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Letters ........................... 3 opinion/Streetalk ............ 5 Sheila Leslie ................... 6 Chanelle Bessette........... 7 news ............................. 8 Green ........................... 11 Feature ........................ 13 arts&Culture ............... 16 art of the State ........... 23

Foodfinds .................... 24 Film..............................26 musicbeat ....................29 nightclubs/Casinos ....... 31 This Week ....................35 advice Goddess ...........36 Free Will astrology ...... 38 15 minutes ....................39 Bruce Van Dyke ...........39

Sick Society See Left Foot Forward, page 6.

First Amendment Gets some scrutiny in locAl pArks See News, page 8.

Sean Shea iS a ScientiSt, a hermit, a hunter, a naturaliSt ... or maybe he’S juSt lucky

ham on The Range See Arts&Culture, page 17.

uncertain future See Film, page 26.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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7/26/13 4:26 PM


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Best ever

Win some

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. This is the last time you’ll see me write about the Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada until next time. Probably. I was happy with it and started sleeping again on the Thursday it published. Our experiment publishing in 3-D was overall a success. There were two or three images that didn’t work particularly well, at least not as well as they worked online. For the geeks out there, there were three factors that seemed to contribute: 1) the short distance between the camera, the foreground and the background, 2) the color saturation, and 3) the shift going from RGB to CMYK, which does not perfectly work with the red and blue of the glasses. But overall, I’m giving us an 8 out of 10. I have some friends who disagree with that assessment. I know people liked it, though. I was at a popular new coffee shop, and I was told by the barista their entire stack was picked up in just a few hours. As far as counting, final results for the Best of: 3,132 voters voted in 108,150 categories; our most voted-in section was Goods & Services with 28,388 votes; and our least voted-in section was Innovation with 1,614 votes. Look, we know there are some weird winners. Every year, somebody gets recognized for work they did a year or even two before or a closed business wins. Sometimes people will campaign to win in areas they don’t necessarily deserve at the expense of people who do deserve them. But it’s not up to us to change the results, and unless we have reason to believe that somebody cheated by gaming the system, the results appear in the paper and online as they are counted. Otherwise, what’s the point of all this fun? I mean, maybe the Moonlite Bunny Ranch is not the Best Local Place to Work, but they didn’t cheat to win the award. I mean, shoot, maybe I’ll send them a resume in a year or two. Finally, there were a few issues that didn’t get the 3-D glasses inserted. Sorry about that. We still have extras here at the office.

Re “Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada” (Feature story, Aug. 8): Really?! Hands down Opa Cafe is the best and most popular Greek restaurant in town. Best out there anywhere! This vote must be rigged. Nick’s Deli and Blue Plate don’t even taste Greek. And Niko’s Greek Kitchen is decent enough, but I’d pick Opas any day over Niko’s. Try them all and decide for yourself. Marika Dimitriadis Reno

Gone to the dogs Re “Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada” (Feature story, Aug. 8): On Command is the best shop around and the cleanest for sure. I’m happy the place is finally getting the recognition it deserves. Thanks. Bear Scott Reno

Chains over independents Re “Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada” (Feature story, Aug. 8): I think for future purposes, it would be good to lump restaurants in the same chain into the same entry. Thus, Peg’s Glorified Ham & Eggs on South Sierra Street would be the same entry as Peg’s Glorified Ham & Eggs on Mae Anne and on Prater Way in Sparks. Gives each restaurant in the chain more chances, but also gives more selections for the top 3, as we wouldn’t have two of the three being the same place (for all intents and purposes). Just my 2 cents. Matt Davis Sparks

Fear of impact It is difficult for citizens to understand why RTC does not want to provide an Environmental Impact Study on the proposed Southeast Connector and have gone to great lengths to avoid it. Now it appears they might even have skirted and ignored some federal

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

requirements. What are they afraid of? Just do the study! Helene Sasser Reno

Give advice to parents Re “Plan ahead for new breaks” (Editorial, Aug. 1): Regarding the editorial on the new school calendar: I am a teacher, and I think there are many positives as we head into the new school year such as retention of learning. Overall, you hit the nail on the head about the struggles of working parents finding daycare (but more jobs isn’t a bad thing). However, I am very disappointed in your closing paragraph which portrays teachers as being stuck in a rut. We constantly seem to be fighting a battle with the media and politicians who seem to think teachers are the enemy. Usually, RN&R doesn’t take this stand. Reform is hard, and this is one step, as you stated. But reform can’t take place in just one area. It needs to be a cooperative effort that includes the school district, parents and politicians! How about some advice for parents about how they can help their children and teachers? That would sure be different! Melissa Sewell Reno

Smarten up Re “Get smart” (Green, Aug. 1): OK, enough about all the emotionalism, misinformation, and a lack of understanding about electric utility Smart Meters. As hard as it may be to believe, it’s really a good thing that utilities are adopting this technology. First, for customers of NV Energy, we avoided almost half of the $300 million thanks to the federal government. That’s money that’s not coming directly out of our pocket. Thank you, DOE. Second, Smart Meters will save a lot of money for everyone—consumers and the utility. It also will result in other benefits in improving customer service and reduced

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

costs—from improved outage response to better billing accuracy and information for customers. It also provides the foundation for the ‘next step’ in modernizing the distribution of electric power. Further it’s an investment that utilities can earn on. It’s literally a ‘win-win’ for customers and the utility in multiple respects. So, how does it save money? Well, first it eliminates monthly meter reading for every residential and small commercial customer. This is on-the-order of $10 million per year. And, for most of us that means a meter reader won’t be trudging through our yard every month. I don’t know about you, but I appreciate this. It also provides the necessary platform to transition to rates based on time-of-day consumption, which is how power is priced on the bulk energy market. For customers who can choose when they run appliances like washers, dryers, etc., they can shift their usage to off-peak periods and save money. I do this with the utility’s current voluntary Time-OfUse (TOU) residential rate structure. It works for me and it’s not ‘rocket science’. But the real benefit with TOU rates is that they provide an incentive for the utility to improve their overall energy efficiency, being able to eventually reduce their overall powerplant requirements by reducing peak generation requirements. This offers enormous savings for consumers and the company, with facilitating the transition to renewable resources and mitigating the need to build additional fossil-fuel plants in the interim. The future transition to TOU rates will result in a shift to a new level of energy efficiency and reduced utility infrastructure from power plants to distribution resources. All of this eliminates waste, promotes efficiency, and reduces costs. We the consumers directly benefit from all of this with reduced energy costs. While the fears associated with Smart Meters aren’t necessarily ridiculous, if you use a cell phone or are in the vicinity of virtually any modern technology, you are far more exposed to these concerns

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

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than anything coming from a Smart Meter. Think about it, Smart Meters communicate for a few seconds an hour. How long are you on your cell phone a day? How far is the Smart Meter from you compared to the cell phone on your ear? Exposure is a function of time and an inverse of the square-of-the-distance of the source. For those that choose to opt out and use meters that need to be read every month, $8.72 is a very small price to pay. What other company will come out to your house for that cost? And, that also includes the additional cost of manually reading and processing your meter information. It’s a bargain. You are actually being subsidized by all of the other customers, so be grateful to have the option, let alone the minimal cost. Rather than taking issue with the cost of opting out, why not opt to use the current optional TOU rates? By managing your consumption you will be able to reduce your monthly cost. Also, to clear up another issue, a Smart Meter only records a customer’s consumption during 15 minute periods, rather than for the whole month. It can’t tell what the customer is doing. Kilowatts from light bulbs, refrigerators, heaters/air conditioners, etc., are all the same. The claims that the utility knows what you are doing is ridiculous. So much of this misinformation is absurd. Tim King Reno

Frack your day Re “Heating up” (Green, July 4): To allow fracking in Nevada is the biggest mistake the state would make in its history! Fracking will waste our clean water, which is already at low levels due to drought, and replace it with a toxic cocktail of “secret” chemicals. The fracking companies will rape the land and leave farmers and ranchers with sick animals, cancer causing water supply and filthy, toxic pollution. Nevadan’s right to drink clean water and breathe clean air supersedes any fracking company’s right to pollute for profit! JoAnn Torre Las Vegas

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Brian Breneman

AUGUST 15, 2013

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YOU COMPLETE ME To hear John’s story and others

Register now for our fall semester.

Call 673-7111 or visit completeme.tmcc.edu.

4   |   RN&R   |   August 15, 2013

– John Vernon, U.S. Army Veteran, Telecommunications Technician


by Dennis Myers

ThiS Modern WorLd

by tom tomorrow

Where do you hide away? Asked in downtown Sparks Paul Izzo Trainer

I usually try to go camping, either Stampede or [the] Lake Tahoe area. It’s just peaceful, I can relax there, and there’s not a lot of hustle and bustle.

Tiffany Devries Student

The mountains. It’s peaceful. I can be myself and think clearly. I feel like that’s where I recognize God’s creations the best.

David Kay Landscaper

Miles to go The idea that Reno Pride could come and go with little commentary from the Reno News & Review seems almost awkward. The fact is that the LGBT community has taken major steps forward since last year, mainly nationally, although to a small extent in the Silver State, too. Still, it’s not as though our community does not have miles to go, it just seems as though we have come so far. So, of course, staff members will be down at Wingfield Park, on the corner of Arlington Avenue and West First Street, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17, to celebrate with our friends and family. But this idea begs certain questions. Why does the least amount of forward momentum mean we the press can sit back and watch what we hope is the inevitability of history? This country has 237 years of hateful discrimination to account for. And just as laws pretending to “protect” marriage swept the country only a few years ago (in Nevada, 2002), the tide can turn with the vagaries of the U.S. Supreme Court. Not to point out the obvious, but despite a vote in the Nevada Legislature, we still don’t have marriage equality in Nevada. We’re not likely to see protesters outside the park, as we did only a few years ago, but we are likely to hear pejorative names downtown. When does that blight on the American conscience end? Interestingly, the Reno Pride marches of just a few years ago happened in spite of public ignorance. They were, in no small way, the gay and lesbian community coming together to thumb their collective nose at mainstream society. They required a certain courage on OPINION

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I usually head up to Gold Lake or Sardine [Lake], California. Beautiful country up there. It’s quiet and peaceful, good fishing.

the part of marchers and supporters to participate. We were there. We saw the protesters and heard their hateful slogans. Westboro Baptist Church with its hateful placards can almost be expected to protest somewhere this weekend. But this weekend will be a celebration. Perhaps that’s the crucial difference between then and now. There are things to celebrate. The U.S. Supreme Court struck down parts of the federal Defense of Marriage Act. The court also overturned 2008 ballot Question 8 in California. Those rulings restarted same-gender marriages in our neighboring state just seven weeks ago. These were baby steps forward, giant only in comparison to the crawl we’ve faced in the years since the Stonewall riots of 1969 and the massacre of 32 gays in New Orleans in 1973. Seems like an eternity, doesn’t it? Since Reno Pride was last celebrated, seven states have made it legal for all couples to wed. Even looking outside our little section of the planet, gay people are still often treated as second-class citizens. Has our country as a country stood up to fight against new anti-gay laws in Ghana, Nigeria or Senegal? How many other countries with homophobic discriminatory laws does Uncle Sam count as friends? Will Obama stand by during the 2014 Winter Olympics as our gay athletes face prosecution due to a new Russian anti-gay law? We in Reno have a lot to celebrate this weekend. But there’s a world of hate out there, and we all must maintain vigilance. Ω

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Mia Robinson Medical coder

I’d go and ride my horse. I go out in Vinton, California. And I live in Golden Valley, so I spend time with my horses when I want to be alone. It’s peaceful and quiet, you have a big animal underneath you and you’re by yourself.

Pamela Anderson Store manager

Go to my bedroom, because I go to read a book, go to read and relax, and that’s what helps me calm down and chill from the day. Fiction, things that don’t happen normally. A Game of Thrones is what I’m reading right now.

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The high cost of apathy This time, it really is about the money. But then, it always has been. After all, we live in a state where you’re expected to solve your own problems or go back to where you came from. The National Alliance on Mental Illness gave Nevada a D grade in its by most recent report card, citing the Sheila Leslie state’s 28 percent reduction in mental health spending between 2009 and 2012. The NAMI report also found that “Nevada has one of the lowest per capita rates of mental health funding in the nation while the suicide rate is among the nation’s highest, as is the percentage of adults reporting poor mental health.” Last week, the Interim Finance Committee approved Gov. Sandoval’s emergency request to add $2.1 million to the state’s mental health budget to address critical issues at the Rawson-Neal inpatient hospital in Las Vegas. The facility recently was recommended for “Preliminary Denial of Accreditation” by the Joint Commission after serious problems were identified with its discharge

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practices and level of services. The inspection was in response to complaints stemming from widely publicized newspaper stories of “Greyhound Bus therapy” whereby patients were discharged to the bus station for transportation anywhere out-of-state and out-of-sight. The new funds will add beds and staffing, but it’s more like putting a proverbial finger in the dike than solving the problem. Patients are stabilized and released from the hospital quicker than you think, discharged back to the street with nowhere to live, no transportation, no income and no future. An appointment six-to-eight weeks away won’t ensure they stay on their medications or remember to do a “walk-in” to the clinic when the side effects from the stronger medications kick in. The truth is the solutions to the new crisis are the same as the answers to the old ones, such as the public health emergency in 2004 when mentally ill people were taking up so many beds in hospital emergency rooms, there was little room for people with medical emergencies.

Sandoval should do more than acknowledge the problem, decades in the making, with an emergency request, hoping it’s enough to keep the lid on the bubbling volcano waiting to explode. Instead, he should create a blue ribbon commission to make short-term and longer-term recommendations for systemic change. The commission’s membership should be small but mighty, with respected professional and political leaders in Nevada who know the problem and potential solutions well. We don’t need outsiders or a two-year study to tell us where we’re failing. It’s painfully obvious. Make no mistake, the commission’s recommendations would certainly involve spending more money since over half of the psychiatric holds in our emergency rooms don’t require hospitalization. They do require services, however, such as supported living arrangements to provide stable, safe housing with staff to make sure appointments are kept and medications are taken.

We need drop-in centers, vocational rehabilitation programs, supported work opportunities, individual and group counseling, mobile outreach teams, triage centers, mental health courts, teams for the most seriously ill, and a co-occurring disorder inpatient program for those with serious addiction issues along with their mental illness. We need rural mental health clinics that are staffed at a reasonable level. All of these programs have been slashed or eliminated during the recession, and they were never adequately funded. Some don’t even exist in Nevada’s mental health system. The bottom line is people can learn to manage a life-long mental illness with some timely and effective help. But without sustained local and state leadership, and substantially more resources, one crisis rolls into another. If we don’t spend the money now, we’ll surely continue to pay for our foolishness through increased jail and prison costs, hospital and health care bills, and most importantly, human tragedy. Ω

Here’s a list of mental health services from the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services: http:// tinyurl.com/lgyea82.


