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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 Sheila Leslie . . . . . . . . . . .6 Chanelle Bessette . . . . . .7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .16 Art of the State . . . . . . .19

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .24 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .25 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Free Will Astrology . . . .34 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .35 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .35

THE WAGES OF POLITICS See News, page 8.

IT’LL ALL COME OUT IN THE GREENWASH See Green, page 11.

WINE AND BRUSHES See Arts&Culture, page 16.

WE’RE NOT IN KANSAS See Film, page 22.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 19, ISSUE 4

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MARCH

14–20, 2013


Do I Really Need a Family Doctor? The short answer is yes. Trained in all areas of medicine, family doctors are specialists that serve the medical needs of the entire family – from infants to seniors. That’s why having a family doctor is one of the most important life decisions you’ll ever make. Think of us as your wellness coach – here for you all the time, every time – through every stage of your life. We help you keep up your exercise program and watch your weight. We treat you when you are sick or if you have a medical emergency. But most importantly, we help you live a healthy life.

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Dr. O’Brien is a board-certified family medicine physician who believes in the “small-town” family doctor model. He enjoys practicing all kinds of medicine, as well as building and maintaining long-term relationships with his patients and their families. He earned his medical degree and completed his residency at the University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno. In his free time, Dr. O’Brien enjoys soccer, skiing, mountain biking and spending time with his wife and son.

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Exceptional People. Exceptional Quality. Experience the Difference. 5575 Kietzke Lane | Reno, NV | 352-5300 | NNMC.com Information is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to constitute medical advice or to be relied upon for the treatment of any particular condition. If you have concerns or questions about specific symptoms that may affect your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

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march 14, 2013


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

I’m on break, sort of

Tahoe truth

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. As I’ve whined for the last several months, I’ve started a master’s degree at the University of Nevada, Reno. I’m only taking two classes, but ... man ... I have not been a college student for a long time. So much has changed. One of the funniest things, for me anyway, is that I no longer know the rules of English grammar. I’ve been writing in newspaper grammar (Associated Press Style) for so long that simple rules no longer occupy a folder in the file cabinet of my mind. And it’s not like I’m a stranger to the college experience since I’ve been teaching journalism up there for a couple of years—in fact, I’m teaching a class now. I have a job that requires more than 40 hours a week. I have seven hours of classes in which I’m a student on campus. I teach four hours a week. I have homework. I run a singleparent household with a young adult. My Wednesdays start about 5 a.m., and my last class lets out at 10 p.m. There’s just one thing that gets me through the week—the countdown to spring break and then summer. And the real sad part is I’m right in the middle of my spring burst of creativity. Give me a little vitamin D, and I’m building projects. For example, this weekend, I sanded and refinished some end and coffee tables so that their tone matches my new hardwood floors. Of course, some things had to give: my time at the gym and my time in the bar. But by the time you read this Editor’s Note, I’ll be on spring break. My last midterm lets out at 11 a.m. on Thursday, and I may just walk out of that class and straight over to the Little Wal. I don’t think anyone would say boo. Fat chance. But if Thursday is productive and my karma is good, I might take Friday off. That’s all fantasy, probably, fueled by the promise of a 70 degree weekend. But with a little luck, I may get to spend some hours in the garden or on my back deck, hopefully reacquainting myself with a frosty Corona Light.

Re “Size matters” (Editorial, Feb. 28): Thank you for your recent editorial about how the Tahoe Daily Tribune and the AP “reported” the senators’ letter and the Sierra Club’s lawsuit against TRPA’s Regional Plan Update. You captured the essence of the issue in your last paragraph. Anyone presenting evidence that questions the initiatives of local jurisdictions, corporate business interests and government agencies, who have benefited from the $1.3 billion of funding over the last 15 years, is quickly ignored. How can there be any validity to claims that put a chink in their armor or threaten to pop the bubble they have spent literally millions of public dollars constructing over several years? There are plenty of them. Using the label of “smart growth”—for what is a catalyst for very large, Wall Streetfinanced resort developments (Boulder Bay and Homewood)—is nothing short of greenwashing. Selling fractional units is the most lucrative real estate development model, and the RPU lays the groundwork for another “gold rush” in the Tahoe Basin. I hope your paper remains open to printing the real story from the trenches, as it will be an epic battle, a story in our backyard that is a metaphor for what is happening in the economic and political sectors across our nation. Main Street, and appropriate, personal scale, is fighting for its life in a very small and sensitive Basin. David McClure Reno

Wither the weather? Re “Dog days of winter” (Feature story, Feb. 28): I know I’m a little late to the dance on this subject, but I really thought someone else would make this comment. I lived in Truckee through the ’80s into the ’90s, and before that I lived in Reno. My family saw the sled dog races advertised for years and planned to attend many times. I think mostly they were scheduled in the airport area. The races never happened as far as I know, and it was either due to lack of snow or canceled

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

NEWS

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Re “Size matters” (Editorial, Feb. 28): The truth hurts. Fantastic analysis of the boondoggle at the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency. No one has dared to verbalize the reality on the ground. Thank goodness for the only watchdog group the lake has left: the Sierra Club. In spite of tremendous pressure from all the politicians, special interests and agencies that feed on the trough of federal and state money, the Sierra Club did the right thing. Now the TRPA spin will try to denigrate and marginalize: after all they have four full-time public relations folks. Reno News & Review, thanks for being an independent news source. Ann Nichols Crystal Bay

Charles in charge Re “Make your destiny” (15 Minutes, March 7): Make your destiny! Such a great article on a movement that was created here in the 775. I will fully support any local-owned businesses with a positive brand and message that can relate to people of all ages. We all have goals no matter how large or how small, and the only way we will reach them is fueled by the strength of our desire to take the steps needed to accomplish our goals. Best of luck to Charles with his company. In my opinion, we need more motivated people like him. Joshua Brown Sparks

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Nora Heston, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

IN ROTATION

No truth for you

Re “Troll dogs” (Letters to the Editor, March 7): Aww, you sound jaded. Did you get dumped by a former pet for a more interesting neighbor down the road? It’s OK, sweetie, maybe you’re more of a ferret owner. Or, maybe with your personality you should get a pet rock. Justin Dunaway Reno

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

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About two weeks ago, several citizens addressed their concerns with the Washoe County Commission about sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act. Those sections gives armed forces power to arrest and indefinitely detain any American. As a “detainee,” you have no rights until the end of the War on Terror. I have to ask, since we are engaged in several wars, how long? I look at Gitmo. Those hooded detainees could be someone you know. San Francisco and 18 other communities have made resolutions to fight the NDAA. San Francisco called theirs “Resolution expressing opposition to the indefinite detention provisions of the NDAA.” Support our fight at nvndaa.org and Sen. Don Gustavson’s Nevada Preservation Act. I am a Nevadan, battle reborn. Are you battle born and proud of your freedom? Valerie Tilson Reno

No dogs for you

—D. Brian Burghart

OPINION

Preserve freedom

due to “too much snow.” Truckee is in a very unusual place and can be the coldest and the windiest place in North America. We had minus 51 degree windchill one year. I’ve seen as much as 8 feet of snow at my house, and none at the same time in another year. In January 1986, I was digging trenches around my house to prevent flooding due to a Pineapple Express [warm wind], which wiped out four feet of fresh snow, and rained for five straight days. Just a few years ago we had record snowfalls, and now we’re in a bit of a dry spell. Nothing has changed. In some other year, we will have more snow than some people would like and that will be a problem, then too much rain, or a forest fire and maybe a landslide that closes Interstate 80 down for three weeks! What will we do? All these have happened and will again, people. M.J. Bender via email

ART OF THE STATE

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Justice and truth Re “Born to be Wild” (Green, March 7): When I read stories about these beautiful creatures [wild horses], I weep. These horses are more intelligent than humans in more ways than one

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Gil Egeland, Neil Lemerise, John Miller, Russell Moore, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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so treating them like brainless animals is not only cruel and inhumane, but it brands those who do these terrible things as monsters. It is a well known fact that there are monsters among us with human masks, so we really are not in a position to know who is human and who is not, except when we witness the actions of Bureau of Land Management. Then we know! We know that these people are not human in the sense that we recognize humans with love and compassion in their hearts. We must keep on fighting for justice for our beautiful horses because they have no one else to fight for them. All we seek is justice and truth. And if we believe in justice and truth, we will win and get our horses back. Do not forget that persistence always wins. Never give up even when the odds are against us. We will get our horses back no matter what! Niki Nicholas West Palm Beach

Taxes and truth History has repeatedly demonstrated when a people and their leaders lose their virtue, freedom perishes. It has recently come to light that Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey allegedly sponsored and promoted legislation that would benefit a major donor to his political campaign. The legislation in question would have granted special tax credits and grants to a company in which his donor had invested heavily. This is how entrenched politicians maintain their hold on power. They manipulate the tax code to reward those contributing to their re-election campaigns. Without the income tax they would not have this “tool” to play “scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” game. There is a bill in Congress that would rectify this anti-virtuous system. It is “The Fair Tax Act.” It takes control of taxation out of the hands of politicians. We must eliminate this corrupt system we have in place before we are completely ruined. As another principle stated long ago says, “Righteousness exalts a nation; but sin is a reproach to any people.” Frank C. Kuchar Arlington, Texas

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

MARCH 14, 2013

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march 14, 2013


by Sage Leehey

ThiS Modern World

by tom tomorrow

What local bands do you listen to? Asked at University of Nevada, Reno Natalie deWitt Student

I listen to Televisions, Na Na Nonchalant, Bazooka Zoo and Evynn Tyler. I think that’s about it.

Guillermo Billalobos Graduate Student

I don’t really listen to anything local. I usually listen to indie and alternative rock. A little bit of electronica.

Nicole Wadden Student

End thought crimes in Nevada The Nevada Legislature is hell bent on adding another offensive opinion to the list of enhanced penalties prosecutors can seek when a criminal is motivated by what the lawmakers define as “hate.” Senate Bill 139, sponsored by Sen. Pat Spearman, provides “an additional penalty for certain crimes motivated by the victim’s gender identity or expression,” the additional penalty being 1-to-20 years in prison. In other words, assaulting someone because he or she was gay could carry a heavier penalty than merely assaulting someone. Unfortunately, state law already provides extra protection to victims of crime motivated by dislike of those victims’ “race, color, religion, national origin, physical or mental disability, or sexual orientation.” That raises substantial questions about equal protection under the law. Why are some citizens entitled to greater protection than others? The great civil libertarian Nat Hentoff quoted a woman whose rapist received a lighter sentence than that handed out in a “hate crime” rape case: “Was what happened to me of less importance to the law than what happened to my friend?” But more important, these thought crime laws serve to punish opinion. And once offensive opinion can be punished, it’s a short hop to punishing unpopular opinion. In a deplorable incident, Sen. Spearman was once attacked by a group of white men while she served in the military. But that attack was already subject to criminal prosecution. The only thing enhanced penalties would have changed is putting government in charge of establishing what are and are not acceptable thoughts. And acceptable thought has a way of evolving. Fifty-six years ago this week, the federal government indicted Confidential OPINION

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I don’t. I’m not from anywhere around here, and I’ve only been here since August. I’m from Novia Scotia, Canada.

magazine and its distributor on charges of sending obscene material through the mails. The material was information on abortion. Sen. Spearman quoted Martin Luther King Jr.: “The moral arc of the universe bends toward justice.” So it does, one hopes. But establishment of acceptable opinion and enforcement of state-approved opinion carries us away from justice. In the same speech, Dr. King said, “It’s a dark day in our nation when high-level authorities will seek to use every method to silence dissent.” Noting that the courts have upheld wide-ranging inquiries into defendants’ opinions years earlier, Hentoff wrote, “Watch what you say, and try to remember what you have said in the past. Other prosecutorial questions also may include magazines or other publications you read, or even which recordings you listen to.” In addition, once hate crimes are established it becomes easier to suppress other forms of expression. This is not just the “slippery slope” argument. It has happened. In Connecticut and New York, for example, the legislature has moved on from thought crimes to thoughts, by outlawing the display of what they consider hateful symbols— specifically, nooses. These laws move beyond prosecutable violence and instead criminalize pure opinion. This should be dealt with at the legislative level. Once the laws are on the books, judges are reluctant to hear challenges. Among those not permitted to sue to overturn thought crime laws are the American Family Association, several Michigan ministers, and 16 Ohio Amish residents. The crimes at issue are already illegal. SB 139 should be defeated and other similar laws repealed. Ω

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

Nick Sexton Musician

The Mark Sexton Band, Jelly Bread and Keyser Soze. I’m a local musician, too. I’m a singer/songwriter. I write soul/ rock/alternative music.

