Issuu on Google+

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 Sheila Leslie . . . . . . . . . . .6 Chanelle Bessette . . . . . .7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .16 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .18

Art of the State . . . . . . .19 Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .23 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Free Will Astrology . . . .30 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .31

ADVICE FROM COUNCIL See News, page 8.

WINTER BEANS MAKE GREENHOUSE GASES See Green, page 11.

FAMILY JEWELS See Arts&Culture, page 16.

GET RED SAUCED See Foodfinds, page 20.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 47

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JANUARY

10-16, 2013


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EDITOR’S NOTE

LETTERS

On your mark

Reefer gladness

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Here we are, 2013, and everything’s the same, except that it isn’t. Congress failed miserably at the fiscal cliff negotiations, exactly as predicted. It’s amazing. Even when the whole world is watching, those people can somehow find ways to help their friends. And then everyone acts all surprised when those dinosaurs are shown to be inept at doing voters’ business, but geniuses when it comes to corruption. It’s enough to make a nice guy cynical. Fortunately, the years of fighting off cynicism have made me a less nice guy, so we’re all going to be fine. Did you notice I have a couple of new columnists? After her years in the Nevada Assembly and Senate, I’m sure Nevada’s liberal lioness Sheila Leslie needs no introduction. I was actually kind of surprised when she agreed to write the column for us. And I’m not that easily taken aback. Chanelle Bessette is a new voice on the conservative columnist scene. I actually had a lot of very intriguing interest from more established conservative voices in this community, including former electeds, regular contributors and political activists. But one of the scruples we have at this paper is we’re committed to bringing new voices into the cacophony. I’ve been acquainted with Chanelle for a couple of years, and when I ran into her at a Libertarian rally, I thought she would be a good fit for us— and part of that is that I’m tired of assisting the lie that the radical right represents conservative thought. We’ll see. You’ll get an idea of where Chanelle is coming from in this week’s column. Along other lines, Dennis Myers is on vacation so Tracie Douglas is filling in for him in the news section and other places. Anyway, this is already shaping up to be one crazy year. I can’t think of a year that I looked more forward to getting underway than this one.

Re “Decriminalization” (News, Jan. 3): Go back, go back! I implore Nevadans to forego any thoughts of decriminalizing the “Devil Weed.” Perhaps my experience on New Year’s Eve will be instructive: I “found” a single joint of marijuana lying on the sidewalk here in Paonia. (I have no proof, of course, but I strongly suspect it was planted there by the Mexican drug cartels.) Realizing that it was now “legal” here in Colorado, I lit it up and took a tentative puff. What ensued can only be described as a nightmare. The first thing I did was search (fruitlessly) in the immediate area for a stash of Heroin or perhaps a few pills of Oxycontin. Then I searched my now fogged brain for the location of an open gun show so I might purchase a Bushmaster assault rifle or some other means of committing mass murder or at least an armed robbery. (None were open at that midnight hour.) Having no other lawless options available, I hopped in my car with the intention of running down pedestrians or smashing into other vehicles. By the merest circumstance I was only a half block from home. My aging Ford Taurus was unable to attain the 100 mph speed I so fervently sought. (I was able to exceed the posted speed limit by 5 mph, and when I got home I thoughtlessly parked with my wheels a good 15 inches from the curb, fully three inches outside what’s permitted by local ordinance!) I stumbled into the house barely able to constrain my urge to kick the dog or beat my spouse. Thence to sleep. (A coma?) Now, as that poisonous THC slowly relinquishes its grip on my body and mind, I am returning to normal. The Iraq war was legitimate. The rich are deserving of tax relief. Personal freedom is mostly too dangerous to contemplate. A few more hours of Fox News and Rush Limbaugh and sanity will return. Be careful out there. Though the details of that

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Money talks

experience are a little fuzzy, I’m pretty sure it happened much as I have described it.

Re “In the dark” (News, Dec. 20): Your story about mining in the U.S. in general, and Nevada in particular, says a lot of important true things. But it leaves out a lot of equally important true things.

Larry L. Wissbeck Paonia, Colo.

Rich man, poor man A lot of the current political debates centers around the difference between “middle class” and “rich.” I’ve made about $40,000 a year for the last several years, and it’s been difficult to maintain a house for a family of four, and impossible to pay for college for two children. If I had made $250,000 for these years, it would have been easy to do both. I say that $250,000 a year is rich.

