Issuu on Google+

FR EE Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.....................25 Nightclubs/Casinos........26 This.Week.................... 30 Advice.Goddess........... 32 Free.Will.Astrology....... 34 15.Minutes.....................35 Bruce.Van.Dyke............35

No school for you see let freedom ring, page 7.

HealtH care for everyone but you and you and you see News, page 8.

farm fresh see Arts&culture, page 16.

somalia

good fun see film, page 22.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE 19, issuE 35

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octobER 17–23, 2013


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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Stranger than truth

Our pleasure

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. This annual Most Censored Stories always kind of hits a nerve with me. In part, because I can remember when it really was about censored stories. Back in the mid’90s before the internet really came on, I’d often not have heard of the stories that made the list. Nowadays, I’ve heard of all these stories on some level. But doesn’t it seem like some futuristic fiction to you? Of course, the truth of Bradley Manning’s disclosures got buried in his gender issues. Of course, Obama’s promises of government transparency were lies. Of course, interest rates and greedy billionaires have increased the gap between the rich and the super rich—you and I are not even in the equation anymore. As I said, there’s not a single story in this selection of “censored” news that I didn’t know something about, but there is so much information out there “in the wild,” it’s difficult to give any important story enough coverage to stand out. Our 95-word fiction contest is coming up. I can see just a whole barrage of stories being inspired by this Orwellian stuff. Just remember to keep the story to exactly 95 words (as counted by LibreOffice or Microsoft Word and excluding title). There’s no cash prize or anything, but you can see your name in print. And if you win, we may even add a photo of you. And because I wrote this for an ad, and it seems relatively helpful, we, the editors, like stories that have a beginning, middle and end, and include setting, conflict, dialogue, character, point of view, and theme written on $100 bills. For those who’ve never seen the contest, last year’s winners can be found at www.newsreview.com/reno/stranger-thantruth/content?oid=8291872. E-mail to renofiction@newsreview.com and put Fiction 2013 in the subject line. All entries must be received by 9 a.m. on Oct. 23. Selected entries will be published on Oct. 31. Include contact information, including name, address and telephone number.

Re “Yeah, we’re awesome” (Editor’s Note, Oct. 3): Congratulations to RN&R for the well-deserved awards, as evidenced by another great article, “Alchemy vs. science” by Dennis Myers, and the very heart-warming article, “Guard your heart” by Brad Bynum. Climate change denialism is just a small part of a much wider war on science funded by some wealthy conservatives and a few corporations who pay others to deceive. Merchants of Doubt should be required reading for all high school seniors. Teach them about the real country they live in and inspire them change it. It’s their future to lose if they don’t. I’m not gay, but love is love is love, and it’s always wonderful to see. It was also wonderful to hear how supportive the military has been to Kim and Deena. Thanks for continuing to print such stories. You produce a real newspaper. Tom Wicker Reno

Bureaucracy paid for Re “All these letters” (Letters to the Editor, Oct. 3): I did not read the recent story “Killing Fields” so I will comment on the letters published later. The majority seemed to have the theme, “the animals are ours, too, so we should have some say.” NDOW is supported I believe primarily by license fees for hunting, fishing, trapping. In 2009/10 years, their site shows total income from hunt, fish, trap, license sales of $1,666,207. And trust me, they have various fees for other things besides license fees. The 1937 P-R Wild life Act took over a pre-existing 11 percent excise tax on firearms and ammunition. Instead of going into the U.S. Treasury as it had done in the past, the money is kept separate and is given to the Secretary of the Interior to distribute to the states, determined by number of hunters.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

A 1970s, amendment created a 10 percent tax on handguns and ammunition and accessories and a 11 percent tax on archery equipment. A 1950 act was passed for fish, the Dingell Johnson act. Much of the money to support hunter safety programs come from this legislation. One source shows hunters spending around $10 billion—that’s with a B—a year on everything they needed for hunting trips. A different source found that hunters spend between $2.8 and $5.2 billion a year on taxable merchandise. Generating between $177 and $324 million dollars a year. Another source estimated that hunters contribute about $3.5 million a day to conservation by purchasing taxable items and hunting licenses. More funds derive from the federal duck stamp program, which costs $16 at present. NV has a state stamp at $10 as well. Funds generated from state and federal stamps are designated for wetlands restoration and preservation. Yes, the animals and the ecosystem belongs to all of us. But some have more chips in the game than others. If anyone wants to actually help wildlife, buy a hunting/fishing license. And then repeat year after year, like hunters and fishermen do. No one will force you to use them. Ron Ryder Fallon

But, Bob? I love the Reno News & Review, but personally, I’ve gotten tired of Bob Grimm’s reviews, to the point where I refuse to read them any more. I now read other newspapers and the “interweb” for competent reviews on films. Others have told me the same thing. Grimm’s reviews, while well written and entertaining, vary too far from quality reviews in national publications such as Rotten Tomatoes, Roger Ebert, The Guardian, NY Times or IMDB to be taken seriously. While he has his viewpoint, I am always left feeling that I’m reading a review by someone who is trying to be entertaining and sarcastic, instead of providing the readers a fair critique

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

of a film. While it is only this reader’s opinion, I suggest RN&R drop Bob Grimm and look for a more helpful reviewer. Where is Howard Rosenberg when we need him? Franklin Miller Reno

Damned Democrats For shame, Democrats! Democratic strategy often exhibits shameful tactics in political gamesmanship. Take the latest desperate Democratic attempt to take a voting factoid into the realm of high reality-show drama. It is statistically relevant that, to date, voters of all ethnic and age demographics often choose to vote in more “exciting,” presidential-focused races. If that works to a Republican advantage, then all the better for those of a more conservative bent. It is called “politics,” and the thrill of advantage to win votes and voters is called “normal,” even laudatory. The latest report on Washoe County college-aged Republicans has this age group literally spilling out the doors to attend rallies, lectures and speeches. And the growing number of minority communities involved in Republican talk shows, events and internet communication is increasing in surprising numbers. These same groups, to Democrats, must be manipulated for their support. Democratic pandering and contempt for their votes puts them in the category of Shameful Overlords. Your vote for a cell phone? Your soul for a concert ticket? But no job? Even the most callous of gimme-gimme voters are beginning to perceive and resent the Democratic con game. We are no longer “Status Quo Republicans.” We will defend, fight for and build upon the aggressive momentum that has been created in the local Republican parties. Staunch Republicans and conservatives are rousing to a new energy and excitement in our movement. We have the answers to set the our state, county and even the nation on a more economically and more stable path. Ray Rocha Sparks

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Michael Schneider, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Joseph White, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

Keep the cats inside Re “When the music’s over” (Editor’s Note, Sept. 9): I have mostly concurred with your Editor’s Notes, but I strongly disagree with your cat story. Do you know how many birds are killed every year by domesticated cats? It runs in the millions. I have cats myself, and they are never allowed outside, and they seem very happy and content, lying in the sunny window sill. And think of the terror of these pets of yours when the coyotes caught up with them. I’m sure it was not an easy death and probably a painful one. Next time you get a cat, please keep him indoors. He will be happy, and what he does not know, he does not miss. Berit Nellemann Washoe Valley

The sporting news Re “Nevada’s Killing Fields” (Essay, Sept. 19): I hunted with my dad as a youth, but after experiencing war firsthand in Vietnam, I never picked up a rifle again. No, I’m not vegetarian, but there’s a big difference between eating animals that are bred for food and killing beautiful animals for “sport.” I have a suggestion for those of you who get a thrill from killing: Why don’t you and your friends buy some AR-15 rifles then go up in the Sierra and hunt each other. Not only is that a fair fight, it should provide the thrills you favor, and animals don’t have to die in the process. Michael Bradley Reno

Correction Re “Best sour grapes,” Letters to the Editor, (Aug. 22): On Aug. 22, we published a letter that said in part, “Opa’s is mostly microwaved food.” This is incorrect. We regret any inconvenience or misunderstandings this statement may have caused.

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover & Feature story design: Hayley Doshay

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 17, 2013

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RN&R

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What bugs you about the press? Asked at the Reno arch Tim Spencer Firefighter

Nothing bugs me about the press. I get along great with the press. I work for the fire department, and I deal with the media quite often, They’re all pretty nice.

Kevin Johnson Job seeker

Ambush interviews. I really don’t like the whole idea of somebody who pretends to be an ordinary person, just walks up and starts asking odd questions, like the Howard Stern show.

Shawn Lee Chef

Family ties Members of the editorial staff here were a little sad to hear that John Ascuaga’s Nugget sold to a private investment firm. “Sad” seems like kind of a weird reaction. We’ve got nothing against Husky Finance or Global Gaming & Hospitality. We never heard of them until now. But we do know that owners from outside the region will make different decisions than the Ascuagas did. Think about it. If there is a casino in this region that is going to host actual family events, as opposed to events that are just postured as “family,” it’s going to be the Sparks Nugget. And the Ascuagas are just so freaking nice. (And somehow, they’d remember your name.) If you ran into Stephen Ascuaga in Costco or Michonne at Scolari’s grocery, they always stopped to chat. They are members of this community. We all remember when Stephen got in a little trouble. We were concerned, and happy when he got his act together. We remember when Michonne took the casino’s reins, and everyone thought it was a titular assignment, until she actually started doing things. Yes, she made some tough decisions, downsizing staff and decreasing benefits, but she steered that ship right through some rough waters that drowned a half-dozen casinos. And it was her influence, in part, that actually made Victorian Avenue a place attractive to other businesses, even in the recession, even businesses that didn’t know their own name. We’re all familiar with John Ascuaga’s reputation for penny pinching, but when you look at how that casino expanded over the last 30 years, that parsimony fueled the engine that drove that thing. OPINION

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NEWS

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ARTS&CULTURE

They’re filters. The government filters everything from the press. It means you only get the part of news they want you to have and not the real news, what’s really going on.

You only know those things about members of your family, so in a way, it seems like they’re members of our families. The Ascuagas are members of our community, and that’s why we’re feeling a little sad at this end of an era. We like to see members of our community succeed, it’s as simple as that. And we feel as though our feeling of appreciation to that family was returned to our families. Where are you going to take your family on the Fourth of July to see the fireworks? John Ascuaga’s Nugget. The Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-off is one of the biggest family events in all of Northern Nevada. Think about all the local artists who had CD release parties at the Nugget. There was a reason those happened there instead of other places. Think of all those photos of recipients of Nugget scholarships. Anyway, we’d like to congratulate the Ascuagas on getting out while the getting was good, and we hope they’re going to stay around and take active roles in making Northern Nevada a better place for their families and ours. As for Husky Finance and Global Gaming & Hospitality, when they’ve been around for 50 years, when they break all molds and turn those hotels into the largest artist colony in the U.S. and the casino floor into an all-platform entertainment environment, we’re sure we’ll have nice things to say about them. In the meantime, though, it’d be OK with us if they’d just rename the business the Sparks Nugget, so that members of local media could get the name right. Ω

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Michael Salzman Retiree

Sometimes it seems like they have a preconceived idea. And also, I grew up with the traditional Walter Cronkitestyle of journalism, where they were reporting the news. Right now they’re filling time, and that’s very annoying.

Carol Ford Job seeker

I can’t honestly answer that because I don’t read the papers. I don’t really want to know what’s going on in the world because it would just make me sad.

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Fix the schools, fix the tax structure It’s difficult to choose the best reason a Washoe County Commissioner might use to rationalize a “no” vote to enact AB 46 from the 2013 Legislative session to provide the Washoe County School District with reliable funding for maintenance and repairs to its 93 schools. There are so many possibilities. by The easiest path for the four Sheila Leslie Republican Commissioners is to hide behind the “no new taxes ever” mantra of their party’s right-wing radicals, especially since several commissioners are contemplating a run at another office when they’re termed out next year. Critics sputter about an independent review commissioned by the school district, which outlined a number of needed reforms. These scolds declare the school district should operate like a large business, ignoring the fact that its purpose isn’t to make a profit. Its purpose is to provide quality public education. Then there’s the real reason we’re in this crisis. Nevada remains one of just three states in the nation that forgoes a tax on corporate

profits, thus chronically underfunding education. Surrounding states have corporate tax rates ranging from 8.84 percent in California to 5 percent in Utah. Nevada: 0 percent. Instead, it’s workers and tourists who fund the state budget through sales tax and gaming tax, at woefully low levels. As if those weren’t enough reasons, there’s the constitutionality question of whether the county commission is empowered to raise taxes for another governing body without any oversight ability. And did I mention the badly played hand of the Democrats in Carson City who let their Republican colleagues and the governor off the hook by not forcing a vote on the original bill? This strategy allowed Republicans to spout pro-education views while keeping their Tea Party credentials intact. The county commissioners deserve credit for taking the issue seriously, despite their unsought assignment. They’ve held a series of pubic hearings taking long hours

of testimony from constituents and groups opposing or supporting the measure. Thanks to some excellent work by the district, you can view much of this material yourself on a webpage at http:// www.washoe.k12.nv.us/community/ schoolcapitalneedsinitiative?_lang=en. The webpage has a direct link to the review produced by the Council of the Great City Schools, a coalition of school districts based in D.C. You won’t see an indictment of the district’s management but rather a very thoughtful discussion, item by item, with a timeline of implementation or reasons why a specific recommendation is not being implemented. Then click on the link that takes you to a list of proposed capital renewal projects that’s overwhelming and comforting at the same time. Overwhelming in the vast amount of work that needs to be done to create safe learning environments in our schools, and comforting in that the school district is organized enough to produce such a thorough inventory of detailed projects, school by school.

