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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 Sheila Leslie . . . . . . . . . . .6 Chanelle Bessette . . . . . .7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .17 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .18

Art of the State . . . . . . .19 Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .22 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .23 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Free Will Astrology . . . .30 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .31

ONE PILL MAKES YOU

SOBER See News, page 8.

WHY SHOULDN’T NEVADA GET ITS POWER FROM NATURAL SOURCES? See Green, page 11.

GREEK LOVE SFoodfinds, page 20.

WEDDING A GRAPHIC ARTS SHOW THAT WAS TOO HOT FOR UNLV COMES TO RENO RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 49

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JANUARY 24–30, 2013

ADVENTURES See Bridal Guide, inside.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Itʼs happen ing in EVENTS 18TH ANNUAL BREW HAHA Raising money for the arts has never been more fun!Sierra Arts Foundation presents its 18th annual fundraiser featuring beers from 35 breweries and live music by Diego’s Umbrella to keep the party hopping. VIP Brewers’ Reception begins at 7PM and includes a rare chance to speak with those who concoct the drafts in a private setting along with notable local Brewers and Chefs discussing beer pairing and draft education. Breweries include: Silver Peak, Great Basin, New Belgium, Newcastle, Pyramid, Merchant du Vin, Anderson Valley, North Coast, Heineken, Mammoth, Stone, Deschutes, Big Sky, Sierra Nevada, Alaskan, Kona, Red Hook, Sam Adams and Rail City. Raffle prizes, nohost bar and light snacks will also be available. F, 1/25, 8PM, $50 general; $65 VIP. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

ACTIVITIES SPANISH SPRINGS TODDLER TIME Designed to encourage a love for books and stories, listening skills and interaction with others. Stories, songs, finger plays and wiggle action. Th, 10:30-10:50AM through 1/31. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs. (775) 424-1800 100 BLANKETS OF COMPASSION Join the Lord of Mercy Lutheran Church in making fleece tied blankets for our area’s homeless. 1/26 10AM-3PM. Sa, 1/26, 10AM-3PM. $10 donation per person for materials. Lord of Mercy Lutheran Church, 3400 Pyramid Way. (775) 358-7863 FILM AND DISCUSSION Join us for a showing of the award-winning documentary “For the Bible Tells Me So”. Su, 1/27, 3-6PM, free. Lord of Mercy Lutheran Church, 3400 Pyramid Way (775) 358-7863

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SPANISH SPRINGS STORYTIME Stories and activities, especially for the preschool child. M, 10:30-11am through 1/28. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 E-READER CAFE Learn how to download library e-books and audiobooks to your electronic device. Please bring your library card, device with USB cable and a basic understanding. Th, 4-5PM through 3/28. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 CONVERSATION CORNER Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions. W, 4:30-6PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 3523200 FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 CONVERSATION CAFE The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month. 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 BEADS AND BOOKS Learn basic beading techniques with volunteer beading expert, Jamie, and work on projects with other beaders. First Su of every month, 1-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP Jean Peters guides this class for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 CROCHET CONNECTION Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 MEDITERRANEAN NIGHT Our first theme night of the year! Join us for a sampling of flavors from the Mediterranean. Sa, 1/26, 3-10PM. Call for details.Vista Grille Restaurant, 1250 Disc Dr. (775) 626-9922

MUSIC ESCALADE Th, 1/24, 7PM, F, 1/25, 8PM and Sa, 1/26, 8PM, no cover. John

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 SHAKA F, 1/25, 6PM, Sa, 1/26, 6PM and Su, 1/27, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 METAL ECHO: GRUNGE METAL ROCK TRIBUTE Paying tribute to their favorite rock, grunge and metal bands like Alice In Chains, Metallica, TOOL, Jane’s Addiction, Iron Maiden, Pantera, Pearl Jam, Three Days. F, 1/25, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 BILL DAVIS Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 MIMIC Sa, 1/26, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 KEITH ALAN HARTRANFT Su, 1PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 WALLE LARSON W, 1/30, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 SCOT MARSHALL Th, 1/31, 5:30PM, F, 2/1, 6PM and Sa, 2/2, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 CHOCOLATE MARTINI Th, 1/31, 7PM, F, 2/1, 8PM and Sa, 2/2, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 KARAOKE ASPEN GLEN BAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd. 89436 / (775) 354-2400 SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861 OPEN MIC GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY! CITY OF SPARKS Mayor: Geno Martini. Council members: Julia Ratti, Ed Lawson, Ron Smith, Mike Carrigan, Ron Schmitt. City Manager: Shaun Carey. Parks & Recreation Director: Tracy Domingues. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 3532311 or through the City of Sparks website. WEB RESOURCES: www.sparksitshappeninghere.com www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com THIS SECTION IS PROVIDED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE BY THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW AND IS NOT FUNDED OR AFFILIATED WITH THE CITY OF SPARKS


EDITOR’S NOTE

LETTERS

Spring forward

Back at ya

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. OK, I’ve written about seasonal affective disorder before. Basically, for me, it’s just the blues when I spend too much time out of the sun. I honestly think that’s a big chunk of why I’m a gardener—I just feel better when I spend more time in the sun. This year, I built my hoophouse for winter gardening, and then went right ahead and got caught up in other things and never planted a winter garden—even though I wrote about my plans in this column. So, now, I find myself without a garden and without a reason to spend time outside in these frigid temperatures. And so, my friends, I’m crabby. But I do know one thing that’s incredibly inexpensive yet makes a massive impact on a person’s life: a coat of paint. So Kelly, Hunter and I put our heads together to figure out a color blue to put on a wall in my upstairs hallway, and there you have it: Instant mood enhancer. I do realize, though, as I look at the colors throughout my house, that I do have a peculiarly Mexican palette. I love the bright, bold colors. This wall is a strident—pretty much Pantone—true blue, and I’d think it would look horrible on anyone’s wall but mine. That lift reminds me that ever day gets a little longer. We’re only 45 days from the daylight saving time switch, and I know summer is on its way. Lots of changes going down between now and then— getting wood floors, teaching’s starting, my master’s begins, Tracie leaves, and Dennis comes back—things are actually kind of exciting. And those lengthening days mean that soon I’ll be pulling weeds in the back 40. I think I need a couple new fruit trees as well. But now I’m preparing for some real, heart-pounding exhilaration. In about an hour, I’m taking Hunter down to the DMV to take the test for his learner’s permit. I’ve taught a few people to drive over the years. This ought to be fun … for me.

Re “10 Things I Hate About Burning Man” (Feature story, Sept. 6, 2007): I love your “10 worst” and see the silver lining in your writings. I have been to Burning Man 11 straight— figure of speech that is—years and may just go for number 12 ’cause I still love everything about it, except the law enforcement people—they suck, and not in a good way most of the time. (Sometimes they are better than others. Love the Black Rock Rangers for the most part; you can make lifetime friends with some of them.) I agree if you want a good spanking you may as well go to “camp spank your ass.” There is good and some truth in everything you wrote about. Better luck with your flashlight, at least it wasn’t your camera, as you were getting a good shot of your proud drug-laden dump that you were going to share with your camp mates. Thanks for the love, and I send it all back to you. P.S. Yes, taking a bike that is not yours is not cool, that is why there are “yellow” bikes. Can’t these people see colors? William Whipple Reno

License to kill

Re “Guns and clubs” (Editor’s Note, Jan. 3): Some folks are touting that their guns are oiled and loaded, and ready. For what I don’t quite know yet. However, to those looking for bloodlust, when you finally turn off your TV/internet and stealthily venture out with your weapon(s), please be sure to only shoot those folks who are packing guns also? If y’all did that, it would certainly solve this knotty problem for the rest of us. And we thank you kindly, too. No, seriously. Guns are not “tools.” That’s bull scatter. They are weapons designed to kill—defend, if you’d rather. That’s what they do. Like the Terminator, that’s all they do. My apologies to all you ‘responsible’ gun owners who are not in a foaming feeding frenzy. Please put your sane voices into this foray, as I understand more folks die from guns than car wrecks.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Me, I want a back-pack nuke. If you’re close enough and crazy enough to shoot at me, you go out too. A more matriarchal society might fix this. We need more women in government.

ment, please show us where throwing more money at school systems has ever shown a positive result. Better graduate rates and higher scores are a result of better dedicated teachers and better parenting. Religious and charter schools more often than not show better results with lower budgets nationwide.

Craig Bergland Reno

Fred Speckmann Reno

Fred’s take Take 2

Re “What Sandoval should say” (Left Foot Forward, Jan. 10): I welcome Sheila Leslie to the RN&R while being in almost complete disagreement with her point of view. She, like so many of the previous liberal columnists at this newspaper, has little understanding of economics and the source of income by the “rich.” The primary reason for the different rates of taxes paid by the “very rich and the rest of us,” is because the “very rich” pay taxes on capital gains from their investments. What that means is that they risk their already fully taxed money in investments that may show a profit or a loss, sometimes a total loss. Furthermore, without these investors, there would be no jobs for “the rest of us.” She also attacks the mining industry and the low taxes she claims they pay as well as the out-of-state businesses who take profits out of Nevada. Another ridiculous claim. Any local business is free to start up a business in Nevada and keep the profits here. Local investors may also invest in these out-of-state companies and receive their dividends here in Nevada. As to the mining companies that are owned by out-of-state or foreign investors, the same is true. Furthermore, Nevadans are perfectly free to float a Nevada company that can engage in mining wherever they wish. The fact so often forgotten is that mining is a very expensive business to engage in and requires investors nation- and worldwide. I would suggest that instead of continuing in these absurd charges against business she and the Legislatures welcome investment by companies in Nevada so that they can employ Nevadans so that the state can benefit from a stronger business tax base.

Re “‘Battle Born’ beginnings led to libertarian enlightenment” (The Liberty Belle, Jan. 10): Chanelle Bessette is a welcome addition to the Reno News & Review. As a self-proclaimed Libertarian, her views are not exactly what I would call a conservative voice as described by Brian Burghart in his introduction of the column, but a welcome new voice nevertheless. I can only hope that her somewhat liberal social views will not interfere with her otherwise conservative views. As a 21-year-old soon to graduate from UNR, we can’t expect perfection but welcome her willingness to learn about and recognize the liberal foolishness that seems to be the general opinion of the RN&R. Fred Speckmann Reno

Forgot us Re “Homeless in Reno” (Feature story, Jan. 3): Your article “Homeless in Reno” had a big gaping hole in it: the office next to Project Restart. It’s called the Tom Vetica Resource Center, and in there we provide resources for homeless people to use in their job searches, like computer access and telephones. Plus, we also have outreach from several organizations, including the Veteran’s Hospital and Food Stamps. And it is run almost exclusively by volunteers. There is only one person, my very kindhearted supervisor Karen Wilcox, who is paid to be there. I know this because I have volunteered there nearly two years running now. So just to let you people know you should have all your facts in a row before you print an article. Jon Bradbury Reno

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Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Tracie Douglas Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Nora Heston, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

FILET OF SOUL

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Re “Low down dirty shame” (Ask a Mexican, Jan. 3): TV commentators ought to get their facts straight before going before the camera blabbing. Having said that, what has happened is that the closed hospitals have or will transfer the load to private clinics, which should work. The clinics can work leaner and more efficiently is the hope. I don’t attribute all closings of hospitals and clinics to the undocumented. Many of them were poorly run and organized to start with. By law no one can be turned away for care. However, it isn’t just the undocumented who don’t pay. Many others give phony addresses and/or phone numbers to the hospital when they are registered. This means that when the hospital sends the bill, the hospital will never collect and absorbs/passes on the cost. Many legal American citizens use this ruse as well. A sick poor person shouldn’t be afraid to seek medical care—many would be coughing raging tuberculosis in your face because they were afraid to go to the hospital. Yes, we do need better enforcement of our immigration laws; we can’t have criminals, drug dealers, perverts, terrorists etc., coming into our country ... but let’s not blame all our troubles on those immigrants who are here from necessity to earn a living. It should be pointed out too, for the privilege of having cheap clothes, food, and the products of any other Mexican-immigrant-driven cheap labor, we pay vis-a-vis our government and private insurance for immigrant health care. It’s certainly not the kind of care the rest of us get because those clinics have way more sick people than they have paid help. And too, one thing you can keep in mind is that unless these people are not spending any money at all for anything, they’re still paying sales tax and likely property tax (that landlords pay but pass on to renters), so it’s not like it’s “free.” Most undocumented immigrants don’t even earn enough to have income tax liability. Reta Tallman Reno

As to the low standing of school investExecutive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Gil Egeland, Neil Lemerise, John Miller, Russell Moore, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

True tax facts

ART OF THE STATE

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover design: Hayley Doshay

JANUARY 24, 2013

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4   |   RN&R   |   january 24, 2013


BIG HE A SMALL H

by Tracie Douglas

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25kWhat type of comic book would SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) you write? Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 5555 S. Virginia St. Chesa Keane Computer consultant

I would write a political comic book, because it’s pretty funny to see what politicians do and the way they take themselves so seriously. My favorite superhero is Iron Man, but I don’t have a favorite comic book.

Carol Coker Cattle rancher

I would write a comic book about all the New Year’s resolutions made and then look at what we really spend all day doing. It would be an adult comic book because kids don’t make resolutions. Growing up, I loved Superman, but my favorite comic book was Veronica.

Billie Dorning

Pep talk

Staff education coordinator

Even though it’s easy to think of January as the beginning of the year, in many ways, it’s the middle. Often, January is the month when people’s get up and go gets up and gets gone. Think about it. Students are starting their third quarter or second semester. Summer seems ages away, and the dark, cold mornings—dragging on yet another sweater after another long, cold night—just seem insurmountable. Hope seems hard to generate. We felt it with Barack Obama’s second inauguration, too. The last four years were a long slough through a mire of ugly partisanship. How can we stand four more years of party posturing and roadblocks? Obama’s positive inauguration speech just appeared like so much malarky— “Everybody come together”—when that very coming together seemed callow for the last four years and seemed to discard the historic social moment and momentum. Liberals wanted to yank this country to the left in the exact way George W. Bush tore it to the right for the eight years previous—straining its very seams. And it is patently obvious that nearly half the country dreads the next four years because they think Obama took us off track to the left. They see a historical moment that is a radical departure from the America they always knew and from which they derived pride. And the politicians play that tune to their own benefit in an endless loop. Many of us, three weeks ago, set New Year’s resolutions, and we’re already tired, already disappointed in our progress, already thinking about quitting. Some of us will smoke cigarettes when a few drinks overwhelm our admittedly weak inhibitions—even though we know that their toxic substances contribute to our own untimely deaths. Many of us will make a decision to ignore—just for the morning, just this once—our three-times-a-week commitOPINION

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I’ve read a lot of comic books, and though I haven’t thought about writing one, I’d probably write something with a futuristic twist on what’s the version of a superhero when the economy changes. I didn’t have a favorite comic book, I just read them all, and I really like Captain America.

ment to exercise. Some of us will opt for that office doughnut despite our towering triglycerides and bulging waistlines. Conversations every night with the kids—forget that, but don’t forget to log onto Facebook to send a picture of that cute thing your cat did or your fantastic tomato bisque or your cliché meme. An evening of volunteering—it’s just so damned easy to put the feet up on the coffee table and forget your finer resolve. Isn’t there work you brought home from the office? Well, if you’re one of the weak—and who’s not?— we’ve got some news for you. The job isn’t over. If you fail now, if you fall down on the job, now, at this moment when the going is just getting hard, you can expect to die with those things that mattered unresolved. But you have the capacity for almost infinite effort. As long as you keep putting one foot in front of the other, making good choices—don’t pick up that smoke, do pick up that telephone, don’t eat the doughnut, do walk around the block, don’t log onto Facebook, do talk about your children’s day—you will get stronger. It’s like lifting a weight: The repetition increases the ability. And pretty soon, you’ll have developed a habit of strength, and the impossible is almost likely. You, this city, this state, and this country all face divisive obstacles in the years ahead. During the last four years, this country has shown itself willing to fight until the last drop of sweat is spilled, but in the next four years, we can expect to have to find a new normal for education, guns, immigration, drone warfare, and the rights and freedoms of individuals. So get off your ass. We’re a long way from the finish line. Ω IN ROTATION

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Tim Dorning Power plant operator

I’d write something big and bulky, where the characters were robots, and they smashed stuff. My comic book would have a bazillion gadgets like Inspector Gadget with muscles instead of stupidity. I loved Superman and Superman comics because he had unclenching morals.

Ethan Christenson Railroad conductor

I love comics, and I’d probably write one based off the Thor stories. I love the whole Viking thing. Of course my favorite comic book character is Thor, but I also like the Venom series of Spider-Man.

