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Letters ........................... 3 opinion/Streetalk ........... 5 Sheila Leslie ................... 6 chanelle Bessette........... 7 news ............................. 8 Green ........................... 11 Feature ........................ 13 arts&culture ............... 16 art of the State ............ 19

Foodfinds .................... 20 Film............................. 22 Musicbeat ................... 23 nightclubs/casinos ...... 24 This Week ....................27 advice Goddess .......... 28 Free Will astrology ...... 30 15 Minutes .................... 31 Bruce Van Dyke ........... 31

The hole sTory See News, page 8.

Get rid

of the grid See Green, page 11.

LocaL honey:

The BeeS’ kNeeS See Arts&Culture, page 16.

Great expectations See Film, page 22.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE

19,

issuE

13

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may

16–22,

2013


2   |   RN&R   |   MAY 16, 2013


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

What comes around Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. For some damned reason, I was trying to figure out my one-year anniversary with my girlfriend Kelly. (Do you call it an anniversary? Sort of like an anniversary of a first date? Not that there was any actual date planned. What? Get your mind out of the gutter.) Like most things in my life, I can backtrack it through these Editor’s Notes to see when and where I did stuff. Since I killed off my historic data on Facebook, this is the most efficient method of finding specific dates regarding myself—when memory doesn’t work, that is. Anyway, the one that I was looking for was “Chortling out loud,” and it ran on May 17 of last year. It described a particular Friday in May last year when Accuweather said it was 73 degrees outside. All I wanted to do was go sit on the deck at St. James Infirmary and drink wine. This office seemed like a jail cell with an open door, and I had a bad influence on the other end of the internet encouraging me to meet her at dive bars. Huh. Here it is, Friday again. Accuweather says it’s 69 degrees out, and I just wrapped up a semester in my dual master’s degrees. I graded my students’ final papers. All I have left to do is grade their final tests—and they don’t even take them until Monday. I have nothing, repeat, nothing to do this weekend. We’re even a bit ahead for the week here at the newspaper. So, there it is in a nutshell. If it weren’t for the editorial meeting I scheduled for 1:30 p.m. to plan for my vacation in Turkey, well, I could walk out of here right now, and feel no guilt at all. Postscript, Tuesday: Well, truth be told, I made it through the 1:30 meeting, and I was down at St. James Infirmary before they even had the deck open. It wasn’t very long before my honey showed up, and just like last year, the friends kept coming, the beer kept flowing, and the breeze kept calming. —D. Brian Burghart

Support the First Amendment Re “War on women: The Nevada front” (Left Foot Forward, May 2): Former State Senator Leslie’s May 2, 2013, column about the bipartisan Nevada Preservation of Religious Liberty Act, Senate Bill 192, is more partisan vitriol of the type that Nevada voters have rejected over the past several election cycles. Voters have asked their elected officials to move beyond the so-called “culture wars” and work together to enact laws and policies that benefit all Nevadans. Nevadans, men and women of all faith groups, need SB 192 enacted to strengthen the protections Nevadans have historically enjoyed to freely exercise the convictions of their faith and conscience. In this regard, the purpose of SB 192 is to strengthen that protection by enacting into law the “strict scrutiny” standard used to determine religious freedom cases at the federal level, as well as in 27 other states. When the government at any level takes action that burdens a citizen’s religious freedom, this standard requires the government to prove that its action(s) are (1) essential to achieve a compelling governmental interest, and (2) the least restrictive means of achieving that compelling interest. SB 192 will guarantee the State will not substantially burden the free exercise of religion and a person’s right to act in accordance with his or her conscience without a compelling justification. After SB 192 was unanimously passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee and passed the Senate on April 22, the Legislative Counsel Bureau (LCB) delivered a memorandum responding to a senator’s question regarding “whether SB 192 would cause health care professionals to take certain actions that conflict with their religious beliefs.” Contrary to Ms. Leslie’s bold assertions, LCB—which has provided reliable legal counsel to both parties for decades—confirmed that SB 192 will do exactly what the bipartisan sponsors said it would do. “Should SB 192 be enacted, a court analyzing the constitutionality of a government

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action alleged to violate a person’s free exercise of religion would require the plaintiff to show that the conduct of the plaintiff constitutes the free exercise of religion.” In this regard, LCB confirmed that SB 192 enacts a legal standard to protect the free exercise rights of all, not the means to guarantee an outcome benefit for a preferred group or political cause. Ms. Leslie’s concern about a woman’s reproductive rights in parts of the state where doctors or pharmacists are few in number is unfounded for several reasons. In the nearly 20 years since the enactment of the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), as well as the 15 years since the enactment of the first state RFRA, there are no recorded cases under either the federal RFRA or any state RFRA where either (a) a pharmacist has been permitted to refuse to provide contraceptives or morning after pills based on his or her deeply held religious beliefs, or (b) an emergency room physician has been permitted to refuse to abort a child in emergent circumstances based on his or her deeply held religious beliefs. Ms. Leslie has created a phantom threat based on fear, fantasy and gross speculation. SB 192 does not provide that a pharmacist or other health care provider has the right to refuse to provide contraception or to perform an abortion in emergency circumstances. Nothing in S.B. 192 changes this established law. Senator Barbara Cegavske Senate District 8

Faith-based law Re “War on women: The Nevada front” (Left Foot Forward, May 2): In response to former State Senator Leslie’s May 2, 2013, column about the bipartisan Nevada Preservation of Religious Liberty Act, let me be clear: Senate Bill 192 is not about the broader culture war regarding such issues as whether an unborn child has a right to life or whether a woman has a right to choose to terminate a pregnancy. SB

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

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192 is simply codifying a standard that will guarantee that free exercise of religion will be afforded the same protections as other civil liberties protected by the Nevada and U.S. Constitutions. SB 192 is not a sword to inflict violence on the rights of women, as Ms. Leslie has recklessly asserted. Rather, SB 192 is a shield to prevent the state government from inflicting violence on the constitutional rights of people with sincerely held religious beliefs, whatever those beliefs may be. Many states have enacted legislation patterned after the federal RFRA in order to provide additional protection for the free exercise of religion. State RFRAs have been enacted in about 14 states. These include progressive states like Illinois and Rhode Island as well as more conservative states like Alabama and Idaho. Meanwhile, six more states, through state court decisions, have established a “compelling interest test.” Notably, there have not been any recorded cases where women’s reproductive rights have been attacked or otherwise undermined. Likewise, there has not been one case under a state RFRA that has permitted a person to unlawfully discriminate against any protected class of persons based on deeply held religious beliefs and the free exercise of those beliefs. However, if federal precedent is any indication on how these cases might be decided if one did arise, the U.S. Supreme Court, when applying strict scrutiny, has already held unequivocally in Bob Jones University v. United States that the government has a fundamental, overriding, and compelling interest in eradicating discrimination and that such an interest substantially outweighs whatever burden enforcing anti-discrimination laws may have on a person’s free exercise rights. Finally, Ms. Leslie’s curious commentary on some supposed “right wing conspiracy” to attack the rights of women has no foundation in fact. Bipartisan sponsors of SB 192 are simply asking that a fair legal standard be applied to all cases that substantially burden the free exercise of religion and conscience of all men and women

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Sean Karp, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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in Nevada regardless of what faith they profess. Senator Mark Hutchison Senate District 6

We miss you, too Re “A beer to remember” (Feature story, May 9): Some “red-state” people might not be into BJ’s or Brewhouse. Maybe some of us like the local businesses and mom and pop ventures. Maybe we like the way Reno has this energetic vibe and courage to even start businesses in these somewhat tumultuous times. This “red-stater” is happy to read about all the new businesses, farms, restaurants that have sprung up in the area. I grew up in Reno and have seen so many changes over the years and applaud local new businesses. I try to stay away from corporate chain restaurants. Keep it in the community! I am presently living out of state, but we are definitely moving back ASAP! Oh, and by the way, this “red-stater” always reads the Reno News & Review and has really missed the paper copies each week. Candy Webb Tilton, N.H.

Historic destruction Re “A landmark case” (Green, May 9): On the eve of Nevada’s Sesquicentennial Celebration it is sad to think one small mining company can open pit mine within this important historic landmark. Historic landmarks are not renewable resources. A kiosk explaining what was does not make up for the destruction left by open pit mining. Donating money to help preserve another historic site does not negate the damage done by open pit mining. This important Nevada landmark should be preserved for our future generations. Why are “we” allowing this to happen? Open pit mining is not historic! Barbara Peck Dayton

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

MAY 16, 2013

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ThiS ModeRn WoR ld

by tom tomorrow

What are you planting this year? Asked at Moana Nursery on South Virginia Street Earl Burton Retiree

This tree right here. Beijing Gold Japanese Lilac. We have decided to plant it to replace a tree that fell down last year. I’m not planning on planting anything else right now.

Anne Polan Mother

Bulbs, vegetables and a tree, hopefully. We’re planting them to improve our landscape and for fun, to have something to do all summer and watch things grow, to get some vegetables and make it look nice.

Chantal Eckvahl Service Manager

Overshooting the mark Democrats have a way of demanding that civil liberties be respected until push comes to shove, and they find a way to benefit politically from abridging them. This Nevada legislative session and last, it has been a measure requiring that DNA samples be taken from anyone arrested—not convicted—of felonies. The bill failed at the 2011 Nevada Legislature. This year it was reintroduced as Senate Bill 243, sponsored by Sen. Debbie Smith, a Washoe County Democrat and one of our best legislators. All of those from whom samples would be taken are, under our system of government, legally innocent at the time of the sample. How is it this Legislature is unaware of Missouri v. McNeely, decided on April 17, in which the U.S. Supreme Court forbad this type of illegal search? In its current language, the bill provides that suspects prove their innocence in order to later have their samples destroyed. So why collect them in the first place? What is the hurry? Collection of samples can wait until convictions. U.S. citizens are not supposed to have to prove their innocence. Government must prove their guilt. In the current fashion of naming bills for crime victims in order to pressure legislators to avoid full scrutiny of legislation, this measure is known as “Brianna’s Law,” for Brianna Denison, the tragic 2008 victim of a brutal Reno murder that engaged so many in this community. Her family members are among those lobbying for the bill. No one can blame them for their activism. Many family members of crime victims put their pain into such activities.

But as everyone who remembers that terrible case knows, a lack of DNA samples was not the problem in the case. The problem was too many DNA samples and not enough money to process them. The community started a fund raising drive and raised almost $300,000 so the Washoe County crime lab could test a large backlog of DNA samples. It was a reproach to the shortsightedness of Nevada’s anti-tax, anti-government culture, and if the legislation proposed by the family had been adequate funding for the state’s crime labs, there would have been few objections. The family members are trying to scoop up as many people as possible to have their samples taken in indiscriminate fashion, exactly the kind of sweeping, wholesale government activity the U.S. Constitution seeks to prevent. The emotion of the situation does not relieve legislators of the responsibility to scrutiny legislation for its weak points and defects. Families of crime victims are not experts on crime or law. When they propose flawed remedies, legislators have an obligation to ignore the emotional context and summon the will to tell family members when they are wrong. In addition, what possible purpose is served in this time of recession and budget shortfalls by conducting expensive and unnecessary operations in government? The Legislature can (1) create a bureaucratic mechanism to take DNA samples from all those convicted of violent felonies, or (2) create a bureaucratic mechanism to take DNA samples from all of those accused of violent felonies and then to destroy all those taken from people who are found not guilty. Which choice is more likely to be unnecessarily expensive? Ω

OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Perennials. I like to buy them every year. You know they are going to come back next year, so I’m trying to find out what’s going to come back next year that didn’t come back last year.

Matt Pullian Manager

Tomatoes. I plant tomatoes every year, and every year I like to try something different. Different types of tomatoes. See what grows best, what tastes best. I’m going to be trying one called Lemon Boy, one called Cherokee Purple, and there’s another called Mr. Stripee that I’m going to try. Those three for sure.

Cari Kelley Retiree

I just have a little front porch and a little back porch, and I just want to pick up a few more plants for my pots. [It’s a] maidenhair fern. I had a real beautiful one that I had real good luck with for a few years, and something happened this winter, and it died. So I’m looking to replace that.