You’ll want to scroll down to your neighborhood schools and see exactly what the extra $20 million a year will fund. Some of the “expired” items are life/safety needs that clearly can’t be postponed for very long, like the expired fire alarm/security system at Gomes Elementary or the HVAC system in the kindergarten area of Booth Elementary. Roofing, carpet, boilers all need to be replaced. And do we really want to take a chance on the expired electric circuits at Cannan Elementary? Other items are labeled as “expired but serviceable” at each school. The list continues with items that will need replacement in the years ahead. The bottom line is the modest increases in the sales tax and the property tax works out to about $8 more a month for the average taxpayer. Before you contact your county commissioner who will be voting on the measure soon, ask yourself if that’s too high a price to pay to make sure children have hot water and heat at your local school. Ω

Here’s a fun story about how corporations don’t pay taxes even when they are taxed: http://money.cnn. com/2013/07/01/ news/economy/ corporate-tax-rate/ index.html.

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6   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 17, 2013


War and other nonessential functions The government shutdown once again had the media buzzing over whether some tax eater’s federal job was essential. Only Libertarians ask why our hard-earned tax dollars are paying for nonessential government jobs in the first place. The U.S. Department of Education by Brendan Trainor furloughed about 90 percent of its workforce. And they wonder why we say it should be abolished. The media covered the pain of being furloughed without dwelling on the near certainty of getting all back pay and then some restored in a short while. The Republican “anarchists” are trying to do that right now. Polls show the American people are tired of government workers who get better pay and retirement than Joe the Plumber for a lot less meaningful work. I am not just being snide. Because there is no market feedback for government work, no immediate incentives to cut costs and improve service, the better part of it is useless toil and meaningless moil. Look at Iraq and Afghanistan.

Do you think the people of those two countries are better off, and the price we paid small enough, to justify the progressive crusades to make them egalitarian democracies? In the end, despite trillions spent and so many lives lost, they will have accomplished nothing. War is just another government program. I could never understand how you can be anti-war and probig government. Or claim to be small government and pro wars of choice, either. Do we want to play a game of which government jobs in Nevada are essential or are nonessential? What about the DMV? Couldn’t their basic functions be performed by insurance companies so you wouldn’t have to ever spend a morning at the DMV again? “Now serving, B29. Now serving, H77.” It’s like a zombie bingo game in there. Business license fees are another example. Why should anyone engaged in the ordinary harmless occupations of life have to get a license from government

to open a business? According to our common law traditions, only a business that is a threat to the community’s safety, health or morals should have to be licensed. Nevada is one of only four states that require aspiring interior decorators to take mandatory courses and pay for a license. I guess Carson City wants to protect us from the feng shui apocalypse. License fees are just another tax. And they don’t provide an ounce of safety. The market can handle safety and health issues better than government. Market incentives and penalties, social media and insurance liabilities would do a much better job of protecting us than bureaucrats enforcing stacks of petty rules and fines. Not to mention the corruption and incompetence often associated with regulatory bureaucracies. The libertarian law firm Institute for Justice describes Nevada as the third-worst state for occupational licensing requirements. There are 55 occupations in our state that require a license, fees and

mandatory education just to hang out a shingle. From travel guides to contractors to sign language interpreters, you must take meaningless hours of courses and pay the state before you can legally earn a dime. These barriers to entry discourage innovation and prevent many people from entering the fields. With unemployment as high as it is in Nevada, the Legislature should have removed some of these requirements. But, those that are already established lobby to retain them, because they keep new competition at bay and the licensing requirements makes their occupation appear more “professional”—and therefore justifies higher prices. Think about it. If you could shut down just one Nevada government bureau, and replace it with nothing—let the market take it over if it has any real value—what would it be? Ω

To learn more about the Institute for Justice, check out http://ij.org.

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www.nevadaASUN.com OPINION

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Though sometimes described as universal health  care, the new federal program does not come  close to such a thing.

Nurses win contract

checked it out, it was a spinoff of a report at HealthAffairs.org that simply gave a demographic profile of those who will not be covered by the federal program, by race, employment status, age, income. But the reports never said who these people are or what makes them ineligible, if they are ineligible. If they’re ineligible because of those demographics, neither the Post or the Health Affairs pieces say so. Are all native-born left-handed men with limps ineligible? If so, why? What guidelines are in the law that exclude some people from coverage?

Registered nurses at St. Mary’s have ratified a new contract reached in collective bargaining. The hospital was taken over by Prime Healthcare Services last year (St. Mary’s new owner, RN&R, June 21, 2013). The contract, the first between Prime and the nurses, provides additional insurance coverage for nurses who experience workplace violence or needle sticks. It also include lower health care premiums and a 10 percent raise with up to three days for continuing education. “As emergency room nurses, we treat every patient who comes through our door without hesitation,” said RN Katie Polimeni in a prepared statement. “Knowing that we have a workplace violence benefit and improved health insurance lets us continue the work of saving lives with the confidence that nurses and our families are protected.” The contract, negotiated through National Nurses Organizing Committee-Nevada, satisfied nurse concerns about nurse-to-patient ratios.

Environmentalists blast Brown

Uninsured endure

A coalition of five green organizations attacked Californian Gov. Jerry Brown for approving Senate Bill 630, a pro-development bill that meets the demands of Nevada politicians for less restrained growth at Lake Tahoe. A statement from the coalition read, “The lake that was once the bluest in America ... now faces the very real prospect of becoming increasingly clouded by pollutants, fast spreading algae and aggressive water plants, with its spectacular mountain ridgelines and shoreline obstructed by new, taller buildings, and increased traffic and congestion around the lake.” The legislation resulted from a threat by Nevada legislators to pull out of the bi-state Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA), created in 1969 after negotiations between California Gov. Ronald Reagan and Nevada Gov. Paul Laxalt. When that initial bi-state compact failed to protect the lake, it was amended in 1980 after negotiations between California and Nevada state legislators, with Brown (then in his second term as governor) and Nevada Gov. Robert List playing key roles. Efforts in the Nevada Legislature to undercut the agency over the years, usually by Douglas County (which wanted heavier development in its territory), were always blocked by Washoe County lawmakers. That held until 2011, when Clark County Sen. John Lee sponsored a measure to pull Nevada out of the bi-state agency unless California agreed to Douglas-style changes. Senate Bill 271 was approved by the Nevada lawmakers in the a.m. hours of June 7 during the final moments of the 2011 legislature. Subsequently, a new regional plan was approved for the Tahoe Basin and it included, among other things, allowing replacement of low-rise buildings with taller structures and transferring permitting to local governments—including Douglas County—which reverses one of the 1980 changes. Last month the TRPA approved a Douglas County South Shore Area Plan. A lawsuit filed in February by the Tahoe Area Sierra Club against the new regional plan is pending.

We needed someone familiar with the language of that law. With government out of reach, we turned to a different kind of expert. At the suggestion of Trudy Lieberman of the Columbia Journalism Review, we sought out Washington and Lee University law professor Timothy Jost, one of the leading experts on the health care law. (As this is written, there are 41 articles on the Google news page that use interviews with Jost.) Jost returned our call while waiting to board a plane. We put our question to him. Jost: “Well, everybody whose income’s below 138 percent of poverty was supposed to be eligible for Medicaid until the Supreme Court … decided otherwise. Now, in about half the states, every person who is legally present in the country and not incarcerated is eligible for Medicaid. Actually, also—see, this is where it gets complicated—people who are legally present but have been so for less than five years are not eligible. But anyway, most people who are below 138 percent of poverty are eligible for Medicaid in states that expanded [their Medicaid programs]. And states that didn’t expand, the people below 100 percent of poverty who are not otherwise already eligible for Medicaid would not be covered. That would include single adults, and it would include couples without children. And it would probably include a lot of parents. In Virginia, if your income’s below 30-some percent of poverty, you’re not eligible for Medicaid even if you’re a parent. So those people are not eligible for anything. “People between 100 and 400 percent of poverty who are legally present in the United States and not incarcerated or citizens, are eligible for advanced premium tax credits unless they have coverage through their employer or are offered coverage through their employer or unless

Annoying calls launched The Republican National Committee Monday started making automated calls to Nevadans to complain about their senior senator, apparently hoping the technique will be just as popular for the GOP as it is for carpet cleaners. The call to Nevada says, in part, “Sen. Harry Reid and Senate Democrats think this shutdown is a game. They are playing politics by cutting off our veterans and their benefits. … These men and women served our country with honor and yet Sen. Reid would rather put partisan politics ahead of honoring our commitment to the people who defended this country.” Although Republicans are usually more vocal in their support of veterans, congressional vote tallies of groups like Disabled American Veterans and Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America generally rank Republicans in Congress lower than most Democrats on bills of veteran interest (“McCain and veterans,” Newsview blog, September 26, 2008).

--Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 17, 2013

Who’s not eligible? Federal health program’s poorly covered side The start of the federal health care insurance program on Oct. 1 was preceded by a heavy wave of advance news by coverage to tell the U.S. citizenry Dennis Myers how the system will work. The reporting informed readers and listeners who could use the system and how to use it. But there was one big hole in all this journalism. Most news stories described who is eligible and why. None described who is not eligible and why. Wouldn’t potential customers want a list of what made them ineligible before they went shopping and were embarrassed by being rejected?

Journalists reported who is eligible and ignored those who are not. The assumption seemed to be that we were supposed to read who was eligible and extrapolate from there— that whoever wasn’t deemed eligible, was therefore ineligible. But no one came out and said that, and assumptions are hazardous. Numerous stories reported that a little more than half of the uninsured would be covered by the ACA, which certainly seemed to indicate that nearly half could not be covered by it, but reporters showed a stunning lack of curiosity about why that remaining near-half of the uninsured were by implication

not eligible. In Nevada, there are an estimated 577,000 uninsured residents. The national program is expected to cover up to 311,000. Does the law simply address those who are eligible and remain silent on everyone else, thus rendering them ineligible by default? That seems like a poor way of doing business. And finding out the answer during a national government shutdown proved difficult. So we turned to our colleagues around the country. Surely someone had published, broadcast or posted a list of things that disqualified 266,000 Nevadans. For one thing, there were plenty of journalists who were reporting that the new national program does not cover everyone: • “Why Some Midlands Residents Won’t Be Covered Under the ACA” • “Affordable Care Act May Not Cover Alaskans Most In Need of Health Insurance” • “Obamacare to leave 31 million uninsured” • “Obamacare Won’t Cover Everyone” • “Obamacare leaves millions uninsured. Here’s who they are.” That seems to suggest that information on who is excluded from the program needs some attention. That last headline was in the Washington Post and sounded like just what we wanted. But when we


2

they’re eligible for some government program. Those are probably the main exceptions. People above 400 percent of poverty can certainly buy health insurance. They can buy it through the exchanges, but they’re not eligible for any assistance. ... “Basically people aren’t eligible for premium tax credits if their income’s above 400 percent of poverty, they’re below 100 percent of poverty, or they’re eligible for a government program or they’re eligible for affordable and adequate employer coverage. That’s, I guess, who is not eligible.” It’s difficult to believe that one of the lessons that was supposed to come out of the abortive 1990s Clinton health plan was a new program that was easy to understand. Jost said it is difficult to account for why nearly a half of all uninsured will remain ineligible for the national program—46 percent of those currently uninsured, in Nevada’s case. He was able to name several categories of people, but they did not seem to account for so many people being excluded from the new system. He mentioned illegal aliens—certainly a factor in Nevada’s service economy— plus people who choose to remain uninsured, are confused, have been misled, or are between jobs.

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“But I doubt that’s 46 percent of the population,” he said. Of those who will still be without insurance once the federal program is operating, about 80 percent are expected to be U.S. citizens. The Congressional Budget Office predicts that after the law is fully operational, 7 million people will be dropped from their employer health plans, and 5 million people will shift out of private plans, all of this to happen within five years.

