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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.....................25 Nightclubs/Casinos........26 This.Week.................... 30 Free.Will.Astrology....... 34 15.Minutes.....................35 Bruce.Van.Dyke............35

delusion climate See News, page 8.

Grow your own, but Grow it inside! See Green, page 11.

Vertical art inteGration See Arts&Culture, page 16.

x couple e s e m a s ’s first meet Reno ts through i f e n e b e s n spou d to enroll i ional Guar t a N r i a a the Nevad

StuCk iN the

slow lane See Film, page 22.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE 19, issuE 33

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octobER 3-octobER 9, 2013


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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Yeah, we’re awesome

A death in the afternoon

Call of the wild

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. The RN&R won what we think is our record number of awards this year at the Nevada Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest. Congratulations to all! Dennis Myers, 1st, Editorial of the Year; Sheila Leslie, 1st, Best Local Nonstaff Column;

Re “Nevada’s killing fields” (Guest Comment, Sept. 19): I’d like to extend my thanks to Fred Voltz for exploring an important topic often regarded as taboo: the intrinsic rights of wildlife on public lands. I’ve had the honor of becoming familiar with Nevada’s vast public lands through field research and personal recreation. I’m in awe of the huge tracts of land that belong to all of us collectively. However, I believe the management practices with which Nevada’s Department of Wildlife govern herds, habitats and ecosystems are contradictory to wishes of a great proportion of Nevadans. In some cases, policy is completely biased toward hunting/trapping interests, examples of which are the species which have languished on the endangered species list as “warranted but precluded,” meaning in need of protection but obstructed from it. The sage grouse is in this group, though many resources have been pooled to approve or disprove its endangered status and optimize conservation, it’s still legal to hunt. A season’s hunting license is $33 and the harvesting of grouse “limited” to three per day. That’s $33 for the life of a struggling species. Even if these species are managed in a way that there’s some surplus in their populations, is our current hunting system ethical? Is it ethical to systematically remove perhaps the most fit individuals from the gene pool, thus weakening the entire group? Is it ethical to kill predators who would be the natural regulators of population size? Is it ethical to kill using snares and traps? I don’t hate hunters or trappers. I do however recognize that a colossal imbalance in representation exists between their interests and those of citizens who would prefer fair treatment for the hunted and their ecosystems. I would like to offer a rebut to Bill Young: I am an ecotourist. I spend all of my free time in the backcountry. I spend money on food, gear, books, bicycle parts, maps, etc. I go to observe, to be inspired by the wild, to play without killing, to learn about our land. Name withheld Reno

You can hear it in their voices, this time of year. They’re no longer strong, or confident, like they were years ago, when they blackened the skies over the Stillwater Wildlife Refuge, east of Fallon. I like to think Canada geese will be among the survivors, and not among the already many victims of our stupidity, greed, and fear. (How many species have we driven to extinction?) Geese are intelligent. Wary. They have great eyesight. But the sound of their honking has changed recently. It’s weaker, confused and hoarse. It is a very disturbing cry to me, and saddening, and should be a deep wake-up call to all of us about what our way of life is doing to this planet. Often, it is only a single bird. I wonder how many have never seen—and heard—the great waves of geese that used to cross over this valley. Now it’s only a few here and there. Do you think if Henry Ford had only known what his inefficient, internal-combustion engine was going to do to this world, he would have put a gun in his mouth? It’s a real canary warning, people. Try to get outside more and see if you can hear it. Jon Obester Reno

D. Brian Burghart, 1st, Best Investigative or In-depth Story; Dennis Myers, 1st, Best Spot News Story; Boys & Girls Club of Truckee

Meadows, Marianne Mancina, Kate Murphy, John Murphy, RN&R Staff, 1st, Best Special Section or Campaign (Advertising); RN&R, 1st, Freedom of the Press; Dennis Myers, 1st, Best Editorial Writing; Skyler Smith, John Murphy, 1st, Best In-House Promotion; Priscilla Garcia, 1st, Best Illustration; Hayley Doshay, 1st, Best Information Graphic; Tracie Douglas, 1st, Best Nonstaff Story; Dennis Myers, 1st, Best Online Writing; D. Brian Burghart, 1st, Best News Feature; Ky Plaskon, 2nd, Best Sports Feature; Jessica Santina, 2nd, Best Critical Writing; RN&R Staff, 2nd, Advertising General Excellence; Dennis Myers, 2nd, Best Business News Story; Skyler Smith, John Murphy, RN&R Staff, 2nd, Best Special Section or Campaign (Advertising); D. Brian Burghart, 2nd, Best Editorial Writing; Hayley Doshay, 2nd, Best Illustration; Priscilla Garcia, 2nd, Best Information Graphic; Bethany Deines, 2nd, Best Nonstaff Story; Brad Bynum, 2nd, Best Business Feature; D. Brian Burghart, 2nd, Best Explanatory Journalism; RN&R staff, 2nd, Best Special Section (Editorial); Melissa Arendt, John Murphy, 2nd, Best Large-Space Ad; D. Brian Burghart, 2nd, Best News Feature; Chanelle Bessette, 3rd, Best Local Non-staff Column; Brad Bynum, 3rd, Best Critical Writing; Dennis Myers, 3rd, Best Investigative or In-depth Story; Brad Bynum, 3rd, Best Business News Story;

Hayley Doshay, Priscilla Garcia, Brian Breneman, 3rd, Best Overall Design; RN&R Staff, 3rd, Best Special Section or Campaign (Advertising); Priscilla Garcia, 3rd, Best Illustration; Megan Berner, 3rd, Best Portrait; D. Brian Burghart, 3rd, Best Business Feature; Bob Grimm, 3rd, Best Entertainment Writing; Skyler Smith, Gina Odegard, 3rd, Best Large-Space Ad; Vivian Liu, Beverly Savage, 3rd, Best Multi-Color Ad; Brad Bynum, 3rd, Best Feature Story.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Short but savory Re “Nevada’s killing fields” (Guest Comment, Sept. 19): I liked the part where you used the headline to compare Nevada’s hunting policies to the genocide of a millionplus human beings in Cambodia. These things are obviously highly correlated. Kyle Magin Incline Village

Where the wild things are Re “Nevada’s killing fields” (Guest Comment, Sept. 19): Well said. Excellent read, 100 percent truth! I ask over and over again, why and how does this happen, that the minority of a “special interest group” make the decisions on how to manage our wildlife over the majority? I have read expert reports of how much

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Design Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

more revenue “Wildlife Watching” generates in our public wildlife lands, a minimum of seven times what hunting [generates]. The whole Fish & Game/Wildlife Departments need serious and complete overhauling. I realize that most people do not believe hunting is a “sport.” So apathetically inherently cruel and unnecessary—just heartbreaking. Life is really hard for wildlife, humans interfere so much by encroachment, but to go out into what little habitat they have left and murder them is nothing short of insane. Dominique Landis Lincoln, Calif.

What amendment? Why is Downtown Reno no longer a part of America? When did Street Vibrations become a place that American freedoms are not allowed? Why? It is my opinion that Roadshows Inc., as well as many downtown businesses, are discriminating against the very spirit of the freedom they are pretending to celebrate. Street Vibrations and downtown businesses are taking in a lot of money from motorcyclists, but are treating motorcycle club members like second class citizens. By declaring Street Vibes a “no colors” event while holding it on public property, I believe they are violating the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, the Nevada Constitution and Nevada Revised Statute Title 54 Section 651. As Nevadans and Americans, we have had enough of discrimination and being labeled as undesirable. Our rights, your rights, every American’s rights are being trampled on public property! “Bikers” are your neighbors, your co-workers, members of your church. We are business owners and vets. We are advocating for everyone’s rights. We are fighting to make Nevada a better place, a place where everyone has rights. No city, county or business can invalidate the First Amendment. Mike Marcum Reno

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Michael Schneider, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Joseph White, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

Take a walk on the wild side Re “Nevada’s killing fields” (Guest Comment, Sept. 19): Thank you for printing Fred Voltz’s piece about wildlife management in Nevada. The non-hunting, non-trapping public has little exposure to this topic. Your readers may be interested in a hot topic currently under discussion between the Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners, trappers, and those of us who believe that Nevada’s wildlife needs protection against trappers, particularly the trap visitation interval of 96 hours. As a result of SB 213 passed earlier this year, the Board of Wildlife Commissioners has been forced by the legislature to consider whether the visitation interval should remain where it is (96 hours) or be shortened (our preference) to help alleviate animal suffering in traps. This examination is timely because of recent information from the Nevada Department of Wildlife regarding animals caught unintentionally by trappers (so-called “trash” animals by trappers). The numbers are remarkable. Although only 20 percent of trappers have reported such information to the Nevada Department of Wildlife, in the past decade, trappers have accidentally caught 4,200 rabbits, nearly 200 dogs, over 100 cats, 172 mountain lions, 25 livestock animals, 200 pack rats, 9 eagles, 11 hawks, an owl, 97 magpies and more. Many died in the traps, others were released uninjured or with damage. Since these numbers were reported by a small percentage of all trappers, this carnage represents only the tip of the iceberg. The true number could be 2-3 times higher than that. For these reasons, it is in the public interest for trappers to be forced to visit their traps more frequently in order to release animals and birds that are not intended targets with less chance of injury or death than is now the case. Information regarding the Trapping Committee meetings can be obtained from the Nevada Department of Wildlife (775) 688-1500 or ndow.org. Donald A. Molde Reno

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover & Feature story design: Brian Breneman

OCTOBER 3, 2013

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Saturday, October 12

THE BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA Saturday, October 19

LEON RUSSELL Saturday, October 26

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See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

BLUE ÖYSTER CULT

doing good in a

big way Inspired by billboards she saw promoting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada while in high school, Amanda McMorran knew she wanted to become a Big Sister to a child in need when she was old enough to volunteer. “I have a passion for helping kids. I want to become a teacher and be a positive influence on youth. Volunteering as a Big Sister is another way to do that, but on a one-to-one basis,” said Amanda. Amanda decided to participate as a site-based mentor, “I chose site-based mentoring because the weekly one hour visit was at the same place each week and worked best with my school schedule.” Amanda was matched with her Little Sister, Markina, in July 2012 as part of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada program at the Boys & Girls Club. Initially, both Amanda and Markina were a little shy with each other, but that’s not the case anymore. “My Little Sister Markina is hilarious! We have both learned to open up to each other and it has really been an incredible experience,” said Amanda. When asked what it means to have Amanda as a Big Sister, Markina said, “She is like a real sister to me. Before I met Amanda, I didn’t really like school, but she has really helped change my attitude. It was very special for me to have her attend my middle school graduation.” Thinking about what new activities they could do together, Amanda and Markina decided they wanted to try a community service project. “I thought community service was something you had to do when you got in trouble,” said Markina, “Amanda taught me that community service is my choice to make to do something good for our community.” Amanda and Markina are working to develop a local chapter of Hugs Across America, a nonprofit that comforts children in crisis through the hugs of teddy bears. “I want to donate the teddy bears and messages of encouragement to the special kids in hospitals,” said Markina. “When Markina and I talked about what she wanted to accomplish this year, she told me she wanted to make a chocolate volcano or do a community service project. Choosing a community service project over the chocolate volcano just demonstrates how much she has matured in the short time we have been together,” said Amanda. If you have just an hour a week and would like to make a lasting impact on the life of a child in need call 352-3202 or visit BBBSNN.org, and get ready to start something BIG!

745 West Moana Ln, Ste 200 Reno, NV 89509 775-352-3202 www.bbbsnn.org


by Dennis Myers

THIS ModeRn WoRld

by tom tomorrow

Would you like to be in Congress? Asked at Java Jungle, 246 W. First St. Devon Eckberd Student

I try and stay away from all that kind of stuff. I really don’t pay much attention to Congress.

David Barber Hospital valet

No, not at all. There’s a lot of pressure, a lot of people that you’re basically making big decisions for, and I’m just not prepared to make those decisions.

Brian Depew IT manager

Two years?

No. I’m not into politics. And Congress is a sore subject right now.