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Give the MOST to mental health care Reno Police Officer Darryl Plumb’s radar was up. It was just a few weeks after the tragedy of Sandy Hook and the bulletin about “a person of concern” from Fremont, Calif., armed and potentially suicidal in downtown Reno, was downright scary. The officer discovered the person had checked into a by hotel under his real name. Plumb Sheila Leslie quickly located the room and knocked on the door. The “eerily calm” man in his 20s admitted to having a gun in his possession. He consented to a search of his vehicle and accompanied Plumb to the parking garage where nine more firearms were located, along with a tactical vest and 4,000 rounds of ammunition. He was cooperative and respectful but admitted to suicidal ideation as well as thoughts of killing his parents to spare them the shame of a dishonorable son. The young man was placed on an emergency Legal 2000 hold and admitted to a local psychiatric hospital. His family and the Fremont police were notified while RPD

took the guns and ammunition for safekeeping. Officer Travis Warren from MOST (Mobile Outreach Safety Team) was called in to monitor the situation and coordinate with the Fremont police to ensure public safety. Warren enlisted the services of a MOST mental health partner, psychiatric social worker Jim Kilgore, to meet with the patient, family members and law enforcement to determine how to keep everyone safe and the weapons locked away. After several weeks, the young man was discharged to his parents’ care through a partial hospitalization program in California and willingly signed the firearms over to the Fremont police. Commendations from the chief were issued to Plumb and MOST for their exemplary work in preventing a Reno tragedy. The patient thought highly enough of MOST to send a letter recounting his experience as an “instance where good will triumphs over despair and hopelessness. … Their professionalism and fervor in helping their fellow man is highly

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MAY 16, 2013

encouraging. Their spirit is worthy of emulation. Their continued actions are the untold stories that show there’s still good in the world. I should know. I used to be misanthropic.” Warren modestly described the event to me as “good police work,” crediting Plumb’s determination in tracking down the suicidal subject as the key to the successful intervention. Meanwhile, amid much handwringing, Nevada’s mental health system has been front-page news lately due to the patient-dumping scandal uncovered by the Sacramento Bee after a severely mentally ill man was discharged to the Greyhound bus station in Las Vegas and provided snacks and a ticket to Sacramento. He reportedly had never been to Sacramento and had no friends, family or treatment agency awaiting his arrival. Since that initial story, Nevada has been ridiculed by Stephen Colbert, (“What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas unless what happens is psychosis”), and threatened with multiple lawsuits. Staffers have been

disciplined and fired. Policies have been changed. Editorials have been written. Gov. Brian Sandoval, after a slow start in publicly recognizing the problem, called for outside reviewers to recommend best practices and vowed to fix the problem. Back in Reno, MOST, a statefunded program that barely survived the budget cuts during the recession, works with unstable and suicidal people every day, using a law enforcement/mental health approach to resolve potentially dangerous situations and get people the help they need. It started as a pilot program in 2009 and costs the taxpayers about $150,000 per year. The Legislature has choices to make. It can allocate $35 million a year in tax credits, for example, to Nicolas Cage’s filmmakers, a subsidy that hasn’t worked elsewhere, or it could invest that money to create MOST and other innovative mental health programs in Las Vegas. I think the choice is pretty clear. Ω

Here’s a bit more about the Mobile Outreach Safety Team: http://tinyurl.com/ c524z7f.

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Republican Party rebirth Think of the word “Republican.” What comes to mind? Perhaps you think of redblooded rural Americans toting their guns in their pickup trucks. Perhaps a fat cat businessman in his tailored suit with a $200 haircut à la Jack Donaghy comes to mind. Or maybe it’s the evangelical right with their by Chanelle Bessette opposition to legalizing gay marriage and penchant for creationism in the classroom. No matter which way you slice it, it’s clear that GOP stereotypes have a pretty firm grip on pop culture. This isn’t to say that Democrats aren’t stereotyped just as often. The flower child of the free love generation, the dirty hipster of today’s coffee shops, and the ivory tower elitist professor are all tropes that one can readily reach for as the traditional left wing cliché. But something unique is happening to the Republican Party at this point in history that warrants attention and analysis. If we think back to last year’s victory for President Barack Obama

over Mitt Romney in the national election, the percentage of votes were approximately 51 percent to 47 percent. Like many presidential elections, voting tended to be cast along party lines instead of with enthusiastic selection for a particular candidate. However, I personally recall my friends and acquaintances that are members of the Republican Party expressing great distaste for what Romney represented (only slightly less than President Obama himself). What he brought to the table was nothing but a platform of out-ofdate, rehashed Republican values. On paper, President Obama and Romney’s economic recovery, foreign policy and health care plans for the United States were virtually indistinguishable, so people essentially either had to vote on party lines or based on whatever platforms differed between the two candidates—which were primarily their stances on tax cuts, immigration, abortion, the Iraq War and gay marriage. Romney was polarizing to

young voters who felt strongly about social issues even if they preferred conservative fiscal policy. For some Democrats, another four years of President Obama’s increased military and social program spending wasn’t appealing, but voting against Romney was all that counted. I have said before in this column that I think many people are libertarian and just don’t realize it yet. While social causes like women’s health rights, gay rights and immigration are traditionally championed by the left and smart fiscal policy is a trademark of the right, we are a indeed divided nation indeed (especially in a swing state like Nevada). If one of the two primary political parties were able to harness the elusive social/fiscal dichotomy that libertarianism is all about, there would undoubtedly be a positive reaction and satisfied customers across the board. Sen. Rand Paul, following the example of his presidential hopeful father Sen. Ron Paul, seems to be trying to bridge the

gap for the Republican Party to become more likeable to the social freedom-oriented young voters. Two months ago, following his news-making filibuster against the use of drone strikes, he spoke at the Conservative Political Action Conference about the changing face of the Republican Party. “The GOP of old has grown stale and moss-covered,” Sen. Paul said, as reported by The Washington Times. “The new GOP, the GOP that will win again, will need to embrace liberty in both the economic and personal sphere. If we are going to have a Republican Party that can win, liberty needs to be the backbone of the GOP.” I haven’t seen a similarly libertarian flavor coming to the Democratic Party, but that doesn’t mean things won’t change between now and the next presidential election. In the meantime, I think we can expect a big image shift for the Republican Party as fresh voices and ideas are brought to the table. Ω

John Stewart also spoke in favor of Rand Paul’s filibuster: www.youtube.com/ watch?v=4Ym2bnuZx0.

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Think Free OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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MAY 16, 2013

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There has been talk of reopening the Anaconda  mine pit in Lyon County. The pit is currently on  the federal Superfund list as a site needing funding for a cleanup.

Bused and abandoned The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is stepping up its scrutiny of Nevada busing of mental patients out of state. The Centers had earlier given the Sandoval administration until May 6 to provide evidence that it has corrected what the agency calls “serious deficiencies” in the operation of RawsonNeal Psychiatric Hospital or lose millions of dollars in federal funding. Whatever the state then submitted was apparently not enough. The agency has now launched a second probe of Nevada’s practices at the hospital. Last month the Sacramento Bee reported that Nevada bused up to 1,500 patients to cities around the nation, including at least 200 in Los Angeles County, 70 in San Diego County, and 19 in Sacramento. Half a dozen local and federal agencies have launched investigations.

School proposal makes splash Former Nevada schools superintendent James Guthrie, who may have been forced out of his job by Gov. Brian Sandoval, is getting wide attention for his notion that some Nevada teachers get pay raises. And as a result, the problems of Nevada education are also getting wide attention. In an essay for the Nevada Research Policy Institute, Guthrie proposed that Nevada pay the top 10 percent of Nevada’s teachers an annual salary of $200,000, thus attracting better candidates for teaching positions. Guthrie described the idea as a quick fix for the state’s schools problems: “A cadre of $200K classroom teachers would have an overall price tag for taxpayers far lower than the incremental school improvement ideas currently being contemplated, such as lowering class size or new add-on programs to ensure students can read by the third grade.” The Nevada State Education Association responded, “There is no ‘silver bullet’ that will fix Nevada’s education system, as the report boasts. Of course we need a way to attract the best and brightest to our profession, but choosing a small percentage of teachers and lavishing them with high salaries would, as the report suggests, capture attention, but do little more.” When Adam Taylor of Business Insider described Guthrie’s proposals, he wrote, “Nevada education may well need rescuing. A 2013 report from Education Week found that the state’s high school graduation rate was just 59.2 percent—the lowest in the country. When 24/7 Wall Street compiled the data ... it ranked Nevada’s public education system second ‘worst’ in the country.” Guthrie appears to be preparing for a Michelle Rhee-like role in his career. He is reportedly planning to release a national plan for education. He was appointed school superintendent by Sandoval in 2011 after the Nevada Legislature switched the appointment power from the state school board to the governor. (Contrary to some published reports, he is not the state’s first appointed school superintendent. That honor goes to John Bray in 1910.) The two men had public differences and Guthrie finally departed.

hikes on mining that would become possible in future legislatures. Service Employees International Union lobbyist Mayra Ocampa, for instance, was quoted by the Las Vegas Sun: “We are asking big business to pay their fair share, including mining.”

Off topic

Keeping the lines straight Strategic blunders, legal obfuscation slow mining tax debate Mixed signals and uncertain legal opinions have been clouding the processing of Senate Joint Resolution 15, which by seeks to remove special treatment Dennis Myers given to mining over other industries in Nevada. The resolution, if approved by the lawmakers and then by voters in 2014, would remove language in the Nevada Constitution that caps mining taxes. No other industry enjoys such a cap. Nevada is the nation’s principal gold mining state, and nearly all the gold mining corporations are based in Canada, with the result that huge amounts of

“If passed, mining will be treated like all other property owners.” James Wadhams Mining lobbyist

Trade alert A report last week in the New York Daily News said Nevada brothels are “in danger of extinction” because of a poor economy and freelance competition from streetwalkers. “When I started as the lobbyist for the industry in 1985, we had 37 brothels in the state,” Reno wedding chapel owner George Flint told the newspaper. “Now we have just 18, and 12 to 14 of them are not doing very well.”

—Dennis Myers

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capital leave the state and the nation, with only token amounts of taxation paid to either the U.S. or Nevadans. The state constitution limits taxation of mines to net proceeds and caps them at 5 percent—after miscellaneous expenses are deducted. The deductions and their breadth have also been a source of controversy. In 2010, 5.3 million ounces of gold and silver with a value of

$6,642,609,597 were taken from Nevada (that was 73 percent of all gold mined in the United States), with just 1.2 percent of that amount paid in state taxes. In that year, mining paid $76,847,872 in taxes to the state. That’s $591,520,123 less than the $668,367,995 paid by the state’s casinos, which have one of the lowest gambling tax rates in the nation. Most supporters of SJR 15 had hoped their fellow supporters would avoid talk of tax hikes, which are not the purpose of the constitutional amendment, and would focus instead on fairness among industries. SJR 15 does not raise taxes, it merely puts mining on the same footing as other businesses by removing its preferential tax status. What the level of mining taxes should be, said SJR 15 backer Guy Louis Rocha, is a question for another day. He said the more important issue now is repealing the industry‘s special treatment, which is a relic of the century before last. “This language went into the constitution in 1864 when mining was considered the state’s ‘paramount industry.’ That is no longer true,” he said. “The legislators should have to treat every industry the same.” But some supporters of the change let themselves be drawn into discussions of subsequent tax

Meanwhile, industry lobbyists tried to keep legislators’ minds off the fairness issue by claiming the state would suffer a loss of revenue if SJR 15 was approved by voters in 2014—a claim previously used in 2011. Mining lobbyist Tim Crowley said last month that approval of the constitutional amendment “will halt revenue to the state,” create money problems for local governments, and create instability in the economy. Except for those allied with the industry, no lawyer has testified in support of that notion. All have said Crowley is wrong, that the legislature’s taxing authority, located elsewhere in the constitution, would be unaffected by SJR 15. But some lawmakers say the argument is influencing them. Still other lawmakers were insulted that the industry would try what they consider a transparently deceptive argument—though they conceded that the tactic had succeeded in diverting attention from the fairness issue. Some critics seemed to suggest that if any legislators are confused by the legal argument, it’s because they want to be. “This is not a doubtful or unsettled question,” said a lobbyist for another industry. “Everyone, including mining, knows they’re just blowing smoke.” (When asked if mining would sue the state if SJR 15 passed, Crowley ducked the question.) Last month, Assemblymember John Ellison said, “If they change this, and we lose the net proceeds going to all these counties, we’re in big trouble. … If they do get this formula changed, the state’s going to lose money, and the counties and cities are going to lose money.” Actually, votes in the 2014 election would be cast and counted on Nov. 5, 2014, just 90 days before the 2015 legislature goes into session on Feb. 2, 2015. And the results of the election will not take legal effect until certified by the Supreme Court on Nov. 25, just 70 days before the legislature will begin. So even if Crowley’s claim was correct, any lapse of taxation of the industry would be brief.


