actions or words are deserving of the “shaft”. This could be an elected official, someone from a public agency or business or the organization itself.

WIN S T E K C TI OPINION

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• Send your nomination (one nomination per entry, please) to contest@newsreview.com • Include your full name, birth date and day phone • Tell us - in 50 words or less - why your nominee deserves “the shaft” • DEADLINE TO ENTER is 11:59pm on Monday, December 30, 2013 The winning entry will receive two tickets to the Sheep Dip Show on Friday, January 17th. Winner will be notified by phone and e-mail on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 |

ART OF THE STATE

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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DECEMBER 26, 2013

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Photo/Library of Congress

U.S. Sen. Patrick McCarran, left, is pictured  here with his senior Nevada colleague, Key  Pittman, at a meeting of the Senate Judiciary  Committee in 1937 during hearings on the  Roosevelt court-packing plan, about eight years  before McCarran’s bill exempting insurers from  anti-trust law was enacted.

Auditions planned “Seeking Business-Experienced Candidates for Public Office. Is It You?” That’s the headline on a message the Reno Chamber of Commerce sent out last week, also signed by the Associated Builders and Contractors, Associated General Contractors, Builders Association of Northern Nevada, and the Reno/Sparks Association of Realtors. The message promoted a workshop for prospective candidates to be held at the real estate offices in January. “[T]he business perspective must be brought to the table when issues such as taxes, education, transportation, energy, and many others are discussed in the political arena. Our public boards, commissions, councils and legislative bodies need leaders with experience in making a payroll, sticking to a budget, and making the tough decisions that you make every day.”

Water grab fails court test In scathing language, a state court judge has overturned the state water engineer’s approval of the planned transfer of water in eastern Nevada and western Utah to southern Nevada to feed growth. Judge Robert Estes of the Seventh Judicial Court of Nevada called the decision by State Engineer Jason King to approve the transfer “subjective, unscientific, arbitrary and capricious,” and “not in the public interest.” To pass muster, the water engineer must recalculate available water to guarantee “the basin will reach equilibrium between discharge and recharge within a reasonable time.” Estes also said King must include the impact on Utah territory in his calculations. The judge seemed to think King’s approval decision was uncooked and that he had become too cozy with the Southern Nevada Water Authority, writing that the water engineer had effectively “relinquished his responsibilities” to SNWA. “There are no objective standards to determine when mitigation will be required and implemented,” Estes wrote. “The engineer has listed what mitigation efforts can possibly be made, i.e., stop pumping, modifying pumping, change location of pumps, drill new wells … but does not cite objective standards of when mitigation is necessary.” “That is exactly the kind of analysis needed,” the Deseret News— owned by the Mormon Church—editorialized in Salt Lake City. “As Utah officials and environmentalists have been saying for years, the results of such pumping could be disastrous. Utah’s deserts contain fragile plant species that keep the soil in place. This allows ranching to thrive while also sustaining wildlife that feed on the plants. Drain water from beneath these plants and they might die, leading to dust storms and destroying the area’s economy..”

Sandoval’s mixed week The same week that Gov. Brian Sandoval took heat for his lethargic response this year to the mental patient dumping scandal, he attracted attention in a major news organ for not blocking the Affordable Care Act. The Sacramento Bee, following up on its summer disclosure of Nevada’s dumping of patients from Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital, reported last week that crimes followed in cities where those patients were dropped. Sandoval said—through a spokesperson—that he was “appalled” and then appointed a committee to examine state mental health policies, prompting the Bee to editorialize, “So far, Sandoval has been minimizing the problem and seeking to whitewash it.” Meanwhile, under the headline, “In Nevada, the Republican governor who doesn’t completely hate Obamacare,” the Washington Post observed, “Only eight states run by Republican governors moved to expand Medicaid to cover residents making less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level. Only three states with Republican governors set up state-based health-care exchanges. Just two states led by Republicans—Nevada and New Mexico—did both. And Nevada is the only Republican-led state with an exchange that’s actually signing people up for insurance.”

—Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 26, 2013

Protected industry Congress looks at repeal of an old gift to insurance corporations There are efforts underway to repeal the protection insurance corporations enjoy from anti-trust law. That protecby tion was conferred on the insurers by Dennis Myers the McCarran-Ferguson Act, approved by Congress in 1945. McCarran is Patrick McCarran, a right wing U.S. senator from Nevada who teamed up with Homer Ferguson, an equally corporate-cozy Republican from Michigan—Lloyd Bridges portrayed his shilling for

“McCarran is the bedrock of the state insurance regulatory system.” National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors General Motors in Tucker—to shield the insurance industry from the law. It happened after a 1944 U.S. Supreme Court decision in United States v. South-Eastern Underwriters Association. In that case, the court ruled, “The conspirators [member insurance companies of the SouthEastern Underwriters Association] not only fixed premium rates and agents’ commissions, but employed boycotts together with other types of coercion and intimidation to force non-member insurance companies into the conspiracies, and to compel persons who needed insurance to buy

only from S.E.U.A.” The court found that the industry could legally be regulated by Congress under its interstate commerce authority. In response, McCarran and Ferguson sponsored legislation to keep regulation of insurance companies at the state level and also to shield insurance corporations from anti-trust laws in most cases. Although the court had empowered Congress to regulate the corporations, the new law left most of the business of regulating insurance to the mostly corporate-friendly states and provided that federal anti-trust law does not apply in states where the industry is regulated. The law has long been a lightning rod for criticism. With the advent of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the level of criticism has risen. At least five measures have been introduced in the current Congress to repeal it, sponsored by U.S. Reps. John Conyers of Michigan, Peter DeFazio of Oregon, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Phil Roe of Tennessee, and Steven Lynch of Massachusetts. Lynch, DeFazio, and Conyers are Democrats, Roe and Gosar Republicans. The bills take different approaches. Roe’s bill is likely a non-starter because it links repeal of McCarranFerguson with repeal of the ACA, which cannot pass the Senate, much less survive a veto in either house. The Act can cut across ideological lines, drawing support and criticism from both left and right.

Some conservatives see it as anticompetitive. Jon Hall wrote last month on the American Thinker website, “The United States has not had a true market for health insurance since at least the passage of the McCarranFerguson Act in 1945. That act gave an anti-trust exemption to the health insurance industry, which severely limited competition.” (The exemption applies to the entire insurance industry, not just health insurers.) On the other hand, another conservative, John Pryor, wrote this month in the Bakersfield Californian, “What would have been unmanageable at the federal level functioned efficiently at the state level. It has worked well for 68 years!” How well state regulation of insurance works is also up for debate. In some states—particularly those without a large population base—if insurance companies dislike the regulatory or legislative climate, they can pull out altogether without losing much trade. Nevada legislators often tread lightly around insurance legislation because of exactly that threat. Repeal of McCarran-Ferguson is often portrayed by the insurance industry as meaning an end to state regulation, which is not necessarily the case. A 2009 repeal measure sponsored by Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont provided for continued state regulation (“Partial anti-trust repeal planned,” RN&R, Oct. 22, 2009). One telling indicator is that both insurance corporations and local agents are apprehensive about losing McCarran-Ferguson. “There have been recent attacks by the Congress to repeal the act,” wrote Florida insurance agent Bob Fowinkle in his home town paper, the Bradenton Herald. “This would cause great danger to the insurance industry and states. The revenues to the states from license fees, premium taxes and fines are substantial and could be at risk. Repeal would give the Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission the power to enforce federal anti-trust laws and regulations within our state relating to the business of insurance. Each state has enjoyed more than 64 years of regulating insurance within their borders and has done a reasonably good job, in my opinion.” The National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors, which calls itself the “voice of the agent,” says it “cannot support any effort to repeal the McCarran anti-trust exemption for any line of insurance. McCarran is the bedrock of the state insurance regulatory system because it dictates that the states—who currently


have the only insurance regulatory expertise—are the sole regulators of the business of insurance.” Just as telling is that state regulators also seem apprehensive about repeal. Their National Association of Insurance Commissioners takes the position that “outright repeal of the McCarran-Ferguson exemption risks creating unintended consequences by threatening state-regulated, procompetitive collaborative activities among insurers.” That regulators and the regulated take the same stand on repeal is an indicator all its own. The man who now occupies the Senate seat McCarran once held has no doubt about the need for repeal. “Since 1945, the insurance industry has enjoyed exemption from federal anti-trust laws because of the McCarran-Ferguson Act,” U.S. Sen. Harry Reid testified at a 2009 Senate hearing. “Pat McCarran, who was the senior senator from Nevada at the time, lent his name to this piece of legislation. ... I’m not sure what Pat McCarran had in mind when he pushed this bill. And if Pat were around today, he couldn’t be happy with the state of the insurance industry. … There is no reason why the insurance companies should have exemption from anti-trust laws. To the extent insurance companies need to share information to provide their services, let them do what other industries have to do—seek prior authorization and guidelines from the Department of Justice for how they can work together.”

Some observers say state regulation is no prize, that local regulators are either unable under state laws to be effective or are too cozy with the industry they are supposed to scrutinize.

“Thestatesbringfewifany meaningfulcasesagainst healthinsurers.” David Balto Former Federal trade Commission staffer “Almost all health insurance markets are highly concentrated and many are dominated by one or two insurers,” former Federal Trade Commission policy director David Balto wrote in April. “Congress hoped that state regulation would suffice, but the states bring few if any meaningful cases against health insurers. In addition, there is no need for an exemption since the practices that led to the Act are now considered legal under standards of anti-trust law. … If there was one thing clear from the Congressional debate over health care, it is that health insurance markets are unhealthy. Over the past few decades, profits have increased dramatically, and the market has become one of the least transparent and most anticompetitive markets in the nation. Indeed, few markets are as concentrated, opaque and complex, and subject to rampant anticompetitive and deceptive conduct.” Ω

Building down Photo/Dennis Myers

The now-vacant Getchell Library building, whose striking profile dominated the main campus and became a symbol of the University of Nevada, Reno, looks like a war zone now. Demolition of the building began last week.

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Celebrate with us!

Gayle Sherman is a resident of Silver City.

In denial Planning Commission recommends denial of mining in Silver City Silver City residents came out again in large numbers to pack the Lyon County Planning Commission meeting room in Yerington on Dec. 10 and are pleased with the decision made by the commission. by Sage Leehey After the month long continuance of the decision about Comstock Mining Inc.’s (CMI) application for a master plan amendment and zoning changes sagel@ that would allow mining in Silver City’s borders, the Planning Commission news re view.c om has recommended denial to the County Commission. “For Silver City, it means we won the first round, but we’ve got a long way to go,” said chair of the Silver City Citizen Advisory Board, Erich Obermayr. “The planning commission makes a recommendation. It’s up to the County Commissioners to make the final decision.” The recommendation from the Planning Commission comes with a 5-to-1 vote denying the master plan amendment and a unanimous vote denying the zoning change. Obermayr stated that if CMI’s application is approved, it will result in mining operations in Silver City’s borders much too close to residents’ homes—something that is unacceptable to “upwards of 90 percent of the people in Silver City.” He said he believes mining shouldn’t be allowed within their town limits. “A mining operation is completely incompatible with a residential area,” Obermayr said. “It’s an industrial operation. It has no place in a residential area.” Prior to this meeting, Silver City residents had prepared a report as part of their presentation to the Planning Commission with their reasons that the application should be denied. The report addressed legal, planning, historical To view a video made by Silver City and real estate issues at stake in this decision. Many of the residents believe residents and that mining will make the area unlivable because of the proximity to their presented at the homes—some as close as 250 feet to the proposed area—and are worried planning commission about several issues, including real estate values, especially because there is meeting, visit tinyurl. already a pit mine near the other end of Silver City that lies in Storey County. com/mrsyv25. “If we have a pit mine in the south end of town, we will be bookended by pits, and that is probably not attractive to potential buyers of property in Silver City,” said Silver City resident Gayle Sherman. Lyon County has a long history of denying requests for mining in city borders, and Sherman hopes that this will continue with CMI’s current application. The next Lyon County Commission meeting will be on Jan. 2, and residents expect that the County Commission will discuss and decide upon this issue at that meeting. At this meeting, both the Silver City residents and Comstock Mining Inc. will present information about why they believe the application should be denied or approved. The Planning Commission’s recommendation will be presented, too. There will also be time for public comment where individuals may voice their opinions on the matter as well. In the time between the Planning Commission and County Commission meetings, the residents of Silver City will “be doing everything [they] can to persuade the County Commissioners to follow the Planning Commission’s recommendation,” according to Obermayr. Ω OPINION

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Our essayist’s lifelong love of poetry serves as introduction for a new RN&R poetry contest By J AKe Hi GHton

Poetry is the rhythmical creation of beauty in words. —Edgar Allan Poe

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he greatest Christmas gift I ever received was an illustrated volume of poetry by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. I got it from a friend of my mother in 1947. I was just 16. The book forever hooked me on poetry. Longfellow is not a profound poet in the sense that Dante, Goethe and Shakespeare are. But that Longfellow book started a lifelong love affair with poetry’s rhyme, beauty, thoughts and wisdom. Longfellow’s “The Ladder of St. Augustine”: “The heights by great men reached and kept / Were not attained by sudden flight, / But they, while their companions slept, / Were toiling upward in the night.” Inspiring, hopeful lines to a dreamy youth. Or these lines from “A Psalm of Life”: “Lives of great men all remind us / We can make our lives sublime, / And, departing, leave behind us / Footprints on the sands of time.” Not immortal poetry but magnificent to a boy.

