Issuu on Google+

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 Sheila Leslie . . . . . . . . . . .6 Chanelle Bessette . . . . . .7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .16 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .18

Art of the State . . . . . . .19 Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .25 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .27 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Free Will Astrology . . . .38 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .38 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .39

REVOLTING

DEVELOPMENT See News, page 8.

BEASTS OF THE

WESTERN WILD See Green, page 11.

I WANT CANDY See Arts&Culture, page 16.

TThe he 220-year-old 0 - ye a r - o l d SSticker ticker Guy Guy iiss tthrowing hrowing a ggiant iant bbirthday irthday pparty ar ty

ALWAYS ROOM

FOR JELLO See Musicbeat, page 25.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

|

VOLUME 19, ISSUE 3

|

MARCH 7–13, 2013


2.99% APR1 FOR UP TO 60 MONTHS, AND BONUS POINTS2 WITH YOUR CARD Get in the driver’s seat and find the financing you’ve been looking for. Buy new or refinance with a Nevada State Bank auto loan, and enjoy no payments for the first 90 days.3 And when you qualify, we’ll offer you a credit card that earns 5x bonus points on new purchases for the first three months. So get your car keys…and the card. Bring your banking home.

® 53 years in Nevada I Over 50 branches statewide nsbank.com/Auto | 866.508.1339

Subject to credit approval. Offers subject to change, restrictions apply. 1. Minimum loan size and model year requirements apply. Sample loan will carry 60 monthly payments of $17.96 per $1,000 borrowed. 2. 5x bonus points available for up to $30,000 in new purchases for the initial three month period. 3. Interest will accrue during the 90-day no payment period.

2 

| 

RN&R   | 

march 7, 2013


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Powered by Bri

Bring your cart

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I remember when the prospect of getting laid that night was pretty much the only thing that could get me out of bed in the morning. Not these days. I’m pretty much excited about everything, all the time, and I can’t wait to get my day started. This weekend, I’m eager to work on my stand-up desk. Long story short: I built a desk out of PVC so I can stand up at work, as sitting at a desk all these years has irritated my guts, causing heartburn and other discomforts. After yet another expensive yet inconclusive medical test, my doctor suggested I get a standup desk. Well, you know me. What would the perfect standup desk look like? Inexpensive, strong, tailored to my 6-feet-2-and-a-half-inch frame, modular (so that other people could build one even more cheaply, since almost everyone I know who sits at a desk for a living has the same issues). And since the whole idea was to make my work environment healthier, a manual treadmill. Don’t you dare scoff. Finally, because things never get weird enough in my world, my friend Ky Plaskon suggested I figure out a way to generate electricity from the treadmill. Actually, it was Ky’s dad, a former NASA rocket scientist, who suggested the idea. So I came up with a design, and I’m going to run my music, charge my cell phone, and maybe power my monitor off it. The desk works great. Right now, while I figure final dimensions, I’m standing on a platform, and I have my keyboard elevated on a couple reams of paper, but I stood here all week and worked and shook my ass. My treadmill arrives today. I’ll bet I’m out of bed before the sun rises tomorrow. After the weekend: Everything works as I hoped. I still might have to adjust the desktop surface up one inch (for a sit-down desk you adjust the chair, for a stand-up desk you adjust the desk), but I burned 46.2 calories on my treadmill while I copy-edited A&C.

Re “Dog Days of Winter” (Feature story, Feb. 28): I read with interest your article on dog sledding in Truckee (Dog Days of Winter), but I find it sad that nobody in charge of these dog sledding events has thought of the obvious solution to the unpredictability of snowfall: Plan for both. Tell the mushers and the audience that the race will happen whether there is snow or not. Each musher will have to bring both a snow sled and a wheeled cart, which is a lot to pack and transport, but isn’t it better than cancelling the event? Karen Inda Sparks

Troll dog Re “Dog Days of Winter” (Feature story, Feb. 28): I’m so sick of dogs I want to puke. Overrated, butt-sniffing, poopeating, barking, ugly-ass animals. Did you know dogs are an invasive species? All the common species of pets are. I love it when coyotes grab a coddled little dog and take it back to the den for a meal. Jennifer Tuttle Reno

Truth karma Re “Dog Days of Winter” (Feature story, Feb. 28): With all the dire predictions for the ecosystem due to climate change—mass extinctions, flooded cities, super-hurricanes, etc—doesn’t the esoteric hobby of mushing seem pretty trivial? Don Manning Reno

Ashamed of government Open letter to both the upper and lower houses of the legislative branch of the American government: As an American-born, Vietnam-era veteran just short of 64 years old, for the very first time in my life, I am both ashamed and embarrassed by the lack of partisanship and

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

cooperation by our elected officials, both Democrat and Republican of my native land. The nerve; the audacity of our politicians to leave “The Hill” on a Thursday afternoon for a long weekend, without even an extended attempt to fix the sequestration issue at hand is mind boggling. We are no longer the greatest nation on Earth, and it’s going to be a long slide downward. I fear for our future and the legacy to follow. If there is a God in heaven, He will punish those who fail the people by their selfishness and inaction by personal self serving design. I can only, and will, pray for those unfortunate uncaring souls. Jon P. Gaits Reno

Water hazard Yosemite National Park managers are the grinch that stole the vacation. The proposed Merced River Plan, written to “protect and enhance the river,” would have the swimming pools at two hotels in Yosemite valley removed because they are “not necessary.” (Yet the pools are not as near the river as many buildings.) The ice rink and horseback riding would also go, along with rental rafts/bikes, because they are “not necessary.” Is John Muir their role model? Muir got by with a fire, some tea and bread. With Muir as a NPS role model, tents and hotel rooms are also not necessary. Fun is not necessary. Please help stop this nonsense before it spreads to other parks. Yosemite park is taking comments on the plan until April 18, 2013. Go to the Yosemite National Park home page and click on Merced River Plan on the right hand side. The direct link is http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome. cfm?projectID=18982 The direct link for comments is http://parkplanning.nps.gov/commentForm. cfm?documentID=50778 Mary Donahue Campbell, Calif.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Nora Heston, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

Dump the dump Re “Nuclear energy is the bomb” (The Liberty Belle, Feb. 28): Chanelle Bessette’s opinion piece, “Nuclear energy is the bomb,” is itself an explosion of misinformation. The idea that southern Nevada in general and Yucca Mountain in particular could be used for “the storage of nuclear spent fuels, reprocessing those fuels and generating power” is absurd. Yucca Mountain is an unsafe site for disposing of nuclear waste. The feds have walked away from it as being unworkable. It’s an even worse location for spent fuel storage (earthquakes, the dangers of transporting the stuff thousands of miles and through urban Las Vegas, etc.). And reprocessing, even if it were technically and economically feasible (which it is not) requires copious amounts of water (not available in the arid Great Basin) and produces copious amounts of radioactive and hazardous waste. Where reprocessing has been done (by the Feds for weapons purposes and at a pilot project in upstate New York in the ’70s), it has resulted in massive amounts of contamination. And a nuclear power plant in southern Nevada? Give me a break! Because of the earthquake potential, you couldn’t license one there. Even if you could, there is nowhere near the amount of water required for such a facility. What the Nevadans 4 Carbon Free Energy is selling is not something that’s good for Nevada. Joe Strolin Carson City

Good to know Re “The Game” (Feature story, Feb. 7): I don’t know if you had a chance to read KOLO’s story, http://tinyurl. com/b7rpcav, but if you didn’t, it talks about a trafficking survivor who is starting a Sex Workers Anonymous chapter in Carson City. Sex Workers Anonymous was first started in 1987, and has grown to be a worldwide program with chapters in the USA, and five other countries now. They are open to anyone of any age, male or female, gay, bi, Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Gil Egeland, Neil Lemerise, John Miller, Russell Moore, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

lesbian, and/or transgender, with no restrictions on the religion, or lack of, absolutely free of charge. Their program has a hotline that’s available anytime at (888) 253-9619 and is answered confidentially by another survivor. SWA is not connected with law enforcement in any way, and it’s highly successful whether they’re working with someone who just wants to quit the sex industry, or a trafficking victim who needs a rescue operation put together. Because so many mothers are dealing with this issue these days—they’ve even put together a program just for their support as well. They have a radio show where you can hear from the survivors at http://stop traffictalk.webs.com/apps/podcast/ and have a Recovery Guide. They can be reached at www.sexworkers anonymous.net Jody Williams Las Vegas

Pay as you go Re “Back to the gold mine” (Left Foot Forward, Feb. 14): Quid pro quo—something for something. Mining needs to pay a fee for every speck of gold, large or small, that they take from our state. Mining needs to pay for every drop of fossil water they drain as they drill—just as we all must do. Mining needs to pay for using our roads, government, schools, airports etc. Mining needs to pay for access and mining claims instead of participating in a land grab and by quickclaim converting public land to private property and private use. Mining needs to pay for the superfund site and other EPA sites that are dirty and need to be cleaned up. I’m only asking for mining to be responsible like I am as an American citizen. I pay when I use or take, and so must they. We need to stop allowing mining to hoard, hide, and stash the gold. There is money in this state, and we are tired of starving our systems so that billionaires can make huge unfair profits. Angie Sullivan Las Vegas/Winnemucca

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

3


4 

| 

RN&R   | 

march 7, 2013


by Dennis Myers

This Modern World

by tom tomorrow

The best bumper sticker you’ve seen? Asked at Java Jungle, 246 W. First Street Kyle Daters Barista

I’m not sure. I know the best license plate I ever saw was “Obiwan.”

Jason Rowden Massage therapist

“Get Lost.” It’s kind of how I feel sometimes.

Shannon Rowden Massage therapist

Spring into action Daylight saving time is coming up on Sunday, March 10. Don’t forget to spring forward an hour. As Reno basks in the false spring of early March, though, it occurs to us here at the world headquarters of the Reno News & Review that false spring is a fine time to make and execute a plan for what you want to do with your personal environment this summer. Many of us will do most of our outdoor-work stuff in the early warm days, and so if chores don’t get done by Memorial Day, they don’t get done. Here are a few ideas to get you started. Consider your outside world: Now’s a good time to think about how you use water around your home. Xeriscaping—use of water-efficient plants in your landscaping—is a great way to go, and installation is easier before you turn on the sprinkler system for the summer. Going to plant a vegetable garden this summer? If you’re taking over part of your lawn, spread cardboard boxes or other organic materials over the area you want to cover now, and you won’t be tempted to use herbicides later in the season. Speaking of lawns: While some staff members here particularly love their grass, most Renoites have to pay for watering it. Increasing flower bed areas allows for less broadcast irrigation, and they’re nice to have around. In Nevada, though, move the gravel or lava rock coverings away from the house as rock absorbs and releases heat. The money you save on water may just cause increased spending on electricity for air conditioning. And speaking of air conditioning (and heating), spring is also a good time to replace the filters on the heating system and to inspect the air-conditioning OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

I can think of a bunch of dirty ones off the top my head, but none of them is my favorite. “My other car is a bike.” system to make sure it is working properly. It’s a lot cheaper to fix it now than at the height of summer when everyone else’s goes bad, too. Even people without yards may want to do some things to get ready for an outdoor spring. Some vegetables grow quite well in pots or old five-gallon buckets. Tomatoes, for one, do great. Just cut a two-and-a-half inch diameter hole in the center of the bottom of a fivegallon bucket. Lay the bucket on its side and thread the tomato plant through so the leaves come out the bottom. Carefully pack dirt around the roots and hang the bucket from the handle from your eaves. When watering, just put water in until it begins dripping out the hole where the tomato plant hangs down. No land necessary. No bugs! Another job that’s much nicer during the spring is installation of a line on which to dry laundry. (Although, yes, you can dry clothes outside in the winter.) Older clothes dryers can cost up to 25 cents per load, but hanging clothes and sheets outside is free and has the benefit of adding a great smell as long as you’re not hanging them during an inversion or near a fruit or berry tree that attracts birds. And finally, not because we’re your mom or anything, but now is a good time to test emergency systems in your home to ensure they are working properly. Emergency systems might include a home alarm, smoke/fire alarm, overhead sprinkler system or carbon monoxide alarms. Change your batteries. Get a fire extinguisher or see where yours is in its life cycle. You know you can’t wait to enjoy some sunshine after work. It’s the unofficial beginning of spring, so while you’re springing forward, spring into action. Ω

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

Max Bryson Bartender

“Honk if you love cheese.” It made me laugh. It had a big piece of Swiss cheese, and it made me laugh out loud.

Dawn Cranfield Writer

“If it’s not grown, it has to be mined.” I liked that because my dad was a miner. And I write for a newspaper in Las Vegas, and I wrote a bunch of stories about the Comstock Lode.

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

5


Irresponsible legislators hurt children No one can seriously argue there isn’t a tremendous need to repair and rehabilitate many of the schools in Washoe County, where 60 percent are more than 30 years old. In recent years, massive budget cuts have slashed maintenance budgets while voters have rejected additional taxes to fix by the problem now estimated to cost Sheila Leslie more than $500 million over the next 10 years. Assembly Bill 46, sponsored by the Washoe County School District, would raise just $20 million a year over the biennium for maintenance and repairs, about 8 percent of what’s needed to adequately maintain our schools. The bill imposes a quarter cent increase in the sales tax and a slight increase in the property tax—by 5 cents per $100 assessed value—in Washoe County only. In a rare bipartisan display of support for new taxes, the Washoe delegation strongly endorsed the idea, with the obvious and expected exception of Sen. Don Gustavson, a politician enamored of the “taxes are evil” philosophy long before the Tea Party

made it fashionable in Republican circles. At the bill’s first hearing, however, a significant amendment was presented by Assemblymember David Bobzien, in recognition of the difficulty in achieving the constitutionally-mandated two-thirds vote threshold for any tax measure. The amendment proposes a “work-around” to enable the school board instead of the legislature to actually raise the taxes. Enabling legislation only requires a majority vote from the legislature although the bill would still run the risk of a gubernatorial veto, which would then require a two-thirds vote to override. The plan could also face legal challenges due to the 1996 constitutional amendment requiring a two-thirds vote on taxes, authored by none other than former Gov. Jim Gibbons. The bill is supported by both labor and business as many jobs would be created with $20 million a year. Even the Reno Chamber of Commerce thinks the school crisis qualifies as dire and has suspended its anti-tax zealotry long enough to support the

measure, perhaps understanding that it is impossible to attract quality new businesses when many of the crumbling schools are in older parts of town where high-end employees tend to migrate. In an interview with the Reno Gazette-Journal, Chamber lobbyist Tray Abney brushed away any constitutional objections and provided this tortured view of the two-thirds requirement: “But be clear, this does not usurp the Constitution. The Constitution says, ‘If the Legislature increases taxes, it has to be a two-thirds vote.’ The Legislature is not raising taxes. The school board, if they want to raise taxes, they can do so.” Gov. Sandoval’s office, however, expressed deep concerns through spokesman Stewart Bybee: “The governor is concerned that the plan circumvents the public process. There is no ballot initiative, no two-thirds vote in the Legislature. ... It also sets a brand new precedent for government entities that can tax the public. The bottom line is the school board is

not a taxing authority.” Indeed, Clark County school officials are already salivating about the possibility of enacting taxes directly. In another demonstration of need for additional educational spending versus lack of revenue, Democrats unveiled their plan last week calling for at least $310 million in additional funding for early childhood education, but this time with no funding plan offered. In the groundhog bubble of Carson City, the Democrats seem to hope public pressure will bring the Republicans to the bargaining table, but none reacted with any hint of support for the idea. Instead they floated the same anti-labor “reforms” they always want in exchange for any serious discussion of adequately funding education. We’ve seen this movie before, several times in fact. As Ray Hagar of the Reno Gazette-Journal noted in his blog: “We’ve created a Legislature incapable of raising taxes.” Ω

Anything you ever wanted to know about AB 46 can be found right here: http:// tinyurl.com/bqb62x3.

it s gonna be nuts!

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 TH 10am to 4pm

Noon

10am to ??

Oyster Fry and Eating Contests

St. Patrick’s Day Parade on “C” Street

Leprechaun Bar Crawl

Authentic Live Irish Music

St. Patrick’s Day Costume Contest (dress up, be creative)

Street magicians & balloon animals for the kids

www.VisitVirginiaCityNV.com 6   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 7, 2013


Nevada smart to bet on internet gambling On Feb. 21, Gov. Brian Sandoval and the Nevada Legislature signed a bill legalizing online gambling in the state of Nevada. This bill, which authorizes Nevada to enter into gaming compacts with other states that also allow internet gambling, will do much more for the state’s by Chanelle Bessette economy than many people realize. By potentially netting the state millions of dollars from online poker through casino licensing fees, taxes and tourism from players who wish to participate in physical tournaments, the Nevada Legislature has made a bold and wise decision to re-introduce online gambling at the interstate level. But first, a history. Fans of online gambling were blindsided in 2006 when the Unlawful Internet Gaming Enforcement Act was slipped into national law in the metaphorical dead of night. It was tacked on to the SAFE Port Act, a bill designed to regulate port security in an effort to contribute to counterterrorism in the post-9/11 climate. Title VII of the act, however, departs completely

from this mission. It rules that, in this new period of technological advancement, “new mechanisms for enforcing gambling laws on the internet are necessary,” and it quickly made illegal interstate betting on “games subject to chance” such as poker and fantasy sports. The UIGEA went into law in 2010, much to the outrage of gambling enthusiasts and online poker careerists everywhere. The Department of Justice has received great criticism for its role in passing the UIGEA. From the way it was slipped in as an aside to a larger unrelated bill to its inability to target the real issues related to online gambling—such as psychological and physical issues related to addiction—the act has done far more damage to the economy than it has helped. Primarily, the act has prevented economic growth in a potentially lucrative field of interactive interstate gambling, and states with legalized gambling in casinos have not been the only ones affected. The most immediate effect of the

‘ 01 LINCOLN LS 3.0L V6, Leather, Spoiler!