It’s really hard to determine what U.S. District Judge Larry Hicks was thinking when he sentenced Nevada power broker Harvey Whittemore to two years in prison and a $100,000 fine. The Reno Gazette-Journal quoted the judge as saying, “The primary purpose of these laws is to limit the actuality or appearance of corruption resulting from large contributions. The appearance of corruption from such a clear violation of the law ... is astounding.” We’d like to ask the judge, with all due respect, what planet has he been living on? Does justice enter into this at all? Was his statement supposed to be ironic in the wake of an election that was entirely dominated by the Citizen’s United U.S. Supreme Court decision? If individuals were afforded the same rights as corporations, Whittemore’s efforts to hide his contributions would have been utterly legal. Essentially, what this judge said was that unlimited and anonymous money equates to speech for corporations and super-rich contributors to 501(c)4s, but not for individuals. It’s not the sentence that boggles the mind—he was guilty and a two-year sentence is only 18 months more than possible jail time for jaywalking—it’s the reasoning. Not to get too far out of the box, but this raises questions of equal protection when corporations have rights that people don’t. But even if the judge’s reasoning for the sentence was sound, why should Whittemore go to prison? Why do we citizens have to pay for this guy’s

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

“punishment”? The admittedly talented attorney and lobbyist could have been sentenced to work on society’s behalf for two years. Isn’t there a punishment that could have better suited the crime? He could have been sentenced to community service and instead of picking cigarette butts off the freeways, he could have been working for some nonprofit like Nevada Legal Services or United Way or a homeless advocacy group. Does society’s need to degrade a fallen icon take precedence over simple pragmatism? The guy’s got talent, and this judge threw it away to make a political point. But if we are to accept that individuals who act in the same manner as corporations must be prosecuted, the U.S. Attorney’s office has got some work to do. Harvey Whittemore was just one guy among many powerbrokers in Nevada. Finding anyone who thinks he’s the only one who skirted election laws is difficult. The only reason he was prosecuted was because some former business partners got angry and turned him in. Nothing will change because of Whittemore’s time in the stocks. Allow us to make some predictions: Harvey Whittemore will do less time in jail than a drunken Santa Crawler; he will prevail in his appeal; and the question of whether citizens can contribute anonymously and generously to campaigns—just like corporations and super-rich casino owners—will be decided in a way that further erodes the ability of common citizens to run or influence this democracy. Ω

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Matt Polley Coffee house owner

Sure, why not? I like to make positive change for my community and my state and my nation. … I’m not naïve in knowing that it would be a significant challenge, but there have got to be those that step up.

George Morris Retiree

No. The politics of it is just not right. All of these guys in Congress are just out for themselves and not out for the normal man. And there’s so many of them that way that if you went in there with that objective, there’s no way you’d have a change. You’d be overwhelmed by the rest of the good old boys.

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OCTOBER 3, 2013

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The GOP holds compassion for ransom As I was reading Pope Francis’ remarks about the Catholic church’s “obsession” with abortion, marriage equality and contraception instead of creating an inclusive “home for all” focused on serving the poor, I reflected on two of Nevada’s most prominent Catholic political leaders who also cared deeply by about the less fortunate, Joe Dini and Sheila Leslie Bill Raggio. These two men, from different political parties, led the Legislature for decades, working together by necessity and choice to forge compromises that kept the state moving forward. While both men were pro-business, they also felt personally responsible to ensure the state budget considered the needs of seniors, the disabled and the mentally ill. I heard Raggio lecture his fellow Republicans many times in public and in private about cutting the budget too much, urging them to do what was right, not what was politically expedient. This lesson is one many in Congress should take to heart as they prepare to blackmail us until

the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is repealed. They seem oblivious to the fact that Obamacare means that the marginalized will finally have access to basic health care. Although the Act is complex and not without initial growing pains, preliminary results have been promising, with health care premiums already decreasing due to competition for the expanded market. Yet Nevada Representatives Joe Heck and Mark Amodei voted for a spending resolution to cut all funding for the ACA, thereby risking another government shutdown. They’re also threatening to refuse to raise the debt ceiling if Obamacare isn’t defunded, potentially causing us to default on our debts, generating world-wide economic chaos. Speaking for his caucus, Speaker John Boehner said, “The American people don’t want the government shutdown, and they don’t want Obamacare,” forgetting that for many people, Obamacare is keeping their college-age children insured or allowing them health care despite a pre-existing condition.

Adding insult to injury, Florida Rep. Ted Yoho compared the rebellion of House conservatives to the acts of visionary civil rights leaders like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, saying, “It only takes one with passion ... people with passion that speak up, they’ll have people follow them because they believe the same way, and smart leadership listens to that.” Adding another level of absurdity, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz read Green Eggs and Ham during a 21-hour “talk-athon” intended to derail a Senate vote on the House bill, despite lack of support from his own caucus. In a stunning display of craven politics, House Republicans pushed through a new farm bill slashing the food stamp program, despite unlikely passage in the Senate and a certain veto by the president. The draconian cuts would mean millions of Americans still struggling through the recession will lose their benefits, careening deeper into poverty. Although Democrats called the bill “heartless” and “a monumental

waste of time,” Republicans insisted the food stamp program had grown out of control during these hard times. Representatives Heck and Amodei voted for the bill, while Democrats Dina Titus and Steven Horsford opposed it. Rep. Horsford noted that 71 percent of Nevada’s food stamp participants are families with children. Nearly 42 percent are working families, with wages so meager they qualify for the program. He pointed out the real budget problem is the huge corporate welfare subsidies for “Big Ag.” Political budgets express our values and carry real-world consequences. While Catholics are spiritually guided by the Pope, voters ask political leaders to base decisions on what is right for everyone, not just the privileged few. Of course the Pope can demonstrate his moral courage without worry of being deposed. But our politicians should show courage by opposing the blackmail demands of those more concerned with a radical ideology than helping their constituents. Ω

Want to read what might happen if the tea partiers succeed in breaching the debt ceiling? http:// nymag.com/daily/ intelligencer/2013/09/ what-happens-ifthe-debt-ceiling-isbreached.html

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WIN TICKETS FOR THE

YUVAL RON ENSEMBLE ON OCTOBER 10TH, PART OF THE 2013-2014 PERFORMING ARTS SERIES TO ENTER: • Send an e-mail to contest@newsreview.com • Put “YUVAL” in the subject line • Include your full name, day phone and birth date • Entry deadline is Monday, 10/7/13 • Winner will be notified by phone and e-mail

S T E K C I T N I W

2013

95 WORD FICTION CONTEST

J

acoby sat in his very public chair with his pants and belt unbuttoned. “True, it’s an office situation,” he reasoned, “but I can reassemble before anyone notices.” Months passed uneventfully while he eased his hiatal hernia’s burn. All that changed with the new management. They installed standup

desks, and there was no way his good parts would remain mysterious if he were standing when the fire alarm sounded. He fretted about it, further irritating his diaphragm. Fortunately, his wife was insightful, noting that while the new owners hated sit-down desks, they had nothing against suspenders.

Look at that: 95 words on the nose (excluding title). It’s 95-word fiction time! We, the editors of the Reno News & Review, ask you, the readers of the Reno News & Review, to send us your short fiction. We like stories that have a beginning, middle and end, and include setting, conflict, dialog, character, point of view, and theme. We’re not into poetry for this contest. Just keep the story to exactly 95 words (as counted by LibreOffice or Microsoft Word and excluding title). Your published story and your employer’s undying respect will be your rewards.

For those who’ve never seen the contest, last year’s winners can be found at www.newsreview.com/reno/stranger-than-truth/content?oid=8291872 E-mail to renofiction@newsreview.com and put Fiction 2013 in the subject line. All entries must be received by 9 a.m. on Oct. 23. Selected entries will be published on Oct. 31. Include contact information, including name, address and telephone number.

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

|   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   october 3, 2013 

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Photo/NASA

Earth is taking a beating at the hands of man,  according to a six-year study of all scientific  research, but industry pushes to continue it.

Working voters The Nevada AFL-CIO says it has registered more than 200,000 voters in union households in preparation for the 2014 election. “At current count, there are 211,642 identified union workers, household members, or retirees registered to vote in Nevada,” the group said in a prepared statement. “Union voter registration varies by district, with state Assembly District 3 containing 22 percent union voters, state Senate District 9 containing 17 percent, and [U.S. House] District 3 containing 16 percent.” According to the Nevada Secretary of State’s office, the most recent count shows there are 1,261,337 active voters in the state, so the union voters—if they turn out—make up 17 percent of the electorate.

Setback Citicorp is laying off 700 mortgage workers in Las Vegas. It’s the latest cut to a corporate presence that once was a significant part of the state’s economy and its tax base. The layoff is part of a nationwide cutback of 1,000 workers, but most of them are in Nevada. Of the remaining positions, the bulk are in Texas. Wells Fargo and Bank of America have also made substantial layoffs of mortgage workers as the refinancing boom wound down. Citicorp is the sixth largest mortgage lender. In 1985 Nevada Gov. Richard Bryan called a special session of the Nevada Legislature to change state banking laws in order to make it possible for Citibank to establish a credit card processing facility in Las Vegas. Bryan said at the time that association of major corporations like Citibank with Nevada helped dispel the state’s unfavorable image. After the legislature enacted the legislation demanded by the corporation, Citibank convinced postal officials to accept an address of “The Lakes, Nevada” (the name of a Las Vegas housing development) as a return address for all its credit card statements, a step seen as an effort by Citibank to disassociate itself from Las Vegas’s image. Early in the current recession, the Nevada credit card operations were moved to South Dakota.

Angle backs gay-basher Former Republican U.S. Senate nominee Sharron Angle of Nevada raised money for an Alabama U.S. House candidate running in a special election on an anti-gay platform. Real estate developer Dean Young is running for an open seat and says things like, “I’m against homosexuals pretending like they’re married.” He demanded that his opponents sign a multi-point anti-gay pledge that, among other things, called for a litmus test to sit on a party governing body. It commits signers to a “by-law change to expel any member of the Republican Executive Committee who opposes the party position by supporting gay marriage.” The pledge also includes this clause: “The tenants of my church oppose gay marriage.” In first round voting last week in a primary with four other candidates, Young came in second, thus qualifying for a runoff election. He received 23 percent of the vote to 35 percent for former state Sen. Bradley Byrne, setting up a Nov. 5 runoff between Byrne, a mainstream conservative, and Young, a religious conservative. In a fundraising email, Angle wrote that Young is a “courageous fiscal and social conservative.” She made a $10,000 purchase of cable television time for Young, according to Roll Call, the Capitol Hill newspaper.

—Dennis Myers

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OCTOBER 3, 2013

Alchemy vs. science Critics laid in wait for new climate report A comedian once said that the U.S. is a society in which people believe in UFOs but think the moon landing was faked. by Little wonder that science critics Dennis Myers were in battle mode even before the new Sept. 27 and Sept. 30 reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change were released. Those reports, six years in the making, were released last week and this, and critics were already attacking them without reading them, prompting science advocates to respond.

“People just end up isolating themselves and communicating only with people who agree with them.” James Richardson Sociologist In an unsigned article, for instance, Fox News “reported” that the IPCC study found that “the planet has largely stopped warming over the past the new IPCC report can 15 years, data shows—and a landmark be read at http://tinyurl. com/nkha3d2 report released Friday by the U.N.’s climate group could not explain why the mercury has stopped rising.” That’s because the warming has not stopped rising, and—contrary to the Fox claim—the IPCC did not say it has. What it said was that the rate of increase of warming has slowed, but that warming continues. At the website for KTVN in Reno, a news release for the International

Climate Science Coalition was posted that claims “the balance of the evidence indicates that dangerous human-caused climate change is not happening.” The ICSC is funded in part by the Heartland Institute, which in turn is funded in part by the American Petroleum Institute. The ICSC also has ties to Australian coal and mining figures. Las Vegas Review-Journal columnist Thomas Mitchell penned a piece suggesting that global warming would be good for society by driving farming north. At the website of Nevadans for Clean Affordable Reliable Energy, meanwhile, an article appeared with the headline, “IPCC climate change report out soon—denialists shift to overdrive.” The site lists as member organizations several groups, mostly environmental, such as the Bristlecone Alliance and Western Resource Advocates, plus the Nevada Chapter of American Institute of Architects. Salon and Mother Jones published lists of the climate myths critics would be likely to employ in trying to discredit the new IPCC report. The IPCC is a United Nationscreated body established to sort out conflicting claims on climate change and provide reliable scientific assessments on the topic, as well as identify any environmental or social-economic consequences and make recommendations. It does not produce original research. Its periodic reports—five have been issued since 1990—are the result of surveys of

all the current scientific reports and consultations with scientists in most nations. More than 2,000 scientists work on the IPCC reports. The second IPCC report in 1995 reported that it was more than 50 percent likely that humans were contributing to global warming. As more and more research has been done, that view has been reinforced. The 2001 report raised that figure to 66 percent. The 2007 report made it 90 percent. The new report has it at 95 percent. Before each report is released, its paragraphs are projected on screens and approved by delegates from all participating nations. Nothing is released without such approval, a process that tends to make the report more cautious and conservative than most scientists would have it. The last report, in 2007, was initially enormously influential in swaying public opinion, according to opinion surveys (“Global warming comes home,” RN&R, Feb. 8, 2007). That gain was sharply undercut by the 2009 release by hackers of thousands of emails and computer files of climate scientists that, when quoted selectively, suggested the scientists were cynically manipulating data. Eight subsequent investigations found no wrongdoing or evidence undercutting climate science. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was critical of the “selectively edited, out-of-context” use made of the material. But the news coverage of the aftermath of the dispute was minor compared to that given to the initial distorted interpretations. More substantive but less publicized after the 2007 report was the publication in 2010 of Merchants of Doubt by scientist and science historian Naomi Oreskes and NASA historian Erik Conway. The book threw a spotlight on the activities of several scientists—all of them physicists, not climate scientists—who were prominent in trying to discredit climate science. (Actually, they might be termed former scientists, because few in the group had done primary research in years or decades.) The group, including Fred Singer, Robert Jastrow, Fred Seitz, and William Nierenberg, were shown by the authors to have long contrarian histories of trying to discredit science on tobacco, tobacco smoke, acid rain and ozone depletion even before they challenged climate change, often while receiving funding from industry or industry fronts. Singer currently has a Nevada forum writing for Range magazine, based in Washoe Valley.