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I remember the truth in Longfellow’s “My Lost Youth”: “A boy’s will is the winds will, / And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.” I liked Longfellow’s “The Children’s Hour” with “Grave Alice and Laughing Allegra” almost devouring their professor father with kisses. And “The Village Blacksmith” under a spreading chestnut tree with arms as “strong as iron bands.” And “The Wreck of the Hesperus,” a schooner sailing “the wintry sea” amid falling snow “hissing in the brine” and death “on the reef of Norman’s Woe.” Taste and judgment in literary matters, as in all things, are individual. My taste may not be yours. Indeed, some of the poems I think highly of are sometimes not anthologized.

“Poetry, A notion” continued on page 14

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“Poetry, A notion”

ContinuED FRoM pagE 13

British and Irish Poetr y Over the years “my taste” seized on some of the following poems. Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus with these wonderful lines: “Was this the face that launched a thousand ships, / And burned the topless towers of Ilium? / Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss. / Her lips suck forth my soul: see where it flies! / Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again.” I like the absurdity in John Donne’s “Song”: “Go, and catch a falling star, / Get with child a mandrake root.” I like the twin Milton poems, “L’Allegro” and “Il Penseroso.” “L’Allegro”: “Hence loathed melancholy / Of Cerberus and blackest midnight born, / In Stygian cave forlorn / ‘Mongst horrid shapes, and shrieks, and sights unholy.” “Il Penseroso”: “Hence vain deluding joys, / The brood of folly without father bred.” Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” a religious epic, is not one of my favorite poems. But I love the fact that the rebellious devil gets its best line: “Better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven.” I like the thought of Pope’s “Essay on Man”: “Worth makes the man and want of it the fellow; / The rest is all but leather or prunella.” I like Thomas Gray’s “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard”: “The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, / The lowing herd wind slowly o’er the lea.” And then these sad lines from “The Epitaph”: “Here rests his head upon the lap of earth / A youth to fortune and to fame unknown: / Fair science frowned not on his humble birth, / And melancholy marked him for her own.” More from Gray’s “Elegy”: “the madding crowd’s ignoble strife,” “some heart once pregnant with celestial fire” and “full many a flower is born to blush unseen.” And this stanza: “The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power / And all that beauty, all that wealth ever gave, / Awaits alike the inevitable hour, / The paths of glory lead but to the grave.” I had to memorize “The Epitaph” in a high school English class. Most kids hated the assignment, but I loved it. My teacher, Miss Koehler, solidified my passion for literature. She was one of those teachers we remember as long as we live. The older I get, the more I like this insight from Yeats’ “Sailing to Byzantium: “An old man is but a paltry thing, / A tattered coat upon a stick.” And speaking of intimations of mortality, I cherish those defiant lines of Dylan Thomas: “Do not go gentle into that good night / Old age should burn and rave at close of day; / Rage, rage against the dying of the light.” William Blake is often too religious for my taste but his opening stanza of “Auguries of Innocence” is worth memorizing: “To see a world in a grain of sand, / And a heaven in a wild flower, / Hold infinity in the palm of your hand / And eternity in an hour. / A robin redbreast in a cage, / Puts all heaven in a rage.” The Robert Burns poem “To a Mouse” is well known. His “To a Louse” should be better known because of this great passage: “O wad some power the giftie gie us / To see oursels as ithers see us!” As an environmentalist, I cherish these lines from Wordsworth: “The world is too much with us: late and soon, / Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: / Little we 14   |  RN&R   |  DECEMBER 26, 2013

see in nature that is ours; / We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!” I love the opening lines of Keats’ “Ode to a Nightingale”: “My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains / My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk.” There is truth in the Keats poem: “Where but to think is to be full of sorrow.” And what stout soul can resist Tennyson’s line in “Ulysses”: “To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield”? One of my very favorite poems is “Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold. Its “moon-blanched land,” its “grating roar of pebbles” and its “melancholy, long, withdrawing roar.” Then these lines: “Ah, love, let us be true / To one another! For the world, which seems / To lie before us like a land of dreams, / So various, so beautiful, so new, / Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, / Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain.” Walter Scott was a novelist but will probably be remembered only for this line of poetry: “Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive!” Wilfred Owen, British soldier-poet killed in World War I, wrote these great words to anyone sickened by constant U.S. wars: “My friend, you would not tell with such high zest / To children ardent for some desperate glory, / The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est / Pro patria mori.” (“It is a sweet and honorable to die for one’s country.”) Robert Southey makes a more subtle anti-war point in the last stanza of “The Battle of Blenheim”: Little Peterkin was asked what was the good of the battle. “Why, that I cannot tell,” said he, / “But ’twas a famous victory.” George Moore was an Irish novelist, playwright and poet (1852-1933). Some of his poems were erotic. One is “The Triumph of the Flesh”: “I am filled with carnivorous lust: like a tiger / I crouch and I feed on my beautiful prey: / There is nought in the monstrous world of Astarte /

So fair as thy body.” (Astarte is the Babylonian goddess of love.) The Reno News & Review is hardly the prudish “family newspaper” published by the Establishment press. Yet it is unlikely to print limericks because, to be any good, most limericks must be “indecent.” Here’s one, written by “anonymous,” printed in many variations but all printable, if insensitive: “A fairy once in Khartoum / Invited a lesbian up to his room / But they spent the whole night / In a helluva fight / As to who should do what to whom.” Here’s an example of the “other” kind: “There was a young plumber of Leigh / Who was plumbing a girl by the sea. / She said, ‘Stop your plumbing, / There’s somebody coming!’ / Said the plumber, still plumbing, ‘It’s me.’” British novelist Arnold Bennett calls “plumbing” the best limerick ever written. Perhaps. But with more than 1,300 in print there is room for disagreement. Two recommended books are out of print but possibly available at Amazon: The Limerick, edited by G. Legman, Portland House, and Poetica Erotica, edited by T.R. Smith, Crown Publisher. My all-time favorite is Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland written by Lewis Carroll with illustrations by John Tenniel. The nonsense fantasy of “Alice” never ceases to delight. I reread it every year or so—and always with pleasure. “What is the use of a book without pictures or conversations?” Alice asks with wisdom beyond her years. “Curiouser and curiouser,” Alice cries. Encountering the tea party threesome, the March Hare, the Mad Hatter and the sleepy Dormouse, she says: “It’s the stupidest tea party I ever was at in all my life.” Alice recites this enjoyable nonsense verse: “You are old Father William, the young man said … / And yet you incessantly stand on your head— / Do you think at your age it is right?”

Carroll’s sequel, “Through the Looking Glass,” features Tweedledum and Tweedledee and Humpty Dumpty. And the Walrus and the Carpenter talking of many things like shoes and ships and sealing wax and asking whether pigs have wings. And the nonsense verse of all nonsense verses is “The Jabberwocky”: “‘Twas brillig and the slithy toves / Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; / All mimsy were the borogoves, / And the nome raths outgrabe.” My No. 2 favorite is “The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám” translated freely by Edward FitzGerald. It is a wondrous ode to hedonism, to carpe diem, to wine, women and song. The 12th quatrain expresses its spirit: “A book of verses underneath the bough, / A jug of wine, a loaf of bread and thou / Beside me singing in the wilderness— / Oh, wilderness were paradise enow!” It closes with an exhortation to Sákí, cupbearer to the gods: “And in your joyous errand reach the spot / Where I made One—turn down an empty glass!” In between it is packed with such marvelous verses as this: “Ah love! Could you and I with Him conspire / To grasp this sorry scheme of things entire, / Would not we shatter it to bits—and then / Remold it nearer to the heart’s desire!” Oscar Wilde’s “The Ballad of Reading Gaol” shows his serious side as opposed to the wit, epigrammatist and esthete. One memorable stanza is printed on the Jacob Epstein sphinx sculpture at Wilde’s grave in Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris. “And alien tears will fill for him / Pity’s long-broken urn, / For his mourners will be outcast men, / And outcasts always mourn.” Émile Zola, the great French writer, once complained that English was a barbarous language. Wilde, in perhaps the greatest putdown in literary history, sighed and said: “Yes, I have been condemned to speak the

our First

We’ll be accepting entries through Feb. 28 Once more into the breach, my friends. The Reno News & Review is holding a poetry contest. While there will be panel of judges from both inside and outside the newspaper, we won’t be announcing who they are until publication of the winners to prevent lobbying. We’ll only accept emailed entries, and the poem must be in the body of the email; we’ll not be opening attachments. Only a single submission per person will be accepted, and entrants must live within 50 miles of the Reno News & Review’s office. Email to renopoetry@

newsreview.com and put Poetry 2014 in the subject line. All entries must be received by 5 p.m. on Feb. 28. Winners will be published on April 3. Include contact information, including name, address and telephone number in the body of the same email as the poem. Nom de plumes will not be accepted. The individual who strips the names from the submissions will not be a member of the judging team. Other than the guidelines for submission, there are only two rules: Poems must be less than 500 words long, and poems

must be submitted in a publishable form. (For example, no one-line, 499-word submissions). While we’ll be mindful of intentional line breaks and word placement, we reserve the right to change if needed, so stay away from unusual fonts or formatting. We will presume all spellings and punctuation are intentional, and we won’t copy-edit. While we’ve tried to think of every contingency, we’re sure someone will attempt to game the system, so we reserve the right to reject any submission at the editors’ discretion.


language of Shakespeare.” It was also the perceptive Wilde who wrote in “De Profundis”: “Shakespeare is the most purely human of all great artists.” H.L Mencken started to compile a book of quotations but quit when he realized he had a preponderance of quotes by Shakespeare. Mencken was right. How can you resist the marvelous poetry of “In such a night” in “The Merchant of Venice”? Or Romeo’s tribute to womanhood: “But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? / It is the east and Juliet is the sun.” And the sonnets, so many wonderful ones. One of my favorites is XXXV: “No more be grieved at that which thou hast done: / Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud; / Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, / And loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud.” Read Harold Bloom and Isaac Asimov for more erudite and profound insights about Shakespeare. My views are those of an amateur in the sense of an admirer, devotee and lover rather than a professional critic. To me, the most poetic of Shakespeare’s plays is Macbeth. Hamlet is the most cerebral. King Lear is the bleakest. In it the cruel Regan says of the blinded Gloucester: “let him smell his way to Dover.” And earlier Gloucester remarks: “As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods; / They kill us for their sport.” Macbeth says his way of life “Is fallen into the sere, the yellow leaf; / And that which should accompany old age, / As honour, love,

the mockingbird sounds his delicious gurgles, cackles, screams, weeps.” And this marvelous Whitman thought should be dedicated to all great teachers: “I am the teacher of athletes, / He that by me spreads a wider breast than my own proves the width of my own, / He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher.” One of my favorites is Edwin Markham’s “The Man with Hoe.” It is a classic cry for socialism. It starts: “Bowed by the weight of centuries he leans / Upon his hoe and gazes on the ground / The emptiness of ages in his face… / Stolid and stunned, a brother to the ox … / Through this dread shape humanity betrayed, / Plundered, profaned and disinherited / Cries protest to the powers that made the world.” I’m mostly indifferent to T.S. Eliot with his fancy words without meaning. To me, his best poem is “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” with its amusing nonsense. Does he dare to eat a peach? He measures out his life with coffee spoons. “I grow old … I grow old … / I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled.” And grant Eliot that great line in “The Hollow Men”: “This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper.” Edna St. Vincent Millay is a fine poet. Her “Recuerdo” (memory) is a 16-line poem about a couple spending a happy night on a ferry. But, sensitive to the feelings of others, the couple shares their happiness with a babushka. Here’s the ending:

obedience, troops of friends, / I must not look to have but in their stead / Curses not loud but deep, mouth honour, breath, / Which the poor heart would fain deny and dare not.” Then: “Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time; / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! / Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, / That struts and frets his hour upon the stage / And then is heard no more. It is a tale / Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, / Signifying nothing.”

