Issuu on Google+

Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Chanelle.Bessette........... 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 12 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.....................25 Nightclubs/Casinos........26 This.Week.................... 30 Free.Will.Astrology....... 34 15.Minutes.....................35 Bruce.Van.Dyke............35

an army of one See Left Foot Forward, page 6.

A lArge silence At A nAtive event See news, page 8.

ThaT’s why They call iT gaming See arts&Culture, page 16.

thE womaN will buRN See art of the State, page 19.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE 19, issuE 20

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july 3-10, 2013


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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

An age of wonders

Honor the flag

Our man on water

All about the numbers

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. It was only a couple weeks ago that I was hanging around the hostel in the neighborhood behind the Blue Mosque in Istanbul. My friend and fellow student, Catherine, had run off to figure out an itinerary at the main bus station. It was urban hot as I sat drinking the fine Efes beer at the Sultan Hostel in this city of more than 13.5 million souls, and the cool breezes off the Bosphorus Straight whipped the Turkish flags that were suspended on wires above the narrow brick street. I was eyeing this grayhaired guy seated a few tables away. I’ll be honest: I had about a half a buzz going, but I could see by the light in his brown eyes that he had a story to tell. So I bought him a beer, and I engaged him in conversation. Turns out his name was Jeff Jennings, hailing from Colorado, and he said he’d been attending a climate conference—I believe it was the Climate Reality Leadership Corps—with Al Gore in Taksim Square. He was also the inventor of a perpetual motion machine. Now, by the time we got to the specifics of the machine, after hours of drinking Raki and smoking hookah, attempts on our honor by beautiful Russian women—or were they Turkish?— and friends and congenial strangers—not to mention the guy huffing shoe polish out of a plastic bag—cutting into the dance, well ... I’ll just have to admit I’m a little foggy on the details. Something about using gravity and centrifugal force to run a flywheel and generator. (Oddly, they were talking about something similar on NPR only an hour ago.) I’m generally a skeptic, but I can tell you, miracles happen in Istanbul. And to repurpose an earlier conversation for those in the know: “Except that never happens.” “Only it did.” *** Finally, don’t forget to vote in our Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada popularity contest at www.newsreview. com/reno/ballot/bestofreno13. The ballot comes down on July 19 at 3 p.m., so you’ll want to rally the troops if you want to get an invite to our fabulous Best Of party.

Please notice how Club Cal Neva is exercising its freedom of speech or maybe its neglect or its ignorance. How is one of Reno’s most illustrious gambling venues exercising its freedom of speech, this most American of American ideals? Please take notice this evening of the majestic flag being flown atop City Hall and then see if you can tell what is different with the flags flying above the Club Cal Neva parking structure. Well, this majestic symbol currently is in the dark, so the symbol of our national ideals is in the dark, at the center of our city. It’s almost like a sign saying, “Welcome to R_no,” and the city’s welcome sign is missing a letter. Can I buy a vowel anyone? It not only looks bad but it has a deeper, more profound meaning still. The American flag is a symbol of the entire nation. This symbol represents the US in USA. So if a corporation or an individual inappropriately uses this symbol it has the meaning of being inappropriate to all of US. Also, Congress has a long list of laws pertaining to the use and display of the flag, which it does not enforce because of the one of those rights dealing with freedom of speech. Maybe Club Cal Neva is trying to say something about all of US? And maybe that institution is correct in what it is saying about all of US. Maybe our national ideals have been in the dark for some time now. Well, they have been at the Cal Neva. Speaking of national ideals being in the dark at the center of Reno, this could also be seen as a bad omen. If I were the mayor of this city, and I were American, I would probably ask that any commercial institution please be respectful to the residents of the city, unless of course, commercial institutions now speak for all of US. Ben Seldkamp Reno

Re “Cut off where?” (Letters to the Editor, June 27): Thank you for letting people know about the water cut off to the homeless, but it is not over yet. Here is the latest news from the homeless front. The homeless are passing around a petition for the homeless to sign for a class action lawsuit for the following reasons. (1) The restrooms, a.k.a. portapotties, are only a few feet from where the food is served. (If you are there at dinner time 7:30 p.m. Mon-Fri and 5:30 p.m. Sat-Sun. You will understand by the smell of human waste where the food is being served.) (2) The city has turned on one drinking fountain that has a leak and does not provide sufficient water to the 300 men and women who get their water from that source, and they just stated that it will be turned off again on or around the first of the month. (3) There are only two portapotties for 300 men and women to use for a week at a time. The portable restrooms are not meant to be used by that many people for that amount of time. The park is open from 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. If there are any concerned citizens in Reno take a look for yourself at 335 Record St. in Reno. This will not end well for taxpayers like us. Finally, city utilities told the people down there that it is illegal to shut the water off without notice first; no notice has been posted as of June 27, yet it was off for four days and turned back on after the people repeatedly complained to a lawyer and the city. What’s next? The last I heard, they have been contacted by a few lawyers so far, but they haven’t decided on which one to represent them. I will try to keep you posted. Shawn Bruce England Reno

Re “Sandoval takes aim at democracy” (Left Foot Forward, June 20): Gun control proponents were free to call the governor, too. If each supposed gun control proponent had called in once, then they should have overwhelmed the gun rights callers. Maybe the numbers were not really there, just made up, like Obama’s 90 percent number. Dave Johnston Reno

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

Gun rights supporters went the distance Re “Sandoval takes aim at democracy” (Left Foot Forward, June 20): In reference to the opinion line set up by the governor and its “absurdity,” I would contend that, though [not] scientific, it was useful in identifying which segment of the population is active on the issue and united in action. If opposition groups were as proactive as those defending the Second Amendment, the number of opinion respondents would have been much higher and the margin much narrower. If 80 percent of Americans supported such a measure, it should have been obvious in the responses. What is clear is those standing with Gov. Sandoval understood the legislative process in its entirety. They recognized that once passed by the legislature, the governor’s signature would impose the law on the people. Refusing to quit until the process ran its course, the opinion line respondents ensured their rights were protected. All of this was doubtlessly supported by out-of-state gun owners acting to help Nevada remain a measured oasis for liberty. Supporters of the bill should have taken a page out of the opposition’s play book and mobilized as they did so successfully during election season. But apparently the motivation to fight to the end was not there. It turns out the provincials were willing to fight for their rights. The governor made his opinion clear early on, he simply Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

—D. Brian Burghart

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

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provided voters another chance to speak after their legislature overstepped its bounds. With regard to voter registration extension, there are multiple years between elections and the registrar’s office is a busy enough organization during election season. Finally, with the Supreme Court recognizing flaws within the Voting Rights Act, it is not surprising that the governor did the same with SB304. If there was misinterpretation by media outlets in reference to the content of a bill and then passing on misinformation, well chock that up to the disintegration of journalism in our community. It’s about time the people approach change more locally and build community. The Pro-Second Amendment crowd are a good example to emulate; outspoken, organized and united. I don’t see how that model can be improved upon. Donald Stockton Reno

Corrections Re “Hospital price power probed” (Upfront, June 27): We reported that Renown Hospital was formerly a publicly owned county hospital that became part of a chain. Actually, it became privately owned by a local corporation. In our June 27 Artown supplement, we incorrectly stated that the Rocky Horror picture show would be screened at Cargo at Whitney Peak Hotel at 8 p.m. on July 28. The 8 p.m. show is actually on July 27. There will be a second showing later that night at midnight. We apologize for any confusion caused by our errors.

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

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by Dennis Myers

ThiS Modern World

by tom tomorrow

Where would you like to travel? Asked at the Sparks Children’s Fountain, 1250 C. St. Johan Espinoza Vasquez Student

I would like to go to Spain and see Real Madrid play.

Nathan Woods Warehouse worker

Probably the Bahamas right now. Just to get away—the beautiful beaches, the scenery, the people, atmosphere.

Shawn Bloomquist Salesperson

Be ready for wildfire

Probably Spain. I’ve got family there. It’s got old world history. I’d travel to Italy, too.

any building on your property. Have key papers or As the nation mourns the 19 firefighters killed irreplaceable items like photographs at hand. Sunday in Arizona, we’re reminded that nature can • Plan for evacuations. and will devastate lives and property in the blink of If wildfire is threatening, put all the pets in one an eye. Northern Nevada, too, is at high risk of fires room. Back your car into the driveway or garage. with the ongoing drought and high temperatures. The U.S. Fire Administration has a good web page Have an emergency plan for the family. For example, establish a place to meet up should the call to evacuthat discusses how to prepare for wildfires at www. usfa.fema.gov/citizens/home_fire_prev/wildfire. There ate come during the school or work day. Prepare a disaster kit with several days worth of foods that is much more on the site than we can mention in this short editorial space, but here are the high points. The won’t spoil and several gallons of water, a change of clothing, medications, pet food, a radio with extra key is to be aware of the danger and prepared for its batteries, sanitation supplies, and extra eyeglasses or eventuality. contact lenses. • Create a 30 to 100 feet safety zone around your • Prep the house when an evacuhome. ation appears imminent. This means clearing out all flam- Nature can and will Close all the windows, door and mable vegetation and removing any devastate lives and outside vents. Turn off utilities and dead leaves or branches. Make sure property in the blink propane bottles on the grill. Open the power company has removed the fireplace damper and close the tree branches near power lines. of an eye. screen. Move any flammable furniStack any firewood as far from ture away from windows. Connect garden hoses to your home as possible. Keep any fuel—like gasoline outside faucets, and wet down shrubs and the roof. for your lawnmower—in approved safety containers • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. and away from the base of buildings. Move propaneWear protective clothing. Grab the pets and disasfueled grills away from the house. ter kit. Lock your home, and choose the route least • Prepare and protect your home. likely to put you in the path of danger. Clean out the gutters and leaves and pine needles There’s a lot more good information on the can collect in them. Install or check dual-sensor website, but now—before we’re directly threatened— smoke alarms on each level of your home. Keep fire is the time to prepare. Ω tools like a rake, ax, saw, bucket and shovel where you can quickly access them. Have a garden hose that’s long enough to reach any part of your home or

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Brandy Papp Student

I think I’d like to go to Japan. I’m more interested in foreign countries. I have a lot of friends there, and so I just want to study there.

Brianna Wood Student

Hawaii because I like volcanoes. And the water, because I like to swim, and I want to go to the luaus. My mom told me about it.