“The legislators should have to treat every industry the same.” Guy Louis Rocha Historian

counties—plus part of urban Clark County—has said he expects the measure to be approved by voters. SJR 15, which was approved by the 2011 legislature, must be approved again this year. The Senate has done so and its fate is now in the hands of the Assembly, at least 38 of whose 62 members have accepted money from the industry. Republicans at the two ends of the legislative building disagree on the issue. Senate Republicans mostly support SJR 15. Assembly Republicans oppose it. The mining tax change is opposed by Gov. Brian Sandoval, but he has no power to veto it. Under the Nevada Constitution, governors are excluded from the amending process. Ω

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Journalist Michael Kinsley has defined a gaffe as someone accidentally telling the truth. In that sense, mining lobbyist James Wadhams may have committed a gaffe during all the disputes over the meaning of the existing constitutional language. He said during testimony before a Senate committee, “If passed, mining will be treated like all other property owners.” The lawmakers were more receptive to testimony from legislators and local officials who represented mining areas. Elko City Councilmember Richard Perry said enactment of SJR 15 could lead to “uncertainty in the natural resource industry, one of the few bright spots in our state’s economy and the primary source of jobs in Elko.” That led one legislator to say that the value of precious minerals is highest when times are bad, so that’s when the state has to get taxes from mining. If the measure does not win approval in this Legislature, the long amending process would have to begin again, or be dropped altogether. It is widely assumed that if the measure passes the Legislature, stopping it on the ballot will be extremely difficult. Even Sen. Pete Goicoechea, a Republican representing part or all of five small

Going modern PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

On the University of Nevada, Reno campus last week, a device to compress trash in outdoor trash receptacles was demonstrated. A couple of dozen mechanical engineering students displayed such “capstone” class projects—inventions created for their final class.

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Join Us For The Great Basin Community Food Co-Op’s

Saturday, May 18, 2013 • 9 am - 1 pm FeaturinG • Hungry Mother Organics • Churchill Butte Organics River School Farm • Avanzino Farms • Ecologica Farms Full Circle Compost and Many More! •

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BIKE WEEK TO WORK

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There will be dozens of local organic producers from Northern NV and beyond selling seedling starts: tomatoes, herbs, lettuce, squash, peppers, annuals, perennials, compost, worm tea and more! Fresh coffee & brunch will be served by the co-op. CASH only. We will be located in front of the co-op on Flint St. and also be taking over the entire street from Ridge St. to Court St.

This project was made possible through The Nevada Department of Agriculture with funding from the USDA, AMS Specialty Crop Block Grant.

Parking is available at surrounding businesses and down the street in the Tyco construction lot on the corner Flint and Liberty.

Contact Us: (775)324-6133 info@greatbasinfood.coop

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PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

Wildlife

Lisa Godenick is an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer who works as the development coordinator for Envirolution and who planned the No Impact Man screening.

in the Black Rock Desert / High Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

Without a trace

Don’t let the name fool you – the Black Rock Desert High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area (NCA) is teeming with wildlife. You’ll thrill to the sight of a peregrine falcon soaring majestically overhead, or enjoy the sweet notes of a meadowlark’s song. Bighorn sheep, wild horses, and pronghorn antelope grace the landscape, and if you look closely you may also spot kit fox, pygmy rabbits, fairy shrimp, and horned lizards.

Envirolution hosts a No Impact Man showing and panel discussion

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`If you’re trying to find some inspiration about how to live with a lower environmental impact or just trying to feel a bit less cynical about the world, come out to Envirolution’s showing and panel discussion of No Impact Man on May 23-24. by Sage Leehey “It’s a really awesome movie. It’s really inspiring,” said Lisa Godenick, AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer and development coordinator of Envirolution. sage l@ “Sometimes it’s easy to get overwhelmed by all the things going on in the news review.c om world and feeling like everything is going to hell, and we’re destroying our planet, destroying all these resources, but it’s inspiring to watch someone’s experience trying to live a more sustainable life.” No Impact Man is a documentary that follows the journey of Colin Beavan, his wife, Michelle Conlin, their 2-year-old daughter and their 4-yearold dog through a year of living off the grid and trying to create as low of an environmental impact as possible in New York City. The event will take place at Goodluck Macbeth Theatre Company at 7 p.m. both nights. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10 per person and include the showing, popcorn and panel discussion. Other refreshments can also be purchased. Godenick helped plan this event and said it is a fun and educational event for anyone interested in learning more about sustainability. “The main goal of this showing is to educate the Reno community about how they can live their lives with a lesser impact on the environment, whether that be by riding your bike, buying local food or not buying things that come in plastic,” Godenick said. “It can also help people to be conscious of every choice they make because every choice we make is a choice to either help the planet or hurt it.” Godenick said she is especially excited for the panel discussion following the movie, which will feature community members from the Reno Plastic Bag Ban and the Be the Change Project. At least one member from each group will be present for the discussion each night. “That’s my favorite part, and that’s why people should come to this as opposed to watching it on Netflix at home by themselves,” Godenick said. “We have some really awesome speakers. They’re going to be talking about how they, in Reno, are trying to live with less of an impact.” The panel discussion will feature community members from the Reno Plastic Bag Ban, Lisa Schmidt, and the Be the Change Project, Katy and Kyle Chandler-Isacksen. Schmidt and her boyfriend try to accumulate as little as trash as possible and are “slowly but surely cutting plastic from their lives.” The Chandler-Isacksens are trying to live off the grid with their family. Both couples will be speaking about their experiences. Anyone will be allowed to ask questions and talk during the discussion. This showing is also a fundraiser for Envirolution. The funds raised will To buy tickets for the No Impact Man go to educational programs hosted by the organization, like their summer Showing hosted by camp, the Three Spheres Leadership Academy, and an upcoming program Envirolution, visit for next school year called Project ReCharge. In this program, they will be www.brownpaper working with schools to evaluate what’s working inefficiently in their buildtickets.com/ event/378613 or email ings and how to decrease their energy bills. lisa.godenick@ At the event, there will also be a raffle each night, with prizes including envirolution.org. Patagonia jackets valued at $200 each, which Godenick said is “another great incentive to come watch.” Ω OPINION

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From the desert playa to aspenlined canyons to high elevation peaks, the NCA’s 1.2 million acres of public land preserve habitats for hundreds of wild creatures, including many endangered species unique to this area and over 250 types of migratory birds. One of the best places to view wildlife in the NCA is in High Rock Canyon. Home to great horned owls and golden eagles, among others, this wild place is identified as an Important Bird Area (IBA) by The Audubon Society. You’re also likely to see bighorn sheep on the steep canyon slopes, and while you may not see the elusive mountain lion hiding in the rocky shadows, they will surely see you. Another great place to view wildlife, believe it or not, is the Black Rock Desert playa. Dunes and hummocks surrounding the playa are home to kit fox, antelope, ground squirrels, kangaroo rats, horned lizards, badgers, and rattlesnakes. When the playa remains wet for a month or more, the shallow waters teem with newborn fairy shrimp and tadpole shrimp–which in turn provide aquick shrimpsnack for migratory birds. Friends of Black Rock High Rock works year-round with the Bureau of Land Management protecting the NCA’s unique landscapes and wildlife making it fun, accessible, and educational for all. This are your public lands and every minute you volunteer to sustain it, is a gift to future generations! Visit www.blackrockdesert.org or give us a call at 775–557–2900 to find out about upcoming volunteer days.

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Henry David Thoreau

by Jake highton

Sometimes one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular but he must take it because conscience tells him it is right. “A Testament of Hope,” writings and speeches of Martin Luther King for it even the well-disposed are daily made the agents of injustice.” Thoreau added: If the law requires you to be an agent of injustice “then I say break the law.” That’s why he defended Brown with moral outrage and indignation. Brown broke the law in 1859 with an attack on the federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry, hoping for an uprising of 4 million slaves. He thus obeyed a higher command: his conscience. Slavery was wrong. It must be abolished at once. “I would rather see the statue of Captain Brown at the Massachusetts state house than that of any other man I know,” Thoreau declared. “We talk about representative government but what a monster of a government it is where the noblest faculties of the mind and of the whole heart are not represented.” Namely: John Brown. Thoreau, calling him “a sublime spectacle” and “an angel of light,” asked: “When were the good and brave ever in a majority?” He agreed with Brown: “a man has a perfect right to interfere by force with the slaveholder.” Brown said his “rifles and revolvers were employed

H

enry David Thoreau, little known and unsung, is one of the greatest American heroes, far greater than soldiers cited for bravery or generals who triumph on the battlefield.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thoreau is worthy of being “canonized” for two works alone: “Civil Disobedience” and “A Plea for Captain John Brown.” Both are in the wonderful American tradition of dissent. As Thoreau noted in Walden: “Public opinion is a weak tyrant compared with our own private opinion.” Or, in “Civil Disobedience”: “There is little virtue in the action of masses of men.” In “Civil Disobedience” Thoreau asked, “Must the citizen ever for a moment resign his conscience to the legislator?” His answer was thunderous: no! “I think we should be men first and subjects afterward,” he wrote. “It is not desirable to cultivate respect for the law so much as for the right. Law never made men a whit more just. And by means of their respect

“fightthepower” continued on page 14

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“fight thE PowEr” continued from page 13

in a righteous cause,” a cause expressing his “sympathy with the oppressed and wronged.” Brown presciently concluded that Civil War was the only way “the Negro question” would be resolved. He knew too the truth in Thoreau’s essay “Life Without Principle”: “What is it to be free from King George and continue the slaves of King Prejudice?” Even the Great Liberator, William Lloyd Garrison, initially thought that Brown was going too far to take action to free the slaves. Garrison thought words were enough. As he wrote, “I do not wish to think or speak or write with moderation. I am in earnest. I will not equivocate. I will not retreat a single inch. AND I WILL BE HEARD.” Brown knew better. Abolishment of slavery must come about through deeds, not words.

[Pfc. Bradley Manning’s] rePressive treatMent is one of the disgraces of oBaMa’s first terM. Ed Pilkington, UK Guardian

Birmingham reBellion Martin Luther King, as a student at Morehouse College in Atlanta, was greatly impressed by “Civil Disobedience.” He came to the same conclusion as Thoreau. Words were not enough. He realized you had to break the law even if it meant going to jail in order to smash the chains of segregation. The rebellion began with Rosa Parks in 1955. A bus driver in Montgomery, Ala., ordered Parks to give up her seat to a white passenger. She refused. She said she was tired of being treated as an unequal human being. The bus driver had her arrested under Alabama law. Her pastor, Martin Luther King, was so incensed he launched the Montgomery bus boycott. The civil rights movement had begun. Inspired by Gandhi’s non-violent satyagraha (“soul force”), King in 1960 lauded Southern black college students for their sit-ins at lunch counters while facing “hoodlums, police guns, tear gas and jail sentences.” 14   |  RN&R   |  MAY 16, 2013

