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RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 19, ISSUE 6

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MARCH 28 – APRIL 3, 2013


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2   |   RN&R   |   march 28, 2013


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

The media is the message

Something to think about Whitney Houston is dead? Re “Think. Then think again.” (Guest

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I’ve been thinking about how technology would affect newspapers for about 20 years now. Most people thought the internet would kill newspapers. I never bought this notion because I could never make it pencil out: Newspapers paid for websites, not visa versa. The way to compete was to accentuate the things newspapers could do better and not to compete in things the internet does better: Databases, speed of publication, interactivity and archives. I’ve written essays on the topic, like this one I wrote in February 2009, www.newsreview. com/reno/coming-golden-ageof/content?oid=914453, and I invited readers to write in five years and show me how wrong I was. Guess what? I just reread it and so far, I’m right on the money with everything except online coupons (think Living Social) and micropayments. (And it’s still premature to call me wrong on this one—99 cent subscriptions anyone?) The only thing that was killing newspapers was suicide—newspapers’ inability to evolve to meet existing market conditions. The titans of newsprint couldn’t turn away from the icebergs of free online classifieds, national internet advertising, and the lie of social media advertising and public relations. But I recently bought the Nexus 10 tablet. This is the future. I can read a tablet newspaper in bed as easily as I can read a book, something I could never do with a laptop or desktop or cell phone. I’ve been watching the two technologies of smart phone and tablet evolve toward each other—cell phones increasing in size for videos and games, and tablets shrinking for portability. There is still not a digital analog for local display advertising that works as well as a newspaper, but think about it—if the content has already been read on the tablet, why would anyone pick up a newsprint newspaper? It’s time for me personally to learn to build apps. And it’s time to seriously consider embargoing stories from the web. Let’s see how suicidal newspapers are in the face of this sea change.

comment, March 21): Let’s see. Why would the Wall Street Journal think highly of Diane Ravitch? Perhaps because her voice serves their purposes. And what might those be? Read their opinion pages, and you will find that this Murdoch rag is very right of center and, of course, the paper has always taken on strongly the business point of view. Both Ravitch and this paper supported very strongly No Child Left Behind, and Ravich spends a lot of her time defending schools as they currently exist. Why? Because, despite her newly discovered adversity to the program she vociferously supported and, I imagine, with her good friend Chester Finn, greatly influenced, she continues to push for a school system that is going to keep students from becoming capable of informed and sensible critique of the society in which they live, a society that very much works to benefit the kind of people Ravitch and Finn like, the rich and powerful, even if the society eats its young to feed those already overfed. Read her blog and tell me how it is that she is so well respected when most of what she says has to do with the goodness of public schools and their teachers. Yes, she goes after the bureaucrats who are hassling teachers—good for her—but she then fails to make the case against the kind of education those teachers are delivering. The more I read her, the more I try to figure her out, the more I come to believe that she is using her antiNCLB, anti-testing, anti-bad teacher evaluation protocol arguments as a way to maintain schools that serve the same purposes she cared to have them serve when she was pro-NCLB. As for the good of school boards old and new, if what they have done and continue to do is the best that they can do, then we need a better way to decide who is allowed to become a decision maker. Stephen Lafer Reno Editor’s note: “The society eats its young to feed those already overfed.” Well said.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Is there any limit as to the lack of scrutiny which Sen. Harry Reid receives regardless of his shameless behavior? Reid tried to link the tragic death of seven Marines and the injury of seven to the sequester! Apparently Obama was more concerned with the death of drug abusing Whitney Houston than those dead Marines. I don’t think the flags in Washington, D.C., were flown half mast for our unfortunate Marines. Reid has amassed tremendous wealth through his office. His false claims about Mitt Romney not paying his taxes would indicate that Reid is either mentally challenged or a compulsive, lying SOB. Joseph DuPont Towanda, Penn.

Keep it home grown For five years, Wellness Education Cannabis Advocates of NV has been the Las Vegas Medical Marijuana Meet up Group. We have recently gone nonprofit in Nevada and are in the process of doing the same at a federal level. As you are aware, things are heating up on the cannabis issues. We as a patient advocacy group are primarily concerned with the issues regarding medical cannabis patients needs, potential business opportunities, job opportunities, and rights. Nevada residents/patients have the right to participate in green jobs and small-business opportunities that will be available once these programs are in place. If the fees related to the cannabis industry are outrageous, and there is no two years or more Nevada residency for owners/operator/distributors in place, big business from outside Nevada will take over, and the benefits/ money will leave Nevada. We need the jobs and taxes for Nevada residents and education. Medical patients who are over their limits at harvest should be allowed to sell this quality tested excess medicine to licensed dispensaries for compensation. This will financially help patients who are unable to work, and they can stay within the limits set by the new bill by selling the excess to licensed

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

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Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

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dispensaries operated by licensed and educated staff. We need to keep profits in Nevada! We have sent emails to every legislator asking them to consider these issues when they are discussing and putting in place the new rules for us. Thank you for your time and coverage of this all important issue! Please call at any time, we have advocates willing and eager to do interviews to help educate the public. See www.wecan702.org. Vicki Higgins Las Vegas

his position on sequestration a little confusing. Harry Reid doesn’t like the president’s budget sequestration scheme. But he doesn’t seem to mind the administration’s sequestration of the Benghazi survivors. Wouldn’t it be helpful to hear from those individuals what really happened in Benghazi? Where are they? Back to the Marine tragedy. Sen. Reid, after hearing your comments, I needed a bath. Robert R. Kessler Las Vegas, NV

No, you!

Left write

Re “Those Flaming Dogs” (Letters to the Editor, March 21): Those smelly ass dogs are the same ones that our local police use to protect and serve. The same ones used for therapy dogs in hospitals and nursing homes. The same ones that accompany our soldiers in war. The same ones that were used to locate the buried bodies in the rubble of 9-11. So, no, you get over it! Kandy Hilton Reno

I wrote Sen. Dean Heller a letter recently. You should, too. I asked him not to be an obstructionist, and to please put our country before his party. And I said a lot of us are politely pissed that the Congress is not acting on the president’s agenda. We did, after all, elect Obama and his agenda with a good majority. I think Sen. Heller’s considering his political future and is making a slight turn towards the middle. No proof, just a suspicion. Sadly, the “middle” in our country is moderate right wing. And the left, is, well ... maybe center at best. (Note, Reno has no Progressive talk radio AM—there is no far left here.) Please do write our senator, and urge him to not let the corporate interests confiscate vital government functions. Privatization breeds only profit for a wealthier few, and as I absurdly say, you can vote out a government, not a corporation. If we let them sell our country to the highest corporate bidder, we’ll all take it in the shorts. Trust me on this. Our government is supposed to protect us from carnivorous capitalism, not opt-out to them. Say no to privatization of vital services. Here’s his email, please take the time to fill in/out the boxes: www. heller.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/ contact-form Counting on you. Craig Bergland Reno

Teens need a safe place Re “The Teen Issue” (Feature story, March 21): Beautiful, authentic contributions here. Kudos to the teachers who have created a safe environment where young people can gain skills and process their life learning. This foundation will stay with them. Reno needs places where young people can focus on other aspects of education. Not all students are in football or clubs, etc., yet all students need places where they can evolve on their own path. Thank you for sharing with us. Dixi Dougherty Incline Village

Bath assaults Setting aside for the moment the smarminess of Sen. Harry Reid’s remarks about the tragic Marine Corps training accident in Hawthorne, I find

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Sean Karp, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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THIS WEEK

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

MARCH 28, 2013

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by Dennis Myers

ThIs ModeRn WoRLd

by tom tomorrow

April fooling, give or get? Asked at Michael’s Deli, 628 S. Virginia St. Simon Bauman Information technology director

My dad came running in and told me that the car was on fire at about 6 in the morning. So I fell out of bed and ran outside in my underwear.

Pam Heisler Administrative assistant

I did play one. I just remembered. It was on my boyfriend, husband now. We were in Florida on vacation, and he was in the shower, and I faked him out by saying his scuba stuff fell off the deck into the ocean.

Beija Rivera Legal assistant

Good on you Every once in a while, reasonable people have to tip their hats to the alternative press, particularly when they do something of note. Not to state the obvious, but the newsprint alternative to us in Reno, Nev., is the Reno Gazette-Journal. Well, RG-J, good job on the March 24 package “13 schools that need our help.” Good reporting. Helpful to the community. Speaks directly to the Spanishlanguage people who need to read it. Good work. As a news source that has published occasional pieces in Spanish, we know the kind of shit you’re going to get for this. All manner of morons will come out of the woodwork to express their ignorance. Editors and business types over there can be certain that most of the commentary will come from people who haven’t picked up a Reno Gazette-Journal for a long time. In fact, the only reason they’re reading it right now, if indeed they read it before they called, is because of your Spanish-language coverage. In other words, they picked it up because people are talking about it in the real world. However, as another news source that depends on freedom of speech and the First Amendment, we say language—and that includes Spanish—is the most fundamental aspect of speech. English-only is about as unconstitutional a concept as the right-wingers have come up with. The Gazette’s package seemed to hit on all cylinders. According to the introductory note by publisher John Maher: “As we prepared this special report, the challenges faced by students and parents who do not speak English emerged as a critical factor in the Washoe County School District’s ability to improve OPINION

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It was supposed to be funny, but it turned out to be true. My mother said my dog got hit by a car. And my dog really did get hit by a car … that same day. My dog died.

teaching outcomes evenly across the district. Because 24 percent of the school’s elementary students are English-language learners, we have taken the extra step of publishing today’s report in both English and Spanish so that this information can be of the greatest utility to families in our community.” We get that. We also that note in the print edition, there were strip advertisements running along the bottom of the pages with Spanish-language content, but none on the English pages. It doesn’t take los científicos de cohetes to find a message in that. Many people like to categorize other people in divisive ways: Rich vs. poor, English vs. Spanish, Republican vs. Democrat. But one thing this report clearly illustrates is that Washoe County School District students’ success or failure of rises and falls based on the success of all students. In those 13 “failing” schools, only 24 percent of those students are Spanish-language students, but all the schools are underperforming. This is the reality, folks, and the RG-J’s package illustrates one thing better than all others: There is only one community in our part of Northern Nevada, and we all live in it. We all care about our kids, and we all want success for all of them. Uno mas tiempo: Todos nos preocupamos por nuestros hijos, y todos queremos el éxito para todos. Full disclosure: This editorial was written by D. Brian Burghart. His girlfriend, Kelly Scott, works at the RG-J and had some input in the RG-J’s package. Ω

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Joyce Pinkerton Retiree

Mostly played on me. My grandchildren—the salt when it should be sugar. They have no new material.

Tina Leighton Retiree

One of my friends is a fireman, and I called him up and told him I was out on Pyramid Lake Highway and asked him if he could come and get me because I had a flat tire. … I did call him back and said I was just kidding.

