Page 1

Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 12 Arts&Culture................26 Art.of.the.State.............29

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

|

VOLUME 19,

ISSUE 43

|

DECEMBER 12–18, 2013

Foodfinds..................... 30 Film.............................. 32 Musicbeat.....................35 Nightclubs/Casinos........37 This.Week.................... 43 Advice.Goddess........... 44 Free.Will.Astrology....... 46 15.Minutes.................... 47 Bruce.Van.Dyke........... 47


EARN 4X BONUS REWARDS1 ON HOLIDAY PURCHASES. NO ANNUAL FEE. This holiday season let us reward you for giving. Get four times bonus rewards when you use your Nevada State Bank credit card2 at select retailers through December 31st. Shop toy and game stores, home improvement stores, bookstores and more. Shop for friends and family, or purchase gifts for your favorite charities. And while you give to the community, get back. All with the Nevada State Bank credit card. Bring your banking home.

53 years in Nevada I 50 branches statewide 600 ATMs across the West nsbank.com/Holiday 1.866.461.6696 1. Earn 4% cash back or 4 rewards points for every dollar spent on net purchases from select retailers. See bank for retailer information. Transactional items such as cash advances, balance transfers, returned merchandise, etc. are not eligible. After promotional period, earnings revert to 1 point or 1% cash back for every $1 spent. 2. Offer applies to AmaZing Rewards®, AmaZing Cash™, or existing Legacy credit cards enrolled in a Cash or Rewards program. Subject to credit approval. Certain terms, conditions, and restrictions apply. See your Consumer Credit Card Agreement and Disclosures for more details. Offers subject to change at any time. MEMBER FDIC

2 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Headlines Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I take this seriously out of respect for the victims, but when the media, including the Associated Press, KOLO-TV, Reno Gazette-Journal, Elko Daily Free Press, KSNV in Las Vegas, the Daily Journal in Indiana and others, report, “Ex-Reno News & Review writer sentenced for date rapes,” all I can do is shake my head. Why not “Rapist sentenced to 40 years”? The last story Danny Riggs wrote for this newspaper was in 2009. He was a generally a music writer. He won a couple of awards, including a big one through the university, the Steve Martarano Best Published Article Award. The award paid him $500. I fired him. I can say that because it’s hard to libel a convicted rapist. It would also be hard to violate his privacy since he publicly suggested to arts editor Brad Bynum that he fight me for his (freelance) job back. He was a liar and a scoundrel, no doubt. I fired him for missing deadlines and ethical violations. There’s this thing about criminality and demonization that I never quite get. I’m a pretty good judge of character. I thought the kid was misguided and would take the easy path to get what he wanted, but I didn’t think he was a bad guy. Just too ambitious. Obviously, I was wrong, but he wasn’t some demon. At some point not that long ago, he was just a boy, loved by his family and his teachers. I remember the extra efforts faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno gave him. They don’t do that for people they don’t like. I’ve got to wonder, though, why Assistant District Attorney Rebecca Druckman included that he freelanced here all those years ago in her release about the conviction. I also wonder why she included that Riggs was an Obama supporter. Weird. Plainly she used the public dime to make political hay—why, I don’t know. I spoke to Associated Press San Francisco Bureau Chief John Raess about it. His argument was that if people in Reno knew Riggs, they were most likely to know him from this newspaper. Still, four and a half years. I see the logic in his argument even if I probably wouldn’t have handled it the same way.

Better sooner than later

our government are based upon fundamental ideological differences. If the writer is referring to President Obama, it is not the man himself that causes people to oppose him, but his radical and destructive policies. The president’s political philosophy is shared by a powerful segment of today’s society, and that philosophy will continue to be opposed by those American who hold strongly different views on the role of government. I think that it is ironic that the writer chose the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as his example of bi-partisan cooperation. He asserts that the assassination of President Kennedy ended opposition to the Civil Rights Act. In fact, the “Southern Bloc” of 18 Democrats and 1 Republican senator delayed passage of the Civil Rights Act with a 54-day filibuster. Secondly, a higher proportion of Republicans than Democrats voted for passage of the Civil Rights Act. So yes, there was a bi-partisan effort to pass the Civil Rights Act. But in the end, the politicians voted in favor of it because it was supported by an overwhelming majority of the American people who saw the moral imperative of passing the Civil Rights Act. The writer goes on to state his belief that the intent of today’s “toxic politics” is to obstruct, destroy careers, blacken reputations, and employ lies to defeat both legislators and legislation.” Really? He can’t admit that there might be valid reasons for opposing laws that some honestly believe are not in the interests of the American people? Especially now that all the negative effects of the Affordable Care Act are coming to light? He also seems to think that once laws are passed, they become untouchable, impervious to change or repeal. Really? This is an interesting, though absurd position to take. If our laws were immutable, as the writer argues, then we would still have the Fugitive Slave Act, Prohibition, and the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution! The writer also makes an odd assertion, “Imagine if extremist billionaires of the time … had ponied up huge sums of money … to target Kennedy’s strengths instead of his

Re “Grouse decision” (Green, Nov. 14): I was glad to see your coverage of the sage-grouse listing determination in the Green section last week. Nevada has had a conservation plan for sage-grouse, in one form or another, for more than a decade. The bi-state population was listed because the area conservation plan was never implemented. Ultimately, it came down to the fact that nobody was willing to pay for sage-grouse conservation because they didn’t think it mattered. Now that the bird is listed, everyone pays in a different way, and people are starting to see that it does matter. This could have been prevented if we had spent less time talking and more time doing. We still have some time to create a conservation solution for the rest of Nevada, but it will take a concerted effort of all affected parties to sit down and make some hard choices. We also will need support from all of our congressional delegation to help us figure out how to fund sage-grouse conservation in Nevada. We won’t be able to do it alone, and we cannot afford to wait. Martin T. Nelson Reno

That’s how it works Re “Our toxic Democracy” (Editorial, Nov. 28): I found the editorial titled “Our Toxic Democracy” to be a strange and bizarre mish-mash of partisan opinion and historical ignorance. Why does the writer believe that a presidential assassination was necessary before bi-partisan agreement could be reached on the passage of the Civil Rights Act? The death of President Kennedy may have given an impetus to the Act’s passage, but it certainly didn’t end opposition to it. The statement, “We suspect that a presidential murder in this century would leave partisanship in Washington, D.C., largely unaffected and undisturbed,” is probably right, but only because the divisions within

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

That’s the law The city of Sparks had their Christmas Parade, and that’s great. But why do both the city of Sparks and the city of Reno have an official “Holiday Tree” instead of a “Christmas Tree.” Reno’s designation to have a Holiday Tree “was decided upon through our elected officials and City Attorney’s office,” according to a return e-mail I received from Reno Direct online. Are the cities of Sparks and Reno observing some holiday other than Christmas that they have not told us about? If so, what are they observing? If not, why avoid the Christmas tree designation? Ernesto Serano Reno

Mind your business Re “And yet, the myth persists” (Left Foot Forward, Dec. 5): Once again it seems to be impossible for a former Democratic Nevada legislator to resist the urge to raise

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Ron Large, Joe Medeiros, Jesse Pike, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Gary White, Joseph White, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

taxes. The proposition put forward by Sheila Leslie defeats the very goal she wants to achieve. Business will always search for locations that have the least cost associated with locating their business in a state. It’s one of the first rules of economics. I agree with her that states, counties and municipalities should not offer “special” waivers of their tax structure to persuade a business to locate there. It was a mistake with Apple, as it was with Cabela’s. The costs to the jurisdictions usually outweigh the benefits. There are many examples of this kind that can be quoted all over the country. Usually the only beneficiaries are the politicians who approve these deals and can later brag about the jobs created. As to the quality of life issue, whenever these sorts of ratings are published most of the people living in the states or cities rated disagree when asked individually. These ratings seem to be very subjective at best and are rarely reliable. She states, “But digging just a little deeper, the myth of low taxes/high prosperity disintegrates. In the Forbes 2013 List of the Best States for Business, Nevada is rated 36th in the country. While our state placed very well in business costs (No. 5), other rankings caused our overall status to plummet, including an educated workforce/labor supply (No. 40), quality of life (No. 47) and economic climate (No. 50).” As an example, take the specific statement, “... low taxes/high prosperity disintegrates.” High prosperity needs to be put into the context of cost of living. Someone in Nevada can live well on the median household income of $48,927. The same could not be said if you lived in New York or much of California. The bottom line is that politicians of either party will seldom be satisfied unless they can raise taxes, as their ability to lower their excessive spending seems to be some kind of genetic disease that rears its ugly head the moment they are elected. Fred Speckmann Reno

weaknesses.” Well, actually, John F. Kennedy’s billionaire father, Joe Kennedy used his vast fortune to support JFK’s political career. The Kennedy family spent lavishly, not only on favorable publicity for JFK, but also on a whole range of underhanded and sometimes criminal activities in every election he ran in. I am not excusing dirty politics, but I wouldn’t assert that it is new, or that only the other side does it, as was stated in the editorial. I’m sure the writer believes that conservatives / Republicans are to blame for the existing legislative gridlock; that bunch of mean-spirited conniving fat-cats are attempting to block President Obama’s efforts to lead the nation to Utopia. Quite frankly, having seen the results of five years of Obama’s Utopia, the economic stagnation, high unemployment, lies, scandals, incompetence, corruption, and contempt for the Constitution, I applaud all those who oppose him. Charles Burt Carson City

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover & Feature story design: Hayley Doshay

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

3


4 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013


by Dennis Myers

ThIs MOdeRn WORld

by tom tomorrow

How do you like winter so far? Asked at Yellow Submarine, 920 Holman Way, Sparks Michelle Howe-Stark Business owner

I’m enjoying winter. I love wintertime. I wish there were more snow because I love to go snowshoeing.

Darrell Benedict Retiree

Oh, I love it. I like the cold. I like cold weather. I don’t like snow, but I like cold weather.

Randy Webster Tax preparer

Open your mind Most of us live a pretty nice life, here in post-Recession America, right? You know this because the first thing people say when they see you, this week at least, is something along the lines of “Cold out, isn’t it?” They say it without irony. They say it with humor. They can do that because this less-than-zero kind of temperature is only a blip on their day’s timeline as they pass between their vehicle and their job, or maybe between their vehicle and their grocery store. Maybe Thanksgiving was already a couple of weeks ago, and maybe we’re smack dab in the middle of Consumas, but when the air outside is cold enough to freeze your lungs from breathing, maybe it’s time to appreciate how lucky most of us are in postRecession America. Most of us did nothing to deserve this life of luxury we lead, but all of us use the sweat off others’ brows to enhance these blessings that we have. We didn’t build the roads that takes us to the shopping centers to buy the foods that were harvested by migrant workers and the clothing that was assembled by child laborers in Third World countries. All the same, it’s easy to forget even those little gadgets you’re buying for people you love have a creepy provenance. Anyway, we’re not trying to bum you out about the season. We know that even for the most selfish of us— except for those moments when the wrong cellular phone was gifted—holidays are really about the time you spend with friends and family. Really. We believe that. What we are trying to do, though, is to get you outside of your own head, to help you realize that there are people who are living with none of your bounty. Not OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

I’m looking forward to summer. I prefer the warm weather. Driving’s easier, and I prefer the outdoor concerts in Carson City.

your fault, and in too goddamned many cases, not their fault either. Too many of them lost their connections to polite society through things like the time they devoted to serving their country in wartime, or lost their living arrangements due to a family member’s sickness, loss of employment or mental illness. We’re asking you to revel in your own bounty and to revel in your own humanity. Who among us—the lucky ones—doesn’t have an extra warm coat that wouldn’t do more for our culture hanging on the back of a homeless human than in our extra coat storage closet? Many of us have warm socks, and some of us have entire drawers filled with gloves. Many of us also have coats that our own children outgrew last year or the year before. Many of us have extra sleeping bags especially designed for sub-zero temperatures that we intended to use on that second winter backpacking trip that we never took. Now, we all know the traditional ways of donating these types of items. There are all kinds of charities and churches that will accept them. But why don’t you take that humanity you’re just remembering and that appreciation that’s swelling your heart and go out and make a human connection with one of these people who are sleeping outside in our alleyways while we’re gathered around our kitchens, drinking spiced tea and enjoying our bounty? It’s not hard—you can find them down on Record Street about dinner time.

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Jody Lammeo Insurance agent

It’s nice. It’s a nice little switch. It’s good for the businesses—ski resorts and that sort of thing.

Amy Landon Office manager

I do not prefer the snow. I’m not really enjoying it. I don’t like driving to work in the winter, and I don’t like being cold in the winter. Reno hasn’t had bad winters since I’ve been here. Normally, the weather is fairly mild.

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

5


Neglected children are great for business Does it matter that Nevada has more uninsured children than any other state? According to a new research brief published by Nevada’s Legislative Counsel Bureau (LCB), Nevada continues to lead the nation in the percentage of uninsured children as one out of five Nevada kids is uninby sured. We are also a national leader Sheila Leslie in uninsured residents, second only to Texas, which also embraces a Wild West approach to coverage. Why should we care? The LCB points out that uninsured adults often postpone needed medical care until the problem gets so bad it can’t be ignored. Then they access the most expensive medical care we have: the hospital emergency room. While parents obviously want to get their uninsured children medical attention when needed, the same survival strategy of waiting and hoping the situation gets better applies. One of the most common reasons for emergency room visits among children is an ear infection, a condition that can be painful and dangerous if left untreated.

Yet without access to primary care, if one of those 134,300 uninsured Nevada children is suffering from an ear infection, she must compete for a spot at a subsidized health clinic, which may also charge a substantial co-pay, go to the emergency room and wait to be seen, or go without care. Emergency rooms are very expensive places to provide primary health care. Uninsured patients may be hounded by bill collectors for years after the visit, but the reality is someone has to pay the bill. We all pay for those ear infections through higher insurance bills as hospitals increase the costs for insured patients to at least partially cover charges for the uninsured visits. In fact, newer research is emerging about the use of emergency rooms as “profit-centers” for hospitals since there is little regulation on pricing and often people end up in out-of-network hospitals where virtually any price goes.

the biggest stars in the

Much has been made of Gov. Brian Sandoval’s decision to become the first Republican governor to accept the federal government’s offer to pay for expanded access to Medicaid, a key component of Obamacare. Certainly it was the right decision given our incredibly high rates of uninsured residents. Despite the governor’s insistence that he was and is against all things Obamacare, he knows the expansion of Medicaid is the right approach. Of course Nevada wouldn’t have so many people eligible for Medicaid if our corporations would provide employer-sponsored health care instead of leaving the cost of coverage for their low-wage workers to the taxpayers. It’s worth noting that almost all the uninsured people in Nevada are under the age of 65 since that’s when the federal Medicare program kicks in. Imagine if we had gone in a different direction when reforming our health care system and taken the profit-making insurance brokers out

of the mix and provided Medicare health services to everyone. All Nevadans would have access to basic health care as every senior citizen in our country does. A single payer system would have its challenges, of course, and there are other systemic health care reforms that need to be fully implemented, such as higher utilization of qualified nurse practitioners in the primary care arena and an expanded workforce training program. But if Medicare is such an awful government-run system, why is it so popular with anyone nearing retirement age? Because health care security means you don’t have to worry about how you’re going to come up with the cash to see a specialist or cover the surgery you need without declaring medical bankruptcy. Ask those who loudly protest the single-payer approach as “socialized medicine” if they’re willing to give up their Medicare when they turn 65 and take their chances in the individual insurance market. I doubt you’ll find many takers. Ω

biggest little city.

Florida Georgia line

Third Eye Blind

DECEMBER 12

DECEMBER 13

7pm Drawing Every Night 12 Winners pick a Prize-Filled Ornament! 36” TVs - iPods - Macy’s Gift Cards - FreePlay - Cash Prizes & More!

DECEMBER 11 – 22, 2013

329-4777 6   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 12, 2013

Bring in three cans of food and get a $5 Food Credit good at any Silver Legacy restaurant! One per day.

1 - 8 0 0 - M U S T- S E E (6 8 7- 8 7 3 3 )

Here’s the Legislative Counsel Bureau research brief Sheila referenced: leg.state.nv.us/ Division/Research/ Publications/ ResearchBriefs/ Uninsured.pdf

Bring an unwrapped, new packaged gift for a boy or girl for the Toys for Tots program and get $5 in Slot FreePlay! One per day.

silverlegacy.com

santa pub crawl DECEMBER 14


The high cost of safety they generate, help us live better, safer lives? Libertarians, who are not progressives, say they do not. Libertarians, and classical liberals such as those who flourished in the 19th century, take a much dimmer view of regulations. The early Democrats believed in decentralized banking, gold and silver money, private schools, drinking alcohol even on Sundays, mutual aid, and a small central government that only occasionally enforced its will on the states, where most of the political power lay. Americans paid very few federal taxes. That changed in the 20th century. The Federal Reserve, the income tax, direct election of senators, and other progressive “reforms” tilted power towards big national government. Some may forget that progressive reforms also produced American involvement in World War I, the eugenics movement, Jim Crow, alcohol prohibition, and the Great Depression. By 1949, the Progressive regulations were firmly embedded in the American way of life.

“If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. If it stops moving, subsidize it.” —Ronald Reagan Do government regulations keep us safe? Without regulations, wouldn’t “unbridled capitalism” keep millions in poverty, pollute the planet, and by Brendan Trainor result in giant private monopolies? This is the progressive viewpoint. In the late 19th century, far fewer regulations resulted in 4.5 percent annual economic growth. The progressives changed that. Democrats like Woodrow Wilson and Republicans like Theodore Roosevelt initiated progressive “reforms” to place the bridle bit on unregulated commerce. Today, even many Republicans are progressives. The progressive institutions include central banking, the income tax, and large regulatory agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the Departments of Energy, Labor, Health and Human Services, Commerce, the Food and Drug Administration, and so on. Do these agencies, and the thousands of pages of regulations

But what if we stopped there? What if we simply stopped passing new regulations after 1949, and left the economy alone, without any new regulations? Where would we be today? Living in a cesspool of pollution, earning 10 cents an hour in a sweatshop? Or, something else entirely? Last June, the Journal of Economic Growth published a study that illustrated what that something else entirely would have been. They started by measuring the number of pages of regulations in 1949 (19,335) with the number in 2005 (134,261). Annual economic output, they conclude, “is 28 percent of what it would have been if regulation remained at its 1949 level.” Put differently, if regulations had remained constant, current Gross Domestic Product would be $53.9 trillion instead of the $15.1 trillion of 2011. Economic growth is slowed by 2 percent annually due to regulatory burdens. Business must comply with often petty and irrational regulations rather than produce goods and

services for consumers. This results in a sort of negative compound interest drag on growth. Think of it in terms of your own income. The median income in America today is about $50,000 a year. If the “unbridled capitalism” that progressives fear actually existed, even from 1949 onward, the average income would be $330,000 a year. That amount of income would allow people, instead of the state, to control their health care, housing, education, and quality of life. Poverty would be very rare. It would certainly be better than individuals being $54,000 in debt due to the constant borrowing needed to prop up the regulatory welfare/ warfare state. Libertarians understand the negative effects of regulations but now they have data that shows the cumulative effect of all regulations over a period of decades. Will Obamacare and the loss of civil liberties serve to alert voters to what the costs of big government really are? Ω

e t a r b e l e ❅C ebrate ❆

l e ❄ C ❅ ❆ ❅

John Hawkins says these are the 40 best Ronald Reagan quotes: http:// townhall.com/columnists/ johnhawkins/2012/07/03/ the_40_best_quotes_ from_ronald_reagan/ page/full.

with

Family & Friends

Locally owned & Operated

LIQUEURS

SIZE

REG. PRICE

BEN’S PRICE

KAHLUA - Assorted

750

$19.99

$9.99

soUtHerN CoMFort

750

$16.49

$12.99

GrANd MArNIer - 150 YeAr oLd

750

$259.99

$159.99

GrANd MArNIer - 100 YeAr oLd

750

$229.99

$129.99

GIoIA LUIsA - LIMoNCeLLo CreMe

750

$24.99

$15.99

CoINtreAU

750

$42.99

$32.99

JAGerMeIster

375

$13.99

$9.99

FrANGeLICo

750

$27.99

$19.99

WILd tUrKeY - AMerICAN HoNeY

750

$24.99

$19.99

GIoIA LUIsA - LIMoNCeLLo CreMe

750

$24.99

$15.99

please like us on facebook: ben’s fine wine and spirits of northern nevada

RENO 3480 Lakeside - 825.0244 | Fourth & Keystone - 323.6277 | 4700 N. Virginia - 322.0588 | 10870 S. Virginia - 853-2367 | Prices effective through 12/31/13 SpaRkS 2990 Sullivan - 337.2367 | CaRSON City 444 E. Williams - 885.9463 | VISIT OUR WEBSITE BENSNEVADA.COM FOR 100’s MORE SPECIAL PRICES OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

7


Photo/Dennis Myers

It’s not easy to spot the ALEC members at the  Legislature. Only some of them post their membership in their official biographies.