Lewis Mandichak Student

Buster Blue. They’re out of Douglas.

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Right wing left hook Nevada is not typically a trendsetter for the political winds of change, but the 2013 legislative session may prove otherwise. It seems there is a seismic shift to the left occurring right before our eyes, as last session’s “no new taxes ever” Senate Republicans call for major increases in mining taxes. by To illustrate the enormity of this Sheila Leslie shift, check out the news release announcing their new position. Many political pundits observed the release might have been written by the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada, commonly referred to on Twitter as the People’s Liberation Army of Nevada by self-proclaimed “Todd the Taxpayer.” While the Republicans’ effort to entice the Democratic majority into creating an alternative ballot initiative to the margins tax proposal is probably destined to fail, they are absolutely right to support the passage of SJR 15 and return the design and mechanism of mining taxation to the Legislature. Last week’s proposal pierced the capital’s political bubble because it was so unexpected, especially since three

of the six caucus members supporting this plan actually voted against SJR 15 in 2011. The only thing that’s changed since then? Public opinion. Other progressive bills are also gaining ground quickly, featured in hearings with minimal opposition. Legislation protecting transgender individuals, increasing transparency of lobbyists’ “gifts” to legislators, campaign finance reform, and even comprehensive universal sex education have not been roundly denounced by the Republicans this year with their usual thinly veiled sneer of contempt for progressives who promote these issues. It even seems possible the bill to begin the process to remove the discriminatory prohibition of gay marriage from our state’s constitution may pass, as Nevada rushes to catch up to the rest of the country and reclaim our title of Marriage Capital of the West. Advocates are pushing the bill sponsors to go even further, by replacing the constitutional prohibition with a law to allow gay marriage in

RISE NIGHTCLUB 210 N. SIERRA ST. DOWNTOWN RENO 775-786-0833

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MARCH 14, 2013

Nevada. The added benefit of significant economic reward through a boost to Nevada’s wedding chapel industry will undoubtedly help, but it still feels remarkable that the bill has such good chances. The much-ballyhooed spirit of “bi-partisanship” in 2013 seems more like a realization on behalf of the Republicans that the electorate has shifted its views and is translating those opinions to the ballot. While national Republicans have responded ineffectively to demographic changes in age and race, Nevada Republicans who once voted instinctively against progressive ideals, reflexively denouncing Democrats as union lackeys and misguided bleeding hearts, now insist they were never really against these ideas. Either they were misunderstood or they just didn’t have all the information. You do have to admire their chameleon-like ability to become whatever they perceive the voters want them to be. Maybe there’s an even simpler explanation: Republicans may be as tired of the Tea Party as the rest of us.

Their children attend the same public schools as ours do after all, at least the kids who aren’t shuttled off to the imagined safety and superiority of private school. It’s also possible they sincerely want to stop the politics of obstruction and move Nevada forward. Or is the House of Cards about to crumble, a la Kevin Spacey, as Republican leaders miscalculate and their caucuses end up bitter and divided, fighting among themselves via increasingly pointed press releases and Twitter bombs by their followers? The real question is whether the Democrats seize the moment and maximize this sudden change of heart. Many fear they will turn timid, worried they might be falling into a clever trap. The next three months will tell the tale. As nimble politicians rapidly adjust to the new reality of voters who have clearly shifted towards the left, longtime progressive Nevadans can afford a small smile of satisfaction. Change is coming. Ω

Here’s the link to the Republican Senate Caucus’ press release on mining: http:// tinyurl.com/cm79k4t


Jury is not out on sequester The first day of March heralded the beginning of the 2013 sequester. While the word “sequester� has an academic or arboricultural ring to it (semester? sequoia?), the real meaning and implementation of the concept is far more misleading. Essentially, this sequester has been a long-time plan by Chanelle Bessette to slash national costs by cutting government expenditures across the board. In theory, a sequester sounds amazing—reduction of budget and discretionary spending! A libertarian dream! But the realities of such a move are less than idyllic. In some ways, the economic roller coaster that this country has been on since the 2007-2009 financial crisis has gotten even worse in recent months. The deadline of limiting the debt ceiling having come and gone from December’s fiscal cliff to the sequester, it might be fair to say that people are becoming numb to what’s happening to the economy. Or, more specifically, what the government is doing to the economy. With every apparently earth-shattering critical point that the economy

reaches, Congress steps in with a supposed solution that either benefits the economy very little, doesn’t help at all or, in fact, makes economic recovery much more difficult. Last month, the Congressional Budget Office reported, “In the absence of sequestration ... GDP growth would be about 0.6 percentage points faster during [the 2013] calendar year, and the equivalent of about 750,000 more full-time jobs would be created or retained by the fourth quarter.� In some ways, it seems that the U.S. government hasn’t fully learned its lesson from the Great Depression. Any historian or economist will tell you that government intervention into the economy slowed recovery the most during the 1930s. Cutting down extraneous budgets and departments is a great first step, but execution is key. With approximately 35 percent of the proposed budget cuts affecting military operations, the militaryindustrial complex will be among the first to see the effects of the sequester. As the military operations in

Iraq and Afghanistan end, it makes sense that the spending going toward defense be brought down to pre-war levels. Even recruiters are acting less aggressively to enlist fresh blood. In September 2011, the CBO estimated that between 2013 and 2021, military spending would be brought down from 10 percent to 8.5 percent, which they predicted would result in a saving of $454 billion over those eight years. As someone who is very close with current and former members of the military, I have heard countless stories about the inappropriate uses of funding. While it’s my sincere hope that the defense budget cuts simply increase efficiency and cut down on waste, it’s my fear that the sequester will do more to hurt our nation’s poorest people than it will help the economy. Without a solid plan to reduce spending costs, all that will come of the sequester will be alternative methods to cutting budgets or further taxation to balance out the current cuts. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, the

sequestration cuts could mean even less funding for schools in Nevada, which could mean even larger class sizes with even fewer teachers. Non-discretionary funding—such as Social Security, welfare and veteran’s benefits—are still maintained under the sequestration, but military and other federal employees—including the Nevada National Guard and air travel workers—could be forced to take unpaid furloughs. Meanwhile, Congress’ $174,000 salaries will not be touched throughout this sequester. Perhaps it would be easier to submit to radical budget cuts if it wasn’t a “do as I say, not as I do� situation. Cinching one’s metaphorical belt for the sake of a business or household is one thing, but it’s another thing entirely to be expected to go without when Congress isn’t willing to do the same. Ί

To read a bit more from the Las Vegas ReviewJournal, click right here: http://tinyurl. com/c63m5rs.

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Photo/Dennis Myers

In December 2010, construction was underway  at UNR on an expanded earthquake lab. Under  legislation being considered in Carson City, the  wages paid on such projects would be reduced.

Pardon effort continues It’s not often that bipartisanship is seen in Congress anymore, but one issue with great emotional resonance is getting support from both sides of the aisle. A resolution calling for a presidential pardon for former world heavyweight champion Jack Johnson is sponsored by U.S. Rep. Peter King and Sen. John McCain, both Republicans. They have sponsored the same measure in previous Congresses. Democratic Sens. Harry Reid of Nevada and William “Mo” Cowan of Massachusetts have signed on as cosponsors this year. Jack Johnson won the championship in Reno on JACK JOHNSON July 4, 1910 (“The great black hope,” RN&R, July 10, 2010), and held it until 1915. His lifestyle of white women and fast cars was offensive to whites in that era—77 African-Americans were lynched the year Johnson won the championship—and the Mann Act, which was enacted nine days before the Reno fight, was used to convict him of taking a woman across state lines for immoral purposes. The prosecution was a misuse of the law, which was passed to deal with prostitution, not consensual relationships. The prosecutors, judge and jurors were all white. The resolution was approved by the Senate on March 5. Opposition to the pardon came from one surprising source. On the liberal Daily Kos, Richard Riis wrote, “Call me cynical, but I can’t help but suspect the motivation here is more political than moral. Perhaps McCain and collaborator Rep. Peter King (R-New York) are sincere, but my suspicion is they simply hope African-American voters can be manipulated into feeling better disposed toward Republicans.” In a press briefing on Dec. 22, 2009, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said President Obama had not considered a pardon for Johnson because the U.S. Justice Department was “not recommending a pardon.”

Eagle Scout notes • Architect and contractor Ted Jones has died in Sonoma. Jones grew up during the Depression in New York, which did not stop him from becoming an Eagle Scout. In Nevada in the 1960s, he built homes all over the western part of the state during the terrific population growth then underway. He was honored by the Northern Nevada Builders and the Sertoma Club. • Derek Nance, who became an Eagle Scout while growing up in Las Vegas and graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno, has succeeded in getting some major performers—Train and Carly Rae Jepsen—to cancel their concert appearances at the Boy Scout national “Jamboree” this year in West Virginia to protest the ban on gay Scouting. Nance used an online petition and a U-Tube video to draw attention to the cause and some major media like ABC News picked up on the issue.

Prescription for recovery: cut wages Legislators look at prevailing wage laws Members of the Nevada Legislature are promoting a means of improving the Nevada economy by slashing wages by on public works projects. Dennis Myers They want to carve out exceptions to “prevailing wage” laws, which require that the approximate average local wage be paid on public works. In earlier legislatures, measures to do away with prevailing wage laws altogether failed. Now critics of the practice seem to be trying to incrementally erode them. This year there are measures to exempt education projects and projects below certain financial thresholds from the prevailing wage laws.

“Schools will be able to do maintenance and repair without having to go through the prevailing wage process.” Assemblymember Cresent Hardy Clark County republican

—Dennis Myers In public works, the prevailing wage is decided with a survey of the wages paid to most workers in an area. The prevailing wage helps prevent the large expenditures for government contracting from disrupting local construction markets, but critics say union wages 8   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 14, 2013

inflate the average, and the surveys do not truly reflect the market. Prevailing wage laws date back to the Gilded Age that followed the Civil War. In the Nevada Legislature so far, there are four bills, though not all seek to curb the practice. Assembly Bill 37, introduced for Clark County, allows that county’s officials to enforce prevailing wages if the state labor commissioner does not. A.B. 211, sponsored by Assemblymember Ira Hansen of Washoe County, seeks to exempt public works costing less than $20,000 from prevailing wage requirements, twice the current threshold. A.B. 218, also sponsored by Hansen, tinkers with the requirements for prevailing wages. Senate Bill 146, sponsored by Sen. Ben Kieckhefer of Washoe and Carson, would exempt education construction from prevailing wages. Assemblymember Cresent Hardy of Clark County has said he and his small counties colleague John Ellison will also introduce a measure in the Assembly that exempts education construction and will raise the threshold at which prevailing wages are paid. “One of the issues that I’ve got in my bill is increase the threshold to 1.5 million,” Hardy said, “which I truly believe that not only schools

but other municipalities will be able to do maintenance and repair projects without having to go through the prevailing wage process, which will create jobs and actually help get some maintenance items done for our schools without having to deal with that process also at the same time.” Union activist Andrew Barbano responded, “Increasing the threshold is the construction equivalent of the Rostenkowski-caused savings and loan crisis under Bush the Elder. It turned stable S&Ls into casinos.” Hardy also said, “The other issue is, the way the reporting is done, through the labor commissioner presently. Typically, if 51 percent [is] turned in by unions, it automatically goes to that rate.” Barbano: “These cats need to go back to school. The wage surveys are voluntarily compiled and turned in by employers. Some contractors are reluctant to participate in the annual survey because they don’t want to disclose wage information to their competitors.” Hardy: “Right now you have DETR [Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation] that already does a rate survey, analysis survey on wages throughout the state, which I believe is a fair rate. And it doesn’t include all the collective bargaining ingredients that the labor commissioner has to deal with which don’t even go into the pocket of the employee. A large amount of that money goes back—in those prevailing wage rates—goes back into those unions for items that I don’t even know what they are when you look at the chart. The labor commissioner has all of those and we can’t get answers for a lot of it, what it even is, that they’re reporting.” Barbano said that if Hardy has evidence of what he is saying and hasn’t turned it over to authorities, he is concealing felonies--which is a felony in itself. “The survey reflects areastandard wages, not just union rates,” Barbano said. “Unions get monthly dues, usually around $30 to $50 a month. They may also get contributions to their health and welfare funds, i.e., health insurance and retirement payments, which unions have negotiated for their members. … At best, this underinformed disinformation disseminator is endorsing low-wage, no benefit work.” Hardy: “And then the other situation that happens is the way that it’s reported, is that if somebody from the rural counties don’t report the


shop, the non-union shop doesn’t report, because it costs a lot of money to put all this paperwork and reporting together, so it doesn’t get reported like at the same way the unions do, because the unions make sure they pay for their people to get their reports out, so it continually [grows], and right now you’ve continued to have because of overtime and everything else, prevailing wages [in] many cases

is higher than the actual rate than the unions are charging with the collective bargaining agreements.” Barbano: “Again, employers compile and turn in the surveys.” Hardy is in the construction business. He said wages could be cut by perhaps 25 percent by doing

Andrew Barbano Labor activist something about prevailing wage law. Republican leaders last week linked changes in prevailing wage with changes in the Public Employee Retirement System. Assembly Republican floor leader Pat Hickey said action on the two issues is not the price of cooperation with the Democrats on other issues, but did also say at the same news conference that leaders from the two parties will begin meeting on ideas for changing the state’s tax structure. Democratic leaders were critical of the prevailing wage and pension proposals as worker-bashing that does little to help the state’s economy. Ω

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

ASSEMBLYMEMBER CRESENT HARDY

“Thewagesurveysare voluntarilycompiledand turnedinbyemployers.”