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ALEC: Government for the wealthy Senator Bill Raggio stopped me one day during my freshman session in the 1999 Legislature to ask me to consider joining the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). He warned me that others would say ALEC was a Republican organization, but he felt it was as non-partisan as the by other two national organizations the Sheila Leslie Legislature paid dues to, the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) and the Council of State Governments (CSG). When I mentioned Raggio’s remarks to my Democratic colleagues, they howled with laughter, explaining that NCSL and CSG really were non-partisan organizations while ALEC was controlled by corporations who basically wrote legislation for themselves and handed these “model laws” to Republicans to introduce in state legislatures. They marveled at Raggio’s ability to muscle ALEC in as an equal to NCSL and CSG in Nevada and allocate taxpayer money to support it. The recession took care of the dues issue as budget cuts eliminated

state-funding to all three organizations long ago. But ALEC has continued to thrive, as its secret corporate donors certainly value its efforts. ALEC’s website claims more than 2,000 legislative members and boasts it is “the nation’s largest, non-partisan, individual public-private membership association of state legislators.” Maybe. There’s no public list of members. Common Cause, a public interest organization we don’t hear nearly enough from, is currently promoting an online petition to urge Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto to investigate ALEC’s taxexempt status, saying it “has discovered compelling evidence that ALEC is a corporate lobby masquerading as a charity.” Common Cause claims the $7 million ALEC annual budget is used to lobby “for laws that will boost the profits of its member corporations” yet its tax-exempt status allows corporations to deduct their contributions from annual tax returns. Perhaps the best analysis of ALEC’s structure and purpose is

found at the Center for Media and Democracy’s website devoted to the topic at ALECexposed.org. The Center calls ALEC “a corporate bill mill” and links corporate “wish lists” to the model bills its member legislators are so fond of introducing. So who are Nevada’s ALEC legislators? Hard to say. After Raggio’s resignation, there was initially a power struggle for the position of ALEC state chairman with Raggio pushing his protégé, newly elected Sen. Ben Kieckhefer, for the post while longtime ALEC supporter, Sen. Barbara Cegavske, insisted on claiming the title. Cegavske prevailed and is now listed on the ALEC website as a member of the board of directors and the Nevada state chairman. No other current Nevada legislator appears on public ALEC lists. Corporate members are also not identified although their contribution levels are suggested, ranging from $7,000 for the Washington Club to $25,000 for the Jefferson Club. Corporate lobbyists who presumably pay the right fee are appointed

as “Private Chairs” of key ALEC committees and vote alongside elected officials on model bills. Their investment produces nationwide returns as ALEC legislators adopt the models as their own bill drafts. How dangerous is ALEC? Last week the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments about whether Arizona can impose restrictions on voter registration that conflict with federal law. The Arizona law, Proposition 200, was sponsored by ALEC member and State Sen. Russell Pierce and then adopted by ALEC as model legislation. Did Arizona really have a problem with voter registration? Out of 2.7 million registered voters, there were 19 examples of noncitizens registering to vote, but Arizona rejected 30,000 voter registrations under the new law, including nearly 6,000 Latinos. ALEC gave the Arizona law a catchy new title to go with its promotion to model status: the Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act. They should have called it the Voter Suppression Act instead. Ω

More information about the American Legislative Exchange Council can be found on the lobbying group’s website, www.alec.org.

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Remember the golden rule The mining industry of Nevada has, in the state’s early years especially, been the foundation of its economy and community development. When the state was founded nearly a century and a half ago, mining was the primary interest group that swayed the development of local laws and by Chanelle Bessette Nevada’s constitution as a whole by instituting tax provisions that left mining revenue largely untouched by the state. By refraining from taxing the mining industry, the state benefited from the rush of prospectors and affiliated businesspeople who came to stake their claims, especially in northern and central Nevada, where many small towns still hold testament to the power that mining had to encourage growth in undeveloped regions. But as the state has changed over the years and developed its lucrative gaming and tourism industries, mining has been seemingly given special treatment when it comes to keeping up with tax laws. Even with approximately $8.76 billion in gold

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mining revenue in 2011, its tax rate to the state totaled only slightly more than 1 percent of its revenue. While $104 million is nothing to sneeze at, it does make one wonder why it has taken so long to address the disparity in the mining industry compared to others in Nevada. Currently on the state’s legislative table is Senate Joint Resolution 15, which would remove the industryspecific tax protection for mining from Nevada’s constitution. The Legislature began the process of passing SJR 15 back in 2011, and it must be passed again this year in order to be put to popular vote. If Nevadans vote to pass SJR 15, then it would be in the 2015 Legislative session that constitutional changes would be implemented and even later than that increased tax revenue from the mining industry could be collected. For proponents of the resolution who are looking for a quick-fix for Nevada’s budgetary problems, they should know that additional taxation for mining is not the short-term solution that they are looking for.

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The mining industry is not exactly thrilled at the possibility of their tax protections being revoked and has registered around two dozen lobbyists to defend their constitutional protection. There is the threat of mining companies moving their business elsewhere so as to avoid taxation, and opponents of the resolution postulate that the Nevada economy would take a major hit without the support of the mining community’s spending in other parts of the state. The thing is, mining doesn’t provide nearly as many jobs as politicians and lobbyists seem to think it does. If mining corporations were to abandon ship in Nevada, job loss would be minimal, and the corporations would be forced to move to less lucrative, less regulated mining ventures, such as those in Central and South America. Mining doesn’t employ as many people as gaming and tourism, so their absence wouldn’t be remarkably detrimental to the employment economy, especially not in major

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cities like Reno or Las Vegas. So if SJR 15 passes, the mining companies have a choice: either leave the state that has accommodated them for more than 100 years, or stay and pay a reasonable tax that is comparable to other Nevada industries. While I am rarely a proponent of increased taxes, it would seem that proportional and reasonable incremental increases would do more good for Nevada’s economy than hosting an industry whose profits go to out-of-state and, in most cases, out of the country. Without proportional income and new jobs coming to Nevada, then the benefits of accommodating the mining industry are moot. If the Legislature wants to increase taxes, however, they must be willing to work with the mining industry to determine a fair agreement and a solid plan for how the industry will fit into Nevada’s new economy. Ω

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Here’s Senate Joint Resolution 15: www.leg.state.nv.us/ Session/76th2011/ Bills/SJR/SJR15.pdf

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A homebuilder has posted this  website to help homebuyers.

Sin takes a holiday There were no arrests on St. Patrick’s Day in Reno, according to police. Statistics released by the city included no arrests for anything. We double checked, and city spokesperson Michelle Anderson reported that the Reno Police Department “said there were no arrests, DUIs, etc. related to” the holiday. A city Community Safety and Service Team inspected 12 businesses and found seven in full compliance. Of the other five, a city statement said, “There were no citations issued, but some businesses were asked to make minor corrections such as unlocking a fire door, turning off a projecting illumination sign that was pointing to an adjacent building, having a mobile food vendor move from the public right of way, posting a doorman to prevent alcohol outside of the business, and having a security guard carry an alcohol awareness training card.” Businesses in compliance were Candela Bar & Nightclub, Corrigan’s Bit O’Ireland, Filthy McNasty’s Irish Bar, Lucke’s Saloon, Rapscallion, Ryan’s Saloon and Broiler, and the Wolf Den. Out of compliance businesses were not identified.

Nevada loses tech firm On Feb. 21, the San Francisco Chronicle reported, “Keller Rinaudo and Jen McCabe of Romotive tell us that Las Vegas provides a more collaborative vibe than Silicon Valley.” In January, Inc Magazine reported on Romotive, a personal robatics firm, under the headline “Tony Hsieh’s Excellent Las Vegas Adventure.” The report read in part, “Hsieh is often described as a Silicon Valley–style entrepreneur who relocated to Las Vegas, but he seems more at home in this weird, fantastical place.” The adventure is over. Romotive is relocating to the Silicon Valley. Inc did a follow-up story: “In the end, however, the benefits of being part of the burgeoning tech community in Vegas didn’t trump the resources Silicon Valley offers. He cited the company’s need to work in ‘close proximity to strategic partners’ and hire ‘brilliant senior talent’ as the reasons behind Romotive’s move to the Bay Area.”

Southern burn put out A proposal for a sort of Burning Man South has come to nothing. The Pahrump Town Board had approved the May event for the town’s fairgrounds. But organizer Dirk Schmidhofer said that late in the game officials brought two Nye County ordinances to his attention that caused his organization to pull the plug. The ordinances dealt with dust abatement, requiring the applicant to either pave parking areas or lay down two inches of gravel at the fairgrounds. Schmidhofer expressed regret. “It would have worked for us, for what we call a regional burn, which is a small burn,” he told Selwyn Harris of the Pahrump Valley Times. Another factor exacerbating feelings was nasty online material posted about the event, prompting local resident John Pawlak to say, “It seems ironic that certain individuals in this town can demonize and prejudge the folks at the regional Burning Man group who were asked to come to our town at our request and then define them as homosexuals, nudists, drug addicts, hedonists and so forth.”

Constructive dialogue? Big money is involved in battle over building defects With Republicans in the Nevada Legislature trying to reduce business liability for construction defects, a homebuilder by last week re-launched his website Dennis Myers where he posts legal disclosures of defects in specific properties where possible buyers can find them. David Lissner, who built homes in Cold Springs, said he has had the site up for about a year but has fine tuned it. He obtains the legally required disclosures from court records when there have been construction defects lawsuit settlements.

“A group of lawyers has created a very lucrative industry.” Troy Abney Reno Chamber of Commerce

The War of 1812 is paid off Non-human costs of the Iraq war topped $812,081,931,541 last week, the tenth anniversary of the war. The meter is still running on ongoing costs. On a single day last week, the war cost $27,516,349. The total cost of all U.S. government wars since 2001 passed $1,434,656,788,354. Associated Press reported last week that the U.S. is still paying off costs from the Civil War, Spanish-American War, two world wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, two Iraq wars and the Afghan war.

—Dennis Myers

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Lissner’s website is http://housesleuth.com/

“They have a right to know in order to make an informed purchase,” Lissner said, referring to home buyers. The notion of a homebuilder working for greater transparency of construction defects may seem counterintuitive, but Lissner said, “I have lots of homebuilders and subcontracters that are supporting it. Others are supporting it but do not want to put their names on it.”

The law requires that when a home is being sold, a “seller’s real property disclosure” form (SRPD) must be filled out and supplied to prospective buyers. But Lissner said he has reason to believe that while forms are always filled out, they are routinely inaccurate or false. In addition, if they are handed over to possible buyers at all, it is either done in a way that downplays their importance, or it is not handed over at all. He said he sent a questionnaire to 29 recent home buyers. One of the questions asked was “Were you aware when you purchased the house that it was in the middle of a construction defects case?” “Twenty-eight of the 29 said they were not aware of it, and they were angry that they didn’t know,” Lissner said. He said the reasons some homebuilders would support his efforts are, “If it’s brought to light what’s going on, and it results in a decrease in the amount of construction defect litigation that’s filed, that helps the contractors and the builders at the same time, as well as the buyers.” At the capitol, meanwhile, the construction defects issue warmed up. On March 18, Sen. Michael Roberson, a Clark County Republican whose bill to water down construction defects laws was going nowhere in the Senate Judiciary Committee, introduced a second bill whose title said it dealt with

“licensing of residential mortgage loan servicers,” and got it sent to the Committee on Commerce, Labor and Energy. It contains language changing existing construction defects law, which may be a violation of law. Article four of the Nevada Constitution reads, “Each law enacted by the Legislature shall embrace but one subject.” The chair of Judiciary, Richard Segerblom, is not receptive to processing the original bill, Senate Bill 161. The chair of Commerce, Kelvin Atkinson, may do so with the new measure, Senate Bill 411. (Not all bills get hearings or votes.) Both senators are Clark County Democrats. Republicans not only had Democrats unknowingly working with them, but also had the aid of journalists. Numerous news stories defined what the Republicans were attempting as “reform.” In one Las Vegas Sun story on construction defects legislation, the term was used four times. Other journalism entities helped the Republicans in another way—by ignoring the issue altogether. The Sun is one of the few reporting on construction defects at all. Lissner said that while SRPD forms are virtually always filled out prior to home sales, “The law says you have to fill it out but there are no penalties for bad information.” Groups that are supporting the changes in construction defects law at the legislature include chambers of commerce at both ends of the state, the Associated General Contractors, Leading Builders of America, Marnell Companies, Nevada Realtors, Nevada Subcontractors, Pardee Homes. On the other side is the Nevada Justice Foundation, formerly the Nevada Trial Lawyers Association. Both sides have been free with campaign contributions. And the debate going on in Carson City seems to have very little middle ground. Reno Chamber of Commerce lobbyist Tray Abney wrote in a recent chamber message to members, “What has actually occurred, however, is that a group of lawyers has created a very lucrative industry based around suing the insurance companies of builders and their subcontractors. The lawyers and their teams go out and target entire neighborhoods that have homes bumping against the 10-year statute of repose and then file claims on everything from stucco cracks and


wind-blown roof tiles to smoke detectors with no batteries and other basic maintenance items that should be the responsibility of the occupants of the home. Abney said the focus is on attorney’s fees. “Even if the issue is a crack in the stucco, the landscaping company that planted the bushes in the front yard is filed against as well. As you can imagine, this drives insurance costs through the roof. These companies, if they can afford it and survive, are then forced to pay huge premiums with dollars that could instead be used to reinvest in the business or hire more employees. The worst thing is that since the language states that all attorney fees must be paid, there are plenty of instances when the lawyers gobble up all of the money and the homeowner does not receive enough to even take care of the issue that began the whole sordid process in the first place! ... The main goal is to get rid of the attorney fee language. At the end of the day, builders just want to be notified of a legitimate problem right away and then be able to immediately fix that problem. Segerblom response was much more terse. “The current law protects homeowners from defects created by contractors,” he said. “Any change should [be] based on helping homeowners, not developers, contractors or lawyers.” Attorney Robert Maddox elaborated.