Mt. Frazier proposed Legislation has been introduced in Congress to rename Frenchman Mountain after a woman who was longtime advocate of improving education in Nevada. After teaching jobs in several mining camps, Frazier moved to Sparks where she was principal of Sparks Elementary School. Eventually she became school superintendent in a Las Vegas district. She was elected to the Nevada Legislature in 1950 and spent 12 years there promoting education. She is considered the driving force behind Nevada Southern University, now UNLV. In 1962, she was appointed lieutenant governor of Nevada. The U.S. House bill was introduced by U.S. Rep. Dina Titus. It will compete with a similar proposal to change the mountain’s name to Mt. Reagan, which has been approved by the Nevada Board on Geographic Names. Frenchman is located in Clark County and is a noted exposure of the Great Unconformity identified by explorer John Wesley Powell.

Vivian Freeman 1927-2013

Photo/Dennis Myers

The woman behind the state’s first mining reclamation law died on Dec. 5 in Reno. After considerable activity as a community leader—including advocacy for the Equal Rights Amendment and the PTA—Vivian Freeman was elected first to the Washoe County Hospital Board and then to the Nevada Legislature. She served seven terms in the Assembly, from 1986 to 2002. As a hospital trustee she was instrumental in creation of the Washoe Medical Center pregnancy center. (The county hospital, now Renown, was later sold to private interests.) Assm. Vivian Freeman, left, with state  In the Assembly, her welfare director Myla Florence at the  1995 legislature. success in passing a bill requiring that land despoiled by mining be reclaimed nevertheless reflected the culture of the time--when the measure reached the Senate, she was forced to surrender sponsorship of her bill to a male senator in order to get it approved. After losing a bid for a ninth term, Freeman stayed involved in legislative affairs. In 2003 after local governments went to court to get initiative petitions on the Reno train trench and Carson’s Fuji Park overturned, she got legislation introduced to protect initiatives and also prevent governments from using tax dollars to campaign for ballot measures. “In both cases, thousands of voters signed these initiative petitions with the expectation of having a say on those controversial issues,” she wrote in the Reno News & Review. “In both cases, hundreds of hours were dedicated largely on a volunteer basis to collect those signatures.” She made a final, unsuccessful run for the Reno City Council in 2006, criticizing the council for allowing sprawl in the Winnemucca Ranch/Spring Mountain development. “It’s leapfrog development,” she said. “The regional plan calls for contiguous development, and it’s 30 miles north of Reno. How close is that?” This stance reflected concerns she had raised in the Legislature when the city—at the behest of developers and a casino—annexed 3,015 acres of noncontiguous land 30 miles west in Verdi. She also said the council’s credibility was undercut by a sense by residents that they could not affect city policies. That was in line with her consistent support for openness issues but also her belief that the trappings of openness, such as public comment, have to be accompanied by genuine respect by officials for the public. “You get up, you’re allowed to be on the record and make your thoughts known,” she said. “But there’s a sense that the decisions have already been made. Nobody’s really listening.”

—Dennis Myers

8   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 12, 2013

ALEC Are legislators loyal to voters or political group? The London Guardian last week disclosed documents showing the financial difficulties faced by the American by Legislative Research Council (ALEC), Dennis Myers documents that touch on ALEC’s Nevada presence. ALEC is an organization that for many years passed for an impartial research organization similar to the National Conference of State Legislatures or the Council of State Governments. In Nevada, moderate lawmakers like Ray Rawson and the late William Raggio were once

“I’m not sure where the language came from.” Sen. Don Gustavson Washoe County republican associated with it, and the Nevada Legislature was actually paying $1,000 a year in tax funds to ALEC for a state membership. (Invoices also indicate the legislature has paid $500 for two-year subscriptions to ALEC publications.) The money for those dues prior to last year’s legislature came out of money set aside by Assembly Bill No. 492 of the 2011 legislature, sponsored by the Assembly’s budget committee “for dues to national organizations.” A similar measure—A.B. 475— was passed by the 2013 session, but an inquiry to the fiscal division of the legislature on whether any of the

funds continue to go to ALEC dues was not immediately answered. In reality, ALEC is a political group funded by conservative billionaires like Charles and David Koch and corporations like Exxon Mobil and Walmart. Its nature has been publicized more in recent years, and its cover was particularly blown by Florida’s Trayvon Martin case. In that case, local police initially took the position that the “stand your ground” law made it legal to shoot anyone viewed with suspicion. Publicity surrounding the Martin case threw a spotlight on ALEC’s activities proselytizing its “model” language for such laws in legislatures around the nation. Soon a dozen corporations were running for cover—Apple, Coca-Cola, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Kraft Foods, McDonald’s, Procter & Gamble, Walmart and Wendy’s broke their ties with ALEC—and state legislators were doing the same. In Nevada, according to one of the Guardian documents, 14 of the 63 members of the Legislature hold ALEC memberships. The document did not give their names. If those 14 are current legislators, it would mean that 22 percent of the Nevada Legislature has signed on with a special interest group. However, the 14 figure may not include just current members. Various lists floating around include both current and former members, and ALEC adds to

the confusion by not disclosing its legislator members. A Wikipedia list of Nevada members, for example, includes former U.S. Sen. Paul Laxalt, who left the Senate a quarter of a century ago and never returned to Nevada to live. The Guardian documents also disclosed an “ALEC oath” that reads, “I will act with care and loyalty and put the interests of the organization first.” That prompted Nevada Democratic Party spokesperson Zach Hudson to ask whether Republican Sen. Barbara Cegavske of Clark County, who sits on ALEC’s national board, has taken the oath. Among currently serving members of the Nevada Legislature, a number of names keep appearing in various places as ALEC members. They include, in the Assembly, Cresent Hardy and Jim Wheeler. In the Senate, they include Barbara Cegavske, Don Gustavson, Joseph Hardy, Ben Kieckhefer, Michael Roberson, and James Settelmeyer. A site called Source Watch also includes Sen. Scott Hammond. All these members are Republicans. Two others are frequently named, but say they have let their memberships expire. Last year, when the RN&R relied on a 2008 U.S. Department of Justice bio used when Brower became U.S. Attorney to describe him as an ALEC member in a voter registration story (“Governmentapproved voters?” RN&R, Jan. 26, 2012), Brower responded by email, “Interesting story, but I am not a member of ALEC.” When we followed up, Brower said he was a member when he was in the Assembly because Sen. Raggio “ensured that all GOP legislators joined” but has not been a member since. Clark County Democratic Sen. David Parks was a member of ALEC but said earlier this year that he let his membership expire. He said he joined in part because he was encouraged to do so by Sen. Raggio and in part because he wanted to receive their publications and go on their junkets. “As an elected official, I feel that I have a responsibility to my constituents to follow what the ‘other side’ is saying and doing,” he said in May to Las Vegas CityLife. “Oftentimes, ALEC puts forward the opposition viewpoint which solidifies my perspective. It is also helpful to be able to see a proposed bill come in front of me and be able to say to myself, ‘OK, that’s an ALEC bill. Be cautious.’ ” In May, a group called Progress Now issued a report identifying 16 pieces of legislation in three legislative


sessions—2009, 2011 and 2013—that it believes were taken from ALEC model bills. The report provided sideby-side comparisons of Nevada bills with ALEC model measures. For instance, S.B. 188 of the 2013 session was sponsored by Washoe County Republican Sen. Don Gustavson and three other senators. The bill read in part, “English is hereby designated as the official language of the State of Nevada.” At least three of the four Senate sponsors were ALEC members. All were Republicans. When contacted, Sen. Gustavson—who introduced three bills whose language tracked with ALEC model language—said, “I’m not sure where the language came from.” He compared ALEC to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which he said also provides model bills to state legislatures. “They all have these services,” he said. However, NCSL is not a political organization, and ALEC is. Moreover, on some issues, NCSL will provide model language on more than one side of an issue. ALEC has language to support only their side of issues. Beside the English bill, Gustavson’s measures included two measures dealing with illegal aliens. All failed to pass. Gustavson also said he never took ALEC’s oath. Just as interesting as the bills is the reaction Progress Now got when

Just in time for the

“OK,that’sanALECbill. Becautious.”

HOLIDAYS

Sen. David Parks Clark County Democrat it made a public records request of Sens. Cegavske, Kieckhefer and Brower on their involvement with ALEC. They received an answer not from the senators but from Legislative Counsel Brenda Erdoes, who refused to provide records because, she wrote, “[I]t is unlikely that the private parties who conducted the private correspondence with the senators would have felt comfortable communicating their ideas to the senators frankly and freely if they had known that their correspondence would be disclosed to the public.” This was contained in a 12-page letter providing legal reasoning on why the senators need not comply with the records request. The Progress Now report also identified corporations that gave money both to ALEC and to Nevada legislators. They include NVEnergy, Wells Fargo, AT&T Nevada, United Health Group, the Nevada Rural Electric Association, Walgreen’s, Verizon Wireless, and the Union Pacific Railroad. Nevada, incidentally, has a “stand your ground” law similar to Florida’s. It was sponsored by Assemblymember John Oceguera, a Clark County Democrat—not, so far as is known, an ALEC member. Ω

get peace of mind ~about~

HEALTH INSURANCE ... The Access to Healthcare/Saint Mary’s Health Plans Option

When should I act?

You still have time (until December 23) to get enrolled in a government-approved health insurance plan that starts January 1, 2014. Imagine seeing a doctor, going to the hospital, or getting medication whenever you need to – that’s what you get with HealthNow: a program that connects you to health insurance.

Holiday duty

Who gets government help?

Photo/Dennis Myers

Cost for comprehensive health insurance may be less than you expect, with government health insurance subsidies available to Nevadans earning a wide range of incomes.

Qualifying annual income ranges: Individual: $15,971-$45,960 Family of four: $32,735-$94,200

Don’t put off your peace of mind – enroll today. We have the team and technology in place to get you signed up.

CALL 877.385.2345

Working from cherry pickers last week, Sparks city workers Jesse Hon, Mike Kelley and Bruce French decorated the downtown holiday tree. The Rail City’s Christmas parade was also held last weekend. OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

9


Peppermill_EDGE_GiveBack_Vertical_12.12.pdf

10 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013

1

12/10/13

11:03 AM


CIGARETTES © SFNTC 4 2013

This is an Ormat geothermal power plant in Amatitlan, Guatemala.

Global energy Ormat moves into Honduras “It’s not exactly an acquisition,” president and chief operating officer of Ormat Technologies, Inc. Yoram Bronicki said about their recent agreement with ELCOSA, an energy company in Honduras. “The agreement is a by Sage Leehey BOT [Build, Operate and Transfer] agreement where Ormat will take the next step in developing the project. ... We’ll build it, operate it for sage l@ a certain number of years and then transfer it back to that company.” newsreview.c om The project he’s referring to is the Geotérmcia Platanares geothermal project that was owned by ELCOSA up until this deal was made. Ormat will first build a geothermal power plant at the site and then operate it, gaining revenue from it for the duration of the contract. Ormat will hold ownership of the plant for 15 years after commercial operation at the plant begins. And it typically takes about five years to get a project to commercial operation when it begins from scratch, according to Bronicki, but he believes it will take less in this case because ELCOSA has begun the work for Ormat. Bronicki cautioned that since they haven’t begun physical work at the property in Hounduras, Ormat can’t know for certain that the project will be successful, but they expect it to be. The Honduran company has done a good amount of work on getting the project started, but the physical building of the power plant will be Ormat’s responsibility. “We need to develop the resource, drill wells, test the wells and provided that the wells are successful—and we believe that they are—we can then move into building the power plant and operating that power plant for a long period of time, selling green power to the greater Honduras,” Bronicki said. Bronicki explained that Ormat decided to strike this agreement because the company is always looking for geothermal resources to develop across the globe where the “people could appreciate or benefit from the positive attributes of geothermal energy.” He also said that this deal is good for everyone involved. “What’s nice about BOT structures is that it allows each party to excel and benefit from what they know how to do, and I think this is how we can bring a lot of value to them and, of course, we will benefit from the good work they have done early on in that project,” For more Bronicki said. information about Ormat will also gain profits made from the project in the time that Ormat Technologies they own it. ELCOSA will benefit from the revenue stream created by Inc., visit the power plant after the contract ends, and “the market in Honduras www.ormat.com. will benefit from the reliable power that is also renewable and does not involve burning fuels and generating emissions,” according to Bronicki. “It will truly benefit all parties,” Bronicki said. When complete, it is expected that the plant will create 35 megawatts of geothermal energy. Ormat currently has about 600 megawatts at this time and expects to be just under 640 megawatts in the first half of 2014. In terms of size, this could be a 5 percent increase to Ormat’s portfolio. This will also be the first geothermal plant in Honduras if successful. Ω OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

Reno News and Review 12-12-13.indd 1

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

11

11/13/13 9:23 AM


13TH ANNUAL TOMMO NATIVE CRAFT FAIR: Features native craft vendors with handmade jewelry and other one-of-a-kind items. There will also be food, treats and good times at this event. Th, 10am through 12/14. Free admission. Tommo Native Craft Fair, 34 Reservation Road, (775) 741-1100.

2013 WILDERNESS WINGDING: Friends of Nevada Wilderness’ seventh annual event honoring its volunteers features live music, food and refreshments, raffle and silent auction. Tu, 12/17, 6-9pm. Free; suggested $10 donation. California Building, Idlewild Park, 75 Cowan Drive, (775) 324-7667, www.nevadawilderness.org/wilderness_wingding.

THE GREAT SANTA DASH 5K RUN/WALK: A festive holiday run in downtown Reno in which participants are encouraged to suit up in their best Christmas costume. The run is held in conjunction with the Santa Crawl that will take place during the evening. Adult participants will receive a commemorative cup to be used for the Santa Crawl. Sa, 12/14, 10am. $35 adults; $25 youth. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., www.aiyevents.com/ civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=230.

HOUSE OF SCROOSH—A HOLIDAY PRODUCTION: Take 2 Performers Studio presents this humorous, family-friendly, take on A Christmas Carol set in a fashion design house with the Queen of Mean, Ebbie Scroosh. W, 12/18, 7:30pm; Th, 12/19, 7:30pm; F, 12/20, 7:30pm. $20 adults $15 students (ID required). Damonte Ranch High School, 10500 Rio Wrangler Pkwy., (775) 8533375, http://showtix4u.com.

KTMB’S CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING PROGRAM:

N

N

OW T HAT WI N TER H A S B EGU N HERE I N RE N O,

it makes it a little easier to start thinking about the holidays, snowball fights, getting up to the slopes in Tahoe and all the other stuff that makes it really feel like winter. I’m personally not a huge fan of the cold and snow. I prefer the heat of the summer and not being terrified of falling each time I take a step outside. Growing up in southern Nevada, I didn’t see much snow at all, and if it did snow, one snowman cleared the whole yard out. But I do have to admit that there’s something nice about the snow and it looking all wintery outside, and the snow sports are pretty awesome, too. It gives a nice cozy feeling—probably because of the amount of time I spend inside hiding from the cold—and it means the holidays, snow fun, time with my family and the new year is coming. And in that spirit, we’ve put together the 2013 Winter Guide. Tim Hauserman gives you a breakdown of the best places to go cross country skiing this season and also tells you some great things to do with and places to bring the kids to have some fun in the snow. If you’re looking to replace your old snowboard or just a whole new board, you can turn to the story about the different shapes of boards and what they can do for you. There’s also a story about splitboarding—a new winter sport that’s gaining popularity for those who want to take themselves through the backcountry. And we’ve included our annual ski resort and cross country resort directories to give you the basics about each resort. So fight the urge to stay inside in your pajamas with a cup of hot chocolate all winter long and have some fun in the snow. Cheers, Sage Leehey 12

|

RN&R

Volunteers are needed to help with KTMB’s Christmas Tree Recycling program, Dec. 26, 2013-Jan. 12, 2014, 9am-1pm and 1-5 pm at three locations in Reno and Sparks: Bartley Ranch Regional Park, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park and Shadow Mountain Sports Complex. 12/26-12/31, 9am-1pm & 1-5pm; 1/1-1/12, 9am-1pm & 1-5pm. Free. Call or visit website for details, (775) 851-5185, http:// ktmb.org/volunteer.

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

NEVADA CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: Reno

ACROSS THE BOARD: Skiing story by Tim Hauserman

SKI RESORT DIRECTORY SNOW PLAY: Places for the kids by Tim Hauserman

SPLIT DECISION: Sage Leehey describes a new winter sport

SHAPE UP: Different snowboard shapes by Sage Leehey

Chamber Orchestra presents its 10th annual chamber music festival. Concerts will be held at Nightingale Concert Hall at the University of Nevada, Reno and South Reno United Methodist Church. M, Tu, Th-Su through 12/31. Opens 12/26. $5-$45. Call or visit website for details, (775) 348-9413, www.renochamberorchestra.org.

NEVADA’S CHRISTMAS SALE & INDIAN ART: Buy direct from more than 50 Native American artists/exhibitors local and visiting, authentic handmade items such as beadwork, basketry, silver jewelry, paintings, handmade blankets, pillows, etc. F, 12/13, 10am-8pm; Sa, 12/14, 10am8pm. Free admission. Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Gym, 34 Reservation Road, RenoSparks Indian Colony, (775) 432-9740.

NOEL NIGHTS: The Village at Northstar will be a festive winter wonderland with a decorated 35-foot tree, ice skating until 9 p.m., fire pits to warm you, holiday carolers, shopping deals and more. Th through 12/19. The Village at Northstar, 3001 Northstar Drive in Truckee, (800) 217-7554, www.northstarcalifornia.com.