For example, the Mining Law of 1872: It may be true that the law itself stands as written in 1872. But there are numerous acts that modify the acquisition of mining rights on public land. A Wikipedia article gives a pretty decent overview of these (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Mini ng_Act_of_1872). And that’s not the full story regarding laws that exploration and mining operate under today. Many laws and regulations have been added. Among other things, these added laws and regulations affect appropriate environmental management of land, including bonding to make sure there’s money for reclamation if the operator goes bankrupt or tries to walk away, and appropriate health and safety protections for workers. For another example, the quote from Dale Bumpers is out-of-date. The article quotes Bumpers as saying “Anyone, and I mean anyone” may stake a claim. In fact a claim holder must be a U.S. citizen or a person who has declared his intention to become a citizen of the U.S. Bumpers goes on to write, “The claim will remain in effect as long as the owner pays $100 a year per claim.” The annual maintenance fee payable to the federal government has gone up to $140 per year per claim, and in Nevada additional claim maintenance fees support the county and the state. By the way, $2 per claim per year is earmarked for the Mackay School of Earth Sciences and Engineering at University of Nevada, Reno. That $140 per year is not a cheap as it sounds: A single claim is not large enough to hold a commercially viable ore deposit these days. Typical exploration projects and mines in Nevada sit on blocks of hundreds of

Richard Sasaki Reno

Road net Re “Road conditions” (Green, Dec. 27): For a guy who wants to follow bicycle policy and projects, he seems pretty unfamiliar with the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP), its bicycle facilities chapter, as well as how the projects come about. Bike lanes are added to a road when it is reconditioned, if it is in the RTP, and where there is enough room. The RTC and its Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee reviews every slurry seal and maintenance/reconditioning project to see if bike lanes can be added. The natural result of waiting for a section of road to be repaved is that the network is being completed in a piecemeal, apparently haphazard, way. Many miles of bicycle lanes and paths are being added every year, and it eventually will all be connected in a network. Terry McAfee Nevada Bicycle Coalition Reno

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Tracie Douglas Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Nora Heston, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Gil Egeland, Neil Lemerise, John Miller, Russell Moore, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

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FILET OF SOUL

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

claims, generating tens of thousands of dollars a year per block in claim maintenance fees. Remember that holding mining claims does not give you permission to mine. For that matter, it doesn’t even mean there is anything worth mining on the claims. A claim holder has to do years of exploration work, during which time he’s paying rent to the federal and local governments but not generating any income. If it turns out the hopedfor El Dorado isn’t on that ground after all, the claim holder may drop the claims, paying for exploration work and for reclamation but never earning any money from it. Far from “stealing” value from the people of the U.S., these projects are pouring money in. Elizabeth Zbinden Reno

Or take the guns away If a person is walking around with a bone sticking out of their body, everyone notices. Nobody notices a broken soul. The only people who know are those closest to the sick person. There are many reasons these people take no action. Shame, guilt and denial are very strong obstacles, and the overwhelming cost of mental health treatment ends the idea of help for many. People who are already hesitant to seek help certainly won’t pay $2,000 per day for in-patient treatment. With a government that can’t agree how to wipe their collective asses, it’s highly doubtful that any legislation will pass any time soon that will have any impact on an issue that needs immediate attention. Perhaps the millions being spent lobbying for, and against, gun control could be put to better use for mental health evaluation and education throughout our schools. Guns aren’t going away so we need to treat the sick and educate the rest so we can feel at ease sending our kids to school every morning. Danny Pettipas Reno

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover illustration: Michael Grimm Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

JANUARY 10, 2013

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special aDVeRTising secTion

special aDVeRTising secTion

!

It’s happen ing in

EVENTS SHEEP DIP 49 This annual comedy show – now in its 49th year – is an evening of skits, songs and dance performed by locals, including with members of the media and even a few of our famous (and infamous) politicians. Funds raised from this year’s show and program will support The Children’s Cabinet, Evelyn Mount Community Outreach and the For Kids Foundation. F, 1/18, 8PM and Sa, 1/19, 8PM, $35. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 www.SheepDipShow.org BREW HAHA Sierra Arts Foundation presents its 18th annual fundraiser featuring beers from 35 breweries, raffle and live music by Diego’s Umbrella to keep the party hopping. F, 1/25, 8PM, $50 general; $65 VIP. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 CONVERSATION CAFE The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month. 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 BEADS AND BOOKS Learn basic beading techniques with volunteer beading expert, Jamie, and work on projects with other beaders. First Su of every month, 1-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

ACTIVITIES

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP Jean Peters guides this class for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

SPANISH SPRINGS STORYTIME Stories and activities, especially for the preschool child. M, 10:30-11am through 1/28. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

CROCHET CONNECTION Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

E-READER CAFE Learn how to download library e-books and audiobooks to your electronic device. Please bring your library card, device with USB cable and a basic understanding. Th, 4-5PM through 3/28. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

MUSIC

SNOWMAN FAMILY PROGRAM This winter-themed family program celebrates the art of the snowman. Make snowman crafts to take home. Su, 1/13, 1-2PM. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 MOVIE MATINEE Watch Ice Age 4: Continental Drift. Tu, 1/15, 4-6:30PM. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 SOURDOUGH SLIM Get ready for a hoot and hollering good time with Sourdough Slim at the Sparks Museum & Cultural Center. Su, 1/20, 3-5PM, $15 per person. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave.(775) 355-1144 CONVERSATION CORNER Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions. W, 4:30-6PM, free.Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 3523200