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The power of one She stood in pink tennis shoes and spoke for 13 hours, with no food or bathroom breaks and no furniture to lean upon. Meanwhile, scores of supporters filled the legislative gallery and state capital halls, wearing orange shirts and making lots of noise. Hundreds of thousands of people followed the by event on Twitter and watched it live Sheila Leslie on YouTube, sharing the moment in real-time from the comfort of their own homes. This was not just a filibuster by Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis, but rather a “people’s filibuster” as hundreds of angry protestors erupted into loud chants and cheers, creating so much chaos and confusion they ran out the clock, effectively killing SB 5, a bill that would have virtually ended abortion rights in Texas. The mainstream media was absent during the final hours of the filibuster, leaving Twitter to fill the void, with people helpfully posting links to live feeds and vivid pictures of protesters in the state capital. Watching the video and reading the scrolling

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commentary was eerily communal, with Nevadans across the state, all focused on the same compelling scenes. Twitter at its best. Meanwhile CNN and other so-called 24-hour news stations, which go on endlessly about any sort of disaster that has already happened, were strangely absent, although Fox News and the AP later issued false reports that the filibuster had failed. Given the dominance of Republican men in the Texas Senate, one couldn’t help but wonder why they let it happen. After all, they wrote the rules. The only explanation: sheer arrogance and hubris. It didn’t occur to these senators who have controlled things for so long that what they regarded as a small political stunt would resonate so strongly with the public, turning the Senate into a circus and making Sen. Davis an instant national celebrity. They certainly didn’t count on the hushed drama of state Sen. Leticia Van De Putte calmly asking the Senate President: “At what point

does a female senator have to raise her hand to be recognized over her male colleagues in the room?” Or the chambers erupting with cheers that didn’t stop as the clock ticked down to midnight. The day after the filibuster, some in Nevada’s Twitterverse were self-righteously congratulating our legislature for not “devolving into anarchy,” quickly labeling the protestors an angry “mob,” echoing the Texas lieutenant governor who ended the evening looking foolish and powerless on a suddenly national stage. Nevada has not experienced this type of open warfare over abortion rights thanks to the constitutional protection approved by voters when they wisely passed Question 7 back in 1990, requiring a vote of the people before these rights can be taken away. Instead, the attacks on reproductive health care in Nevada tend to be more subtle, usually pushed by Mormon or evangelical legislators. The attack this session was hidden in SB 192,

a Trojan-horse bill masquerading as “religious freedom,” allowing medical providers to deny a woman birth control or even an emergency abortion if someone had a religious objection. In Texas, there is no such constitutional protection, and the Republican senators, along with Gov. Rick Perry, had no qualms about outlawing every abortion after 20 weeks, even for medical reasons. The bill implements new restrictions on abortion clinics that would close nearly every one of them under the familiar ruse of “protecting” women. At press time, Perry had called another special session to try to pass the bill again, no doubt taking Sen. Davis and her supporters more seriously. But the victory was in the battle this time. Thanks to sheer courage, stamina and determination, women found their voice through a pink-tennis-shoe-clad senator in the unlikely state of Texas. May there be many more. #StandWithWendy Ω

Read more about Wendy Davis here: www.rawstory.com/ rs/2013/06/27/texasstate-sen-wendydavis-i-would-bylying-to-deny-aspiration-for-higher-office/


A market solution to food problems Quality of food seems to be a cause that everyone can get behind, and there has recently been a grassroots movement to take better consumer control over how food is produced and sold. There is a national trend among food activists against the production of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, which by Chanelle Bessette are the domain of mass food-production companies such as Monsanto. At the very least, many activists are fighting for the labeling of GMOs as a way to increase consumer consciousness about food products. Even in Nevada, there were two “March Against Monsanto” events—one in Reno and one in Las Vegas—on Saturday, May 25, during which activists rallied for GMO labeling through speeches and picketing. The primary reason for resistance against GMOs is the question of safety. Not much is known about the long-term effects of consuming food that contains GMOs, but there are other concerns to take into consideration such as the reduction of genetic diversity—which makes plants more susceptible to outside forces

such as invasive species, drought and insects—and the over-use of pesticides and herbicides. With our current government subsidy system that incentivizes the production of a limited range of crops, GMOs could be putting the entire food supply of the U.S. at risk. From a libertarian perspective, there is intriguing research available on how political ideologies affect the control of food. Most Americans, regardless of their views on government, favor food regulation, according to Jayson L. Lusk’s economic article in the academic journal Food Policy. After a survey of 700 Americans, he found that, “people’s ideologies with regard to food were multidimensional, falling along lines related to food health and quality, food safety, and farm subsidies. Respondents were most in favor of additional government action related to food safety.” The question, then, is why does food get its own unique treatment, and why do even the most conservative people want its regulation? Is

there an alternative to big government when it comes to food? The economics of food is a touchy subject because it affects us all. We believe that without big government regulation, there is a higher risk of negative consequences when it comes to our food consumption not only for ourselves but also for our children. But bigger government needn’t be the solution to the regulation of GMOs and other food labels. If we look to the privatization of other regulatory agencies such as voluntary certification for sustainable timber harvesting, the MPAA movie rating system and the ESRB video game rating system, then it’s clear that effective regulation isn’t limited to the domain of the government. In fact, it could be argued that more successful regulation would occur without government intervention. If we look to the voluntary certification and rating systems, then we can see the favorable business relationships and market interactions that occur as a result of their institution. For example, Home Depot gives

preferential treatment (i.e. purchasing power) to wood products that have been sustainably harvested. Walmart, Game Stop and other major retailers won’t supply video games that have an AO (aged 18+) rating from the ESRB, which de-incentivizes the production of electronic entertainment that contains strong sexual content and strong violence. Similarly, if a private rating system for food were to exist that evaluated the standards of GMO products and labels such as “organic,” “free-range” or “cage free,” then the politics of food would be taken out of the equation because food companies could volunteer for their own labels of certification, and power would be put back in the hands of consumers and private food retailers instead of government. Independent food regulation is not impossible or even improbable, and if we want to find the solution to our food problem, then perhaps it’s time that we abandoned the belief that more government control is the answer. Ω

For more propaganda about the government’s efforts to protect us from bad foods, check out: www.fda.gov.

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Photo/Dennis Myers

Reno Sparks Indian Colony chair Arlen Melendez  (right) greets former National Congress of  American Indians president Joe Garcia outside  the general assembly of the Congress’s national  conference in Reno.

Price tag on court case A federal judge has thrown a roadblock in the way of a lawsuit by environmental groups seeking to stop a new Lake Tahoe regional plan that allows denser development. U.S. District Judge John Mendez ordered the Friends of the West Shore and the Sierra Club to pony up $42,000 by early July to pay for the compilation by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency of a documentary record of the updating of the regional plan for the court case. Otherwise, the case will be thrown out of court. TRPA executive director Joanne Marchetta said, “The judge’s order today is a positive step in getting Lake Tahoe’s environment, communities and economy back on track.” But Laurel Ames of the Tahoe Area Sierra Club said such onerous financial requirements for public records defeat transparency. “We are disappointed in the decision because we think it does not promote transparent and good government,” she said. “But we are moving forward with this litigation because we know it is critical to the protection of the Lake.” The issue of the lawsuit has divided Sierra Club members.

Bee faults Nevada probe The Sacramento Bee, which broke the story of Nevada’s practice of busing mental patients out of state, has published an editorial calling subsequent investigations a whitewash. “Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and the agencies that should be overseeing mental health care are whitewashing Nevada’s practice of busing its mentally ill patients to all corners of the continental United States. … Not surprisingly, the consultants [hired by Nevada] last month praised the care provided by Rawson-Neal [Hospital] and said busing patients to their home states ‘is a kindness to them and to their families.’ ... One patient, Nicholas Caroleo, never made it to his destination. His whereabouts are unknown. But upon learning that Nevada bought him a bus ticket in February, his parents got a restraining order barring him from contacting them. ‘Nicholas has threatened to kill myself, my husband, himself and my grandchildren,’ his mother, Pat Caroleo, told the court in Maryland, where she lives. Asked whether he had access to a firearm, she answered, ‘I have no idea.’ ... The editorial continued, “Too many of us would prefer that severely mentally ill people simply go away. Treatment is hard for the sickest individuals. So we conclude they have the right to be ill, and avert our eyes rather than see them forage through dumpsters. Nevada’s use of Greyhound therapy was one step on that path of studied indifference. The federal agency that is supposed to oversee the use of federal money for the treatment of mentally ill people took more steps.”

Sage hen debated The Nevada Mineral Exploration Coalition, a group of small mining companies, has objected to a Bureau of Land Management environmental assessment (EA) of a proposed expansion of the Snowstorm Exploration Project near Midas. The EA touched on the impact on the sage hen, also called the sage grouse, once a common Nevada game bird. The Coalition wrote to the BLM in response to the EA, “Exploration is commonly a short term, low impact activity and our experience over many decades of working in areas inhabited by sage grouse has been that sage grouse can thrive near exploration projects, and that our exploration projects can operate within sage-grouse habitats without endangering the birds.” But John Hadder of Great Basin Resource Watch responded, “I think the Sage Grouse issue is revealing the ‘man behind the curtain.’ Explorations do have significant impacts to varying extents, of course. Areas that might be considered for special protection that have ‘wilderness characteristics’ would no longer be under consideration once exploration occurs. There needs to be public discussion of cumulative impacts from mineral exploration—and other extractive exploration—in the Great Basin.”

—Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

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Making policy Tribal governments meet in Reno, out of spotlight From Minnesota to Alaska, Native Americans traveled this week to Reno for a conference of the National Congress by of American Indians, believed to Dennis Myers be the oldest all-Native American organization in the nation. Meeting in a casino/hotel convention center, between 800 and 1,000 delegates assembled in workshops and conferences. The conference dealt with dozens of policy issues facing tribal governments around the nation, and participants made it clear they would cherrypick from the experiences of nontribal society rather than accepting anything whole.

“Mixing government with business ... will not work.” Joe Garcia national Congress of American indians At a time when Truckee Meadows governments are giving subsidies to big businesses like Scheels and Cabela’s, Reno Sparks Indian Colony chair Arlen Melendez urged his colleagues from across the nation to focus on aiding small businesses. “When we help those individuals—small-business owners … we’re really helping ourselves,” he told the gathering, calling such a policy a true “entrepreneurial spirit.”

After that speech to the conference, Melendez said the Reno Sparks Colony has one person working on economic development, and he is hoping to add a second person, and that they are expected to focus on small businesses. Melendez also told the conference that the Reno Sparks Colony has in the past carefully tracked “our unemployment rate compared to the rest of” the region and is about to run another such count. The last colony count found a 20 percent jobless rate, which suggests it is more accurate than state and federal government figures. There is a built-in distortion in state and federal calculations because as soon as a person’s jobless pay runs out, he or she falls off the unemployment radar and is no longer counted for the purpose of the publicly announced rate. There was considerable comment at the conference about dysfunctional institutions outside the tribal world, such as Congress and the health care industry, and the need for tribes to avoid their mistakes. Joe Garcia, former four-term president of the Congress, said that the cliché “Government should operate like a business” has led tribes into bad policies. “Mixing government with business—trying to use the same approach to government will not work,” he told the conference.

Garcia said later that there’s a difference between government’s obligation to serve the public and the business community’s mission to sell goods and services. “There are some things you can use [from the business community], but not blanket.” he said. “Like health care, for instance. … Data is there, but it’s how you use the data to make a difference. That’s the part of it that’s hard.” During a discussion of sustainability in fields like housing, and how to get the message out, Melendez said it had a lot to do with thinking ahead. He had learned early in life about the way resources can be used and re-used, and he learned it from the Vietnamese, and recently was given a reminder. He told of how, while serving in Vietnam, he purchased a photo album that has served him well for more than four decades. Recently the binding started to fray and in looking at it to try to repair it, he discovered that it was made in part from a U.S. military c-ration box. “[T]he Vietnamese were taking things and selling them back to us,” he joked. “We have to have this mindset that’s different than what we’ve had in the past, and I think tribal governments can help.”

Out of sight Surprisingly, the conference was virtually ignored by the news media, though it featured discussions of dozens of issues facing tribal governments like sustainable housing, tissue donations, tribal anti-terrorism measures, economic development, international trade, climate change, domestic violence, poverty, taxes, health care, trust lands, tribal sovereignty, gambling, cultural issues, food production and safety, and water. Story ideas, in other words, were hard to miss. Policymaking by tribal governments on issues like these has application—and thus news value—in Nevada, which contains 29 colonies and reservations. The 29 represent Washo, Shoshone, Paiute and Goshute tribes. One of them, in fact, was just a couple of miles from the site of the conference—the Reno Sparks Indian Colony. A conference delegate seated at the otherwise empty press table said he had seen no non-tribal reporters present during the first three days of the conference but believed that the


delegates themselves were getting the word out through social media. Garcia said he has found that journalism is quick to cover conflict in the tribal world, but not policymaking. “I’ll bet if there was a tribal leader that got into a quarrel outside and got into a fight, the media would be here in no time,” he said. Even national developments affecting Native Americans failed to attract news coverage of the conference. On June 25, the second day of the conference, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a ruling on a Native American child custody case. On June 26, the third day of the conference, President Obama created a new Council on Native American Affairs. Neither of those developments drew reporters to the conference.