A thing of beauty Photo/Dennis Myers

Reno residents last weekend gathered in the former downtown Reno Post Office at a farewell party held by the Historic Reno Preservation Society. The U.S. Postal Service has moved out. The gorgeous 1932 art deco building has ornate features inside and out. The building could have stayed in public hands, but after it was turned over to the city, it was kept in city ownership for less than 24 hours and then sold for $1.2 million to a developer with very little public input on the decision. (See “15 minutes,” page 35.) OPINION

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PHOTO/Sage LeeHey

Kim Sheehan defines greenwashing as “exaggerated and unsupported claims in support of the environment.”

Fifty shades of green Greenwashing clouds consumers’ judgement You’re watching reruns of Friends when a commercial comes on promoting a new air freshener plug-in. It brags to have captured the scents of nature and shows beautiful landscapes and exotic animals. And guess what? It’s made with up by Sage Leehey to 41 percent less plastic. Sold yet? If you think about this message before purchasing, you may realize that the ad is misleading and vague. The nature images are just that: images. It doesn’t mean the product is natural. And it says up to 41 percent less plastic. What does that really mean? This is greenwashing. On March 5, Kim Sheehan, advertising professor at the University of Oregon, spoke about it at the University of Nevada, Reno. Sheehan defined greenwashing as “exaggerated and unsupported claims in support of the environment in advertising and persuasive communications.” She explained that in 1986 Jay Westerveld noticed a misleading message on his hotel bed asking him to reuse towels to help save the environment. In reality, the hotel would benefit more from cost savings than the environment would. This is when he coined the term “greenwashing.” Sheehan is involved with the website www.greenwashingindex.com, which allows users to post and rate green ads in order to raise awareness of greenwashing and give feedback to green companies. Through the Greenwashing Index, Sheehan also discovered that consumers are concerned about images that allude to a product being green. There are guidelines for language set forth in the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Green Guides, but there are no guidelines for images or colors. The language used is a problem because it can be misleading. Words like “clean” and “green” are used constantly. Sheehan has found that consumers To check out the greenwashing Index, don’t really understand what these words mean, and neither does the FTC, visit which stated it is unable to define these words for consumers. www.greenwashing A reason behind why greenwashing works today is heuristics, according index.com. to Sheehan. Heuristics, in this sense, is a short cut we use when we’re choosing from many different products, especially low-priced products, in order to quicken our decision. Essentially, they’re symbols that allow consumers not to think. “We want to feel good about ourselves as protectors of the environment, and we want others to see us as protectors of the environment,” Sheehan said. “So we make quick decisions to buy products that look like they’re green.” A lack of scientific literacy also contributes to greenwashing’s effectiveness. Many people do not understand enough about green products and services to spot messages that are exaggerated, unsupported or untrue, according to Sheehan. “If something is chemical-free, what is it?” Sheehan asked. “Are they selling something without toxic chemicals? Are they selling something that’s just organic, that’s found in nature, like our good friend arsenic?” Sheehan encourages advertising agencies to adopt a “good green strategy” when creating persuasive materials for clients to help eliminate greenwashing. She outlined key points to having a strategy like this. Advertisers, according to Sheehan, must be patient because their message can take time to build. They must be both transparent and honest with information about the product. They must encourage clients to think green from the product’s inception, and the most important factor is to listen to consumer’s reactions to their messages. Ω OPINION

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A long tradition

M

ichelle Howe-Stark owns a Sparks sandwich shop, Yellow Submarine. She knows what it takes to run a business, including taxation. So the notion that one industry’s taxes are capped by the Nevada Constitution doesn’t sit well with her. “That shouldn’t be a privilege for one,” she said. She’s not even sure that she would want that special treatment extended to the restaurant industry. “That’s a yes and a no,” she said. “It could go either way, depending on the taxation, what it’s for, where it’s going.” She’s not alone. Barbers, homebuilders, dry cleaners, jewelers, butchers, bakers, candlestick makers, all are on a level playing field with each other—and a lower field than mining. The Nevada Constitution caps the taxes of mining corporations at “a rate not to exceed 5 percent of the net proceeds.” It’s a tax loophole other industries would love. And the mining industry is working hard to keep it. In 2011, the Nevada Legislature approved a constitutional amendment to remove the mining tax cap. It must pass a second legislature to get on the ballot for voter approval. It would not raise or cut taxes, merely put mining on the same level with other industries. If the amendment is approved this year, the public would vote on it in 2014.

Nevada mining always considered itself a special case—as, indeed, more important than statehood itself. In 1863 it tried to get a good tax deal at the first Nevada constitutional convention. When it failed, it helped defeat the first constitution, delaying statehood. At the second constitutional convention in 1864, its supporters said that without mining, there was no Nevada. Delegate E.F. Dunne, a Humboldt County lawyer, said he opposed statehood altogether because it meant taxing mines. “I do not believe the mines should be taxed at all,” he said. He acknowledged that the farming areas of western Nevada would have to take up the slack of paying for public services if the mines did not pay. That was fine with him. “In reply to that, I ask, What is [agriculture] without the mines?” Delegate Neely Johnson, a Carson City lawyer and former California governor, responded. “You pay on more property than we, because you have more, but you are not willing to pay on all you possess, whilst you insist that we must pay on all we have.” His faction, he said, proposed that “all property shall be taxed equally.” This time, the mining corporations won. Their golden tax loophole capping mining taxes was placed in the proposed constitution, which was then approved by voters, and statehood went ahead. But mining was serious when it said it shouldn’t have to pay at all. Eventually it simply ignored its small Nevada tax. By refusing to pay their taxes, mining corporations headed by figures like John Mackay and James Fair starved the Storey County government and residents of the Comstock—and then loaned them money to deal with the emergency. Conditions on the Comstock were dire, and a relief committee was Michelle HoweStark formed. The corporaSparks merchant tions dragged the resulting court case out for years, took it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court (Forbes vs. Gracey 1877) and lost. Then they refused to pay the penalties and started the whole process again. It lost that fight, too, but won enactment by the easily corruptible Nevada Legislature of deduction of a wide variety of mining costs—whereupon the companies’ dec-

“It should just be a fair share all around.”

“A SPECIAL CASE ” continued on page 14 OPINION

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“A SPECIAL CASE” continued from page 13

laration of their costs rose dramatically and was accepted amiably by miningfriendly state agencies. This cozy arrangement continued for more than a century, until 2011. Along the way over the decades, the industry usually operated in a regulation-free climate. Miners died in unsafe working conditions. Mining did a lot of damage to the environment and left dangerous mining shafts and pits behind. Not until 1997 did the Nevada Legislature enact a mining reclamation law by passing a measure sponsored by Washoe Assemblymember Vivian Freeman. When mine pits in Ruth and Weed Heights were shut down because of falling copper prices, the corporations blamed environmental regulation. Meanwhile, Nevada was changing. The increasingly urban state was less and less receptive to the mining industry’s claims of primacy. In Gold Hill in 1979, a battle between a mining company and tourism found the locals on the side of tourism. In the late 1970s, when the state’s only U.S. House member, James Santini, styled himself “Mr. Minerals” as an advocate of mining, it damaged his political appeal statewide. In 1986, Harry Reid beat Santini for the U.S. Senate by running against mining, a campaign strategy that would once have been considered insane in the Silver State. And history was repeating itself. Just as the capital from mining was shipped out of state during the Comstock and later mining periods, all but one of the major mining companies operating in Nevada in the 1980s were based not only out of state but out of the United States. In 1989, Gov. Robert Miller needed funding for his class-size reduction plan. By then the state had gone through many mining booms and busts and was now the gold mining center of the nation. Miller targeted the barely taxed mining industry and ran up against its golden loophole. The industry was no more ready to be taxed than in 1863, but it did increase its charitable giving in the state and start a public relations campaign— “Mining. It works for Nevada.”

the corporations took deductions for things like exploration, employee severance, marketing and travel. His spin blamed state officials for allowing the deductions, not the corporations who applied for them—or lobbyists who may have helped create them. Legislators found still other deductions that Modernity dawns seemed to fall outside the law, such as There were times when state legislaemployee health care and sales taxes. tors, faced with bringing mining into The difficulty of working around modern times, tried to make it as pain- the industry’s loophole in the Nevada less as possible because rural residents Constitution was shown in a particuwere affected. But the industry and its larly egregious way. At a 2010 special lobbyists didn’t make it easy. What session of the legislature, to avert any one lawmaker called the industry’s move toward the golden loophole or “sense of entitlement” kept getting in pre-payments on their usual taxes, the the way. As the 20th century gave way industry volunteered to be taxed on to the 21st, legislators were running mining claims. Under time pressure in out of patience and the industry out of a special session, the legislature went time. In 2011 push came to shove. along, only to see the “claim tax” chalDeductibility of expenses associlenged in court and overturned. ated with mining had cost the state Lawmakers arriving for the 2011 legismillions over the decades—and put lature found the ruling had cost the more of the burden of taxation on state $38 million. And some legislators others. But it was something that flew were not at all certain the industry had below the radar of legislative overnot planned it that way. sight until recession began in 2006. “This was some idea that they sugAs the state’s economy was gested. We didn’t have a crippled by the nation’s hearing, we adopted it, it highest foreclosure and got challenged and we unemployment rates, lost,” Senate legislators looked Democratic floor in nooks and cranleader Steven nies both for Horsford said. places to cut “Now we’re in a spending and predicament.” places to find revOther sectors of enue that they had n a g the business comlo s Industry seldom explored munity did not cause before. In 2011 they these kinds of problems, zeroed in on mining lawmakers said, and some deductions and told taxation of them were fed up with it. agency officials to increase scrutiny. “You say you want to be treated With disclosure of sweetheart regulalike every other business but, oh—you tion enjoyed by the industry deduct your sales tax,” Washoe Sen. impending, Nevada Mining Sheila Leslie said to Crowley. “And, Association chief Tim Crowley got out oh—you also get to deduct your health ahead of the problem with a confesinsurance twice. You can understand sion. On April 14, he sent a letter to our frustration.” the state tax department identifying The 2011 legislature approved deductions corporations had sought Senate Joint Resolution 15, a constituand the state had granted even though tional amendment that would remove they fell outside the law. Supposedly the golden loophole. Leslie guided the the law allowed only deductions measure to a successful enactment. It directly associated with extraction and was a historic moment. milling of minerals. But state officials In Nevada, constitutional amendover the years had adopted regulations ments proposed by the legislature must allowing other deductions, very likely pass two sessions and then be voted on as a result of lobbying. Crowley said by the public. The industry lost the 2011 session. It set about making sure it would not lose the 2013 session. The method: campaign contributions. “It doesn’t work hard enough,” Miller told the legislature. He succeeded in increasing the industry’s taxes slightly and even in amending the constitution to do it—but left the golden loophole intact.