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ERIC ANDERSON Th, 1/10, 5:30PM, F, 1/11, 6PM and Sa, 1/12, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 LAST LANE Th, 1/10, 7PM, F, 1/11, 8PM and Sa, 1/12, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 STEVE EARLE Th, 1/10, 8PM, $28. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 JEFF JONES F, 1/11, 6PM, Sa, 1/12, 6PM and Su, 1/13, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 LIVE MUSIC F, 1/11, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd., (775) 355-1030 BILL DAVIS Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! HOLLYWOOD TRASHED Sa, 1/12, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd., (775) 355-1030 KEITH ALAN HARTRANFT Su, 1PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 JAY ROWE W, 1/16, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ROSENDO Th, 1/17, 5:30PM, F, 1/18, 6PM and Sa, 1/19, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 STEW STEWART Th, 1/17, 7PM, F, 1/18, 8PM and Sa, 1/19, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 TYLER STAFFORD F, 1/18, 6PM, Sa, 1/19, 6PM and Su, 1/20, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 VANDELL ANDREW W, 1/23, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 DJ LARRY WILLIAMS DJ Larry Williams at Trader Dick’s. No cover. F, 10PM, Sa, 10PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 KARAOKE ASPEN GLEN bAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd. 89436 / (775) 354-2400 SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861 OPEN MIC GREAT bASIN bREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY! CITY OF SPARKS Mayor: Geno Martini. Council members: Julia Ratti, Ed Lawson, Ron Smith, Mike Carrigan, Ron Schmitt. City Manager: Shaun Carey. Parks & Recreation Director: Tracy Domingues. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 3532311 or through the City of Sparks website. WEb RESOURCES: www.sparksitshappeninghere.com www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com THis secTion is pRoViDeD as a pUBlic seRVice BY THe Reno neWs & ReVieW anD is noT FUnDeD oR aFFiliaTeD WiTH THe ciTY oF spaRKs


BIG HE A SMALL H

by Tracie Douglas

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25kWorst movie experience SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) of 2012?

Asked at Brasserie St. James, 901 S. Center St. Sean Hill Bartender

The worst movie I saw was Weekend at Bernie’s II. It didn’t make sense that the dead guy would still be around from the first movie. The next was Y.O.L.O., because Y.O.L.O.

Keegan Ferrari Student

This is difficult because I like really bad films. But I’d have to say the worst movie I saw was The Campaign, because it wasn’t as good as the trailers looked, and because I was sitting between my mother and my 14-year-old sister. It was so filthy … I didn’t want to laugh at some things because of my mother and also because of my sister.

Judith Howton

Number 9, Number 9

Nursing student

My worst movie experience of 2012 was the ex-boyfriend who wouldn’t take me to one. I’ve been waiting to be able to tell someone that!

Our intern Bethany Deines went the distance for her And while nobody was saying so publicly, during the cover story last week, “8 things you didn’t know about time right before the overflow shelter opened, there were being homeless in Reno,” but as long as a 3,000-word dozens of people illegally sleeping on the sidewalk outstory is, that’s still not enough room to get in everything side the homeless shelter complex. In fact, that situation a writer wants to get into it. Of course, 6,000 words is what generated some of the complaints of police wouldn’t be enough to write a comprehensive story about harassment—cops would come in the pre-dawn hours something as complex as homelessness. and roust the people sleeping there. The simplest explaFortunately, we editors have all the time and all the nation to this is the police wanted to allow them the words in the world. safety of numbers, but officials didn’t want a public or There was one thing that people don’t seem to realize business outcry at the return of tent city. And by the way, about homelessness in Reno that we there were more serious complaints wished we’d gotten into the story, but about police intimidation and violence Homeless people are toward homeless people that we didn’t space didn’t permit it. We’ve mentioned it before, anecdotally, but write about because we haven’t gotten now staying in the research done for this story confirmed to the bottom of them yet. suburbs. it: Homeless people, who for one The take-home lesson from this reason or another are unsuited to staymigration is that we—citizens of ing in shelters, are now staying in the suburbs. This is Reno, media and probably social services—have a less primarily because the last Reno City Council made it clear idea of the homeless problem in Reno. And the illegal to get caught sleeping downtown. Reasons for homeless people who are living alone are more vulnerabeing unsuited to staying in shelters could include drug ble to the predations of criminals. Homeless people addictions, pet ownership, or being married and wanting who live in alleys in order to avoid interacting with to remain with a spouse. law enforcement and social services are less likely to Basically, individuals find unoccupied homes in the get medical help when they need it. Homeless people neighborhoods and sleep in the alleys behind them. The who live under bridges in order to not go to jail for telltale sign is often a shopping cart. When’s the last time being impoverished are more likely to suffer from you saw a police cruiser checking alleyways when there violent crime. wasn’t a crime in progress? We were told that areas with One effect of this shadow population was that the trees off hiking/running paths are good places to sleep. And overflow shelter did not open for weeks after it was deseven the old “sleeping under the bridge” classic has gained perately needed. And the only people who knew how new fans with reports of more than 20 people sleeping desperately it was needed were afraid to come forward. Ω under one bridge slightly out of the downtown area. OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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Amy O’Brien Hostess

My worst movie experience of 2012 was when I went to see Les Misérables, and my boyfriend slept through the whole thing. I loved it!