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JANUARY 24, 2013

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LEFT FOOT FORWARD

Suffer the children Whenever a study comes out that portrays Washoe County in a poor light, the immediate reaction is usually to attack the study’s methodology. If that doesn’t work, community leaders often smugly blame Clark County for the state’s poor ranking, implying a certain superiority that naturally infuriates our southern citizens. Such was the case recently with by the publication of a new “Quality Sheila Leslie Counts” report in Education Week. The report gave Nevada a ranking of 49th in the country (thank god for South Dakota this time), with a grade of C-. The report used indicators of student achievement, education standards, financing, and teacher accountability to determine the rankings. Nevada’s worst score in the six breakout areas of the study was in the Chance for Success index, where there was no South Dakota to save us from being dead last. No surprise, really, since this index is scored on such measurements as the number of children who go to preschool and the

number who drop out of high school, two measurements where Nevada was ranked 50th in the most recent Kids Count Survey. The breakout of School Financing caught my eye, however, when I saw our highest ranking, an A- in the area of equity of funding, and our lowest score, an F, in spending. One can presume the Nevada Plan, which has guided K-12 funding for nearly 50 years, is the basis for our high equity score and our incredible aversion to a corporate profits tax as the reason for our F in funding. Jim Guthrie, Nevada’s new Superintendent of Education, now hired and fired by the governor as the result of the educational “reform” movement approved by the 2011 Legislature, told the Reno GazetteJournal its readers shouldn’t worry too much about the study results: “By comparison (to Las Vegas), Washoe looks like someone’s dream.” That statement must have come as a shock to parents whose children are trying to learn chemistry in an overcrowded lab or whose elementary

school doesn’t have an art or PE teacher unless the parents raise the money. I can almost hear the sighs of disgust from school counselors who struggle constantly to keep up with too many students with serious behavioral problems, including suicidal ideation. Nevada Democrats unveiled their legislative priorities for education earlier this month, calling for an expansion of full-day kindergarten and early childhood education. Gov. Sandoval responded with a suggested budget increase of just $10 million a year, an underwhelming investment that leaves half of Nevada’s elementary schools without full-day kindergarten. The Democrats also propose a change in the funding formula to account for the higher costs of providing education in districts with higher numbers of students living in poverty and English language learners. There are just 14 states that currently do not account for the cost of low-income students as part of the educational funding formula, and just three states that do not pro-

vide additional funding for teaching English language learners. Adjusting the formula to account for these needs makes sense, but only if the funding pie gets substantially larger. In true Nevada fashion, however, no one is seriously talking about raising the funds to do this. In reality, the new “funding equity” plan will mean shifting existing funds from Washoe and the rurals to Clark County. In a North-South funding war, it is clear who the winner will be, with more than two-thirds of the Legislators representing Clark County. Washoe’s “dream” scenario will be more of a nightmare as additional cuts are implemented. It will be impossible to argue that Clark County’s children should continue to struggle so Washoe children can go to better schools. Instead of arguing over whose children should suffer more, why are we not insisting that education funding be significantly enhanced so all of Nevada’s children have a better Chance for Success? Ω

To read the whole Quality Counts report, go to www.edweek.org/ew/qc/ index.html.

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THE LIBERTY BELLE

Reform education in Nevada Earlier this month, Nevada’s proposed education policies were given a rank of 21st in the nation, a positive step up from Nevada’s historically low national rankings. The political group behind this report card is StudentsFirst, an education advocacy organization based out of Sacramento led by Michelle Rhee, former chancellor of the Washington, D.C., public school by system from 2007 to 2010. Chanelle Bessette When Rhee stepped up to the plate to reform Washington schools, she made enemies right off the bat. After firing 36 principals, cutting 121 office jobs, and closing 23 schools within the first year of her position, she gained a reputation for controversial decision-making. As she continued to ax employee positions and make big cuts, teachers’ unions and Washington community members grew outraged at her decision to do away with teacher tenure and instead institute incentives for teachers to take pay increases for student achievement. In 2010, Rhee and the

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Washington, D.C., teachers’ unions agreed on a contract that would provide 20 percent pay increases and up to $30,000 in bonuses for strong student achievement. While Rhee’s series of restructures had its enemies, StudentsFirst is taking an interest in Nevada’s schools and is recognizing the momentum that it has gained for its educational system in the last few years. With its 56 percent high school dropout rate and a steady history of being among the lowest percentiles of standardized testing, it’s clear that Nevada has needed to change for a long time. Although StudentsFirst has backed Nevada’s proposed education plan, its grade is still equivalent to a D. But the future is looking up. While Nevada still needs to reevaluate its system of laying off teachers by seniority, there are some promising changes on the horizon. In his “State of the State” address on Jan. 16, Gov. Brian Sandoval said that education and the economy will be his top priorities for the coming year. While he spoke about aggressive

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ART OF THE STATE

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reforms of Nevada schools (such as performance-based teacher evaluations), he also spoke about the responsibility of “parents, educators, school board members, legislators and governors” to also have a hand in providing proper educational resources to Nevada’s youth. As segue into his discussion about the state’s economy, Sandoval said, “A quality education is the foundation of economic growth—the key to improving quality of life in our state.” I believe in this message as well. The growth of a productive economy stems from the growth of a well-educated community. While I’m not suggesting that everyone is cut out for a college education, I entreat students take full advantage of the range of opportunities that are available to them. After all, a high school education is now considered the baseline for a minimum wage job, and without marketable skills, that’s where a person will stay. In my time as a student in Nevada’s education system, I

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have had friends who took to the structure of public schools like fish to water. But I have also had friends who, despite their strong intellects, did not thrive in or feel motivated by our education system. While the right group of teachers can do amazing things to inspire their students to learn, the fact remains that many students don’t respond to the current structure. To these students— and parents of these students—it’s important to know that there are other options available. A competitive system where children and parents are allowed to choose their educational programs pushes schools to perform better. Distance education, charter schools, vocational academies and magnet schools are all viable options for acquiring a specialized, challenging curriculum for primary and secondary educations. With the right cuts and a vigorous reformation of Nevada’s educational system, I think our state will have many positive changes to look forward to. Ω

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For more information about StudentsFirst, check out www.studentsfirst.org.

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PHOTO TRACIE DOUGLAS

Pharmacist Chuck Boisselle of Sierra Health Mart in Reno said he was not aware that Naltrexone is being used to treat chronic alcoholics, and he has not filled any Naltrexone prescriptions for that use.

More than a pretty look “We shouldn’t care how much money has been spent on the artwork on I-80 because it makes Reno look good,” said Derek Wilson of Reno. “That art is going to last a long time, which makes it cost effective, and it’s a constant reminder of what is special about our area.” Drivers no longer run the gauntlet of construction on I-80 and 580/395, and they now see representations of native species of animals, fish and plants on the sound barriers. The Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) puts aside 3 percent of highway improvement funds for use specifically for aesthetic enhancements along the freeways. That means approximately $2.22 million was spent in 2012. A look through the I-80 corridor will produce several bevies of quail, sieges of heron, flocks of egrets, stands of cottonwood trees and schools of trout. A wild mustang perches above the Reno sign at the Virginia Street exit, heading west and patterns made of different colored rock appear all along 580/395. “I think it looks cool,” said Robert Rucker, a retired school teacher. “I’m not too sure about spending taxpayers dollars on it, but I think it’s very representative of our area and it adds something special to the freeways.” Scott Magruder, public information officer for NDOT, said there’s more to the designs than just aesthetics. “The sound barriers have patterns to discourage tagging, and the new sign poles are designed to be almost impossible to climb so that highway signs aren’t tagged either.”

A moldy oldie Single-digit temperatures always send fear into the hearts and wallets of homeowners who pray the water pipes don’t break. The unlucky are faced with the unpleasant task of drying out carpets, walls, flooring and cabinets. If that doesn’t happen quickly, mold can become a difficult and expensive issue. Alan Hoffman, owner of Homegate Realty in Reno, says if there is a broken pipe, turn the water to the house off and then call the insurance company: “The insurance company will send out an adjuster who will provide an approved list of contractors to use, and the homeowner should definitely use those contractors. If problems arise later, the homeowner can go back to the insurance company to make it right, so that protects the homeowner.” John Langondis disagrees. He’s the owner of A-Plus Cleaning and Restoration. “The insurance adjusters will push contractors on the homeowners who might not be certified to do this work and then when there are problems later, the homeowner is stuck with the charges,” he said. State Farm Insurance agent Lorri Myler says they do provide the homeowner with a list of approved contractors, but it’s up to the homeowner to pick anyone they want to use. “We don’t shove one contractor on a homeowner, but if they use someone on the approved list, all the work is guaranteed,” she said. Both the Builders Association of Northern Nevada and the Associated General Contractors (AGC) say the homeowner should always check to make sure a contractor is licensed with the State Contractors Board. “Water damage is a very special cleanup situation,” said John Madole, executive director for AGC. “You want to make sure you use the right people because you do not want mold in your home.” For information on local contractors, including complaints, go to the Nevada Contractors Board at nvcontractorsboard.com.

—Tracie Douglas 8

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“These people really want to be here and we know from experience that relapse is a part of recovery,” Strub said. “Throwing them back on the streets isn’t what they need, so we will forgive them as many times as it takes.”

New uses for old drugs

The sober life New drugs give substance abuse recovery programs a shot in the arm

“There are lots of Million Dollar Murrays in Reno,” said Deputy Shawn by Marston, referencing an article in Tracie Douglas the New Yorker written by Malcolm Gladwell about an alcoholic homeless man in Reno who managed to rack up about a million dollars in hospital, ER and jail

“These people really want to be here and we know from experience that relapse is a part of recovery. Throwing them back on the streets isn’t what they need, so we will forgive them as many times as it takes.” Anna Strub Washoe County Social Services

For more information about St. Vincent’s resident program, contact Catholic Charities at (775) 786-5266 or by visiting www.ccsnn.org.

costs over a 10-year period. Murray was a “frequent-flier” who would sometimes be picked up by police or an ambulance several times a day, depending on how drunk he was. For the past two years, Catholic Charities has been supporting a program through their St. Vincent Residency program aimed at helping alcohol- and drug-addicted homeless people by providing a place to live and a complete treat-

ment program. According to Anna Strub, a social worker assigned to the residence program from Washoe County Social Services, these are people who really want to be sober, but need the basics to help them get there. “These people need a place to live where they feel safe and they have all the support necessary to get sober and stay sober,” Strub said. Residents of St. Vincent’s have a specific treatment plan designed around attending Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) and Narcotics Anonymous (N.A.) meetings, taking life skills and job skills classes, and getting a GED or high school diploma. Several government agencies and non-profit agencies come together to provide support and services. The program also helps the residents re-establish their identities by helping them locate birth certificates and Social Security cards. This program is not like some other faith-based programs in Reno where the individual is thrown out of the program for falling off the wagon. The St. Vincent’s Residency program allows for mistakes and slips, only throwing someone out of the program for violence against the staff or residents. Strub says the success rate is quite high, around 70 percent. But because the program allows clients to return, exact figures on how many people continue to do well are a moving target.

There haven’t been many drugs on the market that help alcoholics stop drinking. The most common drug prescribed over the years has been Antabuse, a drug that is meant to cause an aversion to alcohol by causing some nasty side effects if alcohol is taken with it. There is a drug that has been used to help drug addicts stop craving opiates called Naltrexone, which is starting to be used with chronic alcoholics. The drug works by numbing the pleasure center in the brain that craves the continued use of alcohol or drugs. Naltrexone is currently being used by a handful of the residents at St. Vincent’s. It should used under a doctor’s supervision, and doctors are not prescribing it unless the patient is also in a treatment program. Scott Reid grew up between Winnemucca and Valmy and started drinking when he was 13. After years of working on ranches and doing construction, Reid became homeless by choice. “I just didn’t care for a long time, but now I’m ready to do the work, and I want to be sober,” he said. At the age of 50, Reid was one of Reno’s frequent-fliers. “There wasn’t no one who didn’t know me, no cops, no deputies, no ambulance drivers and no firetruck drivers,” he said. “Everyone knows who Reid is.” Reid came into the program when it first started in January 2011. The first time, he stayed for eight months. Then he spent time in jail and eventually came back to St. Vincent’s about three months ago. The Washoe Access to Health Care (HAWC) clinic doctors prescribed Naltrexone to Reid, and he has been taking it just a little over a month. “At first it made me irritable and messed with my sleep, but then it leveled out, and now I don’t really notice it,” Reid said “It also helps with the obsession of thinking about drinking. I usually have trouble staying sober right around three months, so it is helping me.”


Cost benefits

this paper

Gift certificates make great gifts! Visit www.newsreview.com

Million Dollar Murray racked up the charges when he would drop over on a sidewalk. Someone would call 911 and along with police and fire, REMSA would show up. According to Marston, those units arriving at the scene costs about $1,000 for every trip. That didn’t include the charges racked up at the hospitals, which could easily run up to five figures or more. The charge to keep one person in jail per day is approximately $109. Many homeless people end up in jail for days and months, costing thousands of dollars before they are put back on the street. The daily cost for St. Vincent’s Residency program is about $21. Food is provided through several avenues, including the Food Bank of Northern Nevada, Catholic Charities Food Bank, and in some cases, residents have applied for and been given food stamps. A months’ stay in the Washoe County jail costs taxpayers about $3,270. Naltrexone costs about $48 per month, added to the $630 per month cost of the residence program, come out to about $680 per month.

Recycle

HAWC chief executive officer, the evidence is showing that the drug is good for treating chronic alcoholics. But he warns against anyone taking it on their own. “A person needs to be under the care of the prescribing physician who will check for liver disease, kidney issues and any other underlying medical problems before the drug is given,” Ahearn said. “That individual also needs to be in some type of treatment program as well, so that they benefit from all possible services.” Kevin Quint, executive director of Join Together Northern Nevada (JTNN), also said that Naltrexone should be part of a treatment program: “The people who are currently on this drug have been chronic alcoholics who are already willing to try harder to become sober this time around.” Quint is a big supporter of A.A. because he has seen positive benefits over the years: “Personally, I love it. I’ve had friends and family members who’ve done really well in A.A., and I just love the philosophy.” Ω

Not a magic bullet

Naltrexone is not the cure for chronic alcoholics. It is simply another tool in the recovery toolbox. According to Dr. Dan Ahearn,

A good pallet PHOTO/TRACIE DOUGLAS

Angel Guillen, Sr., manager of Falcon Pallets in Reno, recycles pallets from local casinos, rebuilds broken ones, and resells them to large warehouses throughout Washoe County. While Guillen mostly sells to large companies, he will sell small orders, as well as scrap for firewood.

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GREENSPACE Up to ban Several efforts to reduce reliance on plastic products are under way throughout the United States. Waste and Recycling News reported last week that Hawaii is the latest place to pass an ordinance to charge a fee for one-time use plastic bags. “Under the new ordinance, all businesses, including grocery stores, restaurants, farmers’ markets and other retailers must charge a fee for single-use plastic carryout bags,” the report states. “Plastic bags used for bulk items such as meat, fish, nuts, grains, fresh produce, small hardware, clothing and prescription drugs are exempt from the law, according to the county of Hawaii website.” The ordinance went into effect on Jan. 17, and by Jan. 17, 2014, single-use plastic bags will be banned completely. Meanwhile, a plastic water bottle ban has begun in Concord, Mass. The ban was the result of a three-year campaign by local advocacy groups. “It shall be unlawful to sell non-sparkling, unflavored drinking water in single-serving polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles of 1 liter (34 ounces) or less in the Town of Concord on or after January 1, 2013,” according to the town of Concord’s website. An exception was made for water needed in emergency situations. But according to the Huffington Post, some businesses have found loopholes in the new law by selling larger bottles. Reno has its own effort called the Reno Plastic Bag Ban (“Bag lady,” Nov. 22), which seeks to encourage alternative options to plastic bags, but no laws have been set in the region. A map of plastic bag bans throughout the U.S. can be found at http://www.factorydirectpromos.com/plastic-bag-bans. California has more than a dozen. Nevada has none.

Level up The Consumer Electronics Show, held in Las Vegas in early January, showcased dozens of new gadgets, including several intended to make the tech world more sustainable. Environmental website TreeHugger rounded up the most eco-friendly items on display at the convention, including an off-grid solar generator called the Yeti 150, created by a group called Goal Zero. The Yeti 150, which uses a 15W Bolder 15 Solar Panel, takes 12 hours to fully charge and can power devices such as laptops or lights. Another hot item was the Samsung Evolution Kit, which enables people to improve and repair televisions. Rather than upgrading to a newer TV, the Evolution Kit plugs into existing sets and improves image and sound quality. Although the device is much smaller than a new television—it fits in the palm of a hand—and thus has a smaller environmental impact, critics have said the $500 price tag isn’t much incentive for consumers. The lack of ability to repair electronics has long been a sore spot for environmentalists in technology communities—especially manufacturers like Apple, which began using the EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) green certification program last summer after the company came under fire when consumers could not open the devices and make repairs when necessary.

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT If you’re longing for summer’s farmers’ markets, the year-round farmers’ market at the Garden Shop Nursery might be enough to hold you over for a few months. The farmers’ market is held indoors, and features locally made goods and food every Sunday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 3636 Mayberry Drive. For more information, visit www.gardenshopnursery.com.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.

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PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREEN

“We’re importing 90 percent of our energy from out of state,” says Energy Independence for Nevada founder David Gibson.