Sociologist James Richardson said such gadflys, even when funded by industry, perform a function in spreading misinformation. “They’re furnishing legitimacy,” he said. “They serve a wonderful and important function of legitimacy. People don’t have to understand things as long as they can say somebody with a PhD agrees with them. …You get a renegade in some kind of field, and they can get a lot of attention.” While science critics get considerable attention, the work of climate scientists proceeds undisturbed, and in policymaking it is the scientists, not their critics, who are relied on. Most state governments use IPCC figures in dealing with planning. Delaware, for instance, last year produced a study of problems it faces from higher tides. Science critics are not usually players in such policymaking. Nor does the criticism usually penetrate the scientific community, where the issue is regarded as settled and much research has turned to other aspects of the problem. In journalism circles, there is growing criticism of “false equivalence” in news coverage. “[S]ome scientists challenge global warming, but the vast preponderance doesn’t,” Carl Sessions Stepp wrote in June in the American Journalism Review. “So an article that quotes one expert on each side is misleading. One

should be scrupulous and always open to new evidence. But if sufficient research shows the evidence seems to lie more in one direction than another, journalists should present the findings proportionately.” Richardson said the development of a small faction of people who are skeptical of reliable inf ormation in the face of overwhelming evidence is frequently driven by estrangement. “I think what happens is people just end up isolating themselves and communicating only with people who agree with them and reinforcing each other,” he said. “And there are occasional slip-ups like the email scandal of two or three years ago, but basically it’s just self-selected social isolation and reinforcement.” He said such figues assign truth to themselves and do not concede that their adversaries may also have truth on their side. Richardson also said they always have reasons for cherry-picking data, accepting information they agree with but finding reasons not to accept information they do not agree with. “It’s dogma that gets reinforced. They never accept any contrary facts. They find ways of discounting them. If all else fails, they can do the ad hominem copout and say, ‘Well, it’s so-and-so who said that, so we know he’s lying, so he doesn’t have the truth’ or what not.” Ω

Ghost town Photo/Dennis Myers

Apparently no holiday is just a single day anymore. A temporary haunted town is being installed in downtown Sparks and will be open four days a week until Halloween. Incidentally, not all the workers in the photo are real. The two on the balcony are dummies.

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Renewable energy industry specialist Bonnie Lind believes indoor agriculture could be a key part of a diversified Nevada economy.

S R E W E R B T F CRA l a v i t fes

Growth spurt Indoor agriculture may supplement the economy State renewable energy industry specialist Bonnie Lind believes that indoor agriculture can help diversify Nevada’s economy. “Nevada spends approximately $2 billion a year out of state for its food, by Sage Leehey and that’s not all of it,” Lind said. “Nevada needs to self-supply. And this allows traditional agriculture to diversify their project to help a bad water s age l@ year, and maybe this will give them some small piece that will allow you news review.c om to keep your farm going and pay the bills without struggling. … We’re not looking to replace traditional agriculture. We’re just looking to supplement.” Lind works with local farmers, distributors, restaurants, etc. to figure out who has what, who needs what, and so on. She helps these people connect and foster business relations. She said indoor agriculture would allow for all types of produce to be available any time of year and could allow the state to supply more of its own produce. “Instead of it being picked, packed and delivered from somewhere else in three to five days, you’re gaining about three to five more days of refrigerator life,” Lind said. “While we may not get every single tomato on the strip and elsewhere, if we could provide some portion of that out of a $2 billion industry, if I could even take 10, 15, 20 percent of that, I would be pretty happy. That would be a lot of jobs and a lot more tax revenue staying here instead of going out of state.” Indoor agriculture can mean a variety of different techniques, technologies and crops. Some indoor farmers in the state are using greenhouses with increased carbon dioxide levels to increase growth rates or using all LED lighting to specifically target crops in trays in a warehouse setting. Others are using hydroponics or aquaponics. The crops grown with these methods vary from beefsteak tomatoes and hot peppers to basil and oregano. Nevada is especially well-fitted for indoor agriculture, according to Lind, because there are many individuals already working on these projects and technologies that would help them grow. She added that Southern Nevada also has a high demand for quality produce year-round for tourism, and For more Northern Nevada has a lot of the infrastructure needed to get it up and going information about with local farming groups and the “buy local” movement. what’s going on with Indoor agriculture could also potentially be much more environmentally the Nevada Governor’s friendly than traditional agriculture, according to an online indoor agriculture Office of Economic Development, visit brochure from the Governor’s Office of Economic Development. diversifynevada.com. “Indoor hydroponic, aquaculture and aeroponic agricultural methods consume less than 10 percent of the water required for growing similar crops using traditional methods, and recycle water to minimize water loss,” the brochure reads. Lind is excited about the educational opportunities of this agriculture. “DRI [Desert Research Institute] is doing a project with Wooster [High School] looking at growing food with hydroponics and without hydroponics, and the students are going to run it,” Lind said. “It takes everyone from engineers to people with a green thumb to people who can market and sell things like this … but we’d really like to see this as an opportunity to address food deserts as well as incorporate it into the schools so they can eventually feed themselves. … Plus, I’d like to see us build all these systems and then export them around the world.” Ω OPINION

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Deena and Kim Bledsaw at home with their dogs, Bella and Precious.

One

afternoon in May, Kim Bledsaw was at a Port of Subs shop, buying a sandwich. Her phone signaled that she’d received a private message on Facebook. The message was from Deena Mc Devitt, an acquaintance she’d known for a few years and liked, but didn’t know very well. The message said something to the effect of, “Hey, I heard you’re going through some stuff. If you ever need somebody to talk to, give me a call.” Bledsaw had recently ended a relationship and was touched by the friendly gesture. “Coming out of a break-up, I figured it was a good time to start getting in touch with friends and becoming better friends,” says Bledsaw. “Instead of sitting there whining about losing my partner, I’m going to start hanging out with people.” Bledsaw rode her motorcycle home, and, before even digging into her sandwich, called Mc Devitt.

spouse n i d e l l o r n in Reno e e l p u o c x nal Guard e o i t a N r i A A same-s the Nevada h g u o r h t benefits

“This was at 4 o’clock in the afternoon,” says Bledsaw. “I didn’t eat my sandwich until almost 11. … But you know what? It was a conversation you didn’t want to stop.” They started talking, and before either one knew what had happened, hours had gone by. Two months later, Bledsaw and Mc Devitt drove over the hill to be married in Auburn, Calif., where same-sex marriage, per a then-recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, is now legal. As part of their marriage, Deena took Bledsaw’s last name. And now, Deena is one of the first Nevada spouses in a same-sex marriage to receive benefits from the U.S. military. Both Deena and her teenage daughter, Cheyenne, receive medical, dental and vision coverage from the Nevada Air National Guard, where Kim is a non-commissioned officer in Civil Engineer Squadron, based at the Reno Air National Guard Base attached to the RenoTahoe International Airport.

“GUARD YOUR HEART”

by Brad Bynum

bradb@newsreview.com

continued on page 14

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The Bledsaws got married in Auburn, Calif., earlier this year.

“GUARD YOUR HEART” continued from page 13

On the home front It’s a strange situation: Same-sex marriages are still not recognized by the state of Nevada. But, after the U.S. Supreme Court decision this spring striking down Congress’s Defense of Marriage Act as unconstitutional, the federal government, including the military, recognizes same-sex marriages performed in states where such unions are legal per state law, like California (now that the court also declared that state’s notorious Proposition 8 unconstitutional). The Department of Defense announced in August that it would begin offering benefits to the samesex spouses of military personnel. “As far as I know, we’re the first ones for the Nevada Air National Guard,” says Kim. “It’s critical, given our current status now of constantly deploying into foreign countries,” says Konrad Delger, a senior enlisted member in the National Guard and formerly Bledsaw’s supervisor. “If I was killed in the line of duty, my wife would get survivor benefits. This would be the same in this relationship, whereas before it wouldn’t be.” The Bledsaws say their marriage was going forward regardless of the Supreme Court decisions. “We talked about it, and I said, ‘What if we can’t get you those benefits?’” says Kim. “‘Do you still want to get married?’ And she said, ‘Absolutely.’ We were going to do it regardless. It was something we wanted to do. And it was just a bonus when we got it. It made it even more special for us. … This is something that I never thought I would see in my military career. For it to happen while I’m still in is very exciting for me. It’s just going to be even better for those who are younger than me. I’m just glad I got the opportunity to experience it.” Kim has 24 years of military experience. Originally from Sacramento, Kim enlisted in the Army in December 1988, when she was 21. She was stationed at Fort Bliss, Texas, and then deployed to Saudi Arabia in October 1990, as part of Operation Desert Shield, and then into Iraq as part of a truck convoy during Desert Storm. She was deployed there for seven months. She left active duty Army in December ’91 and joined the reserves. In 1994, she enlisted in the Air Force Reserves in Sacramento. She served as a vehicle operator. In ’97, she moved to Reno and enlisted with the Nevada Air National Guard. She started as a vehicle operator and worked her way up to supervisor. She’s currently a full-time federal technician in civil engineering. She was deployed in Iraq for six months starting in August 2005. Now, in addition to her full-time position at 14   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 3, 2013

the base, she also attends Truckee Meadows Community College, studying criminal justice. She received her associate degree in general studies earlier this year. But she’s clearly, first and foremost, a military lifer. “I wear a uniform every day,” she says. “I’m a uniformed employee. I’m not just a civilian on base. You have to be enlisted to have that job.” Deena, a hair stylist, moved to the Truckee Meadows from San Francisco during high school. She graduated from Reed High School, class of ’87. “Moving up here, I thought I was in the country,” she says. “I was in culture shock. I hated it. I wanted go home. But I got used to it, and this is my home now. My kids were all born here. My grandkids have all been born here. This is home.”

aid, “And I s good, ‘That’s ecause Mom, b asking I’m not y o to a ga you to g ge—I’m marria ou to asking y my come to ge.’” marria c Devitt M a n e e D She doesn’t look old enough to be a grandmother. But she’d been married twice before, to men, when she was young. “Obviously, it didn’t work out,” she says, with a laugh. She also had a decade-plus relationship with another woman. But her romance with Kim surprised her as much as anyone. “I was like OK, I’m going to be that old lady with the cats,” says Deena. “I’m going to be single. I’m done with relationships. I’ve got my kids. I’ve got my grandkids. I don’t need it. I don’t want it. ... I swore after my divorce that I was never getting married again, ever. I didn’t care who it was, I wasn’t doing it. ... I was just done. I said, I’ll live in sin, whatever. I don’t want to be married, because it’s a huge commitment. … But when she asked, it was so sweet and so romantic. … It couldn’t have been better.” One day, after work, Kim came home and went into the bedroom. After what, according to Deena, seemed like longer than usual, Kim’s two dogs, Bella and Precious, came

bouncing out of the bedroom. There was something hanging from each of their collars. Deena thought Kim had gotten the dogs new toys. Kim prompted Deena to call the dogs. As the two dogs got closer, Deena noticed that tied with pink ribbon from Bella’s neck was a card. She opened it. It read, “We would really love it if you would marry our mom.” Hanging from Precious’ collar was a ring.