“Changeshould[be]basedon helpinghomeowners,not developers,contractorsor lawyers.” Sen. Richard Segerblom Clark County Democrat “Chapter 40 [the existing construction defects law] protects the rights of homeowners to get their houses fixed. Builders have an absolute, unfettered right to repair when they receive notice from a homeowner. In fact, if a homeowner denies a builder the ability to fix, their case is subject to immediate dismissal. Homeowners are very limited in Chapter 40 in what damages they can recover. They can only receive funds to fix their home, and reasonable attorney fees and costs. If a homeowner had to pay their attorney out of the funds to fix their home, it would ensure they would never have enough funds to make them whole.” On the proposed changes, Maddox said, “The proposed changes to Chapter 40 would hurt homeowners, and protect builders who do not want to be held accountable for their poor practices.” The Sun reported in February that legislative leaders were meeting behind closed doors with lobbyists from both sides. Ω

Take me to the river Photo/Dennis Myers

SAMMY HAGAR

FRIDAY, MAY 3 & SATURDAY, MAY 4 ON SALE THIS FRIDAY AT 10AM! Tickets available at Ticketmaster.com or SouthShoreRoom.com

See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

The bluegrass sounds of Farewell Belladonna in downtown Reno kept a steady audience of several dozen people on an afternoon last weekend. The group is expected to perform at the Americana Music Festival in Virginia City in July. OPINION

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PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

Assemblyman Paul Aizley and Kiki Corbin talk in the Assembly leaders’ lobby at the Nevada Legislature.

Designer genes Bill to label genetically modified foods serves up controversy

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have existed in food only for about the last 20 years, but they already have stirred up quite the controversy over what effects they may have on the health of individuals and the environment. by Sage Leehey Kiki Corbin, certified traditional naturopath, pastoral counselor and director of Label GMO Nevada, started Label GMO Nevada in December and sage l@ has been working to get a label on packaged foods that contain more than 0.9 news review.c om percent GMOs. Assemblymember Paul Aizley, District 41, has sponsored a bill, AB330, to get GMOs labeled. Aizley pointed to the Americans with Disabilities Act and said that labels are required to let consumers know about products that may cause allergies, and it should be the same for products with GMOs. Thomas Helscher, the executive director of Commercial Acceptance at Monsanto Company, explained the process in which the U.S. Food and Drug Administration evaluates the safety of genetically modified crops. This includes a lengthy document “containing data comparing the composition of the GM (genetically modified) plant to the unmodified plant.” The document also includes information on the levels of nutrients and antinutrients “to determine if there are any statistically significant differences between the GM plant and unmodified plant, which would result in any safety concerns” and information about proteins if they are relevant to the crop. “The FDA reviews this information, consults with the applicant and, if all issues are addressed to their satisfaction, issues a letter of no concern,” Helscher said. “All of the GM crops being grown in the US have completed this evaluation.” Although Monsanto, one of the main companies producing GMOs, points to many studies done on their products, Corbin questions the reliability of these studies because she said Monsanto has a role in these studies. “It’s really important to understand that they totally control their seeds,” Corbin said. “They have the right to choose who does their research and who uses their seeds.” The FDA has labeled GMOs as “generally recognized as safe,” but Corbin believes that this designation was given without sufficient research and was biased by the involvement of Michael Taylor. Taylor has worked for the FDA in different capacities before and after working for the law firm that represented the Monsanto Company. He is said to have been involved in the FDA’s policy statement about GMO in foods, but he is not listed on the document. Corbin also said that Monsanto Company has complete control over For more information about Assembly who uses their seeds and forbids use of second-generation seeds that contain Bill 330, see www. their modified genetic material. This means that cross-contamination with leg.state.nv.us/ neighboring farms using their seeds can cause problems. Session/77th2013/ “Farmers have always collected their own seeds, and there was no threat Reports/history. cfm?ID=753. of contamination because there was nothing bad out there,” Corbin said. “You can’t have genetically modified food in your organic food by law, which is the first issue. The second issue is that Monsanto can test your corn, find their genes and sue you.” Corbin stated that despite all the concerns she has about GMOs, she’s only asking for a label on food at this point, which she said 61 countries have done already, including the UK, Germany, Russia and China. Ω OPINION

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TourisT impressed by reno! “Reno’s the By Dora Abbi

For the first time in nearly six years, a visitor to Reno was actually impressed by the city. Warren “Mike” Mudgrove of Bend, Ore., visited Reno for three days beginning on March 8. “Well, we just had a fine time,” said Mudgrove. “Really, it’s just a great little place to get away for a few nights!” Mudgrove, 42, visited the city with his wife, Cindie, 36, her sister, Brandie Smithe, 34, and family friend Harold “Hank” Harfin, 59. Paul D.F. Kidder, who maintains the blog Reno Does Not Suck, said, “This is the surest sign yet of Reno’s cultural and economic turnaround. Things are really starting to look up here in the Truckee Meadows. Suck it, Muppets!” The Muppets comment is in reference to a 2011 movie that depicted Reno in an unflattering light. Reno residents, in a characteristic display of thick skin, reacted to the negative depiction with the grace and sophistication warranted by a lighthearted joke in an all-ages film about talking puppets.

When asked what he enjoyed most about his visit to Reno, Mudgrove said he really enjoyed his time in the downtown casinos. “They had girls in bikinis dealing card games!” he said. “I’ve never seen anything like it! I said to Cindie, ‘Now, this is high class!’” Mudgrove was impressed by Reno’s arts and culture. “I saw some great singers there!” he said. “I went to one show—somebody said it was just karaoke night, but they must’ve been mistaken, because it was in one of those fancy old cabarets where Frank Sinatra used to perform—and there was one gal down there who does a version of ‘Candle in the Wind’ that’s just something else. It’ll bring a tear to your heart, it surely will. I’ve never seen anything like it!”

“I think visitors like Mudgrove represent Reno’s bright future,” said Kidder. “This is a new demographic of visitor—sophisticated people, patrons of the arts, who aren’t afraid to say, ‘Hey, I like what I like, and I don’t think you have an image problem. And even if you did, I wouldn’t care because I don’t care about the stinking Muppets. I’m impressed by the glitz, the glamor. I’m impressed by the flashing lights.’” “Right in downtown, right on the main drag, there’s a big, flashing sign that says, ‘Reno’” Mudgrove said. “It’s like, you can never forget where you are! And underneath that, it says, “The biggest little city in the world,” and I just thought that was so clever. Because it’s a big city, but in some ways, it feels like a small town, on account of how friendly all the people are there. The biggest little city in the world—I’ve never seen anything like it!”

bee’s knees!” proclaims Oregon tourist

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LOCAL BOY BOUGHT MAGICAL BEANS

CON T I NU E D F R O M PA GE 1 3

Jack Stalk, an 11-year-old local elementary school student, traded some of his parents’ dusty old silverware for magical beans. Stalk purchased the beans from an elderly man covered in hideous sores, who introduced himself only as “the Wizard.” The magical beans are brightly colored, pill-shaped and appear to be coated in some sort of plastic. The Wizard recommended that, rather than planting the beans, Stalk might try swallowing them. “Then you’ll be able to climb higher than the clouds,” the Wizard reportedly said. The Wizard also offered to sell Stalk some “faerie dust” that, when inhaled, would allow Stalk to move so incredibly fast that he would become invisible.

“We got a boy on our first try!”

HArrY rEId ANNOUNCES FILIBUSTEr rEFOrM

‘Real change now’

HEIR BALL Dennis Rodman Pregnant With Future North Korea Ruler By Dick Vatile

Official sources have confirmed the persistent rumor that North Korea leader Kim Jong Il has impregnated American diplomat Dennis Rodman. “I couldn’t be prouder,” the former basketball powerhouse said. “I didn’t think it was possible with that little sword he was fighting with, but here’s the proof,” showing his pronounced baby bump. “And we got a boy on our first try!” Shockingly, the expectant father has stated he will not move to North Korea in order to be near his babydaddy, preferring to raise 14   |  RN&R   | 

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the child in a single-parent home in Los Angeles. “Just like his daddy, he’ll get the best education possible,” Rodman gushed. “Obviously, that’s not going to be in North Korea.” The retired Hall of Famer said the future world leader would take a version of his other father’s name: Kim Jong Illin. “Hey, if he’s going to be president or chairman or Shining Star of Paektu Mountain or whatever they call the boss over there, he’s got to have a North Korean name, right?” asked Rodman. As for himself, Jong Il said through a spokesman, “Hey, what can I say? We had a couple of cocktails. Shit got real.”

On Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid revived the threat of filibuster reform after Sen. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) blocked progress on a stop-gap measure to fund the government, and demanded that Reid instead schedule a vote on an amendment to replace the automatic budget cuts contained in the sequester. The move prompted Reid to say that the Senate may “have to reassess all the rules, because right now they accomplish so little,” reported This Week. “Congress is plainly broken, and I truly feel American citizens deserve better,” Reid lied in a repurposed statement to reporters. “It’s those Republicans who are at fault for the dysfunctionality of the “world’s greatest deliberative body.’”

One reporter, CNN anchor Anderson Cooper, expressed doubt that Reid is truly in favor of meaningful reform, since he’s had many opportunities to change his own Senate rules, but he has not done so: “At what point are we supposed to assume that this is a falsehood that you trot out anytime you want to look like you want the president’s agenda to succeed?” “Well, my lips are moving, aren’t they?” Reid asked, pointedly. “And when I’m finished with filibuster reform, I’m going hard after assault weapons.”

BIGFOOT’S GIANT STEp FOrwArd

In a technological advancement that has moved Sasquatch into the 21st century, Waldo Bigfoot has successfully placed an app on BlackBerry’s app site, BlackBerry World. The app, “Where’s Bigfoot?” features the real-time whereabouts of the whole of the primate clan. In the app, the entire family wears red and white striped shirts and hats and Harry Potter-styled glasses and frequently appears in natural habitats like the New Year’s Eve bash in New York City or on Los Angeles beaches. “This is the future, man,” Mr. Bigfoot said. “Find Bigfoot?” asked famed Sasquatch researcher Matt Pruitt. “I defy you to find a BlackBerry.”

rENO dAILY SUFFErS BrAIN drAIN Risky thoughts scarce on opinion page

The Reno Gazette-Journal this week ran out of opinions. Each of its editorials this week was a reprint from the Poughkeepsie

Journal, one of its stablemates in the Gannett chain. The switch to outside opinion had been building for some time. Poughkeepsie reprints have appeared in the RGJ regularly. Reno advertising agency executive Jo Dough noted that the newspaper frequently avoids calling attention to its opinion page to reduce the risk that someone might be offended by something. “There are days when they don’t list the opinion page in the front page index,” she said. She pointed out that the newspaper once ran a weekend “winners and sinners” editorial each week but dropped the “sinners” part for fear of driving off readers and advertisers. UNR journalism professor Jake Lowton commented, “It doesn’t really matter. When they have opinions, they’re banal.”