Benjamin Clyne Restaurant/bar manager

The worst thing has to be the talking. I always go to the last showing of a movie or I go during the day. Any crowded theater is just bad, bad, bad.

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MISCELLANY

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JANUARY 10, 2013

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LEFT FOOT FORWARD

What Sandoval should say As Gov. Brian Sandoval prepares for his biennial State of the State next week, here’s the speech I wish he’d give: My fellow Nevadans, I’m ready to lead our state through the painful and difficult challenges ahead. In Nevada, as in America, the gap between the very rich and the rest of us is wider than any time since the by Gilded Age. It’s no accident that the Sheila Leslie poor in Nevada pay 10 percent of their income in taxes, while the rich pay 1.5 percent. The ultra-wealthy use large campaign contributions laundered through ever-increasing and creative Political Action Committees to create even greater political muscle to protect their economic might. Some call this a system of legalized bribery, as contributors later demand tax perks, lax oversight and special interest legislation as the price of their support. We all turn a blind eye to it, insisting money buys access but never a vote. But we are all complicit if we ignore this fundamental

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flaw in our political system as we watch unlimited campaign contributions destroy our ability to make decisions based on the long-term health of our state. Therefore Secretary of State Ross Miller and I will join forces with legislative leadership to sponsor major campaign finance reform and end the money laundering of “leadership” PACs that collect unlimited contributions and dole them out to caucus members. Let’s change the political culture in Nevada and set an example for the country by enacting publicly funded campaigns. The truth is that after years of significant budget cuts, the state of our state is dismal on many fronts. The traditional gateway to a better life, educational attainment, is no longer available for many children. Our public schools are starved of funding, and the middle class is being priced out of higher education. There’s no funding to fix leaky roofs or buy smart technology. But Nevada does have the money. We

choose to allow our broken tax system to export it to foreign and out-of-state corporations instead of investing it in our children. Our jails and prisons provide more mental health treatment than our state programs. Administrators have requested solutions like a 24-hour urgent care center in Las Vegas to take the pressure off emergency rooms and direct the severely mentally ill to more appropriate services. Despite this clear and urgent need, I did not include this $7.5 million program in my proposed budget, leaving it to languish on a list of “Items of Special Consideration,” which really should be subtitled “Items Nevada Really Needs but Can’t Afford” because we’d rather subscribe to the myth that zero corporate taxes will bring us prosperity. Nevada ranks dead last in per capita public spending. I call on the Legislature to pass SJR 15 immediately before the mining lobbyists have time to descend upon you. Let the voters decide if Nevada should reap a

portion of their windfall profits since we have to endure the pillaging and pollution of our public lands and the ghost towns left behind when the gold is gone. Nevada is a great place to live and work. We don’t need subsidies or other carrots for tax-dodging corporations who play state against state in their race to the bottom. Let’s enact real tax reform based on studies from the last 60 years that tell us a broad-based business tax is an essential component of a healthy state tax system. And let’s make Las Vegas the Marriage Equality Capital of the world by passing legislation to repeal the arcane and discriminatory anti-gay marriage amendment and replace it with a law that allows all committed, loving couples the same right to marry that straight couples enjoy. Let’s grow up Nevada! I promise to lead you down a new path to prosperity and equality. Ω


THE LIBERTY BELLE

‘Battle Born’ beginnings led to libertarian enlightenment Growing up in Nevada lends itself to a unique adolescence. Born and raised in Las Vegas, I was exposed at a young age to a melee of wild political and social ideologies. I remember seeing billboards of naked women advertising anything from strip clubs to sushi joints. I remember progressing grade by grade through a struggling public school system, seeing many teachers by Chanelle Bessette who would have given everything they had to see their students succeed. I remember having friends and classmates whose families had traveled from across the country and around the world to take advantage of the economic opportunities the Silver State had to offer. My own parents are hardworking, middle-class and college-educated, the kind that taught me about the importance of individual responsibility through chores and a set weekly allowance. In addition to a conserva-

tive look at finances, my family was open-minded and encouraged individual freedom of expression. The latter experience led me to a brief foray into bleeding heart liberalism, even where fiscal policy was concerned. But after a period of deep reflection, I gradually came to a more rational— dare I say, enlightened?—viewpoint, that of libertarianism. As a libertarian, I embrace social and political freedoms, and while I may disagree with certain ideologies, I will defend to the death a person’s right to have them. I, myself, am a feminist, a gay rights ally, a gun rights supporter, an atheist, a vegetarian and a champion of the Constitution. But I also believe in responsible, sustainable economic habits from the government and support individual responsibility as well. This balance of social liberalism and fiscal conservatism is one that I think both Democrats and