American Poetr y I’m not wild about Robert Frost, as many American poetry lovers are. But I do like “The Death of the Hired Man.” It reminds us to be kind to someone who “comes home to die,” to abandon our narrow-mindedness, to be more generous about the foibles of people. Nor do I fancy Emily Dickinson, a poet beloved by English teachers. Dickinson is “nice.” (I know: terribly patronizing.) To me, Walt Whitman is the best American poet. Look at his Leaves of Grass: “Walt Whitman, a kosmos, of Manhattan the son, / Turbulent, fleshy, sensual, eating, drinking and breeding.” The poet says of animals: “They do not sweat and whine about their condition, / They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins, / They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God.” He knows bird lore: “Where

“We were very tired, we were very merry, / We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry. / We hailed, ‘Good morrow, mother!’ to a shawl-covered head… / And she wept, ‘God bless you!’ for the apples and pears, / And we gave her all our money but our subway fares.” I love Poe’s “The Raven” with its hammering, repetitious sounds: “While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, / As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.” Then this wonderful stanza: “Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, / In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore. / Not the least obeisance made he, not a minute stopped or stayed he, / But with mien of lord or lady perched above my chamber door— / Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door.” My granddaughter Kamryn Moloney recalls memorizing a famous poem and reciting it for a Mendive Middle School class project. “I chose ‘The Raven’ because I enjoyed the words that Poe used and the story they described,” she said. She and I recently were talking to the library director of the Nevada Historical Society. For no apparent reason, we began quoting to her lines from “The Raven.” The librarian was delighted by the extempore recital. We were even more delighted. Ω

Jake Highton is a professor emeritus at the University of Nevada, Reno.

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he holiday season is winding down, but you might still have some late gifts to buy, or presents for those poor souls with birthdays the week after Christmas, or maybe you just feel like throwing an extra generous New Year’s Eve party and giving out presents to all the guests. Or, even better, you just scored a gift card or a lousy present you’re ready to exchange. Well, Blu-rays are relatively inexpensive, they usually don’t smell all that bad, and they have been known to cure influenza in farm animals. I’m lying about that last one, but they make great gifts. All of these items listed below are Blu-ray. Many of them also contain DVDs for those of your gift recipients who are super late to the Blu-ray party. The prices listed were taken form the all hallowed Amazon.com at the time I wrote this. I provide these prices to give you a ballpark figure for shopping, and it’s not an exact science, so get off of my back! 16   |  RN&R   | 

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Because it’s the greatest TV show that ever was, that’s why Breaking Bad: The Complete Series ($244.99) The conclusion of Breaking Bad was astoundingly, astonishingly good. Along with Agent Cooper’s bloody face laughing into a cracked mirror on Twin Peaks, Bryan Cranston’s final moments as chemistry teacher turned meth master Walter White count as the best series finales I’ve ever seen. You get every season in this set, with the final episodes of the show available for the first time on home video. The final season started where the prior season left off, with—spoiler alert—Dean Norris’s Hank finally figuring out what his brother-in-law was doing in his spare time. From the moment he confronts Walter, to the musical strains of Badfinger’s “Baby Blue,” the final season is a wild, wild ride. All of the seasons come in a nifty “money” barrel. (Those who

saw the final season know of the barrel’s significance). You get a nice booklet, an awesome Los Pollos Hermanos apron, and many hours of special features, including an overtwo-hour documentary that is special to this set. The already circulated Malcolm in the Middle fake ending is here, as well.

Because it has the COOLEST CASE EVER! The Walking Dead Season 3: Limited Edition ($79.99) Yes, the Breaking Bad money barrel is awesome and will make collectors go “Oooh, ahh!” but take a look at this sucker. You get season three of The Walking Dead inside a zombie head aquarium designed by McFarlane Toys. Yes, it has water in it. Yes, it has zombie heads in it. Yes, it is a sick and twisted ode to the Governor and his weird taste in pets. Yes, it’s so cool, it’s crazy.

For the Sea World enthusiast you want to bum out Blackfish $19.99 Do you dislike someone planning a Sea World excursion? Well then, hook that douchebag up with this sometime horrifying look at why orcas should not be held captive in tanks for us to press our noses up to and gawk. The death of an Orlando Sea World trainer, along with other captivewhale-related fatalities, are at the center of this well made documentary. Many who see this may very well be converted to an anti-Sea World sentiment. So, if you know somebody who loves Shamu, and they owe you money or stole your shoes or something like that, give them this and make them feel like dookie. Happy holidays!

For the one who finds the end of the world potentially hilarious This is The End ($22.99) and The World’s End ($19.99) Two of the year’s best comedies were about the Apocalypse, and they both get decent Blu-ray treatments. Seth Rogen and friends (including a hilarious James Franco) spoof themselves and celebrity with their extremely funny, surprisingly violent flick wherein Franco is actually eaten by Danny McBride. Simon Pegg completed his Cornetto trilogy with a great one about bar-hopping while alien robots pull an Invasion of the Body Snatchers. (There’s also a Cornetto Trilogy Blu-ray pack featuring Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and The World’s End).


Because they both have Eric Idle in them The Rutles Anthology ($19.88) and Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life ($14.96) Monty Python have recently announced reunion shows, marking the end of a small feud between Eric Idle and the rest of the group. The Rutles Anthology gives you Idle’s Beatles spoof, and The Meaning of Life Blu features an awesome reunion of sorts (John Cleese, Michael Palin, Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones sit in a room, with Eric Idle piped in via satellite video). These two in the stocking are highly recommended for Python fans.

Also British and also cool Help! ($24.78) and Paul McCartney and Wings: Rockshow ($19.49) While Help! is only the second-best Beatles movie ever, it’s only because A Hard Day’s Night is so damned good. Help! is entirely awesome and cool, featuring a Ringo performance for the ages. As for Rockshow, you’ll make McCartney fans happy even if it does feature a couple of Wings clunkers.

To remind that slasher film fan that they are getting old Halloween: 35th Anniversary Edition ($26..94) The umpteenth edition of John Carpenter’s classic Halloween is worth having, and a fine reminder that many of those who caught in in theaters are now in their 50s! That is some messed-up shit right there.

Because when the folks who get the above stop weeping and examining their wrinkles in the mirror, they will want more Carpenter Prince of Darkness ($24.87) The Fog ($22.38) In the Mouth of Madness ($14.96) Some of Carpenter’s lessor known but still scary as all heck movies got decent Blu-ray treatment this year, especially Anchor Bay’s treatments for Prince of Darkness and The Fog. In the Mouth of Madness has fewer bells and whistles, but it’s still a pretty good film finally coming to Blu-ray.

For those highfalutin, indie-movie loving, stuck-up movie fans Mud ($17.45)

STARSHIP

This is one of the year’s best movies, and offers a distinct reason for why many of us movie critics have stopped making fun of Matthew McConaughey.

FE AT URING

MICKEY THOMAS Saturday, January 11

For that person you sort of hate

BOOKER T. JONES

The Internship ($17.99) If there’s somebody on your list that you kind of hate, but find yourself having to give them a gift for one reason or another, go ahead and give them this piece of shit.

Saturday, January 18

PABLO CRUISE

For the Disney freak Peter Pan ($19.99) Mary Poppins: 50th Anniversary Edition ($24.99) The Little Mermaid ($29.96)

Saturday, January 25

Disney released a lot of good stuff this year. If you get that Disney maniac on your list these three flicks, you will be in good shape. I didn’t like Wreck-itRalph, so it has been excluded. Yes, my motivations are selfish and biased, but it’s my article, so there you go.

TOAD THE WET SPROCKET Saturday, February 1

WALK OFF THE EARTH

Because it’s Charlie Chaplin and part of the Criterion Collection

Saturday, March 1 ON SALE THIS FRIDAY!

City Lights ($22.99) The ever-reliable Criterion folks continue their series of Chaplin reissues with this treasure.

UPCOMING SHOWS WAR

Because the monster eats a diner and it’s part of the Criterion Collection

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8

KELLIE PICKLER

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15

The Blob ($24.99)

THE WAILERS

Steve McQueen stars in a movie about a big piece of Jell-O going around absorbing people and, yes, eating a diner. It has a great theme song, too!

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR SOUTHSHOREROOM.COM.

Longer, still kind of lame, but collectors want it on their shelf

#TahoeConcerts

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Extended Edition ($24.99)

See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

It’s longer, still boring, and has those lengthy behind-the-scenes looks and a Peter Jackson commentary. Tolkien fans who don’t like this movie want it anyway, including myself. Ω OPINION

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12/20/13 3:52 PM


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Itʼs happen ing in

ACTIVITIES CHRISTMAS CAPERS Looking for festive holiday activities for your children during the winter break? This program offers field trips, sports, games, crafts and more. Registration limited to 180. Drop-ins will be taken on a space-available basis only, beginning the Thursday before the week of desired attendance. Anything less than a full section is considered drop in.Youth, Kindergarten - 6th grade. 12/30-1/3/14, 7AM – 6PM. $115/$96 resident discount, per week for weeks 1 & 2. $144/$120 resident discount, per week for week 3. Drop-in, $43/$36 resident discount, per day. No program on 12/25 and 1/1. Sparks Recreation Gym, 98 Richards Way (775) 353-2376 SPARKS DEEP FREEZE SOFTBALL LEAGUE Registration extended to 12/28. The 8-week season will take place on Wednesday evenings, 1/8 – 2/26/14 at the Golden Eagle Regional Park sports complex in all weather conditions. Cost: $400/team. Must be 18 or older. Register at Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385 or sportsinfo@ cityofsparks.us DOG PARK CLOSED The temporary closure of the dog park on the south side of the Sparks Marina Park has been extended to 1/13/14 to complete a fencing renovation project. The park will reopen on 1/14/14. 300 Howard Drive (775) 353-2376. LIFEGUARD TRAINING Become a certified lifeguard through an American Red Cross lifeguard training program. Candidates must pass a swim performance test prior to acceptance into the

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

! class. Students who complete the course will receive Lifeguard First Aid certificates valid for 3 years and a CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer certificate, valid for 1 year. Registration includes instruction, course materials and administration fee. Must be 15 years or older. $180/$150/ resident discount. 1/6-1/9/14, Mon– Thu, 8AM-5PM. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385

BUDDY EMMER BAND Th, 12/26, 7PM, F, 12/27, 8PM and Sa, 12/28, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Wi-Fi Jukebox. Karaoke starts at 9PM on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. doors 6PM. Happy hour from 6 to. F-Su through 12/31, No cover. The Karaoke Bar, 2140 Victorian Ave. (775) 313-2772

WICKED HICKS F, 12/27, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

BLACK AND BLUES JAM Tu, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP Jean Peters guides this class for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

ROCK’N BIRTHDAY BASH! Celebrate the New Year by rock’n it in right with a big happy birthday to the drummer for TaZeR. Sa, 12/28, 9:30PM. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

COUNTRY AT THE CABARET The Casino Cabaret comes alive with the best in country music and dancing for “Country at the Cabaret” featuring DJ Jamie G. W, 7PM and Sa, 9PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 3563300

WOMEN’S DEFENSIVE TACTICS Designed to build confidence through the knowledge gained by training in such techniques as Jeet Kune Do and Judo. Tu, 7-8:30PM through 12/31, $25 a month. Osk Training, 636 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 343-2526 CONVERSATION CORNER Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that the average person encounters. W, 4:30-6PM. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC ROSENDO No cover charge and parking is free. Th, 12/26, 5:30PM, F, 12/27, 6PM and Sa, 12/28, 6PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

NILES NYE Tu, 12/31, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ALL-STAR NEW YEAR’S ROCKIN’ EVE Tu, 12/31, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 NYE CELEBRATION The Celebrity Showroom at John Ascuaga’s Nugget turns into a big dance party with “Foreverland”, a tribute to the music of Michael Jackson. The show starts at 10PM. Tu, 12/31, 10PM, $29. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ERIKA PAUL Enjoy Louisiana-style food and the soulful, breathtaking jazz sounds of Erika Paul on keyboards and vocals. No cover. Th, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 THE KARAOKE BAR

LIVE JAZZ Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM through 12/27, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks, NV 89441 (775) 657-8659 LADIES 80S WITH DJ LARRY WILLIAMS Ladies ’ with DJ Larry Williams, every Thursday! Th, 7PM through 10/4, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

THIS SECTION IS PROVIDED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE BY THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW AND IS NOT FUNDED OR AFFILIATED WITH THE CITY OF SPARKS


Photo/Allison Young

Wild nights

Norm Enlow is the MC of Wildflower Village’s comedy night.