“Mining. It works for Nevada.”

Whoever has the gold

Sheila Leslie’s advocacy of repeal of the mining tax break cost her in the next campaign. PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

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During the 2012 campaign, the industry carefully targeted money to key legislators, and Leslie was specially targeted for defeat. Her opponent, Greg Brower, received at least $29,350 in mining contributions. Leslie lost. The money cascaded across the state from Coeur d’Alene Mines, Comstock Mining, Barrick Goldstrike, Cortez Gold, Gold Corp USA, Kinross

Michelle Howe-Stark wonders whether Nevada taxation is even-handed. PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Gold, Marigold Mining, Midway Gold, Round Mountain Gold, Robinson Nevada, Nevada Mining Exploration Coalition, Newmont Mining and the Nevada Mining Association itself. Though the Democrats provided most of the votes for the constitutional amendment, the industry did not assume those votes were carved in stone. The Nevada Democratic Party got at least $125,000 in mining money and the Assembly Democratic Caucus got $33,500. GOP groups also got money, but that was expected. So much mining money was floating around that a thousand dollars slipped through to Leslie! By October of election year 2012, the Las Vegas Sun was reporting that Democrats were losing interest in the effort to pass the constitutional amendment. “I don’t know where I’m at with that,” said Sen. Moises Denis, who voted for SJR 15 in 2011 and was slated to be Democratic floor leader in the 2013 Senate. “Other issues are more pressing than that type of issue.” Denis received at least $20,500 in mining money and his political action committee received at least $17,500. When the 2013 Nevada Legislature went into session last month, only one of the 12 members of the Assembly Taxation Committee did not report taking money from the industry. On the Senate side, only two of the seven members of the Revenue Committee did not take mining money. Some received well into four figures, others five. While spreading money over the political landscape, the industry— unable to come up with a convincing argument for why it is legitimate to treat the industry differently from others—employed arguments that diverted attention from the issue of equal taxation. One such claim was that repeal would cost the state money. The theory went something like this: If the constitutional language is repealed, that would also remove the language that allows the industry to be

taxed in the first place. So all mining taxation would be voided by repeal. This was Crowley on KTVN News in Reno last month: “What the constitution does is, it requires us to pay another quarter billion dollars in taxes. So, their calculations are flawed. SJR 15 would eliminate the net proceeds on minerals and erase it from the books. And in essence we would no longer pay that quarter billion dollars in taxes.” This claim was first tried out at the 2011 legislature, and some people bought it. At a meeting of the Churchill County Commission on April 7 that year, Bjorn Selinder of Public Policy Innovations told the commissioners, “The first thing that happens with that—with the loss of the net proceeds formula— is that the counties who [have] mining and are the recipients of net proceeds of mines, will lose the funding.” During his campaign last year, Sen. Justin Jones said, “My visceral reaction is, ‘Why is mining deserving protection in the constitution?’ But if we simply took the provision out of the constitution, mining companies would pay less in taxes. That’s not the result that we’re looking for.” There is one deficiency in the claim. It’s false. The golden loophole doesn’t authorize mining taxes, it caps them. The language authorizing taxation of corporations will remain in the constitution if the loophole is repealed, preserving the small mining tax. In 2011, Leslie carefully addressed the matter in a committee hearing with legislative lawyer Brenda Erdoes. Erdoes: “It leaves the legislature free to tax mines and mining proceeds in the manner as currently taxed. … The taxes on mining would remain the same until the legislature made a change to chapter 362 of Nevada Revised Statutes to change the manner in which the taxation is applied to mining.” Leslie: “If this were passed this [2012] session, nothing would change in terms of how taxes are paid by the mining industry.”


Erdoes: “That is correct.” of state, the industry would not find Leslie: “If it were passed again the more agreeable conditions in other second time in 2013, nothing would Western states. Las Vegas columnist change.” Hugh Jackson, a former Wyoming Erodes: “That is correct.” reporter, recently published figures Leslie: “If approved by the voters, comparing Nevada and Wyoming state nothing would change unless the legis- mining taxes. Precious metals are lature changed the way mining was rarely mined in Wyoming, but coal taxed.” and oil and gas are, and they are taxed Erdoes: “That is correct.” well above the Nevada level: Crowley has also tried to use • Wyoming: mining-generated economic Base severance tax/7 percent on activity as a diversion. He coal, 6 percent on oil and gas. wrote in a letter to the County gross proceeds Reno Gazettetax/6.3 percent Journal that Leslie (statewide average). “knows that • Nevada: despite mining State net proproviding only 1 ceeds tax/5 percent. percent of the And article 15, state’s workforce section 3 of the Gov. Robert Mill and 4.4 percent of Wyoming er January 1989 Nevada’s economic Constitution allows output, the industry policymakers greater latcontributes a disproporitude than in Nevada. tionately large 8.3 percent of Nor is leaving the U.S. benethe general fund. Ms. Leslie’s seen ficial to the industry. In the Dominican mining putting Nevadans to work and Republic, Barrick Gold—one of the keeping unemployment low in counlargest corporations operating in ties like Lander (5.7 percent) and Elko Nevada—has just signed a new con(7.1 percent).” But even if those claims tract with the government, which will were accurate, they avoid the issue— receive an estimated $11 billion for a that mining taxes are capped while no single mine during the contract period, other industry’s are. reflecting 3.2 percent of gross producThere have also been hints from tion, 25 percent for income tax and time to time that if SJR 15 is approved, 8.75 percent from net earnings. the industry would leave the state. Leaving aside how to move a mine out

“It’s not working hard enough.”

Dénouement As the moment of truth that will reveal the results of the industry’s money torrent nears, activists are closely watching to see what the Democrats will do. One revealing fact is that since Leslie’s election defeat, no Democrat in the legislature has stepped forward to manage SJR 15. Asked what legislator will lead the fight, Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada director Bob Fulkerson said, “No one has made this the hill they want to die on. ... The people are going to have to lead on this.” Mining critics have seen this before. After Harry Reid won election to the U.S. Senate by attacking the Nevada Mining Association, he made his peace with it and backed the Mining Law of 1872, a federal golden loophole. After Bob Miller as governor made his fight against the industry, he retired to a law practice and is a consultant to the board of Newmont Mining. Last week’s unexpected endorsement of repeal of the state golden loophole by Senate Republicans may mean there is now more enthusiasm for repeal in the GOP than among Democrats. The industry will need all the juice its campaign contributions bring it. The vote this year comes amid a lot of bad industry publicity. Last month, Barrick Cortez, Barrick Gold US and

After the booms, mining leaves behind large and expensive problems.

Homestake Mining—all Nevada operators—were fined $618,000 for failing to properly report toxic releases and waste management activities. In Papua New Guinea, Barrick Gold is under fire for chronic rapes of locals by its workers, and for conditioning help for the victims on waivers of legal action. (A Nevada women’s studies instructor described the Barrick stance as “so wrong!”) In December and January the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency put more than a dozen Nevada streams and reservoirs on the state “list of impaired waters” because of mercury detected in fish tissues. But it remains uncertain whether SJR 15 will get voted on in the Nevada Legislature.

While mining-compromised streams and reservoirs in Nevada are on a federal watch list, at her Sparks restaurant Michelle Howe-Stark will be watching, too—watching whether the mostly Canadian mining companies will continue being a special case and she and other businesspeople have to go on paying part of mining’s share. “That’s not a good thing for our community,” she said. “We should keep the money here locally. I try to help out with my community as much as I can. We all have to pay taxes, understandably. It’s just like anything. It should just be a fair share all around.” Ω

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ike many painters, Alissa Woods studied art in a few different places: Western Nevada Community College in Carson City, an art school in Denver, and in private lessons. Like a lot of painters wish they had, she also spent 12 years in marketing. Her sister, Alanna Woods, is a bar-industry veteran with a sharp eye for interior design. Late in 2011, they were planning to start a business, probably an art co-op, but they looked around town and couldn’t find quite the right space for it. “In the midst of almost giving up, someone Facebook-messaged us,” says Alissa. The message alerted them to a cozy retail space on the block of St. Lawrence Avenue just west of Virginia Street. With Wedge cheese shop, a scaled-down Dreamers’ Coffee House, the Public House bar, and Aces Tattoo across the street, this block has become a stroll-worthy shopping destination. In January, the sisters were suddenly in the right place at the right time. They opened a shop called Picasso and Wine, and it’s just what it sounds like, half wine bar, half painting school. (Though it’s no relation to the Picasso and Wine in Windsor, Colo. They only learned about that one when they were registering their domain name.) They went to work personalizing the interior. It’s warm and comfortable with details fussed over just enough that, in February, it looked as if they’d been settled in half their lives. Distressed wood dining tables, an exposed brick wall, and elegant, bare-bulb lights echo the homey-retro-industrial-chic look that’s becoming the norm in the neighborhood. The flowers and candles on every table, a tidy row of wine bottles at the bar, and tidy rows of acrylic paints in half gallon jugs give it a meticulously well-organized yet relaxed style that’s uniquely Woods-sisters. Alanna went so far as to haul a huge piece of corrugated metal into her yard to let it rust artfully so she’d have a unique piece to make the antique-chic barfront from. One wall is lined with Alissa’s paintings: cheery, confident renderings of poppies in a vase, a few different version of aspens in a forest, an homage to like Van Gogh’s Starry Night, a Starry Night-inspired landscape diptych with a swirling, red sky, and a woman’s portrait that Alissa created Picasso-style, with bold, abstracted lines and a few vantage points at once. Patrons can drop in for just a drink, or purchase a block of open-studio time. Fifteen dollars includes supplies, a glass of wine or beer, and possibly a few painting tips. The highlight activity so far is Alissa’s classes—specific, how-to sessions scheduled at happy hour, where students paint along with her as she introduces the basics of color mixing, applying paint, and cultivating an attitude that technical aptitude is great but getting hung up on perfection won’t help you. “Do people ever get nervous?” I asked her. “Totally. That’s what the wine’s for,” she replied.

Above, students at Picasso and Wine enjoy wine while   learning art techniques.  Opposite page, sisters Alissa   and Alanna Woods own the shop. 


Wherefore art?

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time we started putting the hair color on. They said, ‘I want mine red;’ ‘I want mine auburn.’ One girl’s was all gothic: ‘I’m totally gothic inside.’ I totally push people to do that, if that’s something they want to do.” The students took home their new works right after class. Alissa says she thins the acrylics a little with water before using them and coaches people not to use excess paint, tricks that helps speed drying time so students can leave with paintings that aren’t dripping wet. Picasso and Wine has several similar evening sessions on the calendar, a weekend series called “Bottomless Mimosa Mornings,” wine and cheese pairings, and discounted classes on Tuesdays. In mid-March they’ll begin classes for kids and families. Alissa and Alanna are also planning a few different ways to branch out into the community. They’re considering forging relationships with a few different non-profits. They’re currently considering two different animal rescue foundations, and they’ve scheduled a mid-March class called “We HeArt Reno Bike Project” to benefit Reno Bike Project’s “We HeArt Bikes” exhibit in April. “We’re going to focus the class on doing bicycle art,” Alissa explains. “I’ve been playing around with some ideas. It’s going to depend on the level of artistic ability of the people who sign up. I’m thinking about a couple different options for them to choose from. ... We are taking Picasso and Wine on the road. We’re going to start holding satellite classes in Sparks, Gardnerville, Carson City, and south Reno [at bars and restaurants].” They’re also planning summer classes for children, event partnerships with local organizations, and, of course, plenty more happy-hour painting sessions. Although Picasso and Wine has only been open a couple of months, Alissa says she’d already learned a lot, and she feels her students have, too. “I stepped away from doing art, and coming back to it is so therapeutic,” she says. “A lot of people who come to the class, they say the same thing after about the first hour. You focus. You don’t think of anything except that painting.” Ω

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On a recent Friday, four students, all women in their 30s, arrived to a painting class not nervous at all. A politely gregarious dog named Bozo greeted each person. It felt like happy hour, with the addition of a structured art project, as if the Woods sisters had simply decided that the list of traditional bar activities—karaoke, pool, trivia—should include an option for crafters. The tables were carefully set, each with table-top easels, mason jars full of brushes and clean water, and a floral centerpiece. A Duran Duran song played in the background, lively but not too loud. Alanna, slightly dressed up for hosting, promptly brought each student a piece of red velvet cake, took their wine orders, and surprised them with jelly jars full of strawberry-blueberry-mint-infused water to drink. A student told her, “You know, if you’re like this to us, we’re not going to leave, ever.” One woman saw the Picasso-like portrait among Alissa’s samples and asked if the class could paint that one instead of the bright yellow guitar picture they’d intended to recreate that evening. “I’ve been to the museum in Barcelona,” the student said. “I’m obsessed with Picasso.” After checking with the rest of the class, who OKed the idea immediately, Alissa easily changed gears and began pumping the requisite colors onto her palette. Alissa, casual and stylish in a retro bob cut, lo-top Converses, and lipstick, began with the advice she always gives: Don’t get hung up on perfection, and feel free to stray from the assignment to make this picture all yours. She explained how to mix brown and pink to get a skin tone like the one in her sample painting. She painted the silhouette of a face, and the students copied it un-self-consciously. The two-hour class ended three hours later. By then, each student had taken her Picasso-esque painting in its own direction. Alissa recounts, “They all decided to make her look like themselves. One had red hair. None of them looked alike. Those girls were a hoot. It was so much fun. We posted the pictures on Facebook. It got hilarious about the

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Beyond reasonable

Father Flynn (Adam Neace) is warm, progressive and tolerant. But maybe thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something off about him in Doubt: A Parable.