“Wehavetohavethis mindsetthat’sdifferent.” Arlen Melendez reno sparks indian Colony Then, after three days of ignoring the tribal speakers and other participants at the conference, a speech by Interior Secretary Sally Jewell suddenly made news on the last day of the gathering. An Associated Press account of Jewell’s remarks, made to fewer than half the delegates who remained in town, was posted on news websites across the nation. In the end, the speech of a white speaker was the biggest news to come out of a Native American event. Ω

Photo/Dennis Myers

The NCAI conference in Reno drew nearly a thousand delegates from around the nation.

Summer school Photo/Dennis Myers

In front of the University of Nevada, Reno library, children get in place for a game on the lawn. They are participants in Kids’ University, a summer program that runs from June 17 to August 2. Information is available at www.KIDSU.unr.edu.

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Flower Power in the Black Rock Desert - High Rock Canyon The diverse habitats in the Black Rock Desert High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area (NCA) support hundreds of species of wildflowers. Many are attention-grabbing and dazzling, with large blossoms and stunning colors, while others reward only the most observant eyes. Generally, wildflowers are most abundant at lower elevations early in the season, and are abundant right now at higher elevations. Every spring, some part of the Black Rock Desert NCA puts on a colorful wildflower show. Generally, wildflowers emerge in April and continue blooming into August, but this varies with annual rainfall and elevation. This year, the rainfall has been good and flowers abound. One of the best places to view wildflowers is in the low sagebrush plant communities near Stevens Camp during late May and early June. There is always something blooming here, including brilliant yellow buckwheat, blue lupine and white bitterroot. Although not as dependable, in wet years the barren hills surrounding the Black Rock Desert Playa are awash in the vibrant colors of bee plant, Indian paintbrush, and yellow daisies. Visitors to the hot springs at Soldier Meadows should be on the lookout for basalt cinquefoil, a low-growing herb with bright yellow five-petalled flowers that grows in the moist, alkaline soil near hot springs. This is the only place in Nevada where the basalt cinquefoil is found, so take care enjoy their charm without damaging them or their habitat. From Reno: Take I-8- East to 447 North to Gerlach, take Highway 38 North and continue towards Vya. The scenery is majestic and the flora speaks poetic verse. Artists come to paint and photograph these vast scenic by-ways and it’s something not to be missed. Ensure your tires are in great shape and enjoy! Visit Friends of Black Rock High Rock’s Visitors Center: 320 Main St, Gerlach for maps and more information or call 775.557.2900

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Whether it’s raining in June or dry in December, Truckee Meadows Water Authority always values responsible water use. That’s why we encourage

Weather-Wise Watering.

AltaRock Energy co-founder Aaron Mandell spoke at the National Geothermal Summit.

Heating up Proper tree care begins with proper drip irrigation and Weather-Wise Watering to build a deep, strong root system.

2013 National Geothermal Summit The Geothermal Energy Association hosted the National Geothermal Summit with the Geothermal Resources Council and the University of California, Davis’ California Geothermal Energy Collaborative at the Grand Sierra Resort and Casino last Wednesday and Thursday. The event brought together industry professionals and leaders, policy makers, students and academics to speak and discuss, via panels and presentations, the state of geothermal energy in the U.S. Other topics included new technologies, how to value geothermal energy for power purchase agreements (PPAs), and what should be done for the future of geothermal energy. One of the more publicly controversial topics of the summit was Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). However, it was not a controversial matter to those speaking because they were speaking about current EGS projects they were involved in. The speakers were senior Calpine Corp. vice president Mike Rogers, AltaRock Energy co-founder Aaron Mandell, Energy and Geoscience Institute professor Joe Moore and state geologist Jim Faulds. EGS involve using a process that is essentially the same as the hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, process of the gas and oil industry to increase the permeability of hot dry rock in order to extract geothermal energy. Normally, geothermal energy cannot be extracted unless the naturally occurring heat, water and rock permeability allow for it, but EGS essentially create the conditions necessary by introducing the water via high pressure injections that cause seismic activity and fracture the rock, allowing for steam to rise up to the surface through the wells. Mandell explained that a chart within a report from MIT in 2006 is what sparked his attention in EGS and believes that the information behind it is why EGS is important. “MIT concluded that there is 28,000 times more potential EGS energy than we consume total, which is just a massive number,” Mandell said. “So I think that it’s a very important resource, and we can’t get to it unless we bring down the cost and develop technologies like EGS.” The consensus of those speaking at the presentations about EGS and the future of geothermal energy seemed to be that EGS is the future and that there just needs to be more funding for the development, testing and implementation of projects, such as AltaRock Energy’s Newberry project in Bend, Ore. Leah Sabbath, a geology major from the University of Rochester, spoke about what she thinks the geothermal industry needs to do in the future. Her answer revolved around using the knowledge and skills of students throughout the country to the advantage of the geothermal industry as a whole. As an example, she explained that a student intern or employee could map out areas to help find geothermal systems that do not have surface expressions, like geysers. These are called blind systems. “Grad student internships are really cheap for companies,” Sabbath said. “Oil and gas companies use grad students as interns and to do research … Geothermal really needs to be doing this to be finding their blind systems. A $6,000 summer salary for a grad student or intern is really nothing for a company. Research and technology to figure out how to decrease drilling costs is expensive. Geology students are not.” Ω

by

Sage Leehey sagel@ newsre view.c om

Visit geo-energy.org for more information.

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The ancient city suffers from some very

modern urban problems.

With more than 3,000 mosques in Istanbul, to visit. tourists aren’t going to run out of mosques

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Tear gas and smoke rose over Taksim Square as state-run media reported the peaceful removal of protesters.

Turkish flags are ubiquitous in Istanbul

.


Thi s s u M M e r ,

Chanelle Bessette and D. Brian Burghart traveled to Europe and Asia for foreign studies through the University of Nevada, Reno. In an attempt to avoid a couple of “What we did on our summer vacation” essays, they decided to create “10 Things You Should Know” lists.

10

Things You Should Know Before Traveling to Turkey

I have no doubt that I could write a book about my experiences in Turkey. Maybe at some later point, I’ll write about my adventures specifically. Suffice it to say that in two and a half weeks, I was able to scratch almost every cultural, recreational and academic itch I ever had about this pivot point between Europe and Asia, East and West, Islam and secularism/Christianity. 1. Turkey is a MusliM counTry, buT ThaT haT doesn’T Mean haT ean wha whaTT you Think. The Turkish government is secular, just as the U.S. government was secular under George W. Bush. We know, practically speaking, that Christianity is the dominant religion here. It’s analogous there. These stories about Muslim women not meeting a man’s eye or being defiled by an accidental touch are just baloney. In public situations, men and women stared unabashedly at me. Booze is anywhere you want it, but is most easily accessed in the commercial areas that surround the oldest mosques and other tourist areas. I highly recommend the touristy area behind the Blue Mosque for shopping and partying. I specifically recommend the Sultan Hostel, where one of the waiters, Sercan Sengel, was kind enough to give me a ride to the airport, and then refused to take a tip.

2. The bigges biggesT Thieves are The phone coMpanies. I was occasionally surprised by the honesty of the Turkish people. Once, one of our traveling companions forgot her wallet in a busy store. Several hours later, when she realized its loss, she called the store and walked the proprietor to the spot she left it. Although it was in plain view, it hadn’t been touched. I forgot my umbrella on a table outside for more than an hour during a downpour while we toured the Dolmabahçe Palace. It was there when I got back. On the other hand, I got ripped off twice by representatives of Turkcell. My advice on phones: Just set up a foreign data and phone plan before you leave. Yes, it seems more expensive, but the Turkish police require every local cell phone be registered, and if you don’t know this—and nobody tells you—they automatically shut down your locally purchased sim card after a week. It costs about 130 lira (about $70 U.S.D), to register, but many hoops must be jumped through.

3. The recenTT proTesT es s were boTh ubiquiTous and esT localized To TaksiM square. As students, we were required to stay away from the protests, and our professor was conscientious about this, but when we were on our own time, we headed OPINION

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straight to Taksim. I wasn’t there when the police made their periodic sweeps, and I never got gassed. You know what it felt like? It felt like any other big protest I’ve been too: the Occupy stuff, the anti-war demonstrations before Iraq, the pro-immigration marches. It’s hard to estimate the crowds, but one Saturday night, there were probably 30,000 or 40,000 people there. I never felt particularly unsafe. In fact, the opposite was probably true: When people found out we were Americans, they welcomed us and really wanted us to understand their points of view. We also saw spontaneous protests in support throughout the city and on the Bosphorus Strait.

4. burqas and headscarves are cloThing hing ssTyles, religious syMbols and syMbols of rebellion. I know that there are exceptions to this, but looking through Western eyes, we believe those over-dressed women only do it because the men in their lives force them. This was simply not the most common reason for it. I say they’re symbols of rebellion because since the founding of the country in 1923, they were banned from the public and government sectors. This would be analogous to forbidding American Christian women from wearing a cross—you can be sure they’d wear 10 crosses.

5. Tales of anTi-aM i- ericanisM i-aM are vas vasTly exaggera exaggeraTed. Even when we were drinking with the protesters and the communists in Taksim, nobody ever said anything negative about America. And make no mistake, America has often been the bad guy in this country, backing military coups, etc. No, at most they’d complain about imperialism or capitalism or NATO. I’m not saying anti-Americanism doesn’t exist here, but as soon as I said I was from Nevada—“Las Vegas”—they’d be all “Yeah! Las Vegas!” Nobody had ever heard of Reno.

6. The Turkish Media lies. In the U.S., we love to make media conspiracies, but it’s rare that major American media actually intentionally lies. Here, the problem is more likely to be that reporters and editors are stupid, uninformed or have no long-term memory. I remember one moment in Turkey when I was reading internet reports of a peaceful removal of protestors from Taksim Square at the exact moment we were witnessing columns of smoke and tear gas rising above that section of the city. Until the cops shut down my cell service, Twitter was the only uncensored media we could use to keep current with Taksim, but guess what? The protesters sometimes lied, too.

Not necessarily so in Turkey. To the contrary, most seemed to find the situation humorous and were forthright with their discussions.

8. woMen are noT TreaT rea ed equally. reaT This is a tough one. Men’s and women’s roles are differently defined in the Turkish culture, so it’s easy to apply an American cultural bias to the situation, but there’s no possibility of objectively calling the sexes “equal.” I occasionally saw women forced to defer to random male authority. In one example, a woman was refused access to a secular museum because the guard didn’t like how she was dressed. I also heard several reports of women getting groped or grabbed by men in crowded situations.

9. aTa aTaT aTurk! It’ll only take a visitor about 10 minutes to begin to wonder who this guy is who’s shown on all the statues and photographs and whose name resides on the airports, bridges and buildings. He’s Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. Atatürk means “Father of Turks,” a name that was given to the man by the Turkish parliament in 1934 while he was still alive. Simply put, it would be as though George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton were all rolled into one person. He was the top military and political leader during birth of Türkiye, as they spell it there, and he symbolizes the nationalist secular identity of the country. Any political argument is viewed through the lens of “What would Ataturk do?”