Independence day What will it take for Nevada to become energy independent?

italian americans

“I’ve realized after several years of working in renewable energy related things that Nevada is just ripe for energy independence,” says David Gibson, founder of the aptly-named Energy Independence for Nevada. “Instead of doing that, by we’re importing 90 percent of our energy from out of state, which is billions of Ashley dollars every year that’s leaving our state economy, rather than staying here Hennefer and being spent locally.” ashleyh@ Gibson is also the community services director for Envirolution, a nonnewsreview.com profit that works with local schools to incorporate sustainable research projects and curriculum. He started Energy Independence for Nevada back in November and set up a Facebook page this month. “With my background in energy efficiency and renewable energy, I kind of realized that if no one else is writing this plan, then I was capable of doing that,” he says. Gibson sees energy independence as an obtainable goal, and he has established four necessary steps to get the ball rolling. “The first step is outreach and awareness, and making sure everyone in the state is aware that Nevada receives enough sunlight that we could power the entire United States, and that they understand how much opportunity there is for efficiency,” he says. Efficiency and conservation are the second step, which includes energy audits and retrofitting for residential and business properties. Visit www.energy “At the home level, and throughout many businesses and buildings, there’s independencenv.com a lot of opportunity,” he says. “I’ve read many studies that say Nevada could for more information. reduce our energy consumption by 33 to 40 percent, which would right off the bat save us a third of the money we spend in energy bills.” Gibson recently purchased a home with an energy efficient mortgage, which helps finance retrofits upfront. He was able to reduce his energy consumption by 60 percent, and cut his energy costs down from $6,000 per year to $2,500 per year. But although the mortgage program has been around since the early 1990s, he’s still just one of 12 households in the state who have participated. Compared to 2008, when no one enrolled in the program, Gibson sees it as progress, but notes the potential for economic growth. He’s set up workshops for realtors and loan lenders in order to get more information to potential homebuyers. “There were approximately 20,000 homes sold with FHA loans in Nevada last year,” he says. “If even half of those completed energy efficient mortgages … that’s $75 million injected into our state economy instantaneously.” The third and fourth steps involve installing on-site renewable energy resources, including wind, solar and geothermal, and subsequently, implementing grid-scale renewable energy through large projects. “Ideally, everything will be on site,” he says. “Large grid-scale projects can also be used to export energy to California or Arizona or Utah.” Gibson prefers to focus first on Reno with the hope that the city will lead the way for the rest of the state. He’s optimistic about the new City Council members, but also wants to see the State Legislature come on board. He looks to the examples set in other U.S. states, including New York and California, which have both launched state-wide sustainability programs this year. “We need the Nevada governor and the State Legislature to come on board and say, ‘Here is our plan going forward,’” he says. “We need a concrete plan and a concrete timeline.” Ω OPINION

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Italian Americans have become some of the most celebrated players in baseball — DiMaggio, Berra, Rizzuto, Lasorda, LaRussa, Zito. ’s documentary exhibition honors their contributions and those of 450 others who have left a lasting imprint on the game.

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In Rotation 18 | Art of the State 19 | Foodfinds 20 | Fi¬m 21

lace. With this book, Lust [to Dust], that’s what I wanted to do. I walked to take on a theme that hadn’t really been dealt with that much in comics. There’s been a little bit of it. There’s Rent Girl that was done by Laurenn McCubbin and a few other short stories out there. But for the most part, it’s a topic that was vacant, that hadn’t been occupied by very many people.

Can you elaborate about why prostitution? What about the subject appeals to you?

Tell me a little about you. Where’d you go to school? How long have you been doing art?

Artist Michael Ogilvie is the curator and organizing force behind Lust to Dust, a graphic novel anthology about prostitution in Nevada. He details some of the motivations behind the book, and the trials and tribulations of its production, in this week’s cover story. An exhibition of the artwork in the book will be presented at Reno Art Works, 1995 Dickerson Road, on Jan. 26 at 7 p.m. and featuring performances by Bazooka Zoo, The Siren Society, Empire Improv and Two Shits Poetry. Books available at the exhibition or at www.lusttodust.com.

Professionally, being paid, for about 15 years. I guess that’s the difference between doing art professionally and not professionally is how long you’ve been getting paid for it. But my whole life I’ve been drawing. I didn’t jump out of the womb with a pencil in my hand, but I found it when I was a kid, and it never left. I went to [the University of Nevada, Reno], got my degree at UNR. I got my degree in painting at UNR and my master’s from [the University of Nevada, Las Vegas].

When I started doing this book, when I started putting it together, I was at a point of my life when I had been laid off. I didn’t have a whole lot of freelance work coming in, so I didn’t have much money coming in. It was becoming pretty desperate. I had to move back home with my mom as a 33-year-old man. And I just felt like I’d hit rock bottom, and I thought what were my options at the time. I had to have an income coming in, like most people do. So I needed to get a job. And at that point in time the job market was so terrible—this was circa 2010—that I felt like I didn’t have any other options other than become a soldier or a criminal. That was really what I thought. Then I started to think, what if I was a female? For a female, their options are pretty much the same except you could add prostitute to that list of choices. And I thought, ‘Oh, I could be a prostitute!’ I thought it was kind of funny at first, and then I thought, ‘You know what? It’s kind of weird that I even need to think about this option.’ It became more and more interesting to me. I started looking into it, the history. I grew up in Nevada, and it’s been a part of the culture here for a long time. For better or worse—I don’t really want to place a value judgment on it, but it’s a part of it, and it’s unique to this state. That was it. It was basically from a sheer lack of choices. I thought, I can’t become a prostitute, but I can find out what that’s like from people who do that, and maybe lampoon it, maybe highlight some things people didn’t know, and just bring something out that other artists haven’t dealt with in the past. It is a theme that has been

about the comic BIG HEWhat ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k book/graphic novel/graphic narrative form appeals to you? SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

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I really like the quality of a book. It takes a form of art that has been cheap for the most part of its history—most of it is saddle-stitched, most of it is printed on crappy printers—and it elevates it. The content might not be elevated. I try to make the content elevated with what we have. But it always seems to deal with the abject. Comics tend to touch on racier topics than most art forms because that just appeals to the popu-

dealt with by many artists and many writers for thousands of years.

Well, it is the oldest profession. Tell me about some of the contributing artists. I’ll start the ones closest to home. Evan Dent—I went to school with him at UNR and we’ve been pals for a long time. He’s a very talented artist, and his ability is multifaceted. He doesn’t just do one thing. Like he doesn’t do comics. He can do just abut anything. A lot of his work is laced with humor. Often it’s dark humor, but [I] appreciate that more than anything because it’s usually closer to reality. His work’s just great. He was in [Ogilvie’s previous anthology] Drunk book too. … The artists that were in this book, many of them were in Drunk, and many of them were great to work with. And that was a big reason why I invited them to do another book. … For all the artists, it was important that they were talented, that they had a good understanding of narrative form, of storytelling. Another thing—the last book I did, Drunk, was a great book, and I really enjoyed it, but it leaned toward almost a sad vibe. And we’re dealing with the theme of prostitution, so of course it can go that way really easy, but I didn’t want that to happen. So I wanted artists who know how to deal with life in a humorous way.

Anything you want to say about the exhibition up here? Pan [Pantoja] and Aric [Shapiro]— those guys are really starting something. They’re really a part of something that I think Reno’s needed for a long time. It’s really a center for art making and experimentation. I know downtown is starting to do that, but it really courted the artists that were already established. What Aric and Pan are doing—of course as artists they’re established there, but it’s open to artists who aren’t, and I think that kind of receptivity to up-an-coming artists is needed in any community. Otherwise, it’ll just grow stale. … I think it’s going to be a great event. —Brad Bynum bradb@newsreview.com


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1/18/13 3:04 PM


Letters from the West The Gold Rush Letters of E. Allen Grosh and Hosea B. Grosh Edited by Ronald M. James and Robert E. Stewart University of Nevada Press

I’m not quite sure how to handle writing about The Gold Rush Letters of E. Allen Grosh and Hosea B. Grosh. It’s definitely a different by D. Brian Burghart kind of a thing for this feature, but we’ve moved in the last few years from our brianb@ restrictive definition of what Western Lit newsreview.com is. This newspaper’s definition of Western Lit was “Writers of fiction who live in or write about the West,” but it’s basically become “whatever I feel like reading by authors who live in or write about the West.” And now, it’s apparently “lived in.” As the title expresses, this is a collection of around 80 letters. They are mostly letters written to the East Coast family members of two brothers, Ethan Allen Grosh and Hosea Ballou Grosh, who came out West with the ’49ers for the California gold rush. Dennis Myers wrote about the Nevada Historical Society’s efforts to acquire the collec-

tion back in 2008 (“Letter Perfect,” April 10, 2008). I’ve got a couple of things to mention: First, as I write this, I have not yet read every page of this book, although I likely will have before these words see newsprint. Part of the reason for that is that even though the letters are placed sequentially, I didn’t read the book in that way. For one, I already knew the general outline of the work and how the story ended, so I found myself skipping around for highlights, looking at the few pictures and reading the appendixes. Second, these brothers were about as positive as the most irie of Rastafarians. Readers will just not believe how much care these brothers took not to freak out their family back home despite the fact I feel as though I have a fairly realistic view of the privations they suffered. These letters are at once filled with minutiae and epic in their scope. It seems

everything I’ve read on the topic of the brothers talks about the Sept. 7, 1857, letter from Allen Grosh to his father Aaron describing Hosea’s death, but that letter also shows the brilliant optimism the brothers exuded in their writing: “[Hosea’s death] was very sudden—unexpected but very peaceful. Not a shudder, not a gasp, not a change of feature marked the parting of soul and body. He simply fell asleep. It was such a death as God blesses the good with.” The cause of the death was an infection caused by sticking his foot with a pick.

But life and death are more interesting to me than the ravages of dysentery, details of how silver was extracted from ore, or a perpetual motion device the brothers imagined, and the last letter from Allen to F.J. Hoover describing how he and a companion got caught in a blizzard and got frostbite is gut-wrenching. The various letters that followed were saddening in the way that hearing of the death of an old friend or family member is saddening. It’s as though you know that your dead friend would tell the story a different way, and his or her silence is the saddest part of the news. I believe that a lot of people will approach this book in a lot of different ways. I can’t imagine that modern day miners won’t read this in the way that modern day journalists read the Territorial Enterprise. I can’t believe that lovers of historical fiction won’t find themselves entranced by the story of two smart and educated brothers who overcame obstacle after obstacle, only to die, having sampled but not attained their (short) lives’ dreams. There’s something about epistolary books that really make readers feel like they’re truly inside the letter writers’ mind—because they are. And that makes the tragic, brutal endings all the more sympathetic and real. Ω

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Cluster fun

Gilbert Leiker draws whatever he wants whenever he wants.

Gilbert Leiker Gilbert Leiker has been doodling in the margins of his notebooks since he can remember. He by even still has some of his notebooks Nora Heston from high school and college with drawings in them, but he didn’t start making what he calls “cluster drawings” professionally until he was working as a graphic designer. According to Leiker, it all started with an extremely slow computer. He began doodling on scratch paper while he was waiting for his computer to open files. One day, a coworker came in with a frame and told him that when he completed the drawing he was working on, he wanted to frame it and keep it. The office trend caught on as others began making similar requests. The biggest difference between Gilbert Leiker’s show is at Bibo Three Gallery, 945 Leiker’s earlier work and the work he Record St., where it’s creates now is that he fills an entire scheduled to run through Feb. 18. page with the doodles instead of simply filling the margins of notebooks. The drawings themselves are similar.

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“It’s all the stuff that I used to draw in meetings and in classes on the margins but now instead of … just drawing in the corner margin of the page and then throwing it away, I’m now just filling the entire page,” he says. Leiker held his first show at a friend’s record store, Discology, in 2006. Since then he says he tries to hold one or two shows a year to continue to get his artwork out there. Leiker’s current show is at Bibo Three Gallery, 945 Record St., where it’s scheduled to be on view through Feb. 18. Leiker uses reoccurring themes in his work, including two illustrations that can be found in almost every piece he creates—octopus tentacles and space cats. So why octopi? “Cause I really like octopi,” he says. “I think they’re just kind of crazy. They’re kind of creepy, but they’re also kind of cool looking animals.” As for the space cats, part of that drawing obsession can be credited to Leiker’s two cats who he says are constantly trying

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to help him with his artwork, but the specific space cat idea comes from a graffiti drawing he saw on his way to work one day. In reality, the drawing was just a few simple shapes, and Leiker admits he doesn’t even really know what it was supposed to be, but to him it looked like a female cat in a spacesuit, and from there, he began putting space cats into his pieces. The space cats create an aspect of “Where’s Waldo?” in his artwork. Leiker says he’s been at shows and overheard people searching for the space cats in his various pieces and getting excited when they stumble across one.

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So how many pieces feature his infamous space cats and octopus tentacles? “Pretty much all of them,” Leiker says. “I’ve only forgotten [to draw them in] like once or twice.” In addition to his two specific drawing obsessions, Leiker says his pieces often contain certain reoccurring themes based on his interests including references to comic books, superheroes, science and space. Most of his pieces are random acts of drawing that reference a plethora of his interests including movies and television shows he’s watching and songs he is listening to. An interesting aspect of Leiker’s work is that he doesn’t plan them. He simply starts drawing in pen, never picking up a pencil, and lets the drawing develop itself. “Mostly I just kind of let them happen,” Leiker says of his art pieces, “Just drawing whatever I want, however I want.” Ω

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It’s Greek to me Opa Cafe

280 Giroux St., 322-7500 My friend Brett’s parents, Judy and Steve, were in town from Oklahoma and asked me for a recommendation on places by K.J. Sullivan to eat, so I suggested Opa Cafe. Then I invited myself. When we got there I ksullivan@ fessed up that I had never actually newsreview.com been there before. I assured them it would be fine by sharing that 15 years ago, I visited another Greek place, Pirate’s Pizza, then run by the current owner of Opa Café.

an offensive ingredient wasn’t in the dressing, and we were on our way. I went with the spanakopita with a Greek salad ($12.95), which arrived on a plate piled high with tzatziki sauce, pita bread, a large salad and a huge square of Spanakopita. The salad was loaded with onions, feta, olives and tomatoes and was perfectly dressed with a tangy dressing. I see why they keep this one a secret. The tzatziki was fresh and creamy and they didn’t skimp on the pita bread. I ate so much of the sides that I barely got into the spanakopita. That’s a shame because the amount I did have was layered with feta cheese and tons of spinach with flaky layers throughout. Brett had the gyro platter ($12.95), which came with piles of pita bread, tzatziki, tomatoes, cucumbers and onions along with a huge serving of sliced lamb. I grabbed a bite of meat and found it different than typical gyro meat I’m used to. It was sliced differently, far more tender, and had a strong peppery taste. At some point the owner came out to check on us and told us that he uses a really high grade meat. I hope he keeps it up, because the meat is delicious. Judy had the muffuletta ($8.95), and I scored a slice of this sandwich, which I was supposed to share with Brett. I “forgot” and ate the entire slice. Hey, a friend is great, but this sandwich is better. Besides, Judy gave birth to him, so I was sure she would give him another slice (she did). Steve went with a Greek salad ($3.95 for the small) and a bowl of minestrone ($4.95) and said he liked both dishes. Everyone enjoyed the meal. We especially liked speaking to the owner, who shared that he’s of Greek and Italian lineage, so cooking both types of food feels natural. I read somewhere that the real meaning of the phrase “opa!” is more of an “oops!” Well if Opa Cafe means “oops,” then it’s, “Oops! Sorry this combination of food is so amazing.” Ω PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

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When our tattooed server came over, I thought they might leave. Clearly, everything I know about Oklahoma, I learned from a Merle Haggard song. Instead, Steve pulled out his glasses and set to n e w s & r e v i e w b u s i n e s s work u s e looking o n ly over the menu which and gdo choices designer pg issUe dATe 04.07.11 offers Greek ACCT eXeCItalian ranging reV from mousaka to pizza. FiLe nAMe donutBistro040711r2 dATe 06.17.11 Opa Cafe is fairly small and off the beaten path, hiding in a newer please carefully review your advertisement and verify the following: complex behind Renown hospital. Ad size (CoLUMn X inChes) Inside is casual and comfortable, speLLing filled with plants hanging from the nUMbers & dATes ceilings. ConTACT inFo (phone, Address, eTC) We started with some Greek Opa Cafe is open Ad AppeArs As reqUesTed Monday through beers called Mythos ($4). I’m not ApproVed by: Saturday, 11 a.m. familiar with Greek beers but to 8 p.m. found Mythos to be light, sweet and refreshing. They had a variety of other beers to chose from as well wine. Due to food allergies, Judy requested to know what was in the Greek dressing. Our server had listed a few ingredients when we heard a female yell from the back. He went to speak to her, returned, and told us the rest was secret. I loved it. Judy confirmed Opa Cafe owner Steve Dimitriadis and his daughter Alexi get snappy.