FLAT TAx prOpOSEd

Alien corporations would be hit The Nevada Legislature is considering enactment of a Mountain Flattening Tax. The idea came from a Bruce van Dyke column in the Reno News & Review. Van Dyke wrote that since mining corporations that ship the state’s riches out of the country are reluctant to pay mining taxes, lawmakers should turn to a Mountain Flattening Tax. Mining lobbyist Tim Crowley argued that the proposed levy would still be a mining tax and so would be disallowed by the Nevada Constitution, which limits mining taxes to amounts smaller than can be calculated by human intelligence. But Sen. Debbie Smith said the Flat Tax, as it is called, would apply not just to mining but to any industry that flattens mountains, such as those big saucers that landed on mountains at Area 51 when they were shot down by crop duster Randy Quaid in Independence Day.

LOCAL wOMAN GIvES BIrTH TO A USEd CONdOM Strange On March 19 at 2:30 a.m., Amber Tiffany, 28, of Stead, gave birth to a used condom. The condom weighed 2.2 ounces and is said to somewhat resemble its father, Jeff Rammski, 34, of Carson City. The condom was born at home and delivered by Mandy Tiffany, 29, a partially trained midwife and the mother’s cousin. Both the mother and the condom

but true!

are happy and healthy. “It wasn’t really planned or anything and not really what I was expecting, but I’m going to love the gooey little guy just the same,” says Rammski. “The funny thing is I didn’t even know I was pregnant,” says Amber Tiffany.


couNTess KArDAshIAN

Kim bathes in the blood of young virgins in the hope of eternal youth and stretch mark prevention. Family members would like to say they’re shocked, but …

By B. Jenner

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Sierra faces invasion by million tourists; reporters gleeful Backers of a new winter Olympics in the Sierra this week denied that the event would obliterate quality of life in the area. “There’s no question that residents will have to make some sacrifices during the days of the actual Olympics,” said Jon Killer, chief demolition officer of the Reno Tahoe Winter Games Coalition. “But that is always true of exciting economic opportunities. The trees at Tahoe grew back after the Comstock Lode, didn’t they?” This was a reference to the way the Tahoe Basin was denuded of trees in the 1860s to produce timber for mine supports. Killer was responding to John Eisele Jr., a Truckee physician who says the proposed Olympics pose a threat to the Sierra. Eisele wrote in a newspaper essay, “[I]t is impossible to minimize or mitigate the deleterious impact of more people, more buildings (and their infrastructure), more vehicles (particularly

production, but she keeps the blood plasma for relaxing teas and laundry. According to a story posted by Run Media at http://tinyurl.com/cp45zgn, Kim featured the “procedure” on her reality show: “‘I love trying anything that makes you look and feel youthful,’ Kardashian said.” Ever the environmentalist, Kim is unwilling to waste the product children gave their lives for, so she upcycles the bathed-in platelets to feed her army of big cats. When asked where she could find enough children to irrigate her twice-a-day beauty regimen, she replied, “Ebay.” Nearby parents in Glendale aren’t buying that story, however, and many have forbidden their children from visiting the Kardashian bounce house.

In a scandalous story that hearkens back to a 16th century noblewoman, Countess Elizabeth Báthory de Ecsed, family members have verified that Kim Kardashian has taken up the habit of bathing in the blood of young virgins, for reasons both prophylactic and aesthetic. “Well, she claims she does it to prevent stretch marks,” stated Khloé Kardashian, “but I think she’s just fundamentally evil.” Khloé said her sister basically drains the children by hanging them upside down, much like the vampire’s blood procurer in the movie Let the Right One In. She takes the whole blood and processes it in high speed centrifuges that she purchased from her friend and ex-lover Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. She bathes in the red platelets, which the eldest Kardashian claims enhances the skin’s natural collagen

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buses) and roads, and their consequence of more lake pollution and damage to the fragile Tahoe basin landscape. … Try to think of what Lake Tahoe and its landscape might look like in 2030 as the price to pay for one more Winter Olympics—bringing an estimated 1 million visitors, many from places historically less concerned about the environment than we citizens of the Tahoe region.” Killer said, “It only took a few decades for the trees to grow back at Lake Tahoe. And how many towns do we need up there, anyway? Carnelian Bay, Tahoe City, Zephyr Cove—it’s too congested by people and their homes now.” “And environmental catastrophe would be a great story,” said Reno reporter Don Hixton.

lIFe—WhAT’s The BIG DeAl? Jobs and Second Amendment trump breathing

Nevada yesterday argued that the sanctity of life is overrated. “Guns serve a purpose,” said U.S. Sen. Dean Heller, explaining why he torpedoed the federal

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court nomination of state judge Elissa Cadish. “They hold down the population.” Cadish withdrew her name from nomination after Heller said he objected to her interpreting the Second Amendment according to legal scholarship instead of political necessity. “Think of how many of our problems are associated with overpopulation,” Heller said. “Then think of guns as having a role in solving those problems.” Meanwhile, U.S. Sen. Harry Reid said he is reluctant to oppose President Obama’s use of drone killings. “I tailored the legislation authorizing the construction of centers for testing unmanned aerial vehicles to Nevada,” Reid said. “There are going to be six centers and, by gosh, Nevada’s going to bag one of them. In a recession, what’s more important than that?”

correcTIoN

In this week’s Weekly World News & Review, we said that Dennis Rodman is carrying North Korean leader Kim Jong Il’s love child. This is wrong on many levels. Ω

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PHOTO/Ky PLASKOn

THE NEXT SCENES The Black Box Film Festival focuses on local filmmakers

by Ky Plaskon

“The film explores how the start of something that is important to somebody can be the end of something that is important to them as well,” says Onorad.

Alon “Vision” Bar  visualizes success for  Reno’s film scene.  

LOCAL CLOSE-UP

LIKE

a long movie with a disappointing end, we watched the Reno Film Festival for 12 years, hoping for survival, until at last it dissolved just nine months ago. But wait, there’s a plot twist. The final scene of Reno’s filmmakers has not been written. Just when all seemed to be lost, an unlikely character rides in, facing a seemingly insurmountable obstacle to revive Reno’s damsel of cinematography in distress.

The Black Box Art & Film Festival is at Ali’s Alley, Circle of Life Thrift and Gift, 900 W. Fifth St., Fridays & Saturdays at 7 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. Starting on April 4. Local film scene links: Lumiere All School Film Festival www.consciouscommunity-reno.org CinemaReno www.cinemareno.org Orange Tree Productions www.orangetreeps.com Artemisia Movie House www.artemisiamovies.org The Raw Showcase May 23rd www.rawartists.org Academy of Arts Career and Technology Local film festival in June. www.washoecountyschools.org/aact/ The Holland Project www.hollandreno.org

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Alon Bar goes by the name “Vision,” and his vision is called the Black Box Film Festival. He’s an Israeli who came here less than six months ago. We met on a windy day as he was unloading donations for Circle of Life Thrift and Gift on Fifth Street. We walked in a room with black walls and red plush theater chairs for the interview. His eyes were wide, hair big, face furry, clothes colorful and loose. He took a deep breath, nodded and described his dream coming true. “The opening night at 7 o’clock, we are going to have an art gallery with seven artists,” he says. “At 8, we will start the show, and it’s going to be like a TV show. I am going to be the host, like Oprah Winfrey. We are going to have films. After each film, we will have questions and answers from the audience. After that, we will have a poem reading, more film, more questions, inspirational speakers, a stand-up comedian, more films, more poems and more inspirational speakers and all of them 100 percent local artists.”

Not one night, not two nights, but 12 actionpacked weekend nights in April that will leave the attendees brains “flying, flying and thinking about themselves and what is going to be their art project and how they are going to grow in life. It is going to be extremely inspirational,” he says. Sundays the performances will be for kids with sponsorship by a local theater group, “Art on Earth.” The children will perform on stage, and the films and comedy will be kid- friendly. It’s $10 per night, or $30 for all 12 days. All proceeds will benefit the Circle of Life hospice. Vision is not to be confused with the awardwinning Israeli-American filmmaker Alon Bar, known for the screenplay Under Arrest. But Vision is trying to make his mark. He thought up this project just three months ago while sitting in an empty room in the back of Circle of Life Thrift Store. “There was nothing here,” he says. “And I saw this film festival happening.” The theater space was launched earlier this year when it hosted the play 6:01 a.m.: A Working Class Opera. “I have so many people involved in this project so far,” he says. “About 50 filmmakers, visual artists, inspirational speakers and a stand-up comedian.” One of the filmmakers, Jason Onorad created Fate in a Coffee Shop. The 20-minute film is the story of a boy and girl who mutually decide to split up because the girl is going for a dream job in a big city and they know long-distance relationships don’t work at their age.

With this grand vision for a new film festival in one hand, it might be wise to reach for a little perspective with the other hand: How can this new festival work when similar efforts have struggled and failed? Well, Onorad has an example. He says he submitted a film to the Reno Film Festival in the wrong category, “And they just kicked it out without even watching it,” he said, adding that he thinks the festival failed because there weren’t enough local submissions. “Almost every year, just to fill the gap, they would just get the shorts that had been up for an Oscar,” he said. “You can go on YouTube and see that.” Going ‘locals only’ isn’t the only way the Black Box Film Festival is offering something special. Onorad says the Reno Film Festival tried to get celebrity judges. Black Box is making the viewers the judge. Most film festivals have an entry fee too. Black Box doesn’t. Vision says he is also applying for a grant from Burners Without Borders to offer a filmmaker award. Black Box has evolved already, tweaking the inspirational message even before the festival has started. Local filmmaker Kaleb Temple didn’t expect any of his films to get in. “My films, even the funny ones, have a fair amount of pessimism,” Temple said. “They aren’t necessarily the happiest and go getting. Some of them end on a kind of bummer note.” But all of them, Slumber, Welcome Home, Absolved and Burgled, got in. “Even though not everyone has the money for budgets, people want to work with you,” says Temple, adding that he has worked on 60 projects


Thursday, April 4, 2013 | 7:30 p.m. | Nightingale Concert Hall Delivering intricate rhythms, athletic choreography and the hottest, most JOWFOUJWFSFVTFPGNBUFSJBMTPOTUBHFBOZXIFSF 4DSBQt"SUTt.VTJDJT#"$,UP Reno by popular demand! The green-friendly group uses percussion instruments fashioned from such offbeat toss-offs as industrial scraps, accordian parts, artillery shells and you-name-its to produce their intoxicating mix of music and spectacle. Their roots in street performance and jazz+world traditions combined with kinetic mayhem have elicited knock-out superlatives worldwide: “Scrap rocks...fantastic... pure magic...five stars...WOW!”

here over just five years. “Not everyone is just turning stuff away because they need to pay their bills. People are hungry for projects.” Black Box is far from the only film event here. The Holland Project has a three-minute film competition in its fifth year that takes films from high school students. Temple is one of the judges. “I think people are still really making the effort to bring film making as an art medium and exposing it to Reno,” he says, adding that the snow-capped mountains to the “gnarly” desert make great filmmaking terrain and businesses are really open to helping here. But there is another invisible film-driving force. Reno’s niche is gritty American story-lines, driven like a stake in our mentality. Writer and director Valerie Bischoff knows it first hand. “When I was growing up in Reno, my goal was to get out of there as fast as possible,” she says. When she left, she found that New York and Los Angeles were full of filmmakers, but they were missing something. “I realized that I came from a place that has a very do-it-yourself attitude. It is kind of like the first settlers who try to build a community in the middle of the desert. I find that intriguing and it is really inspiring.” Her film Massacre Creek will be featured at Black Box. It’s a horror film about a woman stranded in the desert with a mysterious stranger, who happens to have a family that’s part of a psycho cult. Another film of hers, Veterans, is about a woman who works at a brothel and everything changes for her once she meets a veteran who is a client. “I feel like the community in Reno is the ‘next level,’ and every artist I meet in Reno is the next level,” says Vision. “There are many artists that are doing the most inspired art that I have ever seen, and I have traveled a lot. So, I see this project as giving back to them.” Black Box might be part of Reno’s latest plot twist in film, but it won’t be the final scene. Ω

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Tickets: Adult $30/ Senior $26/ Student and youth $12

(775) 784-4ART | Buy tickets online at www.unr.edu/pas

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No-one should be left uncared for “I’m involved with HOPES because harm reduction works. We are one of the only centers in the area that is adopting this philosophy into the way we care for and manage our clients. presents

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HOPES is really trying to go out of our way to provide harm reduction services. Figuring out where people are and what might be of real help for them at the time, that can help people. We provide one-on-one educational pieces on a variety of topics. We also offer outreach services, ranging from homeless shelters to the streets to social events. I want to be there to support people when they need compassion. That, to me, is what exemplifies the very best in human beings. That’s what I want to be a part of, people who care, people who support each other, and I get that feeling at HOPES. I get tremendous satisfaction out of building something that is unique to the Reno area and that offers the possibilities for so much healing for those who suffer.