10-17-2013

THE BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA

Corporations start getting out of the health care business.

Saturday, October 19

As the ACA is coming on line, some employers are dumping all but a minimal commitment to health insurance. Trader Joe’s announced a plan to give each of their employees $500 a year. They will then be cut loose to find their own best deal. UPS had already announced plans to dump some workers’ spouses from the corporation’s health insurance. It was joining numerous other corporations who had already done so. In California, state legislators are considering creating an employerfunded trust to cover uninsured who remain after the federal program. Ω

LEON RUSSELL Saturday, October 26

GOV’T MULE Saturday, November 2

Veterans

TOWER OF POWER

Photo/Dennis Myers

Saturday, November 30

CHUBBY CHECKER Saturday, December 21 On Sale This Friday!

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At an open house to mark KOLO’s 60th anniversary, Ed Pearce and Terri Russell greeted and escorted guests, including numerous Channel 8 alumni. The heads of Russell and Pearce contain much of the institutional memory of Reno broadcasting.

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10/2/13 9:21 AM


PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

Nicole Sallaberry and Jolene Cook stand by the nonGMO education station in the Great Basin Community Food Co-op.

Food fun October celebrations at the co-op October is a busy month for the Great Basin Community Food Co-op (GBCFC). It’s National Non-GMO (genetically modified organisms) Month and National Co-op Month, and the national celebration of Food Day is on by Sage Leehey Oct. 24. For National Non-GMO Month, they will be holding a raffle for a sage l@ bag filled with non-GMO goodies, and if you enter the raffle, you will be newsreview.c om helping them to audit their store for GMO labeling. The audit is ongoing and aims to label all of their products that certifiably do not contain any GMOs. If you wish to enter the raffle, you need to find a product that needs a label but does not yet have one or a product that has a label and should not. The winner will be announced on Oct. 30. “We have completed [auditing] our main sales floor, so all of the groceries, the frozen, the chilled, bulk and produce,” said Nicole Sallaberry, co-founder, and local food and sustainability coordinator for GBCFC. “And then we’re going to be doing the new products as they come in. Upstairs is a little more tricky. There’s a lot of high risk stuff. ... There are things labeled upstairs, but we didn’t get through all of the supplements and merchandise and stuff like that.” The labels are for educational purposes, according to Sallaberry. They also have an education station on the main floor with frequently asked questions about GMOs and GMO-free cookbooks, pins and stickers for sale. “What we want to do is provide education and resources so that they can make their own decision, and our hope is that consumer demand will change the market,” Sallaberry said. In addition to the raffle, GBCFC will also give out non-GMO candy to anyone wearing a costume in store on Oct. 30 and 31. Also on Oct. 30, they will be holding a Jack-o’-lantern contest and showing the newly released OMG! GMO movie. Tickets are free, but they are asking for a suggested donation of $5 or more. In celebration of National Co-op Month, there will be a memberFor more information about owner drive. Those who participate will receive a tote bag filled with events at the Great things like free yoga class coupons, a free coupon to the Nevada Museum Basin Community Food of Art and coupons for Great Full Gardens and Dandelion Deli. The totes Co-op, visit are for anyone who joins this month, any member who refers a friend to greatbasinfood.coop. join this month, any member who pays at least $20 of their equity this month and any member who is working to help them reach their member loan goal of $210,000. They will also be giving a special gift to whoever becomes the 6,000th member owner this month. “It’s one of the highest amounts of members per our sales in co-ops across the country, so we’re giving them 6,000 pennies—so $60—worth of gift cards at the co-op and then Campo has matched that,” said Jolene Cook, general manager of GBCFC. And in honor of Food Day, GBCFC is having a party with local music, an art exhibition of photos from their Seedling Sale, free beer and food from 5 to 9 p.m. There will also be 10 percent off to all members all day long. Ω

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When Kathy was enrolled in Big Brothers Big Sisters, she was just eight years old and lacked confidence, social skills and opportunities. Though she was not short on intelligence or potential, and Big Sister Nicole, a graduate student at the time, saw it. “The most rewarding part of my friendship with Kathy has been watching her develop into a caring, mature and independent thinker,” Nicole said of her Little. “She’s incredibly intelligent and wise beyond her years. She doesn’t fall for peer pressure, and is okay going against the norm, which makes me so proud. She is confident in her abilities, has a clear direction of where she wants to end up in life, and knows what she needs to do to get there.” Kathy’s mother and teachers were taking note of her improved performance in school and significant leaps in self-esteem. What started with better grades continued on to Kathy enrolling in a college preparation program at the University of Nevada, Reno. Kathy, now in her first year at UNR, is majoring in criminal justice. “My Big Sister has been my inspiration and my guide,” Kathy said of Nicole. “She has always been someone I could count on, whether it’s personal or academic. Not only is she a great mentor and friend, Nicole pushed me again and again while I was preparing for UNR. I’m glad she did.” Throughout the 10 years they have been friends, Nicole has been able to guide Kathy through elementary, middle, high school, and even now in her college years. Nicole exposed Kathy to all kinds of new activities and opportunities to learn: art museums, symphonies, arts and crafts, sports, and even volunteer work. They have created a truly lasting friendship – Nicole cheered when Kathy walked across the stage at her high school graduation, and Kathy was there for her friend in the celebration of Nicole’s recent wedding. “This has been demonstrated time and again through our matches,” Liza Maupin, Chief Executive Officer of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada said. “The kids in our program, who are matched with caring adult mentors, are more likely to graduate high school than Washoe County students who are similarly disadvantaged.” It only takes one hour a week to make a lasting impact on the life of a child in need. Call 352-3202 or visit BBBSNN.org now to start something BIG!

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The shoddy media coverage of Pfc. Bradley Manning tops Project Censored’s annual list of underreported stories.

his year’s annual Project Censored list of the most underreported news stories includes the widening wealth gap, the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning for leaking classified documents, and President Obama’s war on whistleblowers—all stories that actually received considerable news coverage. So how exactly were they “censored” and what does that say of this venerable media watchdog project? Project Censored isn’t only about stories that were deliberately buried or ignored. It’s about stories the media has covered poorly through a sort of false objectivity that skews the truth. Journalists do cry out against injustice, on occasion, but they don’t always do it well. That’s why Project Censored was started back in 1976—to highlight stories the mainstream media missed or gave scant attention to. Although the project initially started at Sonoma State University, now academics and students from 18 universities and community colleges across the country pore through hundreds of submissions of overlooked and underreported stories annually. A panel of academics and journalists then picks the top 25 stories and curates them into themed clusters. This year’s book, Censored 2014: Fearless Speech in Fearful Times, hits bookstores this week. What causes the media to stumble? There are as many reasons as there are failures. Brooke Gladstone, host of the radio program On the Media and writer of the graphic novel cum news media critique, The Influencing Machine, said the story of Manning (who now goes by the first name Chelsea) was the perfect example of the media trying to cover a story right, but getting it mostly wrong. “The Bradley Manning case is for far too long centered on his personality rather than the nature of his revelations,” Gladstone told us. Manning’s career was sacrificed for sending more than 700,000 documents about the Iraq war to WikiLeaks. But the media coverage focused largely on Manning’s trial and subsequent change in gender identity. Gladstone said that this is part of the media’s inability to deal with vast quantities of information which, she said, “is not what most of our standard media does all that well.” The media mangling of Manning is number one on the Project Censored list, but the shallow coverage this story received is not unique. The news media is in a crisis, particularly in the U.S., and it’s getting worse.

by JoeFitzgeraldRodriguez

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WATCHING THE WATCHDOGS The Project for Excellence in Journalism, which conducts an annual analysis of trends in news, found that as revenue in journalism declined, newsrooms have shed 30 percent of their staff in the last decade. In 2012, the number of reporters in the U.S. dipped to its lowest level since 1978, with fewer than 40,000 reporters nationally. This creates a sense of desperation in the newsroom, and in the end, it’s the public that loses. “What won out is something much more palpable to the advertisers,” says Robert McChesney, an author, longtime media reform advocate, professor at University of Illinois, and host of Media Matters from 2000-2012. Blandness beat out fearless truth-telling. Even worse than kowtowing to advertisers is the false objectivity the media tries to achieve, McChesney told us, neutering its news to stay “neutral” on a topic. This handcuffs journalists into not drawing conclusions, even when they are well-supported by the facts. In order to report a story, they rely on the words of others to make claims, limiting what they can report. “You allow people in power to set the range of legitimate debate, and you report on it,” McChesney said. Project Censored stories reflect that dynamic—many of them require journalists to take a stand or present an illuminating perspective on a set of dry facts. For example, reporting on the increasing gulf between the rich and the poor is easy, but talking about why the rich are getting richer is where journalists begin to worry about their objectivity, Gladstone said. “I think that there is a desire to stay away from stories that will inspire rhetoric of class warfare,” she said. Unable to tell the story of a trend and unable to talk about rising inequality for fear of appearing partisan, reporters often fail to connect the dots for their readers. One of Project Censored stories this year, “Bank interests inflate global prices by 35 to 40 percent,” is a good example of the need for a media watchdog. Researchers point to interest payments as the primary way wealth is transferred from Main Street to Wall Street. It’s how the banks are picking the pockets of the 99 percent. But if no politician is calling out the banks on this practice, if no advocacy group is gaining enough traction, shouldn’t it be the media’s role to protect the public and sound the battle cry? “So much of media criticism is really political commentary squeezed through a media squeezer,” Gladstone said. “And it comes out media shaped.”

SHAPING THE MEDIA McChesney says journalism should be a proactive watchdog by independently stating that something needs to be done. He said there’s more watchdog journalism calling out inequity in democracies where there is a more robust and funded media. And they often have one thing we in the U.S. don’t—government subsidies for journalism. “All the other democracies in the world, there are huge subsidies for public media and journalism,” McChesney said. “They not only rank ahead of us in terms of being democratic, they 14   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 17, 2013

also rank ahead of us in terms of having a free press. Our press is shrinking.” No matter what the ultimate economic solution is, the crisis of reporting is largely a crisis of money. McChesney calls it a “whole knife in the heart of journalism.” For American journalism to revive itself, it has to move beyond its corporate ties. It has to become a truly free press. It’s time to end the myth that corporate journalism is the only way for media to be objective, monolithic, and correct. The failures of that prescription are clear in Project Censored’s top 10 stories of the year: 1. Manning and the failure of corporate media Untold stories of Iraqi civilian deaths by American soldiers, U.S. diplomats pushing aircraft sales on foreign royalty, uninvestigated abuse by Iraqi allies, the perils of the rise in private war contractors—this is what Manning exposed. They were stories that challenge the U.S. political elite, and they were only made possible by a sacrifice. Manning got a 35-year prison sentence for the revelation of state secrets to WikiLeaks, a story told countless times in corporate media. But as Project Censored posits, the failure of our media was not in the lack of coverage of Manning, but in its focus.