Doubt: A Parable

Doubt: A Parable may be one of the most tightly crafted and purposeful plays you will have by the opportunity to see. A small, quiet play, Mark Dunagan it features an efficient, whip-smart script by John Patrick Shanley, for which he won a Pulitzer Prize. BrĂźka Theatre and director Sandra Brunell Neace have taken this lean, mean machine of a play and wrapped it up in a near-perfect package of minimalism, elegance and brilliantly understated performances. Doubt debuted off Broadway in 2004 in Doubt: a Parable runs the wake of the Catholic Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sex-abuse at BrĂźka theatre scandal. While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set 40 years earlier, it through March 23. For plays on the same anxieties to which the tickets or more public grew accustomed this century. information, visit Sister Aloysius (Moira Bengochea) is the www.bruka.org. Fuel hard-edged principal LA023107B of a Catholic school,5 and Sister James (Stacy Johnson) is a young 67â&#x20AC;? (4c process) teacher whose enthusiasm irks Aloysius. af/jb/jb We quickly learn that an awful lot of things irk her, including her superior, Father Flynn (Adam Neace). In a development that feels sadly familiar, Aloysius is particularly

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concerned about Flynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship with a new student. Aloysius, the consummate severe authoritarian, would seem fanatical if she werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so self-possessed. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re introduced to Flynn in the form of a sermon about the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s titular mental state. The sermon, praising the humanity and virtue of doubting, is delivered as though the audience were the congregation. This would feel too on the nose if it werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t behold. Sister James, functioning as a standso perfectly written and so deftly handled in for the audience, wishes she were more by Adam Neace. Throughout, Neace plays like Aloysius, so secure in her ironclad things expertly close to the vest. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an certainty. Aloysius knows Flynn is deviant appealing contrast to Aloysius: warm, like she knows that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frosty the Snowmanâ&#x20AC;? progressive, tolerantâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;yet maybe thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is paganism at its most insidious. Viewers something off about him. Or maybe thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s may side with her simply because her Aloysius getting into our heads. will is so strong. When Flynn is onstage, Given the3/14/2013 widespread real life accusathough, the viewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conviction can falter tions against the Catholic Church, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sFREEP0001 all KHOWARD too easy to get behind Aloysiusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; railroading even though Aloysiusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; never does. Mining This is the genius of Shanleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play: of Father Flynn. While this preconception It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want you to know the answers. is Shanleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trump card, reducing the play The text gives you just enough to form an to cultural commentary would be selling opinion, then just enough more to doubt it short. Doubt concerns itself with the yourself, and so forth. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a master class in concept of uncertainty. Sister Aloysius has audience manipulation in the best way. none, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an almost enviable thing to

Sandra Brunell Neace deserves a huge measure of credit for the productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success. As good as Shanleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play is, it could easily devolve into a hackneyed cat-and-mouse tale if not handled properly. Likewise, the four cast members play their parts meticulously, with nary a misstep. In particular, the quality of Bengocheaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance as Aloysius cannot be overstated. Her lines come with precision and force. She is a true pleasure to watch, and when her humanity ultimately comes through, it is chill-inducing. Early on, Aloysius tells Sister James that God gave her a heart and a brain. The heart can be warm, she says, but the wit must be cold. Aloysius naturally embodies this, but the real coup is how Doubt itself embodies it. The viewer might be inclined to play detective because of the natural tendency to â&#x20AC;&#x153;have to know,â&#x20AC;? but this Swiss watch of a play challenges that tendency, and illustrates how our dogged pursuit of certainty sometimes clouds the truth. Ί

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Ramen at work Momiji Ramen 820 Holman Way, Sparks, 284-1995 And it came to pass … in the time of the college student, the minimum wage worker, the late night snacker, and the by Dave Preston I’m-on-a-budgeteer, the word was ramen, and the word was good. The davep@ stretchy, slurpy stuff—instant and ne w s re v i e w . c o m otherwise, topped with everything from prawns to potato chips— comforts millions around the world and around the clock. It’s truly an American food staple. PHoto/AlliSon Young

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Momiji Ramen is open 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Ramen—although it wasn’t called that, then—first appeared in Japan in 1910, when Chinese cooks at Tokyo’s Rairaiken restaurant created a signature dish comprising broth and Chinese noodles, which were yellower and more elastic than Japanese noodles. But in 1958, Nissin Foods introduced the firstever packaged instant version of the dish. As its broth was chickenflavored, the product was called Chikin Ramen. Nissin brought Top Ramen to the United States in 1970. These days, Nissin nets more than $3 billion a year. But ramen isn’t just instant, and that’s where local restaurant Momiji comes in. There, it’s a traditional noodle dish made by an accomplished chef. Master chef Yoshi Onomura came to the states about three years ago, with his first stop in New Mexico before moving to Reno. His background as a restaurateur for 30 years in the Ginza district of Tokyo is notable, mastering French, German and Chinese cuisines. But his pride was in his noodle house and that passion and expertise is what he brings to Sparks. The seven-item menu offers ramen from the north, central and south parts of Japan at extremely

fair prices ($6.75-$7.50), with a vegetarian dish included, and the portions are generous. There are toppings ($.50-$2.50) like chashu pork, made by simmering pork belly with garlic, ginger, sake and shoyu (soy sauce); wakame seaweed, a sea vegetable—it has a subtly sweet flavor—boiled bamboo, Kimchi, boiled corn and green onions. There are five rice bowls with smalls starting at $2.75 and regular with curry and Japanese fried chicken for $7.75. Side dishes include a special recipe fried chicken for $4.75, pot stickers for $4.75, Edamame $2.00 and a couple of salads $3-$4.75. I had to try the pot stickers (Gyoza), and they were the best I’ve had in this town. Chef Onomura makes them when they are ordered. Filled with chicken, some vegetables and spices, they were light and airy, a bit salty with tones of garlic in a feather-light wrapper. Hot, soft, with a mouth watering flavor before I dipped them in a simple soy and rice vinegar sauce that made them more exciting and delicious in my mouth. Onomura offered a sample taste of his brown curry; savory, sweet, rich and a little bite at the finish, arigatou gozaimasu. The miso ramen ($7.25) was next. Miso is a bean paste, a traditional Japanese seasoning produced by fermenting rice, barley and/ or soybeans with salt. It was first used in Japan in 1965. I asked for a lot of spice ($.50 extra), and it was worth it. The miso was blended with oily pork broth to create a thick, slightly nutty sweet and very hearty soup with some heat. It was topped with slices of chashu pork, corn, green onions and sprouts. Plenty of noodles, and this broth had layers of flavors and texture so tasty and satisfying, I questioned my epicurean sanity about ever eating that instant stuff in those Styrofoam cups—but I was young and reckless. Asahi and Sapporo beers ($3), green tea ($3) and soft drinks make up the libations. The eatery, when expanded, will hold 100 plus in a traditionally simple Japanese environment and décor with a nice, efficient staff. Momiji will open its new dining room mid-month with big, shared-seating areas, like those found in many Japanese restaurants. Gochiso sama—what a feast. Ω


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Jerome Edwards, Board of Directors, Secretary

Ding dong Oz the Great and Powerful

HOPES saved my life “I came to HOPES as a patient six years ago, being diagnosed as HIV positive and having AIDS. From the beginning, I have been treated with the utmost professionalism, and I have received the very best medical care possible, from experienced, high-caliber physicians. I am in very good health; my viral load is undetectable.

I like James Franco more often than not. I loved him as a stoner, loved him as a hiker with an unfortunately small knife getting his arm stuck behind a boulder, even liked him opposite a motion-capture chimp. As much as I often like him, he is all wrong for the central character of Oz the Great and Powerful. by The role of Oz calls for somebody with Bob Grimm swagger and snark factor. Franco is just too laid back and too normal for a role that b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m requires old school charm. Yes, he’s charming in a modern sort of way. Hey, he was a killer on General Hospital. In director Sam Raimi’s take on the wonderful wizard, you just get the sense that Franco is really straining.

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I have also been treated with respect, friendliness, courtesy and with a very welcoming attitude from the entire staff. I know that this is true for all patients. Having AIDS and also being on the Board of Directors gives me a unique viewpoint, because I can look at the organization from all sides. HOPES is in the process of becoming a community health center. I think it is excellent that it is now opening its doors to the general community. Now, patients of HOPES have access to primary medical care, chronic disease management, women’s health services, behavioral health and counseling, social services, a full-service pharmacy and more. HOPES saved my life, and I am truly grateful for its excellence.” Monkeys and dollys and Francos! Oh my!

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5 excellent

When he smiles in this movie, it almost looks like he’s going to tear his face because he’s putting so much into it. His line deliveries are all forced and wigged out. Johnny Depp and Robert Downey Jr. were offered the role leading up to production. Either of them would have been much more sensible choices. The movie acts as a sort of prequel to the 1939 The Wizard of Oz. We see Oz’s origins as a desperate carnival magician in Kansas. His eventual trip to Oz via twister is much like the one Dorothy took on her voyage, and the movie plays out in black and white before arrival in Oz, just as it did in ’39. The movie offers up the three witches from the original film as well (one of them, of course, being the one that got squished by Dorothy’s house). There’s Theodora, played by Mila Kunis as a sort-of-nice witch with a bad temper that is going to cause a major

change in her complexion at some point during the movie. We also get Michelle Williams as bubble-riding good witch Glinda in what is probably the most obvious casting of the year. Finally, there’s Rachel Weisz as Evanora, who may or may not be bad. Of the three, my vote goes to Weisz for best portrayal of an Oz witch. There’s a nice mystery to her, and she looks fabulous in her getup. Williams is fine, if not all that adventurous, as Glinda. Williams has far less warble in her voice as young Glinda. Glinda in The Wizard of Oz always freaked me out when she spoke. Sounded like somebody was standing next to her and rubbing their finger on her throat really quick while she talked. The worst of the three is easily Kunis, who just blows it as the character once played by—SPOILER ALERT— Margaret Hamilton. Raimi’s film gives her a reason for becoming wicked, and that reason—jilted love—is stupid. When Kunis, obviously a sweet woman, is asked to scream and cackle it’s unintentionally funny. She sounds like her voice has never gone to such places before, and it just screams “Bad casting!” She comes off like somebody playing the role in a high school production, and if that production were a graded element of some class, she would get an “F” and be asked to think of another trade in life. You have the option of seeing Oz in 3-D, and you’re probably OK to skip that option. The effects are nothing to get excited about. I wasn’t impressed with the looks of the Emerald City. Raimi is obviously going for the fairytale charm of the original Oz, but he should’ve shot for more detail and less gloss. You get no real sense of these characters inhabiting another world. They just look as if they are part of a screensaver. So, even if the movie had some better casting, the special effects would still pull the whole thing down. Big special effects movies are looking rather crappy lately, with The Hobbit, Jack the Giant Slayer and this one all looking odd. I’m sorry, but I just look at Franco sometimes in movies and expect him to take a hit off a hash pipe or something. As for Oz, he’s just too aloof for this sort of thing. Ω


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21 and Over

budget is something in the neighborhood of $200 million, and that budget must’ve gone to Moon Pies for everybody, because it doesn’t show on the screen. Too bad, because I was just telling somebody a couple of months ago how the world could really use a good movie about giants getting hit with stuff. Actually, that’s not true. I’m totally lying.