Let the right ones in and the taxes that undocumented immigrants do pay wind up going toward widely used services like schools and roads. What really seems to get people riled up is the idea of an oversaturation of workers in the economy who are “taking American jobs.” With an influx of immigrants arriving in the states every day, there is also the element of a perceived threat to American traditions. So with this complex issue pulling at the American psyche, politicians along both Democrat and Republican lines have been trying to assuage the situation with various plans for immigration reform. While some methods include aggressive deportation or a requirement to carry documentation (like with Arizona’s controversial “show me your papers” law), there are other options available. One route that is being strongly considered by the Libertarian Party is a two-part solution. The first part involves not only providing amnesty for undocumented workers

Immigration reform has long been an issue close to the hearts of many Nevadans. With our proximity to Mexico and the West Coast as well as our high demand for service industry positions, Nevada is a perfect storm of immigration by Chanelle Bessette controversy, especially when it comes to undocumented workers. On one hand, undocumented workers provide abundant cheap labor, particularly for positions that don’t require much education. Who hasn’t driven past a home improvement store and seen clusters of hired hands waiting for a day’s work? With the ability to negotiate the payment of a service, both laborers and employers can find a satisfactory arrangement. On the other hand, undocumented workers might not always contribute to certain tax pools. While sales tax and property tax are unavoidable, income tax may or may not be taken out depending on the nature of the work. Then again, income tax isn’t an issue in Nevada,

who are currently residing in the U.S. but also increasing the ease with which immigrants can receive work visas and naturalization. The second part is improving border security. Theoretically, a more streamlined visa and naturalization process would reduce the need for illegal border crossing for immigrants. However, an added bonus to improved border security would be a reduction in criminal activity such as drugs and human trafficking. The incorporation of immigrants as new U.S. citizens is a timehonored keystone of American culture. The “melting pot” still stands as an important facet of America’s strength as a nation. By welcoming new talents and laborers into the country, there is a potential for growth that would not otherwise be possible. We need a system that allows people to move about freely, thereby contributing their skills to the American economy. By doing so, we would essentially be decriminalizing many of the issues that come with undocumented workers,

saving money in the judicial process as well as taxpayer money that goes toward law enforcement, imprisonment and deportation. The condition of being an undocumented worker is not a violent one, and yet many people who have illegally immigrated to the United States are treated with disdain and mistrust that is tantamount to racial profiling. Those who emigrate from their native homes to come to America are just seeking what everyone else is seeking: a better, more productive life. In some cases, particularly when an immigrant hails from a developing country, their contribution to the world economy does twice the amount of good when they are able to send money home to their families as well as provide much-needed services on American soil. All in all, increasing the ease with which immigrants can work and live in America can only benefit our country in the long run, especially in Nevada. It’s time to embrace immigration reform and

Here’s the historical information on immigration from the U.S. Census Bureau: www.census.gov/ population/www/ documentation/ twps0029/twps0029. html.

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17 years of Community Celebration ~ For Comedy night tickets and Festival information visit www.RenoGayPride.com OPINION

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Photo/Dennis Myers

With his sax at his side, street performer  Marcus Moore listens to a discussion of licensing  at the city parks commission. Moore is also a  Truckee Meadows Community College student.

Our friend the government The scholarly journal Foreign Policy has published research indicating that the U.S. and Soviet governments had a “gentlemen’s agreement” to keep information from the public about leaks from underground nuclear tests after all testing went underground. Most U.S. tests were conducted in Nevada. The first Test Ban Treaty, negotiated by the Khrushchev and Kennedy governments, was signed 50 years ago last week. It banned tests in the atmosphere, underwater and in outer space. Thereafter, underground testing “posed a problem because the tests sometimes produced significant ’venting’ of radioactive gases and particles, which traveled across borders in violation of the treaty,” wrote analyst William Burr of the National Security Archive. “Whatever the actual health risks may have been (probably far more serious for people living near the test sites than those far away), venting raised political problems because of the international concern about radioactivity.” Complaints about leaks by the two sides, Burr went on, eventually decreased because, a recently discovered archival document indicates, “Both superpowers came to observe a tacit ’gentleman’s agreement against publicizing venting incidents’ in order to depoliticize the issue and to avoid public criticisms of nuclear testing in general (although that was more important to Washington than to Moscow).” Even then, some leaks were too serious to cover up. “One venting that became a major news story, reaching the front pages of the U.S. press, was the Baneberry nuclear test on December 18, 1970,” Burr writes. “Everything went wrong geologically at the Nevada Test Site. The 10 kiloton test produced a “prompt, massive venting” of radioactive particles and gases, the worst such incident in the history of U.S. underground testing. The cloud reached 8,000 feet in height and radioactive particles were detected across the Canadian border. Owing to an error by the test controller, a warning was not issued quickly enough, and radiation reached Camp 12 where hundreds of workers were stationed.” Earlier research and reporting has dealt with the U.S. government also trivializing fallout risks, and denying the seismic detectability of tests in order to prevent a test ban.

Help run the city The city of Reno is looking for new members of the Charter Committee. That committee reviews the city charter and makes recommendations for change. It is made up of members appointed by each councilmember and the mayor, plus members appointed by state legislators whose districts include Reno (but those members are not at issue here). To apply go to http://reno.gov/Index.aspx?page=188.

We’re Number 42! Political analyst Rhodes Cook last week issued one of his periodic reports, this one on the slow increase in presidential election voter turnout—even in Nevada. “Sixty percent is a good winning percentage for a professional baseball team. And 60 percent is a strong turnout rate for a U.S. presidential election,” Rhodes wrote. “In the last three presidential contests, the turnout rate has been in that ball park. In 2004 and 2008, voter participation surpassed 60 percent of the estimated voter-eligible population (comprised of citizens age 18 and older). In 2012, the turnout rate was 59 percent. Taken together, they represent the three highest rates of voter turnout since the 1950s and 1960s, when the electorate was smaller, whiter and arguably more civic minded.” Nevada, traditionally in the bottom five of states in turnout, still ranks only 42, but has pushed turnout above half of eligible voters—54.3 percent in the presidential election last year, according to Rhodes. That is, 1,014,918 of an estimated 1,869,000 eligible voters in the state voted in the presidential election. They voted for Barack Obama over Mitt Romney by a 7 percent margin and elected two Democratic and two Republican U.S. House members.

—Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

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Art and commerce Licensing of First Amendment activities eyed for city parks The Reno Recreation and Parks Commission last week approved an endorsement of proposed new ordinances governby ing sales and financial transactions Dennis Myers associated with First Amendment activities in public places, but the endorsement was kind of tepid. The purpose of the new ordinances is to get rid of old language in city ordinances that leaves the city in a weak position if it is sued for breaching First Amendment rights in public places. The city’s Arts Commission has already endorsed the legal changes, and the Reno City Council is expected to vote on them next month.

“The Arts Commission has a vested interest in protecting the festival industry.” Ted Levatter Activist Several people, led by activist Tom Levatter, were on hand to oppose the ordinances. “I’m concerned that the city of Reno is looking to restrict First Amendment expression both in public parks and on sidewalks,” Levatter said before the meeting began. “Public parks and sidewalks are traditional public fora and there should be only

a compelling need for the city to restrict our rights in those locations, and I don’t believe they have one. … They want to require artists, nonprofit organizations and First Amendment speakers who would like to use public parks or sidewalks to express their First Amendment rights to go to the licensing department, present identification, give their name and pay a $60 fee in order to continue expressing themselves.” He said that what applies to artists will also apply to non-profit institutions and political groups and activists. Greenpeace activists in San Francisco, he said, have been arrested for selling stuffed whales. “The Supreme Court has said that just because a speaker receives compensation, it makes him no less of a speaker,” Levatter argued. While the court has indeed ruled that paid speech enjoys the same First Amendment protection as any other speech—something which presumably also applies to other First Amendment pursuits like painting— the court did not disallow or even address licensing issues. It was not clear why the city attorney’s office is not pursing permitting language instead of licensing language in this field. Sales are currently banned from Reno parks but take place during special events under permits. It was noted that the city Parks Commission has already recommended approval of the ordinances

and someone asked what that body heard that convinced them. The only person present who heard the Parks Commission discussion was Levatter, and he described it as a case of the arts establishment being hostile to independents. “The Arts Commission has a vested interest in protecting the festival industry instead of all arts,” he said. As if to underscore his words, on two walls of the room in which the parks meeting was being held in McKinley Park School were 18 posters from previous arts festivals, most of them for Artown. There was a reference by one speaker to red umbrellas, but it was unclear what the meaning was. There is a Red Umbrellas outdoor art show in San Francisco, sex workers wield red umbrellas in protests in Las Vegas, and in Napa anti-abortionists picket Planned Parenthood while carrying red umbrellas, any of which could fit the circumstances at issue in the Reno ordinance. Robert McLaughlin, who has just stepped down from the parks commission and was seated in the audience, stood and said he thinks the ordinances represent solutions to difficulties being experienced by large urban areas like New York, but are not appropriate for cities where procedures are less formal. “We’re trying to create a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist,” he said, adding, “I suggest this whole thing be voted down, I think this whole thing just needs to go away until the red umbrellas take over Idlewild [Park].” City Councilmember Jenny Brekhus, the parks commission liaison with the City Council, made comments along the same line. It was, in fact, the court rulings cited by Levatter that created the inducement for new city ordinances in the first place. Deputy city attorney Creig Skau said under its current ordinances—which ban sales in parks altogether—the city is legally vulnerable in lawsuits. “It only takes one,” Skau said, saying that both Reno and Sparks have faced such lawsuits in the past. Reno officials, finding their legal position legally indefensible, quickly settled out of court for about $30,000, while Sparks chose to fight it at an ultimate cost of about $600,000. Some of the critics of the changes argued that accepting donations for, say, music or handcrafts, should not be considered sales. But Skau said that would put the city in the position of sort out what are charges and what are donations, and that simply calling money a donation does not


necessarily make it one—a position well known to casino workers and the Internal Revenue Service that taxes their tips. Commissioner Franco Crivelli pointed out that under existing law, “Sales are not allowed in parks,” and that maybe the things should stay that way. But Skau said, “If we have an ordinance that says, ‘No sales in parks,’ we are violating the First Amendment.” That would expose the city legally. Skau said if the new ordinances are not adopted, that doesn’t mean street artists will not have to deal with city regulation, because there already are ordinances in place—and they ban sales altogether. What the new ordinances will do, he said, is strengthen the city’s hand in the event of a lawsuit because the new language is more defensible in light of court rulings than the existing language. There was considerable dialogue that indicated the purpose of the proposed ordinances was less enforcement than protecting the city in the event of such a lawsuit. When Commissioner Gerry Taylor asked who was going to enforce the ordinances, Skau said in the past the city has simply relied on “self-enforcement.” There was more indication of informal attitudes toward commercial activities in parks when Recreation

“It only takes one.” Creig Skau Deputy city attorney and Parks director Julee Conway said that things like dog training, physical fitness classes and tennis lessons go on all the time in city parks, and the city can do little about them because there is no workforce to police it. She said such things usually come to the city’s attention mainly through complaints, as when regular users of tennis courts can’t get in because of classes, whereupon the city will take action. Otherwise, the system is, of necessity, pretty laissez-faire. In the end, Commissioner Tom Stille made a motion that the commission “is in general agreement” with the proposed ordinance. He leaned hard on the word “general” in his inflection to indicate that the agreement is less than total and that commissioners have misgivings. On another topic, the noticing for the meeting may have been flawed. During the meeting, the News & Review brought to the attention of the parks director the fact that two different printed agendas had been issued. One contained the licensing agenda item. The other did not. Conway said later that the correct agenda was the one posted in advance to the public. Ω

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Holly Golightly’s cab pulled up in front of Tiffany’s on the big screen in the Nugget’s showroom in Sparks last week. A number of free movies were shown at the Nugget during Hot August Nights, some of them classics from the 1950s and ’60s—A Hard Day’s Night, Some Like It Hot and The Graduate.

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5/23/13

7:02 AM

PHOTO/D. Brian BurgHarT

Whether it’s raining in June or dry in December, Truckee Meadows Water Authority always values responsible water use. That’s why we encourage

Weather-Wise Watering.

Greg Atchley takes a shipment at Sunworld USA.

Power ranger

Assigned-Day Watering only applies to your sprinklers. Run your sprinklers when it’s cool and not windy, usually early in the morning. Turn them off when it’s raining.

A Reno company, SunWorld USA, sends solar products all over the world “If you want to be accurate, you’ll want to call those modules, not panels,” says Greg Atchley, owner of SunWorld USA, as I peruse the big black rectangular things in his showroom on Airway Drive. “People who don’t by D. Brian Burghart know any better call them panels, but it’s modules over panels.” Good to know. I don’t know a damned thing about photo-voltaic brian b@ solar modules. These I know weigh about 44 pounds each, measure 65 newsreview.c om by 39 inches, and are rated up to 245 watt peak power, but that’s just from the literature. In fact, I’ve been incorrectly calling the big black rectangular things on my roof at home that heat my water tank “passive solar” for more than 11 years now. What I do know is I want to generate more of my family’s electricity from the sun, so I’ve been shopping around, trying to learn some stuff. Turns out, the 1985 Reno High grad arrived at his knowledge in much the same way. He was a general contractor who specialized in building high end homes. “About 10-12 years ago, I made a conscientious decision to stop building new homes.” That use of the word “conscientious” is interesting. Typically, people say they make “conscious” decisions, but I could tell he meant it the way he said it. “Yes, I wanted to be a better steward of the environment,” he said. “And I was interested in ‘environmentally friendly’ anything.” Now, Atchley seems like a mellow, steady guy, and in fact, I think my slightly hyper demeanor put him off a little bit, but man, after that sentence, we went from LED lights to LVD (low voltage discharge), to magnetic induction lighting and back to solar modules before the ink even started running smoothly out of my pen. The long and the short of it is that his current partner Shumin Zhang, who owned Western Stone at the time, brought back some modules from China, basically not understanding what would be required to actually sell the things. Atchley spent “three years working with Shumin and different factories to get these guys certified over here in the United States. And what we ended up with was SunWorld becoming our parent company, so we’re the only representative in the United States for SunWorld,” shipping all over the world. There is information “Solar use for home and business is a great option. And as power about everything from rates go up, and they’re going to keep going up and up, it’s going to be LED lights to figuring more affordable to put solar on your house or business.” solar system size at http://sunworldusa. Last March, a lawsuit was settled that ended up putting a 200 com. percent tariff on modules that use cells made in China. That was fortunate for Atchley because while the modules are assembled in China, most of the parts are not made there, which, if nothing else, helps keep costs down. “Kind of like GM, right?” “One of the keys to this business and the lighting business and anything else in renewables is that we’re selling energy efficiency,” he said. “You can say we’re selling modules or energy efficient lighting, environmentally friendly lighting, but it’s energy efficiency.” Ω

Water Weather-Wisely on your assigned days. C

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special aDVeRTising secTion

It’s happen ing in

EVENTS BEST IN THE WEST NUGGET RIB COOK-OFF The nation’s top rib cookers compete for the coveted firstplace trophy, cash prizes and the People’s Choice award at the 25th annual end-of-summer barbecue bash. W, 8/28, 11AM-9PM, Th, 8/29, 11AM-9PM, F, 8/30, 11AM-9PM, Sa, 8/31, 11AM-9PM, Su, 9/1, 11AM-9PM and M, 9/2, 11AM5PM. Free. Victorian Square, 1555 Victorian Ave. LUCAS OIL OFF-ROAD RACING SERIES The nationally televised off road racing series pits action sports celebrities against motocross champions and racing legends. F, 8/23, 9am, Sa, 8/24, 9AM and Su, 8/25, 9AM, $11-$33; free for kids age 12 and younger. Wild West Motorsports Park, 12005 East Interstate 80 (775) 323-2977 SHIRLEY’S FARMERS’ MARKET The 21st annual farmer’s market features fresh produce from Nevada and Northern California farmers, children’s activities and live entertainment. Th, 3-8PM through 8/22. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Ave.