Though the New York Times partnered with WikiLeaks to release stories based on the documents, many published in 2010 through 2011, news from the leaks has since slowed to a trickle—a waste of over 700,000 pieces of classified and unclassified intelligence giving unparalleled ground level views of America’s costly wars. The media quickly took a scathing indictment of U.S. military policy and spun it into a story about Manning’s politics and patriotism. As Rolling Stone pointed out (“Did the Media Fail Bradley Manning?”), Manning initially took the trove of leaks to the Washington Post and the New York Times, only to be turned away. Alexa O’Brien, a former Occupy activist, scooped most of the media by actually attending Manning’s trial. She produced tens of thousands of words in transcriptions of the court hearings, one of the only reporters on the beat. 2. Richest global 1 percent hide billions in tax havens Global corporate fatcats hold $21-32 trillion in offshore havens, money hidden from government taxation that would benefit people around the world, according to findings by James S. Henry, the former chief economist of the global management firm McKinsey & Company. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) obtained a leak in April 2013,

revealing how widespread the buy-in was to these tax havens. The findings were damning: government officials in Canada, Russia and other countries have embraced offshore accounts, the world’s top banks (including Deutsche Bank) have worked to maintain them, and the tax havens are used in Ponzi schemes. Moving money offshore has implications that ripped through the world economy. Part of Greece’s economic collapse was due to these tax havens, ICIJ reporter Gerard Ryle told Gladstone on her radio show. “It’s because people don’t want to pay taxes,” he said. “You avoid taxes by going offshore and playing by different rules.” U.S. Sen. Carl Levin, D-Michigan, introduced legislation to combat the practice, SB1533, The Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act, but so far the bill has had little play in the media. Researcher James Henry said the hidden wealth was a “huge black hole” in the world economy that has never been measured, which could generate income tax revenues between $190-280 billion a year. 3. Trans-Pacific partnership Take 600 corporate advisors, mix in officials from 11 international governments, let it bake for about two years, and out pops international partnerships that threaten to cripple progressive movements worldwide. The Trans-Pacific Partnership is a trade agreement, but leaked texts show it may allow foreign investors to use “investor-state” tribunals to extract extravagant extra damages for “expected future profits,” according to the Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. The trade watch group investigated the TPP and is the main advocate in opposition of its policies. The AFL-CIO, Sierra Club and other organizations have also had growing concerns about the level of access granted to corporations in these agreements. With extra powers granted to foreign firms, the possibility that companies would continue moving offshore could grow. But even with the risks of outsized corporate influence, the U.S. has a strong interest in the TPP in order to maintain trade agreements with Asia. The balancing act between corporate and public interests is at stake, but until the U.S. releases more documents from negotiations, the American people will remain in the dark. 4. Obama’s war on whistleblowers President Obama has invoked the Espionage Act of 1917 more than every other president combined. Seven times, Obama has pursued leakers with the act, against Thomas Drake, Shamai Leibowitz, Bradley Manning, Stephen Kim, Jeffrey Sterling, John Kiriakou and, most recently, Edward Snowden. All had ties to the State Department, FBI, CIA, or NSA, and all of them leaked to journalists. “Neither party is raising hell over this. This is the sort of story that sort of slips through the cracks,” McChesney said. And when the politicians don’t raise a fuss, neither does the media. ProPublica covered the issue, constructing timelines and mapping out the various arrests and indictments. But where Project Censored points out the lack of coverage is in Obama’s hypocrisy—only a year before, he signed the Whistleblower Protection Act. Later on, he said he wouldn’t follow every letter of the law in the bill he had only just signed.

“Certain provisions in the Act threaten to interfere with my constitutional duty to supervise the executive branch,” Obama said. “As my administration previously informed the Congress, I will interpret those sections consistent with my authority.” 5. Hate groups and antigovernment groups on rise across U.S. Hate groups in the U.S. are on the rise, according to a report by the Southern Poverty Law Center. There are 1,007 known hate groups operating across the country, it wrote, including neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan, white nationalists, neo-Confederates, racist skinheads, black separatists, border vigilantes, and others. Since 2000, those groups have grown by over half, and there was a “powerful resurgence” of Patriot groups, the likes of which were involved in the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995. Worst of all, the huge growth in armed militias seems to have conspicuous timing with Obama’s election. “The number of Patriot groups, including armed militias, has grown 813 percent since Obama was elected—from 149 in 2008 to 1,360 in 2012,” the SPLC reported. Though traditionally those groups were race motivated, the report noted that now they are gunning for government. There was a smattering of news coverage when the SPLC released its report, but not much since. 6. Billionaires’ rising wealth intensifies poverty and inequality The world’s billionaires added $241 billion to their collective net worth in 2012. That’s an economic recovery, right? That gain, coupled with the world’s richest peoples’ new total worth of $1.9 trillion (more than the GDP of Canada), wasn’t reported by some kooky socialist group, but by Bloomberg News. But few journalists are asking the important question: why? Project Censored points to journalist George Monbiot, who highlights a reduction of taxes and tax enforcement, the privatization of public assets, and the weakening of labor unions. His conclusions are backed up by the United Nations’ Trade and Development Report from 2012, which noted how the trend hurts everyone: “Recent empirical and analytical work reviewed here mostly shows a negative correlation between inequality and growth.” 7. Merchant of death and nuclear weapons The report highlighted by Project Censored on the threat of nuclear war is an example not of censorship, strictly, but a desire for media reform. Project Censored highlighted a study from The Physicians for Social Responsibility that said 1 billion people could starve in the decade after a nuclear detonation. Corn production in the U.S. would decline by an average of 10 percent for an entire decade and food prices would make food inaccessible to hundreds of millions of the world’s poorest. This is not journalism in the classic sense, Gladstone said. In traditional journalism, as it’s played out since the early 20th century, news requires an element of something new in order to garner reporting—not a looming threat or danger. So in this case, what Project Censored identified was the need for a new kind of journalism, what it calls “solutions journalism.”


photo IllUStrAtIon/hAyley DoShAy

“Solutions journalism,” Sarah van Gelder wrote in the foreword to Censored 2014, “must investigate not only the individual innovations, but also the larger pattern of change—the emerging ethics, institutions, and ways of life that are coming into existence.”

“The reporters raise an issue the elites are not raising themselves, then you’re ideological, have an ax to grind, sort of a hack,” he said. “It makes journalism worthless on pretty important issues.” 9. Icelanders vote to include commons in their constitution In 2012, Icelandic citizens voted in referendum to change the country’s 1944 constitution. When asked, “In the new constitution, do you want natural resources that are not privately owned to be declared national property?” its citizens voted 81 percent in favor. Project Censored says this is important for the U.S. to know, but in the end, U.S. journalism is notably American-centric. Even the Nieman Watchdog, a foundation for journalism at Harvard University, issued a report in 2011 citing the lack of reporting on a war the U.S. funneled over $4 trillion into over the past decade, not to mention the cost in human lives. If we don’t pay attention to our own wars, why exactly does Project Censored think we’d pay attention to Iceland? “The constitutional reforms are a direct response to the nation’s 2008 financial crash,” Project Censored wrote, “when Iceland’s unregulated banks borrowed more than the country’s gross domestic product from international wholesale money markets.” Solutions-based journalism rears its head again, and the idea is that the U.S. has much to learn from Iceland, but even Gladstone was dubious.

8. Bank interests inflate global prices by 35 to 40 percent Does 35 percent of everything bought in the United States go to interest? Professor Margrit Kennedy of the University of Hanover thinks so, and she says it’s a major funnel of money from the 99 percent to the rich. In her 2012 book, Occupy Money, Kennedy wrote that tradespeople, suppliers, wholesalers and retailers along the chain of production rely on credit. Her figures were initially drawn from the German economy, but Ellen Brown of the Web of Debt and Global Research said she found similar patterns in the U.S. This “hidden interest” has sapped the growth of other industries, she said, lining the pockets of the financial sector. So if interest is stagnating so many industries, why would journalists avoid the topic? Few economists have echoed her views, and few experts emerged to back up her assertions. Notably, she’s a professor in an architectural school, with no formal credentials in economics. From her own website, she said she became an “expert” in economics “through her continuous research and scrutiny.” Without people in power pushing the topic, McChesney said that a mainstream journalist would be seen as going out on a limb.

President Obama’s “war on whistleblowers” is one of Project Censored’s most underreported stories.

“Iceland is being undercovered, goddamnit! Where is our Iceland news?” she joked with us. “Certainly I agree with some of this list. Bradley Manning was covered badly. I was sad the tax haven story didn’t get more coverage. But when has anyone cared about Iceland?” 10. A “culture of cruelty” along Mexico–U.S. border The plight of Mexican border crossings usually involves three types of stories in U.S. press: deaths in the stretch of desert beyond the border, the horrors of drug cartels, and heroic journeys of border crossings by sympathetic workers. But a report released a year ago by the organization No More Deaths snags the 10th spot for overlooked stories in Project Censored. The report asserts that people arrested by Border Patrol while crossing were denied water and told to let their sick die. No More Deaths conducted more than 12,000 interviews to form the basis of its study in three Mexican cities: Nacos, Nogales and Agua Prieta. The report cites grossly ineffective oversight from the Department of Homeland Security. This has received some coverage, from Salon showcasing video of Border Patrol agents destroying jugs of water meant for crossers to a recent New York Times piece citing a lack of oversight for Border Patrol’s excessive force. The ACLU lobbied the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to call international attention to the plight of these border crossers at the hands of U.S. law enforcement. If ever an issue flew under the radar, this is it.

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PHOTO: THINKSTOCK/iSTOCK

COLD

CFAO RMMF OE RR ST’ MARKETS Is farm fresh produce locally available during fall and winter? BY ASHLEY HENNEFER

D

espite the icy mornings, biting winds and shorter days, fall is a season best spent outdoors. There’s plenty of activities to satiate those already missing the heat of summer—pumpkin patches, hay rides and corn mazes abound in Northern Nevada. It’s not called the harvest season for nothing, giving a community the chance to reap the benefits of a spring and summer spent cultivating the land. But the climate of the Great Basin means that the dynamic of growing and accessing local food has to change for the latter half of the year. Farmers’ markets, a popular spring and summer tradition, mostly wrap up in late August. According to Garden Shop Nursery manager Josh Jimenez, there’s been a community demand for fall and winter markets. So the Garden Shop Nursery started a 16   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 17, 2013

winter market three years ago. “The farmers market here started small, but we had a good relationship with all of our vendors,” says Jimenez. “The markets are their main source of income, and they don’t have an outlet once the weather gets bad. They relish the opportunity to sell their products year round. They want to keep going even when summer is over, and they like having an opportunity to set up shop when the weather turns poor.” There are unique challenges for the winter’s market, Jimenez says, such as space and noise. The unpredictable weather means that most winter markets have to be held indoors. The market is held in the Garden Shop, and an increase in vendors and attendees means the space is a tight fit. But this hasn’t deterred anyone yet. “We have a real devoted following,” he says. “We have some people who come every weekend to

do all of their shopping.” Most of the vendors are from Reno and Northern Nevada, and occasionally a vendor comes from California. While the focus is still on food—including eggs, grass-fed beef, root vegetables and stone fruits—non-food items are also on display, such as homemade soaps, clothing, jewelry and decorative art. “It’s always such a bummer when summer ends and there aren’t many options for markets,” said Corinne McAvoy, a Reno resident and self-proclaimed “apartment farmer”—she has planter boxes full of vegetables and herbs lining her apartment balcony. During the spring and summer, McAvoy attends the farmers’ markets in Minden, Carson City and Reno on a weekly basis. “I get nearly all of my groceries at the summer markets,” she says. “My family eats pretty simple, and I like knowing that I’m supporting farmers and business owners. Going

shopping week to week also helps me plan ahead, and since I never know what I’m going to get, my menu is always interesting.” McAvoy says she buys food locally as much as possible, including at the Great Basin Community Food Co-op, which publishes guidelines on its website ensuring that nearly all products sold are sustainably and locally produced. She’s also signed up for community-supported agriculture (CSA) projects at farms in the area, but enjoys the experience of selecting produce by hand. Farmers’ markets are also a learning experience for her 3-yearold son, Jacob. “It’s an opportunity for him to ask questions about the foods he likes, and I let him pick out fruit and vegetables,” she says. “Farmers’ markets are very colorful, tactile places. They also give people a chance to talk about food faceto-face with growers. I think it’s

important that we have this resource year-round, in some capacity.” But according to Linda Marrone, president of the Nevada Certified Farmers Market Association, fall and winters farmers’ markets can be a hard sell even with the popularity of summer markets. The Nevada Certified Farmers Association is a nonprofit organization that helps “promote farmers’ markets and local agriculture” in Nevada. “The weather is tough, and attendance drops,” she says. Marrone also runs the Carson City farmers’ market. “We didn’t have a flower vendor at last week’s market because the flowers froze. Tomatoes froze. There’s no apples this year because the apple trees froze too early.” Some farmers have found an outlet by using hoop houses or geodesic domes to maintain the humidity and heat some vegetables and fruits need. This produce then becomes available at farmers’ markets.


“For anyone who has a hoop house, their season is extended,” says Marrone. “Hoop houses are changing farming in Nevada.” But the time of year also affects attendance rates for farmers markets. Setting up shop every week can be a costly venture for farmers when the produce isn’t bought right away. And with school starting in September, families “just have different priorities.” Families are among the most frequent attendees of farmers markets, according to the Farmers Market Coalition, a national nonprofit that helps develop farmers market organizations. Marrone suggests CSAs as an alternative to farmers’ markets during the colder months. “CSAs are a great way to get good local produce during the fall and winter,” she says.

“It’s always such a bummer when summer ends and there aren’t many options for markets,” said Corinne McAvoy, Reno resident and self-proclaimed “apartment farmer.” CSAs are often weekly, and, depending on the farm, are delivered or available for pickup at a farm. Most farms offer a variety of meat or vegetables, and all produce is in season. A weekly CSA is usually enough food to use for a family of three or four to eat each week, and some farms offer add-ons like honey, salsas or other goods. Marrone agrees that farmers’ markets fill a niche in the community, adding a very “hands-on” element to participating in the foodshed. But she also wants people to eat smarter, familiarizing themselves with what’s available at certain times of the year. “We’re in Nevada—we’re not in California,” she says. “People need to learn to eat in season. I won’t eat a tomato for a while. What’s the point?” Unless you know how to can preserves, that is. “I’m making plum jam right now,” she says, laughing.