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I’ll be back pain

A Haunted House

3

The Last Stand Arnold Schwarzenegger returns to starring roles with The Last Stand, a fledgling film that falls somewhere in the middle of the Arnie canon. It’s not a totally bad effort, but it’s not anything to get all that excited about, either. That’s right, Arnold is back, murdering the English language with his own special brand of finesse and refusing to take his top off. He needs a little more time of the HGH to kick in so he can take off his shirt, Stallone-style! by Arnie plays Ray Owens, sheriff of a small Bob Grimm town near the Mexican border. When stopping bgrimm@ into a local diner to have some coffee, he newsreview.com notices one of the patrons is played by Peter “Where is pancakes house?” Stormare (the actor who put Steve Buscemi through the wood-chipper in Fargo). Ray correctly assesses that this guy means trouble, and bad things begin to happen. A drug cartel baddie named Gabriel Cortez (Eduardo Noriega) has busted out of a U.S. prison and is racing towards Ray’s town in an incredibly fast Corvette, attempting to cross the

The same can be said for Johnny Knoxville, who once again finds himself playing the wily comic relief in a “sheriff takes a stand” movie. It’s something he also did, to relatively little success, with The Rock in Walking Tall. He’s basically in this movie to wear kooky hats and make funny faces. I have come to the decision that I do not enjoy Knoxville on screen unless he’s being struck in the gonads by a charging bull or run over by a buffalo herd. Director Jee-woon Kim offers up some great car chases—including an especially good one in a dried out corn field—some decent explosions, and lots of cartoon violence. A standout gory moment occurs when Knoxville shoots somebody with a flare gun. The film is never boring, and gets some good grades for its action content. As for the plot, it feels much like a movie you’ve seen before, like the aforementioned Walking Tall, or even Cop Land, which starred a somber Sly Stallone as a lonely sheriff taking a stand against corruption. Stallone played that role when his career took a dip, and he was looking to change up his image and get a vocational jumpstart. As we now know, Stallone didn’t get things swinging again until he played Rocky and Rambo as old guys. I’m thinking Schwarzenegger won’t see his career really spark up again until some of his future slate comes to fruition. That future slate includes a new Terminator, a shirtless, older Conan the Barbarian with saggy man tits, and a sequel to Twins. On a purely performance level, this probably contains Arnie’s best acting yet. He has a few moments when it almost seems like he knows how to actually act rather than just blow things up or punch people. I guess nearly two decades in politics gave him a chance to hone his bullshitting skills. Something about this whole enterprise feels a little off. The Last Stand is drive-in movie material released in the dead of winter. Bad move, Lionsgate. It doesn’t help that movie violence and gun control issues are hot topics right now, making folks more likely to see a Jessica Chastain movie rather than an aging action star looking for a comeback. Mediocre movie aside, it’s good to see Arnold back on the big screen in a central role. Next time out, I’m hoping the movie is a little better. Ω

2

Is it still too soon to make a joke about Kindergarten Cop?

OPINION

border. The Stormare character is part of a team sent in advance to make sure conditions are clear for crossing, which means shooting the occasional farmer brandishing a shotgun. The angry farmer is played by—you guessed it—Harry Dean Stanton. Ray has “seen things” in his past L.A. cop days, so he’s prepared for a good fight. His deputies include the wet-behind-the-ears newbie (Zach Gilford), the hot girl deputy (Jaimie Alexander), and another cop played by Luis Guzman, who, like Stanton, always seems to show up in movies like this.

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I hate the Paranormal Activity sequels. Maybe that’s why this Marlon Wayans spoof of PA sequels, and other found-footage horror movies, had me laughing hard at times. Perhaps I’m in the target audience ready to laugh at the stupidity of foundfootage horror. Perhaps it’s because I think farts are funny. Either way, I’d be lying if I told you this didn’t have me laughing. Wayans plays a guy who has his girlfriend (Essence Atkins) moving in, so he buys a camera and gets security cams installed as well. The girl brings a demon with her, and that demon likes to get high and sleep with both of them while the cameras are rolling. This movie works because Wayans is fully committed to the lunacy, as is Atkins. It’s no comedy classic, but it scores enough raunchy laughs to qualify it as a keeper.

3

Man, it bugs me that Quentin Tarantino’s latest is only passably entertaining. I have loved his past films. This is the first one I’m not in love with. Jamie Foxx plays Django, a slave purchased by a bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) two years before the Civil War. Django is purchased because he has seen some targets the bounty hunter is pursuing. Django is promised his freedom after they find those targets. When those targets are gotten, they pursue Django’s wife (Kerry Washington) on a plantation owned by the repellent Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). This one follows some of the same blueprints as Tarantino’s own Inglourious Basterds. It feels as if he is repeating himself a bit. There are some great performances, especially from Waltz and DiCaprio. It just doesn’t have the heft of past Tarantino efforts. Perhaps this has something to do with this being the first Tarantino movie edited by someone other than the late Sally Menke. An impressive cast is assembled to play one lousy game of cops and robbers. Sean Penn mugs and squawks through the role of Mickey Cohen, real life L.A. gangster who didn’t really do anything depicted in this moronic movie. This is about a late ’40s, mostly fictional effort to dethrone Cohen led by a gutsy cop (Josh Brolin). His squad includes Ryan Gosling (in his worst performance yet) and Giovanni Ribisi (pretty much doing his Giovanni Ribisi thing), and they “leave their badges home” to take down the monster. And a monster he is, badly acted by Penn who can just be the worst man in his trade when he tries. Gosling uses a soft and high-pitched gangster voice that renders him silly. Emma Stone is on hand in what is a rather unlikeable role, yet we are supposed to like her. (She sleeps with Cohen, then two-times him, so she’s stupid and unfaithful.) Sure to stand as one of the year’s worst films.

5

A family struggles to survive in Thailand after the massive 2004 tsunami that claimed more than 230,000 lives. Naomi Watts is Oscar-worthy as Maria Belon and Ewan McGregor is equally good as her husband Henry. The two are on Christmas vacation with their children when the tsunami hits, and become separated. Tom Holland gives one of the great breakthrough performances of 2012 as their oldest son. Amazingly, the film is based on real people and their actual experiences. Director Juan Antonio Bayona has made a respectful film about one of the worst recorded disasters in human history. It’s a testament to the people who lost their lives, and those who survived. Watts will tear your heart out, especially when she lets out her first, terrifying scream. Of all the images that stuck in my head from 2012 films, that one might be the one I’ll remember the most.

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5

Zero Dark Thirty

Bradley Cooper is on fire as Pat, a troubled man recently out of a mental institution and obsessed with his ex-wife. He’s so obsessed that he can’t see the value in Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a recently widowed neighbor trying to befriend him. Directed by David O. Russell, the movie is a funny, slick treatment of people with real problems that works because Russell and his performers find the right balance. Robert De Niro does his best work in years as Pat’s obsessive father, and Chris Tucker gets big laughs as Pat’s former mental institution buddy. Cooper and Lawrence make for one of the year’s most interesting screen couples. They are certainly unique. Russell is establishing himself as one of the industry’s most reliable and innovative directors.

The Impossible

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Silver Linings Playbook

This genuinely chilling haunted fairytale comes from producer Guillermo del Toro and writer/director Andrés Muschietti, and is based on Mushcietti’s original short film. Two little girls are abandoned by their demented father in the forest. They are discovered years later and adopted by their uncle (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) and his girlfriend (Jessica Chastain). The little girls have taken on the characteristics of feral beasts and are convinced they are being watched over by a force they call “Mama.” As it turns out, Mama is very real, and a decent CGI creation that is both scary and just the right touch of funny. The film works well not just because Muschietti knows how to construct a good scare, but also because he does a great job getting you to care for the little girls and the Chastain character. Chastain, looking rather gothic in this one, delivers another good performance, even though she isn’t very convincing as a bass player in a punk band. I was scared throughout much of this movie.

Gangster Squad

Reno

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Mama

This is a grand, beautifully shot adaptation of the legendary musical, directed by Tom Hooper and starring Hugh Jackman in the heavy-lifting role of persecuted bread thief Jean Valjean. Set in 19th century France, the musical calls for nearly every word to be sung, and it’s a major undertaking. Hooper had his cast sing live on the set rather than prerecording in a sound booth, and this results in a moving musical experience. Jackman has a spectacular voice, and you get at true sense that he and his costars are acting these songs, rather than lip-synching. Anne Hathaway will probably win an Oscar for her work as Fantine, singing her big number in one take and summoning honest, heartwrenching tears. Russell Crowe, as Valjean’s lawman nemesis Javert, doesn’t have half of Jackman’s voice, but there’s something about his interpretation that’s appropriate and amplifies the character’s loneliness. Every number is treated with a majestic grace that makes this one of the greatest movie musicals I’ve ever seen.

Django Unchained

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Les Misérables

Director Kathryn Bigelow getting snubbed by Oscar for this taut, scary, intelligent movie about the war on terror and hunt for Bin Laden is a travesty. Well, it’s a travesty when it comes to movies and stuff, not so much in the grand scheme of things. Still, Bigelow deserves praise for putting together a movie that is both exciting political thriller and terrific action movie. Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain is deserving of the accolades as Maya, a composite character of CIA agents who managed to find Bin Laden in Pakistan and end his life. The film contains scenes of torture, but it doesn’t feel “pro-torture” by any means. It’s a great movie that will only get greater with time, and yet another reason to call Bigelow one of the best in the business.

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Movie to the beat Televisions If you’re reading this online, or if there’s a computer or smartphone handy, hop over to YouTube and track down by Brad Bynum the video for a song called “The Breakfast Club (I’m Feeling Wild b ra d b @ with You)” by the band Televisions. ne w s re v i e w . c o m The video is a clip of the dancing scene from the film The Breakfast Club, but slowed down just slightly to match the beat of the new song. In the film, the characters dance to Photo/Brad Bynum

Even though the name  of his solo project  is Televisions, Nick  Rattigan would rather  write a song than  watch TV.

For more information, visit http:// televisionsss. bandcamp.com. to watch the video of “the Breakfast Club (I’m Feeling Wild with you),” visit www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pVLfdq_WlEc.

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a funky, upbeat rock tune, “We Are Not Alone” by Karla DeVito. But for this video, the characters dance to a slightly melancholy indie rock song, anchored by an ’80s sounding drum machine. The slowed-down dancing makes the action seem bittersweet and less temporal—more like a memory than an event. The song draws a little from New Order or, befitting the video and subject matter, Simple Minds, but with the more contemporary surfcore melodic guitar sounds of a band like Diiv, and a bit of the retro urban isolation of the Drive soundtrack, which is turning into the most influential movie soundtrack since The Royal Tenenbaums or Pulp Fiction or, hell … The Breakfast Club. That might seem like a ton of references all of a sudden, but the point is that the song is clearly the product of a mind that’s aware of the most au current musical trends, but is also plugged into interesting outlets from pop cultures past. That mind belongs to Nick Rattigan. He’s one-half of the band Surf Curse and the station manager at Wolf Pack Radio, the University of Nevada Reno’s student radio station.

Originally from Henderson, he came up here to attend UNR—he’s now a junior in the journalism school—and like many transplants from Southern Nevada, he’s amazed at how much better the music scene is here, especially for the all-ages crowd. (He’s 20.) And though the recordings sound like a full band, Televisions is his solo project. He had been using the name The Nicholas Project, which he admits is a “cheesy, dumb name,” and switched to Televisions after writing a song with that title. He’s culturally astute enough to be well aware of the influential ’70s New York band Television, and counts himself as a fan, though there’s no connection between his music and theirs. He points out that good names are hard to find, and there are at least three acts currently using some variation of the name The Weekend, for example. Rattigan describes the Televisions’ sound as “’80s dream pop”: catchy vocal melodies, dreamy, shoegazing guitars, and a retro drum machine. It’s a simple, effective formula that works in large part because he’s a good songwriter, one who picks unexpected chords, and writes clever lyrics, often loaded with references, most often to ’80s movies: “I listened to The Cure, I listened to The Cure, I listened to The Cure, and then I cried/I watched Videodrome, I watched Videodrome, I watched Videodrome, and lost my mind/I tried to write a song, I tried to write a song, I tried to write a song I think you’d like/No one gives a shit, no one gives a shit, no one gives a shit about my life,” he sings in “New Flesh.” “The subject may be a movie, but the latent content is about my life,” he says. And though he works well with Jacob Rubeck in Surf Curse, he says he generally prefers working alone. “I’m a huge control freak,” he says. “I always want to be the one who writes it, sings it, makes the video, edits the video. ... And I do it so often, I don’t want to wait for a band. I want to write it, record it, and put it out online.” He likes to have new material whenever he performs live. “I’d rather be recording a song than watching TV,” he says. Ω


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312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

IO Echo

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 1/28-1/30 1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

Determined, 9:30pm, no cover

Train Wreck AD, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover

Comedy

Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Frances Dilorinzo, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; TBA, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm W, $TBA

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: John Caponera, David Gee, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Bobby Collins, Avi Liberman, W, 9pm, $25

Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Thai Rivera, F, 9:30pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm; $13, $16

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

FUEGO

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800 8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300 1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Otis, Yesir, The Harvest and the Hunt, Whistlepig, 7pm, $5

Jazz Night, 7pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Live Jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

JMAX PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: JMA MA AX P ROD R RO OD DUCT UCTION UC IONS ON NS P RESEN RE ESEN NTS NT S: S:

Thursday, January Thur Th hursday, d Ja Janu nuar ary y 24

ECHO Unicorn IO O ECH HO Plus P guests Stabby Unicor rn

Anthony Bash Ant thon h y ((of of Sil Shoda)) B-day y Ba ash

Friday, F Fr iday, January 25 id

Shoda, W// Sil W S Sh S oda, Kanes, Big Bad & Prescription. P Pr Pre rescr s iption. FREE SHOW!!

TASTE OF RENO V

Saturday, January 26

W/ Fighting The Future, Saving Alleya, Thursday Knights Out, Sound The Sirens, Walk Away Alpha, Stereo Killers, Come Home Geoffrey

MASTERS OF MACABRE

Friday, February 1

W/ Los Pistoleros, The Atomiks, Machine Gun Vendetta Voted Best Band

7TH ANNUAL DATE A DERBY DEMON AUCTION

Saturday, February 2

W/ Candyshoppe, Actors Killed Lincoln, Stabby Unicorn

WINTOUR: HOSTED BY JENNCITY

Monday, February 4

W/ Iona, Saint Diablo, Plus 10 Local Bands! THIS YEARS TASTE OF RENO V, IS THIS SATURDAY!! GET TICKETS FROM PLAYING BANDS, OR AT THE ALLEY!!

THESE DON’T MIX

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: JAN. 24 — IO ECHO JAN. 26 — TASTE OF RENO FEB. 7 — TOASTERS FEB. 8 — BAND OF SKULLS

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. PerIod.

FEB. 14 — Youth Brigade/ Cockney Rejects March 6 — Rev. Horton Heat/GutterMouth

TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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WINTER GUIDE

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JANUARY 24, 2013

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KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

THURSDAY 1/24

FRIDAY 1/25

2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Duwell Medical Bass Benefit 1) Comedy Night w/Ramsey Moore, 9pm, $8 w/DJs Gasmik and others, 7pm, $6 2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover 2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Bar Olympics w/Ugly Sweater, 6pm, $TBA

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

Tommy Emmanuel

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Jan. 24, 8 p.m. John Ascuaga’s Nugget 1100 Nugget Ave. Sparks 356-3300

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

PONDEROSA SALOON

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

SATURDAY 1/26

Porchside Seats, Sons of Jefferson, 9pm, $5

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Live music, 8pm, no cover Comedy Night hosted by Patrick Shillito, 9:30pm, no cover

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Student Night, 10pm, $10, $5 w/college student ID after 11pm

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Metal Echo, 9:30pm, no cover

STREGA BAR

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH

Karaoke with Steve Starr, 9pm, no cover

Ladies Night w/DJ, 9pm, W, no cover Dark Tuesdays, 7pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 7pm, W, no cover

VASSAR LOUNGE

The Hellbusters, 8pm, no cover

Rock ‘N’ J Entertainment, 8pm, no cover

Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no cover

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Allfree & Davis, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

JANUARY 24, 2013

Ruby Jaye, Smiley Mikey, Craig Prather, Grant Davis, Eric Andersen, 8pm, $5

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover Rumble, 7pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

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Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

John Watson & the Friendly Bear, DJ Abear, 9pm, $3

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WILD RIVER GRILLE

RN&R

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Mimic, 9:30pm, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

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Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

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Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Jan. 25, 10 p.m. 1up 214 W. Commercial Row 329-9444

Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

The Polish Ambassador

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 1/28-1/30

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

RED ROCK BAR

RUBEN’S CANTINA

SUNDAY 1/27

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 1/24

FRIDAY 1/25

SATURDAY 1/26

SUNDAY 1/27

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 1/28-1/30

2) Steppenstonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppenstonz, 4pm, Kick, 10pm, no cover

2) Steppenstonz, 4pm, Kick, 10pm, no cover

2) Kick, 8pm, no cover

2) Joey Carmon Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Jo Mama, 7pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Midnight Riders, 10pm, no cover

Midnight Riders, 10pm, no cover

1) Monophonics, EarPhunk, Mojo Green, 9pm, $12, $15

1) Diego’s Umbrella, 10pm, no cover 2) J Boogie, Vinyl Richie, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Bobby Slayton, 8:30-10pm W, $17, $20 ;2) Hypha, Psyfi, 11pm Tu, no cover

1) Magique, 8pm, $21.95+ 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, 9:30pm, $21.95+ 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) SnoBall Benefit, 10pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, W, $21.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Steele Breeze, 10pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, j4:30pm W, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Foghat, 7:30pm, $38.50 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) The Magic of Eli Kerr, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Journey Revisited, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Magic of Eli Kerr, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Journey Revisited, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover 4) Sierra Arts’ Brew HaHa w/Diego’s Umbrella, 8pm, $50, $65 5) Shaka, 6pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 6pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Audioboxx, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1) Tommy Emmanuel, 8pm, $27 2) Escalade, 7pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 6pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, Blizzard Party w/DJ Spryte, 10pm, $20

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, no cover

1) Jay Leno, 8pm, $59.50-$89.50 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

3) Dance party w/DJ Teddy P, 9pm, no cover 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

IN ROTATION

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover

3) Walle Larson, 6pm, W, no cover

Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Local guest DJs, 10pm, W, no cover

2) Patrick Major, 7pm, no cover 3) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

Jan. 25, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Karaoke

1) Mario Cantone, 9pm, $30, $40 3) Boogie Nights at Blu, 8pm, $5-$10, free w/’70s or ’80s attire

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Audioboxx, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

Monophonics

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, no cover

MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Sin Biggest Little Locals Night, 4pm, M, Step This Way, 8pm, W, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, no cover

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

JANUARY 24, 2013

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For Thursday, January 24 to Wednesday, January 30 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., Feb. 7, is Thurs., Jan. 31.