Wildflower Village comedy It’s open-mic night at Wildflower Village, and a few comics and aspiring ones have trickled in to by test-drive new material. Maybe some stragGeorgia Fisher glers will show soon. “Hey,” a young guy named Matt Wiegand calls out to the small, close-knit crowd at around 9 p.m., well after the event is supposed to have begun. He’s peering out a window. “Does anybody know anybody with a white SUV?” A newcomer. Tonight’s comedic gaggle is all male, For more information, visit www.wildflower and mostly 20- and 30-somethings—boistervillage.com. ous, social jokers and a few shy types who look like they’d rather disappear. Go figure. Norm Enlow, a social worker by day who launched the weekly comedy potlucks in July, has brought his wife, Margie. Tonight’s their 15th anniversary, no less, so venue owner Pat Campbell is discreetly preparing a cake. “They’re mostly really funny,” she’s said of her regulars. “And they keep getting better and better. I wish they wouldn’t use crude language all the time, but that’s what comedy’s about sometimes, I guess.”

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Wildflower Village—a West Fourth Street motel cluster turned artists’ community/hostel/wedding chapel/coffee shop/pub, among other things—has been her baby for two decades. “It’s a quaint-ass place,” visitor ElDarius White muses, as if something eclectic and alive has soaked up its occupants’ tastes over the years. But there’s still no audience tonight. Then suddenly there is. Bam. Fewer than 30 people can pack the building’s Green Fairy Pub (named for Campbell’s $5 absinthe), and onlookers soon press against a back wall. Enlow MCs, doing standup as he goes. Washington, D.C., transplant Cliff McGrady is up first, with self-effacing wit that targets his own physical disability. He’s a random sexter, he also notes—doesn’t matter who gets the memo, provided autocorrect doesn’t say he’ll duck the shit out of you. That’s happened. Sex’ll come up a lot tonight. Take Brandon Lara, who sounds a tad like Mitch Hedberg in his delivery. He

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calls himself “Meximidge” in a nod to his heritage and height, but humor transforms him from a petite lad in a squirrelly beanie into a man of stage-harnessed appeal. “He’s so adorable,” a cute, mohawked blonde murmurs when she sees him. “Marriage scares the shit out of me,” Lara announces. Like, “Holy shit, I am going to be eating the same pussy for the rest of my life.” Everyone titters. “That’s like having to eat the same cereal every morning.” He trots out a leprechaun accent. “At first, it’s magically delicious.” “OK, that was terrible,” he admits,

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interrupting himself. “It wasn’t that bad,” someone yells reassuringly. Campbell cracks up. Lara got his girlfriend an Easy Bake oven, he mutters, “ ‘Cause a girl’s gotta learn how to cook before she turns 14.” The crowd howls. “I bought her that book Fifty Shades of Grey,” he zings, “and that bitch colored in it.” Another guy’s routine is too close to one of Louis C.K.’s, and it flops—either because he’s no Louis C.K. or he’s clearly ripped this one off. Ouch. Wiegand, for his part, is loud, confident and quite funny. He tells everyone he doesn’t care if they like his jokes. “This is where folks come to work out their material,” the Vegas native explains offstage. Musical open-mics are popular here too, on Fridays—“everything from classical to country,” Campbell says. Anyway, she still needs to bring the Enlows their cake. She putters it over before the show ends, then turns away with a quiet smile. It’s a friendly place. She’ll see to that. Ω

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India Gate 1565 S. Virginia St., 337-8002 The phrase a “tough act to follow” usually refers to something so impressive you’d be hard-pressed to top it. In by Todd South the case of a restaurant location previously occupied by similar ventures, the phrase might refer to besting an inherited reputation. Since opening for business just over a month ago, the owners and staff at India Gate have been working hard to extinguish pre-existing notions about this edge-of-Midtown location, formerly India Garden. Photo/AlliSon Young

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

Working on my tandoori

Owner Dilbar Ballli  next to the buffet at  India Gate.

For more information, visit www.indiagate reno.com.

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At 7 on a Sunday evening, my wife and I were warmly greeted and seated without delay, being the only diners present. A couple of other tables eventually were filled, though not enough to distract from the Bollywood music videos playing on constant loop. Within moments of being seated, elegantly cone-shaped papadum were served with the traditional hari chutney (green chili pepper, basil, mint, spices) and imli ki chutney (tamarind, sugar, ginger, spices). I really liked this presentation, as compared to the big flat piece of lentil cracker that is more common, and my wife found that mixing the sauces made for a good balance of sweet and spice. The front room staff was friendly and efficient, yet our food arrived more slowly from the kitchen than I’d

expect on a quiet evening. Perhaps they’re still finding their dinner footing as opposed to cranking out buffet trays. We over-ordered a bit to sample the chef’s style, and I certainly don’t mind taking leftovers for lunch. For starters, we ordered vegetable samosas ($2.95), a standard favorite, and fish pakora for something different ($4.95). The samosas were perfectly-fried pyramids of potato and pea, very light and tasty. The salmon fritters were an amazing new experience, crispy and pink, and coated in tandoori spice rub. Definitely a high point of the meal, and easily the best value out of everything ordered. The menu describes the cuisine as being north Indian, and the chicken kashmiri ($10.95) and beef korma ($13.95) certainly bore that out with plenty of spice and flavor. The lamb tikka masala ($13.95) was a bit sweet, with a strong tomato presence, but still quite tasty. My wife felt the sauces were all a bit heavy, with what she described as a “pasty” mouthfeel, but I found them to be perfectly delicious despite the thicker texture. The only real misstep of the meal was the bread, which is unfortunate as this is usually the foundation of a great Indian meal. The flavor of the garlic naan ($2.50) was fine, but the texture wasn’t remotely the fluffy, crispy goodness you might expect from a tandoor oven. It was just disappointing and floppy, as though it had been pulled straight from a freezer and then microwaved. The situation was worse with the onion kulcha ($3.00). Instead of a crisply-baked disc flavored with finely diced onion, the bread was doughy and prone to disintegration under the weight of its coursely-chopped filling. Frankly, it was more like a pile of onion lightly seasoned with a bit of thin doughy bread, and definitely the low point of the meal. Despite this, the overall dining experience was positive. The leftovers were just as tasty when reheated for lunch—the kulcha improved a bit after 10 minutes in a toaster oven—and I look forward to a second visit. The next time, though, I think we’ll do the lunch buffet ($7.99) and see if the naan is improved by being baked en masse for a crowd of hungry diners. I really hope so, because India Gate shows a lot of promise. Ω


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he Way

Bad fellas The Wolf of Wall Street Martin Scorsese’s latest, The Wolf of Wall Street, explodes in your face like a mortar full of deranged bliss. Leonardo DiCaprio, in the performance of the year, plays slimeball stockbroker and convicted felon Jordan Belfort, a real life scumbag who made millions selling penny stocks at a Long Island, N.Y., brokerage. The by movie, based on Belfort’s own autobiography, Bob Grimm takes people doing bad, bad things to such an extreme that the film doesn’t just stand as one b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m of the best overall of 2013, but also one of the year’s best and most deranged comedies. The film begins with a rosy cheeked Belfort starting work at a big Manhattan brokerage where a brash, coke-addicted broker played by Matthew McConaughey, capping off an incredible year, is his mentor. Belfort is ready to take the world by storm in the late ’80s, but Black Monday strikes, destroying his new employer and putting him out of work. He winds up in a Long Island boiler room

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22 | RN&R |

DECEMBER 26, 2013

shilling penny stocks for 50 percent commission. No problem really, because the boy can sell, and people are writing checks. Belfort, with the assistance of new friend Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill, bedazzled with impossibly white caps on his teeth) opens a shiny new brokerage to give his business that first class appearance, but he’s still just slinging penny stocks. This time, he’s slinging them at people with big money under the guise that the stocks are going to explode into major market players. They probably won’t. Still, rich people like and trust Belfort, so they throw money at him. Where there’s money, there are decadent shenanigans, and this is where Scorsese takes the movie party to crazed extremes. Midget

tossing, goldfish eating, hookers and halfnaked marching bands are the order of the day, with all of these activities enhanced by massive drug and alcohol consumption. Like Ray Liotta in Goodfellas, DiCaprio talks to the camera on occasion, often during the sort of highly elaborate tracking shots that have become a Scorsese mainstay. It’s in these moments, and during Belfort’s drug-fueled, rouse-the-troops, fire-breathing speeches to his crew, where DiCaprio does his most exhilarating, bona fide nuts acting to date. He is a formidable competitor for a Best Actor Oscar. He’s certainly my pick. It’s not just the verbal pyrotechnics that qualify DiCaprio’s performance as the year’s best. With this film, he proves he’s a physical actor of phenomenal talent. In a scene where Belfort and Azoff consume 15 year-old Quaaludes with a delayed trigger, DiCaprio rivals the likes of Steve Martin and Charlie Chaplin in his ability to pull off physical comedy. What he does with a Ferrari car door and his leg must be seen to be believed. It got to the point where I couldn’t believe it was DiCaprio, and figured they put his face on a stunt man’s body via CGI. Nope. It’s him. Hill continues to prove that he possesses good dramatic chops to go with his comedy pedigree. Kyle Chandler provides the film’s moral core—if it actually has one—as an FBI agent looking to take down Belfort. Margot Robbie is especially impressive as Belfort’s alternately commanding and befuddled wife. Does The Wolf of Wall Street lack certain emotional warmth for its nearly 3 hour running time? Yep, and that’s precisely the point of this movie. Scorsese and DiCaprio are showing us the travesties of an emotionally void, tragically selfish group of people living life through a chemically enhanced haze. Hey, if these guys weren’t pure bastards when they were committing their crimes, this stuff never would’ve happened, right? No, I wasn’t expecting warm hugs at the end of this pic. These people are terrible—comically terrible—and Scorsese holds nothing back in portraying them this way. The Wolf of Wall Street is a full blast cinematic assault commandeered by a general masterfully displaying that he’s in no way ready to slow down just yet. It’s not only good—it’s Goodfellas good. Ω


4

American Hustle

David O. Russell continues his impressive directorial roll with this semi-comedic look at the notorious ’70s Abscam scandal. This is basically Russell shooting for Scorsese glory here, and while the style of the movie seems copied at times, there’s no denying the power of the ensemble cast. Bradley Cooper scores laughs as a pathetic FBI agent looking to make a name for himself, and Christian Bale looks great in a comb-over as the conman forced into an alliance with the law. Amy Adams gets one of the strangest roles of the year as a con artist pretending to be British, and she pulls it off quite nicely, while Jennifer Lawrence steals her every scene as a seemingly dim Long Island housewife. You also get stand up comic Louis C.K. as Cooper’s field boss. (C.K. canceled a show I had tickets for to make this movie. I was pissed but, after seeing how good he is here, I’m OK with it now.) The film falls a little short of greatness due to its sometimes carbon copy feel, but the cast pulls it out of the fire. It also has the best use of Robert De Niro as a bad guy in many years.