Something about marry The Bledsaws laugh a lot. They seem to be one of those rare couples that has both the giddy excitement of a young couple, and the ease and acceptance of a couple that’s been together a long time. They laugh at each others’ jokes and finish each other’s sentences. “We planned it for next summer, to have a big wedding on the base,” says Deena. “That way, we’d have time to save money. I’d never had a wedding—gone to City Hall, never had a dress, never had any of that. This was her first wedding, so I wanted her to be involved in the process and everything.” “We never thought we would have in our lifetime the benefits federally that we have,” says Kim. “I thought, you know, this is great for the younger generation. But when they legalized it in California we were like, ‘Let’s just get married.’” For a city with a thriving wedding industry and a history of being ahead of the curve on marriage laws—in the first half of the 20th century, Reno was a destination for quick marriages and divorces—the fact that Reno gay couples have to go to California to get married is ironic, to say the least. For Kim and Deena’s friends and family, the biggest concern was the speed of the engagement. The couple started dating in May and got married in July. “We’re not young, either,” says Deena. “We’re older. We’ve been through all the crap. And sometimes you just know. … Everything just fell into place. There were no bumps in the road or anything. It was just weird how it was so smooth.” Kim’s parents were concerned they were rushing it. “We sat them down, and I said, ‘First off, I’m not pregnant,’” says Deena, with characteristic humor. “They’re like, ‘Oh, thank god!’” But the couple’s friends and families just wanted to know that they were getting married for the right reasons. I even said, “I’m not a materialistic person,’” says Deena. “‘I love nice things, but it doesn’t mean anything. I’m willing to sign a prenup, if that will make you more comfortable. I don’t care. Don’t put me on your


benefits; don’t put me on your life insurance. Nothing. Everything can stay separate. That’s not what it’s about. It’s because I love her and want to be with her.’” In the end, Kim and Deena says they were very happy with how many of their friends and family members were willing to take a day off of work and drive down to Auburn to see them wed. “It meant a lot,” says Kim. They didn’t have to drive all that way, even though it’s not far. The support was pretty incredible.” After the ceremony, they had a casual reception in Reno on the military base. (They still plan to have a more formal ceremony and reception next summer.)

“My mom is against gay marriage and she flat-out said, ‘Well, I don’t support it,’” says Deena. “And I said, ‘That’s good, Mom, because I’m not asking you to go to a gay marriage—I’m asking you to come to my marriage. I’m inviting you. You’re more than welcome to come. If you don’t, you don’t.’ … She was there, and she came to the reception and everything.” “It was really cute because we helped her move the day after the reception, and she looked at me and said, ‘Now I can say I have a daughter-in-law,’” says Kim. She later told Deena: “I haven’t seen you be this happy and smile in over 20 years. … You’re never going to find better than Kim.”

“That says a lot,” says Deena. “She’s finally accepting it.”

Military support “I’ve gotten nothing but support from my friends at the base, even from the commanders I’ve had,” says Kim. “I’ve never gotten any negativity.” This sense of acceptance might be surprising to civilians who probably don’t view the military as paragons of progressive tolerance—especially since a large portion of Kim’s military career was during the era of the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy, which meant she had to keep a big part of her personal identity relatively secret. “I might be out in public in the past, and I might grab my girlfriend’s hand or give her a kiss on the cheek,” says Kim. “You always had to be careful who was around you. You never know who’s going to be around you.” Nevada still hasn’t legalized same-sex marriage. The Bledsaws are able to extend benefits to Deena and her daughter because Kim is a federal employee. And they sympathize with Nevada same-sex who travel to California to marry, only to return home and find that the state and most employers therein don’t recognize the validity of their legal marriage.

K to t was O i f l e s y gm re, pt tellin e k t to be he s u K j O “I ’s t I m. “ d says Ki ” , s i h wife, an t y do m s a her troduce n i o t .” d an nything a e d i h ave to to not h dsaw Kim Ble

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The Bledsaws reiterate again and again how supportive the Nevada Air National Guard has been of them and their marriage. “They’re a wonderful couple,” says senior officer Delger. “They work well together. It’s beneficial for both of them to have somebody to sound off to—just like any other relationship. They’re best of friends. If you’re not best of friends, it ain’t going to work. I’ve been married to my wife for 26 years now, and we’re still best of friends.” “I’m sure there’s people on the base who don’t agree with it, but we haven’t seen it,” says Deena. “It’s equal now. Our marriage is recognized like everybody else’s.” “Whenever I’m out for a gettogether after work, people ask, ‘Where’s your wife?” says Kim, who delights in the question. “When I introduce her, I’m like, ‘This is my wife,’” says Deena. “And that’s it. There’s no explanation. And I think we’re fortunate, though, because a lot of people don’t have that support.” The couple cites the Governor’s Military Ball earlier this year as one of the highlights of their young marriage. They were both a little nervous making one of their first public

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appearances as a married couple at an event that included a lot of state officials and high ranking officers from both the Air Force and the Army. “I just kept telling myself it was OK to do this,” says Kim. “It’s OK to be here and to introduce her as my wife and to not have to hide anything.” “I was like, we’re not going to dance, right?” says Deena. “Because I wasn’t sure. … And our friends were like, ‘You better get out there!’ Like, ‘Why aren’t you?’” The couple took the dance floor after all, posed for pictures and had a great time. They credit their friends, mostly straight couples, in the Nevada Air National Guard with encouraging them to be themselves. “Sometimes I think before I speak when I’m going to introduce her,” says Kim. “If I introduce her as my wife, how are they going to react? Because you have those people who are still close-minded. But it doesn’t stop me. ‘This is my wife, Deena.’” Ω

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S A S L C ACTS

We

Though better known for its galleries, the Nevada Museum of Art also offers art instruction by Laura Davis Photos by Allison Young

go to museums typically to observe. We gaze on others’ works of art and admire, or occasionally critique. Rarely do we go to a museum with the intent of creating—but the Nevada Museum of Art, acting as a support advocate for the local art scene, offers the tools to help manifest artistic dreams—big and small, professional and novice, teenage and senior citizen—through a variety of mediums, and at a realistic cost. It may be a less frequented aspect of the museum than the exhibits themselves, but the classes offered at the E.L. Cord Museum School are no less necessary. The role the NMA plays by not only nourishing artists through exhibiting their work, but also creating artists by offering classes taught by artistic professionals, is invaluable. As one such instructor, Katherine Case says, “The museum itself is awesome— imagining Reno without it would be a big loss.” The classes taught by Case and her associate instructors are open learning forums which offer students enrollment

based on a first come, first-served basis with intimate class sizes and no grading scale. Assignments are given, and lessons are imparted, but the amount of effort invested is up to the students themselves—and if late to class, there’s no trip to the dean’s office. From modern classes in the digital arts, to traditional studies in painting and drawing, to creative endeavors like stained glass and pinstriping—the options to further, or discover, the artist within are all-embracing. Just as diverse as the classes to be taken are the instructors themselves, and like a customized paint palette, the colorful personality of each perfectly matches their subject, making for uniquely inspiring atmospheres. This mix of personalities and classes is just a sample of what the museum school has to offer. There are approximately 35 instructors, and classes vary each quarter. Visiting the Nevada Museum of Art’s website provides the most up to date schedule, as well as class prices and supply requirements. Ω

The painter

The bookbinder

The photog rapher

The drawer

The printer

Painting can be a serene and relaxing hobby—with its gentle brush strokes and quiet concentration. Portrait and landscape painting instructor Daniel Helzer is the perfect compliment. A full-time graphic designer/illustrator, Helzer’s casual, soft spoken demeanor, coupled with the coffee shop vibe of the soft music he plays during class, creates an atmosphere for students to learn different brush strokes. “[Painting] provides an escape,” says Helzer. “There are no heavy expectations and students are free to do what they want … I’m not pointing a critical finger.” Helzer’s teaching style is indirect; he gives a demo at the beginning of class, and sets his classes loose from there. “I’m not a hoverer and I don’t want to be a backseat artist,” Helzer says. A style which suits his students just fine. “I like the way he teaches,” his student Elsie says, who’s currently taking her fifth class with Helzer. “He’s low key—not force feeding.”

Case teaches Japanese-style and nonadhesive bookbinding through the museum, as well as introductory letterpress printing out of her home business studio—Meridian Press. As systematic as the books she binds, Case teaches in a step-by-step process with, as she says, “lots of handouts.” But just as you can’t read a book out of order (unless you’re the chooseyour-own-adventure type), you must go from step one to step two. A published poet, Case is practical with her teaching and careful with her words—choosing the language she uses to convey her artistic directions as carefully as the words which she chooses in her poetry to get her message across. Appropriately expressing herself is the goal that initially led her into book binding while working in the book arts department at Mills College in Oakland. “I could [bind] my own books of poetry—to really control how they looked,” Case explains. Her work, which includes gift cards and ink prints, can be found locally at Paper Moon, Reno Artworks and Indie Reno functions.

A professional photographer, Jeff Ross is as sharp as the lens through which he shoots. When it comes to photography, interacting with subjects is one of the skills Ross says many students are looking to improve upon through his studio photography class, which works with live models. “People often don’t feel comfortable photographing others and asking them to pose,” Ross explains. “So I like to pair more experienced models with less experienced photographers and vice versa, to balance it out.” Ross’s class is hands-on instruction from both he and the students themselves through critiques held after the completion of each assignment. “Pretty quickly [the students] get used to [the critiques]—they’re proud of their work and they want to talk about it, they’re generally open and receptive to constructive criticism,” Ross says. He currently has an exhibit on display at Western Nevada College in Carson City.

What would art be without challenging comfort zones, and what challenges comfort zones better than nudity? Life drawing instructor Jerry Stinson is just as honest and straight forward as his naked muses, and he knows the value in encouraging people to step out of their bubble when it comes to art. Everyone can be an artist in Stinson’s mind. No ifs, ands or butts—er, buts, about it. “Students come in and say, ‘I can’t draw, or, I only draw stick figures.’ But I teach them otherwise,” Stinson says. “They can learn to draw just as they can learn to read, and I’ll argue that point to the end.” As for how to get past the nerves of a naked model for those unaccustomed to drawing from life, Stinson’s technique is to encourage communication amongst not just students but the subjects as well. “What I like to do is initiate a conversation with the models while the students draw,” Stinson says. “That keeps everyone involved and comfortable.”

Screen printing is fun, dynamic, and interactive—just like screen printing instructor Candace Nicol, who also teaches classes at Truckee Meadows Community College. As vivacious and colorful as the prints she helps her students to create, Nicol likes her classroom like she likes the red streaks in short brown hair: lively and meshing well together. Nicol loves interaction when she teaches, not just between herself and her students, but her students among each other. With sharing the same space and equipment (which Nicol herself donated to the museum), there’s really no room to be shy. It’s the socialization of print making that drew Nicol to it in the first place. “When I was taking classes at [University of Nevada Reno], I’d always walk by the [print making] room and sneak a peek. They seemed to be having so much fun in there!” Nicol says. “My second year I took it and fell in love. It fits my personality, I can get bored painting—I like the fact that I can sit and talk.” Now Nicol can not only join in the fun, but spread it herself among her students.

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OCTOBER 3, 2013


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Hack of a job

Reno Collective founder Colin Loretz is an organizer of the Hack4Reno event.

Hack4Reno Can the world’s problem be solved with the right line of code? by Many hackers certainly think so, and Ashley Hennefer this is how hackathons began—marathon coding events where creative thinkers brainstorm ideas and create new projects within a day or two. These events have been so successful that the U.S. government wants in on the action with programs like the Open Government Initiative. And a wave of national nonprofits like Code for America and Hack for Good have also made hacking a civic duty. “Hacking” consists of disrupting For more information, visit http://hack4reno. long-standing industries, and establishing com. new approaches to old problems. Since the inaugural Hack4Reno in 2011, Northern Nevada’s hacking culture has taken off, infiltrating other movements like agriculture and the arts. This year’s event will delve further into community projects. “We’ve got an exciting spin on it this year,” says Colin Loretz, who organizes the event along with Dylan Kuhn, John Jusayan and Jesse Anderson.

Loretz is the co-founder of tech startup Cloudsnap and the founder of the Reno Collective (now housed in the newly renovated space on 100 N. Arlington Ave.). He’s passionate about building Reno’s startup culture, hosting beginner’s coding classes at the University of Nevada, Reno and Reno Collective. He also helped organize Startup Weekend Reno earlier this year, and spoke at the first TEDxUniversity of Nevada, Reno event. The hackathon begins at 8:30 a.m. on Oct. 5, ending at 4 p.m. on Oct. 6. Participants will work in teams to come up with an idea, and then build a demo to share on the final day. Loretz estimates about 50 people will participate this year. “We actually are seeing a decrease in quantity of participation but, as cheesy as it sounds, we’re seeing a significant increase in the talent of the participants,” says Loretz. “We saw it last year and we are seeing it even more this year.