OPEN HOUSE & TELESCOPE CLINIC: Visitors can explore the observatory at their leisure, ask questions of observatory volunteers, learn how telescopes work and even learn how to image celestial objects. Guests are encouraged to bring their own telescopes and use the observation deck to view the evening sky. First Sa of every month, 7pm. Free. Jack C. Davis Observatory, 2699 Van Patten Drive in Carson City, (775) 445-3240, www.wnc.edu/observatory.

THE RENO BEER CRAWL: Attendees have an opportunity to sample domestic, nationally recognized and locally distributed craft beers at more than 15 different unique bars and restaurants all within walking distance of the city’s most iconic attractions in downtown Reno. For just $5, you get a commemorative Reno Beer Crawl glass, wrist-band and map to use throughout this self-guided event. For only $1 you can enjoy 6-ounce samples at each of the participating downtown Reno locations. This signature event starts at The Waterfall. Fourth Sa of every month, 2-6pm

through 12/28. $5. The Waterfall, 134 W. Second St., (775) 322-7373, www.renobeercrawl.com.

RENO SANTA PUB CRAWL: More than 12,000 festive-clad wassailers will gather in downtown Reno for the 13th annual pub crawl and fundraiser. Holiday revelers age 21 and older dressed as Santa, an elf or other holiday characters can get a map and commemorative cups and visit participating bars and restaurants. Proceeds from the event will go toward local schools. Sa, 12/14, 7:30pm. Santa Pub Crawl, Downtown Reno, http://renosantacrawl.com.

RIVERWALK DISTRICT WINE WALK: Visit any Riverwalk District Merchant on Wine Walk day to get a map of participating Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, with a valid photo ID, you’ll receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Every month offers a different theme and part of all proceeds are donated to a local charity. Third Sa of every month, 2-5pm. $20. The Riverwalk District, Downtown Reno Along The Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

SUNDANCE HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW: Sundance Books and Music’s annual craft show features local works of art by potter Kristi Jamason, letterpress artist Katherine Case, basket maker Betty Hulse, jewelry maker Lyndsey Langsdale and blown glass art from Burnt Knuckle Glass studio. Sa, 12/14, 10am-4pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

TRAVELS THROUGH TIME: ART JOHNSON: Art Johnson, former director of the Planetarium, will speak about the popularity enjoyed during the Halley’s Comet appearance in 1985 and a special time capsule buried until its next return. F, 12/20, 7-8pm. $5-$7. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., north of Lawlor Events Center, (775) 784-4812, http://planetarium.unr.edu.

TRAVELS THROUGH TIME: TONY BERENDSEN: Astronomer Tony Berendsen of Tahoe Star Tours will speak about his first experiences with the Planetarium in the 1990s and its spark on his efforts on promoting astronomy and space science throughout our region. F, 12/13, 7-8pm. $5-$7. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., north of Lawlor Events Center, (775) 784-4812, http://planetarium.unr.edu.

VINTAGE STAR SHOW: JOURNEY THROUGH SPACE: A look at what’s up in the skies tonight, delivered live with the latest in full dome, digital planetarium projection technology. F, 6-7pm through 12/20. $5-$7; free for members. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., north of Lawlor Events Center, (775) 784-4812, http://planetarium.unr.edu.

WINTER TRAILS DAY: Winter Trails Day offers those new to snow sports the chance to try snowshoeing and cross-country skiing for free, and discover the great fitness and social benefits with these easy-to-learn winter activities. Join organizations and vendors for a day of winter fun with free trail passes for registered participants, mini snowshoe and cross country ski lessons, interpretive hikes with the Tahoe Rim Trail Association, education, product demos, food and entertainment. Bring your own snowshoe or cross country ski equipment. Registration is required. Sa, 1/11, 11am-3pm. Free. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road in Truckee, (916) 924-8900, www. rei.com/event/53278/session/78927/01182014.

Art

ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Art for Christmas, The annual show and sale features holiday-themed art and crafts from many local artists. Through 12/28, 11am-4pm. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artistscoopgalleryreno.com.

FITZGERALD STUDENT SERVICES BUILDING INVESTMENT GALLERY, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: The Names Project/AIDS Memorial Quilt, Each year, the NAMES Project unfolds sections of the AIDS Memorial Quilt at thou-


special aDVeRTising secTion

It’s happen ing in

ACTIVITIES CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP Jean Peters guides this class for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 WOMEN’S DEFENSIVE TACTICS Designed to build confidence through the knowledge gained by training in such techniques as Jeet Kune Do and Judo. Tu, 7-8:30PM through 12/31, $25 a month. Osk Training, 636 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 343-2526 CONVERSATION CORNER Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that the average person encounters. W, 4:30-6PM. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC DUO BRASILEIRO Th, 12/12, 5:30PM, F, 12/13, 6PM and Sa, 12/14, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 FAST LANE Th, 12/12, 7PM, F, 12/13, 8PM and Sa, 12/14, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 TMCC JAZZ ENSEMBLE CHRISTMAS CONCERT Join the TMCC Jazz Ensemble for a concert filled with great music! Th, 12/12, 7:30PM, free. Sparks United Methodist Church, 1231 Pyramid Way (775) 358-0925

special aDVeRTising secTion

! STAR OF WONDER, STAR OF LIGHT The joy and warmth of the holiday season is in the air. Join the Reno Pops Orchestra for its “Star of Wonder, Star of Light” F, 12/13, 7:30PM, free, donations welcome. The Rock Church, 4950 Vista Blvd., Sparks, NV 89436 / (775) 355-7888 MIMIC F, 12/13, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 SHREK: THE MUSICAL Join the Tahoe Players at John Ascuaga’s Nugget for an amazing performance in our 22nd season. Sa, 12/14, 2PM & 7PM, $15$18. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 12 OH 5 Sa, 12/14, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 GET YOUR ROCKIN’ CLAWS ON Come on down and get your Santa Claws on and join the canned food drive for the Northern Nevada Food Bank. Sa, 12/14, 9:30PM, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484 TYLER STAFFORD Spend a well-deserved evening out and relax in the beautiful atmosphere of the Orozko Lounge. There is no cover charge and parking is free. Th, 12/19, 5:30PM, F, 12/20, 6PM and Sa, 12/21, 6PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 STEPPEN STONZ Th, 12/19, 7PM, F, 12/20, 8PM and Sa, 12/21, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

RENEGADE HOLIDAY PARTY Sa, 12/21, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 ROSENDO No cover charge and parking is free.W, 12/25, 5:30PM, Th, 12/26, 5:30PM, F, 12/27, 6PM and Sa, 12/28, 6PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 BUDDY EMMER BAND Th, 12/26, 7PM, F, 12/27, 8PM and Sa, 12/28, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 WICKED HICKS F, 12/27, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 ROCK’N BIRTHDAY BASH! Celebrate the New Year by rock’n it in right with a big happy birthday to the drummer for TaZeR. Sa, 12/28, 9:30PM. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 NILES NYE Tu, 12/31, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

THE KARAOKE BAR Wi-Fi Jukebox. Karaoke starts at 9PM on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. doors 6PM. Happy hour from 6 to. F-Su through 12/31, No cover. The Karaoke Bar, 2140 Victorian Ave. (775) 313-2772 BLACK AND BLUES JAM Tu, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 COUNTRY AT THE CABARET The Casino Cabaret comes alive with the best in country music and dancing for “Country at the Cabaret” featuring DJ Jamie G. W, 7PM and Sa, 9PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 LIVE JAZZ Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM through 12/27, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks, NV 89441 (775) 657-8659 LADIES 80S WITH DJ LARRY WILLIAMS Ladies ’ with DJ Larry Williams, every Thursday! Th, 7PM through 10/4, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

ALL-STAR NEW YEAR’S ROCKIN’ EVE Tu, 12/31, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 ERIKA PAUL Enjoy Louisiana-style food and the soulful, breathtaking jazz sounds of Erika Paul on keyboards and vocals. No cover. Th, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

THis secTion is pRoViDeD as a pUBlic seRVice BY THe Reno neWs & ReVieW anD is noT FUnDeD oR aFFiliaTeD WiTH THe ciTY oF spaRKs

BEWARE OF DARKNESS F, 12/20, 9PM, $5. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 12, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

13


W W

HI LE I T’S THE BIG BOYS of the downhill ski world that suck up all the newsprint when it comes to skiing at Lake Tahoe, it’s the cross-country ski resorts that keep a lot of endorphin-crazed locals happy all winter long. Sure, downhill is a thrill, but if you spend your summer pushing the bike pedals or running along the river, it’s time to get your exercise fix by taking up skate skiing or track skiing at one of the incredible Nordic resorts near Lake Tahoe. In addition to getting your heart pumping, cross-country ski resorts have a distinct advantage over their downhill counterparts: They are small and sparsely populated. You can park your car, put on your comfy boots, carry your lightweight skis and poles to the trailhead and be skiing in two minutes or less. Just ski a few kilometers away from the lodge at a cross-country center, and you might have the trails to yourself. Conveniently, three cross-country ski areas lie within an easy hour’s drive of Reno: Royal Gorge, Tahoe Donner and Tahoe Cross-Country. A bit further, but well worth an occasional visit, is Kirkwood Cross-Country. All the areas offer a variety of ticket plans, ski and snowshoe rentals and both skating and striding lessons. So get out there.

ROYAL GORGE CROSS COUNTRY At Donner Summit, www.royalgorge.com, 200 kilometers of trails and eight warming huts. (530) 426-3871. Billed as America’s largest cross-country ski resort, Royal Gorge has been through a roller coaster ride over the last few years. It was sold by its original owner to a pair of developers, who after paying a high price based on their expectation of developing it into an extensive residential and ski community, faced fierce opposition from Donner Summit locals and the collapse of the economy, and eventually lost it in foreclosure. Just in time for last year’s ski season, Royal Gorge was purchased by a group of organizations including the Truckee Donner Land Trust, whose intent was to keep it as a cross-country ski area. Sugar Bowl took over the ski area operations and some are now reporting that the skiing at Royal Gorge is the best it has ever been. 14

|

RN&R

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

Best views: Not to be missed is a ski out to Point Mariah, where the 360-degree panoramic views of the Sierra include the spectacle of the Royal Gorge itself, a 4,000-foot drop to the North Fork of the American River. Another impressive trail is Razorback, which takes you to the top of a narrow ridge, getting up close and personal with the Pacific Crest. I also like the wide open Stage Coach trail with impressive views of knife-edged Devil’s Peak. Other cool stuff: The Sugar Bowl Interconnect Trail brings you from Royal Gorge to the Sugar Bowl Lodge.

TAHOE DONNER CROSS COUNTRY At Truckee, www.tahoedonner.com/crosscountry, 100 kilometers of trails and five warming huts, (530)587-9484. Whether you are trying out the easy trails near the lodge, gliding through the solitude of Euer Valley, or taking the seemingly never-ending climb to the top of Hawks Peak, there really is something for everyone at Tahoe Donner. Best Views: If you really want to get a great view and are also determined to burn off those holiday calories, then head up to the hut at the top of Drifter trail. The views are incredible, and the fast descent will give you a chance to catch your breath. Then head for Euer Valley, where the extensive trail system includes challenging climbs, and— via Last Round Up and Coyote Crossing—a long mellow glide through a Sierra valley surrounded by spectacular mountains. Other cool stuff: The lodge café dishes out excellent lunch fare, and the Cook House in Euer Valley is a secluded spot to rendezvous with your buds.

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY At Tahoe City, www.tahoexc.org, 65 kilometers of trails and four warming huts, (530)583-5475. Tahoe Cross Country has a relaxed homey feel and an extensive network of trails over fun rolling terrain. While on bluebird days several trails bring you to views of Lake Tahoe, when it’s stormy, there are places to glide through the trees sheltered from the wind.


More than $100 in iTunes® and Amazon® rewards*? It’s time for a We Rock Checking Account.

Best Views: While the short, steep climb up to the Lakeview Trail gives you the best views of Tahoe, the dips and turns heading out to another Tahoe view at the hut on the Silver Trail are my favorite. First pay the necessary penance of climbing to the top of the Gold Trail, then reward yourself with the thrill of the whoop de doing down Bronze to Silver. Other cool stuff: Tahoe XC has free skating clinics several days a week, and season pass holders are treated to free cookies and coffee. They also offer 10 kilometers of dog-friendly trails, so go ahead and bring Rex.

KIRKWOOD CROSSCOUNTRY SKI AREA At Kirkwood, http://winter.kirkwood.com/ site/xc/xc-center, there are 80 kilometers of OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

A VIEW OF ROYAL GORGE FROM POINT MARIAH.

PHOTO/TIM HAUSERMAN

trails and three warming huts, (209)258-7248. Pick a beautiful sunny day when the snow is deep, and you will enjoy the inspiring drive up Highway 88 over Carson Pass to Kirkwood CrossCountry. Situated at 7800 feet, Kirkwood always seems to get the most snow of any ski area in the region, so it could be your early or late season choice. Best Views: The Schneider Camp network of trails brings you to open bowls with spectacular views. Start by climbing steadily on Outpost Trail to the Last Round Up, where you will bask in the glory of Round Top Mountain and Elephants Back. Other Cool Stuff: Did I mention the extraordinary views? Also if you have any friends who like the lifts, they can drop you off at the cross country center, then drive an extra mile to the Kirkwood Mountain Resort.

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

Our We Rock Checking Account helps you live greater in all kinds of ways. Like reimbursing up to $8 a month on Amazon® and iTunes® buys for qualifying accounts*.

Plus! A $20 sign-up bonus Branches throughout Northern Nevada and a massive free nationwide ATM network Free 24-hour online, mobile and toll-free banking We’ll show you how easy it is to switch to Greater Nevada

Visit GNCU.org or call 775-882-2060 *Monthly qualifications are 15 debit card purchases must post and clear, one direct deposit received, and account statements delivered via eStatements. $20 bonus is additional reimbursement for iTunes® or Amazon.com® purchases within first month account is open if qualifications are met. Up to $116 in reimbursements the first year based on $20 sign up bonus and up to $8 in reimbursements each month. Other rewards received when monthly qualifications are met are ATM fee rebates and waiver of the $10 monthly service fee. iTunes® and Amazon.com® are not affiliated with this account.Membership requirements apply. Available to personal accounts only. All Northern Nevada residents are eligible for membership. Federally insured by NCUA.

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

GNCU-WeRockKitchenAd_3-9x11-5_vFINAL.indd 1

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

15

5/23/13 3:18 PM


ADULT LIFT TICKET

Lifts

$95

13

100+

2,400

8,637

1,802

25%

40%

35%

Boreal Mountain Playground www.rideboreal.com (530) 426-3666

$52/59

8

41

480

7,700

500

30%

55%

15%

Diamond Peak www.diamondpeak.com (775) 832-1177

$59/69

7

30

655

8,540

1,840

18%

46%

36%

Donner Ski Ranch www.donnerskiranch.com (530) 426-3635

$49

8

52

505

7,781

750

25%

50%

25%

Granlibakken, www.granlibakken.com (877) 552-6301

$30/35

2

1

10

6,700

400

50%

50%

0%

Heavenly Lake Tahoe www.skiheavenly.com (800) 432-8365

$96-$115

29

97

4,800

10,067

3,500

20%

45%

35%

Homewood Mountain www.skihomewood.com (530) 525-2900

$59/$69

8

64

1,260

7,880

1,650

15%

50%

35%

Kirkwood www.kirkwood.com (209) 258-6000

$57/69

15

81+

2,300

9,800

2,000

15%

50%

35%

ALPINE RESORTS Alpine Meadows www.skialpine.com (530) 581-8374

Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe www.skirose.com (775) 849-0704

$79

SKI TERRAIN Trails

ABILITY LEVEL

SUMMIT VERTICAL Beginning Acres ELEVATION DROP

Int.

Advanced

8

60+

1,200+

9,700

1,800

20%

30%

50%

Northstar California Resort www.skinorthstar.com (800) 466-6784 $91-102

20

97

3,170

8,610

2,280

13%

60%

27%

Sierra-at-Tahoe www.sierraattahoe.com (530) 659-7453

14

46

2,000

8,852

2,212

25%

50%

25%

2

12

200

7,325

625

30%

50%

20%

$84/$87

Soda Springs www.skisodasprings.com (530) 426-3901 Squaw Valley USA, www.squaw.com (530) 583-6300

$36

$76-95

Sugar Bowl, www.sugarbowl.com (530) 426-9000

$82/$88

Tahoe Donner, www.skitahoedonner.com (530) 587-9400

$45

sands of places across the nation. In commemoration of World AIDS Day and Day With(out) Art, University Galleries offers viewers the opportunity to view a section of the quilt. Through 12/13. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., third floor of Fitzgerald Student Services, (775) 784-4278.

RN&R

|

14

1,500

120

SIERRA ARTS: Biggest Little Art Show:

Show and Sale, Featuring a work by more than 20 local artists. Th, 12/12, 6pm. Free. 119 Thoma St., (775) 3489440. http://neverenderreno.com.

|

5

103

3,600

& Gift Faire, North Tahoe Arts Center holds its annual Open House Event for the ARTisan Shop. Refreshments will be served. Sa, 12/14, 12-4pm. Free. Contact North Tahoe Arts (530) 581-2787, exhibits@northtahoearts. com, http://northtahoearts.com for details on this exhibit. 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop in Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www. northtahoearts.com.

NEVER ENDER: Holiday Cash & Carry Art

16

13

170

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Holiday Art

MYSTUDIOX: Annual Holiday Show, This year’s art show will feature one-of-a-kind ornaments as well as other multi-media works of art. The ornament sales will benefit the RHT Heavenly Pantry. Th, 12/12, 5-9pm. Free. 390 Freeport Blvd. ,Ste. 14 in Sparks, (775) 250-6685, www.mystudiox.com.

30

DECEMBER 12, 2013

Icons of NV, Sierra Arts’s biannual Biggest Little Art Show, celebrating miniature format works since 1994, explores the concept of “Icons of NV.” The show features work representing, re-imagining and rediscovering icons of Nevada using a playing card-sized canvas. 17 S. Virginia St. Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierraarts.org.

9,050

8,383

7,350

2,850

1,500

600

25%

17%

40%

STREMMEL GALLERY: Deck the Walls, Stremmel Gallery presents this group exhibition featuring work by John Belingheri, Catherine Courtenaye, Tom Judd, Rafael Lopez, Maurice Nespor, and Melinda Tidwell. M-Sa through 12/28. Free. 1400 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-0558, www. stremmelgallery.com.