ACTIVITIES STOP THE CAR, DAD! A photographic journey through Nevada. This series of photographs by artist Erik Lauritzen is complimented by a collection of more than 40 vintage cameras. Tu-Sa through 9/3, $5 adults; free for children under age 12 and museum members. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-1144 JERRY FENWICH: THE BEAUTY AROUND US Co-author of the popular Reno Now and Then coffee table

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! book and famous local photographer Jerry Fenwick gives us tips on capturing beautiful photographs. Th, 8/15, 7PM, $5 adult; free for children under age 12, museum members. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 3551144 SCHEELS RUNNING CLUB Run with expert pacers and enjoy running in a group as we join the Reno Running & Fitness Tuesday night group runs. Tu, 6:30PM through 11/26. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700 SCHEELS BIKING CLUB Join Scheels cyclists to do some road biking around the city of Sparks. Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Th, 5:45PM through 9/26. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC ERIKA PAUL SINGS AT THE JAZZ KITCHEN Enjoy Louisiana-style food and the soulful, breathtaking jazz sounds of Erika Paul on keyboards and vocals. No cover. Th, 8/15, 6PM and Th, 8/29, 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks, NV 89441 / (775) 657-8659 FIJI Enjoy an evening with great food and lively music at Trader Dick’s restaurant in the John Ascuaga’s Nugget. F, 8/16, 6PM, Sa, 8/17, 6PM and Su, 8/18, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 TONY EXUM, JR. Spend a well deserved evening out and relax with live jazz each week in the beautiful atmosphere of the Orozko

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! Lounge. No cover. W, 8/21, 6PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 TYLER STAFFORD Spend a well deserved evening out and relax in the beautiful atmosphere of the Orozko Lounge. There is no cover charge and parking is free. Th, 8/22, 5:30PM, F, 8/23, 6PM and Sa, 8/24, 6PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 MILTON MERLOS Spend a well deserved evening out and relax in the beautiful atmosphere of the Orozko Lounge. There is no cover charge and parking is free. Th, 8/22, 5:30PM, F, 8/23, 6PM and Sa, 8/24, 6PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 KYLE WILLIAMS Enjoy an evening with great food and lively music at Trader Dick’s restaurant in the John Ascuaga’s Nugget. Their new menu includes many fresh and. F, 8/23, 6PM, Sa, 8/24, 6PM and Su, 8/25, 6PM,no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 LIVE MONDAYS WITH TANY JANE Open Mic Night every Mon night at 8PM, hosted by Tany Jane. M, 8PM through 9/30, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 BLACK AND BLUES JAM Tu, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

COUNTRY AT THE CABARET The Casino Cabaret comes alive with the best in country music and dancing for “Country at the Cabaret” featuring DJ Jamie G. W, 7PM and Sa, 9PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 LIVE JAZZ Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM through 12/27, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks, NV 89441 (775) 657-8659 LADIES 80S WITH DJ LARRY WILLIAMS Ladies ’ with DJ Larry Williams, every Thursday! Th, 7PM through 10/4, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 COLORLESS BLUE Colorless Blue performs live jazz for your dining pleasure. Su, 1PM through 12/2, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 OPEN MIC GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

THis secTion is pRoViDeD as a pUBlic seRVice BY THe Reno neWs & ReVieW anD is noT FUnDeD oR aFFiliaTeD WiTH THe ciTY oF spaRKs


Photos/Laura Davis

Sean Shea is a scientist, a hermit, a hunter, a naturalist ... or maybe he’s just lucky

b y L a u r a Dav i s

When

It’s the threatened Lahontan cutthroat trout, to be exact. While the rest of us make small talk with coworkers at the break room coffee maker, Shea’s only point of contact is the cohabiting wildlife, which makes for much simpler conversation first thing in the morning, before the caffeine’s connected brain to tongue. That’s just the beginning of his day, and that’s only job number one. Once Shea gets snowed out of his fish work, he spends the rest of the year tracking mountain lions, acting as a master guide to big game hunters, and running a taxidermy business. And somewhere among it all, he finds time for an archery competition or two—bow and arrow being his hunting instrument of choice. He hasn’t picked up a rifle in 25 years; there’s no challenge in it for him anymore, and Shea likes a challenge. He’s an extreme naturalist—to say the least.

the alarm clock goes off in the morning, most of us wake up and prepare for the daily commute to our 9-to-5 office jobs, where having a window view and a swivel chair is the equivalent of winning the desk job lottery. Sean Shea, a fishery biologist for the United States Geological Survey, has a different daily routine. He rises before dawn, around 4:30 a.m., pulls on some waterproof trousers, swings open the door to the trailer he calls his second home, and heads out to wade into the nearby creek, giant net in hand, in order to filter fish from a weir constructed in the spring. Not just any fish, though.

Sean Shea collects data on Lahontan cutthroat trout at Independence Creek.

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Gone fishin’ Shea got started with the USGS after graduating from the University of Nevada, Reno with a degree in resource management 22 years ago, a degree he says today is equivalent to a biology degree. After getting hired on with Western Fisheries Research Center’s Reno branch office, he spent some time with the fish out at Pyramid Lake and with some fish species down in Southern Nevada. Then, in the spring of 1997, he got assigned the full-time task of studying fish in Independence Lake—a mountain body of water located 12 miles north of Truckee, Calif., in the Northern Sierra. In the beginning, the project was merely to observe the lake’s native Lahontan cutthroat trout—because not much was known about the aquatic inhabitants aside from some earlier broad studies dating back to the ’70s. Shea and a USGS coworker were the first to be put on the project—their research eventually pointed to the reason behind the heavy decline of the Lahontan’s population in the Truckee River system. According to the USGS website, the Lahontan’s population has been near extinction for the last 25 years, having lost 95 percent of their original population. With the Independence and Summit Lake’s strains being the only known self-sustaining Lahontan cutthroats remaining (the strand in Pyramid Lake are hatchery born), the project took on a new, pointed agenda: to preserve and raise the Lahontan’s numbers at Independence, which has the smallest population of the two lakes. Shea found himself the main man on the scene—perhaps he didn’t quite know at the time that he was committing himself to a decade-plus virtual relocation project, which he says ideally still has a decade more to go to get the Lahontan numbers where they want them. “When we first started, it was primarily to see what was going on in the lake—what the population of all the native species like the Lahontan were and just overall what was in there,” Shea says. But one thing led to another, and as the project began to show successful results with not only Lahontan cutthroat trout increasing in number, but also less scaly species such as bald eagles and osprey, the need to continue work at the lake became apparent. With Shea being committed to the cause, and as a natural outdoors man from an early age, thanks to his mother and grandpa turning him on to fishing as a boy, he was the one willing to stick around to see this thing through. “There are certain parts of my job where it’s a team effort, but most the time, I’m by myself, and I can handle that,” Shea explains of his somewhat isolated profession. “I’ve been doing this a long time, and you find that with new generations, their phone is their whole life. And most people want their time off to go back to the city, whereas if there’s stuff to do, I’d rather stay up there and get it done.” And it’s true, not everyone has Shea’s survivalist knack, or the endurance to withstand the social disconnection. Shea admits that in the busy season when the fish are spawning, and he has to be on the weir from sunup to 14   |  RN&R   | 

AUGUST 15, 2013

sundown—he’ll be up at the lake for five weeks straight. Living in the trailer that he describes as “having everything you really need—a stove, a fridge and a freezer” and consuming primarily the game he’s hunted back in Nevada (California has strict hunting laws), and any dry goods he’s stockpiled. Interactions with the occasional curious hiker happen about three times a week, when they stumble upon the project. And as for cell phone reception, well, it varies day-to-day. At times he has to trek three miles away to find it, depending on the way the wind blows. But the isolation doesn’t bother Shea much, he’s used to hearing about world events in hindsight. “Most the time I’m in another world, it seems,” Shea admits. “I get back down [to Reno] and something is always going on that I didn’t know about, but it generally doesn’t bother me. As long a bomb doesn’t go off, I guess I’m good.” Plus, all that searching for a signal just gives him a good excuse to hike, one of Shea’s favorite pastimes. “I’ve walked thousands of miles [during my time up here],” Shea says. “I’ve hiked up most the peaks in the area, explored all the lakes over the hills. It’s a beautiful countryside.” The scenery surely beats the view from that quick lunch break walk to the corner Starbucks for the rest of us—not that parking lots aren’t awe inspiring in their own right. The only one with room to complain would be, perhaps, Shea’s wife, who works as a graphic designer down in civilization five days a week. But according to Shea, she knew about his job(s) well ahead of time—and they’ve found ways to make it work. “I’m very lucky, she’s good about it,” Shea admits. “She’s busy with her work too, and we just find time to spend time together when we can.” Vicky Vaughn Shea, owner of Ponderosa Pine Design, a book design company, says their lifestyle may be unconventional but it works. “We both lead separate lives, and the time apart gives us our own space, but we’re really good when we are together,” she says. “I don’t think a lot of people could do a relationship like ours, but it works for us. ... Sean was the first boy I kissed, in seventh grade. Then we went to our 20-year high school reunion and [reconnected]. We were married two months later.” “Sean’s definitely a mountain man—he’s happy and loves to do what he does.” That probably explains why he’s so good at it. The success of the project’s Lahontan rehabilitation can be greatly attributed to the second phase of the USGS’s Independence project in which Shea also participates—the removal of nonnative fish that have been calling the lake home, non-natives being species such as the Eastern Brook trout and the Kokanee salmon that were unnaturally introduced to the lake for fishing purposes. “The end of September, since 2005, we spend days straight removing Brook Trout from the upper Independence creek by straining them,” Shea explains. “Since removing them we’ve seen a drastic increase in the survival of the cutthroat trout ... without the brook trout around to prey on them.” Another species which tends to prey on the Lahontans that are a touch more intimidating? Bears. A species Shea may not be trying to strain, but he’s certainly had his share of close encounters with. And to think most people’s daily struggles are simply hand-to-hand combat with the jammed desk stapler.

Sean Shea likes to hang out  with mountain lions when the  fish aren’t biting.

The bears and the lions “There are a lot of bears up there,” Shea says. “A couple of years ago, I was cutting through a side hill with all these thick trees,” Shea recalls. “As I came stepping through them, two bears jumped out—a big boar and a female. He was trying to breed her, and I got right in between them, unintentionally. I was, um, surprised. And he was huge—probably weighed 450 to 500 pounds. He was just a monster, a big cinnamon chocolate bear. I froze, but he was more interested in trying to figure out where she went than me, so he took off into these willows. Then I wasn’t really sure where they were, and that was probably the scariest part.” Yup, just another day on the job, and Shea’s occupational hazards don’t end there. In the winter, once snowed out of the mountains, the Independence Lake project is put on forced hiatus and Shea finds other means of keeping himself busy while still earning a paycheck—he tracks mountain lions. What initially started as a hobby and a good way to give his hounds some exercise turned into a job when Alyson Andreasen, doctoral candidate at UNR, and ecologist for the Wildlife Conservation Society, contacted him. Andreasen’s proposal was another assignment Shea soon found himself

Photos/Laura Davis

continued FRoM page 13

getting an extension on, once the findings from the four years’ worth of research turned out to be significant as well. “The project is looking at various aspects of mountain lion ecology and behavior in Nevada,” Shea explains. “Everything from DNA work, to looking at lion movement across Nevada, to GPS collaring to examine lions’ relationship with their prey.” While Andreasen tackles the informational side of it, Shea gets delegated the hands-on. “He’d be out at 3 a.m., in the winter, in a snow storm, looking for lion tracks,” Andreasen says. “And he hunts all day long, maybe be off the mountain by dark the next evening. Just spending an incredible amount of time and effort on the project. Much more than anyone could appreciate.” But that’s what he’s used to, right? With the fish, Shea’s only job hazard is getting whipped with a tail or perhaps splattered with fish eggs (yes, they do have a tendency to do that), the cats tend to be a little more on the feisty side. “I’ve been hit before,” Shea admits. “Luckily I had a jacket on when it slapped me. They’re not as powerful as a bear, but it’s enough to throw you.” That was just a temporary sting for Shea. His scariest encounter with a mountain lion? “Probably the closest call I had was with this huge Tom,” Shea recalls. “He was in a tree, and as I came walking up to him, he made eye contact with me about 100 yards out and just stared at me through the trees. As I got closer


I could tell something was noticeably up with him. I got probably 20 yards away when he came straight down a limb at me, right over the top of my head and I remember ducking out of the way. The only reason he kept going past is because one of the dogs came.” One similarity of the two jobs is the early hours. As with the fish, Shea begins his tracking when it’s still dark out. Mountain lions are nocturnal hunters. He loads up his truck with his four hound dogs, which he personally trained to track, and hits the back roads. He drives up and down until he spots some tracks in the snow, making winter the best time of year for the job. But there’s no rhythm or reason to a day’s successful odds. “You don’t find one every time you go out. It just varies. I’ve gone a couple weeks without seeing tracks,” Shea admits. “But then you go one day and catch two or three cats.” While the fish work is environmentally important, socially it doesn’t draw as much interest when it comes up in conversation as mountain lion tracking. Shea does assert that fish are wildly under-appreciated—“It’s the idea that

“Youfindthatwithnew generations,theirphoneistheir wholelife.Andmostpeoplewant theirtimeofftogobacktothe city,whereasifthere’sstufftodo, I’dratherstayupthereandgetit done.” Sean Shea Mountain man

“My success rate’s pretty high—but I don’t tell people to shoot,” Shea says. “If we see something they want, we go after it. If they don’t want to shoot it that’s still fun, that’s why they call it hunting, not killing. It’s mostly just the enjoyment of getting out there.” Shea himself prefers the bow and arrow of archery, a sport he not only competes in throughout the year, but also the only way he’ll hunt. He likes the more level playing field it allows, being able to get up close and personal in order to “beat them at their own game,” as he puts it. And that playing field is expansive—he’s hunted everywhere from Africa to the Arctic Circle, to Canada and Alaska. But his favorite spot is still the unassuming Nevada desert, and his favorite target is the fleet-footed mule deer. Once again, it’s the challenge. “I love hunting mule deer in the desert. I think it’s probably the hardest game there is because they’re smart and very tricky,” Shea explains. As for exotic animals, Shea does his share of work with them, but not in the sense you’d expect. He works year round as a taxidermist out of his home’s detached garage. With more than 20 years of experience in this art, Shea’s got his personal home collection going as well as his client work. Over the years his home has morphed into quite the taxidermy art gallery, comprised of all his own pieces, of course. “You walk into my house and it’s full to the ceiling,” Shea describes. “I’ve got mountain lions, mountain goats, sheep, a bunch of deer, and bear skins—that’s the stuff I do for myself. There are probably 25 total throughout my house.”

if it’s not as big as me, or if it doesn’t have hair or feathers, it’s not as important as me. There’s a little hierarchy,” he says. The most interest he gets tends to involve people wanting to give mountain lion tracking a try themselves—to which Shea just smiles, it’s not as easy as hopping in a car and loading up the family dog. “I just say good luck,” Shea says. “It’s a lot harder than people think. People think that there are lions around every bush. But they’re not, they’re a solitary, nocturnal predator.” It’s a highly efficient predator that knows who, what, when and where to hide. And along with those hand-trained hounds, Shea also has some predatory hunting skills of his own on his side, leading to his third job, master hunting guide.

If the boot fits During the hunting season, Shea takes on the title of certified master guide. Hunters from across the country pull big game tags—everything from deer, antelope and elk to bears and mountain lions—then contact him to be guided through the Nevada desert in search of adventure. Shea’s a good point of contact—he’s got 10 years of work under his belt, plus all the equipment and expertise you could ask for. He supplies everything for the average five-day trip aside from his client’s personal gear. It’s a one-on-one camping experience generally, with Shea a silent partner who doesn’t pressure his clients one way or the other. For many, he says, it’s not so much about the kill as it is the sport.