In 1963 he wrote the moving “A Letter From a Birmingham Jail.” He excoriated the “vicious lynch mobs and hate–filled policemen who curse, kick, brutalize and even kill.” He denounced white and colored signs in the South. He deplored the indignity of being called “nigger” or “boy.” He noted “a degenerating sense of ‘nobodyness.’” King’s words resounded with cries for freedom. Freedom rides. Freedom trains. Freedom marches. He wanted to free blacks from racism and whites from the burden of racism. King reminded Americans that by denying freedom to blacks they had “left the house of their great heritage and strayed into a far country of segregation and discrimination. In the midst of all your material wealth you prove spiritually and morally povertystricken, unable to speak to the conscience of the world.” King gave his best-known speech, “I Have a Dream,” during the March on Washington in 1963. It was the greatest demonstration for freedom in the nation’s history. “We have come to our nation’s capital to cash a check,” King said. “When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, black and white, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Then those marvelous, repetitive, rolling cadences: “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.’ I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and girls as sisters and brothers.” Most Americans came to accept King’s dream. But many could not accept King as a social critic, declaring that he should stick to civil rights. Not so. His social criticism was also powerful. He rightly indicted America’s Vietnam War. He flayed the nation’s “spiritual death” in spending more on the military than on “programs of social uplift.” He denounced capitalism. He deplored the gap between the rich and the poor. King’s social criticism is an old, old American tradition. Mark Twain, outraged by U.S. suppression of the Filipino revolt, declared that America ought to paint the white stripes on its flag black and replace the stars with the pirate skull and cross-bones. Suffragette Susan B. Anthony led demonstrations for women’s right to vote, going to jail for voting illegally in 1872. Margaret Sanger advocated birth control early in the 20th century, opening the

nation’s first birth control clinic. She was driven to advocate birth control because her mother endured 18 pregnancies in 22 years. Bob La Follette, Wisconsin senator, deplored the invasion of Nicaragua in 1927. He described it as “harsh, bullying, an unjustifiable action setting Central and South American countries against us.” In 1946 socialist Norman Thomas lamented the fact that 3,200 Americans were jailed for the “crime” of conscientious objection. Pullman car unionist Philip Randolph scored Jim Crow as an “unmitigated evil.” He pointed out the absurdity of a segregated army. Justice Douglas decried the manufactured Red Scare in the 1950s, spawning character assassination and rampant fear. In our day, President Obama’s treatment of whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning is unconscionable. For nearly three years Manning has been held in a military prison, subject to torture and other inhumane treatment. Locked up naked in a cage. It’s one more blot on the American escutcheon. Manning’s crime? Supplying a trove of documents to the world, documents that are no threat to national security but a gross embarrassment to America. The government charge of “aiding the enemy” is patently absurd. He merely wanted to provoke “worldwide discussion, debate and reform.” The world rewarded him with much discussion and debate. Reform, alas, is beyond the capacity of the U.S. government. “His repressive treatment is one of the disgraces of Obama’s first term,” Ed Pilkington of the UK Guardian declared. “Obama not only defended Manning’s treatment but also as commander in-chief of court-martial judges improperly decreed his guilt when he asserted that he broke the law.” Manning is a classic whistleblower. The public appreciates his leak of astonishing examples of systematic U.S. subversion of worldwide democracy, including killings and atrocities. Governments do not appreciate such candor. David Coombs, lawyer defending Manning at the military trial in Fort Meade, Maryland, pointed out that his client disclosed the documents, not as “a reckless act to undermine national security,” but as an “act of conscience designed to expose government misdeeds and defend the public’s right to know.” Governments abroad react the same way with another great leaker, Julian Assange. The British consider him an “enemy of the state.” Assange released hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables showing U.S. war crimes, collusion with death squads in Iraq, lies of U.S. allies, and spying on U.N. officials. U.S. politicians and right-wingers want Assange designated a terrorist. An absurdity. But nothing is absurd to a U.S. government determined to conceal embarrassment. First Amendment rights of Manning and Assange are being denied. As so often in hypocritical America, free speech has its limits. The government tried to block publication of the Pentagon Papers on the grounds of violating national security. Fortunately,

even a conservative Supreme Court saw through that charade in its 1973 decision. Professor Howard Zinn supported civil rights while teaching at Spelman College in Atlanta. He was fired by Boston University for supporting striking union workers on his campus. He gave a defense of civil disobedience while attacking the Vietnam War, declaring that it was essential to break unjust laws in order to achieve fundamental rights. Boxer Muhammad Ali refused induction into the Army in 1967 during the Vietnam War. He declared, “I ain’t got no quarrel with them Vietcong.” Most Americans were outraged. So-called liberal columnist Tom Wicker denounced Ali as “painfully warped in spirit.” Sports columnist Red Smith “smelled” the “stench emanating from the induction center.” The FBI tailed and wiretapped Ali. The World Boxing Association stripped Ali of his heavyweight title. States refused to let him fight. In Nevada, Gov. Paul Laxalt denied an Ali-Floyd Patterson fight with a phony rationale: It would be a mismatch. The Johnson administration stripped Ali of his passport to prevent him from fighting overseas. At the trial for “refusal to submit to induction,” a jury deliberated 20 minutes before sending him to prison for five years. In 1967, his peak as a great champion, Ali was barred from the ring. “It was a marvelous demonstration of the value of civil disobedience [in publicizing injustice] and an inspiration to our generation—particularly to those soldiers and sailors who opposed the Vietnam War,” said Dennis Myers, news editor of the Reno News & Review. Myers was one of those soldiers.

glorious court dissents Despite the many terrible decisions by the Supreme Court throughout history, some great dissents have illustrated what it means to be an American. It does not mean wearing flag pins, flying flags on pickup trucks or draping houses with huge American flags. It means dissents as in In re Yamashita (1946). In that case the court upheld the hanging of a Japanese general ordered by a military commission, declaring that the findings of a military panel were unreviewable. Justice Frank Murphy dissented because the general was denied a fair trial. “No exception is made to those who are accused of war crimes or those who possess the status of an enemy belligerent. Indeed, such an exception would be contrary to the philosophy of human rights that makes the Constitution the great living document that it is. “The immutable rights of the individual belong not alone to the members of those nations that excel on the battlefield or that subscribe to democratic ideology. They belong to every person in the world, victor or vanquished, whatever may be his race, color or beliefs. They rise above every status or outlawry. They


survive any popular passion or frenzy of the moment. “While people in other lands may not share our beliefs as to due process and the dignity of the individual, we are not free to give effect to our emotions in reckless disregard for the rights of others. We live under a Constitution which is the embodiment of all the high hopes and aspirations of the new world.”

In Olmstead v. U.S. (1928) the court upheld wiretapping, but Justices Oliver Wendell Holmes and Louis Brandeis dissented. Holmes declared it would be better for “some criminals to escape than that the government should play an ignoble part.” Brandeis in his dissent declared, “The makers of our Constitution undertook to secure conditions favorable to the pursuit of happiness. They conferred, as against the government, the right to be let alone—the most comprehensive of rights and the right most valued by civilized men. “Our government is the potent, the omnipresent teacher. It teaches the whole people by its example. If the government becomes a lawbreaker it breeds contempt for the law.” After his horrible ruling in Schenck v. U.S., Holmes came to his senses with a marvelous dissent six months later in Abrams v. U.S. (1919). He deplored the 20-year prison sentence for publishing two harmless leaflets. He pointed out that the defendants were punished “not for what the indictment alleges but for the creed that they avow.” Holmes concluded with a ringing declaration of free speech: “We should be eternally vigilant against any attempts to check the expression of opinions that we loathe.” Justice Harlan F. Stone was the sole dissenter in Minersville School District v. Gobitis (1940) when the court upheld a school flag-salute statute. The Jehovah’s

Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, circa 1902

Witnesses objected because to them saluting the flag was worshiping a graven image. “It is a long step and one which I am unable to take to the position that government may, as a supposed educational measure, compel public affirmations which violate religious conscience,” Stone wrote. “The very essence of liberty is the freedom of the individual from compulsion as to what he shall think and what he shall say. This seems to me no more than the surrender of the constitutional protection of the liberty of small minorities to the popular will.” Stone was proved right just three years later in West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette when Justice Robert H. Jackson made his magnificent statement In a sizzling dissent, Justice Jackson about the Bill of Rights: “The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was answered Douglas: • “The day that this country ceases to be to withdraw certain subjects from the vicisfree for irreligion it will cease to be free for situdes of political controversy, to place them religion.” beyond the reach of majorities and officials • “The wall which the court was professand to establish them as legal principles to ing to erect between church and state has be applied by the courts. One’s right to life, become warped and twisted.” liberty and property, to free speech, a free It is dissents like these that reflect the press, freedom of worship and assembly may deeply ingrained conscience of Americans not be submitted to a vote.” who demand freedom, equality and justice In Zorach v. Clauson (1952) the court for all. Ω upheld a New York public school board policy of allowing students released time to Jake Highton is a professor emeritus of journalism at the attend religious classes. Justice William O. University of Nevada, Reno and an occasional curmudgeon at the Reno News & Review. Douglas, to his shame, wrote the majority opinion: “We 239870_4.75_x_6 are a religious people whose 5/9/13 11:37 AM Page There’s a cool1 annotated version of “Civil Disobedience” at institutions presuppose a Supreme Being.” http://thoreau.eserver.org/civil.html.

In “CIvIl DIsobeDIenCe” Thoreau askeD, “MusT The CITIzen ever for a MoMenT resIgn hIs ConsCIenCe To The legIslaTor?” hIs answer was ThunDerous: no!

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Photo/Allison Young

COOL E

EB

These local beekeepers aren’t afraid of the sting

BY LAURA DAVIS

Bees are not exactly what most of us want swarming in our backyard. In fact, we pay people specifically to dispose of them. We run, we scream, we swat … we conjure up tear-jerking memories of My Girl … but like anything else, there are exceptions. People who not only embrace bees, but who join clubs and go to committee meetings to learn all about them. We took to the Reno local honey scene to discover what it takes to be a bee enthusiast. To be bold enough to walk calmly into an angry swarm—and remain cool long enough to sneak off with their life’s work.

The hobbyist “Every time I go out, I get stung,” says  beekeeper Albert Sindlinger.

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Meet Lindsey Pastrell, of local honey producer Over the Roof. While you may not have heard of it by name, you might have already tasted it. The word-of-mouth father-daughter team produces nature’s nectar right in their backyard, and what they don’t give out in hand-to-hand service, they provide for use in local businesses, such as Too Soul Tea Co. on Plumas Street and PJ & Company on South Wells Avenue. The self-proclaimed hobbyists, who now own 20 hives, fell into the art of beekeeping with a little help from the local godfather of honey making himself. “My dad was driving down the street and saw some hives in a backyard,” Pastrell recalls. “He’d always been interested in beekeeping, so he decided to stop and talk to the owner. It ended up being the house of Nevada’s only certified beekeeper of the time—Joe Nunce. Joe talked

my dad into it. This was over 10 years ago.” Once her dad put on the bee suit, Pastrell soon followed. Only her attire of choice was a little more tailormade. The sterile look of head-to-toe white didn’t appeal to her, but seeing as bees are hostile to dark colors, her options where limited. She wisely settled on a pale blue hue to dye her beekeeping garb. “I think I’m the only one in Nevada with a colored suit,” Pastrell laughs. Her tendency to favor color doesn’t end with the thread. Pastrell also prefers her honey to have a bit more distinct hue. While it’s tricky to predict exactly what flavors you’ll get from batch to batch—bees travel around a two-mile radius from their hives, so you never quite know what they’re sampling—different seasons bring different blooms, and the late fall varietal tends to be darker, thanks to shrubs such as rabbitbrush.


“We call it the Black Locust Honey,” explains Pastrell of her favorite fall product. “Darker tends to be the most flavorful. It’s got a little something extra in it.” When it comes to the question of keeping bees as your household pets, the danger of an aggressive hive naturally comes up—just like people, different beehives can have different temperaments. An upset one, typically caused by a failing queen who’s not keeping her hive in productive order—can be intimidating. But Pastrell says a sting or two doesn’t scare her. No, she has a bigger fear: Spiders. “I’m more scared of them than bees!” she says.

The thrill seeker Albert Sindlinger, of Al Bees Honey, has ADD. At least that’s how he explains it—“it” being the multiple career hats he wears. Keeping up with him is tough—good thing he has swarms of coworkers at his side. Sindlinger, a seventh and eighth grade math teacher at Traner Middle School by day, plays with bees by night. And like any good man living a double life, he fights for the safety of others on top of it all, battling blazes in the Sequoia National Forest for the last 20 years as a seasonal firefighter. So why does a man versed in so many fields that he’s even written a book, Common Sense Survival Guide, on how to survive natural disasters, choose to spend the vast majority of his bountiful energy on bees? “It’s the connection to nature,” Sindlinger explains. “When you’re inside teaching school all day and it’s stressful, it’s nice to get outside and work with the bees—away from the city.” Sindlinger originally grew Armenian cucumbers in California where he discovered it was more economical to provide his own pollination system. What started as a means to an end 14 years ago has since become a successful small business, with 13 different locations, ranging from Minden to Reno. Al Bees’ honey can be found at the local Whole Foods Market, Murray Ranch in Pleasant Valley, and Agape Organic Apples in Washoe Valley. He specializes in a lighter colored honey that he says is an effect of keeping his hives tucked up against the Sierra and near a natural creek. Despite his years of experience, Sindlinger says he’s constantly learning something new from the bees. His greatest lesson, he found out the hard way.

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“When I first came to Reno, I was a bearkeeper, not a beekeeper,” he says with a chuckle. Bears really do have a sweet tooth. As for learning to deal with the wrath of the bees, well, he’s toughened up his skin. “Every time I go out I get stung,” he says. “But I don’t worry about it, it’s like fighting fire and being around the smoke—it’s just the nature of the job.”