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM, RANCHO SAN RAFAEL REGIONAL PARK: W-Sa, 10am-

4pm through 12/18; Su, 12-4pm through 12/15. Free. Battle Born, Nevada

Proud Art Show, The Wilbur D. May Museum kicks off the sesquicentennial year with a new art exhibit and sale from the Sierra Watercolor Society. The Battle Born, Nevada Proud show features dozens of regional artists who captured historical impressions of the state in watercolor—focusing on mining, ghost towns, bighorn sheep, horses and more. This is an official

45%

45%

60%

30%

38%

0%

TRAILS(km)=1 TICKET=2 DESCRIPTION=3

Kirkwood, www.kirkwood.com (209) 258-6000

1

2

80

$24

Northstar California Resort www.skinorth35+ $31 star.com (530) 562-3270

3

Lessons, rentals, all resort amenities. Lessons, rentals, groomed trails

Groomed Royal Gorge Cross trails, Country, lessons, www.royalgorge.com 200 28/31 rentals, retail shop, (530) 426-3871 cafes, lodges

Squaw Creek Nordic, www.squawcreek.com (530) 583-6300

18

$20 rentals,

Tahoe Cross Country Ski, www.tahoexc.org (530) 583-5475

65

$24 dog trails,

Tahoe Donner www.tdxc.com (530) 587-9400

NV 150 signature event, celebrating Nevada’s 150th anniversary of statehood. The exhibit will be on display in the museum’s art gallery and pieces will be available for purchase. W-Su through 12/18. Free. 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

Museums

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Ashley Blalock: Keeping Up Appearances, W-Su through 3/9. $1-$10.Carmelo Ortiz de Elgea: Basque Painter in Nevada, W-Su through 1/5. $1-$10.Emilie Clark: Sweet Corruptions, W-Su through 3/9. $1-$10.Ashley Blalock: Keeping Up Appearances, W-Su through 3/9. $1-$10.Andy Warhol: Athletes, W-Su through 1/4. $1-$10.Lauren Bon & The Optics Division Team: Transforming Inert Landscape into Agency, W-Su through 5/25.Toulouse-Lautrec and La Vie Moderne: Paris 1800-1910,

Lessons, snowshoeing allowed Lessons, rentals,

groomed trails

Night skiing

100+ $26 Wednesdays, lessons, rentals

W-Su through 1/19. $1-$10.Andrea Borsuk: Leap of Faith, W-Su through 1/5. $1-$10.Frida Kahlo: Her Photos, W-Su through 2/16. $1-$10; free for NMA members.Franklin Evans: Timepaths, W-Su through 4/20. $1-$10.Frida Kahlo: Her Photos, $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 3293333, www.nevadaart.org.

Music

ARGENTA CONCERT SERIES: FrenchCanadian clarinetist Romie DeGuiseLanglois and bassoonist Peter Kolkay will perform as part of the chamber music series. The compositions presented will include works by Glinka, Poulenc, Mendelssohn and Brahms. Th, 2/13, 7:30pm. $25; general, $5 for students with ID. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St.,

(775) 784-3555, www.argentaconcerts.com.

BROADWAY COMES TO RENO: MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER CHRISTMAS: Grammyaward winner Chip Davis has created a show that features the Christmas music of Mannheim Steamroller along with multimedia effects performed in an intimate setting. Su, 12/29, 7pm. $49-$79. Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 6866600, www.pioneercenter.com.

AN ELEGANT CHRISTMAS: Reno Little Theater presents this heart-warming event featuring Marc Anthony at the organ and dancers from the Spiral Ballet. Sa, 12/21, 11am & 2:30pm. $15. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 329-0661, www.renolittletheater.org.

A HOLIDAY CELEBRATION: University Wind Symphony perform its annual


L L

ET’S

FACE

I T.

Kids and dogs are smarter than adults when it comes to snow. Watch the adults being interviewed on the news when a big storm hits an East Coast city. You will hear a lot of whining about how horrible the driving is, or that they’ve been out there shoveling all day. Then, hopefully, they give the mic to some gap-toothed girl who’s all excited and smiling from ear to ear. School is closed, she is sledding and making snow angels and just about to bop that damned brother of hers with a snowball. Yep. They get this snow thing. Now eventually, some of us decide that snow play needs to be sophisticated and structured, and we buy expensive tickets to go downhill skiing. But what if we just let ’em go sledding or crosscountry skiing or wandering around dumbfounded among all that whiteness?

WHERE TO PLAY Tahoe Meadows at the top of the Mt. Rose Highway is close to Reno and provides some fantastic play space. Park at the Tahoe Meadows trailhead or along the highway and find plenty of room to sled or make snow monsters. It’s all free, but the restrooms are closed. That’s a perfect opportunity for the kids to learn one of life’s essential skills, peeing in the snow. Granlibakken just outside of Tahoe City has a small ski hill, and a great little sled hill. They have restrooms and parking. www.granlibakken.com

holiday concert with members of the Reno Wind Symphony. Highlights include a recitation of the poem “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas” by KOH Radio personality Ross Mitchell, accompanied by the Reno Wind Symphony. Ross will also be the vocal soloist on “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch.” Su, 12/15, 3pm. $5 general admission; free for students with ID. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-3555, www.unr.edu/cla/ music/calendars/index.htm.

STAR OF WONDER, STAR OF LIGHT: The Reno Pops Orchestra welcomes the season with holiday classics and family favorites such as “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” Leroy Anderson’s “Sleigh Ride,” “Winter Wonderland” and familiar tunes by Carmen Dragon. F, 12/13, 7:30pm. Free, donations welcome. The Rock

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

Church, 4950 Vista Blvd. in Sparks, (775) 626-1735, http://renopops.org.

LAST CHAIR FESTIVAL: A celebration of music, culture and community, the second annual festival features an eclectic mix of world-renowned music acts including The Flaming Lips, Jurassic 5, Matisyahu, Fitz & the Tantrums, Mayer Hawthorne and Random Rab. Th-Sa through 1/11. Opens 1/9. Prices vary. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road in Olympic Valley, (800) 403-0206, http://squaw.com/lastchairfestival.

THE MERLING TRIO: The trio, featuring Renata Artman Knific on violin, Bruce Uchimur on cello and Susan Wiersma Uchimura on piano, has been hailed as a brilliantly distinguished group endowed with remarkable gifts of communication, magnificent precision and an

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

impeccable blend of sound. Tu, 1/21, 7:30pm. Free. Nightingale Concert

Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-3555, www. unr.edu/cla/music/calendars/ index.htm.

RENO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT: This program features

Chamber Orchestra presents an hour-long program of chamber music by Nevada composer Monica Houghton. The concert will include the world premiere of Wilderness Portraits: Three Places in Nevada. Proceeds benefit the Reno Chamber Orchestra. Tu, 12/31, 7-8:30pm. $5-$20. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 3293333, www.renochamberorchestra. org.

Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings and Mozart’s final symphony, the “Jupiter.” RCO Principal Oboist Rong-Huey Liu is also featured in the Concerto for Oboe and Orchestra by American composer John Corigliano. Sa, 1/18, 7:30-9:30pm; Su, 1/19, 2-4pm. $22$45 general; $5 youth, students. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-9413, www.renochamberorchestra.org.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunch-

RENO PHILHARMONIC: CLASSIX FOUR: Su,

MUSIC OF MONICA HOUGHTON: Reno

1/12, 4pm; Tu, 1/14, 7:30pm. $26-$77.

time concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

Pioneer Center for the Performing

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

North Tahoe Regional Park in Tahoe Vista has a popular snow play hill, and cross-country skiing with parking and restrooms. www.northtahoeparks.com The Tahoe City Winter Sports Park on the grounds of the Tahoe City Golf Course has a sledding hill, beginner cross-country skiing and trails for the dogs. They also have a restaurant and bar where Junior can get a hot chocolate while you wrap your hands around something a bit more bracing. www.tahoexc.org/tcsportspark

CROSS COUNTRY SKIING Head over to one of Tahoe’s cross-country ski areas. (More details on page 12) They have rental equipment designed for kids, easy trails to learn the sport, and reduced or free tickets for the little ones. Cross-country skiing is a perfect introduction to skiing. It won’t break the bank, and you avoid the crowds.

GO PLAY The most important thing to remember about kids in the winter is you need to get them to the deep snow-preferably with no structure or guidance from the clumsy Muggles. Just let them get out there to make their own magic and play. You remember play? In fact, that’s one of the best parts of being a parent. You get to become a kid again. So get out there and start making snowballs and remember to duck, because that one kid over behind that tree on your left has an awesome throwing arm.

Arts, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 3236393, www.renophil.com.

RENO WIND SYMPHONY: A HOLIDAY CELEBRATION: The Reno Wind Symphony presents its annual concert featuring holiday favorites. Highlights include the recitation of the poem “’Twas the Night Before Christmas” by KOH Radio personality Ross Mitchell, accompanied by the Reno Wind Symphony. Ross will also be the vocal soloist on “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch.” Su, 12/15, 3pm. $5 general admission, free for students with ID. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 7844278, https://www.vendini.com/ ticket-software.html?t=tix&e=b0de 2a2fafb18914206a357655c1c093.

RING THE CELEBRATION: Bella Voce present their winter concert with

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

songs for the holiday season. Sa, 12/14, 7:30pm. $12-$15; free for children age 12 and younger. St. John’s Presbyterian Church, 1070 W. Plumb Lane, (775) 359-1533, www. bellavocereno.com.

RING THE CELEBRATION!: Ring in the music, ring in the fun, ring in the celebration with Bella Voce as we present our winter concert with songs for the holiday season! Su, 12/15, 4pm. $12-$15; free for children age 12 and younger. St. John’s Presbyterian Church, 1070 W. Plumb Lane, (775) 359-1533, www. bellavocereno.com.

TMCC JAZZ ENSEMBLE CHRISTMAS CONCERT: The TMCC Jazz Ensemble perform a program of Christmas music, Dixie music and jazz. Th, 12/12, 7:30pm. Free. Sparks United Methodist Church, 1231 Pyramid Way in Sparks, (775) 622-9020.

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

17


PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

II

F YO U C A N

picture a snowboard sliced down the center but then latched back together, that’s basically what a splitboard looks like. The two pieces come apart, too, almost as if they were skis, but it still clearly looks like two equal pieces of a snowboard. Splitboarding is a fairly new snow sport, and Edgar Rivera, sales associate at Bobo’s Mogul Mouse Ski & Patio, showed me some of the boards Bobo’s sells, explaining that it’s popular in the area. “One of the newest things that’s making a real footprint right now is splitboarding,” Rivera said. “This is for the guy that wants to go even further than his snowmobile is going to take him—way in the backcountry. Backcountry is a big thing in the last few years for skiing and snowboarding.”

As he took the two pieces apart, he showed me the logistics of the splitboard. “You take it apart … and use them almost like skis. You put what’s called skins on them. … If you run your hand down [the skin], it’s smooth in one direction and rough the other direction. That’s so you can actually ascend on the snow. There’s special binding plates that are made for your bindings or step-in boots. With the binders, you just pop them off and re-assemble them for a snowboard.” The skins attach to the under side of each ski-like piece of the splitboard giving you more traction in the snow. The boots or bindings can be faced in a sideways stance—like for snowboarding—or front facing on each “ski.” At Bobo’s, Rivera said they carry brands like K2, Burton, GNU and Jones. And he mentioned that it might be a good idea to go for lighter weight equipment when

possible for splitboarding because you’re often carrying it all. Some of the equipment needed for splitboarding is more obvious, like all the typical snow gear you would wear when snowboarding or skiing, but since splitboarding takes you to the backcountry, you need a little bit more than that. Rivera showed me a starter pack for splitboarding that included a shovel, gear pack and probe. He said these along with transponders

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

n

RN&R

want to be prepared and you want the people around you prepared as well. The last thing you want is somebody in your group that didn’t have all their stuff. … You want to be prepared if you are going to be there overnight or a few days. Always, always be prepared. You can also take avalanche safety courses.”

o io N strat gi Fee

|

EDGAR RIVERA

Re

n

o io N strat gi Fee

Re

18

and avalanche beacons are some gear that every splitboarder should have in the backcountry. Poles—preferably lightweight and collapsible—are also necessary. Referencing a personal loss of a friend to an avalanche accident at a ski resort, Rivera said that preparation for the worst is key, especially in the backcountry. “Getting caught in a situation like that [an avalanche], you definitely


T T

different shapes together to make boards even better.

HERE ARE MANY

different shapes, types and styles of snowboards out there for you to choose from. Many snowboards are a mix of several different shapes and edge controls now, but understanding each can help you decide what you want.

FLAT OR ZERO CAMBER This is the kind of board Rivera and many of the guys at Bobo’s ride. The name explains the shape pretty well—it’s flat between the two primary contact points. This board basically gives the rider a happy medium between the extremes in rocker and camber boards. It doesn’t wash out as easily as rocker does, but it also doesn’t catch as easily as camber does. And it turns pretty easily because it’s already halfway to the crescent moon shape needed.

CAMBER This is the more traditional style of boards. Basically, camber means that the board arches up towards the center from the primary contact points near each tip. In other words, it’s convex, starting at each of these contact points. The primary contact points are the places that get the most contact with the snow. Each tip of the board on any shape arches up from these points, which aren’t far from the tips. “For the guy that’s getting 200 days in, very aggressive, loves to carve, loves to do what’s called early morning groomers—that’s still the guy that likes that cambered board,” said Edgar Rivera, sales associate at Bobo’s Mogul Mouse Ski & Patio and snowboarder since 1981. “He likes that aggressive bite feel. He’s going one direction. Or the guy who likes big, big jumps—he still likes that board also. It’s much more accurate and your pop, your

CAMBER UNDER FOOT spins, your landings, for half-pipe— definitely this [camber] board.” Rivera also explained that turning is more difficult on camber because in order to do so, you have to “make it respond opposite” and make it into “a crescent moon shape.”

ROCKER OR NEGATIVE CAMBER

in the center—the entire board is shaped in that crescent moon shape mentioned above, making it an easier board to turn on and a great board for beginners, according to Rivera. This board is a reaction to camber boards. The shape is especially good for powder because the nose elevates above the snow more easily.

Rocker is essentially the opposite of camber. It doesn’t arch up at all

This is also pretty easy to explain by the name. This board is wavy—convex under your feet and concave at the center. This board allows the rider to have the best parts of camber and rocker in one. It, like most boards now, falls into a cambered medley category. Not all boards will be exactly like this, but they typically include some combination of camber, rocker and/or flat in them.

“If you ever caught an edge [on a camber board], your primary contact points caught, so they had to elevate it. … Where those primary contact points were catching, they elevated it, just like a surfboard or a wakeboard. So now they’ve made it more catch-free.” These boards started out for freestyle and still are great for this use, but improvements and tweaks have been made that incorporate

RENO SUBARU

Great Selection, Great Prices Every Day!!

‘06 FORD FIVE HUNDRED SEL Dual Zone A/C, Multi-CD, Heated Mirrors!

‘02 CHEVY SILVERADO 4X4, Chrome Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry!

‘13 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS Great MPG, Keyless Entry! Pre-Owned

‘08 HONDA ACCORD 2.4 Heated Leather Seats, Sun Roof, Multi-CD!

‘06 FORD MUSTANG Spoiler, Keyless Entry, Alloys!

#6G158814

#21156881

#DU322810

#8A046196

#65235930

8,898

$

8,998

$

‘10 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4X4, iPod®/MP3, Privacy Glass!

‘07 INFINITI M35 Leather, Sun Roof, Keyless Start, Multi-CD!

#AUB16213

#7M303324

$

17,996

S KIETZKE LN

2270 Kietzke Lane 395

NEWS

Fall in love with our Great Selection of Certified Pre-Owned Subaru. Pre-Owned. Pre-Loved. Prepared.

12,996

$

$

16,996

‘10 CHEVY TAHOE LT1 3rd Row Seat, Rear Air, Running Boards, Hitch!

‘10 CHEVY TAHOE LT1 3rd Row, Leather, Hitch, Remote Start!

#AR131605

#AR118280

$

21,996

$

25,698

SHOP: LITHIARENOSUBARU.COM

T [775] 200-1412

SALES HOURS Monday-Saturday 9:00am-8:00pm | Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm

E MOANA LN

|

12,996

LITHIA RENO SUBARU

E PLUMB LN

OPINION

17,996

$

$

Price does not include $345 dealer doc fee, taxes and license fees. Offers expire 12/18/13. |

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

19


Giving SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Season of This time of year, people tend to give more time, money and other resources to non-profit and charitable organizations than during any other season. The community’s needs, however, extend well beyond the holiday season. Please take a few minutes to learn about some of our region’s non-profit and charitable organizations on the following pages as we celebrate the

ACCEPT American Red Cross, Northern Nevada Chapter Animal Ark Artown Austin’s House Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada Boys & Girls Club of Truckee Meadows Boys & Girls Club of Western Nevada Bristlecone Family Resources Capital City Arts Initiative Capital City Circles Initiative CARE Chest of Sierra Nevada

“Season of Giving” while being sure to keep them in mind throughout the year. We’d also like to congratulate the board members of the following 84 organizations, who have been recognized as exemplary and generous leaders in philanthropy, receiving the Community Foundation of Western Nevada’s 100% Board Giving Award for 2013. In all, 1,121 board members have contributed $2,853,884 to support their organizations’ operating expenses.

Carson City Symphony Association Casa de Vida Children’s Cabinet* Citicare Community Foundation of Western Nevada Community Health Alliance Disabled Sports USA Far West ESL In-Home Program of Northern Nevada Family Counseling Services of Northern Nevada First Tee of Northern Nevada FISH Emergency Services

Food Bank of Northern Nevada For Kids Foundation Friends of Washoe County Library Girl Scouts of the Sierra Nevada* Great Basin Outdoor School Historic Reno Preservation Society Holland Project Hometown Health Hosanna Home Immunize Nevada Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful* KNPB Lake Tahoe Conservation Fund, aka Tahoe Fund

We’re very fortunate to live in communities which support charitable and non-profit causes and organizations. Whether it’s volunteering your time, donating money, food, clothing or your expertise, the RN&R extends a heartfelt THANK YOU to you for doing so! Organizations in BOLD are featured in our “Season of Giving” section, on the following pages *these five organizations have received the 100% Board Giving Award for five consecutive years

Lassen Land and Trails Trust Mile High Jazz Band Association National Automobile Museum National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges National Judicial College Nature Conservancy Nevada Diabetes Association Nevada Health Centers, Inc. Nevada Humanities Nevada Land Trust Nevada Museum of Art Nevada Rural Counties RSVP Program Nevada Women’s Fund

Nevada Youth Empowerment Project NevadaGIVES Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer Foundation Northern Nevada HOPES Northern Nevada International Center Northern Nevada Literacy Council Pet Network Humane Society* Planned Parenthood Mar Monte Reno Chamber Orchestra Reno Little Theater Reno Philharmonic Association Renown Health Renown Health Foundation

Renown Regional Medical Center Renown South Meadows Medical Center River Wranglers Ronald McDonald House Charities of Northern Nevada Save Embrace Safe Haven Rescue Zoo Sage Ridge School Special Recreation Services Step2 Tahoe Institute for Natural Science Tahoe Rim Trail Association Tahoe-Pyramid Bikeway

Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum The Note-Ables Music Therapy Truckee Meadows Park Foundation Truckee Meadows Tomorrow United Way Urban Roots Veterans Guest House Volunteers of America Greater Sacramento & N. Nevada VSA Arts of Nevada Women and Children’s Center of the Sierra

January is National Mentoring Month

‘My Big Brother gives me advice and helps me make good choices.’

‘My Big Sister accepts me for who I am and helps me become a better person.’

‘)or the ¿rst time, I actually try hard in school.’