Events THE JOYS AND BENEFITS OF HOUSE PLANTS: Join plant doctor Lisa Braginton to discover the joys of indoor gardening. Sa, 1/26, 10am. Free. Moana Nursery, 1100 W. Moana Lane, (775) 825-0602, www.moananursery.com.

MAITREYA HEART SHRINE RELIC TOUR: View sacred relics of the Buddha and other Buddhist masters, which were found among their cremation ashes. F, 1/25, 6-

8pm; Sa, 1/26, 10am-7pm; Su, 1/27, 10am-5pm. Free. The Reno Buddhist

Center, 820 Plumas St., (775) 232-8067, www.maitreyarelictour.com.

MONTHLY SWING DANCE PARTY: High Sierra Swing Dance Club presents its monthly dance party. Tim Renner will teach a lesson in intermediate nightclub twostep at 7pm. Join the club that night, and the dance is free. Sa, 1/26, 7-10:30pm. $7$10. Brewery Arts Center Grand Ballroom, 449 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 629-9369, http://highsierraSDC.org.

RADON AWARENESS PRESENTATION: Learn more about radon, how to test for radon, get a free radon test kit and hear from a certified radon mitigator. Sa, 1/26, noon. Free. North Valleys Library, 1075 N. Hills Blvd., Ste. 340, Golden Valley, (775) 336-0252.

THE RENO MEDIA GROUP COMEDY FESTIVAL: Comedian Key Lewis headlines the comedy festival. The master of ceremonies for the event is Alvin Williams, and the feature act is elissa Shoshahi. For free tickets go to The Players Club desk at Baldini’s Casino. Th, 1/24, 8pm; F, 1/25, 8pm. Free. Baldini’s Sports Casino, 865 Rock Blvd., Sparks, (775) 358-0116, www.baldinissportscasino.com.

All Ages 100 BLANKETS OF COMPASSION: Come learn, have fun, meet new people and help the church reach its goal of making 100 fleece tied blankets for the homeless in our area. No experience required. Sa, 1/26, 10am-3pm. $10 donation per person for materials. Lord of Mercy Lutheran Church, 3400 Pyramid Way, Sparks, (775) 291-8574, www.lordofmercy.org.

ASTRO POETRY WORKSHOP: The poetry workshop is open to students interested in submitting poems to the 2013 Poetry of the Starry Skies of Tahoe Astro-Poetry Contest. Times: 2-2:45pm for ages 7-13; 3:15-4pm for ages 12-19. Free with museum admission. Sa, 1/26, 2 & 3:15pm. $8 non-members; free for members. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

LET’S CELEBRATE VALENTINE’S DAY: In this two-workshop series, children will create handmade valentines to give to classmates, friends or teachers. Recommended for kids age 8 and older. Call or register online. Su, 1/27, 12:30 &

3pm; W, 1/30, 5:30pm; Su, 2/3, 12:30 & 3pm; W, 2/6, 5:30pm. $25 members,, $45 nonmembers. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

MARVELOUS MARBLING: Create your own marbled stationary while you learn about the principles of density that make this unique art project possible. Call or register online. Sa, 1/26, 1 & 3pm. $3 members, $5 non-members. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

MEET SOME SCALY FRIENDS: Herpetological expert Dave Boland will visit The Discovery with his scaly friends. Get up close and personal with a variety of reptiles and amphibians including Mollie, a 20-foot-long python. Free with museum admission. Sa, 1/26, 10 & 11:30am. $8 non-members; free for members. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

SOUTH VALLEYS TODDLER TIME: This event is designed to encourage a love for books and stories, listening skills and interaction with others. Stories, songs, finger plays and wiggle action are part of the fun. For children ages 18 months to 3 years. Th, F, 10:30-11am through 2/15. Free. South Valleys Library, 15650A Wedge Parkway, (775) 851-5190, www.washoe.lib.nv.us.

SPANISH SPRINGS STORYTIME: Stories and activities especially for the preschool child. M, 10:30-11am through 1/28. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

SPANISH SPRINGS TODDLER TIME: This event is designed to encourage a love for books and stories, listening skills and interaction with others. Stories, songs, finger plays and wiggle action are part of the fun. For children ages 18 months to 3 years. Th, 10:30-10:50am through 1/31. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

Art BUSINESS RESOURCE INNOVATION CENTER (THE BRIC): BRIC Art 3. Capital City Arts Initiatives exhibition features Jill Altmann’s fiber art, Steve Davis’ photography, Andy Gallian’s prints, Mimi Patrick’s ceramics, Stephen Reid’s drawings and watercolors and Gus Bundy’s paintings. M-Su. 108 E. Proctor St., Carson City, (775) 283-7123.

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Built to Weather. The exhibit features a selection of snowboard-related photography by Bud Fawcett, Ian Ruhter, Mike Basich, Jim Zellers with Richard Leversee, Mike Yoshida, Paul Laca and Tim Peare. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 2/8. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

MCNAMARA GALLERY, CHURCH FINE ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Rory Laven. Laven will present his student exhibition. There will be a reception at 8pm on Jan. 24. M-F through 2/15. Opens 1/21. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6658.

NORTHWEST RENO LIBRARY: Life in Color. Working in spray paint, acrylics and other media, artist Bryce Chisholm was recently awarded as the RAW Reno Visual Artist of the Year. Tu-Sa through 2/23. Free. 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 787-4100.

RENO LITTLE THEATER: Anything Goes. Sierra Watercolor Society holds a special watercolor exhibit at Reno Little Theater on performance dates, one hour prior to showtimes. For dates and times, go to www.renolittletheater.org. Call Nancy for exhibit viewings by appointment. M-Su through 4/28. 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 343-8100.

SHEPPARD GALLERY, CHURCH FINE ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Intimacy. Artist Zoe Bray will present her exhibit. Lecture and reception: Jan. 24, 2013. Lecture: 5:30pm at the Wells Fargo Auditorium inside the Knowledge Center. Reception: 6:30pm at Sheppard Gallery, Church Fine Arts Building Room 162. M-F

through 2/15. Opens 1/21; Th, 1/24, 5:308pm. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6658. SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Trespasses As

Whispers. Sierra Arts Gallery presents this group show featuring young, emerging artists. Zack Bent, Erin Elyse Burns, Nick Larsen and Alwyn O’Brien have composed a body of work that explores the notions of the private and the public and asks viewers to consider the psychological effects of boundary, landscape and the connection between the organization of space and ideas. The artist reception is Feb. 1, 5-7pm. M-Sa through 2/7. Free. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: The Light Circus: Art of Nevada Neon Signs, W-Su through 2/10; Kim Abeles: From Studio to Street, W-Su through 4/14; Ciel Bergman: Sea of Clouds What Can I Do, W-Su through 2/10; Hoor Al Qasimi: Off Road, W-Su through 1/27; The Way We Live: American Indian Art of the Great Basin and the Sierra Nevada, W-Su through 3/3; JeanPierre Bonfort: Travelling, W-Su through 5/5; Hook, Line and Sinker: Contemporary Drawings from the Collection of Debra and Dennis Scholl, W-Su through 4/28. Opens 1/26. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

G

ood beer, good music and good times—and it’s all for a good cause. Sierra Arts Foundation will put on its 18th annual fundraiser Brew HaHa this Friday. This is one of the arts organization’s biggest fundraisers. Proceeds help support local artists and goes toward Sierra Arts’ programs, including the Arts in Education residencies, Elder Care Concert Series and the Arts Integration Project. This year’s event features beer from 35 breweries including local establishments Silver Peak and Great Basin, as well as national and international companies like Anderson Valley, New Belgium, Newcastle, Sierra Nevada and Sam Adams. San Francisco “gypsy rock” band Diego’s Umbrella (pictured) and DJ Don “Dondo” Darue of KUNR will provide musical entertainment. The event also features a VIP Brewers’ Reception at 7 p.m. and a raffle. The Brew HaHa begins at 8 p.m. on Jan. 25 at the Rose Ballroom inside John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks. Tickets are $50 general admission and $65 for VIP tickets, which includes entrance to the Brewers’ Reception. Call 329-2787 or 356-3300, or visit www.sierra-arts.org. —Kelley Lang

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JANUARY 24, 2013


Film

QUAI DES ORFEVRES: Artemisia Moviehouse presents a screening of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1947 crime-fiction film. Set within the vibrant dance halls and crime corridors of 1940s Paris, Quai des Orfèvres follows ambitious performer Jenny Lamour (Suzy Delair), her covetous husband Maurice Martineau (Bernard Blier), and their devoted confidante Dora Monier (Simone Renant) as they attempt to cover one another’s tracks when a high-society acquaintance is murdered. Enter Inspector Antoine (Louis Jouvet), whose seasoned instincts lead him down a circuitous path in this classic whodunit murder mystery. Tu, 1/29, 7pm. $7; $5 for members, bicyclists and students. Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

BAG IT: Reno Plastic Bag Ban and Great Basin Community Food Co-op host a public screening of this documentary film. Th, 1/24, 6:30pm. Free. Great Basin Community Food Cooperative, 240 Court St., (775) 324-6133, www.facebook.com/events/205112452947388.

FOR THE BIBLE TELLS ME SO: Lord of Mercy Lutheran Church presents a showing of this award-winning documentary, which recounts the stories of five families that had to reassess their church’s teachings when they learned that a member of the family was gay or lesbian. After the film, there will be an opportunity for questions and discussion. A panel, made up of clergy from area churches which welcome and affirm the LGBT community, will be present to offer their insights and experience. Su, 1/27, 3-6pm. Free. Lord of Mercy Lutheran Church, 3400 Pyramid Way, Sparks, (775) 358-7863, www.lordofmercy.org.

Music COFFEE, TEA, AND HARP: Enjoy warm drinks and brunch and the music of Valley Harpers who will play popular, classical and folk favorites. Su, 1/27, 12-2pm. Free. SWILL Coffee & Wine, 3366 Lakeside Court, (775) 823-9876.

DURGA’S DRUM STORY: Drummer Liz Broscoe’s original production combines film, narration and performance to teach the history of drumming. Liz and her company will have sections of the performances that will include 26 youth performers from the Carson City community trained by Liz and her staff. F, 1/25, 7:30pm; Sa, 1/26, 7:30pm. $5$15. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976, www.breweryarts.org.

THIS WEEK

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Nobody to codepend on My boyfriend and I were invited to dinner at our friends’ house. An hour after the appointed time, another guest, a woman who’s been single for at least a decade, still hadn’t left her house. She called with a crisis about what she was bringing, wearing, etc. (She always seems to have some crisis.) The hostess calmed her down, telling her to just come. Upon hanging up, she said that she thinks marriage both requires sanity and helps keep people sane, and that people who are unmarried and living alone seem to get increasingly neurotic. That seems unfair, but I can see her point. It can be harder to indulge one’s eccentricities in a marriage. Before you head to work in the morning, there’s your spouse blurting out, “You know, that tie really clashes with the Kleenex boxes on your feet.” In other words, no, a wedding isn’t a transporter beam out of serious psych problems, and we shouldn’t be quick to assume people who get married are better adjusted than people who don’t. Some states require a blood test before you marry; none tests to make sure you aren’t cuckoo for more than Cocoa Puffs. Psychologist Dr. Bella DePaulo, in Singled Out, shows that many studies claiming married people are much better off than singles have serious flaws in methodology, and the modest claims of solid studies are frequently distorted, exaggerated and turned into media catnip by the agenda-driven. As a result, “single” is so automatically viewed as the companion to “miserable”—and the prelude to getting your face eaten off by

y a w a e v i G s on i k S Y K C I n Enter to wi AYS ESDoment Skis. N D E W ICKYre handmade in Reno by M

your cat—that even respected researcher Dr. E. Mavis Hetherington can’t see her faulty reasoning in concluding, “Happily married couples are healthier, happier, wealthier and sexier than are singles.” Note that she’s comparing happily married people with all single people. Your friend makes a mistake in throwing all the single eggs in one basket. Some people are single and living alone because they have unresolved issues, and some are because a whole lot of other people do. Others simply prefer living alone. (Why have a mancave when you can have a manhome?) Studies show definite benefits to being (happily) married, such as having a sounding board, a ready source of sex and hugs, and someone to help you pick up the pieces when you drop them. If you’re single, these benefits aren’t unavailable to you— they just take more effort to obtain. For example, you can share a house or duplex with a friend, create a community of friends, and have at least one close friend who knows just about everything about you and is allowed and even encouraged to tell you when you’re being an idiot.

ICKY Skis

a

rs i a p o w t g in We are giv Icky Skis away! of Now through February 6, 2013, every Wednesday is “ICKY Wednesday." Brewery patrons will receive a single entry for every pint of ICKY purchased on Wednesday. The drawing for the skis will be held and winners announced at our Reno brewery on Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at 6:30pm. Winners must be present to win.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

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Onstage THE GOAT OR, WHO IS SYLVIA?: Brüka Theatre presents Edward Albee’s dark comedy about a successful and professional couple whose world is turned upside down by an act of infidelity. There will be a talkback with the company following the Jan. 27 matinee performance. Th, 1/24, 8pm; F, 1/25, 8pm; Sa, 1/26,

8pm; Su, 1/27, 2pm; F, 2/1, 8pm; Sa, 2/2, 8pm; W, 2/6,

8pm; Th, 2/7, 8pm; F, 2/8, 8pm; Sa, 2/9, 8pm. $18 general; $16 students, seniors; $20 at the door. Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org. MURDER ON THE LUST BOAT: Proscenium Players

CLASSIC INTERMEDIATE MAT PILATES: Students

ents a performance by the classical guitarist as part of its Encore series. Th, 1/24, 8pm. $27. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks, (775) 356-3300, www.renoisartown.com.

learn to build on the basic mat routine. Modified intermediate to intermediate exercises will be added to the repertoire as students progress. Maximum of 10 people per class. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 8:309:20am through 12/31. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.pilatesreno.com.

COME IN FROM THE COLD: The family entertainment series continues with the Gabardine Sisters Radio show. Sa, 7pm through 3/9. $3 donation. Western Heritage Interpretive Center, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 828-6612.

DAWN PATROL: Dawn Patrol is a unique early morning mountain experience that includes exclusive access to untouched corduroy or fresh powder depending on the weather. Dawn Patrollers arrive before the general public and take the Tram to High Camp before anyone else. Sa, Su, 7:40am through 3/24. $12-$29. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, (800) 403-0206, www.squaw.com.

MILE HIGH-CARSON HIGH JAZZ EXTRAVAGANZA: The 10th annual show features the Mile High Jazz Band and the Carson High Jazz Band, vocalists, combo performances and a grand finale combining the forces of both big bands. Refreshments and raffle prizes will be on sale in the lobby. The concert is a benefit for the Carson High Jazz Band programs. Tu, 1/29, 7:30pm. $14 adults; $12 seniors, students; $7 for kids age 12 and younger. Carson City Community Center, 851 E. William St., Carson City, (775) 883-4154, http://milehighjazz.com.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

EXPRESS MAT PILATES: A quick 45-minute Mat Pilates class to get the body moving with concentration, control, centering. All levels welcome. M, W F, 12:15-1pm through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT CLASSES: Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement is a journey into physical and mental self-awareness and healing. The movements are done slowly with focused attention, activating the proprioceptors in your joints and the neural pathways throughout your body. Th, 5:30-6:50pm through 12/20. $12 drop-in fee. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St.; Sa, 3-4:30pm through 12/21. $12 drop-in fee. ACHIEVE Fitness, 600 S. Center St., (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

RENO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA: Guest conductor Victor Yampolsky, professor in music performance at Northwestern University, leads the Reno Chamber Orchestra in Stravinsky’s Pulcinella Suite, and two dramatic works by Mozart, Adagio and Fugue in C minor, K. 546, and Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550. The concert also features violist Kayleigh Miller, the winner of the RCO’s annual College Concerto Competition, performing Penderecki’s Viola Concerto. Sa, 1/26, 8pm; Su, 1/27, 2pm. $5-$20. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-9413, www.renochamberorchestra.org.

FELDENKRAIS PELVIC FLOOR SYSTEM CLASS: This class is recommended for people who are concerned with pelvic floor and/or urogenital function, pelvic structure imbalance, injury and/or surgery, scoliosis, spinal problems, low back pain, and/or problems with balance or breathing. Th, 4-5pm through 12/20. $12 drop-in fee; need-based discounts. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

VILLAGE APRÈS MUSIC SERIES: Finish a day on the slopes with free live après ski music at The Village Events Plaza. Sa, 3-5pm through 3/30. The Village at Squaw Valley USA, 1750 Village East Road, Olympic Valley, (866) 818-6963, www.squaw.com.

LEARN TO SKI & SNOWBOARD CELEBRATION: Learn to ski and snowboard at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. Learn the basics and feel comfortable on the slopes. The package includes beginner lift access, lesson and equipment rental. Sa, 1/26, 10am & 1pm. $39. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, (800) 403-0206; Su, 1/27, 10am & 1pm. $39. Alpine Meadows Ski Resort, 2600 Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City, (800) 441-4423, www.skialpine.com.