‘01 AUDI TT 225HP, Convertible!

‘03 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER 3.0L V6, Power W/L, CD!

#1Y690112

#11001838

#30104515

$

$

‘06 BMW 325 Ci Memory Seat, Keyless Entry!

14,698

Pre-Owned. Pre-Loved. Prepared.

‘06 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED! 4.7L V8, Automatic

‘12 FIAT 500 SPORT Wireless Connectivity, Great MPG! Pre-Owned

#6C223909

#CT156960

$

9,996

12,998

$

‘09 HONDA ACCORD Heated Seats, Security System!

‘07 HONDA ODYSSEY TOURING Heated Front Seats, 3rd Row!

#9A011613

#7B043366

16,598

$

$

20,998

LITHIA RENO SUBARU

S KIETZKE LN

2270 Kietzke Lane 395

T [775] 200-1412 SHOP: LITHIARENOSUBARU.COM SALES HOURS Monday-Saturday 9:00am-8:00pm | Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm

E MOANA LN

NEWS

$

$

E PLUMB LN

|

#BH507691

8,996

$

Fall in love with our Great Selection of Certified Pre-Owned Subaru.

‘11 HONDA CIVIC LX CD/MP3, Keyless Entry!

14,399

#6PX85620

8,996

For everything you wanted to know about Nevada’s first in the nation internet law, check out http:// tinyurl.com/bqn7t5m.

Ask today for your free trade estimate

FOR USED VEHICLES

Great Selection, Great Prices Every Day!

4,698

Las Vegas—brings to the state is in the multimillions, but even so, the UIGEA has prevented many poker hopefuls from honing their skills, which in turn deters thousands upon thousands of players from visiting Nevada during the summer when the poker tournaments take place. The lost tourism revenue alone is enough to reconsider the UIGEA’s continued national implementation. While Gov. Sandoval’s signature on online gambling legalization in Nevada—and its unanimous support in the legislature—are a good first step to increasing revenue and broadening individual freedoms, the bill doesn’t reach far enough. The current standard of only being able to make compacts with states that have also approved online gambling needs to stretch to international limits. By doing so, both Nevada and the global gambling community will benefit. Ω

WE’RE LOOKING

RENO SUBARU

OPINION

act’s passing was the withdrawal of millions of dollars from national and international e-commerce. American players and online gambling hosts (such as Full Tilt and PokerStars) were no longer able to legally operate in the U.S., and many transferred their business overseas. Online poker provides exorbitant revenue to places that have legalized it. Some estimates—such as an article published in Forbes in 2010 just before the full effect of the act was realized—say that the global revenue of poker reached somewhere around $30 billion annually. Not only is the U.S. no longer getting a share of the rake, Nevada, especially Las Vegas, is bearing the brunt of the act’s opportunity costs. Since the passing of the UIGEA, fewer Americans have found success at the World Series of Poker, and international online poker players have been featured much more prominently as winners of various events in recent years. The amount of money that the World Series of Poker—held at the Rio casino in

Price does not include $345 dealer doc fee, taxes and license fees. Offers expire 03/13/13. |

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

7


Photo/Dennis Myers

In February last year, Nevada higher education  chancellor Dan Klaich (second from left) listened  closely as Gov. Brian Sandoval offered an economic  development plan. Sandoval’s veto threat on  taxes has limited legislative action on economic        development.

Nevada vs. teen pregnancy Nevada’s teen pregnancy rate has dropped sharply, according to Centers for Disease Control figures. That’s the good news. The bad news is that the state’s rate is still nothing to brag about. Over a three-year period (2007 to 2010), the state rate of births per 1,000 Nevadans aged 15 to 19 years old dropped by a fourth, from 51.6 to 38.6. In raw numbers, that’s 4,351 to 3,413 births. That means that out of 51 jurisdictions, Nevada still ranks 12th in the nation. In 2008, it was at 10th (“We’re number 10,” RN&R, May 5, 2011). Over this period, teen pregnancy declined across the nation, which meant that while Nevada’s rate was dropping, so were other jurisdictions, so Nevada improved its ranking only incrementally. In 2008 the state ranked 10th. The rate fell by at least 8 percent in 47 states and D.C. and by 20 to 29 percent in 16 states, including Nevada.

Dems vs. Heck The office of U.S. Rep Joe Heck, a Nevada Republican, sent out a news release on Feb. 29 at 9:02 in the morning on his vote in favor of S. 47, the Violence Against Women Act reauthorization. The release contained this statement by Heck: “As a co-sponsor of this reauthorization last Congress, I was proud to cast a vote in support of this important bipartisan bill that provides crucial funding for programs, organizations and law enforcement agencies in southern Nevada that assist women who are victims of domestic abuse. This bill increases resources for criminal investigations, strengthens penalties against abusers to better protect victims, and funds programs that protect victims from both the physical and mental scars of domestic abuse, sexual assault, and rape.” Twenty-six minutes later this statement arrived from the Nevada Democratic Party: “After insulting Gabrielle Giffords by agreeing with a right-wing radio host who called her a ‘prop’ of proponents of reducing gun violence, Joe Heck is clearly afraid of the damage his slap in the face to Nevada women has done to his reelection chances. The fact remains, Joe Heck voted last year to weaken the Violence Against Women Act and to criminalize abortion for rape victims. Nevada women have seen over the last few weeks Joe Heck’s cavalier attitude towards violence against women and today’s vote will not fool them.” The Giffords reference deals with a Feb. 19 Heck appearance on an Alan Stock program. Stock claimed Giffords had been used as a “prop” by gun control advocates at the state of the union speech. Giffords “can’t even clap her hands,” Stock said. “I think that is just a shameful act by putting her up there as a prop. I’m sorry, I really did.” Heck responded, “I agree. In the cloud of emotion that’s surrounding the unfortunate incident in Connecticut—that those that are anti-gun want to use that as their opportunity to try to limit our Second Amendment rights.” Heck later backed away from his comments in an interview with southern Nevada columnist Jon Ralston. “Of course, there is no way that I think that Gabby Giffords is a prop. ... Should I have come to her defense?” Heck said. “You know, in a fast-moving interview, in retrospect, I should have said something, but I didn’t. I was just looking to get past that and talk about gun control in general.”

—Dennis Myers

8   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 7, 2013

Doing it on the cheap Economic development crawls along Two years ago, a month before the 2011 Nevada Legislature went into session, a conference in Las Vegas looked at by the state’s battered economy. It was Dennis Myers supposed to be a learning occasion, though it was marked by the traditional state chauvinism and boosterism. For instance, a prospectus for the conference read in part, “For years, Nevadans have understood the need to diversify the state’s economy beyond tourism, construction and mining”—though, in fact, there was substantial doubt that Nevada residents understood any such thing.

“It is appropriate that the state commit before private donors or business.” Dan Klaich nevada higher education chancellor

For those who were listening, the conference offered a lot of wisdom. Economic experts from other Western states—Arizona, Colorado, Texas, Utah—talked about how they had diversified and expanded their economies while Nevadans shrank theirs. Those states used public works like new airports, some incentives, and especially education at all levels—elementary and secondary schools for some economic

development purposes, higher education for others. But the Nevada Legislature that went into session the next month, with Gov. Sandoval’s tax veto threat hanging over like a sword of Damocles, adopted little more than a maintenance budget. Toward the end of its session, the Nevada Economic Forum—which produces binding estimates of the state’s anticipated revenue—predicted somewhat higher revenue than previously expected. Gov. Brian Sandoval recommended nearly all of it, $242 million, be used by elementary and secondary education, leaving higher ed with about $20 million. The state’s campuses were still left with major cuts and shutdowns—and that came on top of the previous four years of the governorship of Jim Gibbons, when the lawmakers went along with decimating the higher education system. Never in the computer era had Nevada been less able to compete in economic development. Commitment of state revenues to education was far below the national average. “And I just don’t see how we are full partners in that at the same time when we’re cutting $162 million out of our budget,” Nevada higher education chancellor Dan Klaich said during the 2011 legislature. As the 2013 legislature neared, while there was still an awareness in elite circles that the state needed to repair its education system, little had been done to educate the public

to that need. In the fall of last year, NBC News could report, “Many other students in Nevada, however, are giving up. In this world-famous gaming capital, the odds are stacked against them. Just 36 percent earn their four-year degrees within even six years, a smaller proportion than in any state except Alaska. And as tuition rises, enrollment has been falling. That, accompanied by an exodus of college-educated workers, has further shrunk the proportion of 25- to 34-year-olds in this state with degrees, already the lowest in the country.” The boosterish in-state news coverage aimed at locals could not combat that kind of message going out to the rest of the nation. There seems to be little reason to expect substantial change in higher education spending. Democratic lawmakers announced an ambitious education program but were unable to answer the first question asked about it: How will you pay for it? Once again, out-of-state news coverage of public relations tricks to make up for actual resources seems more insightful than local reports. Sacramento Business Journal: “If at first you don’t succeed at luring California businesses to a no-tax state, try again after re-branding and partnering with a friend of Google’s. ... The Nevada Regional Development Authority is attempting to up its tech street cred with an announcement Tuesday that the group will now be known as the ‘Las Vegas Global Economic Alliance’ and has moved into a new office called ‘The InNEVation Center’.” Since the Nevada Legislature meets only every other year, each time the lawmakers and governor adopt a maintenance program, the state loses another two years while adjoining states keep moving ahead. In 2008, an Arizona think tank warned that state that it was in danger of becoming “an uncompetitive, unsustainable place where the standard of living stagnates or declines and the position of Arizona tumbles from its historic attractiveness to undesirable.” Every year since then Arizona officials have beefed up the state’s competitiveness. Even more notable was Utah, where in 2005 and 2006 business leaders became alarmed by rising bankruptcies and falling wages, which meant falling taxes and declines in education and public works funding, portending a decline in Utah’s attractiveness to business. Before that trend could get traction, the state responded by throwing $179 million at higher


education systems to lure teams of world class instructors and researchers and later imposing a 5 percent corporate tax. It’s called the Utah Science Technology Research Initiative (USTAR). The results have been very good. Dozens of distinguished engineers and scientists are now Utah-based. With USTAR support, numerous companies were created and patents generated (“USTAR,” RN&R, July 12, 2012). “In fact, Utah is proving to be a draw for a number of big corporate players these days,” Business Week reported last year. “Procter & Gamble chose the state when opening its first U.S. plant in more than four decades last year. ” Wyoming, Idaho, New Mexico, Colorado, Montana and Arizona adopted Utah-style techniques, but though Nevada officials have been briefed on the Utah techniques at least twice, Nevada did not. Two more years went by. Nevada has not stood still. The 2011 legislature created a “Knowledge Fund” to direct funding to academic research with commercial applications—but put no money in it. The lawmakers also changed the administrative structure of the state economic development program. It was anticipated that the private sector would be asked to contribute to the Knowledge Fund, but businesses were not going to invest if state

government didn’t. Or, as Chancellor Klaich said more tactfully, “When the Knowledge Fund was set up it was specifically anticipated that there could be private donations to it and that subject has been generally discussed within the [higher education] system. I would not say that there has been a concerted effort yet as I think it is appropriate that the State commit before private donors or business could be expected essentially to match that State appropriation.” Two more years went by. In the current legislature, Gov. Sandoval has recommended $10 million for the Knowledge Fund for the next two years. That is less than Utah has spent annually since its USTAR program began, and there is no start-up money equivalent to what Utah ponied up. The lawmakers are expected to provide more than Sandoval recommended, but even if they doubled it—as the Democrats want—it would still leave the state playing catch-up with its small state competitors in the West. All this leaves the state highereducation system, by most indices, well below where it was a decade ago. Since the Gibbons administration, the legislature has been satisfied with not damaging the system any more, but rebuilding to get the system back to competitive seems as far out of reach as ever. Ω

Late call Photo/Dennis Myers

A worker at the University of Nevada, Reno distributes new telephone directories to campus offices. The directory came out in November. When asked about the delay, a university spokesperson responded, “I only received my new phone book at home within the past month.”

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

9


100% college tuition • action and adventure • career training • part time service full time benefits • right here in your home town!

For more info contact: SFC Johnny Oliveira Call or Text 775-560-0672

GREENSPACE In the clear Despite an abundance of invasive fish threatening to cloud Lake Tahoe’s waters (“Full of carp,” Feb. 28), the lake’s water clarity improved for the second year in a row. Last year, the clarity reading for the lake was 75.3 feet; in 2011, clarity was at 68.9 feet. Before that, clarity had been declining from 2008, reaching a low point of 64.4 feet in 2010. The highest clarity level in the past 12 years was in 2002, which had a clarity reading of 78 feet. While 2012’s numbers improved, researchers at the University of California, Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center say that the trends still indicate a decline in clarity during the summer months. But the researchers say that the overall improvement is encouraging. Several factors impact lake clarity, including runoff of urban stormwater. Heavy runoff from snowmelt during the winter and spring seasons carries “small, inorganic particles from the land, roads and other developed areas into the lake,” according to a statement from University of California, Davis. A Secchi disk, a 10-inch white disk, is used to measure clarity when it is lowered into the water. This method has been used since the late 1960s, when the average clarity depth was 102.4 feet. For an archive of Secchi data from 1968, visit http://terc.ucdavis.edu/research/SecchiData.pdf.

Burn notice As of Feb. 28, the burning color code season was over. The Washoe County Health District Air Quality Management Division’s Know the Code program, which advises on air quality for wood burning based on a system of colors, lasts from mid-fall to late winter. Green means that residents can light stoves, fireplaces and other wood burning activities; yellow is a “voluntary no burn” and red is a “mandatory no burn” code. This January had the highest amount of yellow code days, with December 2011 close behind. “In particular, January’s stagnant weather conditions contributed to cold temperatures, calm winds and elevated find particulate matter concentrations,” according to a statement from the Washoe County Health District. While the color code program is over for the time being, residents can still find out about the region’s air quality at www.ourcleanair.com. The program will start again in November.

—Sage Leehey

N E W

E X H I B I T

ECO-EVENT The 2013 Golden Pinecone awards, which honors local environmental leaders, will be held on March 28. This year’s ceremony will take place at the Peppermill Resort Casino. Tickets are $40 for the first 100 registrants; after that, tickets are $50. To register, visit http://greenupnow.biz/golden-pinecone.

Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.

10

|

RN&R

|

MARCH 7, 2013


GREEN

The BLM disputes claims that wild horses are traumatized during the gather process.

JOSE FELICIANO

SATURDAY, MARCH 9

Born to be wild Tensions over wild horse roundups continues

ABBACADABRA – THE ULTIMATE ABBA TRIBUTE SATURDAY, MARCH 23

“The horses were about a quarter mile away from where the trap site was,” said Annie Jantzen, photographer and coordinator of the Deer Run Wild Horse Protection Group. “A BLM [Bureau of Land Management] worker brought by Sage Leehey a bucket of grain and lured them to the trap. They just followed them. It wasn’t even hard to catch them. These are the horses that the BLM say are a safety risk.” Although wild horse advocates call it a trap, BLM calls this process a “gather” and follows standardized methods, according to a gather process document on the BLM website. “Section 9 of the of the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act requires that a public hearing be held prior to the use of helicopters and motorized vehicles,” reads the document. “Hearings are held annually.” This gather or trap occurred about three weeks ago in Carson City. This herd, including three pregnant mares close to delivery, has resided in the area for more than 40 years, according to Jantzen. Jantzen, along with the Deer Run Wild Horse Protection Group, has been working around the clock and with nationally recognized organizations to try to get these wild horses back on the range. The BLM told the group they had two weeks to come up with a proposal that responded to the complaints. “It was just lip service,” Jantzen said. “We offered to do fences. We offered to do birth control. A citizen coalition to monitor the herd and investigate complaints was also part of the proposal. They rejected it cold.” According to Jantzen, these wild horses are loved by the community, and To see the full BLM gather process docu- the BLM gave no warning. Residents were outraged when they woke to find ment, visit that half of the herd was gone. http://on.doi.gov/Z7g Jantzen has been working on a photography book of wild horses with Uum. this particular herd for about a year and says they are “extremely gentle and practically tame.” She said that when you bring your children to them, the horses show you their own. The documentation of complaints against the herd that BLM gave to the protection group included car strikes—car and horse collisions—that happened in other locations in Northern Nevada, and all of the complaints were about a stallion that was removed from the area about a year ago, according to Jantzen. One concern some have about gathers or traps is that the horses may be traumatized by the process or by the act of splitting up a herd or family. According to a gather process document on the BLM website, the wild horses are scared during the gather activities, but they do adjust and adapt to their new environment and to human presence. It also states that “most, if not all, impacts disappear within hours to several days of release.” Jantzen said one of the largest issues in this situation is that the BLM will not work with the community. She also claims that the BLM currently has no one to investigate the validity of the complaints made against the wild horses. Spokespeople for the BLM did not return calls for comment. “Every citizen should be scared to death that an agency, like the BLM, can come in and do whatever they want to do no matter how it affects this community,” Jantzen said. “These horses were a part of this community.” Ω

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

MOONWALKER - THE REFLECTION OF MICHAEL SATURDAY, MARCH 30

ELVIN BISHOP

SATURDAY, APRIL 6

LOCAL NATIVES

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

Tickets available at Ticketmaster.com or SouthShoreRoom.com

See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

11


WFC

MMA

AT THE

LAKE

STARTING AT

TICKETS

FRIDAY MARCH 15 » 9PM

25 50 $

$

(plus taxes/fees)

FEATURED FIGHTERS: » Ryan McCarthy » Corey

» Leo Rodelo » Miguel Jimenez “The White Mamba” » Josh Teter Carlson » Shane Miller

» Cris Montenegro

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT

MONTBLEURESORT.COM, BY CALLING 888.829.7630 OR THROUGH TICKETMASTER OUTLETS FOLLOW US A T R O P I C A N A E N T E RTA I N M E N T C A S I N O MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS.