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Photo/Allison Young

The cast and crew of Charter School. Standing: Aric Shapiro, Alissa Willmet, Emily Reese, Chris Haak, Sam Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien, Jeremiah Eck and Lydia Suarez. Kneeling: Deb Girard and Pan Pantoja.

Save our school Charter Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Play Last October, Steve West, principal at Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rainshadow Community Charter High by School, made a quiet announcement to Jessica Santina faculty that the school would be closing due to lack of funding. The young drama teacher, Pan Pantoja, raised his hand and asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, did we ever ask for some?â&#x20AC;? The truth was, they hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do what most other nonprofits do,â&#x20AC;? Pantoja pressed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do a fundraiser.â&#x20AC;? And, as a drama teacher, his first idea Charter schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the was an original play, Charter Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Play runs through Play, which runs through March 31 at the March 31 at the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Theater, Circle of life hospice 900 W. Fifth St. Foundation theater, Fundraising seems obvious, but West 900 W. Fifth st. For more information, visit says he and the board of directors had www.rainshadowcchs. naĂŻvely believed solutions were in place. org. But state money, their primary source of funding, was no longer guaranteed, and their savings had been exhausted. When Rainshadow moved into its current location on Vesta Street five

years ago, they opened two student-run businesses, a coffee shop and a pizzeria, intended to help fund the school. Additionally, the Rainshadow Foundation was installed to solicit funds from the community. Neither worked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately, that Foundation didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do much of anything for four years,â&#x20AC;? West says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over time, we sat in denial, and we got to the point where we were running out of money.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m an insane optimist,â&#x20AC;? says Pantoja. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t consider giving up when the closure was announced. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re artists, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re already used to the bottom.â&#x20AC;? Pantoja, who is also the curator and co-founder of Reno Art Works, talked to Re:Fuel his co-founder, fellow artist Aric Shapiro, about ways to raise4.9 money for (4c the school, x 5.67â&#x20AC;? process) and together they conceived of making the gl/reh/baf/jb/jb schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spring play a fundraiser (independently run, and not hosted by Rainshadow itself). By the time of the formal announcement of closure at the end of January, the two began soliciting monologues from faculty and staff, and had a huge response.

The three full-time staffers (two English teachers and a counselor) and three students performing original monologues in Charter Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Play collectively share the experience of attending the school, whose interdisciplinary approach provides an alternative educational path to at-risk students, and what that has meant to them.LA023107B â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so proud of these guys, that they have the guts to get up and speak in such an honest, hopeful manner,â&#x20AC;? says Pantoja, the director, who says he did little more than tighten the script. â&#x20AC;&#x153;None of them are actors; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just speaking from the heart.â&#x20AC;? Pantoja says the students are using their own stories to represent the feelings of

the population about how charter schools like theirs help students change their lives for the better. At each performance, the audience will also have the opportunity to bid on a wide array of silent auction items, which include massages, haircuts, handknitted apparel and much more. All proceeds from show tickets, auction items, and sale of refreshments go directly to Rainshadow. Though donations from the Redfield Foundation and an anonymous donor came through this month, granting Rainshadow a reprieve for another year, West says theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll spend the next year seeking donations to sustain the school. And Shapiro says that 5 he, Pantoja and students3/14/2013 and faculty are already thinking about other potential fundKHOWARD raising events, including, perhaps, a formal dinner this summer. Mining â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone can do a little bit,â&#x20AC;? says Shapiro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to make a decision as a community: Are we comfortable being 49th in the nation, or do we want to do something about that?â&#x20AC;? Ί

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FREEP0


Flower power Golden Flower 205 W. Fifth St., 323-1628 The French set up shop in Vietnam in 1859, and after quite a few skirmishes, created “French Indochina” in 1885. They by Dave Preston remained in Vietnam until they were booted out in the mid 1950s, but davep@ those 95 years in between created a ne w s re v i e w . c o m marriage of flavors and cultures to behold for a delectable fusion treat. Traditional Vietnamese cuisine features a combination of five fundamental taste elements in the overall Photo/AlliSon Young

Golden Flower, a favorite of late-night diners, is newly remodeled.

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MARCH 28, 2013

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golden Flower Vietnamese Restaurant is open 10 a.m. to 3 a.m.

meal: spicy (metal), sour (wood), bitter (fire), salty (water), and sweet (Earth). Each Vietnamese dish has a distinctive flavor which reflects one or more of these elements. Common ingredients include fish sauce, shrimp paste, soy sauce, rice, fresh herbs, fruits and vegetables. Cam Thai, his wife, Hue Huynh, and their family had a long and somewhat adventurous journey to American from their native Vietnam in 1985 and settle in Carson City for a time. It had always been Thai’s dream to one day a restaurant and in 1994, he took over what is now the Golden Flower. The place is simple, with neat tables and seats for about 85. It’s open well into the wee hours of the morning. It’s a friendly environment with friendly staff. There’s a very extensive menu, and prices range from $5.95 to $11.95. The food is made to order, and the portions often generous. If you’ve never had pho, the beef and noodle soup that’s known as the national dish of Vietnam, I can’t think of a better place to start, because they offer 25 variations on the menu. But I’m very familiar with that dish, particularly great in cold, snowy weather, and I

was out for an experience—and an experience I had. I started out with a simple spring roll ($5.50). Shrimp, pork and super fresh vegetables wrapped in rice paper and served with a creamy peanut sauce complementing the rolls with a touch of sweet heat. Next a bánh mì thit nuông ($4.99), sometimes also referred to as a “Vietnamese hoagie,” served with barbecued pork that was marinated with a little sweetness and grilled. Add a smokin’ jalapeño, pickled onions, cucumbers and carrots on a French roll and you’ve got a threealarmer going on in your mouth—my sinuses were cured! Canh chua tôm, a hot and sour shrimp soup ($7.95), was oh so flavorful. It had some pineapple, carrots, celery, bamboo shoots and elephant ears—huge, green leafy plant with natural sugars producing a sweet nutty flavor—in a light broth with a base of tamarind, a southeast Asian spice with a tart/sweet taste, a favorite in Vietnamese cuisine. It was garnished with lemony herbs, caramelized garlic and chopped scallions. Bún thit nuông chá giò is a bowl with flame-broiled pork and imperial rolls with noodles ($7.95). You get a deep-fried spring roll with shrimp, pork, cabbage and shiitake mushrooms nice and crispy. The wonderful sliced pork is marinated in lemongrass, shallots, garlic, sugar, fish sauce, pepper, dark soy sauce and sesame oil for several hours and then grilled. Vermicelli noodles and fish sauce poured over the top that was savory, lightly sweet and salty tasting, sour and spicy with carottes finement tranchées. The flavor and texture experience on the palate is gratifying and even delicate. And then a dessert, ché, a threecolored bean dessert ($3). Made with mung beans, kidney beans, great northern white beans, tapioca, clear jelly strands and coconut cream. Served like a parfait, you mix everything together, and have the extraordinarily refreshing sweet/ savory almost drink finishers. Again, it’s another flavor/texture experience for your mouth. Food lovers and culture buffs with a passion for fresh flavors will find the Golden Flower a great way to experience one of the world’s best unions, that of Euro-Asian cuisine. Ω


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MARCH 28, 2013

4 Very Good

5 excellent

The film plays out as though Sofia Coppola decided to make a Girls Gone Wild video. Director Harmony Korine, who wrote the extremely hard-to-watch Kids back in the day, is shooting for some sort of dreamscape feel replete with trance music, people talking slow, and slow, slow visuals. Given what the characters are actually doing and saying, he achieves something closer to bad mushroom-induced nightmare than dreamscape. Candy (Hudgens), Faith (Selena Gomez), Brit (Ashley Benson) and Cotty (Rachel Korine) are bored at college, and they’ll do anything for a break. They knock over a chicken restaurant, get some money, and head to Florida, where they will wear nothing but

bikinis for the remainder of the film. After a night of snorting cocaine off of boobies, they are arrested and then eventually bailed out by Alien (Franco), an underground rapper with a big grill, lots of guns, and a bed covered with money. Now, I thought that Franco’s appearance would take the movie in a fun gangster direction. Such is not the case, because Korine’s screenplay is virtually non-existent, and his editing style requires footage and dialogue to repeat again and again. So you essentially feel stuck in place watching much of this movie. True, Gomez’s Faith does say she wishes one could just press a freeze button and make spring break last forever, so perhaps that’s why Korine went for his repetitive, loopy vibe. I think it’s because he didn’t have enough real material for a 90-minute movie. There are no moments in this film where it feels as if performers actually had to learn some lines. Take, for instance, a scene where Franco is describing the contents of Alien’s room. It’s as if Korine just turned a camera on, told Franco to ramble about the stuff in the room, and called that a take. Yes, many films are full of improv moments, but Spring Breakers feels like one terribly long, extremely unsuccessful improv. There is one semi-inspired sequence in the film, where Alien shows off his sensitive side by singing the Britney Spears ballad “Everytime” on an outdoor piano. The moment is accompanied by footage of him and the girls robbing and beating spring breakers in slow motion. It’s almost funny. For every moment that’s almost good, there are 10 that are not. Franco also throws together a song about one of the girls needing to return home after getting shot in the arm. You won’t be humming this one to yourself on the drive home. Korine has directed features before— Julien Donkey-Boy being one of them. He’s also directed a lot of music videos. This movie stands as his longest, most pointless music video. In the hands of a more playful director, I think there could’ve been a fun movie to be had with Spring Breakers. The basic plotline is ripe for some nasty, cynical satire. Too bad that idea isn’t accompanied by at least half of a decent script. Ω


1

A Good Day to Die Hard

1

Identity Thief

Cashing in on her Oscar-nominated turn in Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy gets a headlining role alongside Jason Bateman in Identity Thief. While both performers are talented and make the best of the crap heap of a script they are handed, it’s not enough to make this anything more than a desperate misfire. From the director of Horrible Bosses, this is just another riff on Planes, Trains & Automobiles minus much of the fun. Bateman plays a sorry sap who has his identity stolen by a free shopping weirdo (McCarthy). He gets into some legal troubles, and vows to capture the thief and bring her back to his hometown. So it’s another odd couple road movie, and pretty exploitative when it comes to McCarthy. She’s a talented woman, and she deserves much better than this.