Republicans readily relate to. In truth, I think a lot of people are libertarians who just haven’t realized it yet. I myself came to the realization of my libertarian leanings after I moved to Reno to attend the university. While I still strongly and whole-heartedly believed in upholding social freedoms, I felt uncomfortable following a liberal fiscal policy. In the news and in dayto-day life, I saw governmental waste of resources and invasions of privacy. I came to the conclusion that whether it came to the private lives of its citizens or to their wallets, I disagreed with the idea that “Big Brother” knows best. While I am by no means an anarchist nor a cold subscriber to the “dog eat dog” mentality, I believe that as long as they are not hurting anyone else, an American citizen should be able to make their own decisions for their personal lives and hold as much of their income as they can. I believe in cutting

down on frivolous government expenditures and in pulling our country up by the bootstraps in order to reduce the nation’s deficit. As a 21-year-old woman who will be graduating from college later this year, the future excites me. Ultimately, I want my life to be filled with adventure, success and meaning. I don’t expect to be given handouts nor do I anticipate voting for politicians whose values are to deprive their constituents of their freedoms and wealth. While I hope that most people join me in this goal, I think it’s important to evaluate how that goal will be achieved. Will it be through continued fiscal irresponsibility? Or will it be through a sincere appraisal of our state and country’s economic status, and a realization that we cannot continue down the path we are currently treading? It’s the mission of this column to do the latter, and it is my sincere wish that you come along for the ride. Ω

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PHOTO/TRACIE DOUGLAS

New councilmember Hillary Schieve, right, and Emily Durr inspect clothes at Schieve’s business, Plato’s Closet. Schieve would like to see other areas of Reno developed similarly to Midtown.

On the nose “Anyone who has had norovirus will tell you that for the first half of the illness, they are worried they might die, and during the second half, they are worried that they won’t die,” says Randall Todd, division director of epidemiology for the Washoe County Health District. The hearty virus recently took aim at 19 schools in Washoe County, sending home approximately 2,500 children, teachers and staff. The schools were thoroughly cleaned over the holiday break, and school officials hope the virus has been eliminated. Depending on humidity, temperature and even something as benign as vacuuming, the norovirus can live on surfaces for several days. All it takes is for someone to touch a doorknob, desktop, crayon or volleyball that has the virus living on it, then touch their face or eat food without washing their hands, and norovirus spreads once again. The virus causes vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. If carpets aren’t thoroughly cleaned after a vomit incident, the vacuum can actually throw the virus into the air, where anyone can inhale it. According to the Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC), approximately 21 million people in the U.S. catch norovirus every year. There are no treatments, except rest. To prevent further spread, those infected should stay home until all symptoms have stopped for at least 72 hours. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer does not kill the virus. Washing hands with warm water and soap will remove the virus, and a bleach and water solution will kill it. Because some people are sensitive to the smell of bleach, there are other products that also kill norovirus. To avoid infection, wash hands after every bathroom use, diaper change or before eating.

Don’t hang up The elections are over, and all of those annoying robocallers are on break until 2016. However, there is one kind of robocall that cell phone users may want to get—the reverse 911 call that alerts you to dangers in your specific neighborhood. For example, during the Caughlin Ranch fire in the fall of 2011, people who lived in that part of town wanted to know if they had to evacuate. According to Aaron Kenniston, emergency manager for Washoe County, a recent test of the new Code Red System showed that many homes no longer have a landline. Instead, people are opting to use a cell phone for their everyday phone service. “In the next two to three years, cell phone companies will be making cell phone technology compatible with our existing 911 system,” says Kenniston. “That way, it won’t matter if you have a landline or just use a cell phone, we will be able to reach you in times of an emergency. In the meantime, Kenniston asks that cell phone users simply register their phones by going to www.readywashoe.com and click on the Get the Message icon. He says users will not be contacted unless there is a danger in their neighborhood. “Some people are hesitant to register with us, or they get upset because they have an unlisted phone number,” Kenniston said. “There are no unlisted phone numbers when it comes to our 911 system.” Police and fire are going to roll to a home even if someone dials 911 and hangs up. So register today, or wait until technology catches up. Either way, the information could save lives.

-Tracie Douglas

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to do is go into our police department on Second Street to understand that some of our buildings are in bad shape.” She also pointed out that the few city pools left are highly used and must be well maintained for the citizens, and that the sewer treatment plant is also in need of help.

Hillary Schieve, At Large

Meet the new bosses Reno’s newest City Councilmembers talk about their hopes for 2013 and beyond The Reno City Council is starting 2013 with four new, optimistic, high-energy By councilmembers. They each have Tracie Douglas some of their own ideas of what they would like to see happen in the city, but for the most part, they are walking in lockstep about what is most important. First, they have been going through orientation, spending time in each department of the city. Next, they will attend a planning session on Feb. 5, where all ideas will be placed on the table for careful consideration by the full council.