12 

| 

RN&R   | 

march 7, 2013

|

TROPICANACASINOS.COM

» Mat Medor » Samuel Nolasco » Ryan Coulson » Aspen Ladd


The staffs of Sticker Guy and Pressworks: Ryan Porter, Mitchell Jones, Jay Jones, Pete Menchetti, Eric Foreman, Sophia Shortz, Jenn Archer, David Bruce. Sticker Guy employee Tress Smith works remotely.

BY BRAD BYNUM

WHEN TRAVELING,

PHOTOS BY

b r a d b @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

there are certain questions that are often heard whenever one mentions that one is from Reno: “That’s near Las Vegas, right?” and “What do people from Reno think of that show Reno 911?” are a couple of the most common, and most irritating, offenders. In certain circles, whenever visiting underground rock ’n’ roll clubs, for example, one is just as likely to encounter this question: “Do you know Sticker Guy?” If you’ve ever been asked this question and had to respond to the negative, here are the basics: Sticker Guy is a business that creates stickers—adhesive-backed vinyl shapes that one might attach to the bumper of a car, the bottom of skateboard deck, or the outside of a guitar case. These stickers might promote a business, a joke, a political cause, or a musical group. Sticker Guy has been in the business of making stickers for 20 years—since March 1993. To celebrate its anniversary, Sticker Guy is throwing a giant party. More than 20 bands—including a few legendary groups that many locals probably never thought they’d get a chance to see at all, let alone here in the Truckee Meadows—from half a dozen countries will rock stages at four different venues in the valley over the course of three days. There will also be DJs, international party animals, strange reunions, new encounters, and, it seems safe to predict, plenty of drinking, dancing, hooting and hollering. The party is billed as Debauch-a-Reno 2, and it’s actually a sequel to two separate events from five years ago: Sticker Guy’s 15-year anniversary party and the first Debauch-a-Reno, a showcase of bands on Slovenly Recordings, Sticker Guy’s sister business.

ALLISON YOUNG

Sticker Guy is also a guy. And that guy’s name is Pete Menchetti. If you’ve lived in Reno long, you might have met him. He’s the guy who owns the bright red, seven-person bike that sometimes rolls the streets of Reno, especially at night when the weather’s warm. He picks up friends and strangers alike on the bike and sometimes has rock bands play on it with miniature amps—he calls it the Rocktocycle. He’s got an easygoing charm, and usually has the bemused, observational air of a guy who’s always taking in the scene—and likes what he sees. He knows a lot about obscure, underground rock ’n’ roll—he owns a record label, the aforementioned Slovenly—and often DJs parties and events, playing upbeat, international rock of the type that has a good beat and can easily be danced to. He dresses like a rocker—usually sporting a leather jacket—but isn’t stupid about it. He plays the drums. He’s closing in on 40 but looks half that. He’s of Italian descent and looks it. He speaks a bunch of different languages and spends part of the year living in Amsterdam and a big chunk of the rest of it traveling around the world, tour managing bands, meeting with record distributors, and DJ-ing festivals. But back in 1993, he was a teenager who worked at a car wash. “I was already hanging out, thanks to a fake ID, and seeing bands, ’cause that’s what I was into even then,” says Menchetti. He was making fliers and helping his friends’ bands book shows. At one show, he saw a band called Willard, and they had stickers. “I didn’t much like the band, but the stickers were awesome.”

“STICK IT TO ME” continued on page 14

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

13


Here’s a quick guide to some of the bands playing Debauch-A-Reno 2. Many of the groups can be heard on a free sampler album that can be downloaded at www.slovenly.com. THE SONICS

THE GORIES “One of the most legendary bands in all of the garage rock/rock world,” says Joe Almeida, label manager for Slovenly Recordings.

DEMON’S CLAWS “Modern Canadian legends playing surly, blown-out acid-punk with a country-folk twist,” says Almeida. “Explosive and deep.”

THE SLOTHS “Never in my wildest dreams did I think we’d be on a gig with one of the bands from Back from the Grave [compilation] whose song we covered,” says Gories guitarist Danny Kroha.

SHANNON & THE CLAMS “Ultra-catchy and cuter than any bunny,” says Almeida. “Party time ’60s girl group doo-wop jungle rhythms.”

HELLSHOVEL A Canadian band that Almeida describes as “Johnny Cash drowning in a pool of cough syrup— it’s like a really trippy country stroll. They don’t sound like anybody I’ve ever heard before.”

LOS VIGILANTES A Puerto Rican band that Almeida calls “’60s garage with a really filthy and dumbed-down ’50s doo wop background thing. … They’re just nonstop hits.”

“Possibly the craziest live rock ’n’ roll band on the face of the Earth,” says Almeida. “They climb speaker towers. They roll around on the floor. They bring their instruments into large crowds and they run around playing them without missing a note. They’re absolute maniacs.”

KING AUTOMATIC “I’ve been wanting to see this guy for years,” says Bruce. “This Frenchman took the one-man-band idea to another level by incorporating a keyboard sampler.”

TROUBLEMAKERS “Totally maniacal 60s style garage punk from Sacramento,” says Almeida. “They break stuff.”

THE PSYCHED Almeida describes them as “a massive and pure rock ’n’ roll crack to the skull.”

SCURVY BASTARDS Every wonder why Reno has a seemingly disproportionate number of pirate-themed bands? Scurvy Bastards is the reason.

CAT JELLY One of Reno’s new generation of bands— teenage mutants, but with great taste.

SPITTING IMAGE One of Reno’s best bands. It’s like riding through the desert on a bike with no name. On mescaline. This is only about half the bands on the bill. And there’s a high likelihood of more surprise bands and DJs.

BY BRAD BYNUM

b r a d b @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

|

RN&R

Paint and chemicals gathered from screen-cleaning.

THE ANOMALYS

“I shat my pants when I found out The Sonics where going to play,” says Sticker Guy’s David Bruce. “They’re a hard band not to want to jump up and down to.”

14

Pressworks father-and-son printing duo Mitchell and Jay Jones.

|

MARCH 7, 2013

Screens ready to print.

“STICK IT TO ME” continued from page 13

Sticky situation

Menchetti was inspired. He wanted to add making stickers alongside booking shows and making fliers to the list of things he did to help promote his friends’ bands. And he wanted to make high-quality, weatherproof, vinyl stickers, not the lousy paper ones that dissolve in the rain. He tried making them himself in his bathtub, but wasn’t happy with the results. He tried a few different local print shops, but again wasn’t happy with the results. Finally, he called Nevada Loose Leaf, a company that made three-ring binders. “I got a call one day from Pete,” says Jay Jones, who was then a coowner of Nevada Loose Leaf. “I didn’t know him. He just called up and asked if I could print on vinyl. Three-ring binders are made from vinyl, so I said, yeah, sure. Two days later, he came in. … He was 19. He had dreadlocks down below his shoulders, black hornrimmed glasses, and he was wearing a brown trench coat. I thought someone had sent a hitman to kill me.” But it was actually a beginning-ofa-beautiful-friendship-type moment, a perfect business connection. Jones had the technical know-how that Menchetti was looking for, and Menchetti had the vision: Independent rock bands would buy stickers, especially if they were high-quality stickers that were also really inexpensive. And he knew the scene, and had the enthusiasm to drum up support. A few years later, in ’97, Nevada Loose Leaf closed up shop, and Jones

started Pressworks, a printing company that works almost exclusively with Sticker Guy. The two businesses are now next door to each other in industrial Sparks. “My agreement with Pete from the beginning was, I don’t sell stickers, and he doesn’t find someone else to do his printing,” says Jones. “Primarily, I’m a contract printer for Sticker Guy.” “Without him, Sticker Guy would still be in the bathtub,” says Menchetti about Jones. At first, when Menchetti began advertising for the company, it didn’t attract much business. For the first five or six months, Menchetti wasn’t sure if the business would make it. But then the orders started rolling in. This was back in the pre-internet days when life moved at the pace of snail mail, so in hindsight it’s probably not that much of a surprise that it took a few months to catch on. Nowadays, of course, the vast majority of Sticker Guy’s business is done online. By ’94, Menchetti had quit his job at the car wash, moved out of his parents’ house and, with a few friends, into a house on Ryland Street. That house had a basement, and they started hosting underground rock shows there. And for a few years in the mid-to-late ’90s, the Ryland House, as it was known, was a central hub of punk rock in Reno. Over the years, the business has grown steadily. Sticker Guy currently has six employees. Pressworks has two—Jones’ son and daughter work alongside him. “It’s become a very reliable source of income,” says Menchetti. Jones describes Menchetti as “a world traveler.” On one of his recent world sojourns, tour managing and DJ-ing, Menchetti went from

Pete Menchetti, the Sticker Guy.

Amsterdam to Russia, China, Korea, Japan, Malaysia and Ethiopia. “And everywhere I went, every country, I met someone who knew about Sticker Guy,” he says. “The one that really blew me away was Ethiopia.” In Ethiopia, it was a Norwegian guy who worked for a European record label that was going to reissue some old Ethiopian records. Because of his globetrotting schedule, Menchetti isn’t always at the office. So, much of the day-to-day operations of Sticker Guy are handled by Menchetti’s staff, many of whom have been with the company for years, including longtime manager David Bruce, who has worked there for 10 years. Bruce describes the staff as all heavily involved in music. He’s a DJ himself, primarily spinning old rock ’n’ roll, soul and R&B, and is also known for the propaganda-like stickers adorned with his face that seem to show up in the least likely places around town, especially in the bathrooms of every bar in town. It’s a high contrast image of an expressionless guy with glasses and a beard, usually over a red background, looking a little like a nerdy, Latino Chairman Mao. Bruce makes his personal stickers using whatever extra space is left over on a sheet of vinyl after laying out a sticker design. “Instead of throwing the waste away, I thought, what would be the stupidest sticker on the planet?” he says. “And I like very old-school propaganda imagery, so I made a design of my face, and now it’s all over the place. A couple of years ago somebody sent me a picture. They were on tour in Rome, and right after they got off the plane, they were all jet-lagged, and they went to a record store … and


right on the front door is my fucking stupid face.” Because of the stickers with his face, many people think that Bruce is the Sticker Guy. “Sometimes people confuse me for Sticker Guy,” he says. “That’s not fair because I’m not the fucking Sticker Guy. But because I have a sticker that’s a guy’s face, and I work with Sticker Guy, I can see how people make that connection.” Bruce says most of their customers have very specific ideas about what they want. “But sometimes people want their hand held, and they want to be told, ‘Hey this looks good’ and ‘This looks bad,’” he says. “Sometimes we get asked too subjective of a question, like, ‘What makes a good sticker?’ I don’t know. What makes a good pizza? Everyone has their own taste. … The big two things that we just immediately refund money and tell them no, take your business elsewhere, is racist and homophobic stuff. Sometimes these fucking people— racists, that is—they call back, and they’re like, ‘Fucking faggot! Why are you canceling my order?’ And I try to tell them, ‘Dude, why don’t you start your own racist sticker company? Corner the market!’” Sticker Guy does primarily smaller runs of stickers—unlike other companies, they have no minimum quantity order. That, along with the high-qual-

ity and inexpensive rates, and the fact that everyone on staff is involved in music and known around the local scene, is why, locally at least, stickers are almost always the first pieces of merchandise every new band gets.

OPINION

|

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

Slovenly creatures

S

lovenly creature

S

A year after launching Sticker Guy, with some of that company’s first profits, Menchetti decided to start a record label, 702 Records. (This was back in the days when there was one area code for the whole state.) The label mostly put out records by the top local bands of the day—like Fall Silent, Crushstory and the Atomiks— as well as records by regional acts that used to play Reno regularly, like the great New Mexico garage pop band Scared of Chaka (members of which went on to play with the Shins). In 2002, Menchetti relaunched the label as Slovenly Recordings. Whereas 702 was a label primarily defined by geography—many of the bands didn’t have much in common musically, they were all just either from here or visited often enough to have impact on the local scene—Slovenly is a label with a more particular aesthetic. “It’s loud, distorted rock ’n’ roll— some people call it garage rock,” says Bazooka Joe Almeida, who’s now the

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

Slovenly label manager. “Rock ’n’ roll really encompasses so much for us. It can include surf, go-go, soul, rhythm & blues, noise, punk, garage—all kinds of things.” The label is also distinctly international—with bands hailing from Canada, Puerto Rico, Greece, the Netherlands, France, Colombia, as well as all over the U.S., and many of these bands will be coming to town for

the late ’80s and early ’90s that played bluesy garage rock, primal and dirty, and drawn almost in a straight line from the originator, Bo Diddley, with just a bit more Cramps-style psycho raunch in the mix. The group was hugely influential on the Detroit rock scene that spawned the White Stripes a decade later, as well as influencing legions among the newer garage revivalists like the Black Lips.

unbelievable for Reno. How unbelievable? When Jello Biafra, the former lead singer of the Dead Kennedys, and an underground music legend in his own right, heard that the Sonics were playing, he contacted Menchetti if he could come up from the Bay Area and play a DJ set. Menchetti agreed, of course. (See Musicbeat, page 25.) “In an alternate universe of rock ’n’ roll, this is an event of seismic, earth-shattering proportions,” says Danny Kroha of the Gories. “In an alternate rock ’n’ roll universe, because there is a total alternate rock ’n’ roll universe, where bands like The Sonics and the Stooges and the New York Dolls, Them, and Shadows of the Knight are heroes the world over to a certain segment of the population that’s in this underground. And amongst this underground group of people all over the world—we’re talking Japan, South America, all over Europe, Australia—bands like these, like the Sonics, are revered just like people in the mainstream revere the Rolling Stones or the Beatles.” Also, it’s important to note, that, at Debauch-A-Reno 2, all the bands will have plenty of stickers. Ω

STICKERS ARE ALMOST ALWAYS THE FIRST PIECES OF MERCHANDISE A NEW BAND GETS. the sprawling music fest celebrating Sticker Guy’s anniversary, DebauchA-Reno 2. The event runs March 22-24, at multiple venues throughout the valley including The Alley, Holland Project and 40 Mile Saloon. There will be over 25 bands, as well as more than half a dozen DJs. The bands will include a big chunk of the Slovenly roster, a slate of some of the best local acts, and a couple of headliners sure to make underground rock ’n’ roll aficionados drop their jaws: the Gories and the Sonics. The Gories was a Detroit band in

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

The Sonics is a legendary group, sort of proto-proto-punks. Starting in the early ’60s, the group played faster, louder and more intensely than anyone had before and few have since. Their sound was derived from Little Richard, but dirtier, harder hitting, and more distorted. The group was at least 15 years ahead of its time and over before the end of the ’60s, but not before providing the blueprints for decades of rock ’n’ roll. Reunion shows by both groups are rare occasions to be celebrated, and extra rare on the west coast, and

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

Tickets for Debauch-A-Reno 2 are available from Recycled Records, 822 S. Virginia St. For more information, visit www.stickerguy.com and www.slovenly.com.

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

15


Photo/Allison Young

“We’re going for overall quality,” says  candy man Joe Dutra, pictured here with  his son, John. 

to schedule a tour of the Kimme Candy factory, 525 Reactor Way, call 284-9200 or visit www.kimmiecandy.com.

16   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 7, 2013

On a leisurely drive through the doldrums of Reno’s industrial district, tucked away behind the airport, the sights are lackluster at best. With bleak business buildings lining the streets—a random turn onto Reactor Way sprouts a surprising oasis. Or maybe it’s just a trick of the eye. After all, you’re driving through high desert and may not have chugged enough water. But no, that’s not your imagination deceiving you, like a lone flower—more precisely, a sunflower—standing triumphant among its barren desert landscape, springs the bright and colorful building known as Kimmie Candy Company. As its sunglass sporting, smile flashing mascot, Kacee the sunflower, ensures, Kimmie Candy Co., a local, family-owned manufacturer planted in Reno since 2008, brings some lighthearted fun. As founder Joe Dutra would say, “Everyone loves candy!” While the name may not ring a bell, the candy itself might. Those cutely packaged

ChocoRocks-multi-colored chunks of milk chocolate shaped like, well, rocks—that can be found filling both national and international store shelves, stem from right here in Reno. The ChocoRocks may be the most widely recognized, but it’s the company’s chocolatecoated sunflower seeds, the favorite of Dutra himself, that started it all. Originally in the agriculture business, Dutra worked on a farm, growing and selling hybrid vegetables—which he then named after members of his family and friends. The idea to switch from greens to cocoa transpired, Dutra says, by accident. “My friend brought in a sack of chocolate-coated sunflower kernels he was trying to sell to me, and I thought, ‘This is healthy, recession proof, and a business that just keeps growing … I think I’ll start a candy company.’” And so he did. The Kimmie Candy brand came to Dutra over a martini brainstorm.


Being able to provide local jobs in a bad economy was also important to Dutra, and ultimately impacted his decision to move his business to U.S. soil. The company’s modest beginnings included a staff of seven. And now boasts 29 employees, a number that’s continually growing, along with the company itself. Gov. Brian Sandoval is a fan. With Kimmie Candy donating 3,000 bags of candy to the Governor’s Mansion for Halloween trick-ortreaters, they’ve also earned the title, “Official Candy of the Governor.” “He has our silver ChocoBars on his desk,” says Dutra. “And we presented him with a Nevada container filled with our chocolate.” Sandoval recently took Dutra, along with other leaders in Nevada’s business community, on the governor’s trade mission to China. The opportunity was led by the governor to encourage Nevada companies to export their products to China. “In December, we sold our first candy into Hong Kong, from Reno,” Dutra says proudly, of the distribution destination being added to a list that already includes Canada, Mexico, the Philippines and the Middle East. Looks like that slogan, “The Biggest Little Candy Company in the Biggest Little City,” is earning its chocolate coins.