Meet the markets There are still several farmers markets open throughout the fall and winter seasons. Rather than succulent tomatoes or leafy greens, OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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95 WORD

these markets showcase squash, root vegetables and holiday comfort foods. For a frequently updated list of all Nevada markets, go to www. NevadaGrown.com. • The Reno Garden Shop Nursery Farmers Market continues until Nov. 20. This is the tail end of the summer market, and is held on Fridays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. But the nursery’s winter market also starts on Nov. 1 and will last until late May. Winter market is on Sundays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and offers fall produce from vendors in Nevada and California. Both markets are held at 3636 Mayberry Drive. For more information, visit www.gardenshopnursery. com or call Teri Bath at 813-6505.

FICTION CONTEST

• Make the drive up to Lake Tahoe before the first snow of the season to visit the last few Lake Tahoe Friday Evening Farmers Markets. They’ll run until Oct. 26, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Kahle Community Center.

Look at that: 95 words on the nose (excluding title). It’s 95-word fiction time! We, the editors of the Reno News & Review, ask you, the readers of the Reno News & Review, to send us your short fiction. We like stories that have a beginning, middle and end, and include setting, conflict, dialog, character, point of view, and theme. We’re not into poetry for this contest. Just keep the story to exactly 95 words (as counted by LibreOffice or Microsoft Word and excluding title). Your published story and your employer’s undying respect will be your rewards.

• The Fallon Tuesday night farmers market’s last market of the year is on Oct. 17, 5-8 p.m., at 310 Taylor Street. For more information, contact Salisha Odum at 427-0832. • Shirley’s Farmers’ Markets will hold several farmers markets within the next few months— including a market at the El Dorado Italian Festival on Oct. 12 and 13, and the Summit Holiday Farmers Market on Dec. 7 and 8. For more information, email shirleysfarmersmarkets@gmail.com or go to www.shirleysfarmersmarkets. com. • If you really can’t wait until next summer, the Roseville Farmers Market in Roseville, Calif., is open year-round. It’s part of the Foothill Farmers Market group, which also includes Truckee and Tahoe-based markets. Visit www.foothillfarmers market.com.

acoby sat in his very public chair with his pants and belt unbuttoned. “True, it’s an office situation,” he reasoned, “but I can reassemble before anyone notices.” Months passed uneventfully while he eased his hiatal hernia’s burn. All that changed with the new management. They installed standup desks, and there was no way his good parts would remain mysterious if he were standing when the fire alarm sounded. He fretted about it, further irritating his diaphragm. Fortunately, his wife was insightful, noting that while the new owners hated sit-down desks, they had nothing against suspenders.

Harvest festivals Farmers markets aren’t the only place to find local produce. Harvest festivals offer squash, pumpkins, zucchini and other edibles, as well as family-friendly events. • Lattin Farms holds a fall festival every Saturday in Oct. from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. A farm stand is also open Mondays through Saturdays, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., until the end of October.

For those who’ve never seen the contest, last year’s winners can be found at www.newsreview.com/reno/stranger-than-truth/content?oid=8291872

• Pumpkin Palooza embraces all things pumpkin, and also offers music and non-pumpkin flavored edibles. Oct. 19-20, Victorian Square, Sparks. Ω

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

E-mail to renofiction@newsreview.com and put Fiction 2013 in the subject line. All entries must be received by 9 a.m. on Oct. 23. Selected entries will be published on Oct. 31. Include contact information, including name, address and telephone number. |

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Photo/Rachel Gattuso

Highly decorated

Vietnam veteran James Wilson at work on a new art piece.

National Veterans Creative Art Festival James Wilson is not the man you automatically envision clutching a watercolor brush. A by Vietnam veteran, Wilson is classified as Rachel Gattuso 100 percent disabled. His neatly coiffed silver hair brings to mind tucked bed sheets, and the pride in his voice evokes memories of small town Independence Day parades. As he navigates his motorized wheelchair around the Veteran Affairs (VA) Sierra Nevada Health Care System in downtown Reno, it’s clear Wilson has bled more for country than for canvas. But he will be adding one more decoa public reception for the National Veterans ration to a collection already bolstering creative art Festival Bronze Stars, a Cross of Gallantry and will be at the Grand a Purple Heart: a first place win in Craft sierra Resort, 2500 Coloring in the 2013 National Veterans e. second st., on oct. 27 at noon. tickets Creative Art Festival. are free but limited. Presented by the Department of For reservations, call Veterans Affairs and the American Legion 328-1411. Auxiliary and hosted in Reno this year by the Grand Sierra Resort, the festival will showcase winning entries from veterans

across the nation who participated in a year-long fine arts and talent competition. Beginning Oct. 21, 130 participants will attend a week of workshops and events before exhibiting their work in almost 150 categories in a public show October 27. Artists will accompany their work Oct. 27 at the public display from noon to 1:45 p.m. in the Grand Sierra Resort Tahoe Ballroom. The final variety show of musical, dance, dramatic and original writing selections will begin at 2 p.m. in the Grand Sierra Resort Grand Theatre with Grammy Award Nominee and singer/songwriter Michael Peterson as Master of Ceremonies. For Wilson, “Ruby,” his Craft Coloring entry, is a reminder of his California upbringing; a time of slopping hogs, milking cows and bartering apricots on his grandfather’s farm. “It was a nice project to work on and I’m very proud of it,” says Wilson. “It makes me feel relaxed inside. People say it’s beautiful and this and that, but to me in my own eyes it’s nice, because the

only thing I call beautiful is my wife.” For Wilson, it was an opportunity to enjoy the process and lose track of time. For Guiseppe Pellicano, winner of the Best in Show entry “The Grenade Series,” it was an opportunity to come to terms with his experiences and share his work with veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Pellicano crafted an over-sized grenade replica from steel then photographed it in nine everyday scenarios, three of which will be on display: “Oh Happy Day,” “Ranger’s Creed,” and “Tea Time.”

“My work stems from my experiences as a soldier,” Pellicano says. “I share many concerns veterans have about society, politics and psychological distress. For many of my brave brothers and sisters, the war still exists and their struggles remain. Their stories should be told so that the majority may understand the military experience.” Pellicano’s photographs show in plain terms just how close to the surface veterans’ memories linger, present during both intense and innocent moments of everyday life. As he describes, the photos are designed to represent emotions, practices and events that may take place as soldiers settle back into home life. “While this innocent and positive play time occurs [veterans] may be there in body but in mind still reflecting on the trauma and experiences endured,” says Pellicano. “Hopefully veteran artwork can communicate the human condition and convey an understanding throughout.” Ω

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OCTOBER 17, 2013

was covering some of the stools, so we moved into the restaurant side. The place looks a little sparse, and there isn’t much ambiance, but hopefully more decoration will come in time as they have only been open about six months. The owner brought out the first round of our V.I.P. plate which consisted of pita bread, dolmas, cherry peppers and a huge serving of humus. The humus was rich and creamy, the pita was soft and warm, and the peppers burned my mouth with their spicy tang. The warm dolmas were covered in a rich tzatziki sauce, but I didn’t like the minty flavor of the herbs inside. The next plate had lamb, salad and falafel with more tzatziki sauce. The Greek salad had huge chunks of feta cheese and a light tangy dressing. The lamb was tasty and not over cooked. I made tiny gyro sandwiches with the pita, salad and meat topped with the tzatziki. The falafel was amazing. Each bite was an explosion of herbs and light spice. The falafel was soft and moist without being mushy. When I told the owner how much I liked the falafel, he beamed and proudly told me, “Homemade!” I was so full, I nearly forgot about the pizza, which was brought out last. I liked the thin, crispy crust, but the pizza was a bit greasy and needed a bit more sauce and cheese. I managed to find even more room when the baklava was brought out. The baklava was flaky and light without being over sweet and the ground nuts throughout was a nice touch. Overall, I would definitely come back, but I would stick with the Greek food as this is where Artichoke shines. To be fair, I might have to give the cheese steak a try. Don’t be in a huge rush, as this is a small operation, but the time spent on homemade items is well worth it. Ω Photo/ALLison Young

ONE LUCKY WINNER PER TAVERN WILL WIN

V.I. Pita

Owner and chef Shaun Soleman with Artichoke’s “Get It All” plate.

In addition to Greek food, Artichoke offers a variety of pizzas, Philly cheesesteak sandwiches, salads and soups. We decided to go with the V.I.P. plate ($15.99), for a couple of reasons. First, this is probably the only time I’m going to have V.I.P. Anything, and second, the plate had a bit of everything including gyro meat, Greek salad, dolmas, pitas, cherry peppers and baklava for dessert. The sign indicated it was “great for sharing,” but I could see things getting ugly if there wasn’t enough food so we added on two jumbo slices of pizza (2 for $7). One topping is included on each so we went with pepperoni on one and mushrooms on the other. We also ordered a round of Icky’s (on tap, $3). Artichoke is set up into two areas, with a bar area on the left and the restaurant area on the right, although you order from a counter by the bar. I wanted to sit at the bar, but the TV was down and a daily specials sign


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THROUGH THE SCARY ON THE MORNING THAT ELIZABETH TURNED 17

her mother came into her bedroom with a little cake and a single lit candle. She sang happy birthday to her daughter the way that only a parent can. But what she didn’t know was that Elizabeth had only been in her bed for a few hours, pushed inside her bedroom window by friends, because she was too high to walk. “I knew, or at least suspected I had a problem for a long time,” says Elizabeth. “But what I was doing seemed normal.” Until it didn’t seem normal. Elizabeth realized that she was addicted to cocaine and that she was continuing the drug to avoid the withdrawal. “I was sick, sleeping all day.” Elizabeth did not want her parents to know, honestly because she loved them. She still wanted to be the little girl that they expected. But on her birthday morning, something changed. “I looked at my mom, and maybe for the first time, I thought of my parents, instead of just myself. What if she walked in and found me dead?” It was this thought, combined with a stone cold acknowledgement that the drug was making her sick, that made Elizabeth want to stop.

Hanks for the memories Captain Phillips Once again, Tom Hanks stars in a true events film where his character is stuck in a very small, dangerous space for a long time with an outcome most of us might know from following the news. Even though the ending is out there, Hanks and director Paul Greengrass (The Bourne Ultimatum, United 93) somehow make the story suspenseful. by What he did in the true story of Apollo 13, Bob Grimm Hanks does for Captain Phillips. He makes us terrified and confused for his character b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m even though the outcome of said character’s predicament is well known. He does this by, well, doing an excellent job of playing somebody who’s terrified and confused. If you don’t know the outcome of the true story, go see the film and be doubly frightened. If you must know all the details of the outcome before seeing the film, you’re going to have to Google that shit because I’m not telling.

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But Elizabeth still didn’t talk to her parents. She admits that she was afraid that their response would be one of anger. Elizabeth stayed home for two weeks to face her withdrawal alone in her room, blaming her thyroid problem. She deleted phone numbers . “I loved my friends, but I did not love that lifestyle.” She lost all her friends and barely graduated from high school. But she stayed sober. Elizabeth is now a student at UNR studying phycology, as much to learn about herself as others, and she is very involved with NRAP, the student group that supports a sober life. “I wish I would have talked to my parents because they could have helped me. I know now that their reaction would not have been anger - that they would have used a different emotion.” Elizabeth’s advice to parents is to be educated about the drugs that their kids are being exposed to and to look for the physical signs. Her advice to addicts is to keep trying. “It does not make you a failure to relapse. It sucks, but it’s reality. If you have a desire to be sober, you’re almost there.” Let’s help each other Through the Scary. Please share your successes. Contact me at Laura.Newman8888@gmail.com.

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“Yes, that’s right. There are rats in the hold, and I’d like you to go shoot them, please. Just don’t miss because you’ll sink the boat.”