1

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone

This movie feels like it should’ve come out in the ‘80s, but it probably would’ve sucked then, too. Steve Carell stars as the title character, a Vegas magician who does a Siegfried & Roy type show with his childhood friend and current stage partner (Steve Buscemi). Not only does Burt have a falling out with his partner, but he also gets stiff competition from a Criss Angel/David Blaine type played by Jim Carrey. Had the movie put the Carrey character as the focus, it probably would’ve been a little better. He gets a few good laughs as a human piñata or when he intentionally drills a hole in his head. Whenever it deals exclusively with Burt’s fall from grace, it’s a straight-up dud. Olivia Wilde actually gets more laughs than Carell in this movie, so that’s a problem.

2

Jack the Giant Slayer

Director Bryan Singer’s big budget take on the classic fairytale was delayed from last summer, and they should’ve left it in the vault. He’s put together a movie that lacks any real magic because the special effects are bad, and the performances are mostly flat. Nicholas Hoult, so good in Warm Bodies, plays the title character, a farm boy who gets some magic beans, lets them get wet and … ah, you know. Stanley Tucci and Ewan McGregor have supporting roles in what amounts to a whole lot of nothing that cost lots of money. The budget is something in the neighborhood of $200 million, and that budget must’ve gone to Moon Pies for everybody, because it doesn’t show on the screen. Too bad, because I was just telling somebody a couple of months ago how the world could really use a good movie about giants getting hit with stuff. Actually, that’s not true. I’m totally lying.

2

Olympus Has Fallen

Gerard Butler stars in one of the more ridiculous action films you will see this year. He’s a Secret Service agent on duty the night something very bad happens to the president (Aaron Eckhart), and he winds up with a desk job. When some nasty North Koreans hilariously infiltrate the White House and hold the president and his cabinet hostage in the bunker, it’s time for Gerard to dispense with the paper clips and pick up an automatic weapon! Yes, it’s Die Hard in the White House, or at least it wants to be. There’s some fun to

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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be had here, but the movie has some tragic flaws, including terrible CGI and mawkish patriotic crap that distracts rather than making the heart swell (Melissa Leo screaming the Pledge of Allegiance as she is dragged to certain death comes to mind). You aren’t going to catch me calling this a good movie, but I won’t fault you for enjoying it to some degree if you choose to see it. It’s one of those “so bad it’s almost good” movies.

2

Oz the Great and Powerful

4

Silver Linings Playbook

3

Snitch

3

Stoker

Recycle this paper

The Die Hard franchise has been one of the more reliable action movie franchises in cinematic history—until now. Bruce Willis looks tired, beaten down and embarrassed in this useless installment of the adventures of John McClane. The action takes him to Russia this time, which is a mistake. While there, he helps his son with some espionage crap, another storytelling mistake. He goes up against villains who do not distinguish themselves at all, and this would be the film’s biggest mistake. Die Hard needs a big villain. All of the prior installments had good villains, and that includes naked William Sadler in Die Hard 2. I think McClane has got some good stuff left in the tank, but enough with this garbage involving his kids. And stay the heck out of Russia; that place has lost all of its cinematic bad guy appeal. Little in this movie makes sense and it just doesn’t belong in a category with the first four chapters. Reboot, forget this thing, and start fresh the next time out, sort of like how Rocky Balboa forgot the previous two chapters and restored the Italian Stallion’s dignity.

James Franco is in over his head for Sam Raimi’s mostly lame prequel to The Wizard of Oz. The title character calls for somebody with that old school Hollywood charm like Robert Downey, Jr., or Johnny Depp. Franco looks like a kid playing dress up here, and he’s not even the worst thing about the movie. That would be Mila Kunis looking completely lost as the witch who will become that witch we all know from the original Oz. I’m sorry—that witch isn’t supposed to be all corseted and hot. As for Rachel Weisz, she fares best as yet another witch, while Michelle Williams is just serviceable as Glinda the Good Witch. Raimi relies heavily on CGI effects—big surprise—and they look pretty crappy for the most part. This is an underwhelming movie in much the same way his Spider-Man 3 missed the mark. It’s overblown, misguided and odd.

Bradley Cooper is on fire as Pat, a troubled man recently out of a mental institution and obsessed with his ex-wife. He’s so obsessed hat he can’t see the value in Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a recently widowed neighbor trying to befriend him. Directed by David O. Russell, the movie is a funny, slick treatment of people with real problems that works because Russell and his performers find the right balance. Robert De Niro does his best work in years as Pat’s obsessive father, and Chris Tucker gets big laughs as Pat’s former mental institution buddy. Cooper and Lawrence make for one of the year’s most interesting screen couples. They are certainly unique. Russell is establishing himself as one of the industry’s most reliable and innovative directors.

Dwayne Johnson—ACTOR! He has dropped his alias, “The Rock,” from his screen name, and now stars in a movie where he doesn’t even fire a machine gun or show off his glorious tattoos. Johnson plays the father of a young man who gets into trouble after a friend mails him a whole lot of drugs. Unless the son turns in somebody for distributing drugs and “snitches,” he will face a long jail sentence. Johnson’s character decides to take matters into his own hands, find some drug dealers, and turn them in so his misunderstood son can walk free. This one was a lot better than I was expecting because Johnson really steps up and makes the whole thing work. It’s predictable, yet well paced, a good-looking and wellacted action thriller. Johnson will be coming to a theater near you firing many guns and showing off his ink in the near future (quite often in 2013). For now, it’s kind of cool to see him do something a little different, and doing it effectively.

If you have seen any of director Chanwook Park’s films (Oldboy, Thirst), you know he’s one creative and tremendously sick bastard. This is his English language debut, and it’s just as deranged and disturbing as his prior offerings. Mopey-faced Mia Wasikowska plays India, a girl just turned 18 who has lost her father (Dermot Mulroney) in a mysterious accident. Her mother (an excellent Nicole Kidman) invites India’s strange uncle (Matthew Goode) to stay at the house, and it’s slowly revealed that he has a few “problems.” The filmmaking here is visually impeccable—some of the dissolves are mind-blowing—and the performances are solid. The story itself is a little too sleepy at times to rank this among Park’s best works. Still, this twisty film has many memorable moments, and I’m hoping Park has many more films to come.

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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THIS WEEK

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MARCH 28, 2013

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23


Happy man Bobby McFerrin Bobby McFerrin is the master of solo a capella jazz singing. He’s won dozens of awards, including 10 Grammys, and by Brad Bynum collaborated with other musicians, ranging from jazz pianist Chick Corea b ra d b @ to classical cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Still, ne w s re v i e w . c o m he’s best known for the massive 1988 song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy,” the first a capella song to top the Billboard singles chart. He’ll perform at the Grand Sierra Resort on April 6.

my life. But it’s something that you personally have to decide. You have to make a personal decision that you want to acknowledge your weakness in some of the areas of your life that can only be filled up by God—can only be filled by a god who knows everything, who knows you more intimately than you know yourself, and knows why you are who you are ... and brings healing to you spiritually, physically, emotionally. You have to decide for yourself that you need help. You have to put your pride away. We generally think we can do everything on our own, but I believe I need help every day to be kind, to be patient, to be creative and write. What role does music play in that? It plays a big part for me. I’ve made my career as a soloist. My concerts have been probably the simplest thing you could ever see. … I just walk out onstage, sit in a chair and start singing, and the first two pieces are always improvised. Always. I have no idea what’s coming out, or where the music’s going. I basically trust in it. And that to me is faith. You just step out into this sort of musical stream, you open up your mouth, and you start singing.

“We want to be free,”  says Bobby McFerrin.  “We want to be  unchained.” 

Tell me about the new album. It’s called Spirit You All, and it’s an album of Negro spirituals and some traditional Christian things, like “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands,” some spirituals that my dad sang on his album recorded in 1957 called Deep River, like “Fix Me, Jesus.” What else we doing? “I Shall Be Released” by Bob Dylan. What attracted you to that song? “I Shall Be Released.” I think that’s what everybody aches for in some part of their being—from fears or pain or sickness or relationships or something—we want to be free. We want to be mobile. We want to be unchained. We want to be unstuck. Everybody’s got places that are stuck. So, the album is about change, gratitude, thankfulness—for me personally, acknowledging my creator.

Artown presents Bobby McFerrin at the Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., on Saturday, April 6 at 8 p.m. For tickets or more information, visit www.renois artown.com.

24   |  | RN&R   |  MARCH 28, 2011 24  RN&R   |  march 28, 2013

Is faith important to you? I grew up in a house that was pretty devout. My parents were both Christians. My grandma was Christian. She went to Catholic church. I grew up an Episcopalian. My mom was a soprano soloist in the choir. I was an altar boy. I went to Catholic high school. Religion has always been a prominent thread in

I’m curious about “Don’t Worry, Be Happy.” Do you feel like it’s overshadowed other aspects of your career? Or are you proud to have written a song everybody knows? I’m proud first off. I am proud to have written a song that everybody knows, and I consider it a blessing. Especially when I’m going through YouTube, and I see all these people, kids playing guitar, or a band playing a really odd arrangement of it, somebody singing it in a shopping mall … that in itself is a blessing. For a while, it overshadowed everything else, especially when it was brand new. When “Don’t Worry, be Happy” was sailing out of the record stores, I was studying to be a conductor. … When the tune was doing really well, I took 18 months off. I didn’t go anywhere. I didn’t do a “Don’t Worry Be Happy” tour. I stayed home and played with my kids. … My relationship with the song nowadays is I don’t perform it. I haven’t in many, many years. I might skate around it if somebody requests it, or in an improv, I might try to disguise it and see if anyone hears it. It becomes a game, spot “Don’t Worry, Be Happy.” It’s like Where’s Waldo? Ω


THURSDAY 3/28 1UP

FRIDAY 3/29

SATURDAY 3/30

EDM Thursday, 10pm, no cover

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Larry and His Flask, Last to Leave, Actors Killed Lincoln, 7:30pm, $13, $15

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

BODEGA NIGHTCLUB

Donald Glaude, Sentry, Rizin, Fat Sam, Erik Lobe, FM Marc, 9pm, $10

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206 555 E. Fourth St., (775) 378-4507 Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

Mark Diorio, 11:15am, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FAT CAT BAR & GRILL

Karaoke Night, 10pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255 599 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City; (530) 583-3355

FUEGO

DG Kicks, 9pm Tu, no cover

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm M, no cover

Zion I Ciana, 9pm, no cover

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

The RN&R no longer a ccepts emailed or phoned-in listings. Post show s online by registering at www.ne wsreview.c om/reno. Deadline is the Friday b efore publication .