10. Take a class. I don’t know how practical this one is for everyone since most people travel with families or partners, but having daily writing deadlines, reading assignments, guided discussions and a knowledgeable guide imposed a certain discipline that made this one of the most fun, most informative vacations I’ve ever had. Dr. Berch Berberoglu is a sociology professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, and he leads classes to Istanbul twice a year. There’s just something about the quality of people you meet in this sort of quasi-academic situation that makes the experience so much better than traveling with your average American slack-jawed gawker. —D. Brian Burghart

7. MusliM people are incredibly genuine and friendly. Our professor kept his eyes peeled for opportunities to talk to strangers and to ask them questions that seemed somewhat invasive to some of us students. It took me awhile to realize that some of this feeling of intrusiveness was my own cultural bias. After all, if a group of nine foreigners stopped a typically dressed group of American college students and started asking them, “Why are your shorts so short?” or “Does your boyfriend or brother make you dress like that?” Americans would likely be offended. |

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Things You Should Know Before Traveling to Thailand

people—including Buddhist monks, who don’t use toilet paper—use like a bidet. I was extremely reluctant to succumb to the use of squatters, but once I let go, I found that it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be. I never stopped using my beloved paper products, however.

On a month-long study abroad trip to Chiang Mai, the cultural capital of northern Thailand, I was exposed to a fascinating and hospitable society that was at once familiar and entirely different from what I know in the Western United States. I enjoyed getting to know the people and experiencing a new set of social norms, cuisine and language. I have prepared this guide for Reno folks who are considering traveling to the Rose of the North, as Chiang Mai is sometimes called. It’s a destination for adventurers and urbanites alike, and the amenities provide something for everyone. 1. The exchange raTe is preTTy much The greaTesT Thing ever. At the current rate of 30 baht per $1 USD, traveling to Thailand makes a dollar stretch farther than it would in most other vacation spots. Over a period of three and a half weeks, I was able to go out to eat every meal, travel around northern Thailand, buy quality souvenirs for my friends and family, and do some great personal shopping all for a little more than $500. The most expensive part of the trip was the round-trip airplane ticket, which ran around $1,500. Several of my friends on my trip also spent a few days on the beaches of Phuket in southern Thailand, and their round-trip ticket cost around $150 for travel with very reasonable hotel lodging.

2. The ToileT siTuaTion is … differenT. For me, the trickiest part of traveling to Asia was dealing with non-Western toilets. For the uninitiated, Asian style toilets are also known as “squatters,” where instead of sitting, one squats over a porcelain hole in the floor and scoops water, which is supplied in a bucket in the corner of the stall, to flush the toilet. Toilet paper is often not supplied, and even if it is, most places will request that it be deposited in the trash can, not the squatter itself. Another interesting feature is the oft-supplied water hose, which many Thai OPINION

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emple hist t . d d u ai aB ior of of Chiang M r e t x The e “Old City” in the

This panda lives at the Chiang Mai zoo and is a favorite for tourists.

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3. you should underpack. Remember that awesome exchange rate I talked about? Well, you definitely get more bang for your buck because everything is very inexpensive. Articles of clothing can be purchased for a few dollars, and familiar brands of hair and skin products are available in local shops. In addition, many pharmacies carry very cheap over-the-counter drugs, some of which require prescriptions in the states. For part of my trip to Thailand, I went camping in the mountainous northern region and decided I would rather be safe than sorry when worrying about illness, and I found a 35-day supply of malaria pills for less than $7 at a drugstore.

4. if you’re looking To geT some medical or cosmeTic work done, save iT for your Trip. Medical tourism is a huge industry in Thailand. Many college-aged girls—I was told around 70 percent—invest in nose jobs to install nose bridges, and one girl at Chiang Mai University told me that it only costs around $300. In addition, aesthetic surgery offices exist around every corner, even in malls, to supply botox treatments and liposuctions. Hospital and dental treatments are also inexpensive and are a fraction of the cost compared to American hospitals.

5. adjusT your expecTaTions (or Try To avoid Them enTirely). As is true when visiting any foreign country, it’s important to keep in mind that things will not be everything that you’re used to. There’s a phrase that market vendors like to use in Thailand to describe their products, “Same same but different,” when compared to U.S. items. I find that the easiest way to prevent culture shock is to maintain zero expectations about what a place will be like. That way, there won’t be too many surprises, and I can enjoy the experience more for what it is instead of what I think it will be. For example, I had to adjust my beliefs about sanitation, not only with the squatting toilet situation, but also with how food is prepared and doesn’t contain the same kinds of pesticides and GMOs that American food does.

6. don’T criTicize The royal family, ever. One major difference that I was completely unused to was the complete deferment to royal leadership. Criticism and disrespect of the king can be punishable by 3-6 years in prison in Thailand, although the king will often just forgive and deport an offending international visitor. Currency bills are always treated very well because they bear the king’s image, and many places of business display portraits of the royal family on their walls. In addition, a standing ovation

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Traditional Thai da perform at Kantok ncers e Palace.

is given for the king at the start of every movie shown in a theater. The Thai people love their king, although that love seems somewhat mandated.

7. if you’re looking To drink someThing ThaT’s good qualiTy, drink liquor. Although Singha and Chang are very popular beers in Thailand, they taste a lot like Coors, and I instantly began to pine for the craft beers of my homeland. In addition, good wine can be difficult to find, given the scant selection of wineries in the region. Well-mixed cocktails, however, are abundant, and the fruit juice mixes are often fresh.

8. pracTice your smiling. Thailand is called the Land of 1,000 Smiles, and for good reason. It took me awhile to get used to smiling at random strangers since in the U.S. doing so can invite unwanted attention. But in Thailand, smiling is the easiest way to cross cultural barriers and show an appreciation for the hospitality that seems to be ingrained in Thai culture.

9. learn some Thai phrases, buT don’T sTress. I was pleasantly surprised to discover how many people spoke English in Chiang Mai, and not only college students, but also many people in the service industry. I learned a handful of phrases, but they carried me far in building a rapport with the Thai people with whom I interacted. For example, simply by asking, “Lot day may kha?” (“Can you go lower?”) gave me a huge advantage in bargaining with street vendors and saved me quite a lot of baht. Of course, saying “Sa-wa-dii kha” and “Khap khun kha,” which mean “hello” and “thank you,” respectively, helped a lot as well. One of my favorite phrases that I learned in Thailand was “mai pen rai,” which means, “don’t worry, it’s OK.” It’s a versatile phrase that can be used in a variety of circumstances. You missed your train? “Mai pen rai.” A street vendor is charging too much and you want to walk away? “Mai pen rai.” You’re trying to keep your friend calm while you both get extremely ticklish fish pedicures? “Mai pen rai.”

10. asia is going To rule The world. After my visit to Thailand, I have no doubt in my mind that Asia will be—or perhaps already is—the world’s next ruler. The amount of hard work, industry and dedication to language learning that I saw from the college students I interacted with and the implementation of globalized business practices were astounding. The economic and political unification of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is kicking the area into hyperdrive to expand economic growth and infrastructure, and it will definitely be an area to look for in the news over the next few years. You can catch the growth in action by scheduling your trip to Thailand tout de suite. —Chanelle Bessette |

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C

ing i ve ga m t i t e p om

BY ASHLEY HENNEFER

e —of th

t e va r i e m a g o vide

eno up in R s r e w y—po

Electronic sports—also known as eSport, professional gaming and competitive gaming—is considered by many to be a misnomer. Video games have long had a reputation of being the hobby of choice for the nerdy, the lazy and the socially inept, and while this reputation is changing rapidly with the diversification of the industry, eSports still carry a stigma. How does sitting at a computer and clicking on a mouse constitute a sport, which, by nature, refers to more physical activities? For more information, visit www.glgreno.com.

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But competitive gaming is much like any other competitive sport. It requires specialized gear and hours of practice. The best of the best play professionally and receive sponsorships from major companies around the world. Spectators can watch in person or online. In certain competitions, it can be quite athletic. (Try playing Dance Dance Revolution. It’s a pretty hardcore workout.) There are different leagues—most notably the Pro Gaming League and Major League Gaming, the logo of which looks nearly identical to the Major League Baseball logo, swapping a baseball player for a console controller. There’s also the Electronic Sports World Cup held in France. Gaming competitively began in 1980 with the Space Invaders Tournament. This event is largely regarded as a crucial event in the history of video games, showing the public that there was interest in the—at the time—niche activity. More than 10,000 people attended the tournament. The culture and gameplay of arcade games facilitated a naturally competitive environment, which then shifted when gaming on personal computers and consoles became the norm in the 1990s. Around this time, LAN (local area network) parties

became popular—gamers would transport their computers to their friends’ houses and play collaboratively. Now that internet connections are reliable and most average computers can run fairly intensive games, many players choose to play online with people from around the world. Generally, participants compete either on their own or with a team. Games are played on computers and consoles, and run the gamut of genres, from real-time strategy (RTS), firstperson shooters (FPS) and fighting games, as well as dance games. Competitive gaming has a huge following in other countries, especially South Korea. Reality show World Cyber Games Ultimate Gamer aired on the SyFy Channel a few years ago and brought eSport to the mainstream. Rather than spending the time and money trying to go pro, many avid gamers find a middle ground, playing on amateur leagues within smaller communities. This allows them to use the equipment they can afford. The cost of competitive gaming is high—gaming company IGN spent more than $1 million on its annual IPL 5 (IGN ProLeague competition) held in 2012. 10,000 people attended the event. But IGN was forced to cancel their IPL 6 event in March because the event was a money sink. The IPL 5 tournament was held in Las Vegas, and while Southern Nevada is no stranger to the culture of competitive gaming, it’s taken longer to make a mark here—until now.

Power on There are conflicting views on whether or not the sport is in its prime, now that gaming technology continues to thrive. But others say that the future of competitive and collaborative


Achievement unlocked GLG’s first tournament is the Power-Up Event, which will be held on July 20 at John Ascuaga’s Nugget. Putting on a pro-grade tournament is resource-intensive, says Allan. He and Montoya plan to put on two tournaments a year. “It’s really important that the settings are fair for everyone,” he says, referring to the need for pro-grade computers, controllers, headsets and more. Power-Up will

Photo/Allison Young

Gamers Joe Montoya and Tyler Davis present a Green Light Gaming banner.

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have 12 computers and 16 Xbox 360s. Gamers will compete in League of Legends, Starcraft II, Call of Duty Black Ops II and Halo 4. Eventually, they plan to add more games. There’s a $5,000 prize pool, to be split among the first, second and third place winners. The event is structured as a single elimination bracket using the best game of three. Players have to bring most of their own equipment, although some items will be available to loan. GLG is collaborating with We Got Gamez, an organization that helps sponsor tournaments by providing equipment with its “mobile gaming center”—a truck packed full of gaming gear that travels to tournaments in Sacramento, Roseville, Reno and Folsom. We Got Gamez is based out of Sacramento. To participate in the tournament, gamers will pay a small entrance fee. Allan and Montoya will then verify the stats of each player and team by checking their online ratings. They’re looking for the best players, but don’t plan on excluding people. “We have to work with the skill levels of people available in this region,” Montoya says. They hope that having regular tournaments will raise the standards of participating gamers by giving them incentive to practice. Several scrimmages are being planned to give participants practice time before the tournament. “We want a standard system where people can compete,” says Allan. “People can play and hone in on particular skills.” Montoya and Allan eventually plan to expand Green Light Gaming into storefronts—setting up internet cafes where gamers can practice and train on pro equipment. As part of Reno’s larger technological scene, they’re hoping to also generate a few jobs. “Reno was a gambling and a tourist community,” he says. “People are already here with that competitive mentality.” Ω

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gaming is heading in a different direction, especially with better gaming on mobile devices. Local gamers Matt Allan and Joseph Montoya think that competitive gaming is just getting started. They’re the founders of Green Light Gaming (GLG), an organization that seeks to foster active competitive gaming culture in Northern Nevada. After attending a small tournament in February, they decided that Reno could benefit from a more professional league that would adhere to the global standards. “We just had a different idea of what it should look like here,” says Allan. “We saw that there was a need for an official organization dedicated only to running a video game tournament.” Allan and Montoya started gaming competitively a few years ago after playing games casually for many years. Allan discovered the sport through amateur gaming events. “I didn’t even know that video gaming had become a sport.” While Reno has an active gaming culture (“Game on,” Nov. 24, 2011), showcased at last month’s inaugural Game Expo, it’s mostly comprised of individuals or small groups gaming on their own time. Both Truckee Meadows Community College and the University of Nevada, Reno have gaming clubs, including Nevada eSport, which hosts tournaments on the UNR campus.