The scientist When it comes to the physics of beekeeping, who better than a scientist? After Chris Foster, who runs Hidden Valley Honey with his wife, Karen, quit his job as a molecular biologist, he devoted his life to the local business, which has grown steadily from 10 hives back in 2002 and sales at local farmers’ markets, to 70 colonies on their property alone, and being carried at Great Basin Community Food Co-op, Whole Foods Market, Scolari’s, Sak ‘N Save, and most local Raley’s—to name a few. But it’s more than the entrepreneur success for Foster—it also provides a mental stimulation he may have missed in retirement. After being asked time and time again by customers about local honey’s effect on allergies—Foster, ever the scientific skeptic—decided to search for an answer himself. His hunt resulted in writing a published article titled “Evidence for the Use of Local Honey for the Relief of Pollen Allergies.” After much exhaustive research, coupled with his customers’ testimonials, Foster was not able to come up with a conclusive yes, but he himself was more convinced of honey’s medicinal properties. “Eighty percent of people who buy our honey buy it for that reason,” Foster says of honey’s pollen defense. “One lady’s 7-year-old son was getting shots and the allergist recommended local honey. As a result, he got off the shots.” As for the scientific theory, Foster explains that there is pollen inside the honey, and by ingesting it, your body is able to acclimate and no longer perceive it as a foreign substance. So according to Foster’s research, that old wives tale about taking a spoonful of honey a day may not be a bad idea for your health, after all—but now what about those stingers? The Fosters, like the rest of the beekeeping club, don’t bat an eye—or swing at any aggressive bees that may be circling. Ω

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Wonderland

Artist Andrew Nixon at his home with a painting of his character Posey.

Andrew Nixon A socially outcast young girl wanders alone into the wilderness, and what she finds there is by wondrous and strange. Brad Bynum That’s basically the opening premise of an entire sub-genre of fantasy fiction— bradb@ newsre view.c om everything from Little Red Riding Wood to Alice in Wonderland to the 2009 stop-motion animated film Coraline. Sometimes the girl finds things that are scary, sometimes they’re just comical, but almost always, they’re strange. The renowned fantasy author Neil andrew nixon’s Gaiman—who wrote, among other works, Wilderness, Pussy the graphic novel Coraline, the basis of and ron rash’s retro the film—once said something to the effect Catharsis, Powered by that all fantasy writers start out imitating Gin are at the holland Alice in Wonderland. Project Gallery, 140 Vesta St., may 20“Even though I was like, I don’t want June 8, with an to do Alice in Wonderland, I still did,” says opening reception on Reno artist Andrew Nixon. Fri., may 21 at 6 p.m. Nixon, 30, is originally from Carson For more information, visit hollandreno.org. City but has lived in Reno for the last eight years. He’s a freelance designer whose work has appeared on covers of local publications like Reno-Tahoe Tonight and Nevada Silver & Blue, the University of

Nevada, Reno’s alumni magazine. He also paints pet portraits, although he considers that a chore: “I hate it.” His provocatively titled exhibition Wilderness, Pussy opens at the Holland Project on May 21, alongside Retro Catharsis, Powered by Gin, an exhibition by similarly imaginative local painter and tattoo artist Ron Rash. Wilderness, Pussy is a multimedia exploration of the imaginative possibilities that could follow a classic fantasy beginning: A girl walks into the woods. (That line is to fantasy literature what “a guy walks into a bar” is to jokes.) Nixon’s girl is a 15-year-old named Posey. The “Pussy” in the title of his show is a reference to the nickname her bullies use to taunt her—what else would it be? Nixon takes a kitchen-sink approach to art-making: the exhibition includes acrylic paintings of various sizes—from large canvases to tiny seed packets—as well as found-object sculptures, and a TV featuring the start screen of a mock video game: Xanaxyz II: Sharon’s Quest.

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the biggest stars in the Creedence Clearwater revisited

In addition to video games, Nixon also takes artistic inspiration from animation and comic books—these influences are apparent in his work, which, along with the fantastical subject matter, places him squarely in the contemporary art category of pop surrealism. But though video games, animation and comic books all played parts in forming his aesthetic sensibility, there’s an even larger influence on his work. “Dreams are a big influence,” he says “I love the bizarre visual imagery. I was really into dreams as a kid. I used to listen to Art Bell’s radio show, and he used to talk about dreams all the time … I used to try to lucid dream and was really into writing down my dreams.” In lieu of titles, Nixon’s works in this exhibition feature accompanying narrative paragraphs, which often describe the action

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depicted in the pieces, as in this paragraph, which accompanies an acrylic painting depicting roughly the same scene: “Amid the orange glow intersecting bitter chill and fire-crackle was Posey, joined once more by her dinner companions: the turtle, the bear and the yeti. The bear was called ‘Smoke-shop Indian’ and spent most of the evening pretending to read Posey’s old comics over and over again. The yeti did very little, his matted obsidian fur reflecting no light, painted with pine-sap runes and adorned with strings of beads and bobs and knick-knacks and nutshells. Posey thought he looked like the Devil, but when his trinkets rustled in the wind, he sounded and smelled exactly like Christmas.” Nixon says his original plan, when he started to work on this exhibition, was that Posey would die in the woods, and the work in the exhibition would be all the artifacts she left behind. But, as he worked on the show, he moved away from that idea. He might have stumbled into an ageold problem for writers: It’s hard to kill the characters you love. Ω

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What’s for dinner Beefy’s 1300 S. Virginia St., 870-1333 When one thinks of Midtown, terms like “modern” or “hipster” might come to mind, but Beefy’s, which took over the by K. J. Sullivan old Landrum’s on Virginia Street about six months ago, is taking it old-school by reviving the diner and adding some country flavor. My friend Tim and I headed out for some burgers and were welcomed merrily by the staff. Photo/AlliSon Young

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Beefy’s is open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Inside is very tiny but set up well, with mostly counter area for seating. The décor is a little bit country and a little bit cow and bull. (Yeah, I made an Osmonds joke, because I like to keep things relevant.) A set of actual longhorns hangs on the wall alongside lassos and other ranch type items. The feel is kitschy without being over the top and is oddly comforting. Tim and I sat down on some stools and looked over the menus. In addition to burgers, Beefy’s offers sandwiches, salads and hot dogs, not to mention ice cream. But forget all that, you name the place Beefy’s, I’m trying your burgers. Beefy’s offers a variety of different toppings for hamburgers including avocado, jalapeños, grilled pineapple, sundried tomato pesto

and chilies to name a few. You have options, but these are sound, basic burgers, nothing gimmicky. I went with the Rustler ($6.50), which is a burger topped with Swiss cheese and grilled mushrooms, and I added a side of onion rings ($3.50). Tim went with the Stetson ($6.50), which came topped with bacon and blue cheese and added a side of fries ($2.75). Smelling the food cooking was tough so Tim decided to order a chocolate milkshake ($4.50) to tide him over. The milkshake, made in front of us in an industrial milkshake machine, arrived creamy and chocolaty. I asked for a “sip” and took a long pull when he turned away. It took a lot not to order my own shake, but with the burger and onion rings coming, I decided to refrain. No, just kidding, I reasoned that I could get one to go. When our burgers arrived, I was happy to see lots of Swiss and mushrooms piled on my burger. All of Beefy’s burgers come with lettuce, tomato, pickles, onions and mayo, but they were glad to accommodate some changes Tim requested. The rolls are soft and delicious. I mean, normally, who cares about the bun, but these are really good. Apparently, the buns are fresh baked daily just for them. The meat itself was tasty and fresh as were all the ingredients on the burger. Tim’s Stetson burger was piled high with smoky bacon that was amazing with the blue cheese. Now the onion rings were good but the fries were so fantastic, we left the onion rings a bit neglected. The fries are hand cut, lightly salted and still had the skins on. Dip these bad boys in the chocolate shake, and you’ve got one happy fat kid—me— on your hands. Beefy’s also has wine and beer, which is nice, because I love a beer and a burger. The staff at Beefy’s is incredible. The two ladies were beyond friendly and just made us feel so comfortable. They really cared that we enjoyed our food but were never intrusive. Overall, the food here is solid. Beefy’s uses fresh ingredients and knows how to cook them. The diner atmosphere is fun, and everything about it makes you feel welcome. The Midtown surge is exciting, and Beefy’s is a great addition to the neighborhood, especially when you’re craving a good, old-fashioned burger with some home-style hospitality. Ω


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That’s just great The Great Gatsby The moment when we first see Leonardo DiCaprio’s face as the title character in Baz Luhrmann’s lavish adaptation of The Great Gatsby is perhaps the biggest “movie star” moment of DiCaprio’s career to date. Fireworks popping off in the night sky behind him, he turns and raises his glass to the camera in a way that exudes high octane, by perhaps nuclear, star charisma. The moment Bob Grimm comes off as if Luhrmann is saying, “Oh yeah, I’ve got Leo as Gatsby, so every other director bgrimm@ newsreview.c om piloting every other movie currently playing in this multiplex can suck it!” Now, if you’re a Luhrmann fan, and you appreciated his over-stylized vision in past works like Romeo + Juliet and Moulin

4

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1 Poor

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5 excellent

22 | RN&R |

Rouge!—let’s just forget Australia ever happened, shall we?—then you are bound to find much to like in his Gatsby. It’s full of eye-popping visuals, lush costumes and terrific soundtrack stunts. I loved hearing Jay-Z and Lana Del Rey during a picture set in the roaring ’20s. More important than any of the visual and audio treats is the fact that DiCaprio gives us cinema’s first “great” Gatsby. (Robert Redford played Gatsby once, and I am falling asleep just typing about it.) His Gatsby is an obsessed heartbreaker, relentlessly pursuing the love of the married Daisy Buchanan (Carey Mulligan), a woman he met five years previous, before going off to war. A lessor actor could make Gatsby come off as a true nutball/psycho, but DiCaprio gives us somebody who garners sympathy and makes complete sense in his own deranged, sad way. Gatsby is the sweetest stalker you will see on screen this year. It’s great to see DiCaprio sharing the screen with longtime friend Tobey Maguire, who is equally good as Nick Carraway, who narrates the film as he writes a novel within MAY 16, 2013

the confines of a sanitarium. For me, knowing of the actors’ real-life friendship enhanced their scenes. Their camaraderie feels quite natural. Maguire actually commands the most screen time in the movie, and that’s a good thing. Before he became Spider-Man, he was one of Hollywood’s more reliable dramatic actors in films like The Cider House Rules and Wonder Boys. He’s the perfect choice for Carraway, a man who is at once intelligent, artistic and socially naïve. Maguire always does a fine job when required to look cute and confused. Joel Edgerton is terrific as Tom Buchanan, Daisy’s lug of a husband. Edgerton commands one of the film’s greatest scenes: a confrontation with Gatsby about Daisy in a New York City hotel over a block of ice and some whiskey. Edgerton makes this more than just a standard showdown between two men over a woman. He turns it into a bona fide romantic apocalypse. As the object of multiple affections, Mulligan gives Daisy bountiful charms to go with those fatal vacuous tendencies. There are times when Gatsby’s pursuit is quite understandable based on how luminescent Mulligan looks in the role. Yet Mulligan, an actress of considerable talent, gives Daisy something far more complex below the surface. As anybody who has read the novel knows going in, Daisy is doomed to a dimmed emotional life, yet Mulligan has you always rooting for her to wise up. Luhrmann made the daring choice to shoot the movie in 3-D, and this stands as one of the great uses of the medium. Streaming confetti, orchids, popping champagne and DiCaprio’s face all get wonderful enhancement in 3-D. Some might decry Luhrmann’s crazy music choices, mixing modern music with old Cole Porter standards. This is just something he always does, and he does it well. When Lana Del Rey comes up over a deeply moving romantic moment, it doesn’t feel like a stunt. It feels completely appropriate. Music is indeed timeless when it comes to Luhrmann movies. As for that green dock light Gatsby gazes upon through the night fog—across the lake, where Daisy lives—it amounts to one haunting image that will stick with you. Driving home from the theater after The Great Gatsby, green traffic lights were making me weepy. Ω

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Spike Lee tried to get a movie about American hero Jackie Robinson, starring Denzel Washington, off the ground for many years, but couldn’t make it happen. I get a feeling that Lee, who made one of the great biopics with Malcolm X, would’ve done something really special with the subject. This effort from director Brian Helgeland (Payback) is OK, even really good at times, but gets awfully hokey in too many moments. Chadwick Boseman is a great pick to play Robinson, as is Lucas Black as Pee Wee Reese. Harrison Ford delivers big time as Branch Rickey, the man who brought Robinson to the majors, and Christopher Meloni leaves the movie all too soon as Dodgers manager Leo Durocher, who was suspended the year Robinson made his debut. Boseman shines, even when the movie doesn’t, and it’s a lot of fun to see Ford do something this craggy and different. I’m thinking Robinson went through some major hell during his baseball times, and this movie only scratches the surface. It’s good, but it should’ve been great.