So how do you sample some of this world traveled chocolate right here in Reno? Other than its major distributors—which include Winco, Cost Plus, Raley’s and Sweet Factory—the best place to taste it is at the source. The factory, at 525 Reactor Way, may not feature a velvet-clad man in a top hat and an entourage of OompaLoompas, but it does have a vibrant atmosphere of candy-covered walls in the gift shop, as well as the option of an approximately 20-minute tour. The tour, open to both the public and private groups on a call-ahead basis, can be done five days a week. Opening with product samples, the guide then takes viewers on a trip through the land of Kimmie Candy past—featuring the original packaging of the very first product—then through the doors of the actual factory, where the magic of chocolate—from the arrival process, to the chocolate belt, to the spray paint coating of the chocolate shell, can be witnessed. Viewers can experience the company’s specialty chocolate, named Reactor after the street on which the factory is located, get melted down. A hybrid in itself, Reactor was created through many taste tests (and probably a few stomach aches). “We spent years developing a custom chocolate,” John Dutra explains. “It’s not too sweet, the emphasis is on the cocoa. So the sugar shell complements it really well.” The swirling vats of multicolored chocolate are the most mesmerizing to watch, a collection which includes 20 different shades—contributing to the coats of products such as Sunbursts (their staple chocolate coated sunflower seeds), ChocoRocks (their best-seller), Kettle Corn Nuggets (chocolate toasted corn nuts) and ChocoAlmonds—as well as a variety of holiday mixes. The final product is as appealing visually as it is on the taste buds. “We’re going for overall quality,” says John Dutra, of the aesthetic of the candy shell, to the nut or chocolate inside. “It’s much more fun—look at it next to a bag of M&M’s.” And the tour’s aroma of toasted almonds and melted cocoa is just an added perk. While Kimmie does approximately 15 tours a month, like the business itself, they’d like to see that number grow. “Reno will be seeing much more of us,” John Dutra says. “We want people to know that there is a candy manufacturer here, and that they can come visit us.” Ω

OPINION

|

Candy land

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

“I said I was going to call it Gimmie Candy,” Dutra reminisces, ‘And my wife’s girlfriend said, ‘You name everything else after your friends and family—why not the company?’ And her name was Kim. So I said, ‘All right. Kimmie Candy!’” Kimmie Candy has its original roots in Sacramento Valley, where the Dutras were farmers, and the landscape was appropriate for growing produce. Chocolate, however, not so much. First trying their hands as oversea manufacturers in Korea, after 9/11, Dutra made the decision to move his company to the U.S. And after some deliberation, Reno won out. “We needed a dry climate for our product because we have to control the humidity and temperature very closely,” says John Dutra, the company’s general manager and Joe Dutra’s son. “With Reno being so dry, it’s much easier to remove the moisture out of the air than somewhere in Sacramento.” Reno also has the benefit of being within a day’s transportation of Kimmie’s main chocolate supplier, Blommer Chocolate, located in the Bay Area.

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

17


IN ROTATION: GADGET

Tea party Death Star Tea Infuser

Hot tea offers a wide range of flavors, customs and, of course, gadgets. The IngenuiTEA provides a wonderful way of steeping and straining loose leaf tea. This teapot from Adagio Teas allows the tea to float freely throughout the chamber, allowing a smaller amount of tea to produce a richer result. The 16-ounce, clear plastic teapot eliminates the guessing game over the perfect amount of time to steep the tea and when it’s just right, you place the teapot over a mug or glass. The mug’s presence activates a valve and the gravity pulls the tea through a fine strainer into the mug. It’s easy to use and incredibly effective—in our tests, the mug rarely contained any trace of tea leaves. $20.

This fully armed and operational tea infuser takes the classic silver ball tea infuser your grandparents have and gives it a Star Wars twist. The stainless steel, dishwasher-safe ball features a spherical indent capable of destroying Alderaan and a chain topped off with an Imperial TIE Fighter. Small enough to be portable, the infuser still holds enough loose leaf tea for a generous single serving, even if you like your tea on the dark side. Unfortunately, because it is an “officially licensed” product, expect to pay significantly more for the subtle changes. Though your bank account may cringe at the investment, you can rest assured this tea infuser is free of thermal exhaust ports. $20.

www.thinkgeek.com

www.adagio.com

In this edition of our monthly Gadget column, we examine tea.

Russell Hobbs’ Electric Kettle with Warm Tray

IngenuiTEA

www.russellhobbs.com

When you need to serve tea to guests, you need something with volume. This electric kettle and teapot combo excels in functionality and versatility. The 1.76-liter electric kettle quickly heats enough water for 10 six-ounce servings. Heat the water and steep the tea in the teapot much longer than you normally would. While you’re doing that, refill and reheat the electric kettle. You can now dilute the exceptionally strong tea with water or allow guests to customize the strength of their tea. It’s a much more industrial approach to tea, but sometimes you have to bring in the big gadgets for the big jobs. Retails for $50, regularly on sale for $25.

—Matthew Craggs

WIN TICKETS FOR 4 & A RESERVED BOOTH TO SEE

DOANNKEANRVEIOTENR

FR

ON MARCH 31ST AT THE CRYSTAL BAY CLUB CASINO!

presents

italian americans

Italian Americans have become some of the most celebrated players in baseball — DiMaggio, Berra, Rizzuto, Lasorda, LaRussa, Zito. ’s documentary exhibition honors their contributions and those of 450 others who have left a lasting imprint on the game.

From Sand Lots to the Major Leagues

12 to 5 PM Thursday through Sunday FREE ADMISSION

January 17 – May 19, 2013

442 Flint Street, Reno arteitaliausa.com

18

|

R N&R

|

MARCH 7, 2013

TO ENTER:

WIN TICKE T S

• Send an e-mail to contest@newsreview.com and put “DONAVON” in the subject line • Include your full name, birth date (YOU MUST BE 21 OR OLDER) and day phone • DEADLINE to enter is Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • Winners will be notified by March 22 by phone and e-mail


Photo/Allison Young

Pet projects

Two sculptures by Bryan Christiansen that are part of the current exhibition at Stremmel Gallery.

The Animal in Contemporary Art II The complexity of our relationship to animals has been explored in art for centuries. Animals by may symbolize peace, freedom, evil, death Jessica Santina or even the human condition. They are the ultimate expression of harmony and perfection in nature, and the antithesis of progress. They are our muses, our doppelgangers, our enemies and our friends. Contemporary artists from around our region are showcasing their animal impressions in the Stremmel Gallery’s latest exhibition, The Animal in Contemporary the Animal in Art II. Contemporary Art If Emily Dickinson was right that ii runs now through “hope is the thing with feathers,” Catherine March 23 at stremmel Courtenaye’s work resounds with hope. gallery, 1400 s. Based on her early experiences with Virginia st. For more information, visit penmanship, Courtenaye, a Montana artist, www.stremmel merges raw, rough swoops of color with gallery.com. bird imagery created by fine lines reminiscent of calligraphy. The combination is a feminine, beautiful meditation that emphasizes the contrast between representational and abstract art. Fine lines are a hallmark of painter Leonard Koscianski, a master of light whose

entries in this show include oil on canvas and egg tempera, a precise, complicated method that captures intricacies like a lion’s whiskers or a macaw’s feathers in his small pieces. Meanwhile, Tom Uttech’s largescale, representative landscape paintings in hand-painted and hand-carved frames depict wildlife in untamed settings. In stark contrast are Gaylen Hansen’s primitive oil-on-canvas depictions of such western images as ravens, coyotes, horses and cowboys. The painter, now in his ’90s, is one of the most well-known and significant painters working in the Pacific Northwest. His representations of Washington’s Palouse landscape highlight a comical, fable-like, Native American narrative style. Though University of Nevada, Reno alumnus Bill Braun’s playful work appears primitive at first glance, a closer look reveals that it’s masterful in its complexity. His trompe l‘oeil (“trick the eye”) acrylic paintings appear, immediately, to have been produced by kindergartners; the three-dimensional collages seem to feature

4

Spring

cut-out blocks of construction paper, sheet music or magazine photos, along with thumbtacks, staples and even old Dymo embossed labels. Even close examination of the pieces—which feature primary colors and woodland-type scenes that include birds, deer and insects—will reveal shadowing and folding effects so real you almost need to touch it to believe it was painted. Tom Judd’s collages feature oil paintings of animals, such as elephants or horses, on unusual “canvasses” comprised of maps, dress patterns, handwritten recipes, even book bindings; the juxtaposition points out a contrast between the free-flowing elegance of animals against the manmade, precise elegance of charts and grids. Brian Christiansen’s sculptural collages are deceptively simple in appearance. In fact, the work is remarkably complex. The

UNR graduate repurposes discarded furniture— couches, box springs, mattresses—in order to construct sculptures of animals, primarily deer. By skinning the furniture and displaying it as “hides” in a sort of hunting trophy style, he commemorates his own untraditional “hunt” for cast-offs. Other sculptors in the exhibit are Adelaide Paul, whose leather-encased sculptures depict abstract, often unsettling images of animals encased in “clothing”; Ken Little, whose trophy heads are made of clothing and accessories (shoes, belts, pants); and Brad Rude, who’s considered one of the top patina masters in the country. Rude, the foundry artist who created the 2002 Artown bighorn sheep, brings several small sculptures to this exhibit, all showcasing his unique “balancing act” style—a horse doing a handstand on an archway, a mountain lion perched on a stick and a wheel while holding a ball on its back. “There’s huge diversity in the artists and the work,” says gallery director Turkey Stremmel, “but they’re all really strong Ω works.”

Get the Mt. Rose Unlimited Pass.

Passes

And all the Season Pass Perks, too!

Adult (23-64) Sr., U-22, College Child

s n r u T e r o M k! c u B r u o Y For

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

$329 $199

Valid March 1 through the end of NEXT Season!

Beginner Passes

Ski the rest of 2013 plus the ENTIRE 2013-14 Season! OPINION

$399

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

Just $149 Learn to Ski This Season!

Buy online at skirose.com |

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

19


Celebrate

Ryan’s Saloon & Broiler

ST. PATRICK’S WEEKEND!

St. Patrick’s Day Party!

A St. Paddy’s Tradition – Stop By!

b Abby’s Hwy 40!

Saturday, March 17th 2-6pm

Corn Beef & Cabbage Irish Shots & Beer

Irish Trivia • Irish Music • Irish Beer Irish Boiling Bacon & Colcannon Served with homemade Soda or Brown Bread A Variety of Irish Beers Candy Food Apparel

Home of the Giant Sandwiches & Irish Coffee.

SAT 3/16

Drinking With Clowns

Think Free

SAT 3/17

Jewelry Books CDs

809 south center st, reno

St Patrick’s Day Celebration Festivities start at 10am

Green Beer

Jass Syndicate

Car Bombs Guiness & Jameson shot specials

1718 Holcomb Ave Reno, NV 89502

622 -3208

775-322-9422

924 S. WELLS AVE, RENO 323-4142

JOIN US for our

424 E. 4TH ST • RENO

www.theislesonline.com

2x3 (1/10 H)

A St. Patrick’s Day Tradition

:: Live Music 4pm :: :: Irish Stew :: :: Corn Beef & Cabbage :: :: Reubens ::

Happy St. Patrick’sDay

I-80

from the

1555 S. Wells Avenue, Reno www.Rapscallion.com 775-323-1211 :: 1-877-932-3700

MIX

MB/SW

ISSUE DATE

3.12.09

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

BLS

REV. DATE

03.6.08

USP (BOLD SELECTION) PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE

PLEASE NOTE ANY CORRECTIONS FOR Truckee River YOUR AD, SIGN AND FAX BACK TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW BY ________ TODAY, OTHERWISE THE AD WILL RUN AS SHOWN.

5

4th St.

I-395

4

APPROVED “AS-IS”, NO CORRECTIONS

SIGNATURE

APPROVED WITH CORRECTIONS AS NOTED

SIGNATURE

1. Abby’s Highway 40

424 E. 4th St., Reno

2. Ceol Irish Pub

538 S. Virginia St., Reno

3. Filthy McNasty’s

1718 Holcomb Ave., Reno

4. Ryan’s Saloon

924 S. Wells Ave., Reno

5. The Isles

809 S. Center St., Reno

RTC 4th St Station

3

PLEASE SIGN & FAX NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY N E W S & R E V IDESIGNER EW B U S I N E TO: S SISSUE U S EDATE O N L Y ACCT. EXEC. BY __________ TODAY DESIGNER ISSUE DATE ACCT. EXEC. SS 03.07.13 JDM 775.324.4572 AL/MB 03.06.08 BLS

Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. FILE NAME

REV. DATE

FILE NAME REV. DATE THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING TOUROPUBSMAP030713R1 RAPSCALLION_BARS031209R2 03.06.08 THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW!

East 4th & Lake St

Please don’t drink & drive! Use the FREE RIDE from RTC on St. Patricks Day!

nue Ave

FILE NAME RYANSSALOON031209R2

ACCT. EXEC.

ton

N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY

2

ing

THESE DON’T

Arl

St. 2nd t. 1st S

Center St.

2x3 (1/10 H)

DESIGNER

t Stree inia Virg

t. 4th S

Wells A ve.

1

03.15.12

USP (BOLD SELECTION) PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE

Free St. Patrick’s Day Safe RIDE Program is fully sponsored by...

On March 17th, RIDE free after 4 pm and enjoy a safe celebration. PLEASE NOTE ANY CORRECTIONS FOR PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR YOUR AD, SIGN AND FAX BACK TO AND THEVERIFY THE FOLLOWING: ADVERTISEMENT RENO NEWS & REVIEW BY TODAY, AD ________ SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) OTHERWISE THE AD WILLSPELLING RUN AS SHOWN.

Sunday schedules in effect for: - RTC RIDE, RTC RAPID and RTC CONNECT NUMBERS & DATES - RTC SIERRA SPIRIT will be extended until midnight 348-RIDE CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.) ❑

APPROVED “AS-IS”, NO CORRECTIONS AD APPEARS AS SIGNATURE REQUESTED

rtcwashoe.com

APPROVED BY:

20 

| 

RN&R   | 

march 7, 2013

APPROVED WITH CORRECTIONS AS NOTED

PLEASE SIGN & FAX

SIGNATURE

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   MARCH 7, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

21


Celebrate

Ryan’s Saloon & Broiler

ST. PATRICK’S WEEKEND!

St. Patrick’s Day Party!

A St. Paddy’s Tradition – Stop By!

b Abby’s Hwy 40!

Saturday, March 17th 2-6pm

Corn Beef & Cabbage Irish Shots & Beer

Irish Trivia • Irish Music • Irish Beer Irish Boiling Bacon & Colcannon Served with homemade Soda or Brown Bread A Variety of Irish Beers Candy Food Apparel

Home of the Giant Sandwiches & Irish Coffee.

SAT 3/16

Drinking With Clowns

Think Free

SAT 3/17

Jewelry Books CDs

809 south center st, reno

St Patrick’s Day Celebration Festivities start at 10am

Green Beer

Jass Syndicate

Car Bombs Guiness & Jameson shot specials

1718 Holcomb Ave Reno, NV 89502

622 -3208

775-322-9422

924 S. WELLS AVE, RENO 323-4142

JOIN US for our

424 E. 4TH ST • RENO

www.theislesonline.com

2x3 (1/10 H)

A St. Patrick’s Day Tradition

:: Live Music 4pm :: :: Irish Stew :: :: Corn Beef & Cabbage :: :: Reubens ::

Happy St. Patrick’sDay

I-80

from the

1555 S. Wells Avenue, Reno www.Rapscallion.com 775-323-1211 :: 1-877-932-3700

MIX

MB/SW

ISSUE DATE

3.12.09

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

BLS

REV. DATE

03.6.08

USP (BOLD SELECTION) PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE

PLEASE NOTE ANY CORRECTIONS FOR Truckee River YOUR AD, SIGN AND FAX BACK TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW BY ________ TODAY, OTHERWISE THE AD WILL RUN AS SHOWN.

5

4th St.

I-395

4

APPROVED “AS-IS”, NO CORRECTIONS

SIGNATURE

APPROVED WITH CORRECTIONS AS NOTED

SIGNATURE

1. Abby’s Highway 40

424 E. 4th St., Reno

2. Ceol Irish Pub

538 S. Virginia St., Reno

3. Filthy McNasty’s

1718 Holcomb Ave., Reno

4. Ryan’s Saloon

924 S. Wells Ave., Reno

5. The Isles

809 S. Center St., Reno

RTC 4th St Station

3

PLEASE SIGN & FAX NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY N E W S & R E V IDESIGNER EW B U S I N E TO: S SISSUE U S EDATE O N L Y ACCT. EXEC. BY __________ TODAY DESIGNER ISSUE DATE ACCT. EXEC. SS 03.07.13 JDM 775.324.4572 AL/MB 03.06.08 BLS

Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. FILE NAME

REV. DATE

FILE NAME REV. DATE THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING TOUROPUBSMAP030713R1 RAPSCALLION_BARS031209R2 03.06.08 THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW!

East 4th & Lake St

Please don’t drink & drive! Use the FREE RIDE from RTC on St. Patricks Day!

nue Ave

FILE NAME RYANSSALOON031209R2

ACCT. EXEC.

ton

N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY

2

ing

THESE DON’T

Arl

St. 2nd t. 1st S

Center St.