“Good customer service comes from the department heads down to the staff, and I want to see the city of Reno have the best reputation in the country for good customer service.” Neoma Jardon Reno City Councilmember

Jenny Brekhus, Ward One

“I want to make sure the house is in order,” states Jenny Brekhus. “It’s very big, and I want to look at everything to make sure everything is being done efficiently.” Even though the budget for fiscal year

2012/13 has been in place since July 1, 2012, there are items that will come before the council for approval. Brekhus wants to know the who, what, why, when, where and how of every city expenditure to determine its necessity. Brekhus doesn’t go so far as to say the city’s house is out of order, but she wants to make sure the council knows just where the money is being spent. Brekhus is casting an eye to all of the city’s outstanding debt, especially those incurred by the baseball park, bowling stadium and events center. “I also want to look at the assets and see how they are performing for us,” she adds. She points to the facts that loans were cheap a few years back, and now everyone seems to struggle to make payments. She uses the Silver Legacy as an example of the current downtown struggle, which she believes paints the picture for everything else. The city of Reno has dropped from a high of 1,642 employees in 2007 to 1,107 currently. Brekhus is not opposed to hiring new employees, but she wants to make department heads realize they are going to have to prove their case before she signs off on any personnel additions. Brekhus is also concerned with the issue of deferred maintenance of older city properties, and writing in appropriate maintenance agreements in any new projects. “All you need

“I want to make Reno known as the most business friendly-city in the U.S. by streamlining what it takes to get a business license and doing away with the red tape that currently exists,” says Hillary Schieve. She wants to see new businesses spring up in existing city space, and has a vision for building more areas around Reno that resemble Midtown. It hasn’t taken long for Schieve to learn that it’s very difficult to make people happy while on the City Council. “We have to make priorities that make sense for everyone, and I’m learning to have a thicker skin.” While Schieve says there’s no such thing as a “good councilperson” school, she knows that while the learning curve is steep, it’s just a matter of time until she’s comfortable with the process. Schieve believes it’s a good idea to bring together the resources of local businesses, the University of Nevada, Reno, and members of the Washoe County Commission to help build business downtown. “We have such great resources right at our fingertips, and we really need to use them,” Schieve says. Also aware of the decline of employees over the past few years, Schieve is concerned that using city funds for capital projects could cause more loss of staff. “I hope not to lay off any people,” she says. “We have to have our priorities, and staff provides the services our customers need.”

Oscar Delgado, Ward 3

“It’s not the priority of the city of Reno to take on everything presented, nor should it be,” says Oscar Delgado, when discussing how to restructure the debt issues facing the city. Delgado sees working with the Neighborhood Advisory Boards (NABs) as one way to get the community more involved in taking action in their neighborhoods. He has seen how community non-profits and other agencies have worked together in the past and believes that could be a key to success in Reno.


“The community needs to step up when there are dilapidated houses near their homes, so that they don’t become further targets for graffiti and misuse.” Delgado is optimistic about the new council and like the other new members, is at the end of his orientation. He is interested in working with the union contracts to see if the unions and the city can get on the same page. “We have to have priorities so that we do not overreach at the expense of police and fire.” He is also looking forward to the upcoming strategic planning session. Working together with the city staff and fellow councilmembers to build a list of priorities is high on his list. “I’m excited because having four sets of new eyes look at these issues is going to be good for the city.”

Neoma Jardon, Ward 5

“Good customer service comes from the department heads down to the staff, and I want to see the city of Reno have the best reputation in the country for good customer service,” says Neoma Jardon. She’s not keen on bringing in outside companies to teach customer service because it makes sense to her that everyone within

“I want to make Reno known as the most businessfriendly city in the U.S.” Hillary Schieve Reno City Councilmember city government should treat each other with the same respect they should be giving the customers. Jardon also wants to make the process for obtaining a business license clear, convenient and inexpensive. “Our counter staff should be bending over backwards to foster great customer service because we already have a great tax structure,” she adds. “Doing business with us is easy, and we should make it a smooth and enjoyable process.” All four new councilmembers are enthusiastic and excited to get started with the job at hand. They all agree that the city of Reno must look at all ways to bring in new business to stimulate the economy and to be vigilant about the debt that the city already carries. Ω

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Where’s the meth? PHOTO/TRACIE DOUGLAS

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January 17 – May 19, 2013 Italian Americans have become some of the most celebrated players in baseball — DiMaggio, Berra, Rizzuto, Lasorda, LaRussa, Zito. ’s documentary exhibition honors their contributions and those of 450 others who have left a lasting imprint on the game.

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Reno police detectives discuss the finer points of the ramifications of carrying illegal drugs with a gentleman at the bus stop on the corner of Center and Liberty streets. According to Ron Chalmbers, Street Enforcement Team (SET) supervisor, methamphetamine is a huge problem on Reno streets, and the removal of any and all meth from the streets is one of the team’s goals. SET is partially funded through a federal grant.