3

The Company You Keep

Robert Redford directs himself as an upstate New York lawyer with a past who must flee his life when a nosy journalist (Shia LaBeouf) discovers his true identity. The film gives us fictional characters that were former members of the very real Weather Underground, and they are played by the likes of Susan Sarandon, Nick Nolte and Julie Christie. LaBeouf does much of the heavy lifting, and it’s some of his better work in quite some time. Redford is just OK here, as is his movie. I can’t say it blew me away, but I didn’t dislike it, either. It’s just one of those movies that gets by with semicompetent directing and acting without truly wowing you. Others in the cast include Stanley Tucci, Chris Cooper, Terrence Howard, Richard Jenkins and Sam Elliott.

3

Evil Dead

The low-budget classic horror film gets a slick new remake and loses the iconic character of Ash in favor of a girl trying to kick heroin. Mia (Jane Levy) is trying to sober up, so friends and family take her out to a secluded cabin. They find a mysterious book in the basement, somebody reads it out loud, Mia goes for a walk in the woods, the woods treat her badly, and gore aplenty ensues. While Levy is fine in the central role, and Lou Taylor Pucci is good as one of the guys who should’ve gone to a hotel instead, the film has a few too many uninteresting characters. Shiloh Fernandez is a dud as Mia’s brother, and Elizabeth Blackmore is only there so somebody can cut her own arm off. Let it be said that moments such as the arm-cutting are well done. The film is a true gore fest. While it is OK, and doesn’t slander Sam Raimi’s original trilogy, it’s not a horror classic by any means. Like most good horror these days, it’s just good, and that is all.

4

Iron Man 3

Shane Black, director of Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (starring Robert Downey Jr. in his best performance ever) and writer of such action classics as Lethal Weapon, gets his second directorial chore and delivers big time. Tony Stark (Downey Jr.) is now an insomniac suffering from panic attacks after the events of The Avengers, and he faces a new adversary in The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley). Stark is a little bit shaky in this one, and that gives the film a dark, comic edge. Gwyneth Paltrow gets a little more screen time as Pepper Potts, while Guy Pearce and Rebecca Hall show up as mysterious scientific types. Downey Jr. is as fun as ever here, and Black knows just what to do with him. Black is also pretty snappy with the action scenes, which don’t disappoint. If this is the last of Downey Jr.’s solo Iron Man films, he’s going out on a good note.

5

Mud

It’s official: Jeff Nichols, who gave us the brilliant Take Shelter, is a writer/ director who stands among the best of them. Matthew McConaughey plays the title character, a chipped-tooth, wild-haired drifter living in a boat in a tree along the Mississippi. Two kids, Ellis and Neckbone (Tye Sheridan of The Tree of Life, and Jacob Lofland) stumble

upon him, and find themselves part of his strange and dangerous world. McConaughey is just catching wave after wave lately, and this is his best one yet. He makes Mud a little scary, yet charming and cunning. Sheridan and Lofland are terrific as the young friends who should probably stay away from guys living in boats in trees. The cast also boasts Reese Witherspoon, Michael Shannon and Sam Shepard, all of them equally great. Ladies and gentleman, we have the year’s first “excellent” movie. Jesus, it took long enough.

2

Oblivion

2

Oz the Great and Powerful

3

Pain & Gain

4

The Place Beyond the Pines

Tom Cruise gives it his all, but his all isn’t enough to save this sci-fi effort from feeling like a bunch of movies you’ve seen before. He plays Jack, a man on a sweep-up mission of Earth 60 years after it was beat up by aliens. He has a lot of dreams featuring a dream woman (Olga Kurylenko) and the Empire State Building, and seems to feel right at home when visiting the planet. Thing is, he’s far too young to have been around when the Empire State Building stood tall—or is he? The movie wants to be clever, but you’ll see the big twist a mile away. As for the visuals, some work (the Empire State Building in ruins is cool) and some don’t (most of the other effects). Morgan Freeman shows up as a survivor dude who smokes cigars, which means he’s smoking cigars that are over 60 years old. He must’ve grabbed a thousand of them and the world’s greatest humidor as the apocalypse unfolded.

James Franco is in over his head for Sam Raimi’s mostly lame prequel to The Wizard of Oz. The title character calls for somebody with that old school Hollywood charm like Robert Downey, Jr., or Johnny Depp. Franco looks like a kid playing dress up here, and he’s not even the worst thing about the movie. That would be Mila Kunis looking completely lost as the witch who will become that witch we all know from the original Oz. I’m sorry—that witch isn’t supposed to be all corseted and hot. As for Rachel Weisz, she fares best as yet another witch, while Michelle Williams is just serviceable as Glinda the Good Witch. Raimi relies heavily on CGI effects—big surprise—and they look pretty crappy for the most part. This is an underwhelming movie in much the same way his Spider-Man 3 missed the mark. It’s overblown, misguided and odd.

Director Michael Bay delivers the rare decent film with this crazy concoction based on a true story. Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Anthony Mackie play a trio of bodybuilders who decide to kidnap a rich guy (Tony Shalhoub) and force him to sign over all of his assets. The kidnapping plot nets them the dough, but greed and general stupidity result in the plan going south and people dying. Bay uses the story, based on the real-life shenanigans of Daniel Lugo (Wahlberg) to poke fun at the ‘90s, give Wahlberg a chance to get laughs Wahlberg style, and provide Johnson with his best role yet. The movie contains all of that stuff that makes Bay such an annoying director (slo-mo, hyper-editing, etc.), but it works because the actors pull it off.

Derek Cianfrance follows up his brilliant Blue Valentine with a film bigger in scope but still starring Ryan Gosling. Gosling plays Luke, a motorcycle stunt guy who finds out he has a kid and wants to be a part of his life. Problem is, the kid is the product of a one-night stand, and the mom (Eva Mendes) has moved on. Luke resorts to robbing banks, which culminates in a meeting with a rookie cop played by Bradley Cooper. The film then focuses on Cooper’s character for a segment before dealing with Luke and Avery’s kids (played by Dane DeHaan and Emory Cohen) when they are teens. The movie is long, but never boring, and it crackles most when Gosling is on screen. It’s all about the sins of the fathers, and Cianfrance presents it in a way that resonates. Also stars Ray Liotta and Ben Mendelsohn.


All shook up Pelvis Wrestlies There a certain batch of stock questions that get asked whenever a band gets interviewed—especially an up-andby Brad Bynum coming band for a local music profile. These questions all sound clichéd bradb@ and most of them are: What are your newsre view.c om influences? How do you describe your sound? What are your lyrics about? Interviewers and interviewees alike will roll their eyes when these questions get popped, but the responses are Photo/Brad Bynum

their moms—or because they don’t want perspective employers stumbling across their best jokes. So, what are their influences? “Our biggest influences are me and John Lee,” says Demeritt. “Our third biggest influence is Casey.” And how do they describe their sound? “We’ve gotten Ramones and Spits … the Misfits and the Reatards,” says Demeritt. One apropos genre tag would be hardcore garage rock. The band plays garage rock—louder and nasty rock ’n’ roll—but the members play it fast and tight, with none of the loose sloppiness that often characterizes the genre. They play garage rock at hardcore speeds. The rhythm section whips ahead, while Lee plays frenzied but precise guitar solos and sings in an offhand way. He sings like he doesn’t care—but not like he’s trying to sound like he doesn’t care. The group started rehearsing in September 2011, and played its first show in May of last year. This month, they’re releasing their first record, Make Up Face 7”, a four-song single with the tunes “Make Up Face,” “Magic Carpet Ride,” “Watchin’ TV” and “Rat Trap.” The record was recorded by Josh Hageman of local band Thee Indoors at the Holland Project, a nonprofit youth arts organization, where Demeritt is the music director. “Magic Carpet Ride” is a really good song title that’s already the title of a famous song—classic rock band Steppenwolf’s second-biggest hit. “Well, our song was inspired by the movie Aladdin,” says Lee “I was thinking about when you want to take a girl on a real special date—take her on a magic carpet ride and show her the world.” “Their [song] is about a fantasy land acid trip, and that shit don’t roll,” adds Demeritt. And what are most of the band’s lyrics about? “Being in a bad situation,” Lee says. “Or dying. Or pretty girls. Or making love. Or wanting to make love. We have one song about Satanic cults. Just other people in your community.” Ω

often telling. Some bands will answer the questions straight, often with the fervent enthusiasm of the grandly deluded. Other bands will quip and crack wise, avoiding the questions entirely and acting like they haven’t put any thought whatsoever into matters as trivial as their own sound or lyrics. The best responses are those that are quippy and funny, but also provide the interviewer, and therefore the readers, with the juicy, pertinent information. Band profiles like this are aimed at answering one large question for any given reader: Is this band worth my time? All those cliché questions are just fodder for the band members to make their case, so that the readers can decide. The Pelvis Wrestlies is a Reno trio comprised of singer-guitarist John Lee, bassist Clark Demeritt and drummer Casey Conrad. Depending on your perspective, the band name is either a clever bit of wordplay that nicely describes the group’s playful, lascivious twisting of rock ’n’ roll conventions, or it’s a dumb joke that doesn’t really work. The band members are the type of guys who often say really funny, vulgar, quotable things and then say, “Don’t put that in there. We’re very secretive.” Presumably because they want to show their press clippings to

They play garage rock but practice in a basement: John Lee, Casey Conrad and Clark Demeritt are Pelvis Wrestlies.

the Pelvis Wrestlies record release party is at 40 mile Saloon, 1495 S. Virginia St., with thee Indoors and alphabet Cult, on Friday, may 17 at 9 p.m.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MAY 16, 2013

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RN&R

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23


THURSDAY 5/16 1UP

Schall Adams, 9:30pm, no cover

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

THE ALLEY

Rubles Plunge, J French Project, Ever and Ever, 8pm, no cover

The Dwarves, A.D.D., The Flesh Hammers, Elephant Rifle, 9pm, $15

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Sean McGuinness, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

CORKSCROO BAR AND GRILL 10 E. Ninth St., (775) 284-7270

Burning Dance Night, 8pm, no cover

The RN&R no longer a ccepts emailed or phoned-in listings. Post show s online by registering at www.ne wsreview.c om/reno. Deadline is the Friday b efore publication .

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR Kelly Ann Miller, 6pm, no cover

Green Weather, 6pm, no cover

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

Downtime, 9:30pm, no cover

Ever and Ever, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

0142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Sierra School Performing Arts murder mystery comedy The Dinner Party, F-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm, 6:30pm, $17, $21

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

JAVA JUNGLE

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Marianarchy, 4pm, donations

Marianarchy, 2pm, donations

DJ Quik, Mack 10, 8pm, $24-$62

Limp Bizkit, Ryan Campbell, 8pm, $30-$100

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

Flobots, Wheelchair Sports Camp, Knowledge Lives Forever, 8pm, $13-$30

Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

RN&R

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MAY 16, 2013

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

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Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

SVC Speakeasy, 7:30pm, W, $TBA

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

24

Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Love Like Wes, She’s So Provocative, 8pm, $TBA

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

Comedy

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Charles Fleischer, Brant Hoffman, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Nick Griffin, Gene Pompa, W, 9pm, $25

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/20-5/22

Lonely Planet Travel, Back Country, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Ivan Pecel, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Geno Biscante, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

SUNDAY 5/19

1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

3RD STREET

May 16, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

SATURDAY 5/18 ’90s Night, 10pm, no cover

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

Flobots

FRIDAY 5/17

EDM Thursday, 10pm, no cover


THURSDAY 5/16

FRIDAY 5/17

SATURDAY 5/18

SUNDAY 5/19

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Bobby G, 8pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Live music/DJs, 8pm, $0-$15

Smoke Signalz, 9pm, $5, no cover charge for women

DJ battles, 9pm, $5-$15

Rick Sparks and Friends, 7:30pm, no cover

The Localz, 8pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/20-5/22 Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Colin Ross

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RAW BAR LAKE TAHOE

31 Highway 50, Stateline; (775) 580-6029

RED DOG SALOON

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RED ROCK BAR

Adam Springob, 9pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

THE RED ROOM

Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Reggae Vibes, 8pm, $0-$15

Karaoke, 8pm, M, Mixtape DJ/iPod jam session, 8pm, Tu, live music, 8pm, W, $0-$15

Comedy Night hosted by Brandon Lara, 9:30pm, no cover

Open mic hosted by Frankie Ferreira and Brian Depew, 7:30pm, M, no cover

May 16, 7:30 p.m. Studio on 4th 432 E. Fourth St. 410-5993

J2, 9pm, $5

Fusion Fridays w/DJs Kentot, Fredy G, 10pm, Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10 $10; no charge for women until midnight

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover

MO & SLUGGO’S BAR & GRILL

Mark Castro Band, 8pm, no cover

110 W. Telegraph St., Carson City; (775) 885-1888

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Metal Echo, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

Smiley Mikey, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH

Colin Ross, John Frederick, Mig O’Hara, Todd McLaughlin, 7:30pm, $5

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

CRUSH EP release party, 7pm, $58pm, $10

LYFAO w/Steve Ryan, Matt Wiegand, Adam Holwera, John Agar, 8pm, $10

Lenny El Bajo, Lizzie Cates, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

The Dwarves May 18, 9 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

Standup Tues. Comedy Open Mic, 7:30pm, Tu, Blues Jam Wed., 7pm, W, no cover

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Join us for the first

Old Southwest Street Fair

From DINOSAURS to ice age mammals to legends like BIGFOOT and Yeti.