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Fire season

Greeter Alon Barr puts sticks of wood inside the “Burning Girl.�

Burning Girl This 4th of July weekend, hundreds will dance, look at art, clean up after themselves, be by tolerant, possibly partake in mind-altering Ky Plaskon substances, and engage in other tenets of Burning Man. But this event is Burning Girl, and in contrast to Burning Man’s young, nearly naked bodies writhing to electronic beats on the barren dry Black Rock Desert playa, Burning Girl is happening in an oasis, it is family-friendly and it’s free: “Uh, yeah, it’s a gift to the community,� says Rod Coleman, one of For more the coordinators for the party on 120 acres information, visit of private land in Yerington. burninggirl.myevent. This is the party’s sixth year, but this com. time the owners of the land have reached out for a little more Burner power. Coleman says the owners contacted him: “They said, ‘You might want a break in the middle of the burn season, and so we would like to invite some Burners out and have some Burner art,� Coleman said. The event website, burninggirl. myevent.com, shows there will be art cars

and bands. Water is provided, as well as showers, RV hook-ups, theme camps, volleyball, old-time movie-making sets, massages, a swing set and hiking trails. A video on the site shows a Nevada-centric feel from floating on a river to small groups listening to jazz and folksy music. Burning Girl has a lot at its disposal because so many Burning Man volunteers, artists and employees live in Reno. Many of the organizing characteristics are the same as the older event, like the groups of volunteers that operate the entrance and the theme camps. This is the latest of many Burner parties that have sprung up world-wide. They range from events in Africa, Spain and Texas that draw thousands, to small house parties throughout the United States. In the Northern Nevada area, they include Reno’s organized Decompression and Compression events to Susanville’s Permaburn and a number of private parties in Minden thoughout the year. While it is easy to attribute the infectious spread of Burning Man to its artistic

spectacle, organizers say what is really spreading is something less tangible: Attitude. “Look at modern society, there are pluses and minuses,� Coleman says. “And when you look at Burning Man a lot of those minuses drop away. There is a lot more tolerance for people’s expression.� Expression, tolerance and de-commodification are part of that attitude. “It is the opposite of a gated community. That is to define the demographic and what color you paint the door. We paint the door any color. It is kind of a reaction to the gated community.�

The popularity of “inclusion� can not be understated. Word of mouth about these parties spreads quickly and that leads to events taking on a life of their own, and, in some cases, dying. “At this point there is no next year,� Coleman says. “We are not trained to promote this thing.� The absence of promotion also leads to a perception that these events are secret or exclusive because many people don’t learn about them until after the fact. Registration for Burning Girl is already closed. They’ve reached the 500-person limit. Many question why there are limits on events that are based on inclusion. “That is a matter of not wanting the thing to grow too rapidly, and there are neighbors, and we are trying to respect that,� Coleman said, adding that there are organization and infrastructure questions that are essential to the longevity of an event. “That is what happened with Woodstock, and it just got totally out of control.� Ί

                        

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1862 Restaurant executive chef Richard LaCounte presents a sampling of his foods and wines.

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LaCounte got his start locally in the culinary program at the Glenn Hare Occupational Center when it was attached to Reno High School. He went on to complete a degree at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) at Hyde Park, New York, and has been cooking in kitchens from Vail, Colo., to the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas and a stint at Charlie Palmer’s. After 13 years of honing his craft, the 1862 was his next challenge. The menu ($26-$42 for entrées complete with starch and vegetable) is stunning and seemingly over the top for an eatery in the middle of a field south of Genoa, but LaCounte is determined. The appetizers ($7-$22) are extremely creative. I had the seared foie gras on a caramelized onion tart with pepper roasted strawberries ($22). The creamy duck liver combined with the treatment of the onions and strawberries and a touch of goat cheese was a flavor explosion of salty and tangy. Chef insisted I try the fried rattlesnake arancini with a spiced red cabbage slaw and charred poblano coulis ($14). These were breaded, fried croquettes with rattlesnake meat, a white risotto, a little mozzarella in a puree of poblano pepper. This Sicilian

recipe went from crunchy to creamy with texture from the risotto and slight heat from the pureed peppers—an original, unusual starter and a worthwhile adventure. Next were two of the biggest lamb chops ($34) I’ve seen in a while—7 to 8 ounces each, with German-style potatoes and grilled asparagus— straightforward, well presented with all the flavors expected. A seared duck breast ($30) served over wild rice pilaf, cherry orange chutney and baby bok choy. A generous portion of sliced breast atop the nutty pilaf married in my mouth with the tart-sweet chutney to cause flavor to flow through the palate. And not to leave out the beef, I had a grilled 8-ounce Buffalo Filet ($42) with wilted spinach, potato croquette, truffled celery root slaw and cherry balsamic jus. A very lean meat complemented by a myriad of flavors and textures. Pine nuts put a crunch to the simply sautéed spinach with the slaw’s elegant truffle richness and the jus added a slight, bright tart taste to the meat. The wine list is a Wine Spectator award winner, and Sommelier Troy Denkler manages a very sophisticated cellar with the likes of Petrus and Romanée-Conti. The by-the-glass list is very nice ($6-$30), and there are half bottles also. With the array of foods, I chose a glass of Guigal white from the Rhone Valley ($10). Yellow gold, clear and brilliant with a nose marked by the distinctive aromas of white flowers, apricot, acacia and white peach. On the palate, it was fruity with plenty of richness and body. Red was also called for, so I had a Steltzner Claret ($10). Full fruit balanced with dark toasted oak/vanilla nose. It’s a classic Bordeaux blend with just enough merlot and Cabernet Franc to give the underlying Cabernet Sauvignon finesse and grace. Dark berry fruits on the palate with hints of cedar box on the finish. They have desserts ($7-$8) including table-side bananas foster and cherries jubilee ($9 per), but I couldn’t. The restaurant seats 100 in a lovely, rustic atmosphere, with a very accommodating staff. The lunch menu is exciting, with several burgers made from fresh game meat. This is a place where culinary passions live. Ω


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6/28/13 5:54 PM


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Buddy heat

F O T S E B

N R E H T R NO

A D A V E N

The Heat Sandra Bullock might be top billed, but Melissa McCarthy would be the reason folks should shell out this summer for The Heat. McCarthy, reuniting with her Bridesmaids director Paul Feig, gets more laughs in her first 10 minutes on screen in this picture than the Wolf Pack got in the entire running time of The Hangover Part III. As Mullins, one of those Boston police by detectives that can only exist at the movies, McCarthy reminds viewers that she’s one Bob Grimm of the best comic actresses in movies today. b g ri m m @ When she’s on a roll, anything she says ne w s re v i e w . c o m is funny, especially when that anything is tagged with a creative array of obscenities. Not since Eddie Murphy was in his heyday has a performer spun an abundance of vulgarity so eloquently. She is the goddess of four-letter words.

3

2 0 1 3 O N S TA N D S 8 . 8 . 1 3

DO YOU HAVE THE ? N O I S I V

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Which one’s the lethal weapon?

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 excellent

Bullock complements her well as the straight-laced Ashburn, an FBI agent in Boston to take out a notorious drug lord, and hopefully score herself a big promotion in the process. This is the type of role Bullock has played before, most notably in Miss Congeniality. This time, she isn’t hamstrung by a PG-13 rating and family-friendly themes. She’s trading verbal punches with McCarthy, and she’s up for the task. Mullins and Ashburn find their mismatched selves teamed up, of course, in cop-buddy movie genre style. They hate each other at first, but they will learn to respect and work well with each other as they take out the bad guys. En route to doing so they will, of course, have a drinking sequence where they bond and dance, and they will each learn a little something about themselves and the other that will make them better people.

Yes, The Heat is contrived and feels a little bit like a lot of other movies. But the combo of Bullock and McCarthy is such a winning one, you will forgive its sporadic lack of originality and occasionally slow parts. When the film is firing on all cylinders, it has genuine laughout-loud moments. I love that one of the DEA agents is an albino (Dan Beakkedahl)—an albino with a bad temper who Mullins suspects could be dirty just because he’s an albino (shades of Gary Busey in Lethal Weapon). It’s also great to see Tom Wilson (Biff from Back to the Future) as a frustrated police chief prematurely aged due to Mullins and her breaking-the-rules crap. And, I swear, when a villain called Mullins “a Campbell’s Soup Kid who grew up and turned alcoholic,” I probably laughed harder than I have at any movie this year. I expect McCarthy to be funny, and she often is. I didn’t like her in this year’s Identity Thief, but that was a poorly written vehicle whose failure wasn’t necessarily her fault. Bullock, on the other hand, has never struck me as remarkably funny in her comedic efforts (although she has gotten a few giggles out of me on awards shows). The Heat proves that she might just be most at home in an R-rated comedy with somebody funnier than her holding her up. The Heat might be the very first pure female cop-buddy picture. If there’s another one, it probably wasn’t that good because I can’t remember it, so it’s not worth noting. This one, though plenty of clicks short of a classic, does stand proud among stuff like 48 Hrs., Lethal Weapon and the Ferrel/Wahlberg laugher The Other Guys. While Feig couldn’t talk Kristen Wiig into making a Bridesmaids sequel, I’m thinking he will have better luck getting McCarthy and Bullock on board for more with these characters. Bullock hasn’t had something this good in a long while—I think The Blind Side is overrated—and McCarthy will be game, for sure. So, if you are looking for laughs right now, this one or Seth Rogen’s This Is the End will do the trick. Don’t allow The Hangover Part III in your face, though. That thing will cause you immeasurable damage. Ω


3

The Bling Ring

Based on a true series of robberies where some Southern California teens robbed the likes of Paris Hilton and Lindsay Lohan, Sofia Coppola’s fifth directorial effort is a biting satire featuring fun work from Emma Watson in a performance reminiscent of Nicole Kidman in To Die For. The ensemble, including Katie Chang, Israel Broussard and Taissa Farmiga, do a good job of portraying vacuous teens obsessed with celebrities and what those celebrities are wearing. When they find out a star is out of town, they go to their house and basically go shopping. At one point, they go to Paris Hilton’s, shot on location at Hilton’s real house. In typical Coppola style, the film looks great and boasts a terrific soundtrack. It’s a return to form for the director after the sleepy misfire Somewhere.

2

Fast & Furious 6

1

The Internship

When I heard Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson would be reuniting for a film after their blessed Wedding Crashers, I got justifiably excited. I like when Vaughn is in profane mode, and he made Wilson tolerable in their first go round. However, what we get here is just a terrible two-hour commercial for Google that dumbs down and sanitizes the duo. They play a couple of salesmen who lose their gigs when watches become obsolete. For reasons that are never really explained, the Vaughn character hones in on Google during his job search and convinces the Wilson character to compete with him in an intern contest, with the winners getting jobs with the hallowed Google. Vaughn, who co-wrote the screenplay, allegedly worked closely with Google when creating the film so, needless to say, there aren’t a lot of profanities and nude shots in this flick. Instead we get family-friendly Vaughn and Wilson, with the results being boring, unfunny and embarrassing.