2x3 (1/10 H)

DESIGNER

t Stree inia Virg

t. 4th S

Wells A ve.

1

03.15.12

USP (BOLD SELECTION) PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE

Free St. Patrick’s Day Safe RIDE Program is fully sponsored by...

On March 17th, RIDE free after 4 pm and enjoy a safe celebration. PLEASE NOTE ANY CORRECTIONS FOR PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR YOUR AD, SIGN AND FAX BACK TO AND THEVERIFY THE FOLLOWING: ADVERTISEMENT RENO NEWS & REVIEW BY TODAY, AD ________ SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) OTHERWISE THE AD WILLSPELLING RUN AS SHOWN.

Sunday schedules in effect for: - RTC RIDE, RTC RAPID and RTC CONNECT NUMBERS & DATES - RTC SIERRA SPIRIT will be extended until midnight 348-RIDE CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.) ❑

APPROVED “AS-IS”, NO CORRECTIONS AD APPEARS AS SIGNATURE REQUESTED

rtcwashoe.com

APPROVED BY:

20 

| 

RN&R   | 

march 7, 2013

APPROVED WITH CORRECTIONS AS NOTED

PLEASE SIGN & FAX

SIGNATURE

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   MARCH 7, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

21


Get hooked El Pescador 499 E. Plumb Lane, 323-0500 The first time I saw someone standing outside of El Pescador dressed like a fisherman, yellow rain slicker and all, I by K.J. Sullivan clapped my hands like a seal and excitedly waved back. I just love people in costumes. This tradition would continue for many months before I finally decided to actually go into El Pescador, a restaurant that has been on Plumb Lane for as

Photo/ALLison Young

have no idea what that means, but apparently at El Pescador, “Uncle Benjamin style” means a huge serving of delicious ceviche packed with white fish, onions, tomatoes, cilantro and lime. The ceviche was so large that it could have carried us both over for a meal. We also ordered a pitcher of Margaritas on the rocks ($18) that took longer than I would have liked to get there, especially since we started experimenting with the different hot sauces, so our mouths were on fire by the time it arrived. Our glasses came with umbrellas in them, which is always fun, and the Margaritas worked to cool our tongues. For entrées, I ordered the diabla fish ($12.95), which our friendly waitress cautioned was “very spicy.” Very spicy is just the way I like it, so when two large fillets of basa arrived covered in a red spicy sauce, I was ecstatic. The dish came with tortillas, beans and rice, so I set to work making some spicy fish tacos and dumped lots of the extra sauce over the top. Brett went with the seafood fajitas ($16.95), which came out with a huge serving of sizzling seafood and a large side of guacamole, sour cream, tortillas, rice and beans. I liked the seafood mix they put in the fajitas, which included squid, white fish, shrimp and scallops. Everything was nicely cooked and had a bit of kick to it. Tim, our non-fish eater, had three enchiladas ($11.95), and went with shredded beef, chicken and cheese. Tim said the shredded beef was his favorite, as the meat impressed him. I had a bite of the chicken enchilada, and I thought it had a nice flavor with lots of melted cheese. Overall, I really enjoyed my meal at El Pescador. We had a great time, the food was good, and the service, if a bit slow, was really friendly. It might have been a guy in a fisherman’s outfit that reeled me in, but the food is definitely a catch. Ω

12TH ANNUAL TRUCKEE MEADOWS TOUR! TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 | 7–10 PM | JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

El Pescador’s friendly staff: Antonio Medrano, Juan Munguia, Rodolfo Martinez, Silvia Munguia and Robert Berry.

TICKETS: $20/ADVANCE | $25 AT THE DOOR | $53/VIP TICKETS AVAILABLE AT JANUGGET.COM OR CALL (775)851–5180 FOR INFO

MADE POSSIBLE LOCALLY BY: fOunDIng SPOnSOrS:

HOST SPOnSOr:

MEDIA SPOnSOrS

PATrOn SPOnSOrS AnD EXHIBITOrS

22 | RN&R |

MARCH 7, 2013

SuPPOrTIng SPOnSOr

El Pescador is open Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and saturday and sunday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

long as I can remember. My friends Brett and Tim joined me for a lunch, but Tim wasn’t quite sold on dining here since his motto is, “If it’s from the sea, it’s not for me.” After I promised to buy the Margaritas, he was game. While El Pescador mainly offers fish or seafood dishes, they do have some non-fish items for people who don’t enjoy things from the water. El Pescador has an old-school nautical theme, with yellow booths, carpet with blue anchors, and fishing nets with sea creatures hanging from the ceiling. It was bright and cheerful if a bit dated inside. The place was fairly crowded, and it can get pretty loud, so this is more the place for a fun meal out versus a quiet dinner. We were immediately given a basket of warm, fresh chips, a small dish of warm refried beans and two different salsas. The chips and the beans were amazing, and as if the two types of salsas weren’t enough, there were also six different types of hot sauce at the table. Brett and I decided to start with the ceviche ($13.95), which was served “Uncle Benjamin style.” I


2 for 1 Margaritas

Recycle this paper

On Mae anne ave

authentic & tasty

*one per person

Mon thru Fri, 4pm–6pm

Owner Thep with Best Pad Thai in town

1490 E 4th St, Reno | 25 Foothill Rd, South Reno www.LosCompadresReno.com

Any Dozen

buy any 2 entrees receive 1 free appetizer, salad or soup

(One coupon per customer, per day)

1550 Pyramid Way #100, Sparks 775-355-4848

priced at $395 / $495 / $595 *Regular Menu Only. Cash only. No lunch specials. Dine in or carry out. Expires 04/30/13.

465 S. Meadows Pkwy Reno • 853-4009 5am—8pm

6170 Mae anne ave #5 • reno • 775-747-9999 Mon – Sat • 11am – 9pm

BEER P ANCAKES THE ALL-AMERICAN BREAKFAST

2XU%HHU3DQFDNH0L[VHUYHVXSKHDUW\QXWW\IXOOÅ–DYRUHG SDQFDNHVH[SHUWO\FUDIWHGZLWK*UHDW%DVLQEHHU 3LFNXSDERWWOHIURPDQ\RIRXUORFDWLRQV

HANDCRAFTED ARTISAN BREWMASTER’S BREAD Delicious + Baked Daily

1RZDYDLODEOHE\WKHORDILQDQDVVRUWPHQWRIÅ–DYRUVIRUWDNHRXW

,&.<%HHU%UHDGĸ/RUHQ]R-DODSHQR&KHHVH%UHDG 'DPQ*RRG/RDI (Our Signature Seeded Bread)

Reno 5525 S. Virginia St. 775.284.7711

Taps &T & Tanks

Sparks

n e w s & r e v i e w b u s i n e s s u s e o n ly E. McCarran between Rock & Mira Loma 846 Victorian Ave. 775.856.1177 775.355.7711 designer pg issUe dATe 04.07.11 ACCT eXeC gdo FiLe nAMe donutBistro040711r2 reV dATe 06.17.11

greatbasinbrewingco.com please carefully review your advertisement and verify the following:

OPINION â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; NEWS â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; GREEN â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; FEATURE STORY â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; ARTS&CULTURE â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; IN ROTATION â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; ART OF THE STATE â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; FOODFINDS â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; FILMâ&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; MUSICBEAT â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; THIS WEEK â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; MISCELLANY â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; MARCH 7, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192;

Ad size (CoLUMn X inChes) speLLing nUMbers & dATes

RN&R â&#x20AC;&#x192;

|â&#x20AC;&#x192;

23


Beanstalk is cheap Jack the Giant Slayer After having its release postponed last year, Jack the Giant Slayer finally makes it to screens—with a reported budget somewhere in the neighborhood of $200 million. This thing will go down as one of the worst domestic flops in recent Hollywood history. Director Bryan Singer, who took a lot of flak for his underperforming Superman Returns—a by film I liked—has put together a visual mess Bob Grimm whose budget doesn’t show on the screen. The movie features live actors performing bgrimm@ newsreview.c om alongside CGI giants, and the live action doesn’t integrate with the effects at all. Sometimes, a director just doesn’t find that comfortable balance between live action and CGI, and you just sense the actors standing on a soundstage barking at something that will be added in later.

2

“You did tell your mom and dad we were going to meet them here for a picnic, right?”

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5

The effects have a cartoon quality that had me wondering why they didn’t just make this a CGI animated adventure. It’s not like they have huge stars anchoring the picture. Will Smith fought cartoon zombies in I Am Legend, but you forgave the silliness of those cartoon zombies because Smith sold the whole damned thing. The responsibility of selling Jack rests on the shoulders of the likeable but not extremely charismatic Nicholas Hoult (very good in this year’s Warm Bodies). He plays the title character with enough charm to make the movie mostly tolerable, but never takes it to great heights. Ewan McGregor and Stanley Tucci have supporting roles, and they actually register more than Hoult. Unlike the classic fairytale, Jack must go up against an army of giants this time out. Those giants are created via motion capture that is never convincing or impressive. In fact,

excellent

24 | RN&R |

MARCH 7, 2013

the lineup of giant characters looks quite bad. There just isn’t a nice way to say it. It doesn’t help matters that the lead giant, a two-headed concoction named General Fallon, is voiced by Bill Nighy. Nighy, of course, voiced the villainous Davy Jones in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, and his work here is similar so you spend the movie being constantly reminded of his better performance as a more interesting villain in another picture. It also doesn’t help that Fallon’s simpleminded second head is a total Gollum rip-off. The movie is rated PG-13, but don’t be taking the little kids. Singer has inserted many violent moments where the giants dispatch human victims, King Kong style. That means many people get snatched up and have their screaming heads bitten off. Granted, Singer doesn’t show the bloody aftermath, and usually pulls away before the tearing is complete, but it’s pretty shocking for what’s supposed to be a family film. As this film’s love interest, the reluctant princess who runs away from her puny king dad (Ian McShane), relative newcomer Eleanor Tomlinson doesn’t exactly light up the screen. This isn’t necessarily her fault, in that the screenplay provides her with nothing but flat dialogue and the wardrobe department makes her wear silly hats. For the kids, Singer does allow for a few farts and boogers. I suppose he thinks that balances it all out. “Yes, giants rip heads off screaming victims in this movie quite often, but I will throw in a couple of farts to keep the kids laughing.” I’m curious as to why Warner Brothers moved this from its original release date last summer. Is it because they wanted to do some more work on the special effects in an effort to make them look better? (If so, they failed.) Or did they know they had a stinker on their hands, and a March release would lessen the competition? Either way, they have a relative stinker on their hands. Up next for Singer is a return to the X-Men universe with X-Men: Days of Future Past. That’s encouraging news, for sure, and it’s good to know he will be back on familiar ground. Let’s just hope none of the X-Men fart, pick their nose, or bite somebody’s head off. Ω

1

21 and Over

Directors Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, the writers of The Hangover, basically serve up yet another strain of that film, this one set in a college town with college kids drinking a lot and getting into all kinds of college trouble. Miles Teller (who was in the similarly stupid Project X) headlines as Miller, friend to one Jeff Chang (Justin Chon). Jeff Chang is turning 21, and Miller takes him out for a night of partying with pal Casey (Skylar Astin) and, guess what, they all get crazy drunk and stuff. Nothing even close to new or original in these scenarios. The only thing keeping this from being totally lousy is that the actors play off each other well, especially Teller and Astin. If you crack up when people eat tampons or get their asses branded, well this one’s for you. If you get mildly annoyed at racist humor coupled with guys playing drinking games, go ahead and stay far away.

1

A Good Day to Die Hard

The Die Hard franchise has been one of the more reliable action movie franchises in cinematic history—until now. Bruce Willis looks tired, beaten down and embarrassed in this useless installment of the adventures of John McClane. The action takes him to Russia this time, which is a mistake. While there, he helps his son with some espionage crap, another storytelling mistake. He goes up against villains who do not distinguish themselves at all, and this would be the film’s biggest mistake. Die Hard needs a big villain. All of the prior installments had good villains, and that includes naked William Sadler in Die Hard 2. I think McClane has got some good stuff left in the tank, but enough with this garbage involving his kids. And stay the heck out of Russia; that place has lost all of its cinematic bad guy appeal. Little in this movie makes sense and it just doesn’t belong in a category with the first four chapters. Reboot, forget this thing, and start fresh the next time out, sort of like how Rocky Balboa forgot the previous two chapters and restored the Italian Stallion’s dignity.

2

Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters

This seriously had the makings of the worst, dumbest movie ever made. Hansel and Gretel, the famed gingerbread house eaters, survive their ordeal to become world-class witch hunters. The result is bad, but it’s one of those so-bad-it’s-almost-good endeavors. Jeremy Renner somehow got talked into this thing, and he gives it his best shot, as does Gemma Arterton as his sister, Gretel. Famke Janssen is on hand as a mean witch who plans to take the blood of a bunch of children and do something or other with it. I wasn’t really following, or caring. The 3-D is bad, so go ahead and opt for 2-D. It’s got Peter “Where is Pancakes House?” Stormare in it too, which is usually the mark of a bad film unless it’s Fargo. Lots of blood and curse words get this one an R-rating. Director Tommy Wirkola seems as if he’s playing it for camp at times, and that would’ve been the better move for the whole film. It really slows down when it takes itself too seriously.

1

Identity Thief

Cashing in on her Oscar-nominated turn in Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy gets a headlining role alongside Jason Bateman in Identity Thief. While both performers are talented and make the best of the crap heap of a script they are handed, it’s not enough to make this anything more than a desperate misfire. From the director of Horrible Bosses, this is just another riff on Planes, Trains & Automobiles minus much of the fun. Bateman plays a sorry sap who has his identity stolen by a free shopping weirdo (McCarthy). He gets into some legal troubles, and vows to capture the thief and bring her back to his hometown. So it’s another odd couple road movie, and pretty exploitive when it comes to McCarthy. She’s a talented woman, and she deserves much better than this.

5

Les Misérables

This is a grand, beautifully shot adaptation of the legendary musical, directed by Tom Hooper and starring Hugh Jackman in the heavy-lifting role of persecuted bread thief Jean Valjean. Set in 19th century France, the musical calls for nearly every word to be sung, and it’s a major undertaking. Hooper had his cast sing live on the set rather than

prerecording in a sound booth, and this results in a moving musical experience. Jackman has a spectacular voice, and you get at true sense that he and his costars are acting these songs, rather than lip-synching. Anne Hathaway will probably win an Oscar for her work as Fantine, singing her big number in one take and summoning honest, heart-wrenching tears. Russell Crowe, as Valjean’s lawman nemesis Javert, doesn’t have half of Jackman’s voice, but there’s something about his interpretation that’s appropriate and amplifies the character’s loneliness. Every number is treated with a majestic grace that makes this one of the greatest movie musicals I’ve ever seen.

3

Side Effects

4

Silver Linings Playbook

3

Snitch

5

Zero Dark Thirty

The first half of director Steven Soderbergh’s alleged feature film’s swan song is excellent, while the second half is only passably good. Jude Law stars as a doctor treating a depressed patient (Rooney Mara) who is given an experimental drug with some nasty results. The film is at once a mystery and an indictment of the worldwide pharmaceutical industry, and it hums along nicely for a good chunk of the running time. Then, it suddenly becomes a mediocre Brian De Palma movie as the mysteries are solved, and it gets a little hokey. Good things happen before it unravels, with Mara doing some nice work alongside Channing Tatum and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Soderbergh says this is it for him. Hopefully, he just takes a couple of years off and finds himself back behind the camera someday. This movie is OK, but I would like to see him go out on a better note.

Bradley Cooper is on fire as Pat, a troubled man recently out of a mental institution and obsessed with his ex-wife. He’s so obsessed hat he can’t see the value in Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a recently widowed neighbor trying to befriend him. Directed by David O. Russell, the movie is a funny, slick treatment of people with real problems that works because Russell and his performers find the right balance. Robert De Niro does his best work in years as Pat’s obsessive father, and Chris Tucker gets big laughs as Pat’s former mental institution buddy. Cooper and Lawrence make for one of the year’s most interesting screen couples. They are certainly unique. Russell is establishing himself as one of the industry’s most reliable and innovative directors.

Dwayne Johnson—ACTOR! He has dropped his alias, “The Rock,” from his screen name, and now stars in a movie where he doesn’t even fire a machine gun or show off his glorious tattoos. Johnson plays the father of a young man who gets into trouble after a friend mails him a whole lot of drugs. Unless the son turns in somebody for distributing drugs and “snitches,” he will face a long jail sentence. Johnson’s character decides to take matters into his own hands, find some drug dealers, and turn them in so his misunderstood son can walk free. This one was a lot better than I was expecting because Johnson really steps up and makes the whole thing work. It’s predictable, yet well paced, a good-looking and well-acted action thriller. Johnson will be coming to a theater near you firing many guns and showing off his ink in the near future (quite often in 2013). For now, it’s kind of cool to see him do something a little different, and doing it effectively.

Director Kathryn Bigelow getting snubbed by Oscar for this taut, scary, intelligent movie about the war on terror and hunt for Bin Laden is a travesty. Well, it’s a travesty when it comes to movies and stuff, not so much in the grand scheme of things. Still, Bigelow deserves praise for putting together a movie that is both exciting political thriller and terrific action movie. Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain is deserving of the accolades as Maya, a composite character of CIA agents who managed to find Bin Laden in Pakistan and end his life. The film contains scenes of torture, but it doesn’t feel “pro-torture” by any means. It’s a great movie that will only get greater with time, and yet another reason to call Bigelow one of the best in the business.