Change a child’s life for the better, forever. Visit BBBSNN.org or call 352-3202 today. 20 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013


Crisis PregnanCy Center 8 5 3 H a s k e l l s t, r e n o 7 7 5 - 8 2 6 - 5 1 4 4 • w w w. C r i s i s P r e g n a n C y r e n o . C o m Crisis Pregnancy Center exists to help women and men who are facing unplanned pregnancy and need answers. we’re here to talk about their situation, provide accurate information and help explore all options. our earn while you learn program helps first time moms and dads learn how to be the best parents they can be. this program helps them to understand what to expect in pregnancy and beyond. they work with a parenting instructor who will be able to help them better understand the challenges and joys that lie ahead for them and their baby. We have many volunteer opportunities and ways to support those who come into our center for help. Please call to set up a time to take a tour of our center and find out about all of the different volunteer opportunities. we now offer Vantage Point school For men– creating honorable men for our time. we can help with fatherhood, identity, self worth, preparing for the future, providing for loved ones, anger & more.

way s t o V o l u n t e e r

Here to help, not to judge.

• Serve as a volunteer counselor earn while you learn instructor and more • Host a baby shower at your church

• Plan a workday for your group at our center • Donate maternity clothes & 0-12 months clothes

FinanCial suPPort oPPortunities • Designate your United Way pledge to to CPC • Make a monthly or annual pledge to CPC

• Tax Deductive gifts of any kind • Include us in your planned giving

THANK YOU! Because of YOU, we have been named Food Bank of the Year for the nation. One in four children in northern Nevada do not have enough to eat. Together we are changing that. together we can solve hunger™ Donate l Volunteer l Get Involved

fbnn.org 775-331-3663 OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 12, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

21


Timely immunization throughout your lifespan is extremely critical to protecting your health. Immunize Nevada works to remove barriers to immunizations and provide resources for Nevadans to get immunized. But we can’t do this on our own. We need your help. Every donated dollar stays local and helps your community. This directly impacts your friends, neighbors and family who rely on Immunize Nevada’s expert messaging, innovative programs and technical assistance. Your support gives Immunize Nevada the opportunity to continue making a difference; whether it’s training healthcare professionals on immunization best practices, helping a family find a medical home to access preventive health care or keeping an entire school flu-free through on-site vaccination clinics. Help us create a better and healthier future for our state.

Please contact Heidi Parker, Executive Director, at 775-624-7114 or heidi@immunizenevada.org for more information, or to donate today visit www.crowdrise.com/immunizenevada

K I WA N I S C L U B O F D O W N T O W N S PA R K S 1 4 5 C AT R O N D R I V E , R E N O (775-337-1717) W W W. K I WA N I S B I K E S . O R G Kiwanis Club of Downtown Sparks serves the children of the world and their families! Our club volunteers teach Bicycling Education and Repair Programs. This allows us to donate over 1,000 bikes and helmets to the children of our local schools and youth programs annually. We join with local schools to empower Future Leaders through the Builders Club at Sparks Middle School and the Key Club at Spanish Springs High School. We also sponsor Aktion Club for adults with disabilities. Other club activities include bike repair clinics, Community Book Shelf, PTP Dolls, Make and Take Crafts for kids and the ELIMINATE Project.

Kiwanis Bike Program...teaching bike safety, bike repair and giving back to the community!

22 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013

WAY S T O V O L U N T E E R

WAY S T O G I V E

• Teach crafts • Sew and deliver PTP dolls

• Help teach • Donate bikes and parts

• Collect and deliver books • Donate supplies, money or time for craft events

• Donate $10 – provides a helmet for child • Donate $40 – provides a bike and helmet for child

Thank you to ALL our Business, Government agencies and Community Partners who support us. A special thanks to the Fire and Police Departments, RTC and Waste Management who collect bikes. Thanks to our financial donors, American Family Insurance, Grassroots Books, Burning Man, Patagonia, Reno and Sparks Save Mart, Walmart and Iron Mountain. Thanks to all of you who partner with us!


N O RT H E R N N E VA D A C H I L D R E N ’ S C A N C E R F O U N D AT I O N 3 5 5 0 B A R R O N WAY, # 9 A , R E N O , N V 8 9 5 1 1 P: (775) 825-0888 | F: (775) 825–4726 E: INFO@NVCHILDRENSCANCER.ORG W: W W W. N V C H I L D R E N S C A N C E R . O R G Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer Foundation (NNCCF) is the region’s only organization dedicated solely to childhood cancer. Our mission is to enhance the quality of life for children with cancer and their families by providing financial assistance and compassionate support programs while advocating for increased research funds and raising public awareness. Programs and Services include: Family Assistance Fund, Inspire survivorship program and scholarships, emotional support, family outings, a holiday Adopt-a-Family program and the St. Baldrick’s head shaving event to raise funds for research. All programs and services are given at no cost to the families. To date, the foundation has helped local families with more than $1.9 million in direct financial assistance and raised $1.2 million for research by hosting a local St. Baldrick’s head shaving event. Twig & Turtle Photography

Make a big difference for a little hero!

WAY S T O H E L P Celebrate this holiday season by giving the gift of hope to families in need. Please consider making a one-time or recurring donation of $5, $10 or any amount to help ensure families receive the financial and emotional support to get them through their difficult journey. Donations can be accepted online at www.nvchildrenscancer.org, by calling 775-825-0888.

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 12, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

23


N O RT H E R N N E VA D A H O P E S 7 7 5 - 7 8 6 - 4 6 7 3 • W W W. N N H O P E S . C O M

WHO WE ARE:

Northern Nevada HOPES is a non-profit community health center based in downtown Reno, NV that offers integrated medical care and support services to individuals with or without health insurance. We welcome patients, wherever they are in life, and provide them with a safe and accepting place to receive services that can improve and enrich their lives.

OUR MISSION:

We are dedicated to building a healthier community by providing coordinated care and support for individual and family wellness. Our community health center combines primary care, medical specialties, behavioral health and prevention with a team of experienced professionals who are committed to high-quality care. Call us at (775) 786-4673 to make an appointment today. Se Habla Español.

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: Affordable, quality healthcare – with or without insurance

24 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013

• Primary Medical Care • Chronic Disease Management • Women’s Health Services • Behavioral Health Counseling

• Substance Use Counseling • Case Management • STD, HIV, Hepatitis C Testing • Pharmacy & Delivery

Donate: Your donations provide life changing medical care and support services to thousands of individuals and and families in our community. Give online at NNHOPES.ORG.


Happy Holidays from the Veterans Guest House!

The Veterans Guest House provides temporary housing to U.S. military veterans and their families who are receiving medical treatment in the Reno/Sparks area. Today, the Guest House has 17 beds in two homes and will provide nearly 5,200 guest nights of lodging in 2013. The use has increased by 30% in the past two years. Plans are underway to determine the future needs and how best to meet them.

WAY S T O S U P P O R T T H E G U E S T H O U S E • Donations – The Guest House relies completely on donations from the private sector. For more information or to donate, visit www.veteransguesthouse.org

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year from Our House to Yours! VE TER ANS GUEST H O USE 880 LO CUST STREE T, REN O 89502 (775)324-6958 • W W W.VE TER ANSGUESTH O USE.O RG

• Volunteer – Throughout the year the Guest House has events, projects and other ongoing volunteer opportunities for those who wish to help our veterans and their families. • Wish List – Food, household cleaning products, paper products and gift cards are always greatly appreciated. Wish List items are listed on our website. • Adopt a Day: For $100 you can adopt-a-day at the Guest House. You can do this in honor or memory of someone. A certificate hangs in the house on the day(s) that are adopted. It is a great gift for someone who “doesn’t need anything”.

Recycle this paper

Join Us for Christmas chrisTmas EvE * TuEsDay, DEcEmbEr 24

3:00pm – Holy Eucharist for Children 5:00pm – Family Holy Eucharist 7:30pm – Musical Offering followed at 8:00pm – Festival Holy Eucharist (no incense) 10:30pm – Musical Offering followed at 11:00pm – Festival Holy Eucharist (with incense)

chrisTmas Day * WEDnEsDay, DEcEmbEr 25 10:30am – Holy Eucharist with Hymns

TriniTy Episcopal church

200 Island Avenue

(along the Truckee River)

Reno NV 89501 (775) 329-4279 www.trinityreno.org

Celebrate the Spirit of Christmas OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 12, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

25


I’ll never forget the very special episode of ______ where ______ had to explain ______ to ______.

5

5

5

5

5

HUN G ER FOR GAMES F i nd game s, o f th e u n e le ctr o n i c bo ar d an d c a rd v a ri e t i es, fo r e ve r y o n e o n y o u r h o li day li st B Y MATTH EW C RA GGS Fibber Players: 2–4 Ages: 7+ Best for: Families. Fibber takes the classic card game Bullshit and gives it a kid-friendly makeover. Players take turns laying cards face down, claiming they’re playing a certain number of a suit while others call bullshit!— make that fibber!—if they believe it’s a bluff. Those caught fibbing or incorrectly labeling another a fibber add a plastic nosepiece to their glasses. The player with the shortest Pinocchio nose at the end of the game wins. It’s a simple concept made fun by replacing traditional suits with characters such as bigfoots, ghosts and dragons, and goofy props. Even adults will find it hard to bluff staring down their six-inch multi-colored nose. Spinmastergames.com, $16 26   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 12, 2013

Cards against Humanity Players: 2+ Ages: Not suitable for anyone. Best for: Horrible people or people with a sense of humor. The basic gameplay is similar to Apples to Apples in which one player reads a question and the other players anonymously submit their best answer card. However, instead of Apples to Apples’ lame politically correct cards, Cards Against Humanity’s answers include phrases such as “masturbation,” “the Three-Fifths Compromise,” or, simply, “AIDS.” Equal parts side-splitting laughter and cringeinducing disgust, it’s the perfect party game to ensure you never look at your friends the same way again. Cards Against Humanity is available through retailers or as a free DIY download under a Creative Commons license. Cardsagainsthumanity.com, $25.

gooey Louie Players: 2+ Ages: 4+ Best for: People who enjoy picking boogers until their brain explodes. Someone, somewhere, thought it was a good idea to bring back this booger-picking game. Not much has changed since the game’s initial release in 1995, but a new generation of snot-nosed brats can now enjoy the anticipation of Perfection mixed with squishy nose goblins. Unlike real mining for nose gold, there’s no skill involved with Gooey Louie, just roll the die, pick the boogers, and maybe a Louie’s brain will explode. Kids love the gross-out factor, and it requires less set up with a bigger payoff than Mouse Trap. Gooeylouiegame.com, $16.

ZombiCide season 2: Prison outbreak Players: 1–6 Ages: 13+ Best for: Bloodthirsty co-op game nights. The latest installment in the tabletop, zombie-slaying miniatures game arrives with a deadly new location, berserker zombies, and Zombivor characters that give players a new life after their seemingly inevitable death. This cooperative massacre is a great starter for people looking to explore more complex board games as it handles its RPG elements—leveling, equipment, and combat—in an approachable but immersive manner. The pressure and tension created by an incoming plastic horde of the undead will warm your blood through the long winter nights. Guillotinegames. com, $80.

tHe Very Hungry CaterPiLLar twirL & toss game Players: 2–4 Ages: 3+ Best for: A rainy day. Some games exercise the brain, some games exercise the body, and some games keep kids occupied. Little tikes toss plush fruit at the electronic whirling caterpillar from Eric Carle’s beloved children’s book, trying to be the first to stick three pieces to the hungry Lepidoptera. While the kids scramble around the room picking up far-flung fruit, they can practice hand-eye coordination and get in a little exercise, which should tucker them out just in time for a bedtime reading of the game’s namesake. Ugames.com, $20.


Think Free

home Games w

hether you’re looking to pick up a new game or find a few new players, check out these local game stores for a wide selection of games, in-store events, and advice on finding the perfect game for the holidays. Games Galore One of Reno’s oldest game stores has something for everyone with an inventory of close to 3,000 games and accessories. In addition to the region’s best selection of jigsaw puzzles, dice games, and chess sets, Games Galore stocks hot games from Europe and RPG, family, party, card, and board games. In-store events (resuming January 1) feature board games (Mondays), Magic (Sundays, Tuesdays, and Fridays), and Heroclix (Wednesdays, Thursdays) in addition to open play spaces throughout the week. Meadowood Mall, 5460 Meadowood Mall Circle, Reno. 826-7788, Gamesgaloredirect.com

Gotcha! Players: 3–8 Ages: 14+ Best for: Silly parties, fans of buzzers. In Gotcha! the rules rule. Players must follow the ever-changing rules while trying to catch others breaking them. The rules often reference or dictate real life; some rules only affect people wearing belts or jeans while others require people to whisper or start every sentence with their last name. Catch someone breaking a rule, hit the buzzer, and advance on the board. Easy to learn, almost impossible to master, Gotcha! is hilarious chaos suited to loud, wild game nights. Buffalogames.com, $25. KinG of toKyo Players: 2–6 Ages: 8+ Best for: Fans of Rampage, Richard Garfield. Players control a monster, robot, or alien in an attempt to destroy Tokyo, each other, or remain as the only creature standing when the dust settles. The straightforward OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

heroes Games & hoBBies Heroes offers an extensive collection of Warhammer, Pathfinder, Magic: The Gathering, and Heroclix, as well as board games, model kits, model trains, and collectible card games. The store hosts weekly Warhammer, Heroclix, and Magic gaming events and they have two, 18-foot tables available all week for pick-up games. 1289 Baring Blvd., Sparks. 331-0102, Heroesgamesandhobbies.com merwin’s Game shoppe Find all of your favorite RPG, collectible card games, supplies, and board games—plus a few you never knew you wanted—at this family-friendly shop. Join in the weekly Heroclix, Magic, or Yu-Gi-Oh! tournaments or browse their personal library of hundreds of games that allow you to try it before you buy it. 4104 Kietzke Lane, Reno. 826-0288, Merwinsgameshoppe.com

gameplay—roll dice to deal damage, heal, or earn points or energy—is great for beginners but opens up the game to endless options and strategies for experts. Designer Richard Garfield (Magic: The Gathering, The Great Dalmuti) continues to prove why he’s still one of the biggest names in the gaming industry. Iellogames.com/ KingOfTokyo, $40. Bejeweled Players: 2–4 Ages: 8+ Best for: Families. Many mobile games have attempted the jump to physical board games, most notably Angry Birds with mixed results, but Hasbro’s Bejeweled stands out as a high-quality game with a simple premise that stays faithful to its digital ancestor. Players slide jewels around the board, swapping and matching gems to earn coins needed to win the game. Kids will enjoy the sparkly gems and adults can appreciate a children’s game with some depth. Hasbro.com, $20.

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

27


WE BUY HOUSES!

ine u n e G

FAST.... CA$H 775-455-4500

Northern Nevada Reno HydRo in-stoRe lowpRiCe guaRantee! Huge seleCtion HelpFul & FRiendly staFF

Anything Grows Hydroponics Since 1999 FULL 1000 WATT SWITCHABLE LIGHT SYSTEM FOR $ 98

190

We have unbelievable light package specials & sales all day, everyday!

775.284.8700 www.RenoHydro.com

25% OFF

RENO

TRUCKEE

190 West Moana Ln 775.828.1460

10607 Bld 3 West River St 530.582.0479 AnythingGrowsHydro.com

East on Neil Rd. exit from 395. 1/2 mi. R on Meadow Wood Ln, 1st R on Riggins Ct.

transfer your memories to disc

COME SEE US IN MIDTOWN!

Video to dVd - $17.99 Up to 2 hours per DVD audio to cd - $17.99 Up to 80 minutes per CD

• Our 35th year in business • CDs, vinyl, DVDs, Tapes, VHS • In or out of print, we’ll order for cost + a few bucks • Buy, sell, trade (Selling? Call 1st!) • Knitting Factory and Alley ticket outlet

2nd Copy fRee With This Ad!

BUY-SELL TRADE

ADVANCED NUTRIENTS

5635 Riggins Ct., #21

24 HR SERVICE

AYS

NEW MIDTOWN STORE NOW OPEN ‘TIL 7PM WEEKD 822 S. Virginia (North of Junkee, South of Süp) 826-4119 • recrecreno.com

Y O U R

Locally Owned (big box stores send out-of-state)

Bill Stephens Productions, Inc. 320 Stewart St, Reno 89502 775.322.6292 • billspro.com

F A S T E S T

F L I G H T

Freedom Free dom

to

Happy Holidays

When you get arrested, you need a fast, dependable, & courteous bail bondsman who will respect your confidentiality. Locally owned & operated since 1952.

From our Family at Palace Jewelry and Loan no interest layaway | our loans are up to 4 months | some restrictions apply

For reliable, 24/7, on-site personal service, call

Mac’s Bail Bonds 775.329.7888 Located directly across from the jail at 910 E. Parr Blvd, Reno Bail Bonds | Security Bonds | Insurance Se habla Español | License #8784 | MacsBailBondsReno.com

Bring in this ad fo

ra

FREE DiamonD BRacELEt with any purcha se

over $1,000

10

10

11

10

11

11

12

12

12

11

12

12

12

’12

’13

11

11

11

12

11

28 

| 

RN&R   | 

december 12, 2013

10

12

10

12

12

13

13

12

13

13

13

12

12

13

12

10

10

11

13

13

Serving the Community Since 1958 Palace Jewelry and Loan | 300 North Virginia Street, Reno 775-322-2863 10

13

12

11

11

13

12

12

12

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

12

13

, Antique, Unique & One of New, Used . of ever ything under a Kind ft the sun! 30,000 sq. • Appliances • Furniture • Store Overstock • Tools • Household Goods • Knives • Hundreds of $1 items

Open Tuesday to Saturday 10–6 • Sunday 11–4

380 S. Rock • Sparks, NV

(corner of Rock & Hymer)


Photo/Ashley hAnnefer

Land, mine

Jessica Maddox, library assistant of specials collections, with the new mining exhibit.

Can You Dig It? Building Nevada Harsh, stark and beautiful, the Nevada landscape has been a challenge for its inhabitants for by thousands of years. While native tribes Ashley Hennefer were able to live off the land in a sustainable lifestyle long before settlers arrived, the unpredictable weather and diverse ecosystem made conventional agriculture and exploration difficult. And to the outsider, the state didn’t offer much for enterprising folk seeking opportunity prior to the Gold Rush. Alfred S. Doten, a Comstock journalist Can you Dig It? known for his Gold Rush ventures in Building nevada will California, called Nevada “a territory be open 9 a.m.-5 good for mining but not worth living in.” p.m., Monday-friday, (In this quote, he’s referring to the Dayton until Jan. 31, 2014. area—sorry, Daytonians.) the exhibit is held in special Collections, Despite this, Nevada was once a hub third floor of the for industry and development, according to Mathewson-IGt William D. Rowley, an expert on Nevada Knowledge Center history. Nevada inhabitants in the 1800s at the University of nevada, reno. saw the land as an opportunity—and once precious metals were discovered, it wasn’t long before the Great Basin flourished. “Nevada began from the ground up— literally,” Rowley said.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

Rowley, also the Griffen Professor of Nevada and Western History at the University of Nevada, Reno, has written extensively on the subject of building and digging Nevada. On Dec. 4, Rowley gave a talk about Nevada’s transformation from boom to bust. The lecture was part of the Special Collections and University Archives Department exhibit, Can You Dig It? Building Nevada. Special Collections, part of UNR’s libraries department, facilitates exhibits on the notable history events and movements of the Great Basin. Can You Dig It? opened on Oct. 23, and features photographs, postcards, blueprints and other original and replicated documents tracking the development of industry from the mid1800s to the early 1900s. While much of this development was focused on mining, transportation also boomed. Any and all transportation options were explored—trolleys, highways, trains, and even station wagons made to hold up to eight people. The exhibit covers progress in this area, showcasing events such as the Lincoln

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

Highway Association, established in 1913, which focused on building extensive highways throughout the West. With mining came machinery, which enabled large-scale infrastructure projects and ways to better harness the landscape. In 1906, the Newlands Reclamation Act—facilitating construction of dams in Western American rivers—was founded. Although many of the documents featured evoke a sense of hope for the future— technology, expansion and innovation promised progress and profit—the boom inevitably busted. Rowley refers to this as “the burden of the Comstock.”