Sports & Fitness 30/30 (CARDIO MAT/STRETCHING): Thirty minutes of Cardio Mat Pilates and 30 minutes of intensive stretching. Intermediate-level strength, stamina and flexibility are required for this class. M, 4:30pm through 12/30. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

MOONLIGHT SNOWSHOE TOUR: Bask in the moonlight

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

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while enjoying the mountain setting all while getting some exercise. Sa, 1/26, 5-7:30pm; Sa, 2/23, 5-7:30pm. $45 per adult; $30 per child; $15 rentals. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (866) 466-6784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

NORTHSTAR SNOWSHOE SOCIAL & RACE SERIES: Snowshoers are invited to participate in the Northstar Snowshoe Social & Race Series on Jan. 27 (Tahoe Rim Tour & Race) and March 23 (Truckee Tahoe Humane Society Fundraiser). The March race will feature a 5k, 10k and kids races while the January race, in conjunction with the Tahoe Rim Tour & Race, will be a point-to-point 21k snowshoe from the North Tahoe High School to the Northstar Cross Country, Telemark & Snowshoe Center. The third race will be a fundraiser for the Truckee Tahoe Humane Society. Su, 1/27, 7am-3pm; Sa, 3/23, 7am-3pm. $15-$60. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (866) 466-6784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 5:15-6:05pm through 12/26. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

PRANA FLOW YOGA: Morning yoga that stretches and strengthens the body from the inside out. This class will start your blood flowing and help you body remain toned and flexible. M, W, 8:30-9:45am through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

RINK ON THE RIVER: Operation of the ice skating rink is dependent on weather and ice conditions. Call the Rink on the River Hotline prior to visiting the rink to ensure that it is open and operating. Holiday hours may vary. M-Su through 2/3. $7.50 ages 13-54; $5.50 kids ages 3-12, seniors age 55+. Reno City Plaza, 10 N. Virginia St., (775) 334-6268, www.reno.gov.

TURTLENECK TUESDAY SKATE NIGHTS: Hear your favorite grooves from the ’70s and ’80s while you skate round the 9,000 square-foot rink. Tu, 6-9pm through 3/19. Free admission; $15 for skate rentals. The Village at Northstar, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (866) 466-6784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

WOLF PACK MEN’S BASKETBALL: The University of Nevada, Reno plays Boise State. Sa, 1/26, 1pm. $10-$44. Lawlor Events Center, 1500 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-7225, www.nevadawolfpack.com.

YOGA ALL LEVELS: Classes teach the fundamental principles and therapeutic application of a healthy yoga practice. Classes are designed to give you the time and support to understand the proper alignment of yoga postures (asana) and breathing techniques. M, 5:30-6:30pm through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

YOGA FLOW: This class is designed to get a quick 45-minute workout in over your lunch break. Instructors will help students master form, understand how to breathe and help them build confidence in the postures and explore the wonders of yoga. Tu, Th, 12:15-1pm through 12/31. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

e-books and audiobooks to your electronic device. Please bring your library card, device with USB cable and a basic understanding of how to use your device. Call to schedule your 30-minute appointment. Th, 45pm through 3/28. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 352-3200.

JIMMY BEANS WOOL OPEN KNIT NIGHT: Join local and visiting fiber enthusiasts for an evening of knitting and crocheting. Door prizes awarded. Fourth Th of every month, 6-8pm. $5. Jimmy Beans Wool, 5000 Smithridge Drive, Ste. A-11, (775) 827-9276, www.jimmybeanswool.com.

presents a murder mystery cruise that spoofs The Love Boat. The show pokes fun at crazy on-board activities and no-talent entertainers. In the end, someone is murdered and it’s up to the audience to guess the culprit. Ticket price includes a buffet dinner served with dessert and coffee. There will be a no-host bar available. F, 1/25, 6pm;

RENO PORTRAIT SOCIETY: There will be a live model

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AN EVENING WITH TOMMY EMMANUEL: Artown pres-

E-READER CAFÉ: Learn how to download library

RABBIT HOLE: Reno Little Theater presents this Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by David Lindsay-Abaire that depicts a family in the aftermath of their young son’s death. Th-Sa,

7:30-9:45pm through 2/2; Su, 2-4:15pm through 2/3. $16 general admission; $13 seniors, students, military. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 813-8900, www.renolittletheater.org.

RATE THIS!: Utility Players will bring the idea of a comedic “review” into the 21st century. The internet’s most jaw-dropping personals, reviews, and other writings will be brought to life in this first performance of its kind. Some adult themes and explicit language. F, 1/25, 810pm; Sa, 1/26, 8-10pm. $10. Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 393-9652, www.utilityplayerscomedy.com.

for artists to paint or draw in the medium of their choice. No formal instruction, but participants can learn from experienced artists. The event is open to all ages and abilities. W, 9am-12:30pm. $10. Nevada Fine Arts, 1301 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-1128, www.nvfinearts.com.

BREAST CANCER—ON WITH LIFE: This support group provides a highly educational approach to looking at breast cancer. The latest research is discussed, along with alternative therapies, side effects of chemotherapy, reconstruction and community services. The group meets on Tuesdays at Saint Mary’s Center for Health’s Radiation Oncology Department. Tu, 4:30-6pm. Free. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave., Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

CROCHET CONNECTION: Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 45:45pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

DEPRESSION BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: The Reno chapter of the national DBSA meets. Fourth Th of every month, 7-8:30pm. Renown Health Boardroom, 1495 Mill St., (775) 835-6410.

Classes THE BREASTFEEDING FORUM: Breast-feeding mothers are invited to join this breast-feeding support group. Mothers exchange their experiences and discuss concerns such as milk supply, pumping, going back to work, sleeping or lack of sleep, etc. RSVP at http://doodle.com/cy5nrur23mbg6pie. Tu, 45pm. $10 drop in; free for first-time attendees. Renown South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., (775) 240-9916.

FRIDAY NIGHT BALLROOM DANCING: Every Friday night The Senior Dance Club of Nevada presents ballroom dancing featuring live music by the Ninth Street Band. Singles and beginners are welcome. F, 8-10:30pm. $7 members; $9 non-members. Washoe County Senior Center, 1155 E. Ninth St., (775) 828-1993, www.lreidenbaugh@washoecounty.us.


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BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The German

government sponsored a scientific study of dowsing, which is a form of magical divination used to locate underground sources of water. After 10 years, the chief researcher testified, “It absolutely works, beyond all doubt. But we have no idea why or how.” An assertion like that might also apply to the mojo you’ll have at your disposal, Aries, as you forge new alliances and bolster your web of connections in the coming weeks. I don’t know how or why you’ll be such an effective networker, but you will be.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The United

States Congress spends an inordinate amount of time on trivial matters. For example, 16 percent of all the laws it passed in the last two years were devoted to renaming post offices. That’s down from the average of the previous eight years, during which time almost 20 percent of its laws had the sole purpose of renaming post offices. In my astrological opinion, you Tauruses can’t afford to indulge in anything close to that level of nonsense during the next four weeks. I urge you to keep time-wasting activities down to less than 5 percent of your total. Focus on getting a lot of important stuff done. Be extra thoughtful and responsible as you craft the impact you’re having on the world.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What if your

unconscious mind has dreamed up sparkling answers to your raging questions, but your conscious mind doesn’t know about them yet? Is it possible you are not taking advantage of the sly wisdom that your deeper intelligence has been cooking up? I say it’s time to poke around down there. It’s time to take aggressive measures as you try to smoke out the revelations that your secret self has prepared for you. How? Remember your dreams, of course. Notice hunches that arise out of nowhere. And send a friendly greeting to your unconscious mind, something like, “I adore you, and I’m receptive to you, and I’d love to hear what you have to tell me.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In his book

Our Band Could Be Your Life, Michael Azerrad says that the Cancerian singer-songwriter Steve Albini is a “connoisseur of intensity.” That means he’s picky about what he regards as intense. Even the two kinds of music that are often thought of as the embodiment of ferocious emotion don’t make the grade for Albini. Heavy metal is comical, he says, not intense. Hardcore punk is childish, not intense. What’s your definition of intensity, Cancerian? I see the coming weeks as prime time for you to commune with the very best expressions of that state of being. Be a connoisseur of intensity.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There’s a butterfly

sanctuary at the Como Park Zoo & Conservatory in Saint Paul, Minnesota. It’s called the Enchanted Garden. As you enter, you see a sign that reads, “Please do not touch the butterflies. Let the butterflies touch you.” In other words, you shouldn’t initiate contact with the delicate creatures. You shouldn’t pursue them or try to capture them. Instead, make yourself available for them to land on you. Allow them to decide how and when your connection will begin to unfold. In the coming week, Leo, I suggest you adopt a similar approach to any beauty you’d like to know better.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Novelist Jeffrey

Eugenides says he doesn’t have generic emotions that can be described with one word. “Sadness,” “joy” and “regret” don’t happen to him. Instead, he prefers “complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic train-car constructions,” like “the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy” or “the excitement of getting a [hotel] room with a minibar.” He delights in sensing “intimations of mortality brought on by aging family members” and “sadness inspired by failing restaurants.” In the coming days, Libra, I think you should specialize in one-of-a-kind feelings like these. Milk the nuances! Exult in the peculiarities! Celebrate the fact that each new wave of passion has never before arisen in quite the same form.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): After analyz-

ing your astrological omens for the coming weeks, I decided that the best advice I could give you would be this passage by the English writer G.K. Chesterton: “Of all modern notions, the worst is this: that domesticity is dull. Inside the home, they say, is dead decorum and routine; outside is adventure and variety. But the truth is that the home is the only place of liberty, the only spot on earth where a man can alter arrangements suddenly, make an experiment or indulge in a whim. The home is not the one tame place in a world of adventure; it is the one wild place in a world of set rules and set tasks.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): My

general philosophy is that everyone on the planet, including me, is a jerk now and then. In fact, I’m suspicious of those who are apparently so unfailingly well-behaved that they never act like jerks. On the other hand, some people are jerks far too much of the time and should be avoided. Here’s my rule of thumb: How sizable is each person’s Jerk Quotient? If it’s below 6 percent, I’ll probably give them a chance to be a presence in my life—especially if they’re smart and interesting. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, this gauge may be useful for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The

French painter Cézanne painted images of a lot of fruit in the course of his career. He liked to take his sweet time while engaged in his work. The apples and pears and peaches that served as his models often rotted before he was done capturing their likenesses. That’s the kind of approach I recommend for you in the coming days, Capricorn. Be very deliberate and gradual and leisurely in whatever labor of love you devote yourself to. No rushing allowed! With conscientious tenderness, exult in attending to every last detail of the process.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Nobody

can be exactly like me. Even I have trouble doing it.” So said the eccentric, outspoken and hard-partying actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968). Can you guess her astrological sign? Aquarius, of course. Her greatest adventure came from trying to keep up with all the unpredictable urges that welled up inside her. She found it challenging and fun to be as unique as she could possibly be. I nominate her to be your role model in the next four weeks. Your assignment is to work extra hard at being yourself.

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do you ever fan-

tasize about a more perfect version of yourself? Is there, in your imagination, an idealized image of who you might become in the future? That can be a good thing if it motivates you to improve and grow. But it might also lead you to devalue the flawed but beautiful creation you are right now. It may harm your capacity for self-acceptance. Your assignment in the coming week is to temporarily forget about whom you might evolve into at some later date, and instead just love your crazy, mysterious life exactly as it is.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The

Dardanelles Strait is a channel that connects the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, separating Europe from Asia. In some places it’s less than a mile wide. But the currents are fierce, so if you try to swim across at those narrow points, you’re pushed around and end up having to travel five or six miles. In light of the current astrological omens, I’m predicting that you will have a comparable challenge in the coming days, Pisces. The task may seem easier or faster than it actually is. Plan accordingly.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart PHOTO/D. BRIAN BURGHART

Just a fantasy

But could you ballpark it within $500?

Darlene Cooper

Jonesing for a trip away from the cold, I did what any red-blooded American would do and called travel agents to see if I could manifest the fantasy. Not a chance. Still, Darlene Cooper of Welcome Aboard Travel, 1296 E. Plumb Lane, was kind enough to indulge me. She can be reached at 828-4000.

Where are people going these days? It’s cold out, so I presume there are a lot of south of the border type vacations?

For two I would say ... let me look real quick. And you wanted to leave soon, like in the next couple weeks?

That would be great. I’ve never actually been to Cancun. things going on over there, they might be higher. It just kind of depends. If they’re having big conferences, it might be a little higher.

Cruises, tours, Mexico. South America has become very popular. Europe. Hawaii.

How about South America? What places are people visiting there?

Right now, a lot of Caribbean and Hawaii. I think that’s what we’re doing right now, mainly Caribbean and Hawaii.

Mainly like Machu Picchu or the Galapagos Islands.

What’s the best deal right now?

Europe right now is kind of winter. Prices kind of vary. Depends on what the availability is. That’s kind of where you’re at with that. Availability is a big thing.

What do you mean when you say availability? Depending on what the flight loads look like. It’s kind of hard to tell. If they have a lot of

I’m kinda thinking I’d like to go someplace Spanish-speaking, got any good deals for Mexico or South America?

FEATURE STORY

Oh, that sounds like heaven to me.

That sounds awesome.

Again, that’s kind of hard to say. It depends on

It’s going to be.

THE EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL

∫y Bruce Van Dye

brucev@newsreview.com

|

|

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

Seven days.

What would that cost me?

OPINION

GREEN

JANUARY 25, 2013

So $3,000. How long would I be gone?

We’re going to Honduras, Belize and Cozumel, Mexico.

So yes, I’m now suspecting that the multiple trips to fave Mexican joints in the area on a weekly basis might be at the root of this blubberian assault around my once visible obliques. Indeed, my six-pack of abs have now morphed into a solid, smooth MonoAb, and I’m now getting very suspicious about chicken mole’s part in all this. But equal blame must go, I fear, not to just Mexican food, but Mexican drink as well. As in the damn Margaritas. One blessing/curse that’s a player in my mouth is my sweet tooth. I’ve got a good one. Never have outgrown it. So, in trying to get a handle on the carbloaded goodies of this world, I’ve tried to go cold turkey on cookies, brownies, pastries, etc., with mixed results. Some days are good in terms of disciplined performance in this area, others are a bit more mediocre. But generally, the cookies/goodies zone of the supermarket has been getting avoided. Most of the time. But the tyrannical sweetness receptors on my lively tongue are rag-

|

HAVE ANOTHER

This is an all-inclusive land package. To do a cruise, I’m actually leaving on Saturday. I’m going out of Galveston, Texas. Just to give you an idea of that one, a cruise out of Galveston, you’re looking at about—with air and everything—probably about $1,500 apiece.

Mexico—Riviera Maya is always very, very nice. That’s just outside of Cancun.

Since August, I’ve managed, quite easily, to put 12 pounds of schlubitude around my central torso. For this, I’m afraid I’m going to have to blame the Mexicans. Specifically, Mexican food. In the past year, I have developed what one might call a “jones” for comidas de Mexicana, especially enchiladas, tacos, burritos, chimichangas, mariscos, guacamole, pico de gallo, taquitos, chilaquiles and fajitas, to name but a few of the problem areas. Also playing a factor are the chips and salsa that always land in your face immediately after being seated at any Mexican food establishment, whether it be a class joint or a simple Casa de Greaso. The chips are always there. I thought I was being a paragon of restraint by only consuming the one basket of chips, and that one basket only. Never will you catch me begging for more chips, thinking this is exactly the same strategy that the founding members of Weight Watchers would employ. I may have to double check on that. NEWS

So it’s off Cancun, it’s not Cancun? Are there little villages around there or is it all water?

The best deal? The best bang for your buck? I would say a cruise.

Wasted away

|

I like Riviera Maya much better because it’s off the beaten path. I think Cancun is kind of like overpriced.

It’s just on the outskirts, yeah.

And what kind of cruises are people taking these days? Sunny climes, again, I would presume.