2

Man of Steel

Director Zack Snyder and co-producer Christopher Nolan reboot Superman, and the result is a little disappointing. Henry Cavill puts on the tights—minus the red underwear—and does little else, giving us the dullest Superman to date. The whole endeavor is an effort to take Superman to darker Batman-like territories, and that’s a big mistake. Superman can be in a dark flick, but he must rise above the darkness, not whine about his mom all of the time. There’s a lot of whiz-bang in this film, and some of it is impressive, but lots of it is just noise and things smacking into one another. Michael Shannon provides a terrific villain in Zod, while Russell Crowe and Kevin Costner do well as Superman’s two dads. I just couldn’t get into the depiction of Superman as a joyless, humorless stud. As for Amy Adams as Lois Lane, she isn’t given much of anything to do. This is going to make tons of money, and Snyder is lined up for a sequel already. I hope he gets it right the next time.

3

Much Ado About Nothing

The Bard gets a stripped-down treatment from one of the most unlikely of candidates: Joss Whedon, recent maker of massively expensive geek extravaganzas. The man who gave us The Avengers got his buddies together at his house to shoot a rather reputable and very pleasant black-and-white take on Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, just to show us that things don’t have to explode all of the time in his cinematic forays. The result is intimate, funny and even unique for a play that’s been adapted many times. The film was shot in less than two weeks, an extension of parties Whedon hosted with friends and colleagues that

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Now You See Me

For those of you hankering for another magician movie after The Incredible Burt Wonderstone … here it is! A Vegas magician act called the Four Horseman (Jesse Eisenberg, Isla Fisher, Woody Harrelson and Dave Franco) concludes their show by seemingly robbing a bank in France through teleportation. An FBI agent (Mark Ruffalo) and an Interpol detective (Melanie Laurent) investigate, and we snore. Morgan Freeman is on hand as a man who makes a living debunking magic, as is Michael Caine as a millionaire bankrolling the Horseman. It all amounts to nonsense, with a lot of swirling cameras and stupid fights involving playing cards and paper cuts. The big reveals are silly, and much of what happens on the magic side is never explained. Eisenberg delivers one of the year’s more annoying performances.

financing.

4

This Is the End

Seth Rogen and writing partner Evan Goldberg make a strong directorial debut with this crazed stoner comedy in which Rogen and a bunch of his pals play themselves as the world faces the biblical apocalypse. When Jay Baruchel comes to LA to hang with Rogen, he finds himself reluctantly attending a party at James Franco’s new house. The Rapture happens, the ground opens up, and a bunch of celebrities go to Hell, leaving Rogen, Franco, Baruchel, Craig Robinson, Jonah Hill and Danny McBride to fight for the leftover Milky Way candy bar. All of the participants are in top form, with the laughs never slowing down. The movie is also a pretty good horror film in its own right, with lots of gore for those of you who like that sort of thing. Among the oddities are Michael Cera as a coke-snorting pervert, Hill getting possessed after a romantic evening with Satan, and Danny McBride eating people. The film is as crazy as anything to come out of mainstream Hollywood in a long time, and a welcomed return to form for Rogen and Franco.

1

White House Down

Director Roland Emmerich has made watchable, fun trash before (Independence Day, The Day After Tomorrow, 2012). He’s the new Irwin Allen (producer of The Towering Inferno), and I often get a kick out of his silly disaster movies. This one, starring Channing Tatum as a lawman who happens to be touring the White House when terrorists take over, is a complete bust. It’s too stupid to be fun, and it doesn’t offer enough cool special effects devastation to offset the moronic storytelling. (The capitol getting destroyed is the only memorable moment of carnage.) Jamie Foxx plays the President, an Obama clone, taken hostage in a homeland terrorist scheme that’s beyond impossible. Throw in a precocious daughter (Joey King) and James Woods doing his James Woods routine and you have a movie full to the brim with useless clichés. Tatum, so much fun in 21 Jump Street, is left stranded in a movie that couldn’t be dumber if it tried, and Emmerich has given us one of the summer’s worst movies and likely biggest bombs.

2

World War Z

With this, we get two-thirds of a decent movie. The movie has a helluva start, and an even better middle, making it seem like it’s going to deliver the big summer goods. Then, in its final act, it totally craps out. Too bad, because I was looking to Brad Pitt’s zombie movie as relief from the mediocre big budget blockbusters we’ve gotten this summer (with the blessed exceptions of Iron Man 3 and Star Trek Into Darkness). The much troubled production shows every one of its scars, especially in its bungled, positively ridiculous finale. The opening sequence in Philadelphia is a winner, and the zombies attacking Israel and going nuts on an airplane score good thrills. The movie doesn’t know where it’s going in the end, and it just sort of putters out. Pitt gives it his best, but the movie seems afraid of itself. A zombie movie with no blood and no ending does not a good blockbuster make.

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This franchise could’ve ended about five films ago, and I would’ve been fine with that. Vin Diesel mumbles his way through another fast car movie, this one with some admittedly fine driving stunts. The plot involves some nonsense about Vin and his crew (including Paul Walker) going after some other bad guy driver who’s threatening the world. He also has Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) working for him, even though she blew up in a prior movie. Dwayne Johnson is in there, too, as a badass lawman, and future installments will involve another one of my least favorite action stars if the postcredit footage is any indicator. I like to watch good pyrotechnics, but I hate it when just about everybody in these films opens their mouths. It looks like these movies will never end, and Michelle Rodriguez will never die.

0.9%

featured Shakespeare readings. Consequently, it has the look of a quaint dinner party, with women in sundresses and men in tailored suits. It’s a breezy experiment that works for most of its running time. Having impressed Whedon at one of his shindigs, Amy Acker and Alexis Denisof are awarded the plum parts of Beatrice and Benedick, the reluctant lovers who fall for each other in the most whimsical of ways.

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THE WAKE-UP CALL: 9–10AM WEEKDAYS The Wake Up Call is Northern Nevada’s ONLY alternative morning variety show! Broadcasting live every week day morning from 9-10am, join hosts, Dave Preston, Natalie Jones, Ken McKim, Brandi Dequin, Oscar Ovies, Candy Campbell & DJ Bobby G for the most entertaining start to the morning you will find online!

LIVE FROM THE POLO LOUNGE: 1:30–2:30PM WEDNESDAYS Two Franks, a Tony and a Dean. Where else but Live at the Polo Lounge could you see and hear the greatest from the golden age of entertainment. Frank Perez, the Polo’s master of the house, hosts this magical hour every Wednesday from 1:30 - 2:30 Pacific time. Tune in to hear and make great memories.

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Think Free 24

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Bare bones Infecto Skeletons

by

Brad Bynum b radb@ news review.c om

high energy punk very reminiscent of old-school ’80s-style stuff. It’s not a surprise that one of their most well received gigs was opening for Suicidal Tendencies at Reno’s Knitting Factory. The tempos are fast, the instruments are loud, and the vocals are snotty, raspy and guttural. But there’s also an accessible melodic core—this is friendly music that doesn’t require a refined ear to enjoy. It’s made for drunken sing-alongs. The band members acknowledge that they draw heavily from the hardcore and punk rock that they grew up listening to in the ’80s and ’90s. “It’s driving, and has a good tempo,” says Minyard of that music’s enduring appeal. “It’s raw,” says Read. “It’s real people playing something. Not just somebody fucking around on a computer. There’s also an innocence in that older music. … They didn’t necessarily know how to play, but they made music from what they had.” For Read and the other members of Infecto Skeletons, punk rock’s working class roots are important. It’s not music made by highly trained professionals. Instead, it’s music made by average guys, having fun and

Infecto Skeletons rock out in their practice space: From left, Rashidul Kader, Justin Minyard, Andrew Hockenberry and Myke Read.

For more information, including upcoming shows, visit www. facebook.com/infect yourskeletons

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getting inspired. “Now they have books on ‘how to play punk rock guitar,’ which is just crazy to me,” says Read. Though older—the members are all of legal drinking age, and Minyard and Read are both in their 30s—the band members also say they like the youthful aspects of the music. Read’s background is playing in metal bands, which he says was more technically demanding but also less fun to play. “It’s so contrived and so stuck,” he says. “Everything has to be perfect.” Infecto Skeletons’ brand of fast-loud-rules punk rock is much looser. It’s more about conveying energy and attitude than technical perfection of performance. “We’re all over the place,” says Minyard. “We all run around.” He gestures toward Hockenberry. “If he could run around, he would.” “The next thing I want is a drum set on wheels,” says Hockenberry. The band name evolved from the word “exoskeletons.” The members wanted something with the word “skeleton” in it—because “everybody likes skeletons.” The “infecto” part, according to Minyard, refers to the band’s aim for their “music to infect your body.” “I just want to go fast,” says Hockenberry. Lyrically, Minyard keeps it mostly light and funny, with a few political songs thrown in for good measure. There are many Reno references, including an ode to the Cal Neva casino in downtown. “Rubber Girl” is a song about a sex doll. “Hangman’s Noose” is almost a Johnny Cash-style country murder ballad, with a bit of pirate punk flavor. “What We Become,” the band’s usual set closer, is also the group’s self-described “theme song,” the chorus of which is “This is why we become/Infecto Skeletons.” Unlike most of the band’s tunes, it features some epic guitar solos—Read flexing the chops he honed playing metal. During live performances, the song builds up to a dramatic pause. The band members then wait for somebody in the crowd to hoot, holler or scream. Then, they kick right back into it. Ω

“We try to keep some of the rock in punk rock,” says guitar player Myke Read of Reno band Infecto Skeletons. The four-piece band also includes lead vocalist Justin Minyard, bassist Rashidul Kader and drummer Andrew Hockenberry. Read and Kader also contribute backing vocals. The members describe the group’s sound as “thrashing punk rock”: high speed,

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THURSDAY 7/4 1UP

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Groove Oasis, 9:30pm, no cover

Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds July 4, 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Gemini Syndrome w/guest, 9:30pm, no cover

BAR-M-BAR

Music Trivia w/Chris Payne, 8:30pm, W, no cover Burning Dance Night, 8pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Night, 7:30pm, no cover

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT

Pyle of Zen, 6pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Duo Tones, 9pm, no cover

Suspect Zero, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Hellbilly Wally Invitational Jam, 9pm, M, open mic, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

JAVA JUNGLE

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover Mile High Jazz Band, 8pm, Tu, $5

Rick Hammond Blues Band, 6pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, Colin Ross, 6:30pm, W, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Community Drum Circle, 5:30pm, no cover

Concert Under the Stars with War, Notch 8, 6pm, Tu, $40, $60

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

COMMA COFFEE

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Kivi Roger, Frances Dilorinzo, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; John Caponera, Carrie Snow, W, 9pm, $25

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

CAFE AT ADELE’S

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Andrew Kennedy, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Max Dolcelli, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/8-7/10 Open Deck Wednesday, 8pm, W, no cover

Doom Trooper, Half A Tusk, Boneshaker, End of the Line, 8pm, no cover

1112 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 882-3353

Comedy

SUNDAY 7/7

Cat Party, Spitting Image, Plastic Caves, 9pm, $5

1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 323-1877 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

SATURDAY 7/6 Select Saturday, 10pm, no cover

40 MILE SALOON THE ALLEY

FRIDAY 7/5

Collective Thursdays, 8pm, no cover

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Colorless Blue, 1pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

HAPPY

HOUR

4PM–8PM DAILY • $2.50 DOMESTIC BEER • $3.50 WELL DRINKS • LARGEST LIQUOR SELECTION IN TOWN • BEER PONG ALL DAY • VIDEO POKER / POOL • DANCE POLE

LADIES NIGHT

SUN 9PM–11PM / WED 1AM–3AM • $10 WRISTBAND • ALL WELL DRINKS OR MILLER DRAFT

KARAOKE NIGHTLY

9PM–CLOSE

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. SECOND ST 324–4255 10

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THURSDAY 7/4

FRIDAY 7/5

SATURDAY 7/6

SUNDAY 7/7

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/8-7/10

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

THE POINT

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

PONDEROSA SALOON 106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka, 9pm, no cover