Jello shot Jello Biafra The former singer and principal songwriter of the Dead Kennedys, Jello Biafra is well known for his incisive wit, by Brad Bynum political insight and provocative humor. His current group, Jello b radb@ Biafra and the Guantanamo School news re view.c om of Medicine, has a new album slated for release in April on his record label, Alternative Tentacles. He’ll perform a DJ set at the DebauchA-Reno festival (see this week’s feature story, page 13, for more information).

the first time I saw the term ‘punk’ used for this kind of fierce, primal rock ’n’ roll. … I made a mental note to check them out. And then an old compilation called Explosives was up on a wall in a store when I moved to San Francisco, and I thought that might be only chance to check them out. So I paid way too much money for it, at least at the time, and brought it home. And unlike most of these things where you expect way more than you’re ever going to get because your expectations are so high, I put it on and was like, my god, this is really, really good. This dude’s voice is amazing. … I thought, wow, the missing link between the Ventures and the Stooges. I would put them in the top five as far as the most important, influential bands of my own music and writing. When was the last time you were here in Reno? It’s been a while. … The real Dead Kennedys only played in Reno once. I think the phony Dead Kennedys have been through once or twice, maybe three times.

“I’m very proud of Dead Kennedys,” says Jello Biafra.

For an extra long version of this interview, visit www. newsreview.com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

You’re coming up here to Reno to DJ the Debauch-A-Reno festival. How did that come about? Oh, I just got tipped to it by Jesse Luscious, the old singer of the Frisk and the Criminals and Blatz and all that good stuff. He now works for me at Alternative Tentacles. He just thought I might want to know about it. I see The Sonics at the top, and my eyes popped out of my head. I got to find my way to get up there. Maybe I can even make myself useful. Maybe I can even find a way to have some fun and make myself useful. I had just been in Seattle and Portland doing some cameo appearances on the Reverend Horton Heat tour, and the reports from people up there are that the Sonics are still pretty damn good. … They’re one of my favorite bands. One of the most important bands in my life ever. Why? Just the music and the sound itself, and [Gerry] Roslie’s voice. I’d seen them listed as some obscure ’60s punk band in some magazine in L.A.—I can’t remember what it was. It was some pre-fanzine thing, long before punk happened. That was GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

What’s your relationship with those guys, now? I know there’s been lawsuits. It’s absolutely zero. I get a threat letter from their lawyer every once in a while. And now they have this bum manager who appears he may even be a right-wing Christian, a born-again Christian who runs around cutting deals. People have told me in L.A. that he claims he’s my friend, and that everything’s cool, but that’s not the case at all. They still can’t seem to stop all these promoters putting pictures of the band with me in the ad. As far as I’m concerned it’s one of the lowest points punk has ever reached. … But people shouldn’t get this wrong. I’m very proud of Dead Kennedys and very grateful people are still that into the music this many years later. I have no regrets about the band, the music or what we did. I have terrible regrets about what those guys turned into afterwards. They’ve become Republicans. … They can claim they wrote the songs all they want to, but where are the new songs? The new songs are all with me. Ω

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

25


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Itʼs happen ing in

ACTIVITIES SPARKS SHAMROCK SHUFFLE 5K FUN RUN On St. Patrick’s Day! Athlete in You welcomes all ages to downtown Sparks on Victorian Square to show your Irish spirit. Su, 3/17, 1PM, $32/adults, $22/youth. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave. pat@athleteinyou.com WINTER PRUNING OF FRUIT TREES Presented by Michael Janik. Learn how to correctly prune fruit fruit trees. Proper tools and techniques will also be covered. Please RSVP. Sa, 3/9, 11AM & 1PM. Free with canned food donation. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551 EZ PICK BAREFOOT FRUIT TREES Presented by James Sho-L.E. Cooke. You can have an orchard in even the smallest areas with these specially trained varieties. Sa, 3/16, 11AM & 1PM. Free with canned food donation. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551 FUN WITH DRAWING Give your child a lifelong gift learning the fundamentals of drawing. Your child will learn value, shading and an introduction to perspective while developing techniques. Th, 5:15-6:15PM through 3/14. Opens 2/7, $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385 E-READER CAFE Learn how to download library e-books and audiobooks to your electronic device. Please bring your library card, device with USB cable and a basic understanding. Th, 4-5PM through 3/28. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 CONVERSATION CORNER Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions. W, 4:30-6PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

! Jamie, and work on projects with other beaders. First Su of every month, 1-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP Jean Peters guides this class for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 CROCHET CONNECTION Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 BILINGUAL STORYTIME First and third Saturdays 11-11:30AM, through September. Storytime in Spanish and English for children to age 6. Cada 1° y 3° Sabado. First Sa of every month, 11-11:30AM through 9/7 and Third Sa of every month, 11-11:30AM, through 9/21. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC LES MISERABLES Reed High School presents Les Miserables School Edition Th, 3/7, 7PM, F, 3/8, 7PM and Sa, 3/9, 2 & 7PM, $10-$15. Edward Reed High School, 1350 Baring Blvd. (757) 353-5700 JENNY SIMMONS OF ADDISON ROAD Live, in concert with special guests “I Am They”. Join us for this awesome night of praise and music. Sa, 3/9, 6:30PM, $8. Jesus Christ Spirit Filled Church, 3175 Goldy Way (775) 358-2842

RENEGADE Sa, 3/9, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 SHILTS W, 3/13, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ROSENDO Th, 3/14, 5:30PM, F, 3/15, 6PM and Sa, 3/16, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 STEW STEWART Th, 3/14, 7PM, F, 3/15, 8PM and Sa, 3/16, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 CRUSH F, 3/15, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 STEVEN WRIGHT Sa, 3/16, 9PM, $49. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 KEN NAVARRO W, 3/20, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000

M8TRIX Th, 3/7, 7PM, F, 3/8, 8PM and Sa, 3/9, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

march 7, 2013

ACRONYCAL F, 3/8, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

BILL DAVIS Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

BEADS AND BOOKS Learn basic beading techniques with volunteer beading expert,

RN&R   | 

JUST RIGHT F, 3/8, 6PM, Sa, 3/9, 6PM, Su, 3/10, 6PM, F, 3/29, 6PM, Sa, 3/30, 6PM and Su, 3/31, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

KARAOKE ASPEN GLEN BAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd. 89436 / (775) 354-2400

ERIC ANDERSON Th, 3/7, 5:30PM, F, 3/8, 6PM and Sa, 3/9, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300

| 

happening now!

LADIES 80S WITH DJ LARRY WILLIAMS Ladies ’ with DJ Larry Williams, every Thursday! Th, 7PM through 10/4, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

CONVERSATION CAFE The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month. 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

26 

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861 OPEN MIC GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY! CITY OF SPARKS Mayor: Geno Martini. Council members: Julia Ratti, Ed Lawson, Ron Smith, Mike Carrigan, Ron Schmitt. City Manager: Shaun Carey. Parks & Recreation Director: Tracy Domingues. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 3532311 or through the City of Sparks website. WEB RESOURCES: www.sparksitshappeninghere.com www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com THIS SECTION IS PROVIDED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE BY THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW AND IS NOT FUNDED OR AFFILIATED WITH THE CITY OF SPARKS


THURSDAY 3/7

FRIDAY 3/8

SATURDAY 3/9

1UP

EDM Thursday, 10pm, no cover

Justin Martin, Christian Martin, Worthy, Miss Cooper, Acure, 10pm, $15, $20

’90s Night, 10pm, no cover

3RD STREET

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Days 11, 10pm, no cover

Rumble, 9:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

The Bronx, Elephant Rifle, Old Glory, 7:30pm, $1.04

She Has A Fashion Vice, Saving Alleya, Dennis is Dead, 7:30pm, $TBA

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

Matt Waage, Takedown, 8pm, no cover

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

CARGO

SUNDAY 3/10

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/11-3/13 1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

The Bronx

Andre Nickatina, Mumbls, Smoov-E, 8pm, $25, $30

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Sean McGuinness, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

Steven Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

CORKSCROO BAR AND GRILL Ann Marie Sheridan, 7pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Randy Blake, 7pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FAT CAT BAR & GRILL

Karaoke Night, 10pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255 599 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City; (530) 583-3355

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL THE HOLLAND PROJECT JAVA JUNGLE

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

no cover HAPPY HOUR fri march 9:30 Pm

core

8

hardro

ckers WALK TO CREATE A WORLD FREE OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

determined

WALK MS: Reno/Sparks

The Fryed Brothers & Sactos Favorite Blues / Rock Band

an n a h bl v u a e S

Saturday, May 4, 2013

Idlewild Park Terrace

Don’t MISS tHIS

Southern California & Nevada 2013 Presented by

with reno's own

the stereo killers Come Down for fun

TUES 9PM

Karaoke

GREEN

|

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Scott Kennedy, Carlie & Doni, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Mark Pitta w/guest, W, 9pm, $25

4 -7PM MON - FRI

r e n o ’s

9 s at m a r c h 9:30 Pm

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Quinn Dahle, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Ian Gutoskie, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Tahoe Comedy North’s Sixth Anniversary Party w/Sean Peabody, Th, 7:30pm, $10, $15; Carla Rae, F, 7pm; 7pm, 9:30pm, Sa, $13, $16; St. Patrick’s Day Massacre Roast of Patrick Shillito, F, 9:30pm, $10, $15

Stickers, Pony Time, Elephant Rifle, 7:30pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

|

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

NEWS

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Reggae Night, 9pm, M, Open mic w/host Lucas Arizu, 9pm, Tu, no cover

FUEGO

|

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

OPINION

Comedy

Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

Mark Castro Band, 10pm, no cover

10 E. Ninth St., (775) 284-7270

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

March 8, 7:30 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

WINTER GUIDE

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

REGISTER & START FUNDRAISING TODAY: WalkToEndMS.org or 775.827.4257

WED 9PM

IN ROTATION

OPEN MIC |

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

BE INSPIRED. GET CONNECTED. WALK MS. Walk MS connects people living with MS and those who care about them. It is an experience unlike any other — a day to come together, to celebrate the progress we’ve made, and to show the power of our connections.

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

2013-Walk MS_PSA Square.indd 1

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

27

2/4/13 9:45 AM


THURSDAY 3/7 JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

FRIDAY 3/8

SATURDAY 3/9

Live Jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

SUNDAY 3/10

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

1) Official Tiësto Afterparty w/DJs Alvaro, 1) Ostracized, Something Left Unsaid, Erik Lobe, others, 10pm, $10-$200 Seven Churches, Catalyst, 8pm, $6 2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover 2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Club Sexy Movimiento w/Amplified DJs, 10pm, $12-$15 2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Andre Nickatina

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

March 9, 8 p.m. Cargo 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Silver Wing, 8pm, no cover

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Fusion Fridays w/DJs Kentot, Fredy G, 10pm, $10, free for women until midnight

Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210 210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Acronycal, 9:30pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Yes

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

March 9, 8 p.m. Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. 325-7401

STREGA BAR

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

Allfree & Davis, 8pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Renegade, 9:30pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

Electric Catfish, 8:30pm, $3

Open mic, 7pm, W, no cover Rock’N J Entertainment, 8pm, no cover

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Spontaneous Groove Party, 9pm, no cover

VASSAR LOUNGE

Crush, Ryan Parker, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

Brüka Theatre For Children presents ~ Grimm’s V

Public Performances

March 14, 15, 16 2013 Show Times: 10 am Daily Doors open at 9:30 am TICKETS 12 & under - $5 General - $7 All Groups Over 10 - $4 each ALL PERFORMANCES AT:

BRÜKA THEATRE

99 N Virginia Street, Reno NV 89501

Box Office: 775.323.3221 Fax: 775.323.8209 Email: boxofficebruka@gmail.com Website: www.Bruka.org

28

|

RN&R

|

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/11-3/13

MARCH 7, 2013


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

THURSDAY 3/7

FRIDAY 3/8

SATURDAY 3/9

SUNDAY 3/10

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/11-3/13

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 4pm, Escalade, 10pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 4pm, Escalade, 10pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Hot Rods Band, 7pm, no cover

2) Hot Rods Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Hot Rods Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Joe Buonanno, 6pm, no cover

2) Joe Buonanno, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Sean Peabody, Tony D’Andrea, 8:30pm, $10, $15

1) Polyrhythmics, 10pm, no cover 2) Archnemesis, DeeJay Theory, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers, Easy Leaves, 9pm, $15-$35

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 8pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, 9:30pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

2) Bass Science, Roksmyth, 11pm, W, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

The RN&R no longer a ccepts emailed or phoned-in listings. Post show s online by registering at www.ne wsreview.c om/reno. Deadline is the Friday b efore publication .

1) Pauly Shore, 9pm, $20, $27.50

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

1) Magique, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, W, $21.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Alias, 10pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jose Feliciano, 7:30pm, $44

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Atomika, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Atomika, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35

2) M8TRIX, 7pm, no cover 3) Eric Anderson, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

2) M8TRIX, 8pm, no cover 3) Eric Anderson, 6pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 6pm, no cover

2) M8TRIX, 8pm, no cover 3) Eric Anderson, 6pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 6pm, no cover

5) Just Right, 6pm, no cover

3) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7pm, $10 after 8pm , DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

1) Vivian Chow, 8pm, $48-$158 3) Return of the Beezo Battles w/DJ Enrie, 10pm, $20

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

1) Yes, 8pm, $45.50-$65.50; 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, no cover 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, no cover

WINTER GUIDE

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Sin Biggest Little Locals Night, 4pm, M, Step This Way, 8pm, W, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

3) Shilts, 6pm, W, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

March 9, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Karaoke

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

29


SUNDAY, MARCH 10 5PM – 9PM ON • Find out what the SPCA of Northern Nevada is doing for animals and people in our community! • Meet many dogs and cats looking for a new forever home • Find out how you can support the many programs of the SPCA of Northern Nevada • Be introduced to the new programs provided at the SPCA Stanley James Walker Pet Care & Adoption Center

SPCANevada.org (775) 324–7773 x204 30

|

RN&R

|

MARCH 7, 2013


For Thursday, March 7 to Wednesday, March 13 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

MEDITATION WORKSHOP: Clifford Saron, an

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., March 21, is Thurs., March 14.

Events 10TH ANNUAL RON PETERSEN AFRICAN DINNER: The Student Association for International Water Issues (SAIWI) and International Development Missions (IDM) host the 10th annual dinner to raise support for water-related projects in developing nations. Funds raised from this event will be used for water and sanitation projects in Panama, Kenya and the Navajo Nation. The event includes African cuisine, live entertainment by Drumchik Productions, a silent auction, raffle and Panama trip presentation. Sa, 3/9, 6pm. $40 general admission; $25 students. California Building, Idlewild Park, 75 Cowan Drive, (775) 530-8686 www.saiwi.org/events.html.

RENO SKI & RECREATION CLUB: Hear the most

associate research scientist at the University of California Davis Center for Mind and Brain, is studying the effects of intensive meditation training on attention and emotion regulation through a longitudinal study known as “The Shamatha Project.” Using qualitative, self-report, behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical measures, his team is working to understand the many levels of personal and physiological change that accompany meditation training. M, 3/11, 5:30-7pm. $5 donation suggested. Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences at Sierra Nevada College, 291 Country Club Drive, Incline Village (775) 881-7560, http://terc.ucdavis.edu/calendar.

NOAH’S ART NIGHT AND SILENT AUCTION: Noah’s Ark Child Center sponsors a gala event and fundraiser to benefit the children of the Ark. The children’s artwork will be displayed for purchase. This adults-only event includes a cider bar with drinks and appetizers and a silent auction. Free child care will also be provided. F, 3/8, 7-9pm. Free. Noah’s Ark Child Center, 1660 Grandview Ave., (775) 747-37750 www.noahsarkreno.com.

current information about the Reno Ski & Recreation Club, upcoming trips and activities at the group’s general meeting. Second Tu of every month, 6pm. Free. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 747-0233, www.renoskiandrec.com.

VERTICAL EXPRESS FOR CAN DO MS: The 28th annual skiing and snowboarding event raises money for Can Do MS, a national nonprofit and provider of lifestyle empowerment programs that help families living with multiple sclerosis. Skiers and boarders can participate as an individual or on a team, and join in family-friendly activities on the mountain.

Sa, 3/9, 8:30am-6pm; Su, 3/10, 7am-4pm. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, (775) 530-6137, www.mscando.org.

WINTER PRUNING OF FRUIT TREES: Learn how to correctly prune fruit fruit trees. Proper tools and techniques will also be covered. Please RSVP as seating is limited. Sa, 3/9, 11am & 1pm. Free with canned food donation. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks, (775) 355-1551, www.railcitygardencenter.com.

PLANNING YOUR SPRING GARDEN: Plan and

DANCING WITH THE STARS: CARSON CITY: The

plant your spring garden. The class will explore a range of ways to grow food year round using cold frames, low tunnels, hoop houses and row covers. Learn about cool season crops, soil preparation, irrigation systems, seeding and transplanting. Su, 3/10, 2-4pm. $15 pre-registration; $20 drop in. River School Farm, 7777 White Fir St. off Woodland and West Fourth streets; (775) 747-2222; www.riverschoolfarm.org.

Western Nevada College chapter of the National Student Nurses Association its version of the TV show featuring various Carson City public officials and prominent figures. They will compete for the Mirror Ball Trophy along with experienced dancers Sarah Guzman and WNC students Courtney Edwards and Alexandera Clark, Michelle Michelsen, Mark Johnson, Armondo Nevarez, Desiree McKean, Tiffany Hopkins, Adam Hopkins, Joann Grace, Earl Case and Ivan Ochoa. Sa, 3/9, 7pm. $10 advance; $12 at the door. Carson High School, 1111 N. Saliman Road, Carson City, (775) 815-1857 www.facebook.com/DancingWithTheStars CarsonCity.