WIN WINT NTER TER R MUSIC MU MUS SIC SERIES SIC SE S ERIES IES WINTER

Thurrsday d y, May y 16 Thursday,

W/ Mary Ma Jane Jane Rocket, R Rocket k t, Half H f A Tusk, Hal W/ Frontier Frro ronti ntier Citysounds, Seven Churches! Churchess! (Free (Frree Tickets From Bands!)

RU RUBLES PLUNGE

F id Fr i ay, May 17 Friday,

W/ J French F h Project, P j t And A d Ever E And A d Ever E W/

THE DWARVES

Burgers Bangers & Mash Roast Prime Rib & Yorkshire Pudding Shepherd’s Pie Fish & Chips Chocolate Bacon

Saturday, May 18

At the corner of California Ave. and Plumas St. in front of the Reno Bead Shop and Too Soul Tea Co.

W/ A.D.D. Elephant Rifle, The Flesh Hammers

CHELSEA CROWELL

(Granddaughter Of Johnny Cash)

Sunday, May 19

W/ Dusty Miles And The Cryin' Shame, Spike Mcguire, Blood on The Land

SUBHUMANS

Y DA TO es Y s B clo t OP ST xhibi 2nd E e n Ju

Thursday, May 23

W/ Total Chaos, Out For War, Priscilla Ford

HEAVY METAL BASH

NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

- Mon & tue -

Join Us This Weekend As The Dwarves Return For Debauchery Sat. Night!! And On Sunday Chelsea Crowell, (Granddaughter Of Johnny Cash) Visits For A One Night Only Show!

LadieS 2 FoR 1 Wine - wedneSday -

oPen MiC nite

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: May 18 — The Dwarves May 23 — Subhumans May 25— TSOL May 28— For The Fallen Dreams May 31— Jet Stole Home June 9— The Word Alive June 14— L.A. Guns

Steampunk Accessories Henna Art & Face Painting Food | Drinks 775.322.2225 |

4-7pm & 10pm-close

W/ Scattered, Blasphemous Creation, Pain Clinic, Enslave The Creation.

Crafts | Jewelry | Soaps Plants & Garden | Art Native Beadwork & Paintings Glass Artists

OPINION

- happy hour -

Friday, May 24

May 18th (Saturday) from 11am to 6pm

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM

PaiSLeY BRain Live

$9 Adults / $8 Children & Seniors School & group tours available

ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

If you drink, don’t drive. PerIod.

BReakFaSt, LunCh & dinneR 9aM to cloSe

(775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

|

Think you know your limits? Think again.

- Saturday -

Rancho San Rafael Regional Park 1595 N. Sierra St, Reno 775-785-5961 / www.maycenter.com

TheAlleySparks.com

THESE DON’T MIX

4050 S. Mc carran Blvd, reno nv 775.737.4440 • www.Spitfirereno.coM |

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MAY 16, 2013

|

RN&R

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25


THURSDAY 5/16

FRIDAY 5/17

SATURDAY 5/18

SUNDAY 5/19

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 4pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 4pm, no cover

2) Jason King, 6pm, no cover

2) Jason King, 6pm, Dan Parslow, 8pm, no cover

2) Dan Parslow, 8pm, no cover

2) Rock River, 6pm, Dan Parslow, 8pm, no cover

2) Rock River, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Decades, 7pm, no cover

2) Decades, 8pm, no cover

2) Decades, 8pm, no cover

2) Stew Stewart, 6pm, no cover

2) Paul Covarelli, M, Tu, W, 6pm, no cover

2) The Main Squeeze, 9pm, no cover

1) Afrolicious, Eddie Robert’s West Coast Sound, 9pm, $15, $18

1) Lyrics Born, Skins & Needles, 40 Watt Hype, 9pm, $12, $15

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

BOOMTOWN CASINO HOTEL 2100 Garson Rd., Verdi; (775) 345-6000 1) Event Center 2) Guitar Bar

2) The Palmore Brothers, M, Tu, W, 8pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

Lyrics Born

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

May 18, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

Karaoke Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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RN&R

1) Menopause the Musical, 3pm, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, Caravanserai, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, Caravanserai, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35

2) Chili Sauce, 7pm, no cover 3) Eric Andersen, 5:30pm, no cover 5) DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover 3) Eric Andersen, 6pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) Eric Andersen, 6pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 7pm, no cover

2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover 3) Dotsero, W, 6pm, no cover

2) Jackie Dauzat, 7pm, no cover 3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

2) Soul Experience, 9pm, no cover 2) Soul Experience, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 3) Suits & Sneakers w/DJ Risk One, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20 DJ XM Fredie, 10pm, $20

2) Kyle Williams, 7pm, no cover

2) Kyle Williams, M, Tu, W, 7pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Step This Way (dubstep, house), 8pm, W, no cover

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219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

1) Felicia Michaels, 8:30pm W, $10, $15

1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ J.Espinosa, 10pm, $10

HARRAH’S RENO

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

26

1) Menopause the Musical, 8pm, $24.95+ 1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 3) DJ Scene, 10pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/20-5/22

1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Left of Centre, 10pm, W, no cover

SANDS REGENCY 345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Poolside

2) Rock Monsterz, 10pm, no cover

2) Rock Monsterz, 10pm, no cover

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2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

MAY 16, 2013


Painting the West Stremmel Gallery presents its latest exhibition featuring work by Ron Arthaud, Jean LeGassick, Craig Mitchell, Charles Muench and Jeff Nicholson. The plein-air painters will show work depicting the landscapes of the Great Basin, Sierra and other regions of Nevada. There will be an opening reception at 5:30 p.m., May 16, at the gallery, 1400 S. Virginia St. The show will run through June 15. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Call 786-0558 or visit www.stremmelgallery.com.

The Storyteller Reno Pops Orchestra will present their spring concert, which takes a whimsical look at music inspired by some of the world’s most beloved works of literature, including Candide and The Hobbit. Guest Howard Rosenberg will narrate A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh and Robyn Niedhold, winner of RPO’s 2012 Concerto Festival, will perform Dmitri Shostakovich’s Concerto No. 1. The orchestra will also perform “Olivia,” an original work based on a scene from William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night composed by Tim Labor, winner of the 2012 Reno Pops Orchestra Composer Competition. The free concert begins at 7 p.m., May 18, at Nightingale Concert Hall, 1335 N. Virginia St., inside the Church Fine Arts Building at the University of Nevada, Reno. Call 673-1234 or visit www.renopops.org.

City of Reno Greenhouse Plant Sale Local gardeners who have faithfully adhered to our area’s May 15 last frost date rule can now plant without worry. There are many places around town to stock up on spring and summer plants including this plant sale at the City of Reno Greenhouse, 190 Telegraph St. More than 5,000 plants will be for sale, including heirloom tomatoes, herbs, vegetables and annual flowers. The event is open from 7:30 a.m., until noon on May 18. Proceeds from the plant sale will benefit the Reno Municipal Rose Garden and Children’s Snack Garden. Call 657-4616.

Don Giovanni Nevada Opera concludes its 2012-2013 season with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s opera based on the legend of Don Juan, the infamous womanizer who’s been the subject of several literary works. In in this two-part opera, Don Giovanni, the Italian name for Don Juan, is an arrogant, promiscuous nobleman whose refusal to repent for his transgressions leads to supernatural retribution. Nevada Opera will present two versions of this popular opera. The traditional version will be performed at 7:30 p.m., May 17, and 2 p.m., May 19, at the Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $43-$78. The second version is an abridged work with a vampire twist. Giovanni, A Vampire Tale portrays the title character as a vampire instead of a seducer of women. This more youth-appropriate version will feature singers from NVO’s Chorus and Young Artists Program. Performances are at noon and 3 p.m., May 18, at the Pioneer Underground, located at the Pioneer Center. Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for youth age 19 and younger. Call 786-4046 or 686-6600 or visit www.nevadaopera.org. .

Spring Wings Bird Festival Thousands of shoreline and waterfowl descend on the wetlands in the Lahontan Valley each year during their spring migration. You’ll get a chance to see some of these migrating birds and other wildlife during the annual festival, which begins on May 17. There will be birding and wildlife tours to various locations within the Lahontan Valley wetlands surrounding Fallon, as well as demonstrations, workshops and presentations by wildlife experts at the Churchill County Fairgrounds, 325 Sheckler Road, Fallon. Prices vary from $5 to $50 for most events during the festival, which concludes on May 19. Call (775) 423-5128 or visit www.springwings.org.

Comstock Historic Preservation Weekend You can’t help feeling as if you’ve been transported back in time when you visit Virginia City. Learn more about the historic boomtown’s heyday during the 27th annual celebration, which includes a kick-off party at 5:30 p.m., May 17, at the Fourth Ward School, 537 South C St., followed by tours of the school, Piper’s Opera House and other VC landmarks on May 18-19. Prices vary for tours. Call 847-0975 or visit http://fourthwardschool.org.

Chapel Tavern’s Pop-Up Brunch

—Kelley Lang

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The religious-themed bar will host this foodie event featuring locally roasted coffee from Magpie Coffee, a three-item brunch prepared by Chef Mark Estee of Campo restaurant and a specialty brunch cocktail prepared by Chapel Tavern mixologists. There will be three seatings between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., May 18, at the tavern, 1099 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $25 in advance. Call 815-5937 or visit www.chapeltavern.com.

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I’ve been with my boyfriend for two years. I have trust issues, having been cheated on in past relationships. My boyfriend’s best friend of six years, a beautiful and intelligent woman, passed away three months ago. Since then, he’s visited her grave weekly and kept a photo of them together posted online. When she was alive, the two of them spoke daily about everything—including our relationship. I made it clear that their constant communication and boundary-crossing details were not OK with me, yet they continued. They claimed they were strictly platonic. However, since I’m a woman who has been fooled before, I can’t help but suspect otherwise. I love my boyfriend and want to support him in his time of grief, but I don’t feel he sees how hard it is for me to see the man I love mourn this woman he loved and lost. It can be unsettling when your man comes home with tear stains on his collar, smelling like a trip to the cemetery. But the guy’s best friend died only three months ago, and he’s visiting her grave once a week; it’s not like he’s up all night with the Ouija board, asking her for advice on your sex life. It must’ve been a bummer to find that your man’s best friend of six years wasn’t just a placeholder in his life until he could find a girlfriend. And yes, friends confide in each other, share their lives, and give each other feedback. If there was certain information that you wanted to remain private, you needed to come to some agreement about that together. But you don’t get to mandate that your

boyfriend’s friendship revolve around topics of conversation you don’t find invasive, like the weather. As for why the dearly departed is still clinging to life in your boyfriend’s online photos, it’s probably for the same reason that I still have the phone numbers of several dead friends programmed into my phone. It feels good keeping them in my life, even in such a mundane way, and I refuse to have a hand in making them any more gone than they already are. You have “trust issues” because you’re “a woman who has been fooled before,” not because you have videotape of your boyfriend and his friend making out. Unless he’s given you reason to believe he’s unethical, your jealousy and suspicions arose out of your failure to take responsibility for what was done to you in the past. There are a few crafty sociopaths out there who can hide their true character, but chances are you got cheated on because you didn’t really want to look at who you were with, and that came back to bite you. Accepting that should help you be there for your boyfriend—tempting as it is to take the jealous girlfriend thing to a new level by asking whether that tapping on the wall is his dead friend trying to arrange a time for some out-of-this-world sex.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the alter-