10 E. Ninth St., (775) 284-7270

Bias & Dunn, 7pm, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover Undenied, Hellpig, Ostracized, Tempus, Qarin, 8:30pm, no cover

CORKSCROO BAR AND GRILL COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/1-4/3 1up Wednesday, 10pm W, no cover

Metal Echo, 9:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

CEOL IRISH PUB

SUNDAY 3/31

’90s Night, 10pm, no cover

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

Rick Hammond Blues Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover Reggae Night, 9pm, Open Mic w/host Lucas Arizu, 9pm, Tu, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300 1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Spoken Views Open Mic, 7pm, no cover

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Comedy

Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

Danny Sturtevant, 7pm, no cover Frazzled featuring Rex Stencil, 9:30pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: James Goff, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Tommy Savitt, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Shayla Rivera, Rick D’Elia, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Allan Havey, Don McEnery, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Big Mommas of Comedy: Susan Jones and Nancy Reed, F, 8pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

Widowspeak, Civil Perish, Dirty Divers, 8pm, $5, $7

JAVA JUNGLE

March 29, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

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OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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RNR313RNO

ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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2/19/13 3:57 PM

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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THURSDAY 3/28 JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

FRIDAY 3/29

SATURDAY 3/30

Live Jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Zion I, The Grouch, Eligh, Alexander Spit, 8pm, $20-$40 2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Donald Glaude

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

March 29, 9 p.m. Bodega Nightclub 555 E. Fourth St. 378-4507

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

RAW BAR LAKE TAHOE

31 Highway 50, Stateline; (775) 580-6029

Live music/DJs, 8pm, 0-$15

RISE NIGHTCLUB

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

March 29, 7:30 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

1) Equinox w/Maizon Tech, CRiSiS, Mizchief, Noisemachin3, 9pm, $6 2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Sleeping with Sirens, Conditions, 7pm, M, $17-$32, Pierce the Veil, Memphis May Fire, 7pm, W, $19.50-$45

Fairweather Productions: Hip Hop Night, 8pm, no cover

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Smoke Signalz, 9pm, $5, no cover charge for women

DJ Battles, 9pm, $5-$15

Fusion Fridays w/DJs Kentot, Fredy G, 10pm, $10; free for women until midnight

Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover Karaoke, 8pm, M, Mixtape DJ/iPod jam session, 8pm, Tu, live music/DJ, 8pm, W, $0-$15

Reggae Vibes, 8pm, $0-$15

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/1-4/3

Gypsyhawk, Mothership, Otis, The Harvest and The Hunt, 9pm, $8

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

RYAN’S SALOON

Larry and His Flask

SUNDAY 3/31 Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Mimic, 9:30pm, no cover

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

Truckee River Band, Larry Cooper, 7pm, $5

VASSAR LOUNGE

Rick Hammond Band, 8pm, no cover

Rock’N J Entertainment, 8pm, no cover

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Slow Djinn Fez, Gregory Mitchell, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Open mic w/Keegan Monahan, 7pm, W, no cover

Gyration for Hydration, 8pm, by donaton The Supa Sexy Birthday Bash, 9pm, $5

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

WINTER MUSIC SERIES W WIN INT TER R MU M USIC SIC SE S ERIES IES

Thursday, March Th urrsd day ay, Ma Marc rch h 28

Nuke Vegas, Dusty And W/ N uke V egas, D ustty Mil Miles A nd The C Cryin' Shame, Sham me, Thursday Knights Out, Stereo K Killers

LARRY L LA LAR R AND HIS FLASK RY

From DINOSAURS to ice age mammals to legends like BIGFOOT and Yeti.

Friday, F Fr iday, March 29 id

- Friday 3/29 -

DJ Donald Gloude

With GuESt DJS - DooRS opEN @ 9pm

THESE DON’T MIX Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. PerIod.

RN&R

|

MARCH 28, 2013

PAGANFEST

Thursday, April 4

W/ Ensiferum. Tyr, Heidevolk, Trollfest, Helsott +More!

BATTLE BORN DERBY DEMONS

Vilma Diaz

KARAOKE BASH + BENEFIT

y La Sonora

Special GueSt tierra tropical DooRS opEN @ 9pm

- Saturday 4/6 -

, Yuri s Night

Welcome Burners! DooRS opEN @ 9pm / 21+

- Saturday 4/11 -

James Douglas Band 555 East 4th St, Reno • BodegaNights555@gmail.com

|

UNDENIED

Saturday, March 30

W/ Tempus, Qarin, Hellpig. Free Show!!

- Saturday 3/30 -

DooRS opEN @ 9pm / 21+

26

Last To Leave, Lincoln, W// La Las L asst T oL eave, Actors Killed Linco oln, Riptide R iptide Bandits

W NO UGH nd O e 2 R TH Jun n., Su

Friday, April 5

BETTY ROCKER, KNOT SORRY, JUKEBOX REBELS. FREE SHOW!

Saturday, April 6

$20 All You Can Drink! Wells + Select Beers

THE CASUALTIES

Sunday, April 7

Havok, Goatwhore, Liver Scars, Envirusment

Just Announced: 4/13 Leftover Crack, 4/26 Jason Newstead (Of Metallica), 5/23 Subhumans W/ Total Chaos

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: March 29 — Larry and His Flask April 4 — Paganfest April 7 — Casualties / Havok April 10 — Lucero April 13 — Leftover Crack April 17 — Voodoo Glow Skulls April 20 — Weston Buck

TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM

Rancho San Rafael Regional Park 1595 N. Sierra St, Reno 775-785-5961 / www.maycenter.com $9 Adults / $8 Children & Seniors School & group tours available


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

THURSDAY 3/28

FRIDAY 3/29

SATURDAY 3/30

SUNDAY 3/31

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/1-4/3

2) Midnight Riders, 8pm, no cover

2) Midnight Riders, 4pm, Soul Experience, 10pm, no cover

2) Midnight Riders, 4pm, Soul Experience, 10pm, no cover

2) Soul Experience, 8pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Decoy, 7pm, no cover

1) The Four Preps, 7pm, $22 2) Decoy, 8pm, no cover

1) The Four Preps, 7pm, $22 2) Decoy, 8pm, no cover

1) Steve Kimock Band, 9pm, $22-$42

1) Bomba Estereo, Will Magid Duo, 10pm, 1) Donavon Frankenreiter, $17, $20 RayLand Baxter, 9pm, $17-$37

1) Magique, 8pm, $21.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, 9:30pm, $21.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB 14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Bomba Estereo 1) Magique, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, W, $21.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

March 30, 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE 15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

1) Moonwalker—The Reflection of Michael, 7:30pm, $38.50

HARRAH’S RENO

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

Karaoke

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Apple Z, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Apple Z, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35

2) Emerald City, 7pm, no cover 3) Kate Cotter, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

1) The Oak Ridge Boys, 8pm, $50 2) Emerald City, 8pm, no cover 3) Kate Cotter, 6pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 6pm, no cover

1) The Oak Ridge Boys, 8pm, $50 2) Emerald City, 8pm, no cover 3) Kate Cotter, 6pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 6pm, no cover

5) Just Right, 6pm, no cover

3) Keith Andrew & Osi, 6pm, W, no cover

2) Kyle Williams, 7pm, no cover 3) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

2) M8TRIX, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) M8TRIX, 9pm, no cover 3) Return of the Beezo Battles w/DJ Enrie, 10pm, $20

2) Eric Andersen, 7pm, no cover

2) Eric Andersen, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover

3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Sin Biggest Little Locals Night, 4pm, M, Step This Way, 8pm W, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

1) Bass Heavy, 9pm, no cover

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

2) Duane “Beans” Sousa, 8pm, no cover

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

TAHOE BILTMORE 5 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 831-0660 1) Breeze Nightclub 2) Casino Floor

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MARCH 28, 2013

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RN&R

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27


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Animal Ark opening weekend Spring in Northern Nevada can be quite unpredictable—one day can be mild and sunny, and the next can be blustery and blizzard-like. Hopefully, the weather will cooperate this weekend when Animal Ark opens for the season. The wildlife sanctuary and education center celebrates its 32nd year providing a home for injured wild animals or abandoned exotic pets that cannot be released into the wild. Resident animals include wolves, foxes, brown bears and various raptors, as well as big cats such as mountain lions, tigers, cheetahs and a jaguar. The center is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 30-31, and resumes normal operating hours on Tuesday, April 2. Admission is $9.50 for adults, $8 for seniors and $6.50 for children ages 3-12. Animal Ark is at 1265 Deerlodge Road, off Red Road Rock, north of Reno. Call (775) 970-3111 or visit www.animalark.org.

Strange Women: Classic Sci-Fi

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What do a 50-foot woman, a prehistoric babe and a sexy, swingin’ space agent from the future have in common? They’re the subjects of Churchill Arts Council’s latest film series, Strange Women: Classic Sci-Fi, which kicked off last Friday with a screening of Attack of the 50 Foot Woman and Queen of Outer Space. This week’s movie is the 1966 film One Million Years B.C., which depicts a fantasy world where cavemen and dinosaurs share the planet and a young Raquel Welch frollicks about in a fur bikini. The screening starts at 7 p.m., March 29, at the Oats Park Art Center, 151 E. Park St., Fallon. Admission is $7-$10. The series concludes on April 5 with a screening of the 1968 sci-fi cult film Barbarella, starring Jane Fonda. Call (775) 423-1440.

Seventh and eighth graders can explore their creative sides with art projects and hands-on science experiments during this night at the museum, which includes a DJ, Facebook photo booth and $5 slice of pizza and soda. Admission is $10 for museum members or $15 for non-members. The party starts at 6 p.m., March 29, at the Terry Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St. Call 786-1000 or visit www.nvdm.org.

Classical Doodles Brüka Theatre and Sierra Nevada Ballet present dance/choreographer Ananda Bena-Weber, who will perform her new work that crosses the genres of dance and theater. The shows starts at 7 p.m. on March 29, and 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. March 30 at in the Sub-Brüka level of Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St. A talkback session with the artist will follow the March 30 matinee performance. Tickets are $16-$20. Call 323-3221 or visit www.bruka.org.

Astronomy Evening If you can’t tell the difference between a contrail and a comet tail, you might want to pay a visit to the members of the Astronomical Society of Northern Nevada. Weather permitting, they will meet at 7 p.m. on March 30 for their monthly lecture and star viewing at Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway. A $5 per person donation is requested. Call 849-4948 or visit www.greatbasininstitute.org.

Virginia City Easter Bonnet Northern Nevada Bluegrass Jam Parade and Pet Parade Wear your finest spring frocks at this pre-Easter Day event in Virginia City. Furry friends are invited to get into the spirit by wearing bunny ears, bonnets, etc. The parade starts at noon on March 30. The procession begins at the Virginia City Jerky Company and proceeds down C Street. Prize winners will be announced 15 minutes after the parade at the Bucket of Blood. Call 847-7347 or go to www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

Calling all banjo, fiddle and mandolin players. Northern Nevada Bluegrass Association meets Tuesday, April 2, for its bluegrass jam open to all levels of players at Maytan Music Center, 777 S. Center St. The jam takes place at 7 p.m. on the first and third Tuesday of each month. Call 849-7988 or visit www.nnba.org.

—Kelley Lang

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to keep a woman guessingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but not as to whether you want her to go out with you or give you the Heimlich maneuver. A Dutch study confirmed what you and most of us already knowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that talking to a hot woman can turn a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brain into a pudding cup. The researchersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a team led by Dr. Johan C. Karremansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;did the study after one of them was chatting up a â&#x20AC;&#x153;very attractive girlâ&#x20AC;? heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d just met, intent on impressing her, but when she asked him where he lived, he suddenly couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember his street address. University of Chicago researcher Dr. Sian Beilock, author of Chokeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a book about overcoming performance anxiety in sports, business and the artsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;explains that we have different types of memory. The type crapping out on you every time your head says â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, hello, beautiful!â&#x20AC;? is â&#x20AC;&#x153;working memory,â&#x20AC;? the cognitive horsepower that allows you to hold relevant information in mind

while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to do something else. Stressing about what a woman might think of you and overthinking things you normally do without much thought, like tossing around witty banter, depletes working memory resources that would otherwise be availableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;maybe to the point where you find yourself glancing around the bar for help recalling the simplest facts about yourself: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My name? Uh â&#x20AC;Ś Bud. Bud Light.â&#x20AC;? You stop the pretty ladies from pulling the fire alarm in your head and evacuating your every thought the same way you, ha-ha, get to Carnegie Hallâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;practice. Beilock lays out numerous examples that suggest that the more you practice under pressure the less likely youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll choke when the stress is on. For example, golfers who had their putting practice sessions videotaped and judged by coaches did much better in competition than those who practiced without scrutiny. You, likewise, would probably be helped by going out and practicing hitting on hot women with your friends watching in the wings orâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;better yet, to raise the stakesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with them watching and placing bets with you on how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do. To avoid self-conscious overthink, shift your focus from fretting about what a woman thinks of you to having a good time saying things you find interesting and fun.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I was too lazy