4

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues

After nearly a decade of being absent from our movie screens, Ron Burgundy (Will Ferrell), the world’s greatest newscaster, has returned. This time, it’s the ‘80s, and a new media craze called 24 Hour News has Ron and the boys (Paul Rudd’s Brian Fantana, Steve Carell’s Brick Tamland and David Koechner’s Champ Kind) working the late night shift in New York. The plot is basically just a place setter for weird, random humor involving bats, sharks, shadows, scorpions in RVs, and hair. Ferrell and the crew manage to sell the dumbest of things, and they make so much of it funny. Even the stuff that’s just strange has its own humorous appeal. Carell goes super dopey with Brick as he finds a love interest (Kristen Wiig), Champ still loves Ron in a dangerous way, and Brian has a new condom cabinet. I laughed my face off, with this being a sequel that continues the comedic legacy of the brilliant original, and even ups the ante when it comes to anchor-on-anchor battles in the park (the battle scene in this one is one for the ages, and involves fighter jets). The last time they made one of these, they had enough on the cutting room floor to release an entire other movie. I hope that happened here as well, because I don’t want to wait 10 years for more.

4

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

After a sloppy start, The Hunger Games franchise kicks into high gear with this solid, darker chapter. Jennifer Lawrence, looking a little more haggard and embittered, makes for a far more convincing war-torn survivor this time out. Her performance is great, as are the contributions of a bunch of new cast members including Jena Malone, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Sam Claflin. The new look and feel of the series can mostly be attributed to new director Francis Lawrence and his cinematographer Jo Willems, who get rid of that dopey, baroque look of the first movie in favor of something darker. The plot involves Katniss and fellow survivor Peeta (Josh Hutcherson) being forced into another Hunger Games where former victors must compete against each other. This installment has a lot more meat on the bone, and the action is easier to follow thanks to a much less frantic editing style. Francis Lawrence will direct the final two Hunger Games movies, and that’s good news for fans.

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3

Dallas Buyers Club

Matthew McConaughey continues his career resurgence in this film based on the life of Ron Woodroof, a man who tested HIV positive in the ’80s, and had to battle the FDA while smuggling non-approved drugs into the country for himself and fellow sufferers. McConaughey lost many pounds to look the part, and it’s a frightening transformation. He also delivers an incredible performance. This, combined with his work earlier this year in Mud, easily establishes 2013 as the best year of his career. Jared Leto does incredible work as Rayon, a cross-dresser who helps Woodroof distribute the drugs to those needing some sort of treatment. Director Jean-Marc Vallee does a good job of capturing a time where HIV was a death sentence, and the terror that surrounded those who were fighting for their lives. This is a very good movie with great performances.

Frozen

I have to admit I was more into the strange Mickey Mouse short that precedes this musical adaptation of Hans Christian Anderson’s “The Snow Queen” than the actual feature. It features retro Mickey busting out of a black and white film and becoming 3-D as he battles a bad guy kidnapping Minnie. It’s worth the price of admission. As for the actual feature movie, Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel have wonderful voices, and the visuals are fun to behold in this middle-of-the-road Disney fare. It has a lot of music—some of it quite good, some of it, well, not—and a beautiful look to it. For recent Disney animation, my vote goes to Tangled for best, but that’s not to say this one is a letdown. It’s OK. Just OK. It’s about on par with Pixar’s latest, Monster’s University. It’s fun to watch, but not altogether memorable.

1

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

Think Free

is a tragic, disastrous choice. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, like its predecessor, An Unexpected Journey, is a task to watch. The look of the movie simply doesn’t jibe with the technology, resulting in a visual nightmare. As a middle chapter in The Hobbit saga, Smaug is guilty of the same flaws that marred the first film. It’s overstuffed, the dwarves are severely uninteresting, and the action scenes lack any kind of urgency. It’s just a big, boring stunt film with people looking silly in their getups. As Bilbo, Martin Freeman labors to make things interesting during action scenes that feel redundant. (Hey, it’s another giant icky spider attack!) He definitely stands out among a cast of bland actors playing bland dwarves. Oh Gimli, how you are missed! Jackson finds a way to bring back Orlando Bloom as Legolas. Bloom’s scenes are a bunch of sorry minutes that could be cut from the film’s running time. Too many scenes in this movie feel padded and bloated. With each passing minute, Jackson is doing further damage to his directing legacy. His original Lord of the Rings trilogy was a major triumph. These Hobbit films feel and look like parody. Smaug the dragon (voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) finally shows up, and he is easily the best thing in the Hobbit films thus far. He should’ve arrived in the second half of the first film, and the whole damned thing should’ve been over in three hours.

Saving Mr. Banks

Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson are charming as Walt Disney and Mary Poppins author P.L. Travers in this obviously whitewashed look at Disney’s attempts at getting Travers’ approval to make a movie out of her book. Of course, most of us know he succeeded, but many don’t know that Travers was quite the holdout. The movie splits time between the Disney/Travers business and Travers’ childhood, where we find out much of Mary Poppins was based on her troubled father (Colin Farrell) and actual nanny. B.J. Novak and Jason Schwartzman are wonderful as the Sherman brothers, who made Poppins into a musical, much to the chagrin of Travers. The movie takes a lot of artistic license with the situation. Even though Travers is depicted as difficult here, she was far more adversarial in real life and never approved of the movie (those animated penguins!). Still, the film is fun to watch, with Hanks and Thompson making it all very worthwhile and heartwarming.

Thor: The Dark World

This latest installment is a step back from Kenneth Branagh’s goofy and grand first franchise installment, Thor. While not likely to piss off superhero film fans, this sequel from director Alan Taylor is not going to blow many minds away, either. It’s a semi-efficient placeholder flick moving us towards the next Avengers movie, due in 2015. Chris Hemsworth returns as that incredibly handsome man with long hair, a big hammer and impossibly silly dialogue. The film takes place after The Avengers, with a dark ancient force threatening the universe, and only Thor and his imprisoned brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston, stealing the movie) can save us. The movie is OK, but somewhat of a comedown considering how fun the first Thor and The Avengers were. It’s merely a placeholder until Thor’s next appearance in an Avengers movie, with some decent action and special effects to tide us over until the next Marvel fix.

Peter Jackson’s decision to shoot his latest Tolkien trilogy in High Frame Rate 3-D

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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DECEMBER 26, 2013

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Casual sax Brian Landrus “If by some chance this falls through, it’s because I have a huge arena gig with Prince,” said saxophonist Brian by Brad Bynum Landrus in a recent phone interview. Landrus is a Reno native who bradb@ attended the University of Nevada, newsre view.c om Reno. His group, the Brian Landrus Project, was a fixture around the local scene for a few years before he left 10 years ago to earn two master’s degrees from the New England Conservatory and then moving to New York where he has been “working, playing, teaching, touring and recording.” He’s recorded several albums under his own name and is a member of Grammy-winning vocalist and bassist Esperanza Spalding’s band.

He’s slated to return to Reno with a show at UNR’s Joe Crowley Student Union on Dec. 28 at 7:30 p.m. When he mentions the possibility that he’ll have to cancel the gig so that he can play with the artist formerly known as The Artist Formerly Known as Prince, he does so not with the arrogance of big city namedropper, but with the humility of a guy who doesn’t want to disappoint his hometown. “I’m a little worried,” he said. “You can’t really say no to Prince.” He emailed a few days after the phone interview to happily report that he wouldn’t be joining Prince for that show, so the Reno gig was still on. The local organization For the Love of Jazz, which presents jazz concerts often accompanied with educational programming, like clinics and workshops, organized Landrus’ concert at UNR. “Brian’s doing amazing things with reggae and hip-hop rhythms, as well as some more traditional

“I didn’t realize until after I left how fortunate I was to grow up in Reno,” says jazz musician Brian Landrus.

Brian Landrus plays at UNR’s Joe Crowley Student Union on Dec. 28 at 7:30 p.m. For tickets or more information, visit www.ftloj.org.

OPINION

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NEWS

jazz styles,” says Scot Marshall, the president of FTLOJ and a bass player who’ll be performing with Landrus. “There’s something for everybody as far as the different styles and music that you’re going to hear.” Other musicians performing with Landrus will be local musicians like guitarist Ed Cory, pianist Ron Savage, and drummer Rufus Haereiti—another veteran of the local jazz scene who has also gone on to touring the world, with the renowned reggae group Groundation. They’ll also be joined by a string quartet of Reno Philharmonic musicians—Olga Archdekin, Bruce McBeth, Catherine Matovich and Charles Taggert. The group will primarily be performing material from Landrus’ eclectic new album, Mirage. “It’s in jazz, but there’s a lot of soul,” says Landrus of the album. “There’s some reggae. There are funk grooves. There’s all sorts of different aspects to it. I love traditional jazz, but it’s almost become museum music.” When he lived in Reno, Landrus was known as a tenor player, but since moving to New York he says he’s found more work playing the less-common baritone sax. He’s been awarded accolades, like the tops spots on Downbeat magazine’s critics’ and readers’ polls for his baritone playing. “Brian is six-seven, so when he plays that instrument, it looks like he’s holding a tenor,” says Marshall about Landrus’ skills on the larger horn. Marshall says that as good as Landrus is on the saxes, he’s just as skilled on the bass clarinet. “He has as beautiful a sound as any I’ve ever heard. It’s just gorgeous.” Landrus was genuinely relieved he didn’t have to cancel his Reno concert, his first in the city in about six years. “I didn’t realize until after I left how fortunate I was to grow up in Reno,” he says, citing the city’s amazing teachers, like Frank Perry, and its supportive community. “In Reno, I feel like a lot of the players embraced me, and they really helped me. That’s unusual. … There’s so many great players and great people.” “This is where he was born and raised, so his mom and dad are here, and he’s bringing his wife and his new baby back for Christmas and then doing the concert,” says Marshall. “His folks are over the moon. It’s really cool, a homecoming for Brian.” Ω

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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DECEMBER 26, 2013

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26 

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RN&R   | 

December 26, 2013


THURSDAY 12/26

FRIDAY 12/27

SATURDAY 12/28

1UP

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

THE ALLEY 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/30-1/1

Select Saturdays, 8pm, no cover

College Night Wednesdays, 8pm, W, no cover

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Holiday Hangover Comedy Show, 9pm, $5

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover NYE party w/Blue Haven, 9pm, Tu, $5

Hellbound Glory, Last to Leave, The Bonfire She Has A Fashion Vice, Alpha Complex, Set, Feather Merchants, 8pm, $7 Dennis is Dead, Our Devices, 8pm, $5

Sisters Doom, We Predict A Riot, Anchors For Airplanes, Weight of the Tide, 8pm, $5

NYE Party w/The Saddle Tramps, Greg Golden Band, 8:30pm, Tu, $12-$15

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

SUNDAY 12/29

BAR-M-BAR 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

BODEGA NIGHTCLUB

Rhythm Rewind w/DJs RyOn and Rewind, 9pm, $7

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 378-4507

CEOL IRISH PUB 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

COMMA COFFEE 312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover Krystal McMullen, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

The RN&R no longer a ccepts emailed or phoned-in listings. Post show s online by registering at www.ne wsreview.c om/reno. Deadline is the Friday b efore publication .