Gemini w/Johnny Lipka, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Live music, 8pm, no cover

RED ROCK BAR

Comedy Night hosted by Brandon Lara, 9:30pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Siren Society, 11pm, $5-$10, no cover w/local ID

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

SHEA’S TAVERN

Buster Blue

Bobby G, 8pm, W, no cover

July 5, 7 p.m. Walden’s Coffeehouse 3940 Mayberry Drive 787-3307

Open mic hosted by Frankie Ferreira and Brian Depew, 7:30pm, M, no cover

Rise Culture Saturday, 10pm, $5-$10, free for women until midnight Bobby Nobbit, Creative Adult, Neighborhood Brats, 9pm, $7

715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR 310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

VASSAR LOUNGE 1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Reverend Rory Dowd, Todd Ballowe, Josiah Knight, 9pm, no cover

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

BRAP presents Livewire!, 9pm, $2

Reno Core Project: Burn, Baby, Burn, 9pm, $10 donation

Friday Night Blues, 8pm, no cover

Rock’N J Entertainment, 8pm, no cover

Ten Speed Music, Buster Blue, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

WILD RIVER GRILLE

July 9, 6 p.m. Cafe at Adele’s 1112 N. Carson St. Carson City 882-3353

Open mic, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Sunday jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

War

Eric Andersen, 7pm, M, Tu, no cover

OPENS FRIDAY at BRÜKA THEATER

Burgers Bangers & Mash Roast Prime Rib & Yorkshire Pudding Shepherd’s Pie Fish & Chips Chocolate Bacon

Tickets: In Advance $16 Student/Senior

- happy hour -

4-7pm & 10pm-close

$18 General

- Mon & tue -

At the Door - $20 All Tickets

LadieS 2 FoR 1 Wine

July 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17,

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

18, 19 24, 25, 26 at 8 PM Matinee: July 7, 2013 at 2 PM ProDuceD by SPecIAl ArrAnGeMenT wITh SAMuel french

THESE DON’T MIX

haPPY 4th oF juLY!

T

- thurSday -

Bike night

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

- friday – Saturday -

MuSiC, danCing Food+ dRink SPeCiaLS BReakFaSt, LunCh & dinneR 9aM to cloSe

Brüka TheaTre

99 N. VirgiNia St. reNo, NV 89501 775-323-3221 | www.bruka.org

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Sign up for reward BlaSter get $10

4050 S. Mc carran Blvd, reno nv 775.737.4440 • www.Spitfirereno.coM

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BOOMTOWN CASINO HOTEL

2100 Garson Rd., Verdi; (775) 345-6000 1) Event Center 2) Guitar Bar

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

Donald Glaude

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) The Beach 4) Summit Pavilion

SUNDAY 7/7

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/8-7/10

2) Kyle Williams, 4:30pm, Dale Poune, 8pm, no cover

2) Dean Brownell, 4:30pm, Dale Poune, 8pm, no cover

2) Dean Brownell, 4:30pm, Dale Poune, 8pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, no cover

2) Patrick Major, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, 10pm, no cover

1) Tainted Love, 9pm, $25

1) Katchafire, J Boog, Siaosi, 9pm, Tu, $17, $20

1) Menopause the Musical, 8pm, $24.95+ 1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Mimic, 10pm, no cover 2) Mimic, 10pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, 9:30pm, 1) Menopause the Musical, 3pm, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Mimic, 10pm, no cover $24.95+ 2 ) Mimic, 10pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95

3) DJ Paul “Pauly D” DelVecchio, 9pm, $25+

1) The Fab Four, 7:30pm, $38.50 3) DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, Apple Z, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, 1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 Apple Z, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 7pm, no cover 3) Tyler Stafford, 5:30pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 8pm, no cover 3) Tyler Stafford, 6pm, no cover 5) Jonathan Barton, 6pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 4pm, Country in the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) Tyler Stafford, 6pm, no cover 5) Jonathan Barton, 6pm, no cover

3) Red, White & BOOM! 4th of July Blowout w/DJ Donald Glaude, DJ Eric Lobe, 10pm, $15, $20

1) The Wayans Brothers, 9pm, $45, $55 3) The Male Room, 8pm, $15

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

HARRAH’S RENO

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

RN&R

SATURDAY 7/6

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, $24.95 2) WET Sundays at The Beach, 2pm, no cover

1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) ESC4P3, 8:30pm, M, Tu, W, $24.95

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Karaoke

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FRIDAY 7/5

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

July 5, 10 p.m. MontBleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3353

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THURSDAY 7/4

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219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

JULY 3, 2013

2) Country in the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, W, no cover 3) Deon Yates, 6pm, W, no cover

2) Local guest DJs, 10pm, W, no cover

2) Milton Merlos, 7pm, no cover 3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

2) Maxxt Out, 9pm, no cover 2) Maxxt Out, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, 3) Old Glory Party w/DJ Risk One, Fixx Fridays w/DJs (((Fredie))), 10pm, $20 Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Kyle Williams, 7pm, no cover

2) Kyle Williams, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

3) Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

1) Terry Fator, 8pm, $72.50, $89.50 2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Step This Way (dubstep, house), 8pm, W, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

5) Jonathan Barton, 6pm, no cover

2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover


             







   

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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

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For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

S R A ST &

S E P I S T REVER FOR

OutSleezed #9 A motley crew of local bands and DJs come together for “Reno’s only real holiday.” The three-day music festival features performances by Flesh Lights, Soda Jerk, Cat Jelly, Boneshaker and Pelvis Wrestlies starting at 7 p.m., July 4, at Clark Lane Mall, 249 Ryland St. Admission is $5. On July 5, Cat Party, Spitting Image and Plastic Caves along with DJs Tigerbunny and Bat Brains will play at 40 Mile Saloon, 1495 S. Virginia St. The show starts at 9 p.m. with a $5 cover. The music continues at 1 p.m on July 6 with acoustic sets by Table Fruit and Spitting Image at Recycled Records, 822 S. Virginia St. The festival concludes later that night with performances by Bobby Nobbit, Creative Adult, Neighborhood Brats, Prescription, Blue Eyed Lucy, Plastic Caves and Pelvis Wrestlies at Shea’s Tavern, 715 S. Virginia St. The show starts at 9 p.m. Admission is $7. Visit www.facebook.com/events/332893406844131/

Biggest Little Music Festival Fourth of July events You could spend your Independence Day indoors in an air-conditioned living room watching the Boston Pops concert on TV. But if you think you can take the 100-plus degree heat, get out and see what the area has to offer this Fourth of July. For starters, you could head out to Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, for the first half of Sparks’ annual event, which kicks off at 6 a.m. with free tethered hot air balloon rides and a $3 pancake breakfast. Other highlights later in the morning include a fun run/ walk, the Model Dairy milk carton parade of boats and races, opening ceremony with a military color guard and the Sparks Idol competition. Call 636-9550 or visit http:// thechambernv.org. The festivities move to Victorian Square in downtown Sparks at 4 p.m., and feature a variety of food, vendors and entertainment. The fun culminates with the fireworks show presented by John Ascuaga’s Nugget, starting about 9:45 p.m. if wind conditions allow. Call 356-3300 or visit www.janugget.com. Or you could drive up to North Shore Lake Tahoe for the Red, White and Tahoe Blue celebration. The fourday holiday festival, which kicks off on July 3, features 28 events in Incline Village and Crystal Bay. There will be parades, concerts, veterans’ tributes, rubber ducky races, a community fair, ice cream social and a carnival. The fireworks show begins at 9:30 p.m., July 4, in Incline Village. Call 298-1010 or visit www.redwhitetahoeblue.org. Carson City will hold its free fireworks show at dusk at Mills Park, 1111 E. William St. Call 687-4680. Finally, Virginia City will also offer a variety of Independence Day events, including at parade down C Street at noon, a wine walk at 1 p.m., a performance by Comstock Cowboys at 6 p.m. and the fireworks show which starts sometime after dusk. Call 847-7500 or visit www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

—Kelley Lang

30   |  RN&R   | 

JULY 3, 2013

Celebrate local music and local cuisine this weekend at this festival presented by Note-Able Music Therapy Services. The Artown event features performances by The Note-Ables, Buster Blue, Kung Fu Sophie, The Mighty Surf Lords, Slide Mountain Band and an acoustic set by Mason James Frey. Local gourmet food trucks, including Kenji’s, Burger Me and St. Lawrence Pizza, will be there to feed the hungry masses while Great Basin Brewing Co. will serve up their brews to thirsty patrons aged 21 and older. Roller derby team Battle Born Derby Demons will also make an appearance at the festival, which starts at 2 p.m., July 6, at Wingfield Park at First Street and Arlington Avenue in downtown Reno. Admission is a $5 suggested donation. Call 324-5521 or visit http://note-ables.org.

Dirt Live Off-Road Expo/Eldorado Reno 500 Off-road racers, ATV, motorcycle, rock crawling and other enthusiasts will gather at the Tahoe Reno Motorplex for three day of races, product and vehicle demonstrations, live music, contests, exhibits and seminars. On Friday, the streets of downtown Reno will fill with hundreds of trucks, buggies and motorcycles as race officials perform technical inspection in the vehicles prior to their competition in Saturday’s Eldorado Reno 500, the longest off-road race in the United States. The race will take place at the Tahoe-Reno Motorplex, 420 USA Parkway, Exit 32, in McCarran, east of Sparks on Interstate 80. Visit http://dirtlive.com.


OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

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RN&R  

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31


Recycle this paper

Not a mourning person My girlfriend died in a car accident four months ago, and I fear I’m not grieving the way I should. I was really broken up at first, crying hysterically, and I miss her terribly. I often think of things I wish I could tell her or we could do together, but I’m comforted by remembering all the positive things about her, and I’m grateful for the time we did have. Friends are worried, saying that I need to experience grief fully and work through all the stages in order to recover. Otherwise, the grief could come back to bite me. I worry that I’m suppressing stuff, but I have no idea what. Despite what’s happened, I still like my life. I even find myself laughing at stupid stuff. Am I just in major denial?