Directors Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, the writers of The Hangover, basically serve up yet another strain of that film, this one set in a college town with college kids drinking a lot and getting into all kinds of college trouble. Miles Teller (who was in the similarly stupid Project X) headlines as Miller, friend to one Jeff Chang (Justin Chon). Jeff Chang is turning 21, and Miller takes him out for a night of partying with pal Casey (Skylar Astin) and, guess what, they all get crazy drunk and stuff. Nothing even close to new or original in these scenarios. The only thing keeping this from being totally lousy is that the actors play off each other well, especially Teller and Astin. If you crack up when people eat tampons or get their asses branded, well, this one’s for you. If you get mildly annoyed at racist humor coupled with guys playing drinking games, go ahead and stay far away.

3

Snitch

Dwayne Johnson—ACTOR! He has dropped his alias, “The Rock,” from his screen name, and now stars in a movie where he doesn’t even fire a machine gun or show off his glorious tattoos. Johnson plays the father of a young man who gets into trouble after a friend mails him a whole lot of drugs. Unless the son turns in somebody for distributing drugs and “snitches,” he will face a long jail sentence. Johnson’s character decides to take matters into his own hands, find some drug dealers, and turn them in so his misunderstood son can walk free. This one was a lot better than I was expecting because Johnson really steps up and makes the whole thing work. It’s predictable, yet well paced, a good-looking and well-acted action thriller. Johnson will be coming to a theater near you firing many guns and showing off his ink in the near future (quite often in 2013). For now, it’s kind of cool to see him do something a little different, and doing it effectively.

1

A Good Day to Die Hard

The Die Hard franchise has been one of the more reliable action movie franchises in cinematic history—until now. Bruce Willis looks tired, beaten down and embarrassed in this useless installment of the adventures of John McClane. The action takes him to Russia this time, which is a mistake. While there, he helps his son with some espionage crap, another storytelling mistake. He goes up against villains who do not distinguish themselves at all, and this would be the film’s biggest mistake. Die Hard needs a big villain. All of the prior installments had good villains, and that includes naked William Sadler in Die Hard 2. I think McClane has got some good stuff left in the tank, but enough with this garbage involving his kids. And stay the heck out of Russia; that place has lost all of its cinematic bad guy appeal. Little in this movie makes sense and it just doesn’t belong in a category with the first four chapters. Reboot, forget this thing, and start fresh the next time out, sort of like how Rocky Balboa forgot the previous two chapters and restored the Italian Stallion’s dignity.

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555 East Fourth Street, Reno

www.welcometoakros.com

EXCLUSIVE MULTI-MEDIA COMMISSION CELEBRATING THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER

CHESAPEAKE: SUMMER OF 1814 WORLD PREMIERE

– and –

SUNDAY, MARCH 17 SUNDAY 17, 2013, 2013 4 PM TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013, 7:30 PM AT THE PIONEER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra with music director Laura Jackson celebrates the bicentennial of the Star-Spangled Banner with an homage written exclusively for the orchestra and chorus by the acclaimed composer Michael Gandolfi. This concert combines visual direction and design by renowned artist Anne Patterson.

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MICHAEL GANDOLFI: Chesapeake: Summer of 1814, World Premiere Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner, an Exclusive Commission for the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus

Zero Dark Thirty

Director Kathryn Bigelow getting snubbed by Oscar for this taut, scary, intelligent movie about the war on terror and hunt for Bin Laden is a travesty. Well, it’s a travesty when it comes to movies and stuff, not so much in the grand scheme of things. Still, Bigelow deserves praise for putting together a movie that is both exciting political thriller and terrific action movie. Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain is deserving of the accolades as Maya, a composite character of CIA agents who managed to find Bin Laden in Pakistan and end his life. The film contains scenes of torture, but it doesn’t feel “pro-torture” by any means. It’s a great movie that will only get greater with time, and yet another reason to call Bigelow one of the best in the business.

2

Jack the Giant Slayer

Director Bryan Singer’s big budget take on the classic fairytale was delayed from last summer, and they should’ve left it in the vault. He’s put together a movie that lacks any real magic because the special effects are bad, and the performances are mostly flat. Nicholas Hoult, so good in Warm Bodies, plays the title character, a farm boy who gets some magic beans, lets them get wet and … ah, you know. Stanley Tucci and Ewan McGregor have supporting roles in what amounts to a whole lot of nothing that cost lots of money. The

FEATURE STORY

& Vascular Surgery for over 35 years,

Friday, March 22nd

If you are not familiar with the case of the West Memphis Three, Amy Berg’s thorough documentary (produced by Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh) gets you up to speed. Three young boys, Stevie Branch, Michael Moore and Christopher Byers, were found dead in a ditch in West Memphis, Ark., on May 5, 1993. The circumstances of their deaths seemed to suggest some sort of satanic ritual, or so authorities thought. They arrested three teenagers, Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jesse Misskelley Jr., and eventually put them in jail for 17 years. The film presents much of the information shared in the three prior Paradise Lost films, with new emphasis on another stepfather and his possible involvement in the murders. If I have a bone to pick with these documentaries, it’s that they point fingers at other suspects with little to no evidence to back their claims. (John Mark Byers, a stepfather to one of the murdered boys, was accused in the second Paradise Lost film; Terry Hobbs, another stepfather, is scrutinized in this film). The three prisoners have been released, but the actual killer still walks free. That’s a travesty, and the state of Arkansas should be ashamed of itself.

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Hall, a leader in our region in General

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Cashing in on her Oscar-nominated turn in Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy gets a headlining role alongside Jason Bateman in Identity Thief. While both performers are talented and make the best of the crap heap of a script they are handed, it’s not enough to make this anything more than a desperate misfire. From the director of Horrible Bosses, this is just another riff on Planes, Trains & Automobiles minus much of the fun. Bateman plays a sorry sap who has his identity stolen by a free shopping weirdo (McCarthy). He gets into some legal troubles, and vows to capture the thief and bring her back to his hometown. So it’s another odd couple road movie, and pretty exploitive when it comes to McCarthy. She’s a talented woman, and she deserves much better than this.

GREEN

both MEN & WOMEN. Dr. Wesley W.

West of Memphis

Identity Thief

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icrograft Surgery is the Gold

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NEWS

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Standard in Hair Restoration for

Bradley Cooper is on fire as Pat, a troubled man recently out of a mental institution and obsessed with his ex-wife. He’s so obsessed hat he can’t see the value in Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a recently widowed neighbor trying to befriend him. Directed by David O. Russell, the movie is a funny, slick treatment of people with real problems that works because Russell and his performers find the right balance. Robert De Niro does his best work in years as Pat’s obsessive father, and Chris Tucker gets big laughs as Pat’s former mental institution buddy. Cooper and Lawrence make for one of the year’s most interesting screen couples. They are certainly unique. Russell is establishing himself as one of the industry’s most reliable and innovative directors.

Director Niels Arden Opley, maker of the original The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo films, makes his English language feature debut with a familiar face heading up the cast: Noomi Rapace, who played Lisbeth Salander. She plays a woman badly scarred in a car accident, who witnesses a murder and decides to blackmail the murderer (Colin Farrell) into killing the drunken driver who scarred her face. The Farrell character is working a complicated agenda of his own in the service of Alphonse (Terrence Howard), a Manhattan crime lord. The performances are very good here, and the movie looks absolutely great. The problem is Opley’s decision to stuff his movie with so many plotlines twists and turns that you just get exhausted by the halfway point. I think Opley has some good movies in him, and this one isn’t all bad. It’s just something you don’t really need to see.

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No Plugs • Rugs • Drugs

Silver Linings Playbook

Dead Man Down

OPINION

VICTORY OVER YOUR HAIR LOSS

WILLIAM SCHUMAN: Casey at the Bat, Cantata from The Mighty Casey, Featuring the Reno Philharmonic Chorus MANUEL DE FALLA: The Three-Cornered Hat CONCERT PREVIEW:

– you are – invited

SUNDAY AT 3 PM IN THE MAIN HALL | TUESDAY AT 7 PM IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

AUDIENCE APPRECIATION RECEPTION:

OPEN TO EVERYONE | REFRESHMENTS | MEET THE MUSICIANS SIENA BALLROOM, DOWNTOWN RENO - JUST BEHIND THE PIONEER CENTER IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCE

TICKETS FROM $25 PLUS FEES | RENO PHIL BOX OFFICE (775) 323-6393 PIONEER CENTER BOX OFFICE | M-F 11-6 (775) 686-6600 OR RENOPHIL.COM

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ART OF THE STATE

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MARCH 14, 2013

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Local luminary Whitney Myer About a year ago, in late February and early March 2012, there was suddenly a strange sense of shared community by Brad Bynum across Reno’s music scenes, historically overloaded with oversized egos. b ra d b @ This sense of community extended ne w s re v i e w . c o m well beyond the confines of the music scene—local mothers were calling their adult sons with unabashed awe to boast of brief encounters with a local musician as though this musician were a Beatle or something. Photo/Brad Bynum

“At the end of the  day, it’s about making  music and connecting  with people,” says  Whitney Myer.

the record release show for Whitney myer’s articles of Luminous nature will be april 26 at the Grand Sierra resort, 2500 E. Second St. tickets go on sale march 15. For more information, visit whitneymyerband.com.

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MARCH 14, 2013

It helped that this sense of unity was centered on Whitney Myer, a young singer with genuine, versatile talent and a sweet, likable disposition. So, when she appeared on season two of The Voice, NBC’s answer to American Idol, it was easy to root for a favorite daughter competing on a national stage. And when, after a dazzling beginning, she was eliminated in an early battle round, the sense of disappointment throughout the community was palpable. Even the most grizzled, cynical barflies complained that she was robbed. Nowadays, Myer is hopeful that The Voice will be a mere footnote in a long career. She has a new EP coming out next month with a new musical direction. And, after years of being the centerpiece of the Whitney Myer Band, a group anchored by her father and her uncle, she disbanded the group and is forging ahead as a solo artist. “The Voice was my first time truly stepping far out of the comfort zone of playing with my dad and my uncle and playing with the band,” she says. “And I didn’t realized how much of a comfort zone that was for me until I put myself out on that limb alone.” The experience of being quickly

thrust into a national spotlight and then just as suddenly yanked away gave Myer new perspective and prompted her to reevaluate her priorities. “The Voice helped me decide that I didn’t want to go for that super, super mainstream thing,” she says. “That’s not really the type of music I make anyway. It helped me realize that, at the end of the day, it’s about making music and connecting with people, not all really about all the other stuff.” In the wake of her experience on The Voice, Myer decided it was time for a little self reinvention. This meant disbanding the Whitney Myer Band, and exploring new directions as solo artist—specifically electronic music, what she describes as “indie electronic soul.” Her forthcoming EP, Articles of Luminous Nature, was produced by Carson City-based producer Jiggawattz. “I come from wanting to have this singer-songwriter thing, where my lyrics are easily audible, you can feel a lot of emotion, and it’s heavily vocals—but also backed by emotionally driven electronic sounds,” she says. And though she and Jiggawattz collaborated on the EP’s production, mixing custom electronic sounds and live instrumentation—from local talents like Tim Snider and the members of funk band Jelly Bread and rock band Rigorous Proof—Myer did all the songwriting. “I’m the only writer on all of [the songs], which is nice for me as an independent thing,” she says. “It feels good to me. That was part of my thing that I wanted to be an adult and kind of step out from under the umbrella.” As a writer, Myer favors the trick of marrying upbeat music to downbeat lyrics. “I tend to lean toward the melancholy a little bit,” she says. “I draw from my negative experiences and work through them by translating them to a song.” The record release show for Articles of Luminous Nature, on April 26 at the Grand Sierra Resort, will feature Rigorous Proof, as well as local hip-hop DJ PRSN. It will also incorporate visual aspects from the work of local artists, like Kelly Peyton and Kaitlin Bryson. “I want the show to not just be about me and the EP and the music,” says Myer. “I also think that Reno has so many talented people, not just musicians, but a whole art scene.” Ω