NYE party w/The Clarke Brothers, Krystal McMullen, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Mark Diorio, 11:30am, no cover

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

VooDoo Dogz, 9:30pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

ELBOW ROOM BAR Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

NYE party, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL 8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HANGAR BAR

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Comedy

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

NYE party w/The Mark Castro Band, 10pm, Tu, $TBA

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Kivi Rogers, David Gee, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; John Caponera, Frances Dilorinzo, W, 9pm, $25

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Dec. 28, 8 p.m. Silver Legacy 407 Virginia St. 325-7401

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Rick D’Elia, Th, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; New Year’s Eve Bash with K-von, Tu, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $25

NYE party w/Seeing Eye Dogs, 9:30pm, Tu, no cover

Mary Jane Rocket, 9:30pm, no cover

Vigil, 8pm, no cover

2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-9799

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

The Go-Go’s

NYE party w/Flashback, Dragonfly Aerialists, Drinking with Clowns, 8pm, Tu, $15-$25

Canyon Jam, 8pm, no cover

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Sitcomers of Comedy w/Marc Price, Todd Bridges, F-Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $15, $19; The Sitcomers of Comedy NYE show, Tu, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $19, $25

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

HIMMEL HAUS

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

Bayonics, 9pm, $TBA

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

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OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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DECEMBER 26, 2013

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RN&R

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27


THURSDAY 12/26

FRIDAY 12/27

SATURDAY 12/28

SUNDAY 12/29

JAVA JUNGLE 246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Cherry Poppin’ Daddies Dec. 28, 7 p.m. & 9 p.m. Boomtown 200 Garson Road Verdi 345-6000

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Sucka Punch, Voted Best Band, 9pm, $3

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

Ciroc the New Year w/Amplified DJs, 9pm, Tu, $15

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

THE POINT 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Quartet Minus One, 8:30pm, no cover

No Biggety, 8:30pm, no cover

No Biggety, 8:30pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE RED DOG SALOON

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Dec. 31, 8:30 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

RYAN’S SALOON 924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover NYE party w/Thee Orbitors, Electric Gypsy, 9pm, Tu, $TBA

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Wicked Hicks, 9pm, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

Tazer, 9:30pm, no cover

All-Star New Year’s Rockin’ Eve, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

NYE party w/Gregory Mitchell, 8pm, Tu, $10, open mic, 7pm, W, no cover

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WILDFLOWER VILLAGE 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769

George Souza, M, 8:30pm, no cover

New Year’s Rockn Party w/Lady and the Tramps, 8pm, Tu, $20

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Shasta Tresan Quartet, 8:30pm, no cover

Black & White New Year’s Eve party w/Gemini, 9pm, Tu, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

The Saddle Tramps

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE MOODY’S BISTRO BAR & BEATS

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/30-1/1 Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Wildflower Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 8:30pm, no cover

HELLBOUND HELL LBO BOUN ND GL GLO GLORY ORY

Thursday, T Thur Th ursd sday ay, y December Dece De cemb mber er 26 26 >3HZ[;V3LH]L)VUÄYL:L[ > > 3HZ[[;V3LH]L)VUÄYL:L[ 3HZ -LH[OLY4LJOHU[Z

S E HA SHE SH HAS A FASHION VICE E

Friday, Frid Fr iday y, December 27

W/ Alpha Complex, Dennis Is Dead, 6\Y+L]PJLZ

SISTERS DOOM

Saturday, December 28

>>L7YLKPJ[(9PV[(UJOVYZ-VY(PY Planes, Weight Of The Tide

NEW YEARS EVE BASH

Tuesday, December 31

>;OL:HKKSL;YHTWZ ;OL.YLN.VSKLU)HUK:P_4PSL:[H[PVU

We Will Be Closed For Repairs In Early January, But Please Check In With Facebook.com/thealleysparks Or TheAlleySparks.com For Upcoming 2014 Announcements! Thanks For A Great 2013! GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: Hellbound Glory – Dec 26 Saddle Tramps + Greg Golden – Dec 31 Gentlemens Hall – Feb 3 The Toasters – Feb 5 Toxic Holocaust + Exhumed – Feb 8

TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

28

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RN&R

| DECEMBER 26, 2013


THURSDAY 12/26

FRIDAY 12/27

SATURDAY 12/28

SUNDAY 12/29

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/30-1/1

2) The Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

2) The Vegas Road Show, 4pm, Escalade, 10pm, no cover

2) The Vegas Road Show, 4pm, Escalade, 10pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 4pm, Escalade, 10pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover Escalade, 10pm, M, Tu, no cover

2100 Garson Rd., Verdi; (775) 345-6000 1) Event Center 2) Guitar Bar

2) Mike Furlong, 6pm, no cover

2) Keith Allen, 4:30pm, The Robeys, 8pm, no cover

1) Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, 7pm, 9pm, $19.99-$59.99

2) The Robeys, 6pm, no cover

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

1) Marc Price, Todd Bridges, 8:30pm, $17-$20 2) Stylust Beats, Mr. Rooney, Auxiliary, Fresh Touch, 10pm, no cover

1) Radar Love, 10pm, no cover

1) Jackie Greene Band, The Mother Hips, 1) Jackie Greene, 9pm, $25 9pm, $30

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, $19.95-$24.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, 1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, $19.95-$24.95 $19.95-$24.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 10pm, $10 3) Four Play Saturdays , 10pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, $19.95-$24.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Ice Fantasy, Tu, W, $19.95-$24.95 2) NYE party, 10pm, Tu, $10-$15 3) The Red Carpet Affair New Year’s Eve Party, 8pm, Tu, $35-$100

1) The Peking Acrobats, 8pm, $10-$20

1) The Peking Acrobats, 8pm, $10-$20

1) The Guess Who, 8pm, $27.50-$38.50

1) The Peking Acrobats, 8pm, $10-$20

1) The Peking Acrobats, 8pm, M, Tu, W, $10-$20

3) DJ Kaos, 10:30pm, $20

1) Tainted Love, 7:30pm, $27.50 3) Rev Run and Rukas, 10pm, $20

3) Taboo from the Black Eyed Peas, 10:30pm, $20

3) Golden Dreams New Year’s Eve w/with DJs from Mars, 9pm, Tu, $100

1) Beatles vs. Stones w/Abbey Road and Jumping Jack Flash, 8pm, $25-$35 2) Aerorocks, 8pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) Beatles vs. Stones w/Abbey Road and Jumping Jack Flash, 8pm, $25-$35 2) Aerorocks, 8pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) Beatles vs. Stones w/Abbey Road and Jumping Jack Flash, 8pm, $25-$35

1) Beatles vs. Stones w/Abbey Road and Jumping Jack Flash, 8pm, M, $25-$35 2) NYE party w/ DJ Cooper, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) NYE party w/DJ I, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 7pm, no cover 3) Rosendo, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Karaoke Night, 7pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 8pm, no cover 3) Rosendo, 6pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 8pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) Rosendo, 6pm, no cover

1) Foreverland, 10pm, Tu, $29 2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover 3) Niles Nye, 6pm, Tu, Joel Edwards, 5:30pm, W, no cover

2) Soul Night w/DJ Rick Gee, 6pm, no cover 3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

2) Baker Street, 8pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 2) Baker Street, 8pm, no cover 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

BOOMTOWN CASINO HOTEL

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 5) Stadium Bar

1) NYE party w/The Jackie Greene Band, 10pm, Tu, $45 2) Afrolicious, 10pm, M, no cover

DJs from Mars Dec. 31, 9 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Highway 50 Stateline 588-6611

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) The Beach 4) Summit Pavilion 5) Silver State Pavilion

Karaoke

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

SILVER LEGACY

2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 3) Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Silver Baron Ballroom

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1) The Go-Go’s, 8pm, $49.50-$59.50 2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

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2) Baker Street, 6pm, M, Maxxt Outt, 9pm, Tu, 6pm, W, no cover 3) NYE: Deco, 8pm, Tu, $50-$55 4) NYE party, 9:30pm, Tu, $60

2) Baker Street, 6pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

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2) Rum Burgundy NYE party, 9pm, Tu, $20 3) Blurred Minds NYE party, 9pm, Tu, $20 5) NYE Rockin’ the Dome Dance Party, 10pm, Tu, $40

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Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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This message brought to you by the Washoe County Health District with grant funding from the CDC through the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health.

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For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

BID ADIEU TO 2013

A

nother year has come and gone. Some of us may remember 2013 as a good year; some of us can’t wait for it to be over. If you’re willing to brave the cold temps and don’t mind rubbing elbows with the rest of humanity, there are plenty of places to send off 2013 and make a toast to the promise of a new year. Here’s a list of a few local New Year’s Eve parties that hopefully will be worth leaving the warmth and comfort of your living room for at least one night. The SnowGlobe Music Festival returns to Lake Tahoe with a lineup of electronic, dance and rock acts including Cut Copy, Tiësto, Kaskade, Snoop Dogg (a.k.a. Snoop Lion), Zeds Dead, Beats Antique, Gramatik, Dillon Francis, Claude Vonstroke and Holy Ghost!, among others, starting Dec. 29. The three-day winter sports and music festival culminates on Dec. 31 with headliners Cut Copy, Cashmere Cat and OPINION

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Gigamesh playing on three stages at Lake Tahoe Community College, One College Drive, South Lake Tahoe. The day’s music gets started about 3:45 p.m., with the headliners hitting the stage after 10 p.m. Cut Copy’s set will take audiences into the new year. Tickets are $79 for a single day $179 general admission. Visit www.snowglobemusicfestival.com. If your tastes veer toward classical music, the Reno Chamber Orchestra’s 10th annual Nevada Chamber Music Festival will conclude its six-day run with a New Year’s Eve Celebration starting at 7 p.m. The Masterworks Concert No. 4 program features works by Schumann, Handel, Rachmaninoff, Beethoven and other notable composers, concluding with Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major. The concert takes place at Nightingale

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Concert Hall inside the Church Fine Arts Building, 1335 N. Virginia St., at the University of Nevada, Reno. Tickets are $5-$35. Call 348-9413 or visit www.renochamber orchestra.com. Most New Year’s Eve parties are geared toward adults. But families and young people under age 21 don’t have to be left out of the festivities. Several area ski resorts will hold celebrations for all ages. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, offers a family-friendly party at High Camp. Ride the aerial tram to a buffet dinner, followed by an East Coast toast at 9 p.m. Dinner starts at 6 p.m. and reservations are required. Visit www.squaw.com. Heavenly Ski Resort’s New Year’s Eve celebration includes an outdoor concert, an ice FOODFINDS

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sculpting performance by Fear No Ice, Fire Groove fire dancers and Steve Harness as emcee. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. The Gondola Ball Drop will be timed to the East Coast countdown at 9 p.m., followed by a fireworks show at the resort at 3860 Saddle Road, South Lake Tahoe. Visit www.skiheavenly.com. The Fire & Ice New Year’s Celebration at Northstar California Resort, 5001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, features a DJ, live music by the Killer Queens, a fireworks show, ice skating and more starting at 6 p.m. Visit www. northstarcalifornia.com. Reno Tahoe Comedy wants to end 2013 on a funny note with performances of The Sitcomers of Comedy featuring actors/comedians Marc Price and Todd Bridges. If you watched TV in the 1980s, you might recall Marc Price as Skippy

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on the NBC sitcom Family Ties and Todd Bridges as Willis on Diff’rent Strokes. Two shows take place at 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. on Dec. 31 at the Pioneer Underground, located in the plaza of Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $19 in advance and $25 on the day of the show. Call 322-5233 or visit renotahoecomedy.com. Don’t have cash to spend on a big NYE bash? You can still enjoy the excitement of New Year’s Eve countdown by gathering with other revelers at the Reno Arch as they ring in the new year. At midnight, fireworks will launch from the rooftops of several downtown casino properties for a 15-minute show. Prefer something more intimate? Drive to your favorite hill with your favorite person and make a wish for a happy 2014. —Kelley Lang

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NEW YEAR’S EVE GUIDE 2014 For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno ALL-STAR NEW YEAR’S ROCKIN’ EVE: Tu, 12/31, 9pm. No cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks, (775) 355-1030, www.sidelinesbar.com.

CIROC THE NEW YEAR: Amplified Entertainment presents its New Year’s Eve party Tu, 12/31, 9pm. $15. Knitting Factory Concert House, 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648, http:// re.knittingfactory.com. FIRE & ICE NEW YEAR’S CELEBRATION: Ring in the new year at Northstar with its annual New Year’s Eve celebration for all ages. There will be a DJ, live music by the Killer Queens, an all-female Queen tribute band, a fireworks show, s’mores, drink specials, face painting, shopping, dining, ice skating and more. Tu, 12/31, 12-10pm. Northstar California Resort, 5001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784.

GOLDEN DREAMS NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH WITH DJS FROM MARS: Lake Tahoe welcomes DJs From Mars, electro-house duo and one of the biggest names in the mashup scene. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. $TBA. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, 15 Hwy. 50, Stateline, (775) 588-6611, www.harrahslaketahoe.com.

HEAVENLY’S NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Come for an evening packed with entertainment, interactive games, fireworks show and the world’s only “Gondola Ball Drop.” Entertainment includes an outdoor concert, an ice sculpting performance by Fear No Ice, Fire Groove fire dancers and KRLT’s Steve Harness as MC. Throughout the Village there will be ice sculptures, a photo booth, snowboard simulator and face painting. Festivities begin at 6pm and the Gondola Ball Drop will be timed to East Coast New Year’s at 9pm, followed by the fireworks show. Tu, 12/31, 6pm. Heavenly Ski Resort, 3860 Saddle Road, South Lake Tahoe, (775) 586-7000, www.skiheavenly.com.