All Ages EL ARTE: ART FOR KIDS IN SPANISH: Parent and child will explore a variety of art media in this new series of Spanish immersion classes for kids ages 7-12. All supplies are provided. Dress for a mess. Su, 3/10, 11:30am12:30pm. $9 NMA members; $12 non-members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

Art

EL ARTS: PRESCHOOL PLAY IN SPANISH: Parent and child will explore a variety of art media in this new series of Spanish immersion classes for preschoolers. All supplies are provided. Dress for a mess. Su, 3/10, 10-11am. $9 NMA members; $12 non-members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St. (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Photo Fandango VII. More than 20 local photographers will be featured in this show. Through 3/31, 11am-4pm. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

BUSINESS RESOURCE INNOVATION CENTER (THE BRIC): BRIC Art 3. Capital City Arts

GALENA KIDS: Galena Creek Visitor Center

Initiative’s exhibition features Jill Altmann’s fiber art, Steve Davis’ photography, Andy Gallian’s prints, Mimi Patrick’s ceramics, Stephen Reid’s drawings and watercolors and Gus Bundy’s paintings. M-Su. 108 E. Proctor St., Carson City, (775) 283-7123.

offers this fun and educational presentation and craft session for kids ages 2-10 on the second Saturday of each month. Second Sa of every month, 1011am. $5 suggested donation. Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, (775) 849-4948, www.galenacreekvisitorcenter.org.

CHARLIE B GALLERY: Kathy Colegrove— Watercolors and Her Proteges: Part II. This group watercolor exhibition features work by Kathy Colegrove, Marsha Davey, Helen Gouveia, Darlene Grant, Susan Koch, Kathleen McCuiston, Bessie Mingay, Jan Rudy, Cherie Schweitzer, Jim Shampine, Nancy Soule, Robert Stolting and Skip Wagner. The opening is March 8 from 5pm to 8pm. F, 3/8, 5-8pm. Free. 200 E. Main St., Ste. 101, Fernley, (775) 575-7333, http://charliebgallery.com.

HANDS/ON! THE ART OF MUSIC: This event includes hands-on art projects, performance and storytelling with Kathleen Durham. Sa, 3/9, 10am-4pm. Free. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333.

KIDS’ CORNER: IMITATE THE GREAT VAN GOGH: Kids will learn basic acrylic painting techniques while examining the artistic style of Vincent Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.” Students will be guided in a step-by-step process exploring color mixing and brush techniques. All materials are provided for this class. Sa, 3/9, 9:30am-noon. $29 NMA members; $32 non-members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

THIS WEEK

continued on page 33

FIRST THURSDAY FEATURING BUSTER BLUE: Grab a beer, groove to the live music and check out the galleries at First Thursday. Bring the kids for Kids Open Art Studio, available from 5-7pm for $5 per child. Th, 3/7, 5-7pm. $10; free for NMA members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE: John Packham, director of health policy research, University of Nevada School of Medicine, will describe the coming changes as the Affordable Care Act is implemented and what remains to be done to improve the efficiency of American health care. Su, 3/10, 9am. Free. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Northern Nevada, 780 Del Monte Lane, (775) 851-7100, www.uufnn.org.

Hey, college students! Put down the books and hit the dance floor. Tiësto’s Club Life College Invasion Tour comes to town on Thursday, March 7. The electronic dance DJ, musician and record producer Tiësto got his start playing at nightclubs in his native Netherlands in the early 1990s, eventually releasing material as a recording artist and as a producer later in the decade. He released his first solo album, In My Memory, in 2001, which featured several hit singles. His rise to fame continued after a stint on Moby’s Area2 Tour in 2002 and on a solo tour in 2003, ostensibly becoming the first DJ to perform a solo show in a stadium. The following year, Tiësto reached a worldwide audience when he performed at the opening ceremony of the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. In addition to producing and remixing recordings by various artists, the Grammy-nominated recording artist has three other solo albums under his belt, the latest being 2009’s Kaleidoscope. Tiësto will be joined by guests Tommy Trash, Quintino and Erik Lobe when he performs at Lawlor Events Center, 1500 N. Virginia St. The show gets underway at 7 p.m. Tickets are $35-$48. Call 784-4444. —Kelley Lang

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

31


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

ine u n e G

Northern Nevada ABLE BAIL BONDS

We’re Able To Help!

We're Able to Help

24 HOURS

FAST RELEASE CREDIT CARD RELEASE BY PHONE NATION WIDE PROMPT CONFIDENTIAL SERVICE COLLATERAL NOT ALWAYS NEEDED WE DO HOUSE CALLS HABLAMOS ESPANOL PAYMENTS ON APPROVED CREDIT NOTARY

49

99 *

in-stoRe lowpRiCe guaRantee! Huge seleCtion HelpFul & FRiendly staFF

*most cars

Free diagnostic with repair

Electrical repair systems experts 30,60,90k car maintenance

We have unbelievable light package specials & sales all day, everyday!

complete brake systems service

BRIAN JOHNSON · LICENSE #171783

2950 S. Virginia

www.ablebailbonds.net | ablebailbonds@sbcglobal.net 4430 Bennie Lane · Reno (By the jail, across from NAPA Auto Parts)

829-2525 Free Tow with repair

329–9993

Reno HydRo

Wheel Alignment

$

(Across from Peppermill)

Tur n your unwanTed gold

into cash

sell us your old gold and receive an extra 15% with this ad White Gold, Yellow Gold, Platinum, Silver coins & Diamonds

Beautiful. Affordable.

5890 S. Virginia St. Ste 3 • 775-825-3499 Reno’s local custom jewelry store for 27 years

701 S. Virginia St

“MidTown” Reno, NV 89501 775.322.8040

775.284.8700 www.RenoHydro.com

5635 Riggins Ct., #21 East on Neil Rd. exit from 395. 1/2 mi. R on Meadow Wood Ln, 1st R on Riggins Ct.

our quality will impress you

• Guaranteed lowest prices on premium wholesale flooring • Quality laminates starting at 99 cents a square foot • Locally-owned, all work done by our own licensed crew • Specializing in eco-friendly, sustainable flooring • Solid engineered hardwood, laminate & tile

quality Floors 4 less Reno Costco Plaza 823-5315 • QF4L.com

Don’t Gamble VI NYL with your Gun repair P I WORSH • Vinyl, CDs, DVDs, Tapes,VHS • In or out of print, we’ll order for cost + a few bucks • Buy, sell, trade (Selling? Call 1st!) • Knitting Factory and Alley ticket outlet • Our 35th year in business

BUY-SELL TRADE

NEW STORE IN MIDTOWN! 822 S. Virginia (North of Junkee, South of Süp) 826-4119 • recrecreno.com

on-site Gunsmith | Federally licensed Buy | sell | trade | consiGn

Silver Bullet Gun Works 440 s. rock BlVd | (775)331-8228 | silverBulletGunworks.com

Shamrock RV Park ersary move-in special!!! TH 25 anniv call oR ViSit NoW to ReceiVe the beSt Rate We haVe eVeR offeRed

cheapest propane in Town!!! only $2.30 per gallon

32 

| 

RN&R   | 

MARCH 7, 2013

• Top 100 RV Parks • FREE WIFI • FREE Moving Assistance • Quiet, Picturesque Setting, Only 5 Mins to Major Casinos

• Gift Shop & Store, Exercise Room, Handicap-Accessible • Metered LP Gas, Local Bus Service, 50 Amp, Phone & Cable Ready • No jet Noise, No Flooding, No 28 Day Rule • $50 Storage w/Free Dump

260 Parr Blvd | Reno NV 89512

800-322-8248 | 775-329-5222 | www.ShamrockRV.com


continued from page 31

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: 2013 Scholastic Art Awards Exhibit. The Holland Project Gallery will host the annual Scholastic Art Awards in partnership with the Nevada Museum of Art. This exhibition showcases the best in Northern Nevada middle and high school art and will feature more than 100 pieces ranging from sculpture to printmaking. The Gold Key pieces will be on display in the gallery with the Silver Key pieces featured digitally. The Nevada Museum of Art will exhibit the American Visions nominations through April 1. F, 3/8, 68pm; Tu-F through 3/29. Opens 3/8. Free. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

Ivan Trigueros, Bilingual Case Manager

NEVER ENDER: 1/1000th. Skateboarding photography by Dane Haman. M-Su through 4/12. Opens 3/6; Th, 3/14, 6pm. 19 Thoma St., (775) 348-9440, http://myneverenderreno.com.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Heart ART. This exhibit celebrates the heart in all its forms. The show includes 2D and 3D fine art and jewelry and some fine crafting. M-Su through 3/11; Detour to Tahoe, Watercolor artist Eva S. Nichols will show her newest paintings in the main gallery of North Tahoe Arts starting on March 13. The opening reception will be held on Friday, April 12, from 5-7pm in the Main Gallery at North Tahoe Arts M-Su, 11am-4pm through 4/29. Opens 3/13. Free. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

JAVA JUNGLE: Musical Muse. A collection of paintings by local artist and painter Nicole Oshan. The collection draws upon the artist’s inspiration from music with much of the collection reflecting famous musicians and celebrities whose music has carried on through generations. Th, 3/7, 7pm; M-Su through 3/31. Free. 246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484.

because the client comes first

RENO LITTLE THEATER: Anything Goes. Sierra Watercolor Society holds a watercolor exhibit at Reno Little Theater on performance dates, one hour prior to showtimes. Call Nancy for exhibit viewings by appointment. M-Su through 4/28. 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 343-8100, www.sierrawatercolorsociety.com.

a big part of my job is assisting clients with language barriers. i help with things like translation, appointments, budgeting and housing. at hopes, we help find solutions for people.

SIERRA ARTS: Barton McCoy: Collected Works. Sierra Arts Gallery displays a collection of works spanning a decade created by Northern Nevada native Bart McCoy. M-Sa, 10am-5pm through 3/8; Walter McNamara: Wood. Paper. Etc., This mixed media exhibition includes sculpture and collage from the artist’s private collection. M-Sa, 10am-5pm through 4/18. Opens 3/12. Free. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

the Latino population can be isolated and they don’t always ask questions or know about the types of services available in the community. my job is to figure out how we can help them access those services, either at hopes or through another agency.

THIS WEEK

it’s a team effort. When we first meet with someone, we do a team assessment to determine which services the client might need. By having effective communication between the clinic, social services, and other departments, we’re able to keep track of a client’s progress and better understand his or her needs. our philosophy is to engage with the client, because the client comes first.

continued on page 34

Madame ovary My wife needs a medical test that will involve her being naked in unflattering positions in front of another person, possibly male. I know she won’t enjoy this and it certainly isn’t sexual, but I want her to request a female gynecologist. She says she’s embarrassed to do that, refuses to be controlled by me, and says having a male doctor doesn’t bother her. Well, it bothers me terribly. I was taught that a couple’s bedroom— what happens there, their nude bodies, etc.—is for them alone. I’m not insecure, and I know she isn’t leaving me, but I strongly feel that her being seen naked by a male practitioner violates the sanctity and intimacy of our marriage, and I feel like it’s cheating. Cheating involves having a romance with a person other than your partner, not having him give you a Pap smear. Also, male doctors generally have a female nurse present while examining a female patient (so they won’t be accused of any funny business). There will be that rare Dr. Pervo, but according to doctors I spoke to, by week two of their residency, bodies might as well be giant steaks. So, for a male doctor, your wife’s “special area” is anything but special; it’s the seventh vagina he’s seen before lunch. Stamping your feet and denying the obvious—that there’s a vast difference between medical touch and sexual touch—helps you manipulate your wife with this ridiculous notion that she “violates the sanctity” of your marriage by getting a male doctor in rotation. So, according to you, what’s special about your marriage OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

is just that since you tied the knot, no other man has been assigned to see your wife naked (in a setting more in keeping with performing an autopsy than staging a seduction). Take your “logic” a step further and your wife is two-timing you by even speaking to people who aren’t you. People in loving relationships will often accommodate their partners’ ridiculous requests simply to make them happy. Your wife might’ve been more willing to do that if only you’d appealed to her sympathy instead of demanding that she do all the changing while you lift nary a brain cell to consider whether your position might be unreasonable. Refusing to even consider another person’s point of view generally causes them to cling even more firmly to it. Of course, if only you’d look at this through reason-colored glasses, you’d probably acknowledge the reality: If somebody does come between you and your wife, it’s unlikely to happen while she’s upset, afraid and grossed-out during a medical test. And give doctors a little credit. If you’re a doctor, a woman will take her pants off for you because you drive a sports car. There’s really no need to come up with some ploy about scraping her cervix for cancerous cells.

it’s a rewarding job. i know that people need help and that i’m going to help them. i like to see families smile! • Primary medical care • chronic disease management • hiV, heP c, std testing • mental health counseling • substance use counseling • suPPort grouPs

NORTHERN NEVADA

HOPES Your partner in health We accept most insurances, medicaid, medicare & the uninsured

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com). IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 8AM – 7PM • FRIDAY: 8AM – 5PM 580 W 5TH ST., RENO (775) 786-4673 • NNHOPES.ORG |

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

33


continued from page 33

EXCLUSIVE MULTI-MEDIA COMMISSION CELEBRATING THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER

CHESAPEAKE: SUMMER OF 1814 WORLD PREMIERE

– and –

SUNDAY, MARCH 17 SUNDAY 17, 2013 2013, 4 PM TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013, 7:30 PM AT THE PIONEER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra with music director Laura Jackson celebrates the bicentennial of the Star-Spangled Banner with an homage written exclusively for the orchestra and chorus by the acclaimed composer Michael Gandolfi. This concert combines visual direction and design by renowned artist Anne Patterson. MICHAEL GANDOLFI: Chesapeake: Summer of 1814, World Premiere Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner, an Exclusive Commission for the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus WILLIAM SCHUMAN: Casey at the Bat, Cantata from The Mighty Casey, Featuring the Reno Philharmonic Chorus MANUEL DE FALLA: The Three-Cornered Hat CONCERT PREVIEW:

– you are – invited

SUNDAY AT 3 PM IN THE MAIN HALL | TUESDAY AT 7 PM IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

AUDIENCE APPRECIATION RECEPTION:

OPEN TO EVERYONE | REFRESHMENTS | MEET THE MUSICIANS SIENA BALLROOM, DOWNTOWN RENO - JUST BEHIND THE PIONEER CENTER IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCE

STREMMEL GALLERY: The Animal in Contemporary Art II. Contemporary artists Bill Braun, Bryan Christiansen, Catherine Courtenaye, Gaylen Hansen, Tom Judd, Leonard Koscianski, Ken Little, Adelaide Paul, Brad Rude and Tom Uttech incorporate animals into their works, capturing the playful, yet majestic essence of the wild. Works range from oil on canvas to wood sculpture encased in leather. M-Sa through 3/23. Free. 1400 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-0558, www.stremmelgallery.com.

THE WEDGE CERAMICS STUDIO: seated—Ceramic

TICKETS FROM $25 PLUS FEES | RENO PHIL BOX OFFICE (775) 323-6393 PIONEER CENTER BOX OFFICE | M-F 11-6 (775) 686-6600 OR RENOPHIL.COM

Sculpture Exhibit. Artist Catherine SchmidMaybach uses the chair form to explore narrative possibilities. The chair serves as a metaphor for the connection between the physical body and the intangible aspects of the self. The condition of being “seated in oneself” is a fixed yet perpetually shifting condition over time. M-Su through 3/30; Th, 3/7, 5:30-7:30pm. Free. 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Frohawk Two Feathers: And Those Figures Through the Leaves. And That Light Through the Smoke, W-Su through 6/9; Linda Besemer: Sine Language, W-Su through 5/19; Kim Abeles: From Studio to Street, W-Su through 4/14; BLOOM, W-Su through 6/16; Hook, Line and Sinker: Contemporary Drawings from the Collection of Debra and Dennis Scholl, W-Su through 4/28; Voces y Visiones: Highlights from the Collection of El Museo del Barrio, New York, W-Su through 7/7; Jean-Pierre Bonfort: Travelling, W-Su through 5/5. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM: Timeless Treasures: A Celebration of Native American Culture, TuSu through 5/26. $5 adults; free for children under age 12. 814 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 355-1144, www.sparksmuseum.org.

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM, RANCHO SAN RAFAEL REGIONAL PARK: Creatures, The exhibit features educational and interactive elements for kids, including a fossil dig, a glacier simulation display and several touch stations. Through 6/2. $9 adults; $8 children, seniors. 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

Film 8TH ANNUAL WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: The Sierra Nevada Alliance hosts the eighth annual event with the South Lake Tahoe Earth Day Committee and Patagonia. The Wild and Scenic Environmental Film Festival combines award-winning environmental and adventure films with the energy of local activism. F, 3/8, 7pm. $10-$15 advance, $20 at the door. MontBleu Resort, 55 Highway 50, Stateline, (530) 542-4546 ext. 305.

34

|

RN&R

|

MARCH 7, 2013

Poetry/Literature PETER AMES CARLIN BOOK SIGNING: The acclaimed music writer reads from and discusses BRUCE, his new biography of Bruce Springsteen. Th, 3/7, 6:30-8pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

Music ARGENTA CONCERT SERIES: Jorja Fleezanis and Yura Lee, along with Adela H. Park and Dmitri Atapine, perform works by Aaron Copland and Robert Schumann. Su, 3/10, 2pm. $20 general admission. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-3555, www.unrsota.com.

CARSON CITY MUSIC CLUB: This is a forum for musicians and music lovers to gather and share their love of music. The club offers opportunities to perform individually and to participate in collaborative events and expand musical knowledge. Second M of every month, 7pm. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 882-9517.

COME IN FROM THE COLD: The series continues with a performance by Blarney Band. Sa, 7pm through 3/9. $3 donation. Western Heritage Interpretive Center, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 828-6612.