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

“The boom of the Comstock involved a bust,” he said. “It refers to the boom of mining.” This rendered many projects on the brink of success into ghost towns— notably, the town of Sutro in Lyon County. Founded by German-born Adolph Sutro, the town hosted the six-mile long Sutro Tunnel Co. When the tunnel was completed in 1878, the town was abandoned soon after. Other towns followed suit. While Virginia City is now primarily a haven for history buffs and tourists, it was “once the largest city between San Francisco and Chicago,” Rowley said. Rowley acknowledges that some perceived—and still perceive—mining as an “evil enterprise,” he also notes that, despite the crash, it helped project Nevada into the 20th century. “Building and digging in the earth requires engineering and ingenuity,” Rowley said. “There was this notion that ‘We’re going to have to build something or dig something out of the earth.’ You aren’t going to grow it.” Ω

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

29


Can eat attitude Sushi Minato 5085 S. McCarran Blvd., 825-2552 Reno loves sushi. Specifically, Reno loves “All You Can Eat” sushi, which makes sense in a college town known for by buffet-style dining. At least 35 restauTodd South rants in the area are serving AYCE sushi, versus 25 steak houses (a third of which are casino-based). I find this kind of amazing in a land-locked area known for cattle ranching. Photo/AlliSon Young

Gerson Solis Malo  prepares a crystal  shrimp handroll at  Sushi Minota.

For more information, visit www.facebook. com/MinatoSushiReno.

30   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 12, 2013

Every Reno sushi fan will tell you about a favorite spot, but favorites are a fickle business. When a new sushi bar opens, loyalties can shift on a single visit. I’m no better than the rest. I’ve tried at least 20 of the current bunch, and my “favorite place” has changed at least half as many times. Enter Sushi Minato, the latest “hot spot” on Reno’s sushi map. Located in the Smithridge Shopping Center, the entrance has all the charm a strip mall can afford. Upon entering, though, you’re met with a very modern, austere-yettasteful ambiance that is pleasant and welcoming. Seating is cozy, with perhaps 15 seats at the bar and table seating for 20. My wife and I usually sit at the bar, but we chose table seating in order to give the staff a proper test. Herein lays the greatest strength of Sushi Minato: service.

At risk of hyperbole, I’d say that Sushi Minato has the best service of any sushi bar I’ve visited. The servers were very attentive, despite a busy Saturday lunch crowd. AYCE at Sushi Minato is $17.95 for lunch and $22.95 for dinner. The food arrived from the chefs incredibly fast, yet didn’t look rushed. Despite the above-average service, we did find a couple of items missing from our first order. Then again, it was a big order, and they fixed the errors quickly. For appetizers, we ordered gyoza (average), mussels (great flavor and texture), edamame (hot and salted, as they should be), miso soup and tempura cheese sticks. The miso was a standout, served piping hot with plenty of nori, scallion and tofu. I tried the tempura cheese sticks because they seemed out of place, and the best thing I can say is the mustard sauce was tasty. Not bad, but there are better items on the menu. Reviewing a sushi bar could be an exercise in listing all the ingredients. However, let’s focus on the standouts. The rice itself was just as it should be, not overdone. Nigiri is my favorite form of sushi, and all the nigiri tasted fresh and had great texture. Nigiri stars were octopus, seared tuna and cooked scallop. Of the raw long rolls we tried, the Minato and WinWin were tops, though the Chloe and Tania cooked rolls were really tasty. My wife enjoyed the Dani roll (for those who love cilantro). The Leaf roll lacked any distinguishing flavor. The only item that really missed the mark was the Rainbow roll. The layers of fish seemed a bit small in their version of this standard, which was surprising given how generous the chefs were with other items. A crystal shrimp handroll is something I always try at every new spot, perhaps because it was the first hand roll I ever ordered (20 years ago). Sushi Minato’s version is pure simplicity: deep-fried shrimp, avocado, sushi rice, all wrapped in a cone of dried nori with zero distractions (though I usually add a dash of soy sauce). Sushi Minato easily owns the high water mark on this favorite. Finally, I’d be remiss if I failed to mention that the house hot sake was among the best I’ve ever had, definitely from a higher shelf than what you’ll find at most sushi joints. Sushi Minato definitely warrants a repeat visit. Ω


daily lunCh speCials Mon-fri

That’s How We Roll

mon & tue all day happy hour 11am - closing bangkok south lounge wings, beer & football! well drinks, house wines 16oz drafts or 12oz bottles of beer

only $3.00 HAPPY HOUR

Two for one well drinks, house wine, draft beer, hot sake

MON–ALL DAY & TUES-WED-THU 4 TO 7PM 1507 So. Virginia Street, Midtown, Reno • 775.825.5225

Bangkok Cuisine

Bangkok Cuisine south

55 MT. rose sT.,

5851 s. virginia sT.

reno

(By Meadowood

(2 BloCks norTh of pluMB)

322-0299

Mall)

284-3802

Hand-dipped Belgian Chocolates Fudges • Brittles • Toffee • Caramel • Sugar-free

Great selection of elegant gift baskets and gift boxes! Two locations Reno: on South Virginia near Claim Jumper TRuckee: on Commercial Row

827-8270

www.sweetshandmadecandies.com

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 12, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

31


Into the fire Out of the Furnace

CHRISTMAS

AT S U M M I T C H R I S T I A N C H U R C H

MERRY CHRISTMAS We warmly invite you to join us for one of Summit ’s 13 Christmas ser vices. This beautiful one - hour candlelight ser vice will encourage you and inspire hope.

Christian Bale is at his simmering best in Out of the Furnace, a dark, often scary, and desolate look at two brothers who get dealt numerous bad hands. Directed by Scott Cooper (Crazy Heart), this is not a film designed to send you home smiling this holiday season. Russell Baze (Bale) is a good-spirited, quiet man working at the town mill, and by looking out for his military vet brother, Bob Grimm Rodney (Casey Affleck). Rodney is having trouble adjusting after multiple tours in Iraq b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m that have left him physically and emotionally scarred. This makes Russell ultra-patient when it comes to his bro, paying off his gambling debts behind his back to a local bookie (Willem Dafoe, who somehow makes this sleazy character seem like a nice guy).

4

M a ke yo u r h o l i d a y c e l e b ra t i o n c o m p l ete by re m e m b e r i n g t h e re a s o n fo r t h e s e a s o n — J e su s!

CA N D L EL I GH T S ER V I CES D E C 21 5:00 PM D E C 2 2 8:15. 9:00. 9:45. 10:30. 11:15AM 6:00 PM S PA N I S H D E C 2 3 5:00. 6:30 PM

“Sigh ... I still can’t believe they replaced me with Affleck ...”

D E C 2 4 2:00. 3:30 5:00. 6:30 PM

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 7075 P Y R A M I D H W Y

32 | RN&R |

.

S PA R K S

DECEMBER 12, 2013

.

424 . 5 6 83

.

excellent

SU M M I T N V. O R G

Russell, after a brutal and costly mistake, goes to jail while his brother does another tour. When Russell is set free, he has lost his girlfriend (Zoe Saldana), and his brother is in bad shape. Rodney’s debts have gotten too big, and he starts bare-knuckle boxing. He eventually finds himself in a situation where he should be taking a dive for a nasty criminal (Woody Harrelson, playing one of the year’s most memorable and lecherous movie villains). Rodney disappears, and Russell takes matters into his own hands when a local authority (Forest Whitaker) appears to drag his feet. It’s here that the movie starts to really heat up, thanks to an added element involving the Whitaker character that I won’t give away.

In some ways, Out of the Furnace is a typical revenge thriller, with semi-predictable plot points. What makes the movie worth your time is that it commits to a dark, despairing mode that all of the performers revel in. It’s a downbeat movie for sure, and Bale and company give it a steady, dark pulse. Affleck has had a good year with his work here and the little-seen Ain’t Them Bodies Saints. His Rodney is the sort of tragic figure that feels all too real. You pull for him, but there’s a sinking feeling he can’t be helped. He has a brief face-to-face showdown with Harrelson that counts as one of his career highlights. He’s so powerful in this moment that the screen just melts. Harrelson is just pure, unadulterated evil every single second he spends on screen. His Harlan DeGroat is established in the very first scene as an entity not to be messed with, and he’s terrifying. Harrelson is such a good performer that he never falls into caricature. You ultimately get a sense of a moral code that may’ve once existed in DeGroat, a core decimated by meth, hatred and violence. This is one of the more sublime and understated Bale performances of recent years. I was reminded of his subtle, brilliant work in Terrence Malick’s The New World. With each emotional blow Russell endures, Bale gives him the true sense of a good man convinced things can all work out in the end. He has an optimism that’s heartbreaking to behold. Cooper prominently uses Pearl Jam’s “Release” at the beginning and ending of the film. It’s a very powerful song choice that somehow sets a mood that’s both triumphant and somber, a lot like the movie. He further adds to the mood by casting Sam Shepard in a small but crucial part. Shepard just being there adds gravitas. Out of the Furnace doesn’t try to make any grand statements in its two hours. It tells a sad story of two brothers who love each other, the hardships they face, the bad hits they take, and their somewhat regrettable coping choices. It’s no party, but it is a showcase for three actors just nailing it. Ω


4

The Armstrong Lie

I’ll say this about Lance Armstrong: I couldn’t give two damns about him when he was racing his little bicycle in the Tour de France all those years. Whenever I caught clips of his arrogant ass talking about the sport and defiantly bragging about the legitimacy of his victories, I thought he was a jackass. Now that he’s being caught in all sorts of vicious lies, well, I find him oddly compelling. In 2009, filmmaker Alex Gibney set out to chronicle Armstrong’s intended triumphant return to cycling, and his attempt to win his eighth Tour de France title. Allegations about performance enhancing drugs were starting to really haunt one of the world’s most famous athletes. He wanted to come back and prove that he could win the race with a clean bloodstream. Gibney’s documentary has taken on an entirely new look in the wake of the Armstrong confessional interview with Oprah. It is now a chronicle of Armstrong’s many vindictive, damaging lies throughout his career. It is, perhaps, the most aptly titled movie of the year. The Armstrong Lie is the sorriest of closing chapters to an athletic career you are likely to see.

3

Bad Grandpa

Johnny Knoxville has tried to parlay his Jackass fame into an acting career, and he hasn’t exactly been setting the world on fire. So, because huge paychecks are tempting, he has returned to the Jackass well numerous times with three official movies, and his body has paid a tremendous toll. The man has thrown himself into the path of buffalos and bulls to score good laughs and, oh man, has he gotten those good laughs. As big as those checks can be, internal bleeding and broken limbs lose their luster after a while. So now we get this, a sort of Jackass movie that has a narrative mixed into hidden camera stunts. It’s very much in the tradition of Borat. Knoxville gets to play one part for the film, that of Irving Zisman, an over-80 letch of an old man that has shown up in past Jackass skits. He’s taking his grandson (Jackson Nicoll) across country, leading to some funny stunts that manage to shock a few. The highlight would be Nicoll dressed in drag and dancing to “Cherry Pie” at a beauty pageant, a moment when he basically steals the movie from Knoxville. Not as outrageous as the other Jackass films, but a nice way to keep the franchise going without destroying Knoxville’s body.

4

Dallas Buyers Club

2

Delivery Man

Vince Vaughn battles to make this American remake of Starbuck (both directed by Ken Scott) something worthwhile, and he almost wins. He plays David, a meat deliveryman who finds out he’s fathered over 500 children due to sperm clinic donations, and some of those kids want to meet him. David finds out who some of the kids are, spies on them, and tries to serve them as some sort of guardian angel. The film, while containing some genuinely warm moments, lost me in the final stretch where it gets overwhelmed by its dopey plot. Vaughn gives a good performance, as do some of the supporting cast (good to see SNL’s Bobby Moynihan getting some lines), but the pieces don’t add up. The outrageous premise screams for something a little less conventional than what Scott serves up. It’s one of those movies where you can predict all of the choices the protagonist is going to make, which results in boredom.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

I have to admit I was more into the strange Mickey Mouse short that precedes this musical adaptation of Hans Christian Anderson’s “The Snow Queen” than the actual feature. It features retro Mickey busting out of a black and white film and becoming 3-D as he battles a bad guy kidnapping Minnie. It’s worth the price of admission. As for the actual feature movie, Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel have wonderful voices, and the visuals are fun to behold in this middle-of-the-road Disney fare. It has a lot of music—some of it quite good, some of it, well, not—and a beautiful look to it. For recent Disney animation, my vote goes to Tangled for best, but that’s not to say this one is a letdown. It’s OK. Just OK. It’s about on par with Pixar’s latest, Monster’s University. It’s fun to watch, but not altogether memorable.

2

CHUBBY CHECKER Saturday, December 21

Homefront

Jason Statham and James Franco star in this piece of silliness from the pen of Sylvester Stallone. While I’m not giving it a good review, I can tell you that fans of Statham and Franco probably won’t be too disappointed with this in that both do pretty good jobs of presenting rather stupid material. Statham stars as Broker, a former DEA agent looking for a new life with his young daughter in a place that he so very obviously should’ve stayed away from. Franco stars as Gator, a small-time meth dealer looking to go bigger. When Broker’s daughter punches Gator’s nephew out on the school playground, Gator decides to get involved, and things go haywire. Statham is better than usual here, and Franco is actually kind of great as the bad guy. But Stallone’s screenplay is so routine you can guess the plot points 10 minutes before they happen. Still, it does have Kate Bosworth and Winona Ryder as meth heads, so you could do worse at the movie theaters.

4

STARSHIP FEATURING MICKEY THOMAS Saturday, January 11

BOOKER T. JONES Saturday, January 18

KELLIE PICKLER Saturday, February 15 On Sale This Friday!

Thor: The Dark World

This latest installment is a step back from Kenneth Branagh’s goofy and grand first franchise installment, Thor. While not likely to piss off superhero film fans, this sequel from director Alan Taylor is not going to blow many minds away, either. It’s a semi-efficient placeholder flick moving us towards the next Avengers movie, due in 2015. Chris Hemsworth returns as that incredibly handsome man with long hair, a big hammer and impossibly silly dialogue. The film takes place after The Avengers, with a dark ancient force threatening the universe, and only Thor and his imprisoned brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston, stealing the movie) can save us. The movie is OK, but somewhat of a comedown considering how fun the first Thor and The Avengers were. It’s merely a placeholder until Thor’s next appearance in an Avengers movie, with some decent action and special effects to tide us over until the next Marvel fix.

|

Saturday, December 28

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

After a sloppy start, The Hunger Games franchise kicks into high gear with this solid, darker chapter. Jennifer Lawrence, looking a little more haggard and embittered, makes for a far more convincing war-torn survivor this time out. Her performance is great, as are the contributions of a bunch of new cast members including Jena Malone, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Sam Claflin. The new look and feel of the series can mostly be attributed to new director Francis Lawrence and his cinematographer Jo Willems, who get rid of that dopey, baroque look of the first movie in favor of something darker. The plot involves Katniss and fellow survivor Peeta (Josh Hutcherson) being forced into another Hunger Games where former victors must compete against each other. This installment has a lot more meat on the bone, and the action is easier to follow thanks to a much less frantic editing style. Francis Lawrence will direct the final two Hunger Games movies, and that’s good news for fans.

3

TAINTED LOVE

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

January 17 & 18 Call now for tickets: 356–3300 www.sheepdipshow.org

Matthew McConaughey continues his career resurgence in this film based on the life of Ron Woodroof, a man who tested HIV positive in the ’80s, and had to battle the FDA while smuggling non-approved drugs into the country for himself and fellow sufferers. McConaughey lost many pounds to look the part, and it’s a frightening transformation. He also delivers an incredible performance. This, combined with his work earlier this year in Mud, easily establishes 2013 as the best year of his career. Jared Leto does incredible work as Rayon, a cross-dresser who helps Woodroof distribute the drugs to those needing some sort of treatment. Director Jean-Marc Vallee does a good job of capturing a time where HIV was a death sentence, and the terror that surrounded those who were fighting for their lives. This is a very good movie with great performances.

3

Frozen

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

UPCOMING SHOWS

January 25 - Pablo Cruise February 1 - Toad The Wet Sprocket

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR SOUTHSHOREROOM.COM. #TahoeConcerts See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

V1_106669.1_4.93x11.5_4c_Ad.indd 1

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

33

12/6/13 2:52 PM


This message brought to you by the Washoe County Health District with grant funding from the CDC through the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health.

34 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013


Kick out the jams JamPro Music Factory Chris Sewell, the president and founder of JamPro Music Factory, grew up in New England and worked on Wall by Brad Bynum Street for most of his career. He moved to Northern Nevada in 2004 bradb@ and retired three years ago before newsre view.c om deciding to launch JamPro. He was inspired by his three kids, now between 12-15, who are all very enthusiastic about music. He joined the board of a nonprofit organization based in Incline Village that raises funds for school music programs, and organized a series of youth concerts with professional stage lighting and sound systems. The concerts, he says, had a very positive reception. And he was impressed by how hard the kids, including his own, worked. Photo/Brad Bynum

“If there’s something cool that they’re working toward, they practice, and they get good,” says Sewell. “So I designed this whole concept around that—creating programs and an environment that was so engaging and so inspiring that kids are practicing. They’re not being told to. They want to practice because they’re working toward something.” There are three primary components of JamPro Music Factory: retail, education and recording. The 10,000-square-foot facility has 11 sound-proofed private lesson studios, two commercial recording studios, and a mock concert hall performance room with seating for 200. The music education begins with what Sewell describes as “mommyand-me, early education type programs” for kids as young as three months. Then there’s individual and group lessons for children and adults. Each of the private instruction rooms has a glass slider door, so there’s a

Founder and president Chris Sewell and chief engineer Jeff Cloyes in one of JamPro’s recording studios.