His work can be seen by the public across the United States, as far as a few East Coast museums where pieces like an Indonesian Javan Rusa deer are on display. Closer to home, you’ve likely already walked right by one. The piece in the Reno-Tahoe International Airport, the scene of the mountain lion stalking a mule deer—that’s Sheas’ handy work, habitat and all, which took him approximately a year off and on to make. Shea also gets some off-the wall jobs. Starting as small as a pet cat’s foot being constructed into a necklace, to a severed human leg being carved into a walking stick. Yes, you read that right. A human leg cane. “He was on a motorcycle on the way to Virginia City, when the bike slid out into a guard rail and severed his leg a couple inches below the knee,” Shea says of the customer. Naturally, he decided to commemorate his lost limb into a functional form. Shea’s occupations range from adventurous, to educational, to dangerous, to occasionally disturbing (once again, human leg cane). But how does Shea see his employment world, which is far beyond cubicle walls? “I think I’ve got a pretty normal life. I don’t see anything different about it,” Shea says with a shrug, scratching at his bristly beard. “But I guess I get reminded that I’m pretty lucky when people [come back to the Independence Lake site] and go, ‘Man, you got the best job!’ And I’ll look around and go, ‘Yeah, I got a pretty damn good job. … I’ve got all windows.” Ω

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in

the past 100 years, human communications have changed rapidly, arguably more than any other technology available. As a society we’ve transitioned, within a matter of decades, from handwritten letters to telegraphs to phone calls to instant messaging to tiny mobile devices that enable us to access almost anyone anywhere. Much of this is positive, especially for emergency responders who are alerted the instant an incident occurs. But what happens when the power lines are down? When the internet can’t be accessed? Our current infrastructure just can’t support the lack of communication during a disaster. In this case, ham radios—devices that connect people globally using the radio frequency spectrum—have been and continue to be one of the most reliable forms of communication available. The technology has become cheaper and more accessible, and thanks largely to the communities of makers, hackers and urban survivalists, ham radio is more popular than ever.

HAM SWEET HAM Amateur radio culture flourishes among makers, hackers and urban survivalists By aShley hennefer

Signal

frequency

Ham radio gained prominence in the early 1900s, and the technology is attributed to several scientists, including Nikola Tesla and Alexander Popov, who all share some credit for developing the modern radio. The first amateur radio club, known as the Wireless Telegraph Club, was founded in 1908 at Columbia University. The word “ham” began as an insult, referring to those who interfered with stations, before being picked up later by those who originally misunderstood, and later embraced, the term. The label “amateur” is more about independence than about inexperience. It distinguishes between citizen operators and other broadcasting like emergency response stations, two-way radio and commercial radio. Each ham is assigned a call sign that designates a station. Like license plates, hams can get “vanity” call signs. 16   |  RN&R   | 

AUGUST 15, 2013

Then and now: Ham operator Steve  Johnson displays a photo of a younger  himself.

There’s also an array of radios to use that offer varying frequencies, from vintage radios to hand-held transceivers. Signals are tied to repeaters, stretching frequency across locations, which is how hams can connect with others around the world. Northern Nevada has 15 repeaters throughout the area, with 10 specific to Reno and Sparks. According to the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), more than 2 million people in the United States are licensed operators, many of whom identify as hobbyists, technicians or emergency responders. Testing for an amateur radio license is rigorous and highly technical, but there’s a ton of books, tutorials and websites created to help. It’s mandatory to be licensed, regulated nationally by the Federal Communications Commission. The United Nations agency International Telecommunication Union tracks international ham radio use. “Ham radio is a license from the government that allows U.S citizens to play with electromagnetic frequency,” says Steve Johnson (call sign: KS6A), a long-time amateur radio expert in Reno. “It ensures that hams don’t do things with international implications. It’s a license that allows people to experiment with the electromagnetic spectrum. There’s a tremendous amount of uses for electromagnetic energy.” Johnson has been an operator for more than 50 years.

His wife, Joan, is also an operator—a room in their house is dedicated to their hobby, fully stocked with radios, many of which are vintage. He’s taught ham classes through Bridgewire Makerspace in Sparks, and heads up the University of Nevada, Reno Radio Pack. Johnson got his ham radio license when he was in eighth grade and has been passionate about it ever since, throughout his career in the military and later as a sheriff. In his radio room—to which he refers as the “ham shack”—he keeps track of the countries he’s contacted by putting small star-shaped stickers on a globe. The globe is covered with stickers. He also keeps binders full of QSL cards—postcards that hams exchange when they’ve connected. The name “QSL” refers to a Q code, a three-letter code used in radiotelegraph communication. QSL cards are designed by hams and contain personal information as well as their call sign. Amateur radio is both an independent and social activity. Much of it takes place alone, especially for technicians who enjoy building radios. But there are also plenty of events and competitions for ham communities, such as a marathon where hams have to contact as many ARRL stations as they can within 30 hours. Ham groups also hold campouts, where a group of people will take their radios


Photo/Allison Young

to a campsite off the grid to see who they can contact. Amateur operators who are also emergency responders are often on-call constantly in the event of a community disaster. Johnson loves using his radio skills to socialize. “One of the things that hams do best is talk.”

Breaking

code

Johnson says he’s an “old school ham,” partly because he learned about radio the traditional way. Originally, hams had to learn Morse code before getting licensed. Now it’s not mandatory, but many hams think it’s a good skill to have. There are two prominent schools of thought on learning Morse code: the Farnsworth Method, which gradually increases timing between each word, and the Koch method, which allows operators to learn two letters at a time, building up to an entire word. There are also dozens of apps that can help amateurs learn Morse code on the go. Kevin Jacobsen, a UNR undergraduate student, thinks that amateur radio will continue to become more popular with people his age. Jacobsen is studying for his ham license with the intent to be a volunteer emergency response operator. “I’m just fascinated by how timeless this technology is,” he says. “I think it’s a great skill to have.” Jacobsen has spent months learning about amateur radio after reading an article in Make magazine, a publication that covers all aspects of do-it-yourself culture. “The maker movement is bringing back all of these cool skills that really have been around for a long time,” he says. “People my age are realizing how cool it is to be able to do things like communicate through ham radio and have an understanding and appreciation for that.” Johnson says that ham radio enthusiasts have long been proponents of tinkering and inventing. It’s an endeavor, he says, that attracts curious people. “Hams are the original makers,” says Johnson. “One thing about ham radio is that it was, is now, and will always be an experimental venue, where people who want to play, learn and experiment have a place to do it.” Ω

Hammy Performance Interested in becoming an operator? There are several local organizations that offer resources to get started. • Sierra Nevada Amateur Radio Society, a prominent ham organization that hosts classes, meetups and more for Northern Nevada: www.snars.org • Reno Amateur Radio is a supply store for ham builders and operators: www.renohams.com. • Reno Ham Radio Club, a nonprofit ham group: http://w7rhc. webs.com. • Reno Amateur Radio Information, a Facebook page that tracks ham-related activity in the area: http://on.fb.me/17IV1o8. OPINION

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• UNR Radio Pack, hosted by the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno, meets at 7 a.m. every Monday at Carrows on E. Plumb Ln.: http://wolfweb.unr. edu/homepage/radio. • Bridgewire Makerspace in Sparks, offers occasional workshops on studying for ham license, building your own radio and learning Morse code: www.bridgewire.org.

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• PREPPING SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

If

for the

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AUGUST 15, 2013

you’re planning on being one of the 50,000+ people attending the upcoming festivities on Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, you’ll need to know what to bring. If you’re a Playa Virgin (first timer), this list will be essential. Not a newbie? Take a look anyhow. You’d be surprised at the things perennial Playa Hoppers forget to bring because they didn’t have a checklist. The Playa can be an extremely harsh environment, with sudden winds, dust storms and temperature extremes you’d expect to find in a desert. Microscopic Playa dust particles will find their way into areas of your tent, vehicle, clothing and your body (places where the sun may not shine). The Black Rock Desert surface is alkali in nature, meaning you can actually sustain a type of chemical burn if you’re not careful (no bare feet unless you want “Playa Foot”). This is bound to be one of the most unique & memorable experiences of your life. Exercise some common sense, go with an open attitude and this list and you’ll be hooked! Most of these items are available in outdoor/recreation/sporting goods and surplus stores. Even the “big box” stores stock up on Playa goods this time of year – although we prefer you Buy Local. You might find people willing to gift you an item or two, if you forget to bring something. . .but don’t rely on this. It’s much better to be prepared, so you’re the one in the position of gifting, if necessary. The only things available for sale on the Playa are ice and coffee, so be sure to get everything you need – and more – before you make the trip!


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

The Essentials ❏

BATTERIES Whatever variety fits your

DUST MASK Buy the disposable kind

in bulk or spend more $ for an industrial type. Your lungs will thank you.

CARPET REMNANT(S) Come in

COMFY CHAIRS Either the folding

EARPLUGS There will come a time when you’ll know why we suggest these!

FANNY OR DAY PACK To haul around

FIRST AID KIT Bring adhesive

CONDOMS Just because you’re on the

GLOVES Leather ones, preferably. Save your hands when cleaning up, lashing ropes and removing stakes from the ground.

CONTACTS/EYEGLASSES Bring

FOOTWEAR Sandals and athletic shoes

are tempting, but get enough alkali on your feet and you’ll be hurtin’ for certain. Wear socks and hiking boots if you’re a tenderfoot.

bandages, antacids, antibiotic ointment, headache tabs, eye wash, scissors, tape, gauze, etc.

GOGGLES These go right along with the dust mask to keep particles out of your eyes when the wind kicks up.

❏ ❏

CONTAINERS For storing larger

HAMMER To pound in those tent stakes. HAT A standard issue baseball cap might do, but we suggest a largebrimmed hat with a chin strap or cord. Take a couple in case the wind steals one from you!

items. Make sure the lids fit tight and label them for contents. ❏

portables when you’re surveying the Playa scene. Hydrator daypacks also enable you to take water with you.

a spare of each. Contacts aren’t recommended in such a dusty environment, but if you must, bring extras & solution.

BUCKET With a lid. Great for

garbage & other waste. Get a 5 gallon bucket like they use in the food service business. Some restaurants throw these away, so check out your local eateries.

DUCT TAPE For just about anything you can imagine.

Playa doesn’t mean you don’t need to practice safe sex.

BIO SOAP Earth-friendly biodegradable soap, that is. You can also use the “waterless kind”. Both are readily available at most drug, grocery, outdoor or surplus stores. Stay clean out there!

CAMERA You’ll want to remember your

variety or splurge a little for a used recliner or sofa from the thrift store. It’ll be a welcome sight at the end of a long day on your feet.

BICYCLE Unless you plan on riding around in an Art Car the whole time, this is an absolute essential. It’ll sure make traveling around on the Playa a lot easier. Be sure to bring a patch kit, extra tubes, tires and a pump.

CROWBAR You’ll need this to get tent stakes and rebar out of the ground.

handy for under your shelter, at its entrance or under a dining canopy. Great for keeping down the dust, and they’re cheap.

BANDANA/SCARF A large one works

needs. Buy a bulk pack of each.

Playa experience. Whether a phone cam or regular camera, put it in a baggie.

BAGGIES Freezer bags – gallon or quart

best, for wicking perspiration and keeping the sun off your neck. Also serves as a makeshift dust protector.

can get much colder once the sun sets.

shelter with just these, but they’re great for securing other items together during a windstorm.

size – come in handy for keeping items clean & accessible. ❏

BUNGEE CORDS Don’t secure your

COTTON CLOTHING This breathes

better during the day. Cargo shorts for the day, jeans for nights. Long underwear might come in handy since it

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19 ❏

ICE To keep things cold in those coolers. A combination of dry, block and cubed ice is recommended.

ICE CHESTS/COOLERS Don’t haul the

a downpour. Large yard bags work well, but don’t store water in them. ❏

porta-potties can get long. These are relatively inexpensive and worth it if you don’t like squatting where others have been.

supersize one out to the Playa. Instead, pack frozen goods and perishables in several smaller coolers. ❏

LIGHT Get a headlamp with L.E.D.

bulbs and extra batteries. Flashlights are handy, but take some “shake & break” light sticks so others can see you. Use colored flashing L.E.D.’s affixed to a pole to locate your campsite at night or to decorate your bike.

LIP BALM In your pocket or around your neck. One per person. Or two, ‘cause you’re bound to lose one.

LOTION Aloe Vera gel or any

moisturizing lotion to keep your skin hydrated.

MESH BAG Load your just-washed dishes in this and hang from a pole to dry.

PLASTIC BAGS For an emergency potty, to store things or keep dry during

RAINGEAR If it decides to rain, you’ll

need a poncho or large garbage bag to stay dry.

REBAR Buy this in short lengths (about

two feet long), because it’s a bitch to cut. Pound in the ground to secure ropes for tents and shelters. Bring old tennis balls to put on top of the exposed end. Few things hurt like getting impaled by rebar.

ROPE For securing tents and other flyawayables.

SALINE SPRAY Your nostrils will dry out, so refresh them periodically with some of this.

MATTRESS Not an innerspring, but

an inflatable air mattress or even foam will give you a much better sleeping experience (along with earplugs).

PORTABLE TOILET The lines for

SHADE Some type of shade fabric – the breathable solar fabric works well – to insulate you from the UVR’s.

SHELTER Tent, tarp, camper, RV,

whatever. For sleeping, privacy and protection from the elements.

SHOVEL & RAKE For cleaning up your area.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SLEEPING BAG Even if you don’t sleep in one, use this to insulate your coolers during the day by wrapping them up in the bag with a tarp on top. Your ice will last longer.

SPRAY BOTTLES To mist yourself

with water during the day. Don’t use old household cleaner spray bottles. Buy a couple of new ones cheap at the drug or dollar store. ❏

SUNSCREEN Solar protection is a must on the Playa. Use whatever SPF you’d normally use, plus some.

TARP The poly kind – for some shade or ground cover. Be sure to get either stacking or extension poles (with spreaders) to make a shade canopy.

TENT STAKES The dime

WASH BASIN/SHOWER You’ll get

dirty, for sure. A small basin, solar shower and shower mat to keep your feet out of the mud when showering.

WATER CONTAINERS Large and small. Some folks prefer large containers, but take smaller liter, gallon and portable bottles (always have water on you wherever you go on the Playa).

WATER Lots, about 2 gallons a day for drinking & bathing, per person. Don’t skimp on this.

store kind just won’t work on the Playa. Invest in some long, sturdy nail pegs or lengths of rebar (see above).

TOILET PAPER Just when you need it at the public porta potty, the roll will be empty. Take a roll or two. Or three.

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Photo/Brad Bynum

Wood you rather

“A lot of us here are wood junkies,” says The Woodworking Source proprietor Ralph Benson.

The Woodworking Source When Ralph Benson retired, he took up woodworking as a hobby. Then, when a chain woodworking by retailer closed, he decided to open up his Brad Bynum own store selling woodworking supplies and teaching woodworking classes. bradb@ newsreview.c om “I felt the community needed a store like this,” he says. His store, which opened in February 2010, is called The Woodworking Source. It’s located off Virginia Street in south Reno, but the sign is visible from US 395, which Benson credits with as a big source For more information, for walk-in traffic. The store sells tools and including a schedule of supplies for small-scale woodworking projupcoming classes, visit ects, creating clocks, bowls, jewelry boxes, www.the-woodworking pens and toys, among other things. Benson -source.com. says their target customers are people who make things for the love of doing it, not contractors who buy in bulk. “I love the medium,” says Benson. “Look at some of these pieces of wood. This is nature. It’s beautiful. It’s not manmade. … A lot of us here are wood junkies. We really admire the beauty of what happened naturally. And no two pieces of wood are the same.”