EXPLORING ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS: Reno Pops Orchestra presents a musical exploration of “ancient digs,” which will include everything from the Indiana Jones theme song to music from now-extinct cultures. The program will be accompanied by projected images and a travel commentary by maestro Jane Brown. Sa, 3/9, 7pm. Free. Bishop Manogue Catholic High School, 110 Bishop Manogue Drive, (775) 322-1169, www.renopops.org.

JENNY SIMMONS OF ADDISON ROAD: The singersongwriter presents an evening of praise and worship along with guests I Am They. Sa, 3/9, 6:30pm. $8. Jesus Christ Spirit Filled Church, 3175 Goldy Way, Sparks, (775) 750-4431.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.


D I S C O V E R T H E N I G H T O N A W H O L E N E W L E V E L

H A R R A H â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

L A K E

T A H O E

N I G H T C L U B W E â&#x20AC;&#x2122; R E

B L O W I N G

T H E

L I D

O F F

T H E

N I G H T

I T â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S T H E U LT I M AT E I N T R E N D S E T T I N G E N T E R TA I N M E N T. F R I D AY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; S AT U R D AY DOORS OPEN 10:30PM CALL NOW FOR BOOTH AND BOTTLE SERVICE 2 % 3 % 2 6!4 ) / . 3           s 0 % % + . ) ' ( 4 # , 5 "  # / -

CELEBRIT Y SATURDAYS A PR I L 6

# P e e k Ta h o e Must be 21 to enter. Management reserves the right to change or discontinue this offer without notice. Restrictions apply. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC. T1600-13-31

OPINION â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; NEWS â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; GREEN â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; FEATURE STORY â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; ARTS&CULTURE â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; IN ROTATION â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; ART OF THE STATE â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; FOODFINDS â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; FILMâ&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; MUSICBEAT â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; THIS WEEK â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; MISCELLANY â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; MARCH 7, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x192; | â&#x20AC;&#x192; V1_90002.1_4.93x11.5_4c_Ad.indd 1

RN&R â&#x20AC;&#x192;

|â&#x20AC;&#x192;

35

2/22/13 3:46 PM


Treat yourself to gift certificates up to

75% OFF!

Visit www.newsreview.com GIFT CERTIFICATES FROM RESTAURANTS, BARS, CLUBS, TATTOO, RETAIL, THEATER, SALONS, SPAS, GOLF, VACATIONS & MORE 36 

| 

RN&R   | 

march 7, 2013


Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

Live like a rockstar Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Shawn 800-716-0048 (AAN CAN)

SCHOOLS AND TRAINING Train for an Exciting Career in Beauty! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute of Cosmetology Reno Campus Call Now 1-877-205-4113 Train for a New Career in Massage or Healthcare! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute Sparks Campus 1-866-467-0094

Paid In Advance! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001 Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station.com (AAN CAN) S’ing serious long-term friends to scratch build business & tech side of MP/ media production co...in Reno. 707-386-6365

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Treat Yourself To A Massage 24hrs, 7days, outcall only. Hotels/Motels. Serving Reno, Sparks Ann: 775-329-0606 Lic #NVMT.140

Skilled Licensed Massage $40 1st Time Special 775-443-6278 #NVMP954

ine

more mind body & spirit onl

www.newsreview.com

Music Instrument Repair Expert in Electric & Acoustic String Instrument. Service & Repair for over 30 years. 775-225-8297

this paper.

Discover the “Success & Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1-800-470-7545 (AAN CAN)

BULLETIN BOARD

Recycle

ATTN: Local People Needed Work from home online $500-$4500/mo FT/PT, full training, tools & support. Call Kathy at 1-888-248-6783

Attn Musicians move in specials on rehersal studios. Gate hrs 24hrs 7 days a week, Call Bergin Way Self Storage 775-322-8024

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (AAN CAN)

AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acres-only $99/month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Ownder financing. West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com (ANN CAN)

this paper.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN)

MUSICIAN SERVICES

Recycle

AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Feel The Sensation & Relaxation Of Massage Swedish, Deep Tissue Call David 762-7796 Office $50 Outcall $75 Lic #NVMT1086

GENERAL $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-great-­ pay.com (AAN CAN)

GENERAL

APARTMENT RENTALS

Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.howtowork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN)

HEALTH/PERSONALS/ MISCELLANEOUS: PELVIC/ TRANSVAGINAL MESH? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and present time? If the patch required removal due to complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727

Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

WANTED TO BUY CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Dating Easy

WARNING HOT GUYS!

775.323.7575

Reno

made

Reno

775.334.6666 775. 77 75. 5.334 .334 334. 4..66 .666 6666 66

Carson City

Carson 775.888.9995

FREE

FREE to listen & reply to ads!

775.888.9100 To Listen and Reply to Ads!

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers call

MegaMates.com

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 3027

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers:

1-888MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2460

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   MARCH 7, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

37

R

th


reinvent yourself

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Maybe you’re

not literally in exile. You haven’t been forced to abandon your home, and you haven’t been driven from your power spot against your will. But you may, nevertheless, be feeling banished or displaced. It could be due to one of the conditions that storyteller Michael Meade names: “We may experience exile as a lack of recognition, a period of transition, an identity crisis, a place of stuckness, or else having a gift and no place to give it.” Do any of those describe your current predicament, Aries? The good news, Meade says, is that exile can shock you awake to the truth about where you belong. It can rouse your irrepressible motivation to get back to your rightful place.

at

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do you have

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF:

a recurring nightmare that has plagued you? If so, I suspect it will recur again soon. Only this time, Taurus, you will beat it. You will trick or escape or defeat the monster that’s chasing you. Or else you will outrun the molten lava or disperse the tornado or fly up off the ground until the earth stops shaking. Congratulations on this epic shift, Taurus. Forever after you will have more power over the scary thing that has had so much power over you.

- Convenient Class Schedules - Limitless Career Opportunities - Learn from the Experts - Get into the Workforce Sooner

HAIR • SKIN • NAILS

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The following

NOW enrolling

855.598.4016 Financial Aid available to those who qualify

RENO 5093 S. McCarran Blvd.

marinello.com

Accredited by NACCAS | Programs vary by location

Defining Beauty Education Since 1905

Career Placement assistance for graduates For Gainful Employment disclosures, visit www.marinello.com/disclosure

RNR313RNO

GEM FAIRE MRLO_11587_RenoNews-Reno_March_4.9x5.67.indd 1

2/19/13 3:57 PM

March 15, 16, 17 Grand Sierra Resort & Casino { 2500 E. 2nd St. }

FRI. 12-6 | SAT. 10-6 | SUN. 10-5 - General admission $7 weekend pass ü Huge selection from around the world! ü Buy direct from importers & wholesalers ü Free hourly door prize drawings

*Br

ing this ad for

one FREE admission GemFaire.com

Gems Beads

Jewelry Crystals Minerals Findings

503.252.8300 info@gemfaire.com

38   |  RN&R   | 

MARCH 7, 2013

*Not valid with other offer. One coupon per customer.

request for advice appeared on Reddit: “My identical twin is stuck in an alternate dimension and she can only communicate with me by appearing as my own reflection in mirrors and windows. How can I tell her I don’t like what she’s done to her hair?” This question is a variant of a type of dilemma that many of you Geminis are experiencing right now, so I’ll respond to it here. I’m happy to say that you will soon get an unprecedented chance to commune directly with your alter egos. Your evil twin will be more available than usual to engage in meaningful dialogue. So will your doppelgänger, your shadow, your mirror self and your stunt person.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Usually

I advise Cancerians to draw up precise borders and maintain clear boundaries. As a crab myself, I know how important it is for our well-being that we neither leak our life force all over everything nor allow others to leak their life force all over us. We thrive on making definitive choices and strong commitments. We get into trouble when we’re wishy-washy about what we want. OK, having said all that fatherly stuff, I now want to grant you a partial and temporary license to get a little wild and fuzzy. Don’t overdo it, of course, but explore the smart fun you can have by breaking some of your own rules and transgressing some of the usual limits.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the course of

formulating his theory of evolution, Charles Darwin read many books. He developed a rather ruthless approach to getting what he needed out of them. If there was a particular part of a book that he didn’t find useful, he simply tore it out, cast it aside and kept the rest. I recommend this as a general strategy for you in the coming week, Leo. In every situation you’re in, figure out what’s most valuable to you and hone in on that. For now, forget the irrelevant and extraneous stuff.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here’s a passage from Charles Dickens’ novel Great Expectations: “It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.” Judging from the astrological omens, Virgo, I suspect your life may be like that in the coming days. The emotional tone could be sharply mixed with high contrasts between vivid sensations. The nature of your opportunities may seem warm and bright one moment, cool and dark the next. If you regard this as interesting rather than difficult, it won’t be a problem, but rather an adventure.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I worked as

a hair stylist in Chicago’s Gold Coast for 20 years with some of the most gorgeous women and men in the world,” writes sculptor Rich Thomson. “Once I asked a photographer who shot for the big magazines how he picked out the very best models from among all these great-looking people. His response: ‘Flaws. Our flaws are what make us interesting, special, and exotic. They define us.’” My challenge to you, Libra, is to meditate on how your supposed imperfections and oddities are essential to your unique beauty. It’s a perfect moment to celebrate—and make good use of—your idiosyncrasies.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The genius of Leonardo da Vinci was in part fueled by his buoyant curiosity. In his work as an artist, musician, inventor, engineer and writer, he drew inspiration from pretty much everything. He’s your role model for the coming week, Scorpio. Just assume that you will find useful cues and clues wherever you go. Act as if the world is full of teachers who have revelations and guidance specifically meant for you. Here’s some advice from da Vinci himself: “It should not be hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places, in which, if you consider them well, you may find really marvelous ideas.”

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Ready for a reality check? It’s time to assess how well you know the fundamental facts about where you are located. So, let me ask you: Do you know which direction north is? Where does the water you drink come from? What phase of the moon is it today? What was the indigenous culture that once lived where you live now? Where is the power plant that generates the electricity you use? Can you name any constellations that are currently in the night sky? What species of trees do you see every day? Use these questions as a starting point as you deepen your connection with your specific neighborhood on planet Earth. Get yourself grounded!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There’s

a writer I know whose work is brilliant. Her ideas are fascinating. She’s a champion of political issues I hold dear. She’s well-read and smarter than me. Yet her speech is careless and sloppy. She rambles and interrupts herself. She says “uh,” “you know” and “I mean” so frequently, that I find it hard to listen, even when she’s saying things I admire. I considered telling her about this, but decided against it. She’s an acquaintance, not a friend. Instead, I resolved to clean up my own speech—to make sure I don’t do anything close to what she does. This is a strategy I suggest for you, Capricorn: Identify interesting people who are not fully living up to their potential, and change yourself in the exact ways you wish they would change.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

German word Verschlimmbesserung refers to an attempted improvement that actually makes things worse. Be on guard against this, Aquarius. I fear that as you tinker, you may try too hard. I’m worried you’ll be led astray by neurotic perfectionism. To make sure that your enhancements and enrichments will indeed be successful, keep these guidelines in mind: 1. Think about how to make things work better, not how to make things look better. 2. Be humble and relaxed. Don’t worry about saving face, and don’t overwork yourself. 3. Forget about shortterm fixes; serve long-range goals.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Telling

someone your goal makes it less likely to happen,” says musician and businessman Derek Sivers. Numerous studies demonstrate that when you talk about your great new idea before you actually do it, your brain chemistry does an unexpected thing. It gives you the feeling that you have already accomplished the great new idea—thereby sapping your willpower to make the effort necessary to accomplish it! The moral of the story: Don’t brag about what you’re going to do someday. Don’t entertain people at parties with your fabulous plans. Shut up and get to work. This is especially important advice for you right now.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


Think Free

by D. Brian Burghart PHOTO/D. Brian BurgHarT

Make your destiny Charles “Chuck” Kazemi doesn’t seem like the kind of guy who’d start a clothing line, but he did. His idea is simple: Wear your mantra on your chest. The mantra he sells is Make Your Momentum, and he says that people who wear the shirts get a constant reminder that they are in charge of their own destiny. Kazemi took his own advice when he sent an email to this paper just when we needed an interview for 15 Minutes. See the T-shirts on the web at www. makeyourmomentum.com or like him on Facebook www.facebook.com/ makeyourmomentum.

Tell me a little about Make Your Momentum. Make Your Momentum is an idea we came up with in October 2012. It was an idea to get some friends involved in a T-shirt clothing line. Not even a clothing line, for that matter, just a way to do something fun that we could enjoy. The reason I wanted to get some folks involved in it was because the more positive people [there are], the greater the likelihood of success. The success would be greater the louder the voice is. We’re having fun with it. We’ve done a lot of cool stuff. We call it a positive attitude lifestyle movement. We’re just trying to get some minds moving in the right direction: If you dream big and you push hard, you can achieve anything.

I work in the department called Windows Store. It’s essentially a brand new program that was released with Windows 8 that allows developers and OEMs such as HP or Dell to have an app program where the consumer can purchase apps and stuff like that.

So these T-shirts sound sports related to me.

I think those are all good ideas, but how does that come about from a T-shirt? Our motto for Make Your Momentum is Desire+Drive: As big as you can dream, as hard as you can push. Essentially, keeping that message close to mind and close to heart. Some people need a rubber band or a tattoo somewhere visible to kind of remind them to quit smoking—we’ve pretty much … come up with the idea that if you live the attitude, you live the lifestyle. The philosophy for the T-shirt is the only way we know how to do it. But we’re proof that it’s possible because we started with nothing and we’re making something. It’s all because we’re aware of how much we want something, and what we’re going to do to go after it. That’s pretty much it. Being aware and having a constant reminder that you have so much potential, and you need to focus on that more often.

brucev@newsreview.com

he now admits there’s a chance that Obama really was born in Honolulu. Maybe. So where is this story? The numbers say it simply has to exist. In fact—well, wait a sec. I work for one of them there newspapers. Hey, if I just described you, Mr. Tea Party Kook, get a hold of us here at the RN&R. I think I can guarantee—cover story, babe! • Oh, by the way. You did see the story that California is projected to have a balanced budget next year? Just checking. It got kinda buried and lowballed with all the Oscars and Globes and Grammys flying around. But yes, Gov. Brown said that not only do projections show the budget being balanced for California in fiscal ’13/’14, but there’s an actual chance of—wait for it—a surplus! A word rarely seen in stories about government budgets these days. (Various estimates range from a surplus of $1 billion to a deficit of $2 billion). But wasn’t the Golden State gonna slide off the aforementioned Fiscal

OPINION

|

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

ARTS&CULTURE

The big thing about Make Your Momentum is a lot of people think physical momentum is what we’re trying to suggest, and that’s not necessarily the case. Physical momentum is the best example that people may personally relate to—“Yeah, you know, I’ll wear it to the gym.” And in all honesty, it’s a made-in-America T-shirt, it’s 100 percent cotton, it’s a super-fashionable shirt, but it doesn’t really belong in the gym. They’re that comfortable, and people think it belongs there, but that’s the biggest issue I have, is separating the idea that it’s not just a physical attitude, it’s a mental attitude. It’s a lifestyle attitude that if you change your mind, you put yourself in better situations to achieve. It’s not just for sports, but we actually promote sports, too. We actually just sponsored an MMA fighter over the weekend. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

One thing I’m anxiously awaiting is a new self-manufactured government financial crisis. Come on, folks, this ain’t no time to stop now! I mean, after you get me all tizzied up with the thrills and chills of The Debt Ceiling Drama, The Fiscal Cliff Face-off, and The Sequester Molester, I’m now positively strung out on all these wild episodes of Political Chicken. And I have total faith that Congress will cook up a juicy new crisis soon, because it sure doesn’t seem to be getting distracted with any kind of Jobs/ Infrastructure Bill. What up, Boehner? You want to get around to something in that realm? Or are you and your fellow Tea Timers too busy declaring March to be National Tabasco Sauce Month? Another story I’m waiting for is that of the hardcore Tea Party kook, who, because of Obamacare, now has insurance for his cancer-riddled young son. And because his boy is now getting treatment and feeling better and so forth, maybe the kook has now backed off a bit in his hatred for Barack, Harry and Nancy. Just a bit. As in, you know, NEWS

I’ve got a full-time desk job. I’m a vendor at Microsoft Licensing.

What do you do for Microsoft?

Crisis of the month

|

What were you doing before you started this T-shirt line?

|

IN ROTATION

|

Cliff and into the Pacific about three or four years ago? Gee, funny what can happen when you go ahead and goose those taxes on millionaires. • Mitt Romney finally got on the tube last week to have a chat with Chris Wallace of Fox. In the interview, Mitt said about his now infamous 47 percent video, “It was a very unfortunate statement that I made. It’s not what I meant. What I said is not what I believe.” Hmmmm. “What I said is not what I believe.” As one smart aleck online commented, “Uh, isn’t that called lying?” The funny thing is, I thought that video was the one time that us Americans could see exactly what Mitt believes. Which is why he’s currently appearing in La Jolla and not Washington. Ω

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MARCH 7, 2013

|

RN&R

|

39


Highlights from the Collection of El Museo del Barrio, New York through July 7, 2013

Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts E. L. Wiegand Gallery 160 West Liberty Street, Reno, Nevada 89501 775.329.3333 | evadaart.org

Voces y Visiones: Highlights from the Collection of El Museo del Barrio, New York, was jointly organized by El Museo del Barrio and the Nevada Museum of Art. Major sponsorship provided by IGT. Media sponsorship provided by Entravision. Pep贸n Osorio, The Bed (La Cama), 1987. Mixed media installation, 75 x 57 -1/2 x 81-1/2 inches. Collection of El Museo del Barrio, New York. Museum Purchase.


R-2013-03-07