to write your horoscope this week, so I went to a website that hawks bumper stickers and copied a few of their slogans to use as your “advice.” Here you go: 1. Never follow a rule off a cliff. 2. Have the courage to honor your peculiarities. 3. It’s never too late to have a rebellious adolescence. 4. Criticize by creating. 5. Never make anything simple and efficient when it can be elaborate and wonderful. 6. Complex problems have simple, easy-to-understand, morally clear, wrong answers. April fool! I lied. I wasn’t lazy at all. I worked hard to ensure that all the suggestions I just provided are in strict accordance with the astrological gestalt.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s a perfect time to watch the cult classic film Night of the Day of the Dawn of the Son of the Bride of the Return of the Revenge of the Terror of the Attack of the Evil, Mutant, Alien, Flesh Eating, Hellbound, Zombified Living Dead. It will provide you with just the right inspiration as you deal with your own problems. April fool! I lied. Don’t you dare watch any horror movies. You’re in a phase when you can make dramatic progress in transforming long-standing dilemmas—but only if you surround yourself with positive, uplifting influences.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The coming

week will be an excellent time to wash dishes, clean bathrooms, scrub floors, vacuum carpets, wash windows, do laundry and clean the refrigerator. The more drudge work you do, the better you’ll feel. April fool! I lied. The truth is, you now have astrological license to minimize your participation in boring tasks like the ones I named. It’s high time for you to seek out the most interesting work and play possible.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You know

what would be a really cool prank to pull off this April Fools’ Day? Arrange to have rubber tires airlifted into a dormant volcano, then set them on fire. Smoke will pour out the top. Everyone who lives nearby will think the volcano is getting ready to explode. Don’t forget to videotape the event for YouTube. Later, when you reveal the hoax, your video will go viral, and you’ll become a celebrity. April fool! I don’t really think you should try this prank. It’s old hat. Back in 1974, a guy named Porky Bickar did it to Alaska’s Mount Edgecumbe. Here’s my real oracle for you: It is a good time to boost your visibility by doing something funny. Or to build your brand by being mischievous. Or to demonstrate your power by showing off your sense of humor.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the animated

TV show The Simpsons, 10-year-old Bart is constantly getting into trouble because of the monkey business he loves to perpetrate. His teachers punish him by compelling him to write corrective declarations on the classroom blackboard. It so happens that some of those apologetic statements should be coming out of your mouth in the coming week, Leo. They include the following: “I will not strut around like I own the place.” “I am not deliciously saucy.” “I will not instigate revolution.” “I will not trade pants with others.” “I will not carve gods.” “I will not Xerox my butt.” “I will not scream for ice cream.” April fool! I lied. The truth is, you should consider doing things like that. And don’t apologize!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The sport of

ferret legging is an endurance contest. Participants vie to determine who can last longest as a live ferret runs loose inside their pants. The current record is five hours and 26 minutes, held by a retired British miner. But I predict that a Virgo will soon break that mark. [It has been broken. Does it matter?] Could it be you? April fool! I misled you. I don’t really think you should put a ferret in your pants, not even to win a contest. It is possible, however, that there will soon be a pleasurable commotion happening in the area below your waist. And I suspect that you will handle it pretty well.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Risk being a

crazed fool for love, Libra. Get as wild and extreme as you’ve ever been if it helps you rustle up the closeness you’re hungry for. Get down on your knees and beg, or climb a tree with a megaphone and profess your passion. April fool! I was exaggerating a little. It’s true that now is an excellent time to be aggressive about going after the intimate connection you want. But I suggest you accomplish that by being ingenious and imaginative rather than crazy and extreme.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): British

comedy team Monty Python did a sketch in which a policeman apprehends a criminal. The bad guy says, “Yes, I did it, but society is to blame.” And the cop says, “Right! We’ll arrest them instead.” You should adopt this attitude, Scorpio. Blame everyone else but yourself for your problems and flaws. April fool! I lied. In fact, the truth is the opposite of what I said. It’s time to take more responsibility for your actions. Bravely accept the consequences of what you’ve done— with your sense of humor fully engaged and a lot of compassion for yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Banzai skydiving is a step beyond ordinary skydiving. To do it, you hurl your folded-up parachute out of the airplane, wait a while, and then leap into midair yourself. If all goes well, you free-fall in the direction of your parachute and catch up to it. Once you grab it, you strap it on and open the chute, ideally before you hit the earth. This is the kind of beyond-ballsy activity that would be perfect for you right now. April fool! In truth, I don’t recommend banzai skydiving now or ever. Plain-old skydiving is fine, though. The same principle applies in relation to any adventurousness you’re considering: Push yourself, yes, but not to an absurd degree.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Should

you relocate to Kazakhstan and grow sunflowers? Is it time to think about getting a job in Uruguay and living there for the next 10 years? Can you see yourself building your dream home in Morocco on a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean? I suggest you spend some quality time thinking way, way outside the box about where you belong on this Earth. April fool! I went a bit overboard in my recommendations. It is true that you should brainstorm about the kind of home you want to create and enjoy in the future. But that probably means revising and refining your current situation, rather than leaving it all behind and starting over.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your

brain has a bigger capacity than you realize. According to professor of psychology Paul Reber, it can hold the equivalent of 3 million hours’ worth of television shows. As I’m sure you know, your brain is not even close to being full of that much data. And in accordance with the current astrological omens, I suggest you cram in as much new material as possible. April fool! I told you a half-truth. While it’s correct that now is an excellent time to pour more stuff into your brain, you should be highly discerning about what you allow in there. Seek out the richest ideas, the most stimulating information, the best stories. Avoid trivial crap.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): July 2012

was a sad time in the history of mythic creatures. The National Ocean Service, a U.S. government agency, made a formal proclamation that there are no such things as mermaids. But I predict those stuffy know-it-alls will soon get a big shock when a Piscean scientist presents evidence that mermaids are indeed real. April fool! I was exaggerating. I don’t really foresee the discovery of a flesh-and-blood mermaid— by a Pisces or anyone else. I do, however, suspect that your tribe is now highly adept at extracting useful revelations and inspirations from dreams, visions and fantasies— including at least one that involves a coven of Buddhist ninja clown mermaids.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.

34   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 28, 2013


by Brad Bynum PHOTO/brad bynum

Pin man

I’m born and raised right here in Reno. I went to school in Seattle. I had a practice there for a year after school, and then I worked for a year on a cruise ship, around the Pacific Ocean. It was really cool. And with that, I was seeing about 20 people a day. And the average age on our ship was 72. And that’s with babies bringing the age range down. So I’ve seen a lot of arthritis, a lot of sciatic pain, hip pain, knee replacements, all sorts of surgeries, just about anything you can think of. And most people of that age range are on five to eight medications. In my private practice, I’ve seen many people be able to lower their blood pressure, lower their cholesterol, and get off Western drugs. And with anxiety and depression, the same—being able to get off prescription drugs using Chinese herbs. I’ve got about 320 raw herbs, and I’m the only show in town that has raw herbs as part of my dispensary.

Joey Rueckl Symmetry Acupuncture, 520 Mt. Rose St., an acupuncture office and Chinese herb dispensary, has its grand opening on March 29-30, with an open house and introductory lectures by doctor of Oriental medicine Joey Rueckl. For more information, or to set up an appointment, visit www.symmetry acupuncture.com or call 329-5100.

Tell me about your business. It’s called Symmetry Acupuncture? Symmetry Acupuncture, yes. I am a doctor of Oriental medicine.

What does that mean? That’s how the state licenses me. I have the ability to order out labs, blood work, things of that nature. Also, I work with Chinese herbs, and I do acupuncture and massage.

Do people come to you with specific ailments, like back pain? What do you treat? With acupuncture, pain is the most commonly associated issue that we treat, and with that, I’ve been a massage therapist for the last 13 years. And when I was in Seattle, I was working at Harbor View Hospital at the level one trauma center, and I was helping to run a neck and back specialty clinic. People would come into the hospital, and they’d need surgery. After surgery, the hospital

would send them to us, and we would get them out of pain and restore feeling to their hands, their feet, and really speed up the healing time. Anytime you have any aches and pains, absolutely we can take care of that. … Acupuncture is the longest continually practiced form of medicine in the world. Essentially, I still practice today the way our oldest text book, the Huangdi Neijing—it was written about 3,000 years ago—I still practice the way that was written. And because it is a complete book of medicine, a big part of my practice is anxiety, depression, insomnia. But I also treat all gynecological concerns, infertility—male and female. ... I see diabetes patients all the time. Relieving peripheral neuropathy is a big one of my specialties.

It was just two years ago. The Sierra Nevadas were positively pounded with frozen water. Snowpacks were hyper healthy. I remember that bounty of the winter of 2010/2011, not in terms of skiing fun, which I’m sure was titanic, but in terms of summer drives on highway 120 from Lee Vining up over Tioga Pass into Tuolumne Meadows. Yosemite was just bursting at the seams with water, leaking all over itself, and it was a marvel to behold. It was one of those fantasy times, that August 2011, with rivulets trickling, brooks babbling, creeks gushing and rivers churning, all flowing into one another, doing their circulatory thing. It was all drippy and sloshy and gooshy—unsafe for crocs/sneakers! Driving along Highway 395 this past week, that all seems like a long time ago. Like two years ago. Man, we’re lookin’ at a dry one this year. The mighty Southern Sierra, the tallest mountain range in the lower 48, the monstrous wall of granite that takes the most brutal, drenching, stormy haymakers that roll in from OPINION

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GREEN

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What kind of herbs? Sticks, roots, minerals. I know them all in Chinese. But things that you would recognize—cinnamon. The twig, along with ginger and several other herbs, they help to relieve the cold. We can treat the common cold. If you’ve got it for more than one day, that’s ridiculous. I’ve treated flu, all sorts of viral issues. With herbs, if it’s bacterial or if it’s viral, what we’re doing is working with the system, with your immune system, to strengthen that and kick out what you’ve got going on, your imbalance. Ω

What’s that? Peripheral neuropathy is when you can’t feel your hands or feet or anything. Along with diabetes comes a lot of burning and numbness in the feet usually. That is something we relieve with acupuncture.

High, and dry

You mentioned Seattle. Is that where you’re from?

∫y Bruce Van Dye brucev@newsreview.com

hydrologically speaking, from from paycheck to paycheck. But then, that’s been our reality for longer than we care to admit. • OK, I think it’s now officially a trend, not a fad. More and more people cancelling their landlines and opting to go with their smart phones only. I understand. It’s a good way to reduce the monthly nut. I get it. But man, I just can’t pull that trigger. There’s still something superior about talking on the landline. It’s just better. Must be that satellite lag in the cell phones? Or somethin’. But it’s just more of a stress to chat on the cell. So like an old geezer who blathers on endlessly about the days of 50-cent gas and 10-cent stamps, I just gotta keep that landline. Ω

the Pacific, and then shakes itself off in the sunsoaked morning that inevitably follows and dares to say, “Is that all you got?”... Well, those peaks just don’t have much going for them this season. Pretty dang lean scene, snow-wise. And the fantastic White Mountains, that hefty range directly east of Bishop, home of the world’s most impressive garden of the some of the planet’s oldest plants, the bristlecone pine, and capped by the peak called White Mountain King, which tops out at 14,264 feet, only 231 feet shorter than famous Mt. Whitney, which looms from the other side of 395 west of Lone Pine. The Whites this year are downright brown with about as much snow as your average Lemmon Valley back yard. Which, you know, sorta sucks. I mean, it’s looking like a big summer for chapstick and cracked earth and water cops. Oh sure, we may still catch a break and get a few good rainstorms in April/May. You never, after all, know. I just got the feeling during my drive that we in The West are very much like a guy who lives,

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MARCH 28, 2013

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