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2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT 22 | RN&R |

OCTOBER 17, 2013

excellent

Hanks plays Richard Phillips, captain of the MV Maersk Alabama cargo ship. While delivering relief goods in 2009, his ship encountered Somali pirates who could give a rat’s ass about charity and tried multiple times to board his ship. They eventually succeeded, putting into play a crazy hostage drama that results in Phillips being taken aboard a space capsule-sized lifeboat with his captors. In every stage of this thriller, from the moment Phillips spots the pirates for the first time trailing his ship, through his initial confrontation with them face-to-face, and subsequent search for the hiding crew, Hanks is masterful. His Phillips maintains a certain level of calm and smarts, but isn’t superhuman or oblivious to the true terrors of his situation. Augmenting the story with a terrifying yet somehow oddly sympathetic performance would

be Barkhad Abdi as Muse, the pirate leader. One of the major strengths of this film is the relationship between Phillips and Muse, which basically starts with Muse informing Phillips that he’s no longer the captain of his own ship. Without necessarily portraying Muse as a victim, there are suggestions in Abdi’s performance and Paul Greengrass’s direction that Muse is being forced into his reprehensible actions. We first see Muse in Somalia, being bullied into action by a village elder who tails him in a bigger boat and seems to be suggesting dire punishment if Muse doesn’t comply with hijacking plans to extort millions from the Americans. Whether or not this is a true account of Muse’s participation in the actual hijacking, it definitely makes him a more fleshed-out character in the movie. As for the interplay between Abdi and Hanks, it is chilling, fraught with tension, and always on the edge of explosion. Of the supporting cast, Michael Chernus distinguishes himself playing chief mate Shane Murphy. You might recognize Chernus from his geeky role in Men in Black 3. This time out, he’s called upon to show the dramatic goods, and he comes through nicely. Catherine Keener shows up in the first scene as Phillips’s wife, then disappears completely. We don’t get any scenes of her biting her nails while awaiting her husband’s fate. The movie seems to be a fairly accurate overall representation of what actually happened during the event, although some crew members of the Maersk Alabama have taken issue with Phillips’s account of the hijacking in his book, A Captain’s Duty, on which the movie is based. Some of them say Phillips acted irresponsibly, ignoring warnings to stay at least 600 miles from the Somali coast due to pirates in the area, and not following proper procedures when the pirates boarded his ship. Taking all this into consideration, the story portrayed in the film remains engrossing, with Greengrass keeping the action realistic and believable. So future film directors who will be delivering fact-based stories wherein the main protagonist is confined in an uncomfortable, claustrophobic space facing great danger, Captain Phillips is further proof that Hanks is most definitely your go-to guy! Ω


Joseph Gordon-Levitt writes, directs and stars in this frank sex comedy about a sex addict who thinks porn is better than true romance. Gordon-Levitt is excellent and consistently funny as the title character, a Jersey boy who’s quite the stud, yet finds himself jerking off to internet porn within mere minutes of finishing with a live woman. His little problem comes to the forefront when he meets Barbara (Scarlett Johansson), the first real love of his life, a woman with high standards who doesn’t approve of the porn thing. The movie is full of porno clips, so don’t see it with kids or a first date, unless you and that first date already have some sort of naughty understanding. Gordon-Levitt has given us something akin to a funnier Saturday Night Fever, with porn replacing disco. Julianne Moore is her usual excellent self in a supporting role, and the shock casting of Tony Danza as Don’s dad proves smart. Danza gets to show some cinematic comedy chops that he hasn’t been able to show off before. This is an overall triumph for Gordon-Levitt.

1

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2

This is animation done with all the style and grace of a spastic colon saturated with hot sauce. While the first film in this series had a reasonable amount of charm, this one goes haywire from its start right until the finish line. Bill Hader returns as the voice of Flint, the overly excited inventor who, in the first movie, managed to use a crazy invention to inundate his hometown with giant food. Now, the machine has gone nuts, creating a race of living food including cheeseburger spiders and dolphin bananas. The film boasts an intolerably frantic pace, with a plotline that’s scattered beyond reasonability. It’s hard to follow, but it does have the occasional fart and poop joke to make the kids laugh. The only character I managed to enjoy was a jittery monkey trying to put out a sparkler, and that accounts for about 30 seconds of the film. Don’t waste your time and, trust me, your kids won’t like it either.

5

Gravity

Finally, we get a big event movie that delivers the sort of thrills absent from too many large-scale movies promising big things this year. If you see this movie, you’re going to have a cinematic trip like no other. This is what going to the movies is supposed to be about. I sound like a movie critic quote machine, and I don’t care. In her first true blue science fiction role since Demolition Man, Sandra Bullock puts herself through the ringer as Ryan Stone, an astronaut on her first space shuttle flight. Her mission commander, played by a charismatic and calming George Clooney, ribs her about her upset tummy as he flies around space in a jet pack while she works tirelessly on the Hubble. Space debris comes their way, and an incredible survival story/adventure is underway. Director Alfonso Cuaron has put together something here that will always be remembered and talked about. This is truly a landmark film.

2

Machete Kills

Robert Rodriguez brings Danny Trejo back for another round of violent B-movie action, and the joke has grown tired. I was a big fan of the original movie and the fake Grindhouse trailer, but this one gets dumb to the point of annoyance. The 69-year-old Trejo, who participates in countless film projects, is starting to look a little tired in the title role. Charlie Sheen (billed under his real name, Carlos Estevez) is actually pretty funny as the President of the United States, but he only has a few scenes. The same can’t be said for Mel Gibson, who mugs his way through a bad guy role in a manner that reveals near desperation to be taken seriously again. I give props to Amber Heard, who gets the film’s best part as a beauty queen/secret agent, but issue demerits to Sofia Vergara who screams her way through her role as a villain with machine gun breasts, a gimmicky rip-off of the girl with machine gun legs from Rodriguez’s Planet Terror. Rodriguez seems to be losing it to some degree.

3

Think Free

4

Don Jon

frays at the end, with a finale as stupid as the rest of the film is gripping. Hugh Jackman delivers a fierce performance as Keller Dover, a survivalist who goes into vigilante mode after his daughter and her friend are kidnapped. When a semi-irritable detective (Jake Gyllenhaal) apprehends a mentally challenged suspect (Paul Dano), Dover and the detective go head-to-head on how to deal with matters. When the suspect is set free, Dover captures and tortures him. This part of the film is solid, dealing with the lengths a parent would go to find a child. As for the film’s mystery element, that’s where things fall apart. Gyllenhaal is quite good here, even when the screenplay lets him down. The movie was shot by Roger Deakins, so it always looks good. It’s worth seeing, but it’s a bit of a disappointment.

2

Runner Runner

2

Rush

Was the world aching for a movie about online gambling? If so, was it aching for a movie about online gambling where Justin Timberlake gets beaten up a lot while looking really scared most of the time as Ben Affleck feeds poultry to his pet crocodiles? Timberlake plays a college student making his tuition through online gambling. After possibly getting hustled, he travels to Costa Rica to get in the face of the guy in charge of the gambling site (Affleck). He winds up getting a job and thrusting himself into a seedy online gambling underworld that involves running around a lot and acting real confused. Timberlake is an actor who can look really good, or really, really lost. This time he’s in lost mode. As for Affleck, I kind of like him in this movie, and enjoy when he plays bad guys. The movie lets him down in a big way with its silly subplots and failed attempts at being clever.

Hollywood has a real hard time making car-racing movies even remotely compelling. The latest genre misfire comes from director Ron Howard, who brings the true story of James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) to the big screen in surprisingly ho-hum fashion. The surprise comes in that the story itself is so amazing, it wouldn’t’ seem possible to render it dull, yet Howard manages just that. For a racing movie, surprisingly little of the film actually takes place on the racetrack. Instead, too much of the film is devoted to routine love stories that seem to be a means of saving budget. Bruhl is decent as Lauda, a determined man who returned to racing mere weeks after being severely burned in a near fatal crash. Hemsworth is charming as Hunt, but little more. Their rivalry was one of the greatest in sports history, yet this movie turns it into a soap opera.

3

Department of Theatre & Dance • School of the Arts

William Shakespeare’s

We’re the Millers

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time drug dealer who gets in over his head and is forced by his boss (Ed Helms) to smuggle drugs from Mexico. Realizing that border agents seem to go easy on families, he hires a fake family to make the trip in an RV. The family includes a wife (a stripper played by Jennifer Aniston), a daughter (a homeless girl played by Emma Roberts) and a son (a hapless neighbor played by Will Poulter). The film has a Vacation movie vibe, especially because Sudeikis is charming in a way that Chevy Chase was for a brief time in his career. Aniston plays a mighty good stripper, for sure. She has another calling in case the whole acting thing doesn’t work out. Roberts gets perhaps her best role yet as Casey, delivering some great eye-rolling moments. As for Poulter, he steals scenes nearly every time he speaks, and his encounter with a tarantula is priceless. Sure, the movie gets a little gooey and sentimental by the time it plays out, but we’ve come to like the characters by then so it’s OK. It’s not a grand cinematic effort by any means, but it does provide some good laughs, with a fair share of them being quite shocking.

ARTS

365

Redfield Studio Theatre University of Nevada, Reno Oct. 25, 26, 30, 31 @ 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1, 2 @ 7:30 p.m. Directed by Robert Gander Oct. 27 & Nov. 3, 2013 @ 1:30 p.m.

Prisoners

For tickets:

For a good part of its running time, this one seems as if it could wind up being one of 2013’s best pictures. Alas, it

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A National Tier 1 University

www.mynevadatickets.com • Lawlor Events Center Box Office or call 1-800-325-7328 |

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24   |   RN&R   |   october 17, 2013


Pass the mic Ruben’s Cantina “Hip-hop has been good to me,” says Ruben’s Cantina owner Ruben Renteria, as he works from behind the bar of his by Laura Davis namesake watering hole on Fourth Street, which he runs with his wife Sonja. “It’s been two years already, it started out slow but it’s really pickedup.” The two years he’s referring to is his bar’s weekly Wednesday night 775 Hip Hop open mic night, which just celebrated its two year anniversary about a month ago. Photo/Allison Young

Dan Hubbard hosts the 775 Hip Hop open mic at Ruben’s Cantina.

Hip-hop open mics aren’t a traditional open mic platform. There’s no sign-up list, no announcers calling out names in an orderly fashion, and there’s no time frame—meaning each performer’s moment in the limelight isn’t measured by a song or two before they’re politely booted off for the next eager guitar strummer. Hip-hop open mics are all about the competition, dating back to the genre’s roots, according to local hip-hop promoter Dan Hubbard, who loosely claims the title of host for the Wednesday night shenanigans at Ruben’s. “It’s not a standard open mic format,” Hubbard agrees. “But for hip-hop, it’s conventional. They play beats, and the mics are sitting there open, it’ll progress to a battle at times, but it’s always respectful and switches off—if you’re a really good rapper you’ll control the mic for a little bit. Hip-hop started with competition. That’s how [performers] get better. But it’s positive, we’ve never had a fight in here.” In fact, for a night based around competition, the vibe is surprisingly playful. The mic rotates from hand

Ruben’s Cantina, 1483 E. Fourth st., hosts the 775 hip hop open mic every Wednesday at 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ rubenscantina.

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to hand, occasionally with rappers finishing each other’s verses in a back-and-forth fashion, filling the room with a sense of camaraderie. That sense is fueled not only by a crowd of regulars who come back week to week to take their turn at the verse, but also by Renteria’s efforts to make his bar feel like a home away from home for his patrons. “This is a place where I give them an open opportunity,” Renteria says of his Wednesday night crowd, which he approximates averages in age from 21 to early 30s. “We make it very easy, all the equipment is provided, you just come in and free style.” Renteria’s good hosting efforts don’t go unnoticed by his crowd. Local producer Joey Quayle, who plays beats on Wednesday nights for the Ruben’s Cantina open mic-ers to rap over, cites Renteria as a driving force behind the night’s success. “Ruben takes care of us,” Quayle says. “The drinks are cheap, his hand is heavy, and it’s a great environment.” Quayle is also quick to mention Hubbard’s own dedication to the night. The host who says he continues to organize the night out of love for the local hip-hop community more than anything else—“there’s no money in it,” Hubbard says— provides all of his own equipment for the stage. “Dan invests his own money into this,” Quayle says. The investment is well received, as it’s not the first hip-hop open mic in town, but it is the longest running—thanks to the help of regulars like George Vargas who make it a point to come out every Wednesday primarily for the sense of belonging the night breeds. “You gotta come prepared,” Vargas says, in reference to getting on the mic. “But everyone’s got a positive attitude, and nobody judges you.” A supportive environment is the best place to grow, and encouraged by a little healthy competition, the young rappers of Ruben’s hiphop open mic have a set stage to flourish. “They all start somewhere, and I love seeing people mature out of it,” says Hubbard. “Open mic is the planting of the seed.” Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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OCTOBER 17, 2013

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THURSDAY 10/17

FRIDAY 10/18

1UP

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

SATURDAY 10/19

SUNDAY 10/20

College Night Wednesdays, 8pm, W, no cover DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Paisley Brain Cells, 9:30pm, no cover

Seeing Eye Dogs, 9:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

The Frank Hannon Band, 8pm, $TBA

The Jet Stole Home, Lo’ There Do I See My Brother, The Light Iris, 8pm, $5

For All Those Sleeping, Wolves at the Gate, I The Mighty, PVRIS, 6pm, $13

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/21-10/23

Select Saturdays, 8pm, no cover

Yo Gotti, YG, Zed Zilla, Shy Glizzy, Ca$h Out, 7:30pm, $22, $25

Awol One, 8pm, Tu, $7, Music Trivia w/Chris Payne, 9pm, W, no cover

BAR-M-BAR

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

Hank 3

CEOL IRISH PUB

Oct. 18, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Comedy

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Arann Harris and The Farm Band, 7pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: JJ Ramirez, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Ben Seidman, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

FUEGO

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: The Stagebenders, Joel Lindley, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Scott Record, Chipper Lowell, W, 9pm, $25

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Democratic Women of Washoe County Fundraiser with Will Durst, Th, 7:30pm, $28, $33; Will Dusrt, F, 8pm, $17, $22

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Vaughn Jensen Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Vaughn Jensen Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Jam, 9:30pm, M, karaoke, 9:30pm, Tu, open mic, 9:30pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Mark Sexton Band, 9pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HANGAR BAR

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Canyon Jam, 8pm, no cover Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

Holland Halloween Cover Show, 6pm, $2 w/costume, $5 w/out costume

JAVA JUNGLE

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to

75% OFF!