The best part is that this is not just an event for developers. We’ve had a great relationship with the [UNR] journalism school and many of the top projects over the last two years were made by student led teams from the J-school that were matched with developers on the day of the event.” There are three “challenges” this year. The first is “Live, Work and Play,” challenging hackers to develop better ways to exchange or find social information, such as an app for restaurants. “Health & Wellness” is centered on community health outreach technology—managing and maintaining personal health issues like asthma and allergies, or a city-wide reminder for yearly vaccinations. And “Civic Minded Hackers” brings in a hardware component, encouraging hackers to

rethink public machines like parking meters or traffic sensors. Each challenge offers a $1,000 prize for the winning team. Loretz hopes the public will follow the hackathon, even if they don’t participate. “We’ll be trying to keep the Facebook and Twitter updated as often as possible during the event,” he says. People can also view the final projects on Sun., Oct. 6, 4 p.m at the Reno Collective. While Loretz and his fellow organizers are also hackers, they’ll be working as facilitators, ensuring that teams consider the long-term implications of their projects. “I personally have a whole bunch of ideas for what I’d like to see built,” he says. “But I’ll be moving from team to team throughout the weekend to make sure that everyone has what they need to finish their applications within the weekend and help them think about the life of their application after the Hack4Reno weekend.” Ω

Closing October 13

Lead sponsorship by the Louise A. Tarble Foundation, E.L. Cord Foundation and Nancy and Martin Cohen. Major sponsorship by Nancy and Brian Kennedy, Susan and Bill Pereira, Reno Orthopaedic Clinic and Volunteers in Art (VIA). Supporting sponsorship by Dickson Realty, Jan and David Hardie, Eleanor and Robert Preger, and RBC Wealth Management. Additional sponsorship by Charlotte and Dick McConnell, MINI of Reno and the Mark E Pollack Foundation. In-kind support by The Irvine Company, LAYAR and Fortyonetwenty. Media sponsorship by KNPB Channel 5 Public Broadcasting. William L. Pereira & Associates, Transamerica Corporate Headquarters Tower, San Francisco, California, 1973. Photograph by Albert Tam, 2011. www.albert-tam.com

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Sun Valley Steak House Hobey’s Casino, 5195 Sun Valley Drive, Sun Valley, 673-0683 One of the hidden gems of Sun Valley, north of Reno, is the steakhouse in Hobey’s Casino. For about a decade, by Dave Preston Maitre d’ Marco Brown, a 27-year veteran of food service with astute wine knowledge, has shaped this 80-seat food emporium, with an ambience having all the trappings of a traditional steakhouse, into a top-drawer bistro. Subtle lighting, padded booths, proper linens and a seasoned, friendly staff makes this beefsteak bastion worthy of the moniker. The room chef, James Shepard, has a passion and a well traveled culinary background including stints at Topaz Lodge, Charlie Palmer’s, John Ascuaga’s Nugget and the Carson Valley Inn. PHoto/AlliSon Young

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It’s always sunny ...

Maitre d’ Marco Brown toasts Sun Valley Steak House’s signature filet and lobster.

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20 | RN&R |

OCTOBER 3, 2013

The well structured menu covers everything from chicken Alfredo ($19), to veal Oscar ($28), to cedar plank salmon ($22). The most popular item on the menu is the daily filet and a Maine lobster tail special with soup or salad, a vegetable and a starch for $21.95. You could have two lobster tails if you didn’t want the beef. A nice variety of appetizers ($8-$12), including the one that caught my eye, grilled marinated portobello mushroom with grilled asparagus and bleu cheese fondue ($10). Three medium slices of the mushroom topped with the asparagus and coated with a grand fromage sauce lived up to my expectations. It was rich with layers of savory, creamy tang and a bit of saltiness. It was a blend of bleu cheese and

parmesan creamed with white wine, shallots, garlic, and butter—a sauce that made a flavor statement. Headline soups and salads: hot spinach, Caesar, French onion—all $7. I tried the lobster bisque ($9). The mouth texture was not too thick, and the meaty broth held the Maine lobster au jus through my mouth with a nutty hint of sherry on the finish. The always changing menu is another indicator that Brown is a seasoned operator and knows how to keep folks coming back. The new Tuesday and Wednesday special is a New York strip and prawns combo for $16.95. Prawn options are coconut with an orange marmalade dipping sauce, scampi with lemon garlic butter, and New Orleans blackened or beer battered with Cajun remoulade. The New York, grilled to medium-rare, came out with a tremendous aroma of a well-seasoned fire grill, splashed with a butter/ garlic/parsley drizzle. The coconut prawns batter was a combination of pina colada mix, Myer’s rum and fresh coconut. The beer batter was Myer’s Rum, garlic, onion salt and Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Both were lightly fried, leaving not a hint of grease. The orange marmalade with the coconut prawns was a sweet, tropical essence with every bite. The remoulade paced the beer batter with hints of Cayenne, garlic, Creole mustard, tomato— both complemented the meat with more flavors and textures, true culinary moxie. The wine list is right on for this restaurant with a good variety ($24-$50) and most everything is served by-the-glass ($5-$9). I went with a blend, Eagle Eye Voluptuous ($8), with aromas of blackberry and dark cherry with earthy spice. The mouth feel is soft and powerful with silky tannins and bright fruit. This is a blend of six grapes starting with cabernet, ending with a long finish—the fruit and spice of Zinfandel ever present. Finding a hidden gem like this that gets it right by providing quality food and excellent is a real live dining experience. Ω


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2013 14

Oscar-winningcomposer composer Yuval andartists the artists of theRon Yuval Ron Ensemble weave musical Oscar-winning Yuval Ron Ron and the of the Yuval Ensemble weave musical traditions, traditions, rhythms dance fromEastern diverse Middle Eastern faiths communities folk rhythmsfolk and dance fromand diverse Middle faiths and communities —and Jewish, Christian and— Jewish,— Christian and Muslim — into a celebration of cross-cultural harmony. Creating Muslim into a celebration of cross-cultural harmony. Creating musical bridges between people ofmusical bridgesfaiths between people ofthe various faiths ethnicities, the ensemble has supported various and ethnicities, ensemble hasand supported international peace initiatives at festivalsinternational initiatives at for festivals and benefit worldwide forMorocco such luminaries and benefitpeace concerts worldwide such luminaries as theconcerts Dalai Lama, the King of and many as the Dalai Lama, the King of Morocco and many more. Notbysurprisingly, their“uplifting music and mission more. Not surprisingly, their music and mission have been called Inside World Music in every have been called by Inside World Music “uplifting in every sense of the word.” sense of the word.”

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through the Scary Normally I INtervIew aNd wrIte through the Scary. But I believe Angela, a friend of mine, can

speak for herself, and for many parents. In Angela’s words: My day began exceptionally. I attended my eldest daughter’s baby shower, a day created by time honored friends and one that I will add to my memory treasure box. While watching Tina open her last baby gift, my cell phone rings, “Will you come and visit me“, she asks? Numb, I agree. I use my windshield wipers to see the building as the rain begins to fall. I soon find myself a hall, passing doors with large locks to a cold gray room displaying strange artwork. I wonder about the “artists” and what brought them here. I try to focus; I can‘t catch my breath.

Off track Rush The story of the epic Formula One rivalry between James Hunt and Niki Lauda in the ’70s is an epic one, full of seemingly impossible twists and turns. Rush, Ron Howard’s film chronicling that rivalry, doesn’t serve this incredible story well. It’s one of those period pieces where you notice every wig and every attempt to establish its time through savvy soundtrack choices. by Howard’s movie never feels authentic. It Bob Grimm comes off as some decent actors playing dress up. And it serves up a heaping pile of romantic b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m melodrama that sends the movie off the track and into the bleachers. Rush is supposed to be a movie about Formula One racing, yet the performers spend surprisingly little time behind the wheel. The focus is on their lives off the

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She finally appears in the doorway, my daughter, the little girl that just a few years ago was swinging safely in our back yard. I almost don’t recognize her, my mind becomes flooded with questions and I begin to swell with emotion. How can a day begin with such joy and end, surrounded in so much pain? What am I to say? How did she end up here? Will she ever allow life to teach her? Taking another glance down the hall I ask myself “can anything good possibly come of this? We hug, we sit, we walk, as she uses the sleeves on her shirt to wipe up her tears. I have so much to say, yet, find it easy to just listen, as the sound of her voice calms me. She begins to reveal things and I learn so much. The scenarios that brought her here, are so interesting, so profound, that I wonder how on earth, she is walking and talking. Then it happens…so instant and unexpected, my sorrow and fear miraculously turn to acceptance and I am overcome with gratitude. Gratitude that we are not planning a funeral, gratitude that her body remains whole, gratitude she is safe, at least for today, grateful that we can feel some peace in a place that looks and sounds so hopeless and, of course, grateful that there is a plan for “All” who fall short, and a reassurance that someone with a view and perspective greater than my own… is in charge.

Hopefully, this photo doesn’t spoil the ending ...

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OCTOBER 3, 2013

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track, and while that warrants some interest, come on. Show us more races, and less of Hunt’s boring marital woes. Hemsworth keeps his Thor hair to play Hunt, a superstar car-racing English playboy who’s tearing it up on the tracks when egotistical rich boy Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) buys his way into the sport. It turns out Lauda happens to be a decent driver, and their rivalry eventually leads to Formula One competition, where the two push themselves mightily during the 1976 season. On a rainy day in Germany, Lauda crashed his car in a near fatal accident, suffering major burns to his head. The wreck also damaged his lungs in a life threatening way. Amazingly, Lauda came back to race only six weeks later, his head covered with bloody bandages, to try to preserve the lead he had before the crash. So, with a premise like that, a crazy real-life scenario that astonishes on all levels,

it would seem a movie based on the events would kill. Bruhl, saddled with some pretty big false teeth to physically resemble Lauda, is excellent as the obsessive Austrian. His Lauda is easily the film’s most compelling character, even when his storyline goes into Lauda’s humdrum love life. Hemsworth’s Hunt is everything to be expected and little more. He likes to party before and after races. He likes to vomit before races because he’s “really” stoked. He likes to wield his mighty hammer and save the human race from invading alien forces. OK, that’s in the Avengers. It’s just my wiseass way of saying what he does here isn’t far removed from his performance as Thor. Hemsworth actually catches the mannerisms of Hunt quite accurately. A look at footage of the real Hunt shows that Hemsworth manages a pretty good impersonation. That said, Hunt comes off as a predictable dullard in many ways. Fault the screenplay for that. Ron Howard allegedly got just south of $40 million to make this movie and this, perhaps, accounts for the surprising lack of sustained racing sequences. That’s not a lot of money for a movie that demands a lot of vroom-vroom. This would probably be the reason why too much screen time is spent on Hunt’s blasé marriage to model Suzy Miller (Olivia Wilde, so very good in this year’s Drinking Buddies). Howard ends the film strangely, with Bruhl’s Lauda narrating over footage of the actual Lauda and Hunt, including the paths their lives took after the movie. To have the actor talking over footage of the character he just played strikes me as a little odd. It also had me wishing that the movie was just a documentary about Lauda, who is still alive, and Hunt, who passed away from a heart attack at the age of 45. The story is so amazing, and footage of the crucial racing events exists. How about just interviewing those involved with the story, splicing it all together with race footage, and calling it a day rather than blowing $40 million? As it turns out, the BBC did a documentary episode on Hunt and Lauda for their Clash of the Titans series. It’s available on YouTube, along with a few other documentary looks. Rush is a poser movie with a great premise whose tires go bald well before the finish line. Ω


4

Blue Caprice

Isaiah Washington is terrifyingly good as John Allen Muhammad, the sick mind behind the 2002 sniper attacks that plunged Washington, D.C., Virginia and the surrounding region into a living hell. The title of the film refers to the assassin’s vehicle of choice, a blue Caprice with a hole in the trunk to allow for a sniper rifle. Tequan Richmond is equally chilling as Lee, the simpleton who followed Muhammad’s advice, learned to fire a weapon, and participated in the killing of 10 people. Director Alexandre Moors builds a compelling story as to why these morons did what they did, with Washington and Richmond delivering convincing, disturbing performances. This film will stick in your craw long after you’ve seen it. Available for rental on iTunes and Amazon.com.

5

Blue Jasmine

There was a time in film history when Woody Allen was consistently making the best movies in the business. His latest, one of many movies he has made in the last 10 years, is that return to form that some of us former Allen fans have been waiting for, thanks in large part to a phenomenal central performance by the sure-to-be-Oscarnominated Cate Blanchett. Blanchett plays Jasmine, the wife of a Bernie Madoff-type financier (Alec Baldwin) who must relocate from New York to San Francisco after she is bankrupted and emotionally destroyed. She gulps martinis, criticizes her helpful sister (Sally Hawkins), and, quite frighteningly, is prone to bouts of talking to herself. Allen finds the dark humor in the story, and employs a supporting cast that includes comedians Bobby Cannavale, Louis C.K. and, most astonishingly, Andrew Dice Clay, who, doggone it, delivers one amazing performance as Ginger’s financially destroyed ex-husband, Augie. Above and beyond the humor, Allen makes his film a parable about how some deeds are irredeemable, and some folks are simply doomed. It’s as bittersweet as any movie you will see this, or any, year, for that matter. As far as the Allen film canon goes, it’s a top five installment. It’s one of those films where everything pulls together perfectly, with Blanchett at its powerful center.