The Woodworking Source conducts classes five or six days a week on subjects like “Woodturning,” “Scroll saw basics,” and “Cabinet making.” The instructors, like Jeanette Cleaves and Peter DeBay, are people who share Benson’s love for woodworking. “The only people we hire are people who actually are woodworkers, so they know the answers,” says Benson. “And if they don’t know, they call one of the rest of us.” He says that there goal is not sell customers a set of bowls, but rather to sell them the tools and the knowledge that they can then use to create their own custom set of bowls. Every Saturday, the Woodworking Source presents free demonstrations beginning at 10 a.m., and three or four times a year they present a “bash,” a free barbecue, with free seminars and demonstrations, and raffle prizes. The next bash is Sept. 14. They sell kits to make things like bottle stoppers, ice cream scoops,

cheese knives, razors and more. There’s also woodcarving equipment, measurement tools, finishes and stains, dust collection and safety equipment. Benson says that whenever possible he tries to stock American made products from family-owned businesses. He also buys woods from a variety of sources, often in Oregon and California. He employs three full-time, and four part-time employees. Most of the classes are $50 to $180, depending on the time and materials used. The classes are small in size, usually restricted to just six or seven people or as few as four, depending on the class. They offer

discounted family classes between Christmas and New Year’s, and they partner with different churches every year to create unique toys for charity. Students and customers range from young people just getting into woodworking to retirees rediscovering it for the first time in years “Some of them are retiring, and they took shop when they were kids but haven’t touched anything since, but [they] think it would be fun,” says Benson. He says that many of their students go on to sell their handmade objects at craft shows and on websites like Etsy, but that there’s a positive reaction even among the students who just take the classes for fun. “We offer them the option to fill out a critique sheet after a class,” says Benson. “I’ve wondered if I needed to change the scale because almost everything comes out all fives.” Ω

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Haven on Earth Bread & Bakery Co. 10855 Double R Blvd., 284-4200

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One loud food alarm to wake up the American diet in the last quarter century has been the gluten-free revolution. The by Dave Preston U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates one in 133 Americans has celiac disease, which greatly impairs the digestive process in the intestines, causing pain and constant discomfort. A gluten-free diet is the only existing treatment. Photo/Allison Young

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Kathy Johnson poses with a display of her gluten-free products.

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For more information, visit www.havenonearthbakery.com.

24 | RN&R |

AUGUST 15, 2013

Kathy Johnson knows that all too well, she has celiac disease and that’s why her husband Tim, a retired Aero Space chemist decided to become a baker. “We wanted to have a place where people could come and know the food was safe to eat and had a delicious flavor,” said Kathy, a nutritionist and institutional dietician. Originally from Fresno, the two spent 20 years in Mexico as missionaries. Millet, sorghum, sweet rice flower, tapioca and garbanzos are the basis for all the breads and pastries. The binding agent to replace gluten is xanthan gum (commonly used as a thickening agent and stabilizer, made of five sugar derivatives). They offer 135 items and distribute their products to places like Walden’s Coffee Shop, Emerald City and the Great Basin Community Food Co-op. For the past three years, in this small working environment with tables for lunch holding a couple of dozen folks, Haven has been discovered by newly diagnosed people with celiac on any given day. The menu offers sandwiches like roasted turkey, ham with Swiss, chicken or tuna salad, pesto chicken and provolone, and a fresh veggie item, all $7.25. There’s pizza by the slice ($2.95) or a whole pie ($10.95), with all kinds

of toppings, including fresh veggies, bacon, pineapple, and pepperoni. Salads go from chicken Caesar to Oriental ($7.25), and there’s a kids’ menu with grilled cheese or six-inch pizza ($4.95). Homemade soups (bowl $2.95), and a combo with a salad ($6.95) make a well-balanced, really complete lunch menu. Hot entrees with soup or salad ($7.50) include things like spinach or ham quiche, lasagna, macaroni and cheese, chicken pot pie, carnitas burrito with beans and rice, and, what I ate, chicken green sauce enchilada. Kathy wanted me to try her lentil soup. Full of legumes, a little tomato and some Worcestershire for a savory tang, there was a hearty flavor with every spoonful. The enchilada was made with millet and topped with mozzarella and a verde sauce on the side to add just a little heat. If anything, it was moister than the traditional corn flower enchilada without losing any of the flavor. The chicken was generous and nicely seasoned. Application of “eating with your mind first” comes into play when you see “gluten-free” on everything. You think, “Will it taste different from what you expect?” It did not. There are plenty of pastries and breads to choose from and 95 percent of what Haven offers is both gluten and lactose free, and about 80 percent of its products are also soy free, and they cater to those with special allergy needs. There is a great assortment of breads ($5.95-$6.25) including sourdough, Hawaiian multigrain and raisin/cinnamon. I tried the savory bread with flavors of onion, rosemary and a touch of vinegar for a tart, hearty flavor. It was made with tapioca, rice flour and garbanzo, giving a firmness great for toasting. Buns and bagels are $5.75 for half a dozen. As for the desserts, everything from baked donuts to éclairs ($2.50$2.95). I tried the award-winning lemon bar ($2.50). It was creamy, with just enough sweetness to balance the lemon-tartness atop a light, flakey crust. Then came the oatmeal-raisin cookie ($2.50) which melted in my mouth—so moist with chewy raisins, and that light, brown-sugar caramel taste—sublime! When George Bernard Shaw said, “There is no sincerer love than the love of food,” he didn’t know Kathy and Tim Johnson, but clearly that’s how they feel and that’s why they created Haven. Ω


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Future tension Elysium Writer-director Neill Blomkamp follows up his strong feature-directing debut District 9 with another solid sci-fi effort in Elysium, a film that delivers terrific action along with a reasonable amount of smarts. Now, I know this will sound a bit confusing, but Elysium is also a little on the stupid and illogical side, especially when considerby ing its ending. I realize I just complimented Bob Grimm the film above for being smart. Well, it is as stupid as it is smart at times. It’s very b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m possible to be both dumb and brilliant in the same movie. Heck, Guillermo del Toro did just that with his Pacific Rim earlier this summer. It’s about 140 years in the future and man has, not surprisingly, screwed up the planet, real good. It’s one big garbage heap (shades of WALL-E and Idiocracy) and the planet’s

3

Think Free

Matt Damon stars in Behind the Candelabra 2: Liberace’s Revenge.

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 excellent

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AUGUST 15, 2013

wealthy people have abandoned Earth for a bitchin’ space station in the sky. This space station, Elysium, has everything a rich bitch would want. It’s got mansions, pools, sweet landscaping, 10 different kinds of tacos and, most notably, healing booths. These healing booths don’t just fix a bruised knee or a paper cut. They cure cancer, and even reconstruct one’s face after it has been blown apart by a grenade. Matt Damon has shaved his head to play Max, an ex-con factory worker who puts together the droids that police the decrepit Earth. One morning, he gets sassy with one of these droids and gets his arm broken for the effort. Then, while working under the watchful eye of the worst boss ever (William Fichtner, getting some cool points back after his dreadful turn in The Lone Ranger), Max microwaves himself and suffers radiation poisoning. With only five days to live, the only thing that will save him is a trip to Elysium.

While Elysium has the all-healing chambers, the soots in the sky don’t allow for Earth residents to use them. So Max can’t just hop a space shuttle and get fixed up. After a visit to Spider (Wagner Moura), his former crime boss, Max gets a super weapon skeleton welded to his body (echoes of Robocop) and must agree to download a bunch of secret stuff into his brain in order to get a trip to the space station. Yes, it’s all a little farfetched. Farfetched and enjoyable, thanks to a stellar performance from Damon and some of the year’s best special effects work. The look of the dirty planet, the pristine space station—it’s all spectacularly done. Taking things up another notch is Sharlto Copley playing against type as a bad guy hunting Max. Copley is many miles away from his affable stooge in District 9 here. He’s a seriously awful beast in this one, with a fantastic and crazy accent. Jodie Foster gets some of her best work in years as Delacourt, Defense Minister for Elysium. She also has a great accent, and has no problem shooting down ships full of Earthly residents trying to enter Elysium. Elysium brings on the super cool gadgetry and brainy sci-fi up until its finale, where the whole thing nearly falls apart. I won’t give away the ending, but I will tell you it’s rather dumb and illogical for a movie that was so smart up until the final minutes. Also, Blomkamp, who delivers terrific action scenes throughout his film, settles for incomprehensive Michael Bay-type editing for the final showdown. It’s as if he just switched his style for the final reel. Flaws and all, Elysium is well worth your time, and further establishes Blomkamp as one of the modern film era’s kings of sci-fi. He gets sole credit for the screenplay on this one, so it’s combined brilliance and silliness rest entirely in his creative hands. As for Damon, he looks pretty badass with a steel skeleton grafted to his body and a computer drilled into his head. With this and his turn in Behind the Candelabra, the actor is having a banner year. Ω


3

2 Guns

3

The Conjuring

This haunted house/demon possession movie from Saw creator James Wan delivers the scary goods. Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston move their family into a nice new home that has plenty of living space, a nice yard, and a bunch of ghosts freaking them out. Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson play the Warrens, real life paranormal investigators who looked into this case, as well as the Amityville Horror. Wan teases you for the first chunk of the film, trying to get scares out of closing doors and creepy sounds. Then he pulls the sheet back and goes for some really good, in-your-face frights. This is one of those movies where the family stays in the house even though freaky things are happening, and that’s a bit annoying. Still, Wan, who I used to hate for creating Saw, makes up for the stupidity with scares created without too much help from CGI. He relies on creepy lighting and makeup rather than megabytes for the most part, and he’s fashioned a good old-fashioned haunted house story as a result.

1

Grown Ups 2

Adam Sandler has done it again. He has made the worst movie of his career, yet again, as his films just keep topping themselves in horribleness. This one, a sequel to the Dennis Dugan disaster that joined forces with David Spade, Chris Rock and Kevin James, is twice as bad as the original. Considering how awful the original was, I didn’t think such a feat was possible, but Sandler has done it. The plot involves Sandler moving back to his hometown, where a deer enters his house and promptly urinates on him. Then he goes shopping with his friends who fart and burp a lot. Then he has a big ’80s party where everybody dresses up as people from the ’80s (Pat Benatar, Bruce Springsteen, The Terminator). Then somebody farts again, and then the movie is over. I sat in a theater where people were laughing their asses off every time somebody farted. It was one of the more depressing experiences of the movie going summer, and I had to sit through The Purge, so that’s pretty bad. I have officially given up on Sandler. This is a talented, funny guy who can’t seem to say goodbye to some of the people who drag him down. Given the box office performance of this piece of crap, he probably will be giving Dugan plenty of directing jobs in the future. This is our loss.

3

The Look of Love

Steve Coogan reunites with his frequent director Michael Winterbottom (24 Hour Party People) to tell the true story of Paul Raymond, Britain’s version of Hugh Hefner, a man who became one of Britain’s richest men before his death in 2008. I must confess that I knew nothing of this man before watching the film, strange considering he was so huge in England. He opened up England’s first strip club, and followed that with soft-porn magazines and real estate ownership until he amassed a huge fortune. Coogan plays Raymond as a likeable enough sort with a wandering eye and a lack of commitment when it comes to his relationships. Anna Friel (Land of the Lost) plays Jean, Raymond’s long suffering wife who has no problem with his dalliance until he actually picks up and leaves. Imogen Poots is memorable as Debbie, Raymond’s daughter and the reason for his reclusiveness after her death from a drug overdose in 1992. Winterbottom captures the essence of the ’60s and ’70s just fine, and Coogan is enjoyable as the likeable Raymond. Perhaps that’s one of the problems with the film, because it seems like Raymond must’ve been a much

OPINION

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lousier person than this film portrays him to be. While the film is always good to look at, some of it feels a bit shallow. There’s a strange sensation during and after watching this film. Part of that sensation stems from my being totally oblivious to this man’s existence before I started watching it. Another part stems from my feeling as if I still didn’t know him after watching the movie. The Look of Love is a good-looking movie well played by its participants, but it’s just scratching the surface. (On Demand and on iTunes while playing in select theaters.)

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Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg do the buddy action movie thing, and they do it well. There’s a satisfying mixture of laughs and whiz-bang in this effort, with Washington getting a chance to really cut loose as an undercover DEA agent unknowingly working with an AWOL Navy man (Wahlberg). The two find out each other’s true identities, and join forces to take down everybody who has double-crossed them. The film is shamelessly ridiculous, but it’s good to see Washington going for laughs, and always fun to see Wahlberg doing his man-child bit. This is Wahlberg in a mode similar to his great success with Will Ferrell in The Other Guys, while the film itself leans a little more towards the edgier side. It’s directed by Baltasar Kormakur, who helmed the Wahlberg mess Contraband, and this proves to be a much better and less convoluted effort. Bill Paxton gets to play a bad guy, and he does it well. He’s played bastards before, but never one this sinister.

D I S C O V E R T H E N I G H T O N A W H O L E N E W L E V E L

3

Lovelace

Amanda Seyfried does a decent job playing Linda Lovelace, infamous star of Deep Throat who, as it turns out, had one truly lousy husband in Chuck Traynor (a creepy Peter Sarsgaard). Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman have made a film that feels surprisingly short, especially since part of their technique is to show the story from two different angles. The movie builds up to Lovelace’s big porn moment, and then reverses and retells some of her ascension again, this time showing Traynor’s brutality. Being that the film is just over 90 minutes, it winds up not covering much ground. Still, Epstein and Friedman pull good performances out of Seyfried and Sarsgaard, with Sharon Stone doing decent work as Lovelace’s angry mother. In fact, this is one of Stone’s best performances, and she is nearly unrecognizable. The film features an interesting supporting cast, including James Franco in a cameo as Hugh Hefner, and small parts for Bobby Cannavale, Robert Patrick, Chris Noth and Wes Bentley. One of the fascinating things about Lovelace (real name Linda Boreman) is that she turned against pornography and fought the medium shortly after becoming the world’s first true porn star. The film touches upon this fact very briefly, but then ends abruptly. Boreman died in 2002. As it stands, all things considered, the film is just OK … and perhaps a little shallow. The directors manage a respectable recreation of the early ’70s in what ultimately feels like about 75 percent of a good movie. (Available for rent on iTunes while playing in select theaters.)

3

We’re the Millers

H A R R A H ’ S

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time drug dealer who gets in over his head and is forced to smuggle drugs from Mexico by his boss (Ed Helms). Realizing that border agents seem to go easy on families, he hires a fake family to make the trip in an RV. The family includes a wife (a stripper played by Jennifer Aniston), a daughter (a homeless girl played by Emma Roberts) and a son (a hapless neighbor played by Will Poulter). The film has a Vacation movie vibe, especially because Sudeikis is charming in a way that Chevy Chase was for a brief time in his career. Aniston plays a mighty good stripper for sure; she has another calling in case the whole acting thing doesn’t work out. Roberts gets perhaps her best role yet as Casey, delivering some great eye-rolling moments. As for Poulter, he steals scenes nearly every time he speaks, and his encounter with a tarantula is priceless. Sure, the movie gets a little gooey and sentimental by the time it plays out, but we’ve come to like the characters by then so it’s OK. It’s not a grand cinematic effort by any means, but it does provide some good laughs, with a fair share of them being quite shocking.