THURSDAY 3/14 1UP

FRIDAY 3/15

SATURDAY 3/16

EDM Thursday, 10pm, no cover

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

SUNDAY 3/17

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

Ryan Parker, Lonely Planet Travel, 9:30pm, no cover

Whiskey Haulers, 9:30pm, no cover

Drinking with Clowns, 9:30pm, no cover

Jazz Syndicate, 9:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

Asphalt Socialites, Clementine Knights, J French Project, 8:30pm, no cover

Agent Orange, Beercan!, Up Against It, Reno We Have a Problem, 8pm, $10, $12

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

ABBY’S HIGHWAY 40

424 E. Fourth St., (775) 322-9422 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

Shoestring Trio, 9pm, $5

CARGO

Yukmouth, 8pm, $15, $20

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 378-4507 255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

Mark Diorio, 11:15am, no cover

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Blarney Band, 7pm, no cover

Richard Blair, 7pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FAT CAT BAR & GRILL

Karaoke Night, 10pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255 599 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City; (530) 583-3355

Knowledge Lives Forever, Weapons of Mass Creation, Sweaty Already, 8pm, $5

St. Patrick’s Day 2013 Celebration w/Doc’s Holiday, Blarney Band, 4pm, no cover

Comedy

Head Trip, 9:30pm, no cover

Train Wreck—AD, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Ian Gutoskie, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Rich Aronovitch, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm W, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Reggae Night, 9pm M, no cover Open mic, 9pm, Tu, no cover

FUEGO

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

St. Patrick’s Punk Day w/Los Pistoleros, Mary Jane Rocket, 9pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Milk Music, Gun Outfit, Prescription, 8pm, W, $5

Last to Leave, 7pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Mark Pitta w/guest, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Ben Gleib, Karen Morgan, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Utility Players, Th, 7:30pm, $12, $16; Justin Rupple, F, 7pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Agent Orange

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

The RN&R no longer a ccepts emailed or phoned-in listings. Post show s online by registering at www.ne wsreview.c om/reno. Deadline is the Friday b efore publication .

10 E. Ninth St., (775) 284-7270

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

March 16, 8 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

Doc’s Holiday, 9pm, no cover

CORKSCROO BAR AND GRILL COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

St. Patrick’s Dawg Day w/The Bradfords, Monday Night Open Mic, Chadillac, 7pm, no cover 8pm, M, no cover

BODEGA NIGHTCLUB

CEOL IRISH PUB

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/18-3/20

’90s Night, 10pm, no cover

DiD YOu kNOW?

100% college tuition • action and adventure

Opiate addiction is a chronic and re-occurring pattern of physical and behavioral reactions. Without professional help, few escape.

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WE CAN HELP DON’T

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The Life Change Center has the experience and

• right here in your home town!

Whether you require medication assistance or not, we offer respectful treatment designed around your goals.

TAkE THAT STEP. MAkE THAT CHANgE. TODAY.

Think you know your limits? Think again.

The Life Change Center is a 501(c)3 corporation. We accept ALL types of Medicaid and will assist with other insurance billing.

The Life Change Center

If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

1755 Sullivan Lane • Sparks NV 89431

For more info contact: SFC Johnny Oliveira Call or Text 775-560-0672

Phone (775)355-7734 Fax (775)355-7759 (Just past Greenbrae on Sullivan Lane, take the #2 or12 bus)

PINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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THURSDAY 3/14 JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

FRIDAY 3/15

SATURDAY 3/16

Live Jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

SUNDAY 3/17

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/18-3/20

Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

Conspirator

1) Saving Alleya, Krystos, Otis, vx36, Qarin, 8pm, $6 2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Valentine Rodeo, Hellbilly Bandits, Velvet Glove, 8pm, $6 2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Ciana, 1pm, The Localz, 8pm, no cover

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Fusion Fridays w/DJs Kentot, Fredy G, 10pm, $10; free for women until midnight

Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210 210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Crush, 9:30pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

STREGA BAR

Ruby Fradkin, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 3-17, 7:30pm, no cover, Last to Leave, The Feather Merchants, 8pm, $5

Bound by Reno Binder, 9pm, $5

The 59th St. Bridge—A tribute to Simon & Garfunkel, 9pm, $3

VASSAR LOUNGE

Moses Malone, 8pm, no cover

Rock’N J Entertainment, 8pm, no cover

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

3-17, Kate Elaine, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993 1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE

the biggest stars in the KENNY ROGERS

Jim Jefferies

mariachi VARGAS

MARCH 16

APRIL 9

APRIL 13

HIS & HERS FIATS 2nd Place 3rd Place 4th Place 5th Place 6th Place 7th Place

$7,000 $5,000 $3,000 $2,000 $1,000 $500

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RN&R

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1 - 8 0 0 - M U S T- S E E (6 8 7- 8 7 3 3 )

MARCH 14, 2013

NOW THROUGH JUNE 30 Weekly Qualifying Drawings Fridays 9 pm - 11 pm Saturdays 5 pm - Midnight Sundays 11 am - 5 pm DRAWINGS EVERY 15 MINUTES!

Plus we’ll give away $7,000 in slot FreePlay!

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Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover Open mic, 7pm, W, no cover

biggest little city.

Grand Prize

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

3 2 5 -74 0 1

Ciana, noon, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

STUDIO ON 4TH

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Rhythm Tailors, 8pm, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

March 16, 1 p.m. Marc 17, noon Ponderosa Saloon 106 S. C St. Virginia City 847-7210

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Ciana

1) Flyleaf, Drowning Pool, Stars In Stereo, 8pm, Tu, $20-$60

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

1) Volbeat, Danko Jones, Spoken, 7:30pm, $34-$65

Conway Productions’ Hip Hop Night, 9pm, $5

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

March 16, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

1) Video Killed the Radio Star w/DJ Kos, 8pm, $10 2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

EARN BONUS ENTRIES EVERY DAY!

silverlegacy.com

foreigner APRIL 19


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB 14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

THURSDAY 3/14

FRIDAY 3/15

SATURDAY 3/16

SUNDAY 3/17

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/18-3/20

2) Atomika, 8pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 4pm, Cook Book, 10pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 4pm, Cook Book, 10pm, no cover

2) Cook Book, 8pm, no cover

2) Rebekah Chase Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Midnight Express, 7pm, no cover

2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover

2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover

2) Brian Andrews, 6pm, no cover

2) Brian Andrews, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Greensky Bluegrass, Ryan Montbleau, 9pm, $15-$25

1) Nigel Hall Band, 10pm, no cover

1) Conspirator, NVO, 9pm, $17, $20

2) Andrew the Pirate, IJV, 11pm, Tu, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Alias, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 8pm, $21.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ Ikon, DJ Roni Romance, DJ Dragon, 10pm, $10

1) Magique, 7pm, 9:30pm, $21.95+ 1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Alias, 10pm, no cover 3) St. Patrick’s Day party w/DJs Dragon, 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover Romance, 10pm, $10

1) Magique, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, W, $21.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Left of Centre, 10pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) G Spot Boogie Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) G Spot Boogie Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, no cover 3) Rosendo, 6pm, no cover

1) Steven Wright, 9pm, $49 2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, no cover 3) Rosendo, 6pm, no cover

3) Ken Navarro, 6pm, W, no cover

1) PANTyRAiD, 9pm, $22, $25 3) Boogie Nights at Blu, 8pm, $5-$10, free w/’70s or ‘80s attire

2) Local guest DJs, 10pm, W, no cover

HARRAH’S RENO 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

2) Stew Stewart, 7pm, no cover 3) Rosendo, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

2) Patrick Major, 7pm, no cover 3) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, no cover

TAHOE BILTMORE 5 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 831-0660 1) Breeze Nightclub 2) Casino Floor

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover

2) Mike Furlong, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Mike Furlong, 9pm, no cover 3) Return of the Beezo Battles w/DJ Enrie, 10pm, $20

2) Joe & Danny, 7pm, no cover

2) Joe & Danny, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

1) Kenny Rogers, 8pm, $60-$80 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, no cover 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Sin Biggest Little Locals Night, 4pm, M, Step This Way, 8pm, W, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) The Robeys, 8pm, no cover

2) JT Chavallier, 8pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

March 16, 9 p.m. John Ascuaga’s Nugget 1100 Nugget Ave. Sparks 356-3300

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35

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2

Have a ball at the Rocky Mountain Oyster Fry

S

ometimes you feel like a nut, or in this case, a lot of nuts. Virginia City kicks off another season of unusual special events with its 22nd annual Rocky Mountain Oyster Fry on March 16. As TV host and culinary adventurer Andrew Zimmern has demonstrated many times on Travel Channel show Bizarre Foods, the testicles of bulls, sheep, pigs and other animals are considered delicacies, or even standard fare, in many parts of the world. Virginia City’s event offers the naughty bits of the bull, also known by the euphemisms Rocky Mountain oysters or bull fries.

Amateur and professional cooks will compete in four categories: Best Overall Taste, Best Presentation, Most Creative Dish and Best Booth. There will also be an oyster-eating contest with heats taking place at 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. The festival gets underway at 10 a.m. at the Delta Saloon parking lot at C and Union streets. Admission is free. While you’re there, raise pint and wear a bit o’ green. Unofficially billed as the “Irish Testicle Festival,” the oyster fry falls on that all-important drinking holiday, er, feast day, St. Patrick’s Day. Highlights include the annual Virginia City parade down C Street at noon, live music throughout the day at various bars and saloons and the inaugural Leprechaun Bar Crawl from 10 a.m. until the last shot of whiskey is gone. Visit www.visit virginiacitynv.com.

3

Art Night Do you like art? Do you like music? If you don’t, then you won’t care that the Nevada Museum of Art and the Holland Project are joining forces to present this all-ages happening of art, live music and creative expression on March 15. The indie hip-hop band Who Cares will perform that night, along with another group called Superdeluxe featuring artist Frohawk Two Feathers (whose exhibit is also on display at the museum). The event starts at 7 p.m. at the NMA, 160 W. Liberty St. Admission is $5. Visit www.nevadaart.org or www.holland project.org if you care.

Indie Reno Open House The Wildflower Village will hold an open house for Indie Reno Boutique featuring door prizes, live music, refreshments, baked goods for sale and six new gallery rooms featuring work by local artists, including the opening reception for Norma Gonzales at 5 p.m. on March 15. The open house takes place from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on March 15 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on March 16. Admission is free, but it’s good karma to buy a piece of local art while you’re there. Visit www.indiereno.org or www.wildflowervillage.com.

Sparks Shamrock Shuffle Give your heart, rather than your liver, a workout this St. Patrick’s Day. Runners of all ages and fitness levels are encouraged to dress as leprechauns, paint themselves green or express some Irish spirit as they participate in a 5k fun run that starts and ends at Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks. The race starts at 1 p.m. on March 17. Entry fees are $32 for adults and $22 for youth until March 15, after which fees will increase by $10. Visit www.aiyevents.com.

4

—Kelley Lang

Nevada Poetry Out Loud State Finals Nevada high school students will demonstrate their gift for the spoken word at the eighth annual event. A program of the Nevada Art Council, the national arts education event encourages students to learn, memorize and finally, present poetry on stage. The champion will travel to Washington, D.C., to compete in the National Poetry Out Loud Competition in April. The state finals begin at noon on March 16 at Whitney Peak Hotel (formerly CommRow), 255 N. Virginia St. Visit http://nac.nevadaculture.org.