4

Don Jon

Joseph Gordon-Levitt writes, directs and stars in this frank sex comedy about a sex addict who thinks porn is better than true romance. Gordon-Levitt is excellent and consistently funny as the title character, a Jersey boy who’s quite the stud, yet finds himself jerking off to internet porn within mere minutes of finishing with a live woman. His little problem comes to the forefront when he meets Barbara (Scarlett Johansson), the first real love of his life, a woman with high standards who doesn’t approve of the porn thing. The movie is full of porno clips, so don’t see it with kids or a first date, unless you and that first date already have some sort of naughty understanding. Gordon-Levitt has given us something akin to a funnier Saturday Night Fever, with porn replacing disco. Julianne Moore is her usual excellent self in a supporting role, and the shock casting of Tony Danza as Don’s dad proves smart. Danza gets to show some cinematic comedy chops that he hasn’t been able to show off before. This is an overall triumph for Gordon-Levitt.

1

Insidious: Chapter 2

Director James Wan was on a bit of a roll with the first film in this series and his recent The Conjuring. That roll doesn’t simply come to a halt with this film. That roll crashes into a concrete, steel enforced wall that Jesus himself built while reminiscing about his carpentry days. This latest attempt to make a haunted house movie with next to no money is a hilarious catastrophe. Wan basically uses the same tricks, including smoke machines, green lights, practical makeup and crappy music, to try and get scares out of a formula that clearly had a short shelf life. This one involves Josh (Patrick Wilson), the father from the first film acting a little strange after his trip into another dimension to retrieve his son. His wife (Rose Byrne) suspects that, gosh darn it, something must be wrong because there are still funny things happen-

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ing with her baby monitor. The movie wants to be a poor man’s The Shining, with Wilson going all Nicholson wacky and Byrne doing her best Shelley Duvall impersonation. It’s terrible, but it’s a big moneymaker, so, as with the Paranormal Activity films, this isn’t going to stop anytime soon.

3

Lee Daniels’ The Butler

3

Prisoners

3

We’re the Millers

Director Lee Daniels, prominently mentioned in the film’s title after a much publicized lawsuit, delivers a fine emotional wallop with this historical epic very loosely based on the life of Eugene Allen, a butler at the White House for 34 years. Those going to this film for its true historical significance take note: the film contains much fiction. Allen is renamed Cecil (played by Forest Whitaker), and is given a fictional son in order to depict a family conflict regarding the Civil Rights movement. So, this film, which shows the butler interacting with presidents from Eisenhower (Robin Williams) thru Ronald Reagan (Alan Rickman), is mostly made up. That doesn’t hurt the film’s dramatic significance. It’s an ultimately moving experience. What does damage the film a bit is horrible makeup, especially a goofy fake nose for John Cusack as Richard Nixon. The makeup is sometimes so bad that the film turns into unintentional comedy when some characters are on screen. Whitaker holds the whole thing together, and Oprah Winfrey, in her first starring role since her excellent turn in Beloved, does strong work as Cecil’s wife. Other stars playing presidents include a relatively makeup-free James Marsden as John F. Kennedy, and an absolutely covered Liev Schreiber as Lyndon B. Johnson.

For a good part of its running time, this one seems as if it could wind up being one of 2013’s best pictures. Alas, it frays at the end, with a finale as stupid as the rest of the film is gripping. Hugh Jackman delivers a fierce performance as Keller Dover, a survivalist who goes into vigilante mode after his daughter and her friend are kidnapped. When a semi-irritable detective (Jake Gyllenhaal) apprehends a mentally challenged suspect (Paul Dano), Dover and the detective go head-to-head on how to deal with matters. When the suspect is set free, Dover captures and tortures him. This part of the film is solid, dealing with the lengths a parent would go to find a child. As for the film’s mystery element, that’s where things fall apart. Gyllenhaal is quite good here, even when the screenplay lets him down. The movie was shot by Roger Deakins, so it always looks good. It’s worth seeing, but it’s a bit of a disappointment.

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time drug dealer who gets in over his head and is forced by his boss (Ed Helms) to smuggle drugs from Mexico. Realizing that border agents seem to go easy on families, he hires a fake family to make the trip in an RV. The family includes a wife (a stripper played by Jennifer Aniston), a daughter (a homeless girl played by Emma Roberts) and a son (a hapless neighbor played by Will Poulter). The film has a Vacation movie vibe, especially because Sudeikis is charming in a way that Chevy Chase was for a brief time in his career. Aniston plays a mighty good stripper, for sure. She has another calling in case the whole acting thing doesn’t work out. Roberts gets perhaps her best role yet as Casey, delivering some great eye-rolling moments. As for Poulter, he steals scenes nearly every time he speaks, and his encounter with a tarantula is priceless. Sure, the movie gets a little gooey and sentimental by the time it plays out, but we’ve come to like the characters by then so it’s OK. It’s not a grand cinematic effort by any means, but it does provide some good laughs, with a fair share of them being quite shocking.

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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“

I wanted to showcase how important world music is, and open people’s eyes to new sound that they might not have explored. Much of it is just as good and interesting as what we know.� „ ~ Reylon Yount, Davidson Fellow - 2011

Copland Huang Shostakovich Copland Huang Shostakovich Copland Huang Shostakovich c

Classix Two Reylon Reyl Reylon Rey lon n Yount Yount ountt | Y Yangqin angqin a ngqin n ((Chinese Chi ese Dulcimer) Chine D lcim Dul imer er))

The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra with Laura Jackson, Music Director

1* 5ÄŒĆŤ0+!.ĆŤÄ‡ÄŒĆŤÄ‚Ä€Ä ÄƒĆŤĆŤÄ‘ĆŤĆŤÄ…Ä?ĀĀƍ ~ and ~

1!/ 5ÄŒĆŤ0+!.ĆŤÄ‰ÄŒĆŤÄ‚Ä€Ä ÄƒĆŤĆŤÄ‘ĆŤĆŤÄˆÄ?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 South Virginia Street, Reno, Nevada

Reylon Yount, Yangqin HUANG: Spirit of the Yellow Earth-Concerto for Yangqin and Orchestra  Ä?ĆŤSuite from Appalachian Spring   Ä?ĆŤSymphony No. 12, op. 112 “The Year of 1917â€? Classix Two is generously sponsored by the Davidson Institute for Talent Development.

TICKETS FROM $26 PLUS FEES - (775) 323-6393 OR RENOPHIL.COM Subscriptions are still available. The Classix series offers the best in symphonic classics performed by a superb orchestra with world-renowned guest soloists. Each performance in the six-concert series is a unique and memorable experience. Let us share them with you. Classix One

Classix Three

Classix Five

TCHAIKOVSKY Jennifer Koh, Violin

HAGEN | BEETHOVEN | DVOĹ˜Ă K Zuill Bailey, Cello

STRAVINSKY | RACHMANINOFF Conrad Tao, Piano

September 8 & 10, 2013

November 3 & 5, 2013

March 2 & 4, 2014

Classix Two

Classix Four

Classix Six

COPLAND | HUANG | SHOSTAKOVICH Reylon Yount, Yangqin

BACH | RESPIGHI | BRAHMS Neil Tatman, Oboe

HAYDN | VAUGHAN WILLIAMS Reno Philharmonic Chorus

October 6 & 8, 2013

January 12 & 14, 2014

April 6 & 8, 2014

PRORATED CLASSIX SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE. LOCK-IN GREAT SEATS — SAVE! Only available directly through the Reno Phil Box Office. Details at www.renophil.com/subscribe or (775) 323-6393.

Family Concert Free Concert - Voices of America

Saturday, October 5, 2013 Hands-On Activities ÄŠÄ?ĀĀƍ

Concert Begins Ä Ä€Ä?ĀĀƍ

Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St., Reno

COPLAND: Fanfare ffor the Common Man HUANG: Spirit of the Yellow Earth Concerto for Yangqin and Orchestra   Ä?ĆŤChesapeake: Summer of 1814 (Abridged)   Ä?ĆŤChe Ch sape Ch

Pre-concert activities provided by Maytan Music Center and the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum

This free concert is generously sponsored by The Nell J. RedďŹ eld Foundation

Subscriptions and Tickets: Reno Philharmonic Box Office

(775) 323-6393 3 | RENOPHIL.COM Tickets also available through the Pioneer Center Box Office M-F 11-6 (775) 686-6600 or pioneercenter.com

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october 3, 2013


Homeward bound Hellbound Glory “I’ll be eternally grateful for Kid Rock,” says Leroy Virgil of country rock band Hellbound Glory, while speaking by Laura Davis over the phone from the bright light city of Manhattan, clear across the country from his home base—the Biggest Little City. While Virgil and his band mates have been on the road since they left Reno the beginning of August touring with fellow country rockers Supersuckers, it’s the infamously controversial Kid Rock who garnishes the most gratitude from Virgil—and with good reason. After the band’s current manager, who

“If you listen to my music, you’ll hear the Reno influences,” says Leroy Virgil of Hellbound Glory.

formerly worked with Kid Rock, played the country rock singer Hellbound Glory’s music, he invited them out to play on his cruise ship, which later led to a three-month tour as his opening act, along with a Detroit date later in the year at a show that also featured ZZ Top. “For some reason he liked my crazy music,” Virgil says. “He really liked the words and where we’re coming from.” Going hand-in-hand with shared musical tastes comes similar personality traits—meaning brutally honest, if not somewhat brash, tendencies which generally don’t mesh so well together, think two negative magnet sides repelling each another’s energy when pushed together. “He’s just like you would imagine him to be, kinda a dick but in a good way,” says Virgil. “I wouldn’t say we get along, but we’ve got a good rap going back and forth.” Virgil then gets sidetracked into an argument with someone on his side of the line over points of

Hellbound Glory performs at the Knitting Factory, 211 N . Virginia St., with Supersuckers, Last To Leave, Dusty Miles & The Cryin Shame, on Tuesday, Oct.15, at 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.hellboundglory. com.

OPINION

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NEWS

destination, then transitioning back into the conversation. As for the Supersuckers, that touring relationship has been smoother sailing. The collaboration which happened thanks to Hellbound Glory’s manager’s ties once again—this time to the Supersuckers’ manager—is a perfect match in regard to musical style and collaboration. “It’s been a good fit, and I’ve been a fan of theirs since I was a teenager,” Virgil says. “I’ve got the Supersuckers’ guitar player playing guitar for me now too, so we’re sharing musicians.” Virgil’s self-described dream is to “become a star.” This goal brought him to Reno initially back in 2002 from a small town in Washington. But being on the road is not always easy. The lifestyle involved with touring, living out of a van for months on end, can take a toll if the homesick bug settles in. “I consider my band co-workers, not my family—my family is my family,” Virgil says in regards to whether or not a close-knit group of traveling partners can help to ease the homesickness. “We’re all out here working together on this project, but there’s a lot of dealing with personality conflicts. … It’s difficult keeping the band together, it’s like being a human resource manager.” Virgil is the sole original member of Hellbound Glory, which he started the very day he moved to Reno. But he continues to work hard at keeping both the band and his transplanted Reno roots vital. “Reno’s my home,” Virgil says. “If you listen to my music, you’ll hear the Reno influences. It’s influenced by the Reno nightlife, experiences I’ve had, women I’ve met, fights I’ve gotten into—the local bar scene in general. The Hideout, Shea’s, Davidson’s Distillery—they’ve all been a big influence. They’re Reno.” And while being on the road has exposed the band to many new faces and places, traveling has only furthered Virgil’s strong sense of hometown pride. “I’m looking forward to the big homecoming show,” Virgil concedes. “I just want people to know I love Reno and I miss it, even my enemies.” Ω

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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THURSDAY 10/3 1UP 214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

FRIDAY 10/4

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

424 E. Fourth St., (775) 322-9422

Molly’s Revenge Oct. 5, 8 p.m. Ceol Irish Pub 538 S. Virginia St. 329-5558

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

Anima Stereo, Sucka Punch, Bazooka Zoo, 8:30pm, no cover

BAR-M-BAR

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Comedy

COMMA COFFEE

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Jimmy Shubert, Suli McCullough, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Jeff Dye, Brandt Tobler, W, 9pm, $25

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Unknown Comic, F-Sa, 8pm, $15, $18

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE 235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Hemlock, Countress, Deathstalker, Up Against It, 8pm, $10, $12

Zero Jones, Easter Island, Moving Company, 8:30pm, $TBA

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

Open Deck Wednesday, 8pm W, no cover Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Cro-Mags, Crown of Thornz, Old Glory, Out For War, Doomtrooper, 8pm, $13, $15 Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Molly’s Revenge, 8pm, no cover

Latin American folk music/flamenco guitar, 7pm, no cover Pyle of Zen, 6pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Larry Reeb, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Morgan Preston, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Live music, 9:30pm, no cover

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Live music, 9:30pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/7-10/9

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

CEOL IRISH PUB

SUNDAY 10/6

Select Saturday, 10pm, no cover

ABBY’S HIGHWAY 40 THE ALLEY

SATURDAY 10/5

Collective Thursdays, 8pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

VooDoo Dogz, 9:30pm, no cover

Bill Watson Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon M, no cover Mile High Jazz Band, 8pm, Tu, $5

Open Mic Jam, 9:30pm, M, karaoke, 9:30pm, Tu, open mic, 9:30pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL 8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HANGAR BAR

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

Canyon Jam, 8pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

JAVA JUNGLE

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

OPENS FRIDAY at BRÜKA THEATER

simply seafood

“Saints can be hell to live with” USA VS. USA VS S. M MEXICO EXICO EXI CO SKA BA B BATTLE!! ATTL TTLE! E!!!