NEVADA CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: Reno Chamber Orchestra presents its 10th annual chamber music festival. Concerts will be held at Nightingale Concert Hall at the University of Nevada, Reno and South Reno United Methodist Church. M, Tu, Th-Su through 12/31. Opens 12/26. $5-$45. Call or visit website for details, (775) 348-9413, www.renochamberorchestra.org.

NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH AT CATCH A RISING STAR: Comedian K-von headlines two NYE shows. Tu, 12/31, 7:30 & 9:30pm. $25. Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401, www.silverlegacyreno.com.

NEW YEAR’S CELEBRATION AT POLO LOUNGE: Black & White New Year’s Eve Party. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. Free. Polo Lounge, 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864.

NEW YEAR’S EVE AROUND THE WORLD: Starting at 2pm on Dec. 31, Sands Regency will ring in the new year as its celebrated around the world with drawings every hour until 11pm. The John Dawson Band will be on stage at the 3rd Street Lounge from 10pm to 2am. There will be party favors and a midnight toast

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throughout the casino floor. Tu, 12/31. Free. Sands Regency Casino Hotel, 345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200, www. sandsregency.com.

midnight, complete with party favors, on the casino floor. Tu, 12/31, 10pm. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks, (775) 356-3300, www. janugget.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE EXTRAVAGANZA: Free

NYE CELEBRATION AT SILVER LEGACY: Silver

champagne, party favors and music by San Francisco’s Glam Cobras. The party takes place at Opal Ultralounge, Blu Nightclub and the Convention Center. Tu, 12/31, 10pm. $55 in advance, $75 day of event. MontBleu Resort, 55 Hwy. 50, Stateline, (800) 648-3353, www.montbleuresort.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE FIREWORKS SHOW: Downtown Reno kicks off the new year with a fireworks show at midnight. Tens of thousands revelers will gather in downtown Reno for the 15-minute fireworks show featuring hundreds of pyrotechnics shot off from the roofs of four different casino properties. Tu, 12/31, 11:59pm. Downtown Reno, Virginia Street.

NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTIES AT THE ELDORADO: The Eldorado Hotel Casino will ring in the new year with parties throughout the property, countdowns and champagne toasts, party hats and favors handed out on the casino floor and a downtown fireworks show at midnight. BuBinga Lounge will host a New Year’s Eve Red Carpet Affair featuring Roni Romance and DJ Dragon spinning well into the new year. General admission is $35 in advance. The Brew Brothers New Year’s Eve features Audioboxx playing new rock hits and DJ Montague rockin’ the beats well into 2014. Advance tickets are $10 for the first 100 guests and $15 after. Roxy’s Bar and Lounge mixes it up with Gil, Stan and Bobby at the piano bar starting at 4:30 p.m., followed by DJ MoFunk spinning tunes into the new year. There will be party favors, a countdown and midnight toast. Tu, 12/31, 4:30pm. $0-$100. Eldorado Hotel Casino, 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 7865700, www.eldoradoreno.com.

NYE AT KIRKWOOD: Ring in the new year with an evening of family-friendly festivities. A free torchlight parade kicks off the evening’s events as skiers and riders wind their way down the slopes holding brightly lit torches. All guests are welcome to participate but you must be at least 8 years old and an advanced skier. The parade ends with a fireworks celebration. Tu, 12/31, 6pm. Kirkwood Mountain Resort, 1501 Kirkwood Meadows Drive, Kirkwood, (209) 258-6000, www.kirkwood.com.

Legacy presents its Rockin’ the Dome party featuring DJ Kentot in the Silver Baron Ballroom. The party includes complimentary party favors and a midnight champagne toast. The festivities start at 10 p.m. Tickets are $40 with one drink included. Aura Lounge will hold a “Blurred Minds” party with a Foam Finger drop at midnight. Rum Bullion’s Island Bar will hold its “Rum Burgundy” party featuring all things polyester. The party begins at 9pm. $20 for both parties. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. $20-$40. Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401, www.silverlegacy reno.com.

NYE CELEBRATION AT SQUAW VALLEY USA: Ring in the new year at Squaw Valley with a family-friendly East Coast midnight toast at High Camp. Ride the Aerial Tram to a buffet dinner, followed by an East Coast toast at 9pm. Dinner starts at 6pm and reservations are required. Those age 21 and older can gather at Olympic House to welcome 2014. Live music from NVO in Plaza Bar. DJ Mancub from Space Cowboys in Bar One. $10. Tu, 12/31, 6 & 9pm. $10 and up. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, (800) 403-0206, www.squaw.com.

NYE CELEBRATION AT THE PEPPERMILL: Celebrate the new year at this NYE bash in the Capri Ballroom starting at 9:30pm. The party features music by Soul Lads, a midnight, balloon drop and champagne toast. Tickets are $60 per person. Enjoy free champagne and festive party favors starting 10pm on the casino floor. Maxxt Out will ring in the new year in the Terrace Lounge starting at 9pm. There will be complimentary party favors and champagne toast. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. $0-$60. Peppermill Resort Spa Casino, 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121, www.peppermillreno.com.

NYE PARTY AT 3RD STREET: Celebrate the last day of 2013 and ring in the new year with Blue Haven. The party includes free champagne and party favors. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. $5. 3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005.

NYE PARTY AT BODEGA NIGHTCLUB: New Year’s Eve and Bodega’s anniversary party featuring music and entertainment by Flashback, Dragonfly Aerialists and Drinking with Clowns. Afterparty at 1pm featuring DJs Rewind, Nick Nasty and Love One. Champagne toast at midnight. Tu, 12/31, 8pm. $15 advance, $25 at the door. Bodega Nightclub, 555 E. Fourth St., (775) 378-4507.

fNEW YEAR’S EVE SAFE RIDE: The Regional Transportation Commission offers free bus rides on RTC Ride, RAPID and Sierra Spirit routes on New Year’s Eve night from 6pm to 2am. Tu, 12/31, 6pm. Free. Call or visit website for details. (775) 348-7433, www.rtcwashoe.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH AT GOLD HILL HOTEL: The party includes a live band and a toast at midnight. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. Free. Gold Hill Hotel, 1540 Main St., Gold Hill, (775) 847-0111, www.goldhillhotel.net.

NYE PARTY AT CRYSTAL BAY CLUB: The Jackie Greene Band performs its annual New Year’s Eve show. Tu, 12/31, 10pm. $45. Crystal Bay Club, 14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay, (775) 833-6333, www. crystalbaycasino.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE ON THE COMSTOCK: Help ring in the new year Comstock style. The paryt features live and silent auctions, a raffle, live entertainment, party favors and champagne toast and balloon drop at midnight. Proceeds help Virginia City schools. Tu, 12/31, 8pm. $40 per person; $75 per couple. Piper’s Opera House, 12 N. B St., Virginia City, (775) 847-0433, www. mustangranchnewyears.com.

NYE PARTY AT DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY: Seeing Eye Dogs performs at the endof-the-year bash. Tu, 12/31, 9:30pm. no cover. Davidson’s Distillery, 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917.

NYE PARTY AT THE ALLEY: Featuring music by The Saddle Tramps and the Greg Golden Band. Tu, 12/31, 8:30pm. $12-$15. The Alley, 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 358-8891, www. thealleysparks.com.

NYE PARTY AT THE GRID: Classic rock power trio The Mark Castro Band helps ring in the new year. Tu, 12/31, 10-11:59pm. $TBA. The Grid Bar & Grill, 8545 N. Lake Blvd. in Kings Beach, (775) 391-7757, www.thegridbarandgrill.com. RENO TAHOE COMEDY: THE SITCOMERS: Reno Tahoe Comedy presents a New Year’s Eve show featuring The Sitcommers of Comedy starring headliner Marc Price and Todd Bridges. Tu, 12/31, 6:30-8 & 9:30-11pm. $19 in advance, $25 the day of the show. Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St. Pioneer Center plaza on Virginia and Mill streets, (775) 3225233, www.renotahoecomedy.com.

SNOWGLOBE MUSIC FESTIVAL: The adventure-driven winter festival returns to Lake Tahoe. Australian electronic band Cut Copy will join a stellar lineup of artists that includes Tiesto, Kaskade, Snoop Dogg (a.k.a. Snoop Lion), Zeds Dead, Beats Antique, Gramatik, Dillon Francis, Claude Vonstroke, Holy Ghost! and others. M, Tu, Su, 3pm through 12/31. Opens 12/29. $79-$179 general admission; $135-$334 VIP. Lake Tahoe Community College, One College Drive, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4660, www.snowglobemusicfestival.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE: DECO: A night inspired by the Art Deco movement. DJ Risk One spins the party. Complimentary champagne tastings will be offered from 8p to 10pm. Celebrate all night with party favors, confetti and a midnight balloon drop. Tickets are $50 in advance and $55 at the door. Tu, 12/31, 8pm. $50-$55. Peppermill Resort Spa Casino, 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121, www.peppermillreno.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE SAFE RIDE: The Regional Transportation Commission offers free bus rides on RTC Ride, RAPID and Sierra Spirit routes on New Year’s Eve night from 6pm to 2am. Tu, 12/31, 6pm. Free. Call or visit website for details. (775) 348-7433, www.rtcwashoe.com. NYE CELEBRATION AT HARRAH’S RENO: Club Sapphire will celebrate the new year with DJ I spinning today’s hottest dance hits along with old-school classics. The Stage @ the Zone will feature DJ Cooper, spinning video club hits on three giant screens. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. Free. Harrah’s Reno, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900, www.harrahsreno.com.

NYE PARTY AT CEOL IRISH PUB: The Clarke Brothers and Krystal McMullen help ring in the new year. Tu, 12/31, 9pm. Free. Ceol Irish Pub, 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558, http://ceolirishpub.com.

NYE CELEBRATION AT JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET: The Celebrity Showroom turns into a big dance party with Foreverland, a tribute to the music of Michael Jackson. The show starts at 10pm. Tickets are $29. There will also be a free champagne toast and countdown to

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The rat of the litter For two months, I’ve been dating an awesome guy. He does sweet things like leaving cute notes on my windshield, but I worry about how he looks up to his older brother. His brother treats women like garbage, saying anything to get them into bed and then ditching them. I haven’t known my boyfriend long, so part of me worries about whether any part of his brother has rubbed off on him or will. How much of a “family resemblance” is there between brothers? Younger brothers do tend to look up to older brothers, and frankly, this is hard to avoid if one’s older brother is always dangling out some married woman’s second-floor window. But behavioral science research finds that personality isn’t transferred from one person to another like cat hair from a couch to black pants. “Personality similarity between relatives seems to come mostly from their shared genes,” writes behavioral geneticist and twins researcher Nancy Segal in Born Together—Reared Apart. About your boyfriend and his brother, Segal told me, “If they were identical twins, I would worry!” Identical twins share 100 percent of their genes, she explained. But “siblings share 50 percent of their genes, on average” and “can be very different.” And even with those genes they share, biology isn’t destiny. The same gene that vaults into action in one brother—sending chemical signals to the brain that influence personality—might spend a lifetime napping in the other. Gene expression—whether certain genes get switched on—is triggered by environment, which includes diet, chemical exposure and a person’s experiences. And although these brothers grew up in the same family, the 34   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 26, 2013

same environment’s effect on different siblings can be different because they experience it at different ages, with a different combination of genes, and with different peer and other influences. So, for example, four brothers can have the same physically abusive grifter father but only one of them—executed murderer Gary Gilmore—ends up a coldblooded killer. Chances are your boyfriend looks up to his brother for historical reasons—for building him forts out of couch cushions and making some bully wear underwear on his head—and he doesn’t want to mess up his misty view with new information You, however, are on the right track— “having cautious fun” instead of deciding your boyfriend’s the cheese and closing your eyes to any information contradicting that. But while your boyfriend’s brother is a user of people, which points to a lack of empathy, your boyfriend’s behavior—just per the notes he leaves on your car—suggests he takes pleasure in delighting you, which suggests he truly cares about you. If only his brother would show similar thoughtfulness and start leaving his own cute notes on girls’ cars—perhaps something along the lines of “Roses are red, violets are blue; I just got a shot at the free clinic, and so should you.” Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