Are prices cheap in Europe, right now, since they’re still having more serious economic issues?

availability and if you wanted to do hotel-only or if you wanted to do an all-inclusive property, which would include all your meals and drinks and everything.

ing bitches indeed, and constantly howl at me to service their needs. That’s where the Margaritas come into play. These sweet, luscious cocktails deliver on two levels. Namely, mildly pleasant inebriation (unleashing usually dormant powers of frightful wittiness and debonair suavicity) and sugar (quieting the shrieks of those neglected glucose buds on the tongue tip). Small wonder that I can knock down margies in the same way a frat boy blows up a 12pack of Keystone Light. I finally made it down here to Mexico, after my screwup at LAX last week with the passport and all. I’m currently in the sleepy Baja town of Loreto, which, I’m discovering, is a fine town for January sun and toxic cafes. The mole is ultra tasty. And boy, do they know how to make Margaritas. I may be buying an extra seat for the flight home. Ω

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Love CRAFT Welcome to the 2013 bridal guide

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sizes. Nevada has a unique wedding culresearching content for ture, where our quick stop chapels and this guide, I decided to check out the First Class Banquet Services wedding show selections on Netflix. I’m Elvis impersonators attract lovebirds from all over. Marriages in this region take place still not sure this was a good idea, anywhere from the shores of Lake Tahoe The Ridge Tahoe because I ended up watching the entire 400 Ridge Club Dr. season of Bridalplasty, a reality competi- to the dusty playa of Burning Man. And some locals choose to hightail it out of tion in which brides-to-be compete for Stateline, NV 89449 Nevada altogether and get the ceremony the chance to win plastic surgery before (775) 588–3553 ext. 3160 and honeymoon done in one fell swoop. their dream wedding. There were so www.ridgetahoeresort.com We tend to enjoy nontraditional approachmany things wrong with this show that you can probably derive for yourself, but es to marriage, so we’ve included a little bit of all of that in this year’s guide, along with the show did well to go through each some suggestions for the little things like aspect of bridal planning in detail— T H E R I D G E T A H O E Grand View Garden offers bridesmaid dresses and wedding rings. choosingThe a dress, creating a bouquet, However, for you more traditional bridesviews picking of the Tahoe selectingspectacular a wedding party, a venue and writing vows. Each bride had mountains and Carson Valley from to-be, that doesn’t mean we don’t appreciate the work it takes to put on a wedding, so spent years painstakingly curating their an elevation 7500tofeet we’ve also put together our annual wedding special day. I learned,ofthanks Netflix, guide checklist to help you get started. that these kinds of brides are often No matter what your wedding looks like, referred to as “Bridezillas.” I prefer the AvailAble Saturdays and sundays until 4pm with no room charge remember to enjoy the day for what it version established by popular wedding is—a celebration of the next phase of site Offbeat Bride—“Bridethulhus,” for Beautiful Outdoor Ceremony with Romantic your life with the person you love. us nerdier folks. Indoor Reception for up to 175 people Of course, a wedding doesn’t—and probably shouldn’t—have to be a day full Cheers, Cozy Indoor Ceremony and Reception for of monsters. Renoites, of all people, know Ashley Hennefer, Winter Months for up to 100 people that weddings come in all shapes and RN&R special projects editor

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02 | Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | JANUARY 24, 2013 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

Maids of honor:

06

Runaway brides:

The big leap: Unconventional

weddings for adventurous couples 14

Going to the chapel:

The disappearing art of the chapel ceremony 18

Check it out: Wedding

planning checklist

Editor D. Brian Burghart Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Editorial Intern Tracie Douglas Designer Hayley Doshay Contributors Katie Dow, Tim Hauserman, Shaun Hunter, Jessica Santina Design Manager Kate Murphy Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Matt Odegard, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Office/Distribution Manager Karen Brooke Administrative Assistant Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Gil Egeland, Neil Lemerise, John Miller, Russell Moore, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach.

General Manager John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Senior Systems Specialist Joe Kakacek Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.


a special supplement to the reno news & review | J a nu a r Y 2 4 , 2 013 |

Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | 03


c e l e b r at e Your wedding in style

ec ia l Ev en ts R ec ep ti on s & Sp

04 | Bridal Guide 2 0 1 3

| JAN UARY 2 4, 2 0 13 | A speciAl sUpplemeNt to the ReNo News & Review


BRIDAL GUIDE 2013

l e t

h e r

s h o w

t h e

w o r l d

h o w

m u c h

Love Her

y o u

Put a ring WI NHAA TWTEOD DLIONOGK RFI ON RG on it by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

Now

that you have some bling on your finger signifying your engagement, you’ll soon be looking for the counterpart ring to signify your marriage. Here are some questions to ask before you seal the deal on your wedding ring.

Was it ethically produced? Despite a heightened awareness about the problem of “blood diamonds”—diamonds mined in torture camps and war zones—the issue is still rampant in many regions of Africa, including Zimbabwe and the Côte d’Ivoire. Ethical diamonds can still be found, however—look for companies that use terms like “conflict-free” or “ethically sourced,” but do background research before you commit to a ring. A quick Google search is an easy way to find out if companies are making false claims. Many couples are choosing to forgo diamonds altogether, opting for stones and gems instead. However, it’s not just the jewels that can be a problem. Mining gold is damaging to the environment, and has its own ethical quandaries concerning the health of indigenous populations. Other metals, such as titanium, can be more sustainable and durable options.

Is it in your budget? Even small weddings can put a strain on bank accounts, so consider the cost when purchasing the perfect wedding rings. While having the rings ready for the ceremony is vital, it might be an option to use a temporary ring while saving up for something that will last a long time. Payment plans, too, are often available, but it’s not worth going broke at the start of your marriage over something trivial.

Is it made from durable materials?

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If having your ring ready to go on your wedding day is preferable, a small budget doesn’t have to result in a cheap ring. You still want to choose a piece that will stand the test of time. Some cheap metals, such as copper, can cause allergic reactions to those with sensitive skin, and are also known to turn skin green after extensive wear. A poorly made ring is also at risk for losing hold of the jewels.

Does it fit your style? Given that a wedding ring is an item most married people wear every day, consider how it fits your personality. A custom jewelry maker can help you design and create a ring of your choosing. Vintage rings often have stories attached and can come in unusual designs from decades past. Some couples opt for highly personalized rings, like a fingerprint ring, in which the ring is stamped with the spouse’s fingerprint. If you and your fiancé prefer simplicity, a flashy ring might clash with your everyday wear. Most metals and diamonds will match any outfit. Also take into account your profession—many people in with labor-intensive professions choose to leave wedding rings at home, so if having a symbolic representation of your marriage with you at all times is important, perhaps try something different altogether, like a small tattoo on your ring finger. If that’s too radical, carrying your ring on a necklace might be a better option.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JANUARY 24, 2013 |

Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | 05


BRIDAL GUIDE 2013

MAIDS

of

HONOR

DITCHING THE TRADITIONAL BRIDESMAID DRESS by KATIE DOW

Most

women will have the honor of being asked to be a bridesmaid at the wedding of a loved one a least once in their lives. Of those women, it’s safe to say that a majority of them have been forced to wear a dress that made them look like a corpse

wrapped in taffeta. The ugly bridesmaid dress has passed into the realm of cliché. Movies and television are flooded with images of lines of women in garish puffy dresses that swallow them whole. Aside from the dreaded ugly bridesmaid dress, there are other time-tested issues that

06 | Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | JANUARY 24, 2013 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

come along with choosing. Finding a dress that looks good on multiple women is a task in and of itself. A bride should take into consideration the different body types, as well as different skin tones, of the bridal party. It’s also important, if not just nice, to take personal taste into account. It’s best to

avoid being the bride who makes her friends look terrible just to look good by comparison. There are ways to make brides and bridesmaids feel good about what they are wearing on a wedding day. “There has never been a better time to be a bridesmaid,” says Michelle Depoali, owner of Swoon bridal salon. “Bridesmaid dresses have shifted significantly over the past few seasons, and have never been more fashionable and fun.” The practice of having bridesmaids at a wedding originated with the idea that the bride may need protection from any violent wedding guests or unwanted visitors. They were intended to be an army to serve as a shield should the bride need protection. This eventually evolved into the belief that bridesmaids were needed to confuse any evil spirits that should bring ill wishes to the bride and groom. The bride and bridesmaids, as well as the groom and groomsmen, wore identical


PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

Michelle Depoali is the owner of Swoon.

idea to keep friends’ budget concerns in mind when making the final call on what dress they all have to buy. If the bride intends to maintain friendships after the wedding, it’s best not to ask them to drain their bank accounts for a dress they’re only going to wear once. On that note, brides tend to be hopeful and say, “It’s really pretty, and you can wear it again too!” It’s a sweet thought, but one that rarely turns out to be true. How many women have the occasion to wear that maroon and black floor length strapless gown? One major challenge when finding bridesmaids dresses is trying to suit all of the different personalities, body types, and skin tones in the bridal party. But this means that some brides leave the decisionmaking to the bridesmaids, which can sometimes be more complicated. “One thing we see with this shift in approach is that brides are letting their maids pick out their own gowns without much direction,” says Depoali. “This sounds like a good idea, but we find that maids prefer some kind of firm direction from the bride. It’s her day

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“THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO BE A BRIDESMAID.” Michelle Depoali, swoon clothing, in order to make it difficult for the spirits to tell whom to curse. With this in mind, being a bridesmaid was meant to be a big deal. The women were sacrificing their own safety, physically and spiritually, to protect the bride and her future with her husband. And while today the tradition is little more than a shadow of the original intention, for all of their willingness to be in your front line, it’s nice to choose dresses that don’t make people feel uncomfortable or send them into bankruptcy. Today, we are no longer subject to such strict customs and superstitions in most cases. Gone are the days of the identical bridesmaid dresses. Brides choices and opportunities to set your wedding apart from the rest. “Like the general trend with weddings, brides are infusing personality into all elements of a wedding and bridesmaid dresses are no exception,” Depoali says. “One trend that we just saw this past season is to put maids in lace or in prints.” It has become the goal of many brides to have a unique and interesting wedding day, and the bridesmaid dresses can play a role in making that happen. Having some options laid out for the bride and her bridesmaids can help to make the whole process easy and fun. Wedding tradition suggests that bridesmaids pay for their own dresses. This is the first thing that should be considered when shopping around. The more formal the attire, the more expensive the dress. A bride may find the perfect dress for all of her ladies—it fits the theme, color scheme, and taste of the wedding … but it’s really expensive. It’s a good

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and her visions, and a lot of maids we see who are just trying to find a purple dress feel pretty lost.” Consider picking not just a color, but a general style and theme as well, such as retro and strapless. A bride still has the final say over whether or not it goes in her wedding, but this gives more freedom to the friends who can now work within their individual budgets and personal preferences; plus, it can add flare to the overall look of your wedding. A combination of direction and choice can give brides a break and allow bridesmaids to feel comfortable. Some brides tend to go overboard on micromanagement. “Something we also see go wrong is the bride inviting in too many opinions to pick out a bridesmaid dress,” Depoali says. “It’s part of the fun of being a bridesmaid—you wear a dress you may otherwise never wear. It’s part of the deal. We see a lot of brides trying to please all of the maids and as long as the bride picks something with style and that is flattering, most maids are happy with that.” If letting bridesmaids choose their own dresses is just giving up too much control, there are still plenty of options out there. Most bridal stores carry dresses by manufacturers who specifically produce wedding attire. They make lines of dresses that work well with one another. Brides can pick a specific color and a set of several dresses that you feel comfortable with, and allow the bridesmaids to choose among the selection. That way, brides can both accommodate the different women in her bridal party and, at the same time, keep with the dream she has envisioned for her wedding day. Ω

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Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | 07


BRIDAL GUIDE 2013

Runaway brides HOP ON A PLANE, BUT DON’T FORGET THE PAPERWORK by JESSICA SANTINA

Close

your eyes and picture yourself and your betrothed exchanging your wedding vows on a Brazilian white sand beach, the gentle sounds of the turquoise waves the only music you hear. It all seems exquisitely romantic until you arrive in Brazil for your wedding with all your required documents in hand and discover that in Brazil there’s a 30-day waiting period for all marriage licenses to be approved. Getting married in a foreign country enables you to steep yourself in the history and culture of a faraway land; set off on an adventure together to begin your life as husband and wife; package your honeymoon and wedding together into a convenient package; and even to save—yes, save!—money on your wedding. But if getting hitched in another country appeals to you, you’d better learn the ropes first.

Lesson #1: Give up control

Getting married in Scotland was a “really wonderful, relaxing experience,” says Buffy Martin Tarbox.

08 | Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | JANUARY 24, 2013 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

For Buffy Martin Tarbox and her husband, Orpheos, the decision to wed abroad was an easy one. “From the moment we got engaged, we knew we wanted a small, intimate wedding, and we both loved to travel and love Europe.” By descent, he’s Italian and she’s Scottish; the two points of focus were Italy and Scotland from the getgo. To avoid a language barrier, they focused on the UK and Scotland. Because all their planning would have to take place from the U.S., the first thing Tarbox had to do was relinquish some control. They found a good wedding planner online, and from that moment, all the details were handled through that one point of contact. “We communicated with the planner on all the things we wanted,” she says. “We got an all-inclusive package, so she found our location [Edinburgh Castle in Edinburgh], hired the florist, arranged a steam press for my dress, hired a photographer and we trusted her judgment. We did everything online; we didn’t even talk by phone. But we didn’t have to worry about anything.” When Marti Benjamin and her husband decided to marry in Paris in April 1989, they relied heavily on their friend Valerie, who resided in Paris, to handle their logistics. The couple never once traveled to France in the planning stages. Like the Tarboxes, the Benjamins planned to come to Paris cold, just in time to marry. “Valerie embraced the project with great enthusiasm,” Benjamin says. “She arranged the best man, and she was the maid of honor.” Five Parisian friends of Valerie’s, whom the Benjamins had never met, were their only guests. “We were fortunate, though—one was a photographer, and she showed up with cameras in hand, so we had some photographs!”


then went to El Salvador for their commitment ceremony, which Shepard officiated. Marti Benjamin ran into the same issue with her French wedding. In France, engaged couples must establish residency for at least a month for their marriages to be legal. As much as she would have wanted to, moving to France for a month wasn’t an option. Instead, the two married in a civil ceremony in the U.S. first, and had their church wedding in Paris at the American Cathedral. “I don’t think every ceremony is this complicated,” says Shepard. “But the reality is, your ceremony is symbolic. And I don’t think it’s any less of a marriage that they did the legal ceremony two days before leaving the country.”

Officiating her friends’ wedding in El Salvador was a “really cloudy” process, says Lorna Shepard.

Lesson #3: Arrive early In the end, the Tarboxes’ wedding went off without a hitch. The couple arrived in Edinburgh three days before their wedding, to allow time to get over their jet lag, and the planner greeted them with an itinerary. All taxis and appointments were arranged for them, so the two were able to enjoy their time together without running around. And they actually had time to see the local sights with their parents (the only attendees) prior to the wedding. “It was a really wonderful, relaxing experience,” says Tarbox. For Marti Benjamin and her husband, their early arrival in Oaxaca, six days before her daughter’s wedding, meant ensuring its validity. Mexican law required that someone other than a biological relative attest to Karri’s identity, and Karri’s stepfather was able to do that in enough time to legitimize the ceremony. “Having feet on the ground to confirm details ends up being important,” says Benjamin.

Buffy and Orpheos Tarbox were joined by their parents at their Scottish wedding.

Lesson #4: Scale back on size and complexity

When Benjamin’s own daughter, Karri, married Carlos last year in a hotel in his family’s hometown of Oaxaca, Mexico, a measure of control was also relinquished. “My daughter handled all arrangements using the Internet and Skype,” Benjamin says, explaining that the Karri had hired a wedding coordinator who worked directly with the venue’s bilingual events manager. “My advice is just to remain flexible,” says Benjamin.

Lesson #2: Every country has different rules According to the U.S. Department of State, “In general, marriages which are legally performed and valid abroad are also legally valid in the United States.” But there are exceptions to this rule, so you need to do plenty of homework on any country you’re considering as a wedding destination. Fortunately for the Tarboxes, weddings in the UK are recognized in the States. Unfortunately, it’s time-consuming. Couples

must apply for a special $600 visa, and give notice to the UK register at least 16 days prior to the wedding. They had to wait six to eight weeks to receive their required, specially stamped passports by mail. And they had to post their banns, which are formal public announcements of their pending nuptials, for a period of time prior to the wedding (to enable anyone who knows of lawful impediments to come forward). “You can’t elope,” Tarbox says. “That kind of spontaneity just isn’t possible.” When Lorna Shepard was asked to officiate at a friend’s wedding in El Salvador, however, it was more complex than that. “First, I had to go to the American embassy in San Francisco, with Krista and Ron [the engaged couple], to apply to be credentialed as a wedding official,” Shepard says. “El Salvador’s a Catholic country. There’s no separation of church and state, and they’d both been married before, so there were some problems with them having been previously married and divorced.”

They would need to provide documentation of their divorces, and they’d need to interview with an El Salvadoran priest at the embassy to clear up the matter of their religious affiliations. “Then I found out it was my responsibility to find the governor of the province, who’s kind of like a mayor, and hopefully one that speaks English, and get him to the ceremony, and I got the impression there had to be some form of payment,” Shepard recalls. “I tried to find out from the embassy whether they needed a U.S. marriage license, but no one could answer that. I called city hall in San Francisco, and they were baffled. The process was really cloudy.” The long and short of it was, though Shepard was entirely willing to jump through these hoops for her friends, it was likely a lot of trouble for a wedding that could likely not even be legally recognized here at home. In the end, the couple opted quietly for a private, city hall wedding here in the States,

All told, Tarbox estimates that they spent about $6,000-$7,000 on the wedding, including travel fares. They honeymooned in London, which added, she estimates, about another $1,500. “You could safely say it was under $10,000,” she says. For this, she was willing to forego such rituals and traditions as the bouquet toss— she simply handed hers to a hotel employee—the first dance, and even attendants. “Just make sure people know it’s your decision and stick to your guns,” Tarbox says. “Decide what you want as a couple and don’t allow other people to influence you.”Ω

Considering a wedding abroad? Here are some resources to get started on your research: U.S. Department of State information about Marriage of U.S. Citizens Abroad: http://travel.state.gov U.S. Government information (including contacts for embassies and consulates), “Marriage Abroad for American Citizens”: http://answers.usa.gov

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JANUARY 24, 2013 |

Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | 09


AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION’S

Fantasy Wedding Faire

SPECIAL THANKS TO: Circle K International Connie Wray-Gaudard and Bill Schulz Fig Tree Catering Hidden Valley Country Club Stylish Scribe Wells Fargo Volunteers COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Event Chair April Haymond Décor Committee Nisha Scrottish-Hallert Teresa Schwartzman

2013

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BRIDAL GUIDE 2013

The Big UNIQUE LOCAL WEDDING OPTIONS Leap FOR ADVENTUROUS COUPLES by TIM HAUSERMAN

When

my daughter was in fourth grade, she was excited to be given the opportunity to see her teacher getting married. We all stood on the dock at Sunnyside Lodge on Tahoe’s West Shore, and watched as the bride-teacher arrived glamorously in the back of a classic old wooden boat. She gave a hearty smile and a wave to her admirers on the dock, and then promptly fell into the lake. There was a loud “Oh my God” gasp from the crowd, and then, after a minute or two, the “real” bride emerged from her hiding place in the cabin of the boat to loud applause. Meanwhile, the hopefully well-compensated fake bride sloshed her way over to the dock in what turned out to be an $11 wedding dress. When I think of all the special moments at weddings I have attended over the last 15 years, it’s the bride falling into Tahoe that is the most memorable.