JamPro music Factory, 9300 Prototype drive, will host an open house, with refreshments and live music by the instructors on dec. 14, from 3 to 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.jampromusicfactory.com.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ton of visibility, as well as audio and video security for each room. “And all of my employees are background checked,” says Sewell. “We’re super family friendly.” JamPro employs about 20 instructors and has the capacity to serve about 400 students. The facility offers lessons in voice, guitar, bass, drums, piano, woodwinds, brass, strings and percussion. There are loaner guitars for beginning students, including three-quarter sized guitars. Sewell says that it’s hard to teach with instruments that don’t stay in tune. It’s frustrating for both students and the teachers if much of the instruction time is squandered tuning guitars—thus, the loaners. They run their lessons by the semester and follow the Washoe County School District calendar. Their first semester began on Aug. 20 and ends Dec. 21. The next semester starts Jan. 13 and runs til June 7. Registration is available at www. jampromusicfactory.com. During the weeks that the school district takes off from school, the JamPro hosts music camps, including rock camp, jazz camp and choir camp. Each camp is limited to 10 students. During each camp, the students learn and record three songs and present them onsite at a Friday night concert for family members. “It’s a concert setting,” says Sewell. “A recital doesn’t begin to describe what we do here.” Students in the regular semesterlong classes, receive mid-semester evaluation recording sessions—a recording experience and an opportunity to see how they’re doing. They then participate in another, more professional recording session at the end of the semester. The store sells music equipment like Legator guitars, Marshall amps, and Earthquaker effects pedals. The recordings studios are spacious, state-of-the-art rooms. Jeff Cloyes, the chief engineer, is a Reno native who has worked in studios in Nashville, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Miami. “Everyone’s an asset here because we all have multiple talents that contribute to everything that goes on,” says Benjamin Rilea, the facility’s retail manager who also assists in studio productions and education. “This is a fantastic spot,” says Cloyes. “I think we’re going to do great stuff here.” Ω ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

35


LOWEST PRICES • INCREDIBLE SELECTION • GREAT SERVICE Prices good thru 1/5/2014.

Get in the Spirits! Over 3,000 Spirits at Unbelievably Low Prices

$16.49 1.75L

Captain Morgan’s Spiced Rum,

$17.49 1.75L

Crown Royal,

Tanqueray Gin,

Kahlua,

$33.49

$27.99

$11.99

1.75L

RENO

www.totalwine.com

36 

| 

RN&R   | 

TotalWineAndMore

December 12, 2013

TotalWine

From 395, take exit 62 (Neil Road). Head East on Neil Road, take right at S. Virginia Street. The Commons Shopping Center will be on your immediate right. HOURS: Mon-Sun 8am-11pm

VISIT US ONLINE FOR OUR HOLIDAY HOURS.

EXIT 62

750ml

MEADOWOOD MALL

St. ginia S. Vir

Prices good thru 1/5/2014. Not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Same Price Cash or Credit. Products while supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. © 2013 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.

395 Jr. ing er K hway uth tin L l Hig Mar emoria M

THE COMMONS 6671 S. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89511 (775) 853-3669

1.75L

Whole Foods

THE COMMONS

Total Wine

ALSO VISIT US IN CALIFORNIA d. Neil R Home Depot Target

Enjoy the Total Wine & More Experience in 15 States. Find them att www.totalwine.com

SACRAMENTO ROSEVILLE FOLSOM Prices May Vary

REN-13-1209Lifestyle-TAB

Smirnoff,


THURSDAY 12/12

FRIDAY 12/13

SATURDAY 12/14

1UP

SUNDAY 12/15

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/16-12/18 College Night Wednesdays, 8pm, W, no cover

Select Saturdays, 8pm, no cover

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

THE ALLEY

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Our Devices, The Jet Stole Home, Drag Me Under, Thursday Knights Out, 8pm, $5

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

Winds of Plague, Impending Doom, No Bragging Rights, City in the Sea, 6pm, $15

Weapon Status Red, Shadow Beat Ritual, Up Against It, 8:30pm, $5-$7

Loud as Folk, 7:30pm, Tu, $5 donation Music Trivia w/Chris Payne, 9pm, W, no cover

BAR-M-BAR 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

Mark Diorio, 11:30am, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

Ciana, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Jam, 9:30pm, M, karaoke, 9:30pm, Tu, open mic, 9:30pm, W, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HANGAR BAR

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL HIMMEL HAUS

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Shayla Rivera, Nick Cobb, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Will Durst, Ahmed Bharoocha, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Utility Players, Th, 7:30pm, $12, $16; Tru Grinders Comedy Tour starring Sean Peabody, F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Recycle this paper

GREEN

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

JAVA JUNGLE

|

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: ANT featuring Jackie Jones, Th, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Rick D’Elia, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Canyon Jam, 8pm, no cover

Wigs & Onesies Dance Party w/Multipleks, Tre Tuna, 9pm, $5

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

Comedy 3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

NEWS

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

|

Dec. 13, 8 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. 789-2000

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover Mark Diorio, 5:30pm, W, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

OPINION

Tedeschi Trucks Band

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

Awarded 2013 Greater Reno-Tahoe's 'Best Place to Work’

WE'RE HIRING! We seek friendly and reliable individuals to help WOW! our customers in the following roles:

• • • •

Satisfaction Associate (Customer Service) Sales and Customer Service Representative Logistics Associate Production Artist (Graphic Design)

Full time career opportunities with a progressive, growing company located in Reno, Nevada Could you be our next Inker?!? Apply online today at customink.com/jobs

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

37


9LVLW,Q)/8HQFH1HYDGDRUJWRðQGDñXVKRWFOLQLFQHDU\RX

38 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013


THURSDAY 12/12

FRIDAY 12/13

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

SATURDAY 12/14

SUNDAY 12/15

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/16-12/18

Micawber, Through these Gates, Ostracized, Extirpate, Contortion, Qarin, 7pm, $7

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Jake Miller, Action Item, Air Dubai, 8pm, $18.50-$60

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover Fort Knox Five, 8pm, $10

Metalachi, Soultorn, 8pm, M, $10-$20

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH PUB

Third Eye Blind

TaZer, 9:30pm, no cover

906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Dec. 13, 8 p.m. Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. 325-7401

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Darcy & January, Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON 924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Mimic, 9pm, no cover

12 Oh 5, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

The Adventures of Good & Proud w/Tovah Goodman, Kelly Proud, 7pm, $5-$10

Karaoke Night, 7pm, Tu, Open Mic Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

Country in Lights w/Lizzie Cates and Friends, 8pm, no cover

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

Everything Hard EDM, 7pm, $5

VASSAR LOUNGE WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Ben Allfree, 7pm, no cover

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILDFLOWER VILLAGE

Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769

Wildflower Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 8:30pm, no cover

g in th y r e v E d n a e ic p Sugar and S y r e k a B ’s e e D t a t e e w S

OUR OUR OU R DEVICES DEVIC DE VICES ES

Thursday, T Thu rsday rsd ay, y December D Decem cember ber 12 2

W/ Th The he Jett Stole Stol Home, Thursday Knightss Out, Drag Me Under

WEAPONS WEA W EAPONS STATUS RED

Saturday, Sat S Sa aturd urday, y December 14

W// U W Up p Ag A Against g gains ainst It, Shadow Beat Ritual,, Stone Daddy St D dd

• Christmas Baked Goods • Cookie Baskets • Gift Baskets • Holiday Cakes & Pies • Yule Logs • Gingerbread Houses

LOUD AS FOLK (Re-Visited)

Tuesday, December 17

Hosted By Spike Mcguire W/ Moses Jones, (Buster Blue) Dave Berry, (Jelly Bread) Lucas Young, Michelle Pappas, Liam Kyle Cahill

WICKED TROOPS

Thursday, December 19

W/ Legitimate Cause & Shifty +Guests

YOUTH BRIGADE / SWINGIN' UTTERS

Friday, December 20

Machine Gun Vendetta, Infecto Skeletons, Pig Farmers

THESE DON’T MIX

MOJO GREEN + DEL MAR

Saturday, December 21 HELLBOUND GLORY

Thursday, December 26 >3HZ[;V3LH]L)VUÄYL:L[ Feather Mechants

NEW YEARS EVE SHOW: THE SADDLE TRAMPS w/ GREG GOLDEN BAND & SPECIAL GUESTS

Think you know your limits? Think again.

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: Weapons Status Red – Dec 14 Youth Brigade + Swingin' Utters – Dec 20 Mojo Green + Del Mar – Dec 21 Saddle Tramps + Greg Golden – Dec 31

Catering Available Full Service Bakery Cafe

If you drink, don’t drive. PerIod.

TheAlleySparks.com

1635 Marvel Way • 775.827.CAKE (2253) www.deesbakery.com • M-F 9-4, Sat 10-3

(775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com |

NEWS

|

GREEN

Dec. 16, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Rock’N J Entertainment Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

OPINION

Metalachi

Toys for Tots Drive w/Contress, Doomtrooper, 9pm, $5 donation or unwrapped gift

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

39


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 12/12

FRIDAY 12/13

SATURDAY 12/14

SUNDAY 12/15

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/16-12/18

2) Doctor Rock-It, 8pm, no cover

2) Doctor Rock-It, 4pm, Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Doctor Rock-It, 4pm, Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 8pm, no cover

2) Kick, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 7pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) The Silent Comedy, 10pm, no cover

1) Dead Winter Carpenters, 9pm, $15

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 10pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Four Play Saturdays, 10pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) Valley Sky Theatre

Dead Winter Carpenters Dec. 14, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

Karaoke

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

HARRAH’S RENO

Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

40

|

RN&R

| DECEMBER 12, 2013

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub 15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

2) Fast Lane, 7pm, no cover 3) Duo Brasileiro, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Karaoke Night, 7pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

SILVER LEGACY

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Ice Fantasy, call for showtimes, Tu, W, $19.95-$24.95 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Left of Centre, 10:30pm, W, no cover

1) Tedeschi Trucks Band, 8pm, $39.50-$49.50

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, Tu, W, no cover

2) Singer-Songwriter Showcase w/Verbal Kint, 6pm, no cover 3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 3) Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

3) DJ Keenan, 10:30pm, $20

3) Rick Gee, DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

1) Beatles vs. Stones w/Abbey Road and Jumping Jack Flash, 8pm, $25-$35 2) Big Bad Boogie Rock, 8pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) Beatles vs. Stones w/Abbey Road and Jumping Jack Flash, 8pm, $25-$35 2) Big Bad Boogie Rock, 8pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) A Very Frank Christmas starring Steve Lippia, 7pm W, $34-$44

2) Fast Lane, 8pm, no cover 3) Duo Brasileiro, 6pm, no cover

1) Shrek The Musical, 2pm, 7pm, $15-$18 2) Fast Lane, 8pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) Duo Brasileiro, 6pm, no cover

2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover

1) Terry Bradshaw: America’s Favorite Dumb Blonde…A Life in Four Quarters, 9pm, $35-$45

1) Tahoe Adventure Film Festival, 7:30pm, $20-$30 3) Boogie Nights, 8pm, no cover w/’70s-’80s attire

2) Leftover Cuties, 8pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 2) Leftover Cuties, 8pm, no cover 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

2) Holiday Sing-Along w/Kyle Rea & Megan Moore, 6pm, no cover

1) Third Eye Blind, 8pm, $52.50-$67.25 2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Step This Way (dubstep, house), 8pm, W, no cover


The Law Offices Of Randolph C. Wright Attorney & Counselor at Law

Personal Injury & Accident Claims Protect Yourself Against Insurance Companies Reduce Insurance Delays & Unfair Treatment

Practice Emphasizing Criminal Defense Arrested? Get Help Now! CALL: 775-786-4188 www.Houston-LawFirm.net

Call 775-786-4111

A sudden motor vehicle accident or death may bring you unexpected medical expenses, property damage, and the financial burden of the loss of an income due to extended time away from a job. Not knowing your legal rights can be just as devastating to you as the injury itself. Randolph C. Wright offers a free consultation to help you understand your legal options and determine your best possible course of action. He handles personal injury and wrongful death cases on a contingent fee basis. You pay only a percentage of the amount awarded to you plus costs. No recovery, no fee! Mr. Wright has over 29 years experience getting results for injured people in Northern Nevada. He is a member of the American Association for Justice and the Nevada Justice Association. He cares about you and invites you to visit him at 241 Ridge Street, Suite 320, in Reno. Call 775-786-4111 to make arrangements for your free consultation. Mr. Wright is available to see you at home or in the hospital if necessary. The editors of this Consumer Business Review, for the 11th year, recommend the law office of Randolph C. Wright. "The state bar of Nevada does not certify any lawyer as a specialist or expert"

Would you represent yourself if you became the defendant in a criminal matter? No, of course not! You'd retain an attorney. But, it's difficult to know whom to call, unless you know someone. We'd like to help! Criminal defense is not something you should consider lightly. You could spend significant periods of incarceration and large fines & assessment fees should you lose your case. Your personal freedom and your financial well-being are at stake when you are accused of a crime. David R. Houston is engaged in the practice of criminal defense. His emphasis is in the areas of DUI, drug and sex offenses, crimes of violence, theft crimes and all other felonies and misdemeanors. He knows the laws and knows how to properly prepare your case. Call 775-786-4188 today for a confidential consultation. Mr. Houston's office is located at 432 Court Street, in Reno, and he is prepared to offer you aggressive & experienced legal representation which may make the difference in retaining your driver's license, avoiding jail and large fines. The editors of this Consumer Business Review feel you owe it to yourself to have David R. Houston on your side and be on the winning team. We're proud to recommend him to our readers for the 19th time!

140'45610'107/'065 Serving All Nevada, Lake Tahoe & Truckee * Serving All Faiths *

775-267-1958 * Call For An Appointment! Creating masterpieces in granite and bronze is the full time job of Cornerstone Monuments at 2768 Clapham Lane, in Minden, one of the regions most highly regarded monument makers. It's a beautiful final tribute when your family selects one of the many fine designs in granite, bronze or marble that this experienced craftsman has to offer. Cornerstone Monuments offers one of Northern Nevada's largest selections, and every stone has the touch of the master on it. Artistic quality and eternal beauty is what you get when you choose your monument from the outstanding collection available at Cornerstone Monuments. Cornerstone Monuments is always available to help you select the monument or marker, which best suits your needs and desires. Their prices are exceptionally reasonable and their work is among the very best. The editors of this Consumer Business Review urge all Northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and Truckee residents to make Cornerstone Monuments your choice when it comes to investing in an eternal tribute!

- V9:9DQV

Call: (775) 355-7033 PreferredAutoReno.com

This childhood program makes "A World of Difference" year after year. Their family atmosphere, personal attention, experienced staff, community involvement and affordability is the partnership you need to ensure your child's success. Individual Educational Plans and custom curriculum generate new ideas that teach children to be creative, confident thinkers and successful in life! The Editorial staff of the "Consumer Business Review" is proud to present the 2014 Early Childhood Educator of the Year Award to A+ Learning Center. Celebrating 40 years of Educational Devotion

CALL: 775-348-1445

What do you look for in a Volkswagon repair shop? Efficiency? Friendliness? Realistic prices? Well, J's VW Vans offers all of this and more! Located at 545 Depaoli Street, off of 4th Street, in Reno, this first-rate VW and Audi repair shop can take care of your vehicle and save you money doing it! From oil changes to minor tune-ups to major engine overhauls to mounting tires and balancing, J's VW Vans, with years of experience plus the right tools for the job are just a couple of the reasons that make doing business with J's VW Vans such a pleasure. The personal touch is not forgotten either and J's VW Vans want every customer to know that their PERSONAL guarantee of satisfaction accompanies every job. J's VW Vans can handle most any repair or general maintenance that your VW or Audi requires. The Consumer Business Review recommends that our many readers do themselves a favor and have J's VW Vans service your VW or Audi!

Quality Service & Repair Done Right the First Time!

775-825-2522 * www.apluslearningcenter.weebly.com

Reno's Finest Mexican Food Daily Lunch Specials & Tasty Margaritas

www.VansReno.com

3UHIHUUHG$XWR&DUH

Award Winning Programs & Staff Recommended By the "Consumer Business Review" For The Last 10 Years!

6,$0,*26

Volkswagon & Audi Repairs Specializing In VW Camper Vans New Tire Machine & Tire Balance Machine New & Used Parts

775-323-4943

Sarasue Spielman: Highest Ranked Child Development Expert In The State of Nevada

"La comida suprema!" That's what you'll always find at Si Amigos! This outstanding Mexican restaurant features all of the traditional south of the border favorites cooked in the authentic manner. Bring the whole family for a truly great dinner. They're at 1553 S. Virginia, in Reno. Hearty combination dinners are available and your appetite is the only thing that will stand in your way! Select from great tasting main dishes. Choose from one of their popular lunch specials. Whatever you decide on, you can be assured that you are getting some of the finest Mexican food anywhere. Si Amigos features the undisputed "best margarita" in the city. Make plans now to stop in at Si Amigos and enjoy a real Mexican dinner. The editors of this Consumer Business Review know that you'll soon become a regular customer at Si Amigos!

Wouldn't it be nice to be able to take your Japanese car to just one place for all of your repair work? In Sparks there is such a place and we're talking about Preferred Auto Care! With shop facilities at 1705 Greg Street, Preferred Auto Care is the area's leading repair shop. Ask any one who's used their services. They'll tell you this is the ONLY stop you need to make on your way to worry-free driving! From a simple oil change to a complex engine repair, Preferred Auto Care has the equipment, parts and skill to repair or replace any part that may malfunction. With years of recommendations behind them, Preferred Auto Care has established the type of reputation you can trust. So, when you need ANYTHING done to your car, see the best...first. The editors of this Consumer Business Review recommend you make an appointment with Tom at Preferred Auto Care. He'll take good care of you at prices you can afford!

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 12, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

41


Christmas RNR 4.9x11.5 12-12.pdf

1

12/9/13

10:11 AM

Holiday Dining Enjoy holiday offerings or items from our amazing regular menus at these locations:

The Steakhouse at Circus Dos Geckos Cantina Americana Café The Courtyard Buffet Please visit www.circusreno.com to see holiday and regular menus and hours.

December 21 & 22

8 a.m. - 10 a.m. $8.99 Adults $4.99 Kids 4-1 10 a.m. - Noon $11.99 Adults $6.99 Kids 4-11

Come and enjoy Brunch with Santa in the Courtyard Buffet! Santa will be handing out treats for the little ones and don’t forget to bring your camera so you can take photos with Santa.

775.329.0711 42 

| 

RN&R   | 

December 12, 2013

CIRCUSRENO.COM

Recycle this paper

Gift certificates make great gifts! Visit www.newsreview.com

Mkt


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

The Nutcracker A.V.A. Ballet Theatre presents its 18th annual production of Tchaikovsky’s popular holiday ballet. The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Laura Jackson, will perform the moving score. Performances are 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Dec. 13-14, and 2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 15, at the Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $25$50 with discounts for seniors and children. Call 762-5165 or 686-6600 or visit www.avaballet.com.

CO O L YULE

Reno Santa Pub Crawl Santa Claus suits will be in short supply this week as an estimated 13,000 holiday revelers gather in downtown Reno for the 13th annual pub crawl and fundraiser. Participants age 21 and older dressed as Santa, an elf, or other holiday characters can get a map and $5 commemorative cup and visit bars and restaurants for drink specials and other perks. Proceeds from the event will go toward local schools. The pub crawl begins at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14. Visit http://renosantacrawl.com.

MF 1422 Toys for Tots Drive Bring an unwrapped gift to this toy drive featuring music by Countress, Doomtrooper, Walk Away Alpha, Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame and Brit Spitz. The show starts at 9 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13. If you don’t have a gift, a $5 donation will get you in the door at Ryan’s Saloon, 924 S. Wells Ave. Call 323-4142 or visit www.facebook.com/ RyansSaloon.