THESE DON’T MIX Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period. OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 26, 2013  |  

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May the &

of the holiday season be with you throughout the coming year.

love ,

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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 26, 2013  |  

RN&R  

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Recycle this paper

Think Free

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Edmund Kean

(1789-1833) was one of the most famous British actors of his time. But a contemporary, the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, was frustrated by Kean’s inconsistency, regarding him as a great artist who, on occasion, lapsed into histrionics. “To see him act,” said Coleridge, “is like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning.” Now and then I get that feeling about you, Aries. You have bursts of brilliance that you sometimes don’t follow up on. You’re like a superstar who loses your concentration. But I’ve got a strong feeling that in 2014 you will at least partially overcome this tendency. Your word of power will be “consistency.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Ernest

Rutherford (1871-1937) is known as the father of nuclear physics, not just because he won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. He was also a superb teacher. Eleven of his students won Nobel Prizes. That’s the kind of teacher or mentor or guide I urge you to connect with in 2014, Taurus. The coming months will potentially be an optimum time for you to learn deeply and at a rapid rate. One of the best ways to fulfill that promise will be to apprentice yourself to adepts who have mastered the skills and savvy you want to acquire.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your last

best hope to get rich was back in the latter half of 2001 and the first six months of 2002. From July 2025 to June 2026, the cosmos will again conspire to give you a big fat chance to expedite your cash flow to the max. But why get bogged down dreaming of the past or fantasizing about the future when fertile opportunities to boost your prosperity are in front of you right now? Financial luck is flowing your way. Viable ideas for making money are materializing in your subconscious treasure house. The contacts that could help you build your wealth are ready to play with you. (This offer is good until July 2014.)

CANCER (June 21-July 22): French poet

Edmond Jabès had this to say about the birth of big creative ideas that dramatically transform one’s life: “For the writer, discovering the work he will write is both like a miracle and a wound, like the miracle of the wound.” Regardless of whether or not you’re an artist, Cancerian, I expect that you will experience a wrenching and amazing awakening like this in 2014. The opening you’ve been hoping and working for will finally crack its way into your destiny. It may be one of the most pleasurable disruptions you’ve ever had.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the coming

months, I’m betting that you will exit a confined place or shed cramped expectations or break off your commitment to a compromise that has drained you. It may happen suddenly, or it could take a while to complete. How the escape unfolds will have to do with how thoroughly you extract the lessons that your “incarceration” has made available. Here’s a ritual that might also expedite the process: Give a gift to the people you’re leaving behind, or offer a blessing in the spot where your difficult teachings have taken place.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “[N]ow that

you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good,” says a character in John Steinbeck’s novel East of Eden. I suggest that you make this your rallying cry in 2014, Virgo. In fact, why not begin right now, wherever you are? Say: “Now that I don’t have to be perfect, I can be good.” Free yourself of the pressure to be the polished, ultimate embodiment of everything you’d ever hoped you would be. That will allow you to relax into being more content with the intriguing creation you have already become. You may be surprised by how much mojo this affords you.

2014, Libra: You will have the ability to get a lot done in a short time. Here are two ways your fate will be different from Drake’s: First, you will have a big pool of trustworthy allies to call on for help. Second, what you produce won’t take nearly as long to get the appreciation it warrants.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Eierleg-

ende Wollmilchsau” is a colloquial German term for a mythical pig that lays eggs like a chicken, provides milk like a cow, supplies wool like a sheep, and ultimately becomes bacon and pork chops. Metaphorically, it may refer to a fanciful device that performs many functions. Imagine, for instance, a futuristic smartphone that could interpret your dreams, trim your unwanted hair, fix you a perfect cup of coffee, tell you you’re beautiful in ways you actually believe and cure your little health problems. In the real world, there’s no such thing, right? Not yet. But there’s a chance you will find the next best thing to an eierlegende Wollmilchsau in 2014.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“[W]e don’t accomplish our love in a single year as the flowers do,” said Rainer Maria Rilke in the Duino Elegies. Do you promise to take that truth into consideration in 2014, Sagittarius? Will you pledge to diligently devote yourself to creating the right conditions for love to flourish? In the past, you may not have been fully able to carry out this slow-building marvel; you may not have had quite enough wise perseverance. But you do now.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1588,

Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the ruler of Japan, confiscated the swords, daggers and spears belonging to every citizen. He announced they would be melted down and used to make a giant Buddha statue. I’d love to see you undertake a comparable transformation in 2014, Capricorn. You shouldn’t completely shed all your anger and pugnacity, of course—a certain amount is valuable, especially when you need to rouse yourself to change situations that need to be changed. But it’s also true that you could benefit from a reduction in your levels of combativeness. What if you could “melt down” some of your primal rage and use the energy that’s made available to build your personal equivalent of a Buddha icon?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The period between last July and next June is prime time to find or create your dream job. That might mean simply upgrading your existing gig so that it serves you better. Or it could involve you rethinking your relationship with work and going off in quest of a new way to earn a living. So, how are you doing on this project, Aquarius? If you are proceeding on schedule, you should be halfway there by now. The goal should be clear, and you should be more disciplined, organized, and determined than ever. If for any reason this isn’t the case, start playing catch-up.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Singing

teaches two skills that are essential for any creative process,” said author and vocalist Rachel Bagby, “the ability to listen and the ability to be flexible and spontaneous.” I bring this to your attention, Pisces, because 2014 could potentially be a golden age for your creativity. It will be a time when you will benefit even more than usual from exploring and enhancing your imaginative originality. That’s why I’m encouraging you to sing more than you ever have before. Make a list of your 50 favorite singable songs. Be aggressive about expanding the music you get exposed to, and learn the melodies and lyrics to a lot of new tunes. Cut loose with your vocal stylings whenever you have a chance, and take a vow to propel yourself out of funky moods with the creative energy of your singing.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1972, English

folk musician Nick Drake recorded his album Pink Moon. He finished it in a mere four hours, singing all 11 songs and playing every instrumental track himself. It took years for anyone to appreciate his artistry, but eventually, the magazine Melody Maker selected Pink Moon as number 48 on its list of the “All Time Top 100 Albums.” Here’s one way I suspect your efforts will be similar to Drake’s in

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DECEMBER 26, 2013

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Brad Bynum PHOTO/brad bynum

Embrace it Matt Schultz

Tell me about other projects at the Generator.

The Generator is a collaborative arts space in Reno. Executive director Matt Schultz is also currently leading the construction of a new large-scale art piece called “Embrace.” For more information, visit www.thereno generator.com

We have an artist who’s building a full set of armor. We have number of artists that are working on motorcycles and scooters, modifying them and fixing them up. We have an artist that takes found scrap material and makes belt buckles. There’s a great number of painters. Mallory Mishler is working on 52-card tarot deck project, which is the biggest project she’s ever tackled in her life. … And we’re starting to have a number of shows booked in our little gallery.

Tell me about “Embrace.” “Embrace” is basically two 70-foot-tall people buildings. They’re a pair of sculptures of a couple in an embrace. They’re full sculptures about the same scale as the Statue of Liberty. ... They’re fully traversable. They’re basically large cathedral spaces on the inside, with stairs going up to the shoulders, and spiral staircases up the neck into the head, where there’s a gathering space in each head, and you can look back at people in [the other] head and say hello and think about the nature of consciousness. The project is meant to elict feelings about your relationships in the moment. It’s meant to get people to consider the relationships with people they have, people from their past, maybe people that are with them. There’s a chance it will be the temple at Burning Man. As a temple for Burning Man, it’s meant to be a place where people can release from death. Instead of running away from it, instead of saying goodbye to people, I want people to consider the impact that people who have passed made on their lives, and the permanent change they’ve made in your everyday existence, mostly for the positive. We started working on it in late November, and we’ve been work-

ing on building infrastructure, raising money, then actually physically building it.

What’s the material? Mostly wood. Almost exclusively wood, with a small amount of metal fasteners. It’s basically like a house in that regard.

It might be the temple at Burning Man? We really believe in our team, and we think we deserve being the temple. If we don’t end up being the temple for Burning Man, the project is something that the world needs to see, so we’re going to make it happen whether or not it’s the temple. If it’s not the temple, it’s certainly going to be more challenging from a fundraising perspective. Being the temple brings a level of clout to a project that helps us in our ability to clear that $276,000 fundraising goal that we have. … We’ll be taking donations all the way up ’til August of next year. If people are interested in donation funds, they can contact me directly. My email is mrschultz@gmail.com. We’re a nonprofit,

Plus the last Beatles concert One of the more colorful, maligned, iconic, and idiosyncratic sports spots in America has very likely hosted its last ball game. The great Candlestick Park of San Francisco. Many are indulging in their memories of The Stick this week, as it hosted on Monday night what is very probably the last game to ever be played there. I’d like to jump on this dog pile, too. First, major kudos to the usually groovy citizens of San Francisco, who in 2008 did something that not many cities, if any, have ever done. After the naming rights to Candlestick had been sold to 3 Com in ’95, and then to Monster Cable Company in ’04, righteous Friscans had had enough of 3 Com Park and Monster Park, and voted to forbid the city from ever selling the name of their beloved dump to any other corporate sponsor. For the rest of its six years, the place would be known once again as Candlestick Park. That makes it, arguably, the best named football stadium in the USA. And it will remain so until it gets blown up sometime early next year. OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

so all the donations are tax deductible. If people want to give a year-end donation, that would be rad.

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

Tell me about the Ichthyosaur going to the Discovery Museum. Ichtysaur was out at Burning Man. Jerry Snyder put his heart and soul into it, along with 20 other really amazing people, making this full-scale giant wooden Ichthyosaur. It went out to the playa and was really adored and loved, and it looks like the Discovery Museum wants to have it in their space to share with others. So he’s fixing the damage it took at Burning Man, which every art project takes a heavy bit of damage when you open it up to the public and let them wail on it. So he’s fixing it up and getting it ready for that install.

Anything else? It feels like this renaissance that we’ve talked about is starting to happen. The Generator is here as a foundation to support all the other artists, all the other art groups. … The Generator is here, come out, make something amazing, and share it with the world. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

My favorite football memory of Candlestick is one that I’m sure not a single writer for the Chronicle or Examiner has mentioned. That’s cuz they’re all a bunch of no good flatdick homers. But I have no problem naming my fave game at the Stick, being a lifelong Viking fan. It was on Jan. 9, 1988, when the 8-7 Vikes rolled into Candlestick for a semi-final playoff battle against the mighty 49ers of Joe Montana and Steve Young. Everybody pretty much figured the Purple People were just fodder upon which the Niners would chomp and snack. So we rolled in there and shocked Walsh’s Weiners by a score of 36-24. This was the infamous A.C. game, where my wideout Anthony Carter caught 10 passes for 224 yards and burned the Niners all damned day. I still love the memory of that phone call to my old man after that game. He was steamed beyond big time! There are choice baseball memories, too. My first big league games ever, back in ’62, when dad took the family to see two games between my team, the Braves (then of Milwau|

‘It’s really great to share successes and failures together, like real brothers do, all while getting to know each other and having fun.’

kee), and the Giants, who my brother and dad loved. Mom, in her eternal feminine goddess wisdom, didn’t really give a poop. The first game was on a Friday night, and it was classic Candlestick—foggy and colder than a welldigger’s ass. The Braves won, 5-4, as both Eddie Mathews and Hank Aaron, my fave players, homered. I was in baseball nirvana. The Saturday game was in the afternoon, and it was sunny and gorgeous. Eddie and Hank each homered again, god bless ’em, and I thought I was in Fat City. But then that bastard Mays hit two homers, including a grand slam, and the Giants won 8-6. So everybody, as it turned out, had something to be happy about from the two games, as we left the park and experienced our first gnarly ass Candlestick traffic jam. How totally perfect. Ω

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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Ryan (Big) and Brandon (Little) have been matched for just two months, and are having a great time simply introducing each other to their favorite hobbies.

Change a child’s life for the better, forever. Visit BBBSNN.org or call 352-3202 today.

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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DECEMBER 26, 2013

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