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Ex-rated movie I’ve been with my boyfriend for a year. We were best friends and talked about everything—what our kids would be like, projects we’d do together, magical worlds, and even other people we found attractive. Then, on his computer, I accidentally clicked on what I thought was just some porn video, but I recognized his blanket and realized it was he and his ex-girlfriend having sex (when they were dating). I had a very hard time seeing him with someone else and have become very sensitive and jealous, and this has set our relationship on edge. We don’t talk as we used to. So many areas have become off-limits, because he’s so afraid that anything he says will upset or hurt me. I want to communicate as we used to when I was his “cool girlfriend.” As distressing as it is that you could probably pick your boyfriend’s ex out of a lineup—one from the waist down—it’s not like you found footage of him clubbing squirrels. You just got unfortunate visual confirmation of what you already knew: He had a girlfriend before you. They did more than spoon. Jealousy is a good thing when it rears its little green head to warn of an actual threat to the relationship: “Eeek! He’s having sex with another woman …” But jealousy needs a slap in the mouth from reason when there is no real threat: “… and it happened a year before we’d even met.” To help yourself think rationally, don’t be nebulously hysterical (“I’m afraaaaid!”). Verbalize exactly what you’re actually afraid of—probably that

he’d leave you, maybe for his ex. Next, consider what would happen if he actually did. The world would not end. Your head would not fall off, roll under the bed, and become a cat toy. You’d probably sob into your pillow for a few months, but you’d eventually get over him and get on with your life. To get back the relationship you had, start acting as if you’d never lost it—meaning, when your boyfriend asks you the time, you just tell him. You don’t shriek that all you can see is that clock on the nightstand in his sex video. There’s a good deal of research, laid out by psychologist Dr. Richard Wiseman in The As If Principle, that suggests that changing how you behave is actually the fastest, most effective way to change how you feel. Let your boyfriend know that you know your fears aren’t rational, that you’re going to stop acting like they are, and that he, in turn, needs to stop treating you like a bomb that could be triggered by “pass the salt.” Before long, you should be his cool girlfriend again— faster, probably, if that blanket from the video finds its way to some homeless man. Ω Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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R

th


by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “If it’s stupid

and it works, it’s not stupid.” That could turn out to be a useful mantra for you in the coming week. Being pragmatic should be near the top of your priority list, whereas being judgmental should be at the bottom. Here’s another mantra that may serve you well: “Those who take history personally are condemned to repeat it.” I hope you invoke that wisdom to help you escape an oppressive part of your past. Do you have room for one more inspirational motto, Aries? Here it is: “I am only as strong as my weakest delusion.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t you

just love to watch the spinning of those wheels within wheels within wheels? Aren’t you grateful for the way the ever-churning plot twists keep you alert and ready to shift your attitude at a moment’s notice? And aren’t you thrilled by those moments when fate reveals that its power is not absolute— that your intelligence and willpower can in fact override the seemingly inexorable imperatives of karma? If you are unfamiliar with the pleasures I’ve just described, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to get deeply acquainted.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It won’t be a

good week to issue unreasonable, illogical and self-centered demands. And please don’t make peanut butter and jelly a part of your sex life, take a vacation in Siberia, or photocopy your butt and deliver it anonymously to your boss. On the other hand, it will be an excellent time to scrawl motivational poetry on your bedroom wall, stage a slow-motion pillow fight, and cultivate your ability to be a deep-feeling free-thinker. Other recommended actions: Give yourself a new nickname like “Highball” or “Root Doctor” or “Climax Master”; write an essay on “The Five Things That the Pursuit of Pleasure Has Taught Me;” and laugh uproariously as you completely bypass the void of sadness and the abyss of fear.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the mid-

19th century, prospectors mined for gold in the mountains of western Nevada. The veins weren’t as rich as those in California, but some men were able to earn a modest living. Their work to extract gold from the terrain was hampered by a gluey blue mud that gummed up their machinery. It was regarded as a major nuisance. But on a hunch, one miner took a load of the blue gunk to be analyzed by an expert. He discovered that it contained rich deposits of silver. So began an explosion of silver mining that made many prospectors very wealthy. I suggest you be on the alert for a metaphorical version of blue mud in your sphere, Cancerian: an “inconvenience” that seems to interfere with the treasure you seek but that is actually quite valuable.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When pioneer film-

maker Hal Roach worked on scripts with his team of writers, he sometimes employed an unusual strategy to overcome writer’s block. He’d bring in a “Wildie” to join them at the conference table. A Wildie was either a random drunk they found wandering around the streets or a person who lived in an insane asylum. They’d engage him in conversation about the story they were working on, and he would provide unexpected ideas that opened their minds to new possibilities. I don’t necessarily recommend that you seek the help of a Wildie, Leo, but I hope you will come up with other ways to spur fresh perspectives. Solicit creative disruptions!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Is the term

“unconscious mind” a good name for the foundation of the human psyche? Should we really be implying that the vast, oceanic source of everything we think and feel is merely the opposite of the conscious mind? Dreamworker Jeremy Taylor doesn’t think so. He proposes an alternate phrase to replace “unconscious”: “not-yet-speechripe.” It captures the sense of all the raw material burbling and churning in our deep awareness that is not graspable through language. I bring this up, Virgo, because you’re entering a phase when a lot of notyet-speech-ripe stuff will become speechripe. Be alert for it!

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1928, biolo-

gist Alexander Fleming launched a medical revolution. He developed the world’s first antibiotic, penicillin, making it possible to cure a host of maladies caused by hostile bacteria. His discovery was a lucky fluke that happened only because he left his laboratory a mess when he went on vacation. While he was gone, a bacteria culture he’d been working with got contaminated by a mold that turned out to be penicillin. I’m thinking that you could achieve a more modest but quite happy accident sometime soon, Libra. It may depend on you allowing things to be more untidy than usual, though. Are you game?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I am iron

resisting the most enormous Magnet there is,” wrote the Sufi mystic poet Rumi. He was wistfully bemoaning his own stubborn ignorance, which tricked him into refusing a more intimate companionship with the Blessed Source of all life. I think there’s something similar going on in most of us, even atheists. We feel the tremendous pull of our destiny—the glorious, daunting destination that would take all our strength to achieve and fulfill our deepest longings—and yet we are also terrified to surrender to it. What’s your current relationship to your magnet, Scorpio? I say it’s time you allowed it to pull you closer.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

NASA used whale oil to lubricate the Hubble Space Telescope and Voyager spacecrafts. There was a good reason: Whale oil doesn’t freeze at the low temperatures found in outer space. While I certainly don’t approve of killing whales to obtain their oil, I want to use this story to make a point. It’s an excellent time for you, too, to use old-school approaches for solving ultra-new-school problems. Sometimes a tried-and-true method works better, or is cheaper, simpler or more aesthetically pleasing.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The

theory of the “butterfly effect” proposes that a butterfly flapping its wings in China may ultimately impact the weather in New York. Here’s how the writer Richard Bernstein explains it: “Very slight, nearly infinitesimal variations and the enormous multiplicity of interacting variables produce big differences in the end.” That’s why, he says, “the world is just too complicated to be predictable.” I find this a tremendously liberating idea. It suggests that every little thing you do sends out ripples of influence that help shape the kind of world you live in. The coming week will be an excellent time to experiment with how this works in your daily life. Put loving care and intelligent attention into every little thing.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Former

football quarterback Joe Ayoob holds the world’s record for throwing a paper airplane the longest distance. After it left his hand, the delicate craft traveled more than 226 feet. I propose we make Ayoob your patron saint and role model for the coming week. From what I can tell, you will have a similar challenge, at least metaphorically: blending power and strength with precision and finesse and control. It’s time to move a fragile thing or process as far as possible.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A source

of fulfillment you will enjoy in the future may seem almost painful when it initially announces its presence. In other words, your next mission may first appear to you as a problem. Your situation has a certain resemblance to that of prolific Russian composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who produced a wide variety of enduring works, including symphonies, ballets, operas and concertos. When he was a precocious child, he was assailed by the melodies and rhythms that frequently surged through his mind. “This music! This music!” he complained to his mother. “Take it away! It’s here in my head and won’t let me sleep!”

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Urban historian Alicia Barber is the author of the essential history of Reno, Reno’s Big Gamble, published in 2008, which is available at Sundance Books. She has moved beyond simply recording the city’s history to take a direct interest in the city’s future, particularly the downtown. Barber is also director of the oral history program at the University of Nevada, Reno.

You were at the “farewell party” for the downtown Reno post office. What did you think of the plans for that building? I think that adaptively re-using the post office building as a retail and commercial center can really give it new life and a new role in the community. I think more people will be able to appreciate it as a commercial and retail building than ever stepped inside it as a post office. Everyone who came to the event on Saturday was astounded at just how beautiful and spacious it is.

What do you think of the way downtown is now? I think we’ve had trouble downtown ever since it got divided into tourist spaces and residential spaces. So a lot of plans right now are attempting to bring residential life

Former mayor Jeff Griffin said that if the city could get people to move back to the downtown to live, it would do more than anything else to revitalize the downtown.

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What did you mean when you said we made a mistake by separating business and residents downtown?

I think bringing more residential spaces to downtown is something that will, ideally, be part of a reconfigured downtown, but in truth, I think the first step and the more achievable step now is just to bring more people downtown for various reasons throughout the day and having more foot traffic in our downtown area for a number of purposes will make people feel safer and more comfortable in the downtown and will help restore a lot of that vitality that we’ve lost. I think there’s still a number of obstacles to bringing more residents downtown, and making it more appealing space can be a first step to making that happen.

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ARTS&CULTURE

Well, Reno underwent a huge transition in the 1970s when the large block-size casinos began to dominate the spaces of our central downtown core and at the same time resident-oriented businesses, retail shopping, department stores, cafes and restaurants started to move outward to outlying areas. And when you separate tourist spaces from residential spaces, it doesn’t contribute to the vitality of a healthy downtown. Another problem with that, the interstate went in in the mid-1970s and essentially divided downtown Reno from the university and that’s been a division that’s remained in place ever since. It’s not just physical, it’s symbolic, too. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye brucev@newsreview.com

giant, hungry fish? Did he love the sensation of having his leg munched on and then ripped off by a terrifying monster? I’m guessing no. Just a hunch. • A lot of talk lately about the nickname of the Washington Redskins football. It happens periodically. There’s really no getting around it. It’s easily the most racist team name in sports. Yes, it’s exactly the same as if there were the Washington Wetbacks or the Detroit Dagos, or—well, you can follow the example downward to its most blatant and ugly conclusions. The Redskins, as always, defend the name by using the TD (the tradition defense), saying that the team has had that handle for decades, and now it’s a proud part of Redskin tradition and blah, blah, blah. The fact that the tradition was begun by the original owner, an out-and-out racist of the worst kind, and one who was not hard to find in the ’30s, is rarely mentioned. But basically, the team’s defense is,

Can we please retire this horribly lame notion of “he died doing what he loved”? In many cases, it’s not just horribly lame, it’s very likely inaccurate. For example, a guy dies while skydiving. Often, if not invariably, someone tries to bring comfort with the old, hoary, HDDWHL line. OK, wait a sec. Yes, he loved jumping out of planes, free falling in the air, and then floating to Earth under a perfectly functioning parachute. Great. But I’m willing to bet he did not love feeling a complete, heart-stopping panic upon realizing that his chute was screwed up, and that he did not love smashing full speed into the ground. In fact, I bet he just hated that. Or the guy who gets killed by a shark while surfing. “Oh, well. At least HDDWHL,” some well-meaning but brain dead cliche-spewer will say. But, really? Sure, he loved being in the ocean, sitting on his board, waiting for that great wave, and then, catching it and gliding into the shore. Totally righteous, dude. But did he love being attacked by a OPINION

Well, I think there are a lot of amenities that are still necessary to have downtown in order to make residents feel that it’s more attractive. There’s definitely a need for a grocery store, a food source. The whole point of having people downtown, I think, is to increase pedestrian life. And people would tend to live in the downtown area because they like to be able to walk to a number of attractions but also be able to walk to get the things for their daily life. So there’s a need for all those things to happen at the same time. It’s sort of a chicken-and-egg scenario where it’s hard to attract the residents before you have those amenities.

back to the heart of downtown, and I think it’s very exciting.

Cliches and slurs

What obstacles?

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IN ROTATION

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“Hey folks, we’ve been racists for a long time here, so much so, in fact, that the ‘tradition’ is too old to change. So kindly buzz off!” The NFL owners, being a clique of jowly, mottled billionaires, won’t do a thing to force a change. That much is clear and understood. But I wonder what wold happen if the Redskins new star quarterback, one RG3, said something along the lines of, “After my contract is up, I’d like to leave Washington. As a highly visible African-American, I’m simply not comfortable playing for a team with an insensitive and, for many, abhorrent nickname. I just will not. I would no sooner sign a new deal with the Redskins than I would sign with the Kansas City Kikes.” Wonder what the Redskin brass would say to that? Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MARCH 14, 2013

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RN&R

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