Thursday, Thu ursd rsday, y October O tob Oc obe er 3

W/ A Anima nima Ste S Stereo, reo, eo, Suc Sucka ka Punch P Punch, unch, B Bazooka a Zoo

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for 36 years

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HEMLOCK

Friday, Fr y October 4

W// C Countress, ountres ou ess, Deathstalker, Up Againstt It

ZERO Z ERO JONES

Saturday, S aturd rday October 5

Burgers Bangers & Mash Roast Prime Rib & Yorkshire Pudding Shepherd’s Pie Fish & Chips Chocolate Bacon

weD 10/09

- Monday & tueday LadieS 2 FoR 1 Wine

FRi 10/11

BReakFaSt, LunCh & dinneR 9aM to cloSe

Sign up for reward BlaSter get $10 4050 S. Mc carran Blvd, reno nv 775.737.4440 • www.Spitfirereno.coM |

RN&R

walk away alpha the Harvest and the Hunt & Countress

sat 10/12

Diamond Head, Raven, Pain Clinic, Volture & weight of the tide

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CRO MAGS

Sunday, October 6 SIX MILE STATION

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Thursday, October 10

Tickets:

W/ Weapons Of Mass Creation, Feather Merchants, Man The Tanks

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MARCUS YOUNG (Son of Dr. DRE)

Friday, October 11

In Advance $18 Student/Senior $20 General At the Door - $25 All Tickets

W/ Keyringz, Christine Storm, Spectrum In Motion, Dj Reverb, Knappsacc, Graveyard Girls, Athena Camille, Soul 7, Virginia Montoya

Oct. 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 25, 26 at 8 PM Matinee:

JOIN US ON FACEBOOK, OR AT WWW.THEALLEYSPARKS.COM FOR DAILY + WEEKLY DRINK SPECIALS, CONTESTS, SHOW ANNOUNCEMENTS, AND MORE!!!

Oct. 27, 2013 at 2 PM

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW:

PrODuceD by SPecIAl ArrAnGeMenT wITh SAMuel french

tHU 10/17

actors Killed Lincoln, Ghost town Gospel & thee Hobo Gobbelins

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W/ Out For War, Doomtrooper, Old Glory

with Betty Rocker & Paul allen

Brian McPherson, adam springmob, Chris Fox & tyler stafford

CoMe CheCk it out!

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sat 10/05

stabby Unicorn CD Release Party

- happy hour 4-7pm & 10pm-close

new Menu iS here!

W/ Easter Island Moving Company. Free Show!!

DRAG QUEEN BOXING

Saturday, October 12

Ring Girls, Drag Queens, Performances

Hemlock – October 4 Cro-mags – October 6 Drag Queen Boxing – October 12 Frank Hannon (Of Tesla) – October 17 A Skylit Drive – October 19 Yo Gotti ft. YG – October 20

TheAlleySparks.com Brüka TheaTre

99 N. VirgiNia St. reNo, NV 89501 775-323-3221 | www.bruka.org

(775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

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13 1555 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV

www.Rapscallion.com

775-323-1211 • 1-877-932-3700 Open Monday - Friday at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm

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13


JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

THURSDAY 10/3

FRIDAY 10/4

SATURDAY 10/5

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

SUNDAY 10/6 Colorless Blue, 1pm, no cover

Stabby Unicorn, Betty Rocker, Paul Allen, 8pm, $8

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Datsik, FuntCase, Antiserum, Mayhem, Sub Antix, 8pm, $22-$50

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Open mic, 9pm, M, Brian McPherson, Adam Springmob, 8pm, W, no cover

Zedd, Oliver, Alex Metric, 8:30pm, $25-$65

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/7-10/9

POLO LOUNGE 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka & Andrea, 9pm, no cover

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka & Andrea, 9pm, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

Oct. 5, 8:30 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Localz, 8pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

Zedd

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

RED ROCK BAR

Comedy Night hosted by Brandon Lara, 9:30pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Maximum Volume Thursdays w/DJs Max, Noches de Sabor: Latin Night w/DJ Fierce, 11pm, $5-$10; no cover ages 21+ Freddo, 11pm, $5-$10; no cover for locals

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

Rise Culture Saturday, 10pm, $5-$10

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Seeing Eye Dogs, 9pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

Zombie Frightmare, 8pm, $10

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

Videograss Premiere Party, 8pm, $5

Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers with Edie Brickell

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Wicked Hicks, 9pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Ritual (’80s post-punk, industrial, goth), 9pm, $3 before 10pm; $5 after

Karaoke Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover Open Mic Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

Oct. 5, 9 p.m. MontBleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3353

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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o io N strat gi Fee

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OPINION

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 10/3

FRIDAY 10/4

SATURDAY 10/5

SUNDAY 10/6

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/7-10/9

2) Atomika, 8pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 4pm, Decoy, 10pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 4pm, Decoy, 10pm, no cover

2) Decoy, 8pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 7pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) Sneaky Creatures, 10pm, no cover

2) VNDMG, indaskyes, Le Moti, 11pm, no cover

1) Grease, 8pm, $24.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 3) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) Valley Sky Theatre

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

VNDMG Oct. 5, 11 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 5) Stadium Bar

1) Grease, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

HARRAH’S RENO

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

1) Gordon Lightfoot, 8pm, $60 2) John Dawson, 7pm, no cover 3) The Scotts, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Karaoke Night, 7pm, no cover

2) Brian Andrews, 6pm, Tu, W, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Garage Boys, 10:30pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 2) DJ Viola Lala Mia, 9pm, no cover 2) DJ Viola Lala Mia, 9pm, no cover 8pm, $25, $35 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover 1) Gordon Lightfoot, 8pm, $60 2) John Dawson, 8pm, no cover 3) The Scotts, 6pm, no cover

1) Bob Schneider, 9pm, $10 2) John Dawson, 8pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) The Scotts, 6pm, no cover

2) John Dawson, 7pm, no cover 3) The Scotts, 5:30pm, no cover

2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm W, no cover 3) JJ Sansaverino, 6pm, W, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

1) Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers with Edie Brickell, 9pm, $60-$80

3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

1) Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm W, no cover

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S T E K C I T N I W

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

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For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

P OT T Y RACER S World Championship Outhouse Races What started out as a protest to an outhouse ban in Virginia City back in the 1990s has turned into a yearly tradition in Virginia City that honors, as well as pokes a little fun at, the humble outdoor commode. The races pit teams of costumed outhouse racers against each other. One person rides and the remaining team members push, pull or drag a decorated outhouse down the racetrack along C Street, the town’s main street. The teams will compete for cash and trophies, as well as bragging rights. Past events have featured entrants with a variety of humorously off-color names such as “The Urinator,” “The Potty Pooper” and “Breaking Wind.” The races start at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5, and at noon on Sunday, Oct. 6, and are expected to last until about 3 p.m. The Parade of Outhouses takes place at noon on Saturday prior to the start of the race. Admission is free. Audience members can also vote for the fan favorite outhouse on Saturday. Call 847-7500 or visit www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

—Kelley Lang

30   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 3, 2013

Reno Celtic Celebration

The 23rd annual festival celebrates the culture of the seven territories in Northern and Western Europe surrounding the British Isles whose unique Celtic languages and cultural traits have survived. The event will feature pipe bands, clan tents, Scottish and Irish dancers, historical reenactors, vendors, kids’ games, food and a Celtic Critter Village featuring animal breeds that are indigenous to the Celtic nations. Main stage entertainers include Molly’s Revenge, Avalon Rising, The Blarney Band and Ciana. The gathering takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5, and Sunday, Oct. 6, at Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road. Admission is $15 for a one-day pass or $25 for both days. Children age 12 and younger are admitted free with a paying adult. After Saturday’s festivities have concluded for the day, Ceol Irish Pub will host a ceilidh, or party, featuring Molly’s Revenge starting at 8 p.m. Call 378-0931 or visit www.renoceltic.org.

Reno Philharmonic Family Concert: Voices of America

KUNR 2013 Manhattan Short Film Festival

The Reno Philharmonic will present this program highlighting the varied voices of America as expressed in music. Selections include Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man” and “Chesapeake: Summer of 1814,” a new, multimedia work composed by Michael Gandolfi that uses music of the era to tell the story of how Francis Scott Key came to write “The Star SpangledBanner.” Davidson Fellow Reylon Yount will perform on the yangqin, a traditional Chinese dulcimer in a piece titled “Spirit of the Yellow Earth.” Conductor Laura Jackson will lead the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra, which will be joined by tenor Albert Lee and soprano Jennifer Tibben as narrators. Doors open at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5, with a variety of pre-concert, hands-on activities for kids. The free concert begins at 10 a.m. at the Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Call 323-6393 or visit www.renophil.com.

88.7 KUNR Reno Public Radio and the Joe Crowley Student Union offer local audiences a chance to see this year’s 10 finalist short films of the Manhattan Short Film Festival. More than 100,000 people in 300 cities across six continents will gather at cinemas, theaters and other viewing areas between Sept. 26 and Oct. 6 to view and vote on the Finalist Films in this global film festival. The winner will be announced at the conclusion of the festival on Oct. 6. Local screenings take place at 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 4; 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5; and 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 6, at the Joe Crowley Student Union Theatre at the University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St. Tickets are $10. Call 784-6505 or visit www.kunr.org. For a list of films, visit www.msfilmfest.com.


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I just started a new job. My boss and I were having a meeting, and he started asking me about my personal life—whether I have a boyfriend, who I live with. No biggie. He then began grilling me as to why I don’t have a boyfriend and whether I’ve ever had one. I started deflecting these prying questions back to him, and he told me that he lives only with his younger brother, so he understands me well. Weird, but whatever. Well, it turns out he actually has a wife and a 4-year-old daughter! This isn’t my first experience with managerial prying, either. In a previous job, my married manager scheduled after-work “meetings” with me, delving into non-work topics. When I’d go to leave, he’d say, “Sit down! You have nowhere to be!” My exit statement every time? “I have to change my cat’s litter.” I’m definitely leaving this job. My last boss was an ethical guy, and that’s the kind of person I want to work for. We usually feel sorry for a man who has lost his wife and child. Of course, this is usually a tragically permanent event. They don’t pop back into existence as soon as he gets home from taking a detailed ex-boyfriend history from his hot employee. Some people would tell you to sprint to the nearest sexual harassment lawyer’s office and sue your employers until they’re living out of a Dumpster. The truth is, these cases can be hard to win. Your supervisor can retaliate in ways that are hard to prove, and having a claim on the record can make it hard for you to get another job. Also, after a single creepy line of questioning from your boss (even one that makes you suspect that—eeuw!—he wishes he could make sex biscuits with you), you aren’t exactly ready to pick out an outfit to wear to court. Wayne State University law professor Kingsley Browne explains in Biology at Work that the “hostile environment” type of sexual harassment involves a work environment “permeated with sexuality.” Browne told me via email: “The legal question is whether the harassment is sufficiently ‘severe or pervasive,’ and the way you show that something is pervasive is to show that there’s a lot of it.” There’s probably no need for things to get to that point. As for your approach, if you’d like a role model, think more Sigourney Weaver in Alien than Bambi in Bambi. This doesn’t mean you pull out your flamethrower every time some guy says, “Hey, nice dress.” You just need to be firm and immediate in shutting

down any situation that’s uncomfortable for you, and you did a superb job of that the last time. You didn’t go limp or hysterical. You coolly informed the guy that the closest he’d get to your personal life was a status update on your cat’s turds. You might also consider whether you should dial back on how bubbly and open you are at the office and maybe err on the side of a vibe that says, “Talk to me about some boring work question!” And here’s to finding a more admirable new boss—one whose remarkable qualities don’t include the ability to make his wife and child disappear without doing jail time.