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The chemicals used in commercial salt spread on the ground to melt ice often end up in water and subsequently food supplies intended for human and animal consumption, according to water quality scientists. Known as “ice melters,” the salt—often white, blue or reddish in color—can be more harmful than helpful. While the products work effectively to make sidewalks, driveways and streets safer to walk on, pets can ingest the salt and become ill. Gardens, too, can be contaminated when the snow melts. According to the Journal for Surface Water Quality Professionals, some states, including California and Nevada, “restrict road-salt use in certain areas to reduce chloride injury to roadside trees.” If it’s absolutely necessary to melt the ice near homes or workplaces, environmental publication Grist suggests looking for “pet-friendly” rather than “eco-friendly” formulas. Ice melter companies have been known to greenwash—claiming that a product is environmentally sustainable when it’s not. But products safe for pets generally means that it’s digestible, although the America Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals encourages pet owners to keep an animal’s exposure minimal, even to pet-friendly options. But scientists have also discovered that beet juice is an effective ice melter. When mixed with brine—using sea salt or table salt mixed with water—it can be sprayed onto the ground, and while significantly more time consuming, has a similar effectiveness. Beets can melt ice in temperatures as low as minus-20 degrees.

Gold goes green California is ready to lead the march toward large-scale sustainable infrastructure in the U.S., according to a Washington Post editorial that referred to the effort as “California’s climate-change experiment.” California is launching a greenhouse gas (GHG) capand-trade program which “covers major sources of GHG emissions in the State such as refineries, power plants, industrial facilities and transportation fuels,” according to the California Environmental Protection Agency Air Resources Board. But so far, it’s mostly a solo act. The Post’s editorial expresses concern about the “potential problems that flow from the fact that California is acting alone. As with any market, the bigger a carbon market is, the more efficient it is. But the group of Western states that were going to join California in creating a linked carbon market have not followed through.” The editorial is referring to the Western Climate Initiative, formed in 2007 by California, New Mexico, Arizona, Oregon and Washington. Nevada was considered an observer, but not an official partner, of the initiative.

-Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT You don’t need a geodesic dome greenhouse (see Green, right) to create a nourishing home garden. Learn how to grow food in small spaces at a workshop hosted by the River School Farm. Tom Stille, a River School Farmer, will show techniques for sprouting, growing micro-greens, and potting some favorite vegetables. Jan. 27, 2-4 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 to drop in. Register by emailing office@riverschoolfarm.org or call 747-2222.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.

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PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREEN

Susie Sutphin embraces arugula grown in the Tahoe Food Hub’s greenhouse.

Grub hub JONNY LANG

The Tahoe Food Hub aims to make local food sustainable and accessible The atmosphere inside the Tahoe Food Hub’s geodesic dome greenhouse in Truckee, Calif., is warm and humid. With the rows of green vegetables and the sun shining through the triangular windows, it’s hard to believe it’s the middle of by Ashley winter, save for the snow piles leaning against the side of the structure. Hennefer “The coldest it gets in here is 32 degrees [Celsius],” says Susie Sutphin, co-founder of the Tahoe Food Hub, who manages the greenashleyh@ newsreview.com house. “These domes are on average about 15 to 25 degrees warmer than the outside temperature.” The dome, privately owned, is one of several projects linked to the hub, which is in the process of getting non-profit status. Produce harvested on average every four weeks, but this fluctuates depending on the season. Growing in the winter has unique challenges, the biggest of which is keeping the soil warm. The dome has insulated walls and foundation, and the rows are covered regularly to keep the humidity. Fifty percent of the food, including veggies like kale, arugula, spinach and edible flowers, is donated to the community, and the rest is kept by the owners. Sutphin, who previously worked for the Wild & Scenic Film Festival in Nevada City, Calif., co-founded the Tahoe Food Hub with Bill Kelly, whose For more information, family owns the greenhouse, and fellow sustainability advocate Eve visit www.tahoe McEneany after being inspired by food documentaries screened at foodhub.org. Wild & Scenic. “There’s all this talk about improving local economies, but so much of that starts with food,” Sutphin says. The dome, made by a company called Growing Spaces, was a hit with local schools and organizations, so Sutphin says a project called the Dome Raising Project is on the agenda for 2013. The Tahoe Food Hub will collaborate with schools and other interested groups, such as nursing homes, to build the domes and teach participants about growing food in mountainous regions. Sutphin says that she didn’t come from a farming or gardening background, but has long been an advocate for organic foods. “I’ve had to learn a lot about the whole process, like crop rotation, how close to plant vegetables,” she says. But Sutphin’s priority is making the hub an aggregator for regional farmers to better facilitate the flow of organic produce into local restaurants. Doing so will also help farmers reach difficult markets, such as hospitals. “Farmers don’t always have time to connect with restaurants,” she says. “We can also ensure that food is better harvested so that we don’t take it all from one farm and then run out.” Food security is also a necessity, Sutphin says, which is why much of the greenhouse produce is donated. She doesn’t want the hub to be a grocery store because Truckee already has an organic food store, New Moon Natural Foods, but plans to coordinate a community kitchen and offer surplus produce to the community. Sutphin hopes the Tahoe Food Hub will help connect the Tahoe, Truckee and Reno food communities. “The more hubs we have, the better,” she says. “These projects are intended to be regional. We can make sure that food is distributed within 15 miles, rather than be transported from hundreds of miles away.” Ω OPINION