12 | Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | JANUARY 24, 2013 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

Many folks try to create the perfect wedding. They arrange to have the music, flowers and food prepared properly and presented at just the right time and place. They make sure that all of those classic wedding traditions are upheld and that their guests leave filled with lots of warm fuzzies caused by the obvious love of the bride and groom. And then there are folks who say: Screw that traditional stuff. I want to do something that pushes the envelope, something adventurous that people will actually remember. Instead of a church, would you rather get married in a remote wilderness or up in the air in a helicopter? Or do you just want to add a few special touches of whimsy that will make your event special? Here are a few ideas:


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SNOW LOVE BUNNIES How about doing the deed—you know, getting married—at the top of a ski resort? Downhill skiers will produce wedding photos to die for at the top of Homewood Ski Resort or Diamond Peak. Cross-country skiers can arrange to have an on-snow wedding and mini-reception overlooking the lake at Tahoe Cross-Country Ski Area. At Homewood, after the ceremony you can ski down to West Shore Café for your reception at their luxurious digs on the edge of the lake. At Diamond Peak you can either get married at the top of the mountain for the views, or set up the wedding on the lodge deck, where the bride and groom can literally ski together past the assembled crowd to the alter. Diamond Peak/Incline Village wedding planner Susie Cheatley says they can also set you up in the summertime with a golf course wedding. Picture the bride and groom on the tee-box of the signature seventh hole on the Incline Village Championship Course. Perhaps the guests and bridal party could arrive via golf carts wearing “Caddyshack” inspired clothing. For Homewood weddings go to: www.westshorecafe.com. For more information on Incline Weddings: Susie Cheatley, (775) 832-1303 www.thechateauatlaketahoe.com

BACKCOUNTRY WEDDING Are you a backcountry skier who would like to find a place to get married where you can have a piece of the snowy world all to yourself? Pacific Crest Snowcats takes skiers to remote little bits of powder wonderness in

TWO CLOWNS If getting married and then dropping into a steep chute to ski through the powder, or taking your vows mid-air above Fanette Island is a bit too much adventure for you, what about adding just a touch of humor to make your wedding memorable? Long time Tahoe wedding officiant Ed Miller remembers when he married a juggler. When it came time to exchange the rings, the bride and groom pulled out big Frisbee-sized rings that they began juggling back and forth. Another time, Miller was performing a more informal ceremony on a dock in Homewood. He looked out at the crowd and noticed that in the first five rows, all the guests looked very serious in dark suits. He turned around to talk to the groom and when he looked back, all those serious looking guests had donned Groucho Marx glasses, noses and bushy eyebrows. If you are looking for ideas, it seems that the wedding humor that works the best is a gentle poke at wedding traditions.

MORE IDEAS If your spirit of adventure cannot be confined to one day, you can also find adventure the day before and after the wedding. How about taking the wedding party on a kayak trip along the shore of Tahoe with a stop for a picnic on a beach? A hike into the wilderness? Paddleboard excursion? Tahoe Trips and Trails, who perform a lot of weddings at their Cedar House Hotel in Truckee, can handle all the details and provide guides for a before or after wedding day adventure. Learn more at www.tahoetrips.com. A relatively new after-wedding tradition is a Trash the Dress photo session. Once the pomp and circumstance of the big day are complete, you can let your hair down, and get that beautiful white dress a little dirty, or even more fun, wet. Sure, it is a bit invigorating for the bride and groom to have their April wedding pictures taken half immersed in Lake Tahoe, but think of how cool and memorable those photos will be. Whatever you do, remember this is your wedding. Show your spunk and personality and produce an event that a few years down the road will make your friends smile, or better yet, laugh. Ω

HOPING FOR A

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How about getting into a helicopter, flying over Lake Tahoe, and then reciting your vows over Emerald Bay? Reno-Tahoe Helicopters will do that. Just bride, groom, minister and the pilot/witness up there in the light blue sky above the deep blue lake. If you eschew the big fancy wedding, this might be your way to escape the guest lists, but if you don’t mind sharing the occasion with friends, your inflight ceremony can be followed by a downto-earth reception on land. www.renotahoehelicopters.com

the area between Sugar Bowl and Squaw Valley. Bring a small group of friends and have a lovely day skiing the powder before taking a break for vows on a mountain top. The trick might be to get your powderhound friends to be patient. They know all that time spent listening to you say “I do” is time that they are not skiing. Get the scoop at www.pacificcrestsnowcats.com.

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BRIDAL GUIDE 2013

Going to the chapel THE DISAPPEARING ART OF THE CHAPEL CEREMONY

The Chapel of the Bells is one of several wedding chapels near the Truckee River.

Story and photos by SHAUN HUNTER

It’s

a blustery cold Friday evening. Inside The Chapel Of The Bells near the corner of Fourth Street and Keystone Avenue, Gabriela Osuna’s mother passes a message to her daughter, who is standing in a hallway around the corner and out of sight from Jesus Vazquez, the groom who is walking through the lobby and toward the altar. As the wedding ceremony proceeds, Osuna walks into a room of standing family members while her mother follows her, carrying the long trailing tail of her white gown. The couple have traveled from Livermore, Calif., for this ceremony, which they plan to follow with a weekend in town. Nestled amidst the casinos and motels in downtown Reno are a handful of private wedding chapels. They are either buildings at the edge of downtown—Silver Bells Wedding Chapel, or the Chapel of the Bells, the only chapel located off of Virginia Street—or chapels within storefronts inside downtown buildings—the Arch of Reno Chapel or the Antique Angel Chapel, both within two blocks of the Truckee River. The state of Nevada requires two steps for a couple to be legally married: first, a wedding license, and second, a ceremony overseen by a person ordained to perform marriages. Traditionally, the state has had more lax laws to obtain a marriage license than surrounding states, such as the absence of a required waiting period or blood tests to obtain a marriage license that many California counties have required. This, coupled with the lack of residency requirements, has for decades made Reno’s chapels a destination for those from Nevada as well as surrounding states who prefer a quicker and more simple ceremony. “I started marrying people in 1962,” says George Flint, owner of the Chapel of the Bells. “It was a fun industry. People came from all over.” Vic Marino, whose official title is Officiant to Perform Marriages at the Arch Of Reno Chapel on Virginia Street, explained the ease of the ceremony. “The wedding license bureau is open from 8 a.m. to midnight, 365 days a year, and our chapel has similar hours. In less than an hour, with the right documenta-

tion, you can be married.” The choice to allow private commercial chapels throughout Nevada is determined by each county’s respective clerk. Carson City has opted against the chapels, leaving Reno the hub of quick and convenient wedding ceremonies in northern Nevada. *** Hanging above Osuna and Vazquez is an aging chandelier, while large arrangements of white silk flowers frame the altar. Those in attendance vary in dress from suits and dresses, to one relative in a San Francisco 49ers jacket. Music plays from hidden speakers as the minister leads the couple through the wedding vows and the exchanging of the rings. *** “The majority of the people that get married here are from Northern California, then Oregon, Idaho, Washington,” Marino explains. Asked about the types of ceremonies that he’s had requests for, he says, “We’ve absolutely had themed weddings, Halloween ceremonies where everyone’s in costume. One couple dressed up as teddy bears.” At the Chapel of the Bells, Flint put in a drive-through chapel several years ago. “In summer, we’ll get couples on motorcycles— their friends stand gathered around,” he says. Despite the history of the chapels’ presence in Reno’s entertainment-destination fabric, both Marino and Flint describe the chapel industry facing the same economic hardships that have affected other parts of the city’s tourism economy. Today, many California counties no longer require blood tests, and often now have little, if any, waiting period to obtain a wedding license. Those who have lobbied for the chapels in Northern Nevada say that the fight for the statute that keeps Washoe County’s licensing bureau open until midnight each day of the year has been a recurring issue, saying they have faced murmurs of a County Clerk who would like to reduce office hours on weekends and holidays. “New Year’s Day, the 4th of July—those are our

“EVERYTHING’S FESTIVE. EVERYONE’S HAPPY ... EXCEPT MAYBE A MOTHER-INLAW.” Vic Marino, Officiant to Perform Marriages, the Arch Of Reno Chapel on Virginia Street “GOING TO THE CHAPEL” continued on page 17 A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JANUARY 24, 2013 | Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | 15


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“It was a fun industry,” says George Flint, owner of the Chapel of the Bells, pictured. “People came from all over.”

The Chapel of the Bells provides a ready-to-go wedding venue.

busiest days,” Marino says, considering the potential loss of business should the licensing bureau’s hours be changed. At the Arch of Reno, a large crowd of people fill the main chapel. “Reno is a tourist-based town, and we’re a part of that,” says Marino. “We’re a major contributor. That party from Nevada City [California] has over 30 people. These are people who come to town for a wedding, then go to a casino, or go to a show, or go to a restaurant.”

Flint echoes these sentiments. “In 1978, there were 21 chapels operating in Reno,” he says. “Today, aside from the casino hotels, there are four. We’re facing the same economy pains all the other businesses are having. People are still getting married, they’re just not spending as much on getting married.” Flint’s chapel no longer keeps a constant supply of fresh flowers, and video and photography sales are down due in part to the prevalence and quality of camera-phones.

“The little businessman is barely holding on,” he says. *** After the ceremony, Vazquez and Osuna pose for their first pictures as husband and wife while the rest of the party gathers in the lobby awaiting the final witness signatures and paperwork. “A Reno wedding is convenient,” Osuna’s mother explains. “They do everything for you. They take you to get the license and

everything.” Everyone shares a few jokes before shuffling out the door and into the snow. They discuss their plans for the weekend they’ll spend in town before heading back to California. *** “We’re a true tradition of Reno, and we want to stay a tradition,” says Marino. “In this industry, everything’s festive. Everyone’s happy ...” he pauses, smiling, “... except maybe a mother-in-law here and there.” Ω

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BRIDAL GUIDE 2013

i t C H E C K OUT by ASHLEY HENNEFER

ashleyh@newsreview.com

WEDDING CHECKLIST

Even

if you choose to hop on a plane and head out of the country or jump off a dock in Lake Tahoe for your wedding, like some of the couples featured in our guide, you still need to plan ahead. Weddings are costly and involve more than just you and your betrothed. But don’t stress—we got you covered. Go purchase a new calendar or fire up your smartphone and enter these dates.

Two years to 12 months before Break the news of your engagement to friends and family. Give ’em a quick call before you blast the news on Facebook. It’s just common courtesy. Start planning a budget with your fiancé. Consider all expenses, including small ones. Get your finances in order—if possible, pay off existing debt and get a savings account started. Keep this money for after the wedding to get your marriage off on a good start. Grab your betrothed and hit the gym if fitness goals are on your wishlist.

12 to nine months Select the members of your wedding party and establish a budget on clothes and accessories. Set up accounts on wedding forums or websites to get ideas for themes or to ask advice. Visit venues and select one. Many venues require a deposit early on. Book any live entertainment, including DJs and bands.

Nine to six months Get engagement photographs taken.

closer to the nine-month mark because photographers are booked fast. Purchase the wedding rings (and check out our suggestions on page 5 for what to look for in your rings). Start planning the honeymoon.

Six to three months Apply for a passport. This process can be arduous so it’s best to start early. Purchase the necessary expenses for your honeymoon—book plane tickets, hotels, rental cars, etc. If you’re going somewhere really exotic, you might need to get vaccinated before you leave, so make a doctor’s appointment.

Three months to one month If you plan to cut or dye your hair, do it now to avoid any last minute emergencies. Visit a hair and/or makeup stylist to discuss your options for the wedding day. Experiment with makeup ahead of time to ensure that you don’t have an allergic reaction to any of the cosmetics. Book a spa appointment for the day before your wedding. Host or attend parties, including your bridal party and bachelorette/bachelor party.

Mail save-the-date cards. Set up a gift registry. Hire a wedding photographer. If you plan to get married in the summer, particularly June, you may want to do this

Week of Double check all honeymoon plans— check the weather forecast, ensure that passports are up to date.

18 | Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | JANUARY 24, 2013 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

Do laundry and clean the house. Even if you aren’t going on a honeymoon, having clean clothes to change to after the wedding is one less thing to worry about. Pack for honeymoon. Break in your wedding shoes. Even if you plan to wear funky sneakers, you don’t want blisters after the walk down the aisle.

Day before Hold rehearsal and rehearsal dinner. Give your wedding party a small but special gift. Head to the spa and get a manicure and pedicure. Have tip money ready for the vendors.

Wedding day Relax and remember to slow down and take in the day. Everything will go by very fast. Take time to try some of your food and get a piece of your wedding cake. Mingle with guests and thank them for attending your special day. The most important part: Have fun!

Wedding night Well ... you know what to do.


BRIDAL GUIDE LISTINGS 2013 ATT I R E BLUE GARTER BRIDAL & TUX 948 Victorian Ave. Sparks, NV 89431 775-358-4141 www.bluegarterbridal.com

B E A U TY & H E A LT H PLANET BEACH 5110 Mae Anne Ave. Suite 503 Reno, NV 89523 775-747-4772 www.planetbeach.com

C AT E R I N G FAMOUS DAVE'S BBQ 4925 Kietzke Lane Reno, NV 89509 775-826-7427 www.famousdaves.com FIG TREE CATERING 1401 W. Second Street Reno, NV 89502 775-770-1110 www.figtreecatering.com

MICHAEL & SONS 2001 E. Second Street Reno, NV 89502 775-786-5110 www.michaelandsons.com PRECISION DIAMONDS 5034 S. Virginia Street Reno, NV 89502 775-829-8282 www.precisiondiamonds.net

PHOTOGRAPHY

VENUES CHISM HOUSE 1401 W. Second Street Reno, NV 89503 775-322-5455 www.chismhouse.com NAKOMA GOLF RESORT 348 Bear Run Cilo, CA 96106 530-832-5067 www.nakomagolfresort.com

DARBY ANN PHOTOGRAPHY NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM 775-830-4245 10 S. Lake Street www.darbyannphotography.com Reno, NV 89501 775-333-9300 I DEUX PHOTOGRAPHY www.automuseum.org 1401 W. Second Street Reno, NV 89503 PLUMAS PINES GOLF RESORT 775-622-3847 402 Poplar Valley Road www.ideuxphotography.com Graeagle, CA 96103

R E S TA U R A N T / V E N U E

530-836-1420 www.plumaspinesgolf.com

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia Street Reno, NV 89502 775-689-7325 www.peppermillreno.com/ weddings

RANCHARRAH ELITE EVENTS 6001 Talbot Lane Reno, NV 89509 775-824-4315 www.rancharrah.com

DIAMOND VAULT 4950 Kietzke Lane Suite 301 Reno, NV 89509 775-342-6663 www.diamondvaultreno.com

VISTA GRILLE 1250 Disc Drive Sparks, NV 89436 775-626-9922 www.vistagrille.com

THE RIDGE TAHOE 400 Ridge Club Drive Stateline, NV 89449 775-588-3553 ext. 3160 www.ridgetahoeresort.com

GEM GALLERY Tim Ottman 5890 S. Virginia Street Reno, NV 89502 775-825-3499 www.renogem.com

WILD RIVER GRILLE 17 S. Virginia Street Reno, NV 89501 775-284-7455 www.wildrivergrille.com

TANNENBAUM EVENT CENTER 20007 Mt. Rose Hwy Reno, NV 89511 775-849-7688 www.tannenbaumevents.com

JEWELRY

VERDI PINES 400 Sylvan Circle Verdi, NV 89439 775-544-6694 www.verdipines.com WILBUR D. MAY CENTER Rancho San Rafael Regional Park 1595 N. Sierra Street Reno, NV 89503 775-785-5961 www.maycenter.com

SERVICES ADAM & EVE 7520 S. Longley Lane Reno, NV 89502 775-852-1162 www.adamevereno.com INK: PLAN B 267 Vassar Street Reno, NV 89502 775-322-0232 www.inkplanb.com RENO-TAHOE LIMOUSINE 775-348-0868 Reno-Sparks 530-582-1300 Truckee-Tahoe www.ltlimo.com WEDGE A CHEESE SHOP 16 St. Lawrence Ave. Reno, NV 89509 775-737-4078 www.wedgecheeseshop.com

a special supplement to the reno news & review | JANUARY 24, 2013 |

Bridal Guide 2 0 13 | 19


INTRODUCING

VERDI PINES X X X W F SE J Q J O F T  D P N

OUR AREA'S NEWEST WEDDING AND SPECIAL EVENTS VENUE Where resort like ambiance meets the rustic, natural beauty of the Sierras.

You are cordially invited to experience northern Nevada’s newest and most charming venue for weddings and special events. Verdi Pines, located at the base of the Sierra Mountains, is a captivating, intimate and elegant location perfect for weddings and special events. Guests will enjoy our large deck and stone bar as well as our elegant landscaping, romantic ponds and waterfalls like none other in northern Nevada. Schedule your private tour and see why Verdi Pines is the perfect setting for your special day! Please contact us for a tour of the property and to book your special event today!

Phone: 775.544.6694 Events@Verdipines.com 400 Sylvan Circle Verdi, NV 89439

VERDI PINES


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