The Wolverine

ARTS&CULTURE

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I’m not an X-Men Origins: Wolverine hater. I thought it was stupid fun. Still, many despised it, so this is a new attempt to take Hugh Jackman’s Logan into a freestanding franchise. Director James Mangold goes a darker, more serious route, but proves quite adept at making action scenes. The opening scene in Nagasaki and a fight above a bullet train are incredible. Jackman, who has a lot more veins popping than the last time we saw him, still has a blast in the title role. The plot involves an old friend of Wolverine’s looking for the key to eternal life, which Wolverine actually has, so this makes him a mutant of extra purpose. Most of the action takes place in Japan, and Wolverine loses his powers for a stretch, so we get the odd sight of him bleeding and getting lethargic. Mangold and his crew must get credit for filming two of the year’s most beautiful women, Tao Okamoto and Rila Fukushima. Good lord, these two are remarkable looking. Famke Janssen makes some dream appearances as Jean Grey, and, yes, stay through the credits to get what some might consider to be the film’s best scene.

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Noise pop rocks No Age Randy Randall is the guitarist of the critically acclaimed noise pop band No Age. The Los Angeles-based duo is on by Brad Bynum the legendary record label Sub Pop and the new record, An Object, will bradb@ be released Aug. 19. No Age is newsre view.c om set to return to Reno for the first time in five years with a show at the Holland Project, 140 Vesta St., with Protect Me, Surf Curse and Cat Jelly, on Aug. 26 at 8 p.m.

It had a bar, but it was all ages. Club Underground. It’s not there anymore. I remember the spot was cool. And it was the first time we ever Pricelined a hotel. There’s so many hotels in this town, where do we crash? We didn’t have WiFi or anything, so we had one of our girlfriends Priceline a hotel in Reno. We got a nice hotel for $40 or something. … It was one of the casinos. It was just exciting because you could book a hotel online. That technology had been around, but it was new to us. … I think it was the beginning of 2008. It was new to us even just staying in a hotel. Even being able to afford a $40 hotel was new to us. It was very new. The world was very new to us as a band and as people back then. Fast forward to 2013, and we’re roadweary old men.

No Age plays the Holland Project, 140 Vesta St., on Aug. 26 at 8 p.m. For tickets or more information, visit www.hollandreno.org.

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NEWS

This show is going to be at Holland Project, which is an all-ages, no-alcohol club. Do you like playing venues like that? I definitely prefer playing the shows that are all ages and have a different sort of vibe. … What I like about it is that the majority of the time, these places are set up to see music. Not saying that bars can’t be like that or stadiums or whatever. But these kind of all ages show places, the one goal is for people to come in and see a band. It’s not about getting drinks. It’s not about riding the mechanical bull. It’s not about playing the slots, and you happen to get a band also. Really, these places are designed to see a band. It’s not like the biggest budget or the biggest PAs or anything, but really the spirit is right there. … And they’re usually independent. You don’t have Clear Channel taking a hand in all ages spaces. They could give a shit. So you feel like you’re off the corporate map. So, intentions are transparent. Sometimes it can get weird. Sometimes you’re attacked by a 14-year-old kid doing the door who doesn’t think your pants are the right kind of pants. It can feel corny a little bit, especially as you get older. I don’t want to get punked by a 14-year-old. But it depends. Every space has its own vibe. And I like the idea of it being some place different. Maybe not every band goes to these places. And if you’re interested in a band, maybe you have to go out of your comfort zone to see them, and I always like that. Ω

I know you’ve played in Reno at least once before. I saw you play here with Liars five or six years ago. What do you remember about that show? I remember it was awesome! That was right at the beginning of our tour. We were still getting to know the Liars guys. They were still getting to know us. And I remember the club was sort of like a youth sort of club?

Randy Randall and Dean Spunt of No Age, a band that likes to play unusual venues.

OPINION

One of the main things I remember about your set was you passing your guitar out into the crowd. Like building up to the climax of a song and passing the guitar out and the guitar kind of went crowd surfing. Do you remember that? Is that something you do a lot? Yeah, especially then, I was doing that a lot. It was fun. I think since then, it’s met with negative consequences at times. We’ve caught guys trying to run out the door. Our sound guy would see someone heading toward the door or somebody just completely ripping the shit out of it and trying to break it. So at some point I realized that not everybody is as nice as the people in Reno. So I’ve got more cautious with it. But that night it was fine. Smaller places, where you can actually look people in the eye, it’s fine. The bigger places where you can’t see who’s back there, it’s not always a good idea.

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8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HANGAR BAR

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

Comedy 3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Stewie Stone, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Chris Monty, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Rick Hammond Blues Band, 8pm, no cover

Dane Rinehart, 6pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Aug. 15, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Chris Murray, Keyser Soze, 9pm, W, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Michael Franti & Spearhead

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, Colin Ross, 6:30pm, W, no cover

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Graham Elwood, Chris Mancini, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Ben Gleib, Tracey McDonald, W, 9pm, $25

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Canyon Jam, 8pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Judy Tenuta “The Love Goddess,” F, 8:30pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $17, $23

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

The Longshots, Last to Leave, The Deadly Gallows, 7:30pm, W, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

JAVA JUNGLE

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

BEER

PONG + NIGHTLY KARAOKE AND SPECIALS

MON 1 shot Crown Royal $6 Angry Nipple- Angry Orchard beer & Hot Licks bourbon $5.50 TUE American Harvest Organic Vodka w/ Red Bull $6 Burnetts Pink Lemonade Margarita $5.50 WED Miller High Life 60oz pitchers $5 Angry Balls- Angry Orchard beer & shot of fireball $7.50 THU Red Bull Blasters $5 | Red Bull Jager Bombs $5.50 FRI Corona bottles $3.50 | Newcastle Werewolf bottles $3.50 (limited time) SAT Bud & Bud Light 16 0z aluminum bottles $3.50 Newcastle Werewolf 12 oz bottles $3.50 (limited time) SUN Devotion Cosmos w/cranberry $5 | Peligroso Cinnamon tequila $7

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE 235 W. 2ND ST | 324–4255 10

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JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

THURSDAY 8/15

FRIDAY 8/16

SATURDAY 8/17

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

SUNDAY 8/18

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 8/19-8/21

Colorless Blue, 1pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Michael Franti & Spearhead, Ethan Tucker, 8pm, $34-$65

Back to School Foam Party w/Amplified DJs, 10pm, $10

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

DJ JayCeeOh

Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

Aug. 17, 10 p.m. Peppermill 2707 S. Virginia St. 826-2121

THE POINT 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Bobby G, 8pm, no cover

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka, 9pm, no cover

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka, 9pm and 9pm, no cover

Chris Costa, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Moonalice, 8pm, $12, $16

Nick Gravenites & The Blue Chips, 9pm, $12, $16

Michael Martin Murphey, 8pm, M, $26.50, $32, open mic, 7pm, W, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

RED DOG SALOON 76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RED ROCK BAR

Comedy Night hosted by Brandon Lara, 9:30pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

RISE NIGHTCLUB 210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

Maximum Volume Thursdays w/DJs Max, Noches de Sabor: Latin Night w/DJ Rise Culture Saturday, Fierce, 11pm, $5-$10; no cover ages 21+ Freddo, 11pm, $5-$10; no cover for locals 10pm, $5-$10

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Force Multiplied, 9pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Tazer, 9pm, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

Rebelution

Dropkikk, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

STREGA BAR

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

Aug. 21, 6 p.m. MontBleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3353

STUDIO ON 4TH 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

BobFM Homegrown Showcase, 7:30pm, $5

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Crush, Alisha Sadler, 7pm, no cover

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE 17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

THE ZEPHYR BAR 1074 S. Virginia St., (775) 348-1723

Camp Elysium Black Light Party w/The Ultraviolets 7pm, $5

Tyler Stafford, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 5:30pm, no cover Mel Wade & Kate-Elaine, 7pm, no cover

Erika Paul Carlson, 2pm, no cover Alex Muddy Smith, 7pm, no cover

KristiNikol, 8pm, no cover

Think

NOW OPEN! RED RE ED JU JUMP JUMPSUIT MP MPSU PSU SUIT UIT T APP A APPARATUS P AR PP ARAT AT TU US Thursday, Thursd Thu Th day, August Augus Au gustt 15 15

W/ Th The he Material, Mat aterial, ial Eve E Eversay, rsay, Th Thursday Knightss Out

S E HAS SHE SH H S A FASHION VICE HA E TO KICK OFF TOUR Friday, August 16 Fri

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Milton Merlos, 7pm, M, W, Verbal Kint, Chris Murray, 7pm, Tu, no cover

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W/ Gossamer Fate, Speakermeat, Fall Mortality And The Machine

DUANE PETERS GUNFIGHT Friday, August 23

W/ Out For War, Volition, 10 Cent Mistake, Dime Runner

WE PREDICT A RIOT Saturday, August 24

W/ Up Against It, Dennis Is Dead, Half A Tusk

RIB COOK OFF PRE-GAME PARTY WITH: GOLDEN GUNS TATTOO!!

Tuesday, August 27

Win Tattoos & Prizes, With Free Music From : Thee Orbiters

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 8/15

FRIDAY 8/16

SATURDAY 8/17

SUNDAY 8/18

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 8/19-8/21t

2) Kick, 8pm, no cover

2) Kick, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Kick, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Rebekah Chase Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 7pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) NVO, 10, no cover

1) Everest, 10pm, no cover

1) Steelin’ Dan, 9pm, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Grease, 8pm, $24.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm, Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Mimic, 10pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, M, Tu, W, $24.95

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) Valley Sky Theatre

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

2) Les Claypool’s Duo de Twang, Reformed Whores, 9pm, Tu, $25, $30

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) The Beach 4) Summit Pavilion

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

HARRAH’S RENO

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

2) Crystal Image, 7pm, no cover 3) Milton Merlos, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Karaoke Night, 7pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 2) DJ Viola Lala Mia, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 2) DJ Viola Lala Mia, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35

2) Crystal Image, 8pm, no cover 3) Milton Merlos, 6pm, no cover 5) Fiji, 6pm, no cover

2) Crystal Image, 7pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) Milton Merlos, 6pm, no cover 5) Fiji, 6pm, no cover

2) Crystal Image, 7pm, no cover 5) Fiji, 6pm, no cover

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover 2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover 3) Tony Exum Jr., 6pm, W, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

OPINION

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NEWS

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3) ill.Gates, Amp Live, 11pm, W, $15, $20 6) Rebelution, Matisyahu, 6pm, W, $30, $35

3) The Male Room, 8pm, $15

2) Deception, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 2) Deception, 9pm, no cover 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) DJ JayCeeOh, 10pm, $20 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

2) Patrick Major, 7pm, no cover 3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

Aug. 20, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Karaoke

1) Dickey Betts & Great Southern, 7:30pm, $55 3) DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

Les Claypool’s Duo de Twang

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MISCELLANY

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

2) Tyler Stafford, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

| MUSICBEAT

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

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THESE DON’T MIX Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

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THESE DON’T MIX


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

BoweRs MaNsioN BluegRass Festival

If

Jam, and The Note-Ables. The main event runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17, at Bowers Mansion Park, 4005 Highway 395 north, Washoe Valley. There will be free evening entertainment on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 16-17, at Davis Creek Regional Park, located nearby Bowers Mansion in Washoe Valley. The Garbardine Sisters will present a gospel show and sing-along at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 18, at Davis Creek Amphitheater. Call 843-7053 or visit www.bowersbluegrassfestival.org.

you haven’t had a chance to go camping or swimming or just spend a lazy afternoon relaxing in the shade of cottonwood trees this summer, you can accomplish all three this weekend at the 28th annual Bowers Mansion Bluegrass Festival. This year’s lineup features a variety of country, bluegrass, folk and roots music acts such as Michael Martin-Murphey, Run Boy Run, Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen and Anderson Family Bluegrass, as well as local bands such as Wild Horse Drive, Monday Night Volunteers Home Made

—Kelley Lang

OPINION

Party in the garden

Reno gay Pride Festival

Positively 4 th street

Hipsters of the High west

Listen to live jazz performed by CeCe Gable, nibble on hors d’oeuvres and desserts from Hi Point Cafe and Franz’s Backstube and sample beer from Silver Peak Brewery and wine from Whispering Vine at this outdoor party set in Burke Garden at Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St. Browse an art exhibit featuring historical botanical illustrations along with modern illustrations from local artist Suzanne Cody Adams. This event benefits the May Arboretum Endowment Fund, which will help protect, preserve and support the operations of the Wilbur D. May Arboretum and Botanical Garden. The party starts at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17. Tickets are $60. Call 785-4153 or visit www.mayarboretumsociety.org.

Reno’s LGBT-community comes together for the 17th annual pride festival. The celebration begins with a kick-off party on Friday, Aug. 16, featuring Emmy Award-winning comedy writer, songwriter and actor Bruce Vilanch. The show begins at 7 p.m. at Sammy’s Showroom inside Harrah’s Reno, 219 N. Center St. Tickets are $20. The main event takes place from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17, at Wingfield Park in downtown Reno at First Street and Arlington Avenue. The all-day fête features entertainment by host Charley Geary, Bruce Vilanch, The Haus of Gaultier, Miss Gay Reno, Knowledge Lives Forever, Xavier Toscano, Ethel Merman Experience, Latino Pride New Generation and others. Tickets are $5. Call (877) 344-7366 or visit www.renogaypride.com.

For the past few decades, Fourth Street has had the unfortunate reputation as a run-down part of town frequented by prostitutes, drug dealers and the down and out. There has been several attempts over the years to revitalize the once-bustling area, but the renaissance has been slow going. Yet that doesn’t deter a few enterprising souls who have opened businesses along Fourth Street with the hopes of attracting commerce back to this historic part of town. This weekend several Fourth Street businesses and organizations, including Reno Bike Project and Valley Arts Research Facility, will hold a street festival celebrating the positive improvements to the area. There will be a grand opening of Bodega Nightclub and Lounge, 555 E. Fourth St., and Under the Rose Brewing Company, 559 E. Fourth St. The festival will also feature a block party in the alley behind Reno Bike Project, 541 E. Fourth St. with live music, DJs, food trucks and a makers fair. The festival begins at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17. Tickets are $5. For more information, visit www.valleyartsresearch facility.org or call 954-6968.

The Red Dog Saloon salutes its tie to the San Francisco’s ’60s-era psychedelic rock scene with its annual Hipsters of the High West event this weekend. In 1965, San Francisco refugees bought the old Comstock House that now contains the Red Dog, fixed it up and invited bands from the City to play there, including The Charlatans and Big Brother and the Holding Company. While the “Red Dog Experiment” was brief, it made a lasting mark on the course of rock ’n’ roll. Bay Area band Moonalice will kick off the first night of Hipsters of the High West at 8 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 16, at the Red Dog, 76 N. C St., Virginia City. Tickets are $12 and $16. The celebration moves to Piper’s Opera House, 12 N. B St., with a performance by Big Brother & The Holding Co. The show begins at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17. Tickets are $25-$35. The event concludes that night at 9 p.m. with a performance by Nick Gravenites & The Blue Chips at the Red Dog. Tickets are $12 and $16. Call 847-7474 or visit www.reddogvc.com.

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artemisia moviehouse p r

e

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Beijing Flickers

Wuss it good for her?