Andrew W.K., 8pm, $18 Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

FRANK FRA ANK K HANNON HAN HA AN A NN NO NON ON ON BAND BAND (OF ((O OF O F TESLA) TESL TESL LA)) LA

Thursday, T Th Thu rsday, y October Octob October er 17

Greg G reg Golden Golden Band, Band, W/ Max Volume

JET STOLE HOME

Friday, Friday Fri d y, October 18

W/ L Lo' o' There T Do I See My Brother, Ou Ourr D Dev Devi De Devices, evvices, ces, Drag Me Under, The Light Iris

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Saturday, October 19

W/ Authmentis, For All Those Sleeping, Wolves At The Gate, I The Mighty, Pvris

YO GOTTI + YG

Sunday, October 20

W/ Zed Zilla, Shy Glizzy, Ca$h Out, +TBA

AWOL ONE

Monday, October 21

W/ The Halve Two, Moral, Davastate,wild Things, Frend, Dj Plan C

THE ICARUS LINE

Thursday, October 24

W/ Me Time, Prescription, The Flesh Hammers

COBRA SKULLS

Friday, October 25

W/ Beercan!, Machine Gun Vendetta, Priscilla Ford

JOIN US ON FACEBOOK, OR AT WWW.THEALLEYSPARKS.COM FOR DAILY + WEEKLY DRINK SPECIALS, CONTESTS, SHOW ANNOUNCEMENTS, AND MORE!!!

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RN&R

| OCTOBER 17, 2013

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Norm Follett, 7pm, no cover

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

Frank Hannon (Of Tesla) – October 17 A Skylit Drive – October 19 Yo Gotti ft. YG – October 20 The Icarus Line – October 24 Cobra Skulls – October 25 A Pale Horse Named Death – November 1 He Is Legend – November 2 Jello Biafra And The Guantanamo School Of Medicine – November 17

TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

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JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

THURSDAY 10/17

FRIDAY 10/18

SATURDAY 10/19

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

SUNDAY 10/20

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Thee Hobo Gobbelins, Actors Killed Lincoln, Ghost Town Gospel, 9pm, $5

Gypsy Flight, Stonedaddy, Some Fear None, 8:30pm, $5

Burn Burn Burn!, Melvin Makes Machineguns, The Moans, 8:30pm, $5

Roach Gigz, Husalah, J. Stalin, Bobby Brackins, 7pm, $20-$35

Hank 3, 8pm, $19-$36

Andre Nickatina, Mistah Fab, 8pm, $27-$50

Colorless Blue, 1pm, no cover Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover The Used, William Control, The Jet Stole Home, 8pm, $25-$40

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Portugal.The Man, Crystal Fighters, 8pm, Tu, $22-$35 Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

POLO LOUNGE 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka & Andrea, 9pm, no cover

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka & Andrea, 9pm, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, 7:30pm, no cover

Hired Gunnz, 7pm, no cover

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

Andrew W.K. Oct. 19, 8 p.m. The Holland Project 140 Vesta St. 742-1858

RED DOG SALOON

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

THE RED ROOM

Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Maximum Volume Thursdays w/DJs Max, Noches de Sabor: Latin Night w/DJ Rise Culture Saturday, Fierce, 11pm, $5-$10; no cover ages 21+ Freddo, 11pm, $5-$10; no cover for locals 10pm, $5-$10

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SHEA’S TAVERN

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Clairy Browne & The Bangin’ Rackettes

Contortion, Scattered, 10pm, $3

715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Tazer, 9pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030 Reno_Print_ad_S:S.pdf

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VASSAR LOUNGE

Friday Night Blues, 8pm, no cover

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Ladies Night with Chippendales, 8pm, $15, $25

9:21 AM

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/21-10/23

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Sleepy Sun, 9pm, $TBA

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Scott Monroe Experimental Music Showcase, 8pm, no cover

The Bonfire Set, Couches, 8pm, M, $3, karaoke, 7pm, Tu, open mic, 7pm, W, no cover

Oct. 19, 7 p.m. Eldorado Hotel-Casino 345 N. Virginia St. 786-5700

Rock’N J Entertainment Karaoke,

9:21 AM 8pm, no cover

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IN ROTATION

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 10/17

FRIDAY 10/18

SATURDAY 10/19

SUNDAY 10/20

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 2) Escalade, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 2) Rebekah Chase Band, 8pm, no cover 10pm, no cover 10pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Melissa Dru, 7pm, no cover

2) Melissa Dru, 8pm, no cover

2) Melissa Dru, 8pm, no cover

1) The Lettermen, 7pm, Tu, W, $29.99 2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, 10pm, no cover

1) Cherub, Con Bro Chill, Mansions on the Moon, 9pm, Tu, $12, $15, Rusted Root, Goodnight Texas, 9pm, W, $22-$42

1) Grease, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 1) Grease, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Clairy Browne & The Bangin’ Rackettes, 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 7pm, $10

1) Grease, 7pm Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) Valley Sky Theatre

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

Rusted Root Oct. 23, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

1) Grease, 7pm, $24.95+

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 5) Stadium Bar

1) Grease, 8pm, $24.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/21-10/23

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) The Beach 4) Summit Pavilion 5) Silver State Pavilion

1) Cheech & Chong, War, 9pm, $35-$75 5) Bell Bottom Bash, 9pm, $10-$15

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

1) Blind Boys of Alabama, 7:30pm, $46.20 3) DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

HARRAH’S RENO

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Blue Collar Men, 9pm, no cover 2) Blue Collar Men, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

SILVER LEGACY

1) Magic to Die For, 8pm, $17 2) Just Us, 7pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Karaoke Night, 7pm, no cover

1) Magic to Die For, 8pm, $17 2) Just Us, 8pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover

3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 3) Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

1) America’s Got Talent Live, 8pm, $63.25-$72.25 2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Just Us, 8pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover

1) Lisa Lampanelli, 8pm, $40-$60 2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

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For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno weekly PIcks

Holland Halloween Cover Show

sQUAsH

2.0 PumpkinPalooza

October is in full swing and with it all the pumpkin patches, fall harvest festivals and haunted houses that make this autumnal month one of the best times of the year. This weekend, downtown Sparks celebrates one of the most visible harbingers of the season: the pumpkin. The bright orange gourd is the star of the second annual PumpkinPalooza, a family-friendly festival and fundraiser for the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living. Highlights of the weekend event include the Pumpkin Derby, the Lighting of the Pumpkins and the Zombie Prom, as well as a children’s costume parade, storytelling, carnival-style games, pie-eating, pumpkinseed spitting, marshmallow-shooting and mummywrapping contests, live music and the Pumpkin Beauty Contest. The event takes place from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 20, at Victorian Square in downtown Sparks. Admission is free. Call 353-3599 or visit www.pumpkinpalooza.org.

—Kelley Lang

Members of local bands get in the Halloween spirit by dressing up as various punk, indie rock, hip-hop and other musical acts at Holland Project’s annual show. This year’s lineup includes “appearances” by garage punk bands the “Wipers” and the “Cramps,” death rockers the “Sisters of Mercy,” pop-punk outfit “Blink 182,” hip-hop legends the “Beastie Boys” and New Zealand’s comedy folk duo “Flight of the Conchords,” among others. The all-ages show begins at 6 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 18, at the Holland Project, 140 Vesta St. Cover is $2 with a costume and $5 without a costume. The fun continues with an after-show event featuring the “Black Keys” and the “Yeah Yeah Yeahs” at 40 Mile Saloon, 1495 S. Virginia St. Visit www.hollandreno.org.

Reno Chamber Orchestra The RCO presents its second concert of the season featuring guest artist Caroline Goulding. The violinist will perform the “Scottish Fantasy,” a concerto by Max Bruch based on Scottish folk songs. The chamber orchestra will also perform Symphony No. 5, South African composer Peter Klatzow’s arrangement of Johannes Brahms’ String Quintet Op. 111, as well as Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9. Maestro Theodore Kuchar, RCO music director, will conduct the orchestra in these performances, which begin at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19, and 2 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 20, at the Nightingale Concert Hall inside the Church Fine Arts Building, 1335 N. Virginia St., at the University of Nevada, Reno. Tickets are $5-$45. Call 348-9413 or visit www.renochamberorchestra.org.

Social Science Dress as your favorite ghost, alien or mad scientist at the Discovery Museum’s monthly adults-only event, which includes science demos, art projects, a DJ spinning tunes, wine and beer and food from some of Reno’s most popular food trucks. The event begins at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St. Admission is $20-$30. Call 786-1000 or visit www.nvdm.org.

Carson City Ghost Walk It wouldn’t be October without a ghost walk or two. The monthly Carson City Ghost Walk season will conclude this Saturday, Oct. 19, with its original ghost walk event. Participants will learn about lingering spirits of Carson City’s past as they take a 90-minute, guided tour through the St. Charles Hotel, four historic homes and the Governor’s Mansion in the capital city’s historic downtown district. Tours depart every half hour from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. from the corner of Third and Carson streets next to the Firkin & Fox, 310 S. Carson St., located on the lower floor of the St. Charles Hotel. Tickets are $15-$20. There will also be a mini ghost walk for kids and families, starting at 10:15 a.m. Costumes are encouraged, and there will be old-fashioned trick or treating during the event. Tickets are $5-$10. Call 348-6279 or visit http://carsoncityghostwalk.com.

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Recycle this paper

Tease for two I’m dating a wonderful guy I’m totally in love with. He’s always looked up to his older brother, a very attractive guy who’s a real ladies’ man. I’ve found myself behaving in some unsettling ways when we hang out with his brother, like fixing myself up beforehand like I’ve got a big date. I realized that I want his brother to want me. I get a very naughty feeling when he looks me up and down, and I love it. To be clear, I don’t want him in any real or threatening way, and I don’t want to jeopardize my relationship with my boyfriend. Perhaps I’m motivated by knowing that my boyfriend has never been envied by his brother, and now I get to make that happen. Like many good people, you’re inspired to do volunteer work to bolster the less fortunate, such as the boy who grew up deprived of being envied by his older brother. Interestingly, others who do charitable work, like Salvation Army Santas, somehow manage to accomplish it without first re-engineering their cleavage to graze their jawline. In addition to your push-up humanitarianism and the ensuing uplift for your ego (and possibly your boyfriend’s, too), another explanation for your behavior is that you aren’t just yourself; you’re also what two researchers call your “subselves.” It’s long been believed that we each have one consistent “self,” with stable preferences, leading us to make consistent choices from situation to situation. That actually isn’t the case. Psychologists Douglas Kenrick and Vladas Griskevicius, authors of The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think, find evidence for our having seven “subselves” driving our choices, each corresponding to a different evolutionary challenge our ancestors faced. These challenges include: 1. Evading physical harm. 2. Avoiding disease. 3. Making friends. 4. Gaining status. 5. Caring for family. 6. Attracting a mate. 7. Keeping that mate. Although we like to think of ourselves as driven by rational thought, environmental triggers can prime a particular subself to grab the controls. For example, seeing a scary movie or a crime report primes our harm-evading subself to take charge, amping up our loss aversion. (Good time to sell us a Rottweiler and the world’s first suburban moat.) And although you’re in a happy relationship, real or imagined potential mates on the horizon prime your mate attraction subself, which is the one leading you, whenever your boyfriend’s bro will be around, to dress for sliding into a booth at the diner like you’ll be sliding down a greased pole. 32   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 17, 2013

The complicated truth is, if your boyfriend notices his brother’s eyeballs bouncing after you like puppies, you may be priming his mate-retention subself by reminding him that you have other options. To keep him from suspecting you’re interested in other options, prime your own mate-retention subself. Look at cute pictures of the two of you and run through reasons you’re grateful for him and for your relationship. This, in turn, should help you refrain from saving your sexiest looks and moves for when you two are hanging out with his brother: “Just gonna twerk my way to the bakery case, bend over in this short skirt, lick the glass, and see if the banana nut muffins speak to me.”