Wane man Is it a no-no to just cut off communication to break up? I am 27 and was dating a 25-year-old guy for three months. This past month, he started texting way less, ignoring many of my texts, and making excuses not to hang out. Realizing he was taking the easy way out of dumping me, I blocked his number and email. If he was looking to ignore me until I went away, I figured I’d do the same. Help! It feels terrible ending things this way. There are times a man can’t help but disappear on a woman, like when he’s kidnapped by revolutionaries who happened to stop off for Slurpees and hostages when he was at 7-Eleven. Otherwise, there’s only one good explanation for him not telling you it’s over: On the manliness scale, he’s a little old lady’s dishtowel. Where you go wrong is in letting his bad behavior shape your breakup behavior, effectively letting him shape who you are in a small way. Do the decent, adult thing. Call him and say something like, “I thought we should have a nicer ending than we did, so I just wanted to say thanks for the good times and wish you the best.” You’ll surely feel better ending things classy, and who knows, maybe he’ll be inspired by your example—at least enough for his next girlfriend to get the message when his mom calls to tell her it’s over.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   October 3, 2013  |  

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by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Are you good

at haggling? Do you maybe even enjoy the challenge of negotiating for a better price, of angling for a fairer deal? The coming week will be a favorable time to make extensive use of this skill. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will thrive on having friendly arguments with just about everyone, including your buddies, your significant other, your mommy and even God herself. Everywhere you go, I encourage you to engage in lively discussions as you hammer out compromises that will serve you well. Be cheerful and adaptable and forceful.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In David

Markson’s experimental novel Wittgenstein’s Mistress, the protagonist fantasizes about the winter she lived at the Louvre Museum in Paris. She says that to keep warm, she made big fires and burned some of the museum’s precious artifacts. I’m hoping you won’t do anything remotely resembling that mythic event in the coming week, Taurus. I understand that you may be going through a cold spell—a time when you’re longing for more heat and light. But I beg you not to sacrifice enduring beauty in order to ameliorate your temporary discomfort. This, too, shall pass.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Don’t say

you want love,” writes San Francisco author Stephen Sparks. “Say you want the morning light through a paint-flecked window; say you want a gust of wind scraping leaves along the pavement and hills rolling toward the sea; say you want to notice, in a tree you walk past every day, the ruins of a nest exposed as the leaves fall away; a slow afternoon of conversation in a shadowy bar; the smell of bread baking.” That’s exactly the oracle I want to give you, Gemini. In my opinion, you can’t afford to be generic or blank in your requests for love. You must be highly specific. You’ve got to ask for the exact feelings and experiences that will boost the intensity of your lust for life. (Here’s Sparks’ Tumblr page: http://invisiblestories. tumblr.com.)

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The world

breaks everyone, and afterward, many are stronger in the broken places,” wrote Cancerian writer Ernest Hemingway. By my estimation, my fellow crabs, we are now entering a phase of our astrological cycle when we can make dramatic progress in healing the broken places in ourselves. But even better than that: As we deal dynamically with the touchy issues that caused our wounds, we will become stronger than we were before we got broken.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Let’s hope you

have given deep thought to understanding who you are at this moment of your life. Let’s also hope that you have developed a clear vision of the person you would like to become in, say, three years. How do you feel about the gap between the current you and the future you? Does it oppress you? Does it motivate you? Maybe a little of both? I’ll offer you the perspective of actress Tracee Ellis Ross. “I am learning every day,” she told Uptown Magazine, “to allow the space between where I am and where I want to be to inspire me and not terrify me.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do the words

“purity” and “purify” have any useful purpose? Or have they been so twisted by religious fundamentalists and mocked by decadent cynics that they’re mostly just farcical? I propose that you take them seriously in the coming week. Give them your own spin. For instance, you could decide to purify yourself of petty attitudes and trivial desires that aren’t in alignment with your highest values. You might purify yourself of self-deceptions that have gotten you into trouble and purify yourself of resentments that have blocked your creative energy. At the very least, Virgo, cleanse your body with extra-healthy food, good sleep, massage, exercise and sacred sex.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I periodically

hike alone into the serene hills north of San Francisco and perform a set of my songs for the birds, insects, squirrels and trees. Recently, I discovered that British comedian Milton Jones tried a similar experiment. He did his stand-up act for a herd of cows on a farm in Hertfordshire. I can’t speak for Jones’ motivations, but one of the reasons I do my nature shows is because they bring out my wild, innocent, generous spirit. Now is a good time for you to do something similar for yourself, Libra. What adventures can you undertake that will fully activate your wild, innocent, generous spirit?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Are you anx-

ious and agitated, afraid that you’re careening out of control? Is there a flustered voice in your head moaning, “Stop the insanity!”? Well, relax, dear Scorpio. I promise you that you no longer have to worry about going cray-cray. Why? Because you have already gone cray-cray, my friend. That is correct. You slipped over the threshold a few days ago, and have been living in Bonkersville ever since. And since you are obviously still alive and functioning, I think it’s obvious that the danger has passed. Here’s the new truth: If you surrender to the uproar, if you let it teach you all it has to teach you, you will find a lively and intriguing kind of peace.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): To

give you the oracle that best matches your current astrological omens, I’ve borrowed from “Sweetness,” a poem by Stephen Dunn. I urge you to memorize it or write it on a piece of paper that you will carry around with you everywhere you go. Say Dunn’s words as if they were your own: “often a sweetness comes / as if on loan, stays just long enough // to make sense of what it means to be alive, / then returns to its dark / source. As for me, I don’t care // where it’s been, or what bitter road / it’s traveled / to come so far, to taste so good.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In her

book Teaching a Stone to Talk, Annie Dillard apologizes to God and Santa Claus and a nice but eccentric older woman named Miss White, whom she knew as a child. “I am sorry I ran from you,” she writes to them. “I am still running, running from that knowledge, that eye, that love from which there is no refuge. For you meant only love, and love, and I felt only fear, and pain.” Judging from your current astrological omens, Capricorn, I’d say that now would be a good time for you to do something similar: Take an inventory of the beauty and love and power you have sought to escape and may still be trying to avoid. You’re finally ready to stop running and embrace at least some of that good stuff.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Dragon

Lives Again is a 1977 film that tells the story of martial-arts legend Bruce Lee fighting bad guys in the underworld. Among the villains he defeats are Dracula, James Bond, the Godfather, Clint Eastwood and the Exorcist. I urge you to use this as inspiration, Aquarius. Create an imaginary movie in your mind’s eye. You’re the hero, of course. Give yourself a few superpowers, and assemble a cast of scoundrels from your past—anyone who has done you wrong. Then watch the epic tale unfold as you do with them what Bruce Lee did to Dracula and company. Yes, it’s only pretend. But you may be surprised at how much this helps you put your past behind you. Think of it as a purgative meditation that will free you to move in the direction of the best possible future.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): After study-

ing the myths and stories of many cultures throughout history, Joseph Campbell arrived at a few conclusions about the nature of the human quest. Here’s one that’s apropos for you right now: “The cave you fear to enter holds the treasure you seek.” He came up with several variations on this idea, including this one: “The very cave you are afraid to enter turns out to be the source of what you are looking for.” I urge you to consider making this your operative hypothesis for the coming weeks, Pisces.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Sage Leehey PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

Info guy Dave Croasdell is the chairman of the Information Systems (IS) department and the Charles and Ruth Hopping Professor of Entrepreneurship at the University of Nevada, Reno, and is involved in many different areas on campus in addition to entrepreneurship and IS, including athletics and international programs.

Can you tell me a little bit about what you’re involved with? I’ve been pretty fortunate because while I do wear a lot of hats, I feel like all the hats fit pretty well. First and foremost is being a faculty member here and interacting with the students. That’s great. Our students in the IS program are generally pretty bright and pretty highly engaged, so that’s been pretty fun. I’m chairman of the department, which means I do mostly just a lot of paper pushing. ‌ I’ve been highly engaged in international and global education. I’m just coming off a stint as chairman of the university’s international activities commission. ... The number of international conferences that this university has hosted in the last year is amazing. It’s like 12 conferences in five years that we’ve hosted—international. I’ve had the opportunity to work with Corina Black and the folks at the Northern Nevada International Center putting together a program for Young African Leadership Institute that’s sponsored by the state department. So next summer we should have 25 young African business leaders here learning about how to do business in the United States. And I’ve taught abroad in almost every continent.

That’s pretty awesome. It’s very cool. Going to China and manufacturing facilities there—it was fantastic. And then comparing it to things that are happening in Europe or in Spain. Mark Pingle and myself and Marcel Schaerer, who works in our Small Business Development Center, we just went to Chihuahua, Mexico, for the last five days. We just got back from this global entrepreneurship conference. ‌ So the idea is this notion of global entrepreneurship. There’s over 7 billion people on the planet, anyone of them is a potential customer. ... So about four or five years ago, the dean reached out to Mark Pingle in economics, and I jumped on board about the same time to boost that program a little bit, start offering more classes. We developed a minor program and started to get some traction with the Entrepreneurship Club and what not.

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âˆŤy Bruce Van Dye

It had been my intention this week to write something light-hearted and even humorous about some fairly unfunny situations taking place—the insanity going on in the House of Representatives, for example, with the threats of shutdown/default (a situation which once again begs the question—are current House Republicans getting close to traitor-hood?), or the complexity of making this Syrian chemical weapons agreement actually work, or the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that concluded it’s now 95 percent certain that our planet is getting warmer because of the activity of humans, and could we please stop arguing and denying and finally get around to doing? But I’m not up for it. My deadline approaches yet I’m just not feeling any of that stuff. I’m emotionally spent since Breaking Bad concluded last night. And goddamn, those guys stuck the finish. So what was it about this freakin’ show that got me and millions of others all caught up and crazed? OPINION

Are you looking at that becoming a minor program or something like that?

I really enjoy the entrepreneurship aspect. It’s people with energy and people with ideas. We talk about not getting a job, but creating your job. So I think for me it’s the entrepreneurship, but the global aspects of it and exploring that in research and talking about it in classes and working on that with various different entities on campus. That’s probably been where I get the greatest thrill. Ί

There [are] eight centers for cyber security excellence in the United States, but none, that I’m aware of, on the West Coast. ‌

Bad turn

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What’s your favorite thing to be working with?

What would that be, exactly?

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The idea of a cyber security center is very interdisciplinary. It’s pulling from political science to do policy, from computer science to do sort of the hardware stuff, from IS to do our thing, from central IT to help support and manage that. We’re trying to figure out what it’s going to look like. ‌ It’s about working together, but obviously there’s a lot of stuff going on right now with security and cyber security in particular. One of the cases that’s fairly well known is something called Stuxnet, a software virus that was unleashed on nuclear facilities in Iran. They shut their whole plants down with software, and if it can happen to them, it can happen to us.

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`3. The music on the show was always good and often sensational. This was something the BB producers stole from The Sopranos, and wisely so. The Sopranos, you’ll recall, made great use of perfectly chosen songs to enhance certain scenes. So did BB. There is one montage where Walt is making blue meth and mad money to the entire four minutes of Tommy James “Crystal Blue Persuasion� that is just nothing less than perfect. The effect was thrilling. But I’m glad Bad is over. It was an extraordinary show and a helluva ride, but, in the end, there comes a time where you just have to get off the roller coaster. As show creator Vince Gilligan said, “I’d rather check out one season too early than stay on one minute too long.� Right on, VG. But when the super deluxe ultra mega BB box set goes on sale in time for Christmas, I’ll be rested and ready. I just gotta have that Los Pollos Hermanos Bar-B-Q apron! Ί

1. Its location was interesting. It was simply time for Albuquerque to dent the national consciousness! Not only was a show set in New Mexico completely new and fresh, but many of us appreciated a show that wasn’t set in a goddamn apartment complex in New York or a glitzy neighborhood in Los Angeles. Very simply, no other show has ever looked quite like BB. Meetings would take place on lonely desert back roads. Days would pass with the help of fantastic time-lapse photography. Stunning stuff. 2. Through the character of young Jesse Pinkman, a recent high school grad and typical modern wastrel thoroughly involved in the meth scene, BB could establish some serious, young, hip credibility. And it did so with gusto. With Jesse and his buddies, us old squares could get a feel for how Jesse’s generation truly look at school, life, love, and money. These unapologetic cross-generational glimpses would bristle with cred, ’tude, and humor.

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OCTOBER 3, 2013

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