China 2012

GLM Theater 713 S. Virginia • aug 20 • 7pm NV Museum of Art 160 W. Liberty • aug 25 • 2pm www.ArtemisiaMovies.org

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36   |  RN&R   | 

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Recycle this paper e this paper

our quality will impress you

I’ve been on three dates with a gorgeous, funny, kind and successful woman. Two weeks ago, we met for drinks with a group of my friends, and a guy in our crowd who’s in the habit of saying crass things showed up. He ended up insulting her by making a rude, totally vulgar sexual remark about her. He was trying to be funny, but I could see she was offended. I was so taken aback that I didn’t say anything. Shortly afterward, she said that she had to leave. I walked her out and apologized for him, and I have since apologized by email and in three voicemails. I’ve tried to set up another date so I can apologize in person, but she keeps getting off the phone really quickly. Would sending flowers to her work be appreciated or seem creepy? Life sometimes presents you with a chance to show a woman what you’re made of, like when some creep aggressively disrespects her in your presence. Your response—staring into your beer—told this woman a lot about you, like that you’re the sort of boyfriend who would take her camping and, upon hearing a bear crashing through the woods, tuck a hot dog in her pocket and shove her out of the tent. If your initial response wasn’t enough to make her never want to see you again, you probably sealed your romantic doom by taking immediate inaction in the wake of your inaction. Sure, you did say you were sorry … and email her that you were sorry and leave her multiple voicemails saying that you were sorry and then flap your lips some more and try to ask her out to say you’re sorry in person. Unfortunately, there’s a difference between a meaningful apology and regret-flavored borderline stalking. Sending flowers—immediately—might have been wise, as a number of studies find that people are more likely to be forgiven, even for serious transgressions, if their apology is accompanied by a gift, which says that they value the person they hurt enough to invest in repairing the relationship. But no amount of flora will solve what I suspect is the real problem here: She probably now sees you as a passive wimp who responds to even a minor challenge by folding like a sheet of typing paper. You didn’t have to challenge the guy to a parking lot duel. You just needed to say—something—perhaps just a stern, “Dude, you’re really out of line.” Even women who can defend themselves just fine want a man who’ll stand up for them. Being a stand-up guy comes not out

of memorizing a list of the right things to do but from becoming a person who can’t help but do them. This, in turn, comes out of personal standards for courage, generosity, fairness and integrity. Of course, in order to assert these standards, you’ll need self-respect. If that’s a problem area for you, pick up The Assertiveness Workbook, by Dr. Randy J. Paterson, and No More Mr. Nice Guy by Dr. Robert Glover. Put in a year manning up, and if happy hour again becomes insulting hour, you’ll take action—and it won’t be scurrying to the nearest florist to ask, “Excuse me, but which color roses say ‘I’m a man who will rise to the occasion instead of hiding under the table’?”

Prance charming

I’m an accomplished, caring, sensitive and funny guy. I do well talking to women in social situations where I’ve had time to warm up. I’m not great at approaching women on the street. How can I increase my street-side “swagger”? The stride itself—that wide-legged rolling gait—isn’t hard to adopt. Just pop a sleeping gerbil in your underwear. But you’re probably talking about the street meaning of swagger: self-assured cool. That’s a way of being that you can’t just throw on like a sweatshirt. Guys who try to put it on usually end up coming off cartoonishly cocky. Sometimes what’s most endearing about people are the small ways they aren’t totally put together, especially if they’re gutsy enough to put themselves out there, flaws and all. So maybe talk to compelling women you see on the street—a tough audience for any guy— but do it as you, not with your best imitation of Jay-Z. And accept that your natural hunting ground is probably your local coffeehouse, where you won’t have to charm a woman before the light changes and she won’t immediately suspect that what you’re really saying is, “Hi, I’m a purse snatcher, and I was wondering if I could distract you with some small talk while I root around for your wallet.” Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   august 15, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

37


Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Normally,

International Caps Lock Day happens only once a year, on June 28. But in alignment with your current astrological omens, you have been granted the right to observe the next seven days as your own personal International Caps Lock Day. That means you will probably be forgiven and tolerated if use OVERHEATED ORATORY and leap to THUNDEROUS CONCLUSIONS and engage in MELODRAMATIC GESTURES. You may even be thanked—although it’s important to note that the gratitude you receive may only come later, AFTER THE DUST HAS SETTLED.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Wil-

liam Turner was a 19th-century English landscape painter born under the sign of Taurus. His aim was not to capture scenes in realistic detail, but rather to convey the emotional impact they made on him. He testified that on one occasion he had himself tied to the mast of a ship during a snowstorm so that he could experience its full effects firsthand. The result was “Snow Storm – Steam Boat off a Harbor’s Mouth,” a painting composed mostly of tempestuous swirls. What would be the equivalent for you, Taurus? I’m trying to think of a way you could be perfectly safe as you treated yourself to an up-close encounter with elemental energies.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some years

back, the Greek government launched a huge anti-smoking campaign. In response, cigarette sales spiked dramatically. When my daughter was 6 years old, I initiated a crusade to ban Barbie dolls from our home forever. Soon, she was ripping out pictures of the accursed anti-feminist icon from toy catalogs and leaving them on my desk. With these events in mind, I’m feeling cautious about trying to talk you into formulating a five-year master plan. Maybe instead I should encourage you to think small and obsess on transitory wishes.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Wings are a

constraint that makes it possible to fly,” the Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst reminds us. That will be a good principle for you to keep in mind during your own adventures during the coming weeks. I suspect that any liberation you are able to achieve will come as the result of intense discipline. To the degree that you cultivate the very finest limitations, you will earn the right and the power to transcend inhibitions that have been holding you down.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “The secret of

change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” When I came across that quote while surfing the Web, I felt that it jibed perfectly with the astrological omens that are currently in play for you. Every website I consulted agreed that the speaker of this wisdom was Socrates, but I thought the language sounded too contemporary to have been uttered by a Greek philosopher who died 2,400 years ago. After a bit of research, I found the real source: a character named Socrates in Way of the Peaceful Warrior, a new-age self-help book by Dan Millman. I hope this doesn’t dilute the impact of the quote for you, Leo. For now, it is crucial that you not get bogged down in quarreling and brawling. You need to devote all your energy to creating the future.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do you know

that you are a host for more than 10,000 different species of microorganisms? Many of them are bacteria that perform functions essential to your health. So the stunning fact of the matter is that a large number of life forms share your body and constantly help you in ways about which you have no conscious awareness. Might there be other examples of you collecting benefits from unknown sources? Well, do you know who is responsible for providing you with the water and electricity you use? Who sewed your clothes and made your medicine? Who built the roads and buildings you use? This is an excellent time to take inventory of all the assistance, much of it anonymous, that you are so fortunate to receive.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): More often than

not, your fine mind does a competent job of defining the problems that need solving. It comes up with concise questions that lead you in the right direction to find useful clues. It gathers evidence crisply, and it makes smart adjustments as the situation evolves. But after studying the astrological factors currently at work, I’m a little concerned that your usually fine mind might temporarily be prone to suffering from the dreaded malady known as paralysis through overanalysis. To steer yourself away from that possibility, keep checking in with your body and your feelings to see what alternate truths they may have to tell you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): By the

standards of people who don’t know you well, the triumph you achieve in the coming days might seem modest. But I think it will actually be pretty dramatic. Here’s my only concern: There’s a slight danger you will get grandiose or even a bit arrogant in the aftermath of your victory. You could also get peeved at those who don’t see it for the major achievement it is. Now that I’ve given you this warning, though, I’m hoping you will avoid that fate. Instead you will celebrate your win with humble grace, feeling gratitude for all the help you got long the way.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “All my life, my heart has yearned for a thing I cannot name.” So said French writer André Breton. I suspect that many of us feel the same way, which is kind of depressing. But the good news for you, Sagittarius, is that there will be times in the coming months when you will get as close to naming that mysterious thing as you have ever gotten. On more than a few occasions, you may be able to get a clear glimpse of its true nature. Now and then, you might even be fully united with it. One of those moments could come soon.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The

Paris Review did a story on novelist William Gass. The interviewer asked him why he wrote his books. That was “a very dumb question,” he sneered. Nevertheless, he answered it, saying, “I write because I hate. A lot. Hard.” In other words, his primary motivations for expressing himself creatively were loathing, malice and hostility. I beg you not to use him as your role model, Capricorn. Not now. Not ever. But especially now. It is essential to your long-term health and wealth that you not be driven by hate in the coming weeks. Just the opposite, in fact: The more you are driven by love and generosity, the better chance you will have of launching a lucky streak that will last quite a while.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Until we

have seen someone’s darkness, we don’t really know who they are,” said author Marianne Williamson. “Until we have forgiven someone’s darkness, we don’t really know what love is.” Your assignment, Aquarius, is to seek out the deepest possible understanding of these truths. To do that, you will have to identify the unripe, shadowy qualities of the people who are most important to you. And then, you will have to find it in your smart heart to love them for their unripe, shadowy qualities almost as much as you do for their shiny, beautiful qualities.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Aldous Huxley was the renowned 20th-century intellectual who wrote the book Brave New World, a dystopian vision of the future. Later in his life, he came to regret one thing: how “preposterously serious” he had been when he was younger. “There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet,” he ruminated, “trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. That’s why you must walk so lightly. Lightly, my darling.” He said, “Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply.” I would love for you to put this counsel at the top of your priority list for the next 10 months, darling Pisces. Maybe even write it out on a piece of paper, and tape it to your bathroom mirror.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.

38   |  RN&R   | 

AUGUST 15, 2013


by Sage Leehey PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

Whistleblower Guiseppina “Guisi” Meili Guiseppina Meili is a secondary marketing analyst for International City Mortgage here in Reno. She was introduced to me as “kind of like the Snowden of Switzerland.” She and her husband saved records that showed assets of Holocaust victims had ended up in Swiss banks, resulting in a $1.24 billion settlement for survivors.

How did you get here, to the United States? Well, at that time I was married to Christoph Meili (Michel Christopher Meili). That’s my ex-husband, so he was working for the largest Swiss bank in Zurich called UBS, Union Bank of Switzerland. He was a security guard and was doing his rounds one night, and he stumbled upon these bins filled with ledgers in the shredder room. They were these beautiful, gorgeous handwritten ledgers, you know, with the really beautiful cursive handwriting and stuff like that. … So he took it home. When he got home, he had to walk the dog. I was waiting up for him, so he gives me this ledger. ... I saw that there were these dates that were between 1923 to like 1945 or even a little bit later. And then there were these like little white machine-typed little papers that were added on that said like, “taken over from forced sales.” That

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butters, etc., goodies that will be battling it out for economic survival in the dispensaries of Colorado, California, and eventually—us! Yay for us. About goddamn time. With the Sandoval signature on Senate Bill 374 in June, we pulled our heads out, took a look at the writing on the wall, and finally got into this game. I mean, us voters gave the green light years ago (2000, fercrissake) and the legislature has been half-assing it ever since, hoping the issue would go away. It didn’t. With SB 374 on the books, the path is cleared for up to 66 dispensaries in the state, which will break down thusly: Vegas 63. Reno 2. Carson 1. Fine. Whatever. I’ll take it. But wherever our dispensaries actually end up, they’re gonna be loaded with a dazzling range of products that will herald a whole new era in attitude adjustment. Again—yes, yo, and yeah, baby. Ω

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keep it away from the kiddies. Which is a real concern. Youngsters have been known to enjoy chocolate bars, so you gotta hide your Kivas! Or else Kippy’s gonna have a bad brownout! So how was it? Real good, I’d say. The bar costs 20 bucks and it consists of four squares. The recommended dose, according to our man, was one third of ONE square. He was right on. I gobbled up my chunk and had a very pleasant afternoon. Yes, I was indeed high, but mildly and subtly so. I was feelin’ it, yes, but I wasn’t incapacitated or useless. IMHO, anyway. I’m hopeful my comrades would concur. I can report that I told a couple jokes that stone cold KILLED. And dig the value of a Kiva. One $20 bar has 12 doses, a very thrifty $1.66 per dose. Dayam. Sign me up! Big picture overview—these candy bars are just the tip of the potberg. There’s literally a revolution in marijuana consumption going on now, a revolution that will lead to an amazing range of pot-laced cookies, candies, pastries, oils, snacks,

FEATURE STORY

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It was just crazy, but at the same time, they basically, in Switzerland, they started to really, really hate us. They said that we soiled the nest that we grew up in. It’s a very, very derogatory word that they use. ... And he (Christoph) obviously got suspended from his job and then fired, so we were just trying to struggle and survive. ... We said, “Listen, this is not working here in Switzerland. We can’t live here anymore. We have two little kids, two and a half and four and a half. We’re coming to the United States, and something has to happen.” ... And that’s how we got to the United States.

wasn’t even so much what struck me in the beginning, it was more so the dates. And why was because the Swiss government had just passed a law to protect any documents, any finance documents or any insurance documents, that had to do with that period of time because here in the United States they were doing this research on behalf of the Holocaust survivors. Well, with those documents we had the proof that there was. ... So we thought, well, it has to do with the Jews—the Jews, Israel. Maybe we should call the Israeli embassy. ... And the Israeli embassy said to just mail it to them, and we’re talking about very large ledgers. In the mean time, my ex went back to work. Now, we are all suspicious, and he went back to the shredder room. They actually

Melts in your mouth I recently had the chance to attend a party in the lovely little California hill town of Murphys, which is on Highway 4 in the Angels Camp area. At this party, a cool cat dropped by with some of the products he was taking up to the medical marijuana dispensary in the town of Arnold. One of these products was a tasty bar of chocolate (think of a good old Hershey bar) that was, of course, liberally dosed. After sampling this stuff (under the clinical supervision of a local bass player), it’s obvious that a renaissance of reefer is well underway. These were Kiva bars of blackberry dark chocolate, and they were scrumptious. The people making these confections know what the heck they’re doing. The packaging was informative and hip. Kiva touts itself as a “higher chocolate experience.” Yes, yo, and yeah, baby! Right on the box, you see clearly this stuff is medical cannabis, the flavor is dark chocolate, the net weight is 50 grams (1.7 oz), it’s not a food or a snack and

did shred those documents, but there were still two ledgers that they didn’t. ... So he took those home as well. When we got home the second day, we thought of the Jewish Cultural Center in Zurich and maybe that we should call them because they were local. So we called them. ... The bank basically came out with a statement that said, “Oops. We did a mistake.” Basically saying that we apologize, but we shredded a bunch of documents of historical value. But they really didn’t admit too much. They just apologized. They wanted to put it under the rug. And with that, my ex-husband went public. He did a press conference, and then all hell broke lose.

IF YOU ARE THE PARENT OF A CHILD SUFFERING FROM ADDICTION,

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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AUGUST 15, 2013

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RN&R

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39


Nevada Humane Society

Duck Race & Festival

Reminder:

The City of Reno prohibits glass containers, alcohol and pets in Wingfield Park during events. The only pets allowed at the Duck Race & Festival will be adoptable pets from NHS and service dogs. Thank you for your compliance.

August 25, 2013 • 11am – 5 pm Duck Race at 4 pm Wingfield Park, Reno FREE ENTRY

Official Program


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2 Nevada Humane Society Duck Race & Festival

530-582-7268 | 10960 WeSt RIveR St. tRuCkee CA WWW.tRuCkeetAhOePetLODGe.COm


Welcome to the 2013 Nevada Humane Society Duck Race & Festival

Thank you so much for joining us for the Nevada Humane Society Duck Race & Festival and supporting homeless pets in Washoe County.

Washoe County – one of the country’s safest for homeless pets

Approximately 10,000 homeless dogs, cats and other animals rely on Nevada Humane Society each year to provide them with shelter, lifesaving care and loving homes.

In January 2007, NHS became a no–kill shelter and launched a bold effort to create a no–kill community. Since then, Nevada Humane Society, working cooperatively with other animal rescue organizations in our community, has continued to lead the progress toward this goal. Washoe County is now one of the safest communities in the U.S. for homeless pets.