32   |  RN&R   | 

Those who care about you are worried that you aren’t wallowing in pain and despair, and they’re maybe even a little suspicious: “Come on, man, who’s keeping you company if not Misery?” Supposedly, if you really loved somebody, you’ll grieve big, long and showy. But bereavement researcher Dr. George A. Bonanno points out in his terrific book, The Other Side of Sadness, that there’s no evidence for this belief or a number of other widely held beliefs about grieving, like the notion that there are “stages of grief”—five of them—that every bereaved person must go through before they can go on: “Whoops, you flunked anger. Better go back and get in bar fights!” The “stages of grief” were based on psychiatrist Elisabeth Kubler-Ross’ observations of people who were themselves dying, not those who’d lost someone they JULY 3, 2013

loved. “Grieving over the death of a loved one is not the same as facing your own death,” Bonanno points out. He adds that Freud’s notion that the bereaved must do “grief work” to heal—slog through every one of their memories and hopes about their lost loved one—is unsupported by research, and there’s even evidence that this re-chewing of memories strengthens their connection to the deceased, preventing healing. Yet another myth is that your failure to go into Scarlett O’Hara-style hysterics in the coffee room every day means you’re postponing your grieving. In fact, the idea of “delayed grief”—grief as a darkly mischievous force determined to eventually pop up and bite you—is another unsubstantiated idea from one of Freud’s psychoanalytic minions. Studies find delayed grief extremely rare—almost to the point of nonexistence. What your behavior seems to reflect is resilience—healthy coping through putting your girlfriend’s life and death in perspective in ways that help you go on with your life. In other words, if you have a problem, it’s that your friends think you have a problem. The next time they suggest you’re grieving incorrectly, you might reassure them. Tell them you’re in the “bargaining” stage and that you’d feel much better if only they’d stock your fridge with beer and steak, and on their way out, would they mind detailing your car? Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   JULY 3, 2013  |  

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by rob brezsny

O F F I C I A L B I R T H D AY B A S H J U LY 5 , 2 0 1 3

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In his book

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Summing up

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the course

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Thirteen-

The Fisher King and the Handless Maiden, Robert A. Johnson says many of us are as much in debt with our psychic energy as we are with our financial life. We work too hard. We rarely refresh ourselves with silence and slowness and peace. We don’t get enough sleep or good food or exposure to nature. And so we’re routinely using up more of our reserves than we are able to replenish. We’re chronically running a deficit. “It is genius to store energy,� says Johnson. He recommends creating a plan to save it up so that you always have more than enough to draw on when an unexpected opportunity arrives. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make this a habit, Aries. of your long life, I estimate you will come up with approximately 60,000 really good ideas. Some of these are small, like those that help you decide how to spend your weekend. Some are big ones, like those that reveal the best place for you to live. As your destiny unfolds, you go through phases when you have fewer good ideas than average, and other phases when you’re overflowing with them. The period you’re in right now is one of the latter. You are a fountain of bright notions, intuitive insights and fresh perspectives. Take advantage of the abundance, Taurus. Solve as many riddles and dilemmas as you can.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): No one knows

the scientific reasons why long-distance runners sometimes get a “second wind.� Nonetheless, such a thing exists. It allows athletes to resume their peak efforts after seemingly having reached a point of exhaustion. According to my reading of the astrological omens, a metaphorical version of this happy event will occur for you sometime soon, Gemini. You made a good beginning but have been flagging a bit of late. Any minute now, though, I expect you will get your second wind.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Thomas Gray

was a renowned 18th-century English poet best remembered for his “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard.� It was a short poem—less than 1,000 words, which is less than the length of this horoscope column. On the other hand, it took him seven years to write it, or an average of 12 words per month. I suspect that you are embarking on a labor of love that will evolve at a gradual pace, too, Cancerian. It might not occupy you for seven years, but it will probably take longer than you imagine. And yet, that’s exactly how long it should take. This is a character-building, life-defining project that can’t and shouldn’t be rushed.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The 18th-century

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German philosopher Georg Christoph Lichtenberg accepted the possibility that some humans have the power of clairvoyance. “The ‘second sight’ possessed by the Highlanders in Scotland is actually a foreknowledge of future events,� he wrote. “I believe they possess this gift because they don’t wear trousers. That is also why in all countries women are more prone to utter prophecies.� I bring this to your attention, Leo, because I believe that in the coming weeks you’re likely to catch accurate glimpses of what’s to come—especially when you’re not wearing pants.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Were you

nurtured well by caring adults in the first year of your life? If so, I bet you now have the capacity to fix whatever is ailing your tribe or posse. You could offer some inspiration that will renew everyone’s motivation to work together. You might improve the group communication as you strengthen the foundation that supports you all. And what about if you were not given an abundance of tender love as a young child? I think you will still have the power to raise your crew’s mood, but you may end up kicking a few butts along the way.

his experiment in living at Walden Pond, naturalist Henry David Thoreau said this: “I learned ‌ that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws will be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings.â€? Given the astrological factors that will be impacting your life in the next 12 months, Libra, you might consider adopting this philosophy as your own. thousand years ago, lions and mammoths and camels roamed parts of North America. But along with many other large beasts, they ultimately became extinct. Possible explanations for their demise include climate change and overhunting by humans. In recent years, a group of biologists has proposed a plan to repopulate the western part of the continent with similar species. They call their idea “rewilding.â€? In the coming months, Scorpio, I suggest you consider a rewilding program of your own. Cosmic forces will be on your side if you reinvigorate your connection to the raw, primal aspects of both your own nature and the great outdoors.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Who was Russia’s greatest poet? Many critics say it was Aleksandr Pushkin, who lived in the 19th century. His abundant creativity was undoubtedly related to his unruly libido. By the time he was 31 years old, he’d had 112 lovers. But then, he met his ultimate muse, the lovely and intelligent Natalya Goncharova, to whom he remained faithful. “Without you,� he wrote to her, “I would have been unhappy all my life.� I half-expect something comparable to happen for you in the next 10 months, Sagittarius. You may either find an unparalleled ally or else finally ripen your relationship with an unparalleled ally you’ve known for a while. One way or another, I bet you will commit yourself deeper and stronger.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s

Grease Week—a time when you need to make sure everything is as well-oiled as possible. Does your car need a quart of Castrol? Is it time to bring more extra virgin olive oil into your kitchen? Do you have any K-Y Jelly in your nightstand, just in case? Are there creaky doors or stuck screws or squeaky wheels that could use some WD-40? Be liberal with the lubrication, Capricorn— both literally and metaphorically. You need smooth procedures and natural transitions.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Two years into the War of 1812, British soldiers invaded Washington, D.C. They set fire to the White House and other government buildings. The flames raged out of control, spreading in all directions. The entire city was in danger of burning. In the nick of time, a fierce storm hit, producing a tornado and heavy rains. Most of the fires were extinguished. Battered by the weather, the British army retreated. America’s capital was saved. I predict that you, Aquarius, will soon be the beneficiary of a somewhat less dramatic example of this series of events. Give thanks for the “lucky storm.�

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Like the

legendary Most Interesting Man in the World who shills for Dos Equis beer, you will never step in gum on the sidewalk or lose a sock in the coming weeks. Your cereal will never get soggy; it’ll sit there, staying crispy, just for you. The pheromones you secrete will affect people miles away. You’ll have the power to pop open a piùata with the blink of your eye. If you take a Rorschach test, you’ll ace it. Ghosts will sit around campfires telling stories about you. Cafes and restaurants may name sandwiches after you. If you so choose, you’ll be able to live vicariously through yourself. You will give your guardian angel a sense of security.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Dennis Myers PHOTO/dennis myers

Drought Tom Harris The economics of ranching and farming is the field of interest of University of Nevada, Reno economist Tom Harris.

Ranchers and agricultural production, alfalfa and all that, is bound by surface water irrigation—TCID [Tahoe Carson Irrigation District], Walker River, Pershing, Rye Patch. They get a lot of surface water irrigation, so for many of those people, the irrigation is really reduced. They may only have 20, 25 percent of normal water delivery. That would be a significant decrease in ag production. Usually, you get three cuttings. You wouldn’t get that. For them, it would be a loss of revenue. The price of alfalfa would rise. In Eureka, in Diamond Valley, they have ground water. There is some worry about power costs and the depth of water, but some of the people who have ground water sources for alfalfa, their production should be maintained. As for livestock producers, many of our northeast Nevadans, many of our range cattle producers also grow alfalfa, and so they would be hurt with that, too, because they usually feed within their own

operations. They kind of grow two crops at the same time. They grow cattle, but they also grow alfalfa to feed their cattle. If it’s a good year, they can also sell some of the alfalfa. Of course, this year, they’re going to be feeding alfalfa but the problem is, some won’t be able to feed their own [cattle] with their own [alfalfa] supplies. At the same time, alfalfa supplies go up. … Dairy herds also will be increased in food costs. We’re not the only place having the drought. New Mexico and the Midwest are having a drought, too. … Nevada qualifies for drought aid, so some of our producers may be able to get some loans, but of course, you have to pay them back. … It’s always a fear of what may happen next year. …

The heat has gotten to Bruce this week, so we present an encore column from 20th century Bruce. It was July and I had just found six mattresses from an old motel that was being gutted. (The mattresses were going to be used to catch cannonballs out at Burning Man, an idea that was later wisely scuttled.) I had my truck but no rope to secure the mattresses. Poking abut in some debris, I spied a length of telephone cable, the noncurly kind that hooks your phone to the jack in the wall. I figured this stuff could handle the beds. Bad figuring. Six mattresses were too tall to be stacked vertically, so I slotted them into the truck on their sides and tied them down with the cord. Satisfied with this cockamamie setup, I took off. The mattresses stayed in check on city streets well enough, but then I got impatient and overconfident and jumped onto the freeway. More bad figuring. While the phone cord could keep the mattresses corralled at 30 mph, It couldn’t come close to keeping them together at 60. Within a matter of seconds, I had trouble. OPINION

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The cord began to stretch, trying to contain these weighty rectangles that were rassling with the laws of Newton. Just past the Spaghetti Bowl, traveling east on 80, the mattress on the far left side of the truck bed suddenly lurched over, stretched that flimsy cord, and then flopped out onto the highway. Oops. How horribly inconsiderate of me to drop a mattress in the middle lane of Interstate 80 at 5:45 on a Monday afternoon! As soon as I saw it hit the pavement, I realized there was potential for this situation to be very, very, very bad, bad, superbad. As in maybe a Honda Civic bouncing off the mattress, careening into the next lane, touching off an extremely nasty six-car, rushhour pile-up, resulting in five dead and nine injured, three critically. Obviously, I needed a big dose of instant luck. I got some. If I have a guardian angel, he may well have been driving that monstrous old Ford Victoria sedan on my left, because as that potentially killer mattress landed in front of the Ford, the behemoth-like sedan swallowed it up, trapped it under the oil pan |

20 at the door

Yes. I mean, it’s just an investment deal. It’s an investment question. … Some of them, if there’s not a cohort that wants to take it over, they can. And sometimes there’s consolidation of ranches and farms. But, you know, this is the question that’ll happen. At the same time, we go it going on, this dry milk power plant going on in Fallon that’s coming in, and there’s potential of dairy herds increasing. … You may have some producers who retire, and then you have some producers who will let their children take over the operation. And then there’s also federal help that will come around that will help maintain them to some degree. Ω

Not necessarily. What happens is basically this: Alfalfa’ll go up, which is an increase in food costs. Sometimes, yes, but what will happen though, is because [for] producers, it costs more, they will liquidate their herds.

FEATURE STORY

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Are there cases around here where ranchers, instead of reducing their operations, simply decide to get out of the business?

With the price of alfalfa going up, I assume the price of beef and other farm products go up.

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ART OF THE STATE

and kept rollin’ down the freeway. Un-freakin-believable. His journey slightly hampered by the bed now under his car, he pulled over, I followed and ecstatically paid a tow truck guy the 42 bucks to get that mangled mattress from under that Bruce-saving Ford. My angel turned out to be a nice man from Winnemucca, who just wanted to get outta town. No wrecks, no deaths, no injuries, no damage to the Ford, no tickets, no insurance hassles. An un-freakinbelievable performance. So this holiday season, it’s very easy for me to give gigantic thanks and eternal praise on a daily basis. I’m guessing there may be a similar incident in your life, although probably not as dunderheaded, that you would be wise to recognize. And yes, I now carry three lengths of real rope in the truck at all times.Ω

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I spoke with you about 10 months ago on the impact of drought on the economy. Things have not really improved. Can you tell me about the impact on Nevada ranchers?

So when you liquidate your herds, you increase the supply, and all of a sudden the price of beef will go down. This kind of happened last year. … It takes time to rebuild [after liquidating]. I do know in Humboldt County, Humboldt last year had those extreme rangeland fires. And in that area … the livestock people will not have access to public lands [for grazing] because it has to rehabilitate that. So that’s at least a two-year [period] being slowly—go back and build up your herds when you can’t be on public land. … And then, honestly, I think also another question is during this drought, there’s many of our rangeland producers who are close to retirement. And do they want to go back after this to build back their herds? So there’s going to be some long term impacts from this drought.

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