The Blocked Stallion I really like this guy from my college English class. We hang out a lot, eating together and playing pingpong, and when it was raining, we ducked into a building and talked till 2 a.m. No matter how much I flirt with him, including touching him, he never makes a move or touches me, beyond once fist-bumping with me for what seemed like a long time. Should I make a move on him? A man’s body language can tell a woman a lot about his intentions. A series of fist bumps, for example, suggests he wants to have a burping contest. You’ve done your part—flirting to let this guy know you’re interested—which was his cue to do his part and ask you out. There are four possible reasons he hasn’t: 1. He’s gay. 2. He’s got a girlfriend. 3. He’s just not interested. 4. He’s a huge wimp. Even if you suspect he’s a wimp who’s crushing on you, do you really want to reward this behavior by manning up and doing the asking? If a man can’t endure a possible 10 seconds of rejection, is he the man you want with you when danger rears its head? (You’ll be facing it head-on; he’ll be hiding behind a bush.) Look elsewhere for a boyfriend, and look to this guy for what he’s capable of providing: friendship. In fact, it seems he’s fast becoming one of your best girlfriends—although probably not the one to go to when you need to borrow a tampon.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   October 17, 2013  |  

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33


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by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): This is an

indelicate oracle. If you’re offended by the mention of bodily functions in a prophetic context you should stop reading now. Still here? OK. I was walking through my neighborhood when I spied an older woman standing over her aged Yorkshire terrier next to a bush. The dog was in discomfort, squatting and shivering but unable to relieve himself. “He’s having trouble getting his business done,” his owner confided in me. “He’s been struggling for 10 minutes.” I felt a rush of sympathy for the distressed creature. With a flourish of my hand, I said, “More power to you, little one. May you purge your burden.” The dog instantly defecated. Shrieking her approval, the woman exclaimed, “It’s like you waved a magic wand!” Now I am invoking my wizardry in your behalf, Aries, although in a less literal way: More power to you. May you purge your psychological burden.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “You won’t

do it at the right time,” warns writer Kate Moller. “You’ll be late. You’ll be early. You’ll get re-routed. You’ll get delayed. You’ll change your mind. You’ll change your heart. It’s not going to turn out the way you thought it would.” And yet, Moller concludes—are you ready for the punch line?—“It will be better.” In describing your future, Taurus, I couldn’t have said it better myself. Fate may be comical in the way it plays with your expectations and plans, but I predict you will ultimately be glad about the outcome.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the coming

weeks, you Geminis could be skillful and even spectacular liars. You will have the potential to deceive more people, bend more truths, and even fool yourself better than anyone else. On the other hand, you will also have the knack to channel this same slipperiness in a different direction. You could tell imaginative stories that rouse people from their ruts. You might explore the positive aspects of Kurt Vonnegut’s theory that we tend to become what we pretend to be. Or you could simply be so creative and playful and improvisational in everything you do that you catalyze a lot of inspirational fun. Which way will you go?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m all in

favor of you indulging your instinct for self-protection. As a Cancerian myself, I understand that one of the ways you take good care of yourself is by making sure that you feel reasonably safe. Having said that, I also want to remind you that your mental and emotional health requires you to leave your comfort zone on a regular basis. Now is one of those times. The call to adventure will arrive soon. If you make yourself ready and eager for changes, the changes that come will kick your ass in mostly educational and pleasurable ways.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Who exactly do you

want to be when you grow up, and what is the single most important experience you need in order to make that happen? What riches do you want to possess when you are finally wise enough to make enlightened use of them, and how can you boost your eligibility for those riches? Which one of your glorious dreams is not quite ripe enough for you to fulfill it, but is primed to be dramatically ripened in the coming weeks? If I were you, Leo, I would meditate on these questions. Answers will be forthcoming.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): At an

www.newsreview.com 34   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 17, 2013

elementary-school festival some years ago, I performed the role of the Mad Hatter from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. One of my tasks was to ask kids to make a wish, whereupon I sprinkled their heads with magic fairy dust. Some of the kids were skeptical about the whole business. They questioned the proposition that the fairy dust would make their wishes come true. A few were so suspicious that they walked away without making a wish or accepting the fairy dust. Yet every single one of those distrustful kids came back later to tell me they had changed their minds, and every single one asked me to bestow more than the usual amount of fairy dust. They are your role models, Virgo. Like them, you should return to the scene of your doubts, and demand extra fairy dust.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The door to

the invisible must be visible,” wrote the surrealist spiritual author René Daumal. This describes an opportunity that is on the verge of becoming available to you. The opportunity is still invisible simply because it has no precedents in your life; you can’t imagine what it is. But just recently, a door to that unknown realm has become visible to you. I suggest you open it, even though you have almost no idea what’s on the other side.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In Tim

Burton’s film Alice in Wonderland, Alice asks the White Rabbit, “How long is forever?” The talking rabbit replies, “Sometimes, just one second.” That’s an important piece of information for you to keep in mind, Scorpio. It implies that “forever” may not necessarily, in all cases, last until the universe dies out 5 billion years from now. Forever might actually turn out to be one second or 90 minutes or a month or a year or who knows? So how does this apply to your life right now? Well, a situation you assumed was permanent could ultimately change—perhaps much faster than you have imagined. An apparently everlasting decree or perpetual feeling could unexpectedly shift, as if by magic.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“I need a little language such as lovers use,” wrote Virginia Woolf in her novel The Waves. “I need no words. Nothing neat,” she wrote. “I need a howl; a cry.” If I’m reading the astrological omens correctly, Sagittarius, Woolf is speaking for you right now. You should be willing to get guttural and primal—to trust the teachings of silence and the crazy wisdom of your body, to exult in the inarticulate mysteries and bask in the dumfounding brilliance of the Eternal Wow. Are you brave enough to love what can’t be put into words?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I get

bored with the idea of becoming a better listener,” writes business blogger Penelope Trunk. “Why would I do that when interrupting people is so much faster?” If your main goal is to impose your will on people and get things over with as soon as possible, Capricorn, by all means, follow Trunk’s advice this week. But if you have other goals—like building consensus, finding out important information you don’t know yet and winning help from people who feel affection for you—I suggest that you find out how to have maximum fun by being an excellent listener.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The last

time meteorologists officially added a new type of cloud formation to the International Cloud Atlas was 1951. But they’re considering another one now. It’s called “asperatus,” which is derived from the Latin term undulatus asperatus, meaning “turbulent undulation.” According to The Cloud Appreciation Society, it resembles “the surface of a choppy sea from below.” But although it looks rough and agitated, it almost never brings a storm. Let’s make asperatus your mascot for the next few weeks, Aquarius. I suspect that you, too, will soon discover something new under the sun. It may at first look turbulent, but I bet it will mostly just be interesting.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Should you

try private experiments that might generate intimate miracles? Yes! Should you dream up extravagant proposals and schedule midnight rendezvous! By all means! Should you pick up where your fantasies left off the last time you got too timid to explore further? Naturally! Should you find out what “as raw as the law allows” actually means? I encourage you! Should you question taboos that are no longer relevant? Most assuredly! Should you burn away the rotting pain with a show of liberated strength? Beyond a doubt! Should you tap into the open secret at the core of your wild beauty! Of course!

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


Think Free

by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Multi-tasker

But I wanted to date her, and her father wouldn’t let me date her unless I first went to church.

What happened with her? Stephen Sprinkel is a marriage and family therapist, pastor of St. Mark’s Fellowship of Reno, and author of Pure River ... Dark Hearts, a mystery novel and first volume of a planned trilogy.

I have no idea. We broke up when I was 18 and told her I didn’t want to get married. She threw my class ring at my head.

You don’t seem to have trouble keeping yourself busy.

All the characters in my novels are characters who reflect people I’ve met in life and all walks of life. I’ve worked with people in politics, I’ve worked with prostitutes, I’ve worked with religious fanatics, and these are all characters in my novels. And I’ve also worked with some very kind and sweet and gentle people who also are in my novels.

I don’t. I’m usually pretty busy, and I guess I thrive on that.

You’re an author, minister and therapist. The first two are avocations, and therapy is your full-time job? Well, therapy is my full-time job and being a minister is my second job. And it used to be the other way around. When I came to Reno in 1977, I was a full-time minister and a part-time therapist. And that changed in 1990, and I went to full-time therapy. … For a time I dropped out of the ministry when religion was becoming too political.

How do they overlap? Oh, gosh. Well, whether it’s the church or it’s in the therapy office, people struggle with the same human needs and concerns. The church becomes a place, for me, that’s a very positive, uplifting place to respond to people’s needs and hurts. And in therapy I do a lot more teaching and intense kinds of work that I did as a minister.

How does the therapy and the religion work its way into your writing?

How did you choose this line of work—or these lines of work? I was heavily influenced as a young man by a man that was both a minister and a marriage and family therapist. And in high school, he sort of took me under his wings, and by the time I was 17 or 18, I decided I wanted to be both a therapist and a minister.

Actually, many, many years later—it was about four years ago—I had a chance to meet him again. It had been probably 30, 40 years since I’d seen him, and I shared with him the impact he’d had on his life. I think it meant a lot to him.

And there was a girl somewhere in this. Oh, yes, yes. That was the reason I’d started going to church to begin with, to sit next to a teenaged girl that I had a crush on. I didn’t grow up in the church.

∫y Bruce Van Dye

So hasn’t this whole thing with the dumping of the vat of Gatorade on the hero of the game/winning coach become redonkulously tired already? I mean, strictly yawnsville, man. Jeez, it was getting old at about G-Dump number 677, and time hasn’t done a whole lot to refresh this nasty little gag. • This country didn’t go into a national seizure when all the state legislatures began passing laws making it mandatory to purchase auto insurance. Right? Or was I living in a cave at that time? Where were all these tea-sucking kooks when that was going down? You know what the penalty is in 2014 for those who don’t buy mandatory health insurance? 95 bucks. That’s it. So STFU and GTFO. • This story about the nickname of D.C.’s NFL team has legs. Thick, hairy ones, with mangled surgical scars on each knee. More and more sports columnists and talk show hosts feel compelled to declare their position on the issue, and an angle that’s getting |

NEWS

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GREEN

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Yes, Yes. I’ve had that happen numerous times, not just in the novels, but sometimes in my homilies and sermons. Ω

Did he know of the impact he had on you?

Potpourri

OPINION

Has anyone every come to you and said, “Hey, that was me.”

time in the sportlight spotlight lately is the viewpoint of Native Americans. The one study that everybody cites is one that states 90 percent of natives weren’t bugged by the Redskin name. But, there are just a couple of problems with that study. (1) It’s old. 2004. That’s awhile ago. (2) It’s small. Sample size of 768. That’s not instantly dismissible, no. But it’s close. Time for a new study, while this story is hot. Take the temp now, with a basic sample size of 1,000. I’d be much more trusting of an updated, legit survey. If it’s true that the majority of Indians don’t give a flying Fudgsicle about this Redskin jazz, dandy. I’ll be happy to take my guilt-ridden PC honky ass down the line to the next crucial social issue. Far be it from me to force my righteousness upon those who think it sucks. Something tells me, though, that the results of a survey in 2013 would be a bit different than that one in ’04. Just a hunch. If the ’Skins did decide to bow to pressure and change their name, there is one old Washington nickname that is

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

(1) well established in sports history and (2) currently available. It’s a name that, in the past, wasn’t particularly terrifying. Not like Lions or Pirates. But now, well, now its power to make blood chill and hearts go positively arrhythmic has grown exponentially. Of course I’m talking about the name used by Washington’s baseball teams for decades: The Senators. Eeeekkk! • I’ve been raving a bunch about the AMC program Breaking Bad. While watching the rally in Washington this past week presided over by Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Utah Sen. Mike Lee, I couldn’t help but think of another popular AMC show—Mad Men. I mean, here they are, doing more than their fair share to close down the government. Then, they’re out at some military memorial in D.C., rousing the rabble about it being closed. Kafkaesque, man! Ω |

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

NorthstarCalifornia.com 1800.GoNorth

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 17, 2013

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RN&R

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