On average, our cost is $240 for each dog or cat coming into the shelter. However this year, with the very challenging economy, we are seeing many more pets arrive at the shelter with serious injuries or medical problems that their owners cannot afford to treat. Caring for these most unfortunate pets is costly, but it is also so very rewarding to see them made well and headed off to a new life with a loving person.

Nevada Humane Society

Pet Adoption Statistics Every pet neutered, vaccinated & microchipped before adoption

2006: 4,990

2007: 8,030 up 61%

3,040 more adoptions

2008: 8,635 up 7%

By taking part in this event, you’re making lifesaving care for the homeless pets of our community possible. Together we are making Washoe County one of the safest communities in the U.S. for homeless pets.

605 more adoptions

2009: 9,184 up 6%

549 more adoptions

2010: 9,668 up 5%

484 more adoptions

2011: 9,340 down 3%

Thank you so much! Mitch Schneider Interim Executive Director Nevada Humane Society

Pre–no–kill initiative

328 fewer adoptions (admissions down 3%)

2012: 8,822 DOWN 4%

518 fewer adoptions (admissions down 3%)

Countywide Save Rate for Homeless Pets Nevada Humane Society & Washoe County Regional Animal Services combined

2006:

Dogs

83%

Pre–no–kill Cats 53% initiative

2009 Save Rate National Average: 58% (Source: Maddie’s Fund)

2007: Dogs 92% Cats 78% A no–kill shelter creating a no–kill community

2008: Dogs 90% Cats 83% 2009: Dogs 90% Cats 89%

2825 Longley Lane, Ste. B Reno, NV 89502 NevadaHumaneSociety.org info@nevadahumanesociety.org Phone: 775–856–2000 Fax: 775–284–7060

2010: Dogs 91% Cats 91% 2011: Dogs 91% Cats 91% 2012: Dogs 92% Cats 92% OFFICIAL PROGRAM 3


Have you adopted your rubber ducks yet?

N evada H u mane S ociet y ’ s

Duck Race & Festival

There’s still time to adopt a rubber duck – or an entire Feathered Flotilla – and be a winner. Even if yours is not a lucky duck, you’ll win by helping the homeless animals of our community.

Quacker packages

All–day entertainment and more Radio personalities from K–Bull 98.1FM, KOH News Talk 780, Magic 95.5FM and Wild 102.9FM will emcee the free festivities in between an exciting line–up of live performances. Here’s the schedule: 11am Welcome 11:15am Rumble • Reno punkabilly rock and blues band that plays old school rock with an attitude Emcee Monica Jaye and pet pals

In the Park Games, activities, refreshments, shopping and pet adoptions are all featured during the Festival preceding the Nevada Humane Society Duck Race. Here’s a sampling of how you and your friends and family can spend the afternoon:

Bring your friends and family and plan to spend the day at Wingfield Park while the excitement builds for the Nevada Humane Society Duck Race.

Games and Activities

MoMatik • Local Hip Hop artist with a unique personality and uplifting message

• Get an official Duck Race poster, signed by the photographer, Jeff Ross.

• Luxurious Las Vegas Vacation

• Meet the mascots – Quacky, Daisy, Hope, and Lucky from Nevada Humane Society

• Sierra Golf Getaway

• Play carnival games for a host of ducky prizes.

• Dine Around Reno Restaurant Package

Come to 2825 Longley Lane and adopt a rubber duck – and perhaps a live pet as well?

• Pampered Pet Package

Visit an adoption partner

• Shop for Duck Race merchandise, including beach towels, stainless steel water

• Great Balloon Race Staycation

• Adorn your face with a Fantasy Face Painting by Heidi Figueroa. • Find a four–legged forever friend at the Nevada Humane Society adoption booth. • Relax and enjoy the live entertainment on stage.

Peppermill Photo Booth. • Pick a shady spot on the river bank to cheer on the floating flotilla at the 4 p.m. Duck Race.

Rumble

Plus, every duck has the chance to win a $400,000 CASH prize!

Refreshments • Indulge in cool ice cream treats from Baskin Robbins. • Nosh on gourmet grilled cheese and other savory and sweet sandwiches

4pm Duck Race in the Truckee River (followed by raffle and grand prize presentations)

from GourMelt. • Treat yourself to hot dogs, nachos, cotton candy and other goodies from

All proceeds from the Duck Race go directly to help homeless pets and advance Nevada Humane Society’s goal of sustaining a no–kill community. Nevada Humane Society is a non–profit organization whose lifesaving work is made possible through donations.

Goodi’s Fresh Squeezed Lemonade.

5 pm Close

How to adopt

Prizes for the fastest ducks include:

• Dress in our ducky accessories and have your picture taken at the

3pm

Parade of prizes

Thank you for supporting this important fundraising event for Nevada Humane Society!

• Clown around with stilt-walking Cameron’s Balloon Party.

• Adopt a rubber duck for a chance to win great prizes at the 4 p.m. Duck Race.

12:30pm VooDooDogz • From funky soul classics to grooving blues to electric sounds of Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughn or Tommy Castro, this band can rock!

Special thanks to our Ducky Donors

Lonely Duck: 1 duck $5 Quack Pack: 5 ducks $20 Quacker’s Dozen: 12 ducks + 1 raffle entry $50 Beak Brigade: 25 ducks + 3 raffle entries $100 Feathered Flotilla: 50 ducks + 6 raffle entries $200

• Bounce off the walls in Bouncing Around.

bottles, cuddly plush ducks and more.

1:45pm Farewell Belladonna • Drawing from elements of Rock, Jazz, Bluegrass and Folk music, Farewell Belladonna has invented their very own unique sound. VooDooDogz

• Enjoy an icy handcrafted microbrew from Silver Peak Restaurant & Brewery.

For more information:

Online

Visit NevadaHumaneSociety.org and follow the easy instructions.

At the shelter

Stop by any Smith’s in the Reno/Sparks/ Carson City area, one of three local Great Basin Federal Credit Unions, or Archie’s Giant Hamburgers & Breakfast. A big THANKS to these businesses for actively adopting out rubber ducks on behalf of Nevada Humane Society.

In the community

Visit NevadaHumaneSociety.org and click on Adopt a Duck to find out where we’ll be adopting ducks in the Reno area.

At the Duck Race & Festival

If there are ducks that haven’t yet been adopted on August 25, you can adopt at the Duck Race & Festival at Wingfield Park. Adoptions will be offered from 11 a.m. when the Festival begins until all ducks are adopted or about one hour before the 4 p.m. Duck Race – whichever comes first.

call 775–856–2000 or go online at NevadaHumaneSociety.org. MoMatik 4 Nevada Humane Society Duck Race & Festival

Our deepest gratitude for helping to feather the Nevada Humane Society nest so we can advance our no–kill mission!

When 15,000 bright yellow ducks race down the Truckee River in competition for a host of prizes – and a chance to win $400,000 CASH – will your duck be among them?

August 25 • 11 am – 5 pm • Wingfield Park

On Stage

Five – quack salute to our Splashy Sponsors

Farewell Belladonna

Big Ap – Paws for our Plucky Partners We truly appreciate these businesses putting together duck adoption teams and helping promote the Duck Race & Festival! Advanced Data Systems Kafoury, Armstrong & Co. Archie’s Giant Hamburger & Breakfast NV Energy Great Basin Federal Credit Union

Peppermill Resort Spa Casino Sam’s Club Smith’s Food & Drug Stores PetSmart

Kudos to our Super Volunteers You know who you are – and we know that we couldn’t make the Duck Race & Festival happen without each and every one of you. Thank you!

Reminder:

The City of Reno prohibits glass containers, alcohol and pets in Wingfield Park during events. The only pets allowed at the Duck Race & Festival will be adoptable pets from NHS and service dogs. Thank you for your compliance. OFFICIAL PROGRAM 5


Have you adopted your rubber ducks yet?

N evada H u mane S ociet y ’ s

Duck Race & Festival

There’s still time to adopt a rubber duck – or an entire Feathered Flotilla – and be a winner. Even if yours is not a lucky duck, you’ll win by helping the homeless animals of our community.

Quacker packages

All–day entertainment and more Radio personalities from K–Bull 98.1FM, KOH News Talk 780, Magic 95.5FM and Wild 102.9FM will emcee the free festivities in between an exciting line–up of live performances. Here’s the schedule: 11am Welcome 11:15am Rumble • Reno punkabilly rock and blues band that plays old school rock with an attitude Emcee Monica Jaye and pet pals

In the Park Games, activities, refreshments, shopping and pet adoptions are all featured during the Festival preceding the Nevada Humane Society Duck Race. Here’s a sampling of how you and your friends and family can spend the afternoon:

Bring your friends and family and plan to spend the day at Wingfield Park while the excitement builds for the Nevada Humane Society Duck Race.

Games and Activities

MoMatik • Local Hip Hop artist with a unique personality and uplifting message

• Get an official Duck Race poster, signed by the photographer, Jeff Ross.

• Luxurious Las Vegas Vacation

• Meet the mascots – Quacky, Daisy, Hope, and Lucky from Nevada Humane Society

• Sierra Golf Getaway

• Play carnival games for a host of ducky prizes.

• Dine Around Reno Restaurant Package

Come to 2825 Longley Lane and adopt a rubber duck – and perhaps a live pet as well?

• Pampered Pet Package

Visit an adoption partner

• Shop for Duck Race merchandise, including beach towels, stainless steel water

• Great Balloon Race Staycation

• Adorn your face with a Fantasy Face Painting by Heidi Figueroa. • Find a four–legged forever friend at the Nevada Humane Society adoption booth. • Relax and enjoy the live entertainment on stage.

Peppermill Photo Booth. • Pick a shady spot on the river bank to cheer on the floating flotilla at the 4 p.m. Duck Race.

Rumble

Plus, every duck has the chance to win a $400,000 CASH prize!

Refreshments • Indulge in cool ice cream treats from Baskin Robbins. • Nosh on gourmet grilled cheese and other savory and sweet sandwiches

4pm Duck Race in the Truckee River (followed by raffle and grand prize presentations)

from GourMelt. • Treat yourself to hot dogs, nachos, cotton candy and other goodies from

All proceeds from the Duck Race go directly to help homeless pets and advance Nevada Humane Society’s goal of sustaining a no–kill community. Nevada Humane Society is a non–profit organization whose lifesaving work is made possible through donations.

Goodi’s Fresh Squeezed Lemonade.

5 pm Close

How to adopt

Prizes for the fastest ducks include:

• Dress in our ducky accessories and have your picture taken at the

3pm

Parade of prizes

Thank you for supporting this important fundraising event for Nevada Humane Society!

• Clown around with stilt-walking Cameron’s Balloon Party.

• Adopt a rubber duck for a chance to win great prizes at the 4 p.m. Duck Race.

12:30pm VooDooDogz • From funky soul classics to grooving blues to electric sounds of Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughn or Tommy Castro, this band can rock!

Special thanks to our Ducky Donors

Lonely Duck: 1 duck $5 Quack Pack: 5 ducks $20 Quacker’s Dozen: 12 ducks + 1 raffle entry $50 Beak Brigade: 25 ducks + 3 raffle entries $100 Feathered Flotilla: 50 ducks + 6 raffle entries $200

• Bounce off the walls in Bouncing Around.

bottles, cuddly plush ducks and more.

1:45pm Farewell Belladonna • Drawing from elements of Rock, Jazz, Bluegrass and Folk music, Farewell Belladonna has invented their very own unique sound. VooDooDogz

• Enjoy an icy handcrafted microbrew from Silver Peak Restaurant & Brewery.

For more information:

Online

Visit NevadaHumaneSociety.org and follow the easy instructions.

At the shelter

Stop by any Smith’s in the Reno/Sparks/ Carson City area, one of three local Great Basin Federal Credit Unions, or Archie’s Giant Hamburgers & Breakfast. A big THANKS to these businesses for actively adopting out rubber ducks on behalf of Nevada Humane Society.

In the community

Visit NevadaHumaneSociety.org and click on Adopt a Duck to find out where we’ll be adopting ducks in the Reno area.

At the Duck Race & Festival

If there are ducks that haven’t yet been adopted on August 25, you can adopt at the Duck Race & Festival at Wingfield Park. Adoptions will be offered from 11 a.m. when the Festival begins until all ducks are adopted or about one hour before the 4 p.m. Duck Race – whichever comes first.

call 775–856–2000 or go online at NevadaHumaneSociety.org. MoMatik 4 Nevada Humane Society Duck Race & Festival

Our deepest gratitude for helping to feather the Nevada Humane Society nest so we can advance our no–kill mission!

When 15,000 bright yellow ducks race down the Truckee River in competition for a host of prizes – and a chance to win $400,000 CASH – will your duck be among them?

August 25 • 11 am – 5 pm • Wingfield Park

On Stage

Five – quack salute to our Splashy Sponsors

Farewell Belladonna

Big Ap – Paws for our Plucky Partners We truly appreciate these businesses putting together duck adoption teams and helping promote the Duck Race & Festival! Advanced Data Systems Kafoury, Armstrong & Co. Archie’s Giant Hamburger & Breakfast NV Energy Great Basin Federal Credit Union

Peppermill Resort Spa Casino Sam’s Club Smith’s Food & Drug Stores PetSmart

Kudos to our Super Volunteers You know who you are – and we know that we couldn’t make the Duck Race & Festival happen without each and every one of you. Thank you!

Reminder:

The City of Reno prohibits glass containers, alcohol and pets in Wingfield Park during events. The only pets allowed at the Duck Race & Festival will be adoptable pets from NHS and service dogs. Thank you for your compliance. OFFICIAL PROGRAM 5


(775) 322-5400

2697 Mill Street (at Terminal Way) Reno, Nevada 89502

Think Free

“WhereWe WeTreat Treat Your Your Dog “Where DogLike LikeFamily” Family”

www.adoggiesdream.com adoggiesdream “Where We Treat Your Dog Like Family” “Where We Treat Your Dog Like Family”

THANK YOU! for 16 YeArs of wonderful support! –Vicki Madalinski Owner

“go ducks, go!” 1338 Disc Drive | Sparks, NV 89436 (775) 626–3433 | Since 1997

Mobile Veterinary Services

Let us care for your pet...at home! • Vaccinations, yearly exams & well patient care

(775) 322-5400

• Companion Laser Therapy

2697 Mill Street (at Terminal Reno, Nevada 89502 Way) Reno, Nevada 89502

• Practice limited to dogs & cats

(775) 322-5400 2697 Mill Street (at Terminal Way) adoggiesdream

adoggiesdream

i

6 Nevada Humane Society Duck Race & Festival

www.adoggiesdream.com

www.adoggiesdream.com

• Hospice care & in-home euthanasia

Dr. Renée Bufkin, DVM

775.338.8500 • www.Vet-To-Pet.com


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7450 Longley Lane, Reno, NV 89511 • (775) 852-4300

12 Mon - Fri 7am - 6pm, Sat 9am - 4pm, Closed Sun 10 aplusreno@sbcglobal.net • www.aplusanimalhospital.com 09 10

Dogs • Cats • Birds • Exotics Brad Lingenfelter, D.V.M. & Associates

FREEEDOM DAY USA – A DAY OF FREE: Honoring The Sacrifices They Make To Preserve Our Freedom. A Plus Animal Hospital will be giving back to our armed forces on September 12, 2013. Includes: Free Exam, Vaccines and Nail Trims for those pets belonging to our armed service men and women. By Appointment Only with Military ID. www.freedomdayusa.com

OFFICIAL PROGRAM 7


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