nate universe created by Marvel comic books, there is a mutant superhero called Squirrel Girl. She has the magic power to summon hordes of cute, furry squirrels. Under her guidance, they swarm all over the bad guy she’s battling and disable him with their thousands of tiny chomps and thrashing tails. She and her rodent allies have defeated such arch villains as Dr. Doom, Deadpool, Baron Mordo and Ego the Living Planet. Let’s make her your role model for the coming weeks, Aries. The cumulative force of many small things will be the key to your victories. As in Squirrel Girl’s case, your adversaries’ overconfidence may also be a factor.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have

arrived at the edge of reality. Or rather, to be precise, you have arrived at the edge of what you think of as reality. Here’s where things could get very interesting. Just on the other side of that edge you’re brushing up against, there is much, much more reality—a vast territory you have barely imagined, let alone believed in or explored. Are you feeling brave? If you’re willing to find out about stuff you didn’t even realize you would love to experience, I suggest you slip across the border and wander around on the other side.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A character

in Neil Gaiman’s graphic novel A Game of You delivers this speech: “Everybody has a secret world inside of them. ... No matter how dull and boring they are on the outside, inside them they’ve all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid worlds. Not just one world. Hundreds of them.” As a Gemini, you are not, of course, dull and boring on the outside. That may have something to do with why your secret inner worlds are often even frothier and sparklier than most people’s. But lately, I’m afraid, some of those secret inner worlds of yours have gotten a bit shabby and dank. It’s time for a deep cleansing. To be thorough, don’t just wash your own brain. Wash your wild heart and funky soul, too.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “You begin

saving the world by saving one person at a time,” said writer Charles Bukowski. “All else is grandiose romanticism or politics.” I invite you to make that thought one of your guiding principles in the coming week, Cancerian. Translate your high ideals into actions that make a practical impact on particular human beings and animals. Instead of merely talking about what good things you want to do, actually do them. As much as possible, be sure that every detail of your daily life reflects your vision of ultimate truth and beauty.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you were a fledgling savior, now would be a propitious moment to begin your messianic mission. If you were a musician hoping to leap to the next level of career success, this would be prime time to plan an extensive tour. If you were the inventor of the “next big thing,” I’d suggest that you get your marketing campaign in gear. And if none of those descriptions fits your personal situation, regard them as apt metaphors for your use. How can you spread the word about what’s most important to you?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): As frontman of

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by rob brezsny

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H A R R A H ’ S

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the band Queen, Virgo singer Freddie Mercury made use of his four-octave range with flamboyant showmanship and breathtaking technique. Many critics regard him as one of the greatest vocalists in the history of pop music. Mercury joked that he was perfect except for one glaring flaw: his overbite. Because he had four extra teeth in his upper mouth, his top jaw protruded. But he chose not to alter his appearance with surgery because he suspected it might change his singing voice in unpredictable ways. Is there a comparable situation in your own life, Virgo? A so-called imperfection that seems to be entwined with a beautiful asset? I urge you to be like Mercury. Accept the paradox—embrace it and celebrate it—and move on.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The 14th-

century poet Dante was a major influence on 20th-century novelist James Joyce. “I love Dante,” wrote the author of the epic novel Ulysses. “He is my spiritual food.” And yet Joyce felt he had to absorb Dante in small doses. He said, “Dante tires one quickly; it is as if one were to look at the sun.” Is there any influence like that in your own life, Libra? Judging from the astrological omens, I’m guessing it’s a fine time for you to get as much sustained exposure to that glorious source as you can bear.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Greek poet

Sappho was renowned in antiquity. The nine books she wrote were so esteemed that the historian Strabo wrote, “in this whole span of recorded time we know of no woman to challenge her as a poet even in the slightest degree.” And yet little of Sappho’s work survives. As of 2004, there were just 264 fragments and three complete poems. But then a fourth complete poem emerged. Its text was written on papyrus that had been wrapped in the casing of an Egyptian mummy. The mummy had been stored for years in a backroom at the University of Cologne in Germany before someone discovered its hidden treasure. Your assignment, Scorpio, is to seek an equivalent recovery. Search for a part of the past that’s still beautiful and useful, even if that quest leads you to unlikely and obscure places.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

When I turn my psychic attention in your direction, I smell smoldering smoke. Here’s how I interpret that: Your internal fire is burning with less than maximum efficiency. Do you agree, Sagittarius? If so, do you know why that might be? Did you not provide enough kindling? Is the wood too green? Is the ground wet? I urge you to find out what the problem is. You can’t afford to have sputtering flames and sooty light and spotty warmth. You need a steady blaze that radiates brilliant light and strong heat.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Very

few of us are completely uninhibited about expressing who we really are. Most everyone is shy about revealing at least one facet of his or her identity. Why? Maybe because we’re afraid that people will judge us harshly for being different from what they think we should be. Or maybe our secret side is at odds with our self-image, and we hesitate to acknowledge it even to ourselves. What is this part of you, Capricorn? In what sense are you still in the closet about a truth or quality or event that’s central to your character? I urge you to have a conversation with yourself about it. You aren’t necessarily ready to tell the whole world about it, but now might be the right time to start considering the possibility that you can give it more room to play.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I abso-

lutely forbid you to be a slave of happiness, a victim of pleasure or a prisoner of love. Wait. Sorry. I take that back. What gives me the right to forbid you from doing anything? It’s your life. You’re the boss. So let me reframe my previous advice: Dear Aquarius, I beg you not to be a slave of happiness, a victim of pleasure or a prisoner of love. None of the good things in life will give you what you need if you make yourself crazy or sick while pursuing them. That’s the cautionary news. The encouraging news is that in the next five weeks, I think you will have a knack for cultivating a graceful relationship with happiness, pleasure and love.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t be

like the ducks that are floating on Phoenix Lake a short distance from where I’m sitting. They’re feeding entirely on the surface, happy to skim a few insects from the top of the placid waters they’re drifting on. No, Pisces, be more like the frogs that are diving to probe for morsels down below. This is a phase of your astrological cycle when the quest for more variety can deepen your perspective and provide better nourishment.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Sage Leehey photo/SAGE LEEhEY

Friend to felines Tina Cook, a Sun Valley resident, has a passion for animal rescue and has created her own small shelter at her home. She has been rescuing animals since she was 10 years old, when she brought home her first dog, which she had found shot.

Tell me about what you do with the cats in your neighborhood. About 10 years ago, my husband and I saw cats coming out of a garbage can. Come to find out, a lady let her cats go and never had them fixed. They formed a colony of feral cats, so I started feeding them. Now, I have camouflaged feeding stations at three different stations on our street. Within that first year, I found out about Community Cats, which is a trap and release program. They fix them for free. … We’ve fixed over 200. We bring them to the Humane Society. They have certain days where Community Cats does the trap and release, usually Mondays and Sundays. I keep them overnight because they’re really groggy, and then I release them. I don’t always release them, though, if they are kittens or if they’re injured, in the hopes to adopt them out. I’ve probably adopted out, myself, at least 100 cats and kittens.

Why did you decide to do this? I’m passionate about animal rescue. Someday I want to have an animal sanctuary with acres of land. I’m the crazy lady who

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home. The people lived in an apartment with no yard and five dogs. We fell in love with her, so we offered to take her. He loved her so much that he gave her to us. He cried when he gave me his dog, but we promised we would take good care of her. It’s been four years. Dogs are actually my favorite, but I don’t rescue them as much as I would like to.

How do you pay for this? The lady who owns the Cozy Cattery—the other half of her business is the Feline Rescue of Northern Nevada—supplies food to feral colonies that help her. I get her cleaning supplies for her sanctuary. If they need monetary donations, I try to get that. During the holidays, I help put barrels in all of the Walmarts in town, just like you see for the food bank. She supplies the food because it gets donated to her, and I’m not a nonprofit. I do the litter and everything else, cat toys and everything.

stops for dogs in the middle of the street. We’ve even a cut a little hole so the cats can sleep under the house for shelter. I’m very big on being a voice for animals.

How many cats do you call your own?

How does your family feel?

Honestly, probably about 30. They’re mostly feral. Most of them were babies we had the intention of adopting out. We’ll adopt all of the litter out but one, and then five years go by, and you still have them. Or one cat we acquired because a lady at my dad’s senior apartment had died, and the cat was left at the apartment for a month alone. Her family didn’t want it, and it was traumatized. She’s been with us for four years. We’ve been trying to find her a home, but she needs a special home. I do stuff like that sometimes, but mostly it’s the cats at the end of the street.

One day my husband will be OK with it, and the next day, he gets angry. My daughters did better when they were younger. Now, it’s just my one daughter because my stepdaughter has moved out. I think my daughter knows it’s my passion, but I’m sure if she could have me do something different, she probably would. I love it, though. We built an addition onto the house. It was supposed to be the game room with a pool table, which we had in it once. It started with a small cage in there, and before we knew it, we had taken everything out of the room … It’s like my own little sanctuary. They have everything they can possibly want in there, and if they get sick they go to the vet. Ω

What about dogs? If I catch them, I try to find their home. One of our dogs my husband found in the middle of the street. We placed an ad and found her

More power to us As soon as anybody mentions the words nuclear power, most of us tuck into a fetal position, pop our thumbs in our mouths, and begin rocking unconsciously, gently glazing off to images of Chernobyl/Three Mile Island. We’re horribly stuck in the past. The new reality is that many brilliant and wealthy people are seeking to build nuclear power plants that are to those notorious fuckups what a ’52 Buick is to a modern Corvette. And when one of the world’s most famous and wealthy men gets actively involved in all this, it’s time to at least give it a look. The wealthy gent I refer to is none other than William Gates, and the company he’s backing is called Terra Power. It’s a company that’s developing a nuke that could be quite radical and quite important over the next 20-30 years. That is, if the damned thing works. Gates has been involved with Terra for the last three years, and without getting too technical, what TP is pushing is a new kind of nuclear

Abigail Polus, HOPES Prevention Coordinator

∫y Bruce Van Dye

energy generator called a traveling wave reactor. What makes the TWR attractive—very attractive indeed— is its appetite for nuclear waste. Current nukes take uranium 235, burn it for fuel, and leave plutonium and uranium 238 as waste. The TWR will have to use a little U-235 to get going, yes, but once it’s fired up, it would use U-238 as fuel. That’s a big deal. In fact, a gigantic breakthrough. Not only would we be making oodles and oodles of energy from nuclear waste, but we would also be getting rid of our—nuclear waste! This would be a good thing. A very good thing. A reactor that could burn current stockpiles of toxic junk would be very busy indeed. We currently have at least 700,000 metric tons of nuke waste laying around various reactor sites, now that Yucca Mountain has been shelved. It’s estimated that 8 tons of this stuff could power 2.5 million homes for a year. So basically, if the TWR works, well, we would instantly have a brand new and very

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powerful energy source. A lot of it. A baseline energy source that would run your toaster when the sun didn’t shine, and the wind didn’t blow. An energy source that would emit zero carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. That, too, would be a real good thing. I’m certainly not going to be as pie-in-the-sky as those guys in the ’50s with their happy face movies about “the friendly atom.” We’ve come a long way. Terra Power and its new “green” reactor has to be eyeballed to the max by both the learned and the skeptical. But it’s a timely and important proposition. We are becoming more and more desperate to create big energy without adding greenhouse gases to the mix. Because, seriously, what’s gonna be worse—the damage from another Three Mile Isle nucleo-blooper or the damage from 50 years of intensifying global warming? Ω |

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No-one should be left uncared for “I’m involved with HOPES because harm reduction works. We are one of the only centers in the area that is adopting this philosophy into the way we care for and manage our clients. HOPES is really trying to go out of our way to provide harm reduction services. Figuring out where people are and what might be of real help for them at the time, that can help people. We provide one-on-one educational pieces on a variety of topics. We also offer outreach services, ranging from homeless shelters to the streets to social events. I want to be there to support people when they need compassion. That, to me, is what exemplifies the very best in human beings. That’s what I want to be a part of, people who care, people who support each other, and I get that feeling at HOPES. I get tremendous satisfaction out of building something that is unique to the Reno area and that offers the possibilities for so much healing for those who suffer.

HOPES is committed to helping people to receive health care no matter where they’re at, if they’re still using, if they’re not using, we want to get you in to see someone for behavioral health or whatever you need because no-one should be left uncared for.” • PRIMARY MEDICAL CARE • CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT • HIV, HEP C, STD TESTING • MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING • SUBSTANCE USE COUNSELING • SUPPORT GROUPS

NORTHERN NEVADA

HOPES Your partner in health WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCES, MEDICAID, MEDICARE & THE UNINSURED MONDAY – THURSDAY: 8AM – 7PM • FRIDAY: 8AM – 5PM 580 W 5TH ST., RENO (775) 786-4673 • NNHOPES.ORG

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MAY 16, 2013

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R-2013-05-16