Yulesteam! 1864 Party like it’s 1864 at High Desert Steam’s fourth annual Steampunk-Victorian Christmas party. The festive gathering will feature a raffle, refreshments, drink specials, “tea dueling” and the debut of the video footage of the Steampunk Victorian Ball held in September. Steampunk or Victorian costumes are encouraged but not required. The Christmas party is a gift drive for the annual Christmas on The Corridor, which serves underserved children and seniors living in the weekly motels of the Reno-Sparks Corridor. In return for a donation, you will receive a voucher for raffle tickets to be used for the drawing at the Yulesteam! event. You can drop off donations of toys, winter coats, hats and gloves, gift cards and other items at Melting Pot World Emporium, 1049 S. Virginia St., PolyEsthers Costume Boutique, 655. S. Virginia St., and Prism Magic Clothing and Imports, 2161 Pyramid Way, Sparks. The holiday party starts at 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13, at 1864 Tavern, 290 California Ave. Call (775) 378-0931 or visit highdesertsteam.org.

Tahoe Adventure Film Festival The festival highlights the best adventure sports films of the year and showcases the action sports world’s best talent. The night includes special guest speakers, action photo displays, breakdancers, DJs and a few special surprises. The festival begins at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14, at the MontBleu Resort, 55 Highway 50, Stateline. Tickets are $20-$30. Call (530) 318-1688 or visit www.laketahoefilmfestival.com.

Reno Wind Symphony: A Holiday Celebration The annual holiday concert features seasonal favorites and the recitation of the poem “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas” by local radio personality Ross Mitchell, accompanied by the Reno Wind Symphony. Ross will also be the vocal soloist on “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch.” The show begins at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 15. at the Nightingale Concert Hall inside the Church Fine Arts Building, 1335 N. Virginia St., at the University of Nevada, Reno. General admission is $5 and free for students with ID. Call 784-4278.

—Kelley Lang

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

43


VICTORY OVER YOUR HAIR LOSS No Plugs • Rugs • Drugs

M

icrograft Surgery is the Gold Standard in Hair Restoration for

both MEN & WOMEN. Dr. Wesley W. Hall, a leader in our region in General & Vascular Surgery for over 35 years, has helped countless WOMEN AND MEN with their hair

ay Holidia Spec l

loss. Read his free

FF 20%eO dure Proc

dule Must sche procedure-14 before 3-31

report Candid Answers About Hair Restoration.

FREE CONSULTATION AKROS- THE INTELLIGENT CHOICE IN HAIR RESTORATION

WESLEY W. HALL MD FACS DIPLOMATE AMERICAN BOARD OF SURGERY MEMBER INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY HAIR RESTORATION SURGERY

AKROS HAIR RESTORATION 635 Sierra Rose Dr. Ste A • Reno

775.284.3331 • 866.424.7548 www.welcometoakros.com

[ X I   _M [ \ 

Flesh prince

This year, give the gift of health and relaxation! SPA OF THE WEST

On sale now at the Spa of the West Front Desk 1545 S. Virginia St or call us at 775/322-7777

Valid until December 31st, 2013

2SHQ+RXUV‡69LUJLQLD6W5HQR19‡

     6  9 L U J L Qwww.sportswestreno.com LD6W5HQR19‡

44   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 12, 2013

My boyfriend of two years has always disparaged gentlemen’s clubs. I believed him until I searched Google Maps on his computer for something. Various searches for strip clubs showed up. He claimed he didn’t do these searches and suggested that his brother or someone who borrowed his computer did. We have sex regularly, and he is loving and treats me very well, so I gave him another chance. I understand men’s interest in these clubs. I just don’t feel it’s right for guys in relationships to go because of the possibility of cheating. Disturbingly, I just found some Hooters coupons with his stuff. The fact that he may go to these places doesn’t bother me as much as the fact that he’s lying about it. There’s that line from politics: “It isn’t the crime; it’s the cover-up.� Not only did your boyfriend pre-lie, laying out the above bed of lies like lettuce on a cottage cheese plate, but he followed up with the obvious honker that it had to be somebody else searching for nudie bars on his computer. As for why he lied, consider that there’s a notion that men are pigs—simply for being men. Men evolved to be highly visual and variety-driven in their sexual desire, while women evolved to be more emotion- and commitmentdriven. Male sexuality isn’t wrong; it’s just different. But men are so used to being under attack for what turns them on that many default to denying it. They keep mum to avoid conflict in their relationships. The truth is we all lie, all day long, and often think nothing of it. If you cram your muffin-top into Spanx or put goop on your eyebags, you’re lying about what you

really look like. And frankly, if people could read our thoughts, most of us wouldn’t make it to lunchtime without a co-worker bludgeoning us with a stapler. But because we alone know what we’re thinking, a person can say sweet, relationship-enhancing things to his partner—“You’re the only woman for me!�—while entertaining less palatable fantasies: “If only I could have you, the Swedish women’s bobsled team, and that girl from The Weather Channel in a swimming pool of butterscotch pudding!� Still, fantasizing and cheating are two different things. Some guys go to strip clubs looking to get some on the side, but a guy can do that at the office or the corner bar without breaking out a wad of Benjamins. And Hooters? Naughty in concept, but in reality, a place to eat heavily battered chicken strips while having platonic conversations with a married waitress in gym clothes. Relationships are built on trust, but they’re also built on white lies and having the wisdom to look the other way at stuff that doesn’t mean much in the grand scheme of things. You and your boyfriend have heat in the bedroom, and he treats you well. Sounds like he’s happy. That’s probably the single best motivator for a guy to make visiting strip clubs nothing more than an occasional form of sightseeing. Ί

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

Train for an Exciting Career in Beauty! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute of Cosmetology Reno Campus Call Now 1-877-205-4113 EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2013. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institue of Maintenance 888-242-3214 Help Wanted! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.process-brochures.com (AAN CAN)

DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following postion in Reno/Sparks: Satellite Installation Technician If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/careers. EOE. Paid In Advance! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station.com (AAN CAN)

Attn Musicians move in specials on rehersal studios. Gate hrs 24hrs 7 days a week, Call Bergin Way Self Storage 775-322-8024 Reno Guitar Repair Electric & Acoustic Guitar Service. Setups, tremolo adjustments, wiring & repair. 775-225-829

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Recycle this paper

FIND YOUR SOULMATE Call 702-623-0059 or 800-738-3156 Try FREE! Feel The Sensation & Relaxation Of Massage Swedish, Deep Tissue Call David 762-7796 Office $50 Outcall $75 Lic #NVMT1086 Men’s Lifestyle Medications FDA Approved USA Pharmacies. Remote Tele-­ Medicine Physician. Safe. Secure. Discreet. Calls Taken 7 days per week. Call ViaMedic: 888-786-0945 Trusted Since 1998 (AAN CAN)

Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

Keep it Real

Think Free

Train for a New Career in Healthcare, Massage or Business! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute Sparks Campus 1-866-467-0094

DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following postion in Reno/Sparks: Satellite Installation Technician If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/careers. EOE.

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

90 Chevy Suburban 350 V8 1500 Automatic NEW Transmission. Has only had 2 owners. Now has 190,672 Miles. New engine @ 153,530 New Transmission @ 181,444. $4,000 775-343-8967

hot talk, local singles

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

FREE TRIAL

702.623.0059

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical & continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. 24/7 877-362-2401 (AAN CAN)

More local numbers: 1.800.738.3156 / 18+

WARNING HOT GUYS!

Dating Easy made

Reno

775.323.7575

Reno

Carson City

Carson City

775.888.9100

775.888.9995 FREE to listen & reply to ads!

FREE

To Listen and Reply to Ads!

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers call

775.334.6666

MegaMates.com

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 3128

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers:

1-888MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2575

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   december 12, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

45


by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Franklin D.

Roosevelt was elected president of the United States four times, more often than any other president. We can conclude that he was one of the most popular American leaders ever. And yet he never won a majority of the votes cast by the citizens of his home county in New York. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life. You may be more successful working on the big picture than you are in your immediate situation. It could be easier for you to maneuver when you’re not dealing with familiar, up-close matters. What’s outside your circle might be more attracted to your influence than what’s nearer to home.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 2009, ac-

tress Sandra Bullock starred in three films, two of which earned her major recognition. For her performance in All About Steve, she was given a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress. Her work in The Blind Side, on the other hand, won her an Oscar for Actress in a Leading Role. I’m thinking that you may experience a similar paradox in the coming days, Taurus. Some of your efforts might be denigrated, while others are praised. It may even be the case that you’re criticized and applauded for the same damn thing. How to respond? Learn from Bullock’s example. She gave gracious acceptance speeches at the award ceremonies for both the Golden Raspberry and the Oscar.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Almost

2,000 years ago, a Roman doctor named Scribonius Largus developed recipes for three different kinds of toothpaste. One contained the ashes of burned-up deer antler, aromatic resin from an evergreen shrub known as mastic and a rare mineral called sal ammoniac. His second toothpaste was a mix of barley flour, vinegar, honey and rock salt. Then, there was the third: sun-dried radish blended with finely ground glass. Let’s get a bit rowdy here and propose that these three toothpastes have metaphorical resemblances to the life choices in front of you right now. I’m going to suggest you go with the second option. At the very least, avoid the third.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Are you

the reno news & review is

hiring a distribution manager Your favorite newspaper – the Reno News & Review – is growing its circulation to meet the demands of increased readership in the market and we’re looking for someone to manage our distribution department.

The Distribution Manager directs and coordinates activities of the distribution department to ensure on-time delivery of our newspaper to various locations throughout the greater Reno/Sparks and Carson City/Lake Tahoe region.

Working in partnership with the Distribution Director, General Manager and other members of the management team, the Distribution Manager will establish and achieve distribution goals associated with the weekly publication of the Reno News & Review and special supplements. Supervise our outstanding team of drivers.

The ideal candidaTe will possess: • Strong operational and communication skills

• Strong supervisory and customer service

• Ability to analyze and resolve problems at both a strategic and functional level

• Ability to lift up to 50 pounds

• Ability to to professionally represent the RN&R to clients and the general public

• Valid Nevada driver’s license, vehicle, insurance and clean DMV record

For consideration and a complete job description, please send your resume by e-mail to jobs@newsreview.com. Please put “RN&R DISTRIBUTION MANAGER” in the subject line. Chico Community Publishing, dba the Reno News & Review, is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

46   |  RN&R   | 

DECEMBER 12, 2013

feeling a bit pinched, parched and prickly? Given the limitations you’ve had to wrestle with lately, I wouldn’t be surprised if you were. Even though you have passed some of the sneaky tests and solved some of the itchy riddles you’ve been compelled to deal with, they have no doubt contributed to the pinched, parched prickliness. Now what can be done to help you recover your verve? I’m thinking that all you will have to do is respond smartly to the succulent temptations that life will bring your way in the coming weeks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you ever situ-

ated yourself between two big bonfires on a beach and basked in the primal power? Was there a special moment in your past when you found yourself sitting between two charismatic people you loved and admired, soaking up the life-giving radiance they exuded? Did you ever read a book that filled you with exaltation as you listened to music that thrilled your soul? These are the kinds of experiences I hope you seek out in the coming week. I’d love to see you get nourished stereophonically by rich sources of excitement.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mythically

speaking, this would be a propitious time for you to make an offering to the sea goddess. In dreams or meditations or fantasies, I suggest you dive down into the depths, find the supreme feminine power in her natural habitat, and give her a special gift. Show her how smart you are in the way you express love, or tell her exactly how you will honor her wisdom in the future. If she is receptive, you may even ask her for a favor. Maybe she’ll be willing to assist you in accessing the deep feelings that haven’t been fully available to you. Or perhaps she will teach you how to make conscious the secrets you have been keeping from yourself.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t linger in a

doorway, Libra. Don’t camp out in a threshold or get stuck in the middle of anything. I understand your caution, considering the fact that life is presenting you with such paradoxical clues. But if you remain ambivalent too much longer, you may obstruct the influx of more definitive information. The best way to generate the clarity and attract the help you need will be to make a decisive move—either in or out, either forward or backward, either up or down.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “It’s a rare

person who wants to hear what he doesn’t want to hear,” said TV talk-show host Dick Cavett. I will love it if you make yourself one of those rare types in the coming week, Scorpio. Can you bring yourself to be receptive to truths that might be disruptive? Are you willing to send out an invitation to the world, asking to be shown revelations that contradict your fixed theories and foregone conclusions? If you do this hard work, I promise that you will be granted a brainstorm and a breakthrough. You might also be given a new reason to brag.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

There are pregnant truths I could reveal to you right now that I’ve decided not to disclose. I don’t think you’re prepared to hear them yet. If I told you what they are, you wouldn’t be receptive or able to register their full meaning; you might even misinterpret them. It is possible, however, that you could evolve rather quickly in the next two weeks. So let’s see if I can nudge you in the direction of getting the experiences necessary to become ready. Meditate on what parts of you are immature or underdeveloped—aspects that may one day be skilled and gracious but are not yet. I bet that once you identify what needs ripening, you will expedite the ripening. And then you will become ready to welcome the pregnant truths.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Finifugal” is a rarely used English adjective that I need to invoke in order to provide you with the proper horoscope. It refers to someone who avoids or dislikes endings—like a child who doesn’t want a bedtime story to conclude, or an adult who’s in denial about how it’s finally time to wrap up long-unfinished business. You can’t afford to be finifugal in the coming days, Capricorn. This is the tail end of your cycle. It won’t be healthy for you to shun climaxes and denouements. Neither will it be wise to merely tolerate them. Somehow, you’ve got to find a way to love and embrace them. (P.S. That’s the best strategy for ensuring the slow-motion eruption of vibrant beginnings after your birthday.)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): According

to 20th-century British author John Cowper Powys, “A bookshop is a dynamite-shed, a drugstore of poisons, a bar of intoxicants, a den of opiates, an island of sirens.” He didn’t mean that literally, of course. He was referring to the fact that the words contained in books can inflame and enthrall the imagination. I think you will be wise to seek out that level of arousal in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Your thoughts need to be aired out and rearranged. Your feelings are crying out for strenuous exercise, including some pure, primal catharses. Do whatever it takes to make sure that happens.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I am not

fearless,” said Mexican journalist and women’s rights advocate Lydia Cacho, “but I’m not overtaken by fear. Fear is quite an interesting animal. It’s like a pet. If you mistreat it, it will bite, but if you understand it and accept it in your house, it might protect you.” This is an excellent time to work on transforming your fright reflexes, Pisces. You have just the right kind of power over them: strong and crafty and dynamic, but not grandiose or cocky or delusional. You’re ready to make your fears serve you, not drain you.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Educator Howard Rosenberg is a university professor who ran for and won a seat on the Board of Regents, which governs the Nevada system of higher education—an idea so novel at the time that there were unsuccessful efforts to keep him from taking his seat. He served his term, was reelected, then stayed out of public life for a couple of years. In 2012 he ran for and won a seat on the Washoe County School Board, where he has served since January.

How is serving on the school board different from serving on the Board of Regents? The Board of Regents was responsible, and is responsible, for eight institutions statewide. Washoe County has 96 schools, each one of whom has a full complement of teachers, all of whom work in a slightly different way, the way good teachers do. Governing that kind of a situation so far flung, getting to the places you need to get, to understand what’s going on, is far more involving and time consuming than the Board of Regents was.

How do you feel about the fact that you’re serving in a time when most of your job is coping with a lack of money. That was the same situation on the Board of Regents—lack of money. It’s always the same situation. I am not certain at

this point—and I mean no disrespect to anyone—that our problem is a lack of money. I think maybe it might be priorities. And we need to really reexamine where our money is being spent. What I said after A.B. 46 failed [the county commission last month voted not to authorize funding for school district maintenance and capital improvements], I said, “OK, let’s show people that we can indeed do what we said we’re going to do.” The first year’s yield would have been $20 million. We have $20 million in a fund. Nobody wants to spend it because it’s the safety net. By the same token, we maybe need to spend some of it. And I said, take the $20 million, and let’s do what we were going to do with the first year’s money from A.B. 46. Show people that we have a priority; we know how to spend our money; we can complete things that we say we’re going to complete. Let’s put all of the objections to rest and show people that we are good stewards of the public’s money.

Nelson and Jimi There have been a slew of tributes to Nelson Mandela in the last couple of weeks. Rightly so. The guy was, looking back on it, pretty gigantic, and indeed, an inspiration well beyond the borders of his country. Go ahead, rank the dude with Gandhi and MLK. Absolutely. When you realize that he spent 27 years in some dank, dark, brutal South African prisons—27 years—and then came out and led his country to overthrow the wretchedness of apartheid and become its first president—yeah, rank him up there. Way the hell up there. And the one thing he did that is perhaps most impressive—he lived to be 95 years old. Out of all his accomplishments, just the fact that he lived that long is notable. It’s safe to say that many black “troublemakers” in South Africa were killed, dumped and forgotten during the years of apartheid. The fact that Mandela actually lived through his prison term, walked out, and then got down to business is, when you stop to consider, wildly ginormous. OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

I’d like to talk about education. All I seem to be talking about is contracts and RFPs and RQLs and I don’t know half of that alphabet soup. But it’s the day-to-day governance of the system that seems to be consuming us. I want to talk about curriculum. I want to talk about how we develop good curriculum—not the kind that you go out and buy, because one size doesn’t fit all. That’s what I hope to be able to do. And once we get a balance between superintendent, school board, academics, finances, I think we’ll be able to do that.

Is there anything that has surprised you about the school board? Yes. They’re bright, intelligent people who try. They really, really try.

You mean Mark Twain was wrong? [Twain: “In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.”] I don’t know. Mark and I don’t always get along. But ... these are good people. They have the right feel. They want it to be right. The problem is that we come from such a diverse group of people, from diverse backgrounds and diverse experiences, that it’s difficult. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

I don’t know about the term “visionary.” I mean, on the one hand, sure, you can easily say MLK and Mandela were visionaries, in the sense that they could see what life should be and how life could be better if it was just and fair. But on the other hand, how visionary is it to say to the world, as both these men did, “Hey, would you just treat us like real men? Is that too much to ask? That you just recognize that we’re, you know, people?” Is that visionary? Or simply a plea for reasonable decency? Not that this semantic hair-splitting matters, in the macrocosmic picture of it all. You know who else was a great man, in terms of advancing racial integration? Jimi Hendrix. Don’t laugh. Not on the level of MLK/Mandela, maybe, but also not insignificant. For one thing, his band, The Experience, consisted of him on guitar and two white British dudes on bass and drums. In 1967, this was a big deal. Now, 46 years later, you wouldn’t think twice about an integrated band. But Jimi, and then Sly Stone shortly |

As you’ve served here, are there things that you want to get done before your term is ended?

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

thereafter, blazed this very influential trail, one that is not to be underestimated. In July of ’68, Hendrix was performing in Baton Rouge, and he walked backstage with his white girlfriend. The cops who were supposed to protect Hendrix saw this, were predictably outraged, and they pulled their guns on the very guy they were hired to protect. That’s just the way it was back then. The promoter was furious at this porcine display, but Jimi stayed cool, explaining “Fifty years ago, I couldn’t have even walked into this building. And 50 years from now, no one is going to care about this.” He was spot on with this analysis, perceiving that, in the grand scheme of things, sometimes the best strategy is to just let the old bastards and their shitty, backward, backwoods thinking literally drop dead. In the end, it’s usually a great way—often, the best way—to get things done. Ω FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

DECEMBER 12, 2013

|

RN&R

|

47


R 2013 12 12  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you