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12/28/12 12:07 PM


A Nevada tradition, “Sheep Dip” is a bath in which sheep are literally dipped. In the Sheep Dip Show, local news-makers, politicians and the like are “dipped” in the satirical “Vat of Sheep Dip” to cleanse them of their past deeds. This annual comedy show – now in its 49th year – is an evening of skits, songs and dance performed by locals, including members of the media and even a few of our famous (and infamous) politicians. Sheep Dip, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation. To date, over $410,000 has been donated to local scholarships and charities through Sheep Dip. Funds raised from this year’s show and program will support these local charities:

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Tickets: (775)356-3300 • Corporate Tables: (775)626-4141 www.SheepDipShow.org 12   |   RN&R   |   january 10, 2013


FIRST OFF, I just want to say

BGRIMM@NEWSREVIEW.COM

this about a big 2012 cinematic event: Hell yeah, I’m happy Disney bought Star Wars. I want more Star Wars movies, I love Disney, and I think it’s a good marriage. Give me more Star Wars now, and I don’t care if Goofy, Ariel or Pluto make cameos!

/ ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL GRIMM

Good—I hadn’t gotten a chance to express that to the masses yet. Now, on to the business at hand, the movies of 2012. I liked, even loved, far more movies in 2012 than the offerings of 2011. So, in that way, this was a great movie year. Of course, I’m a critic, and I still have plenty to bitch about. There were some crushing disappointments involving wizards and orcs. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey actually qualified as something I would have to call a bad film. That’s a movie I was dying to see, and one that I left with slumped shoulders and head hanging low. Guillermo del Toro handing over director chores to Mr. Middle Earth, Peter Jackson, turned out to be a bad thing, at least as far as the first installment is concerned. The major “unexpected” aspect of Unexpected Journey is that it kind of blew. The Amazing Spider-Man was a useless reboot featuring a goofy CGI bad guy lizard and C. Thomas Howell’s moronic cranes. And while I liked The Dark Knight Rises and Django Unchained, Bane sounded like a drunken Gandalf speaking through a cardboard paper towel tube, and Tarantino’s copying of himself got on my nerves a bit. Then there’s Lincoln. I love Spielberg, and I think Daniel Day Lewis delivered one of the year’s best performances. But Lincoln was borrr-ing. I was able to hang with the movie for a little bit. It started losing me when Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s son character threw his first hissy fit because busy daddy Abraham wouldn’t talk to him. While these were disappointing, there were many worse. Much worse. We shall explore these films later in the article. Let’s get back to what made this year exemplary overall. Here are the best movies of 2012.

THE BEST 1. LES MISERABLES I must give top honors to this colossal achievement. The year’s best movie is one of the greatest screen musicals I have ever seen. It captures the grandeur of the Broadway show, and it does something extraordinary in having its performers sing their songs live on set. No lip-syncing up in this bitch. Hugh Jackman should get serious consideration for Best Actor this year. Everything about his lead performance is astounding. If Anne Hathaway—also terrific as Catwoman in Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises—gets snubbed, Jackman should seek vengeance for her with his Wolverine claws. And be kind to Russell Crowe and his somewhat inferior voice. He gives it his all and creates a sad, lonely Javert that had me feeling sympathy for that character for the first time after seeing many Les Mis incarnations. I have seen the movie multiple times already. It gets better with repeated viewings. Anybody who tries to film a musical after this one has their work cut out for them. The bar has been set, and it’s way, way up there.

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2. THE IMPOSSIBLE I cried throughout this movie. (I cried through a lot of Les Mis, too. Actually, I cried through an Audi commercial last week. I’m a goddamned wussy.) Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor will destroy you as a real-life couple vacationing in Thailand when that awful tsunami hits. This is a stunning testament to those who lost their lives, and those who amazingly survived. Watts is my pick for the year’s Best Actress. It’s a mostly physical performance, and it’s appropriately devastating. This movie kicked my ass. 3. ZERO DARK THIRTY Director Kathryn Bigelow has made two great movies in one. The first part is a great investigative thriller along the lines of All the President’s Men. The second is a nail-biting action thriller as Team Six meets a stupid asshole named Osama Bin Laden. 4. MOONRISE KINGDOM Wes Anderson has still never made a movie I haven’t liked. His magical film about a couple of kids running away and getting struck by lightning on occasion is pure pleasure, and boasts a stellar supporting cast with Edward Norton, Bruce Willis, Frances McDormand and Bill Murray. 5. LOOPER This movie reminded me a lot of Back to the Future Part II, one of the greatest, most underrated sequels ever made. I loved how that film came up with so many new twists and turns using time travel. I love this movie for much the same reason. Joseph Gordon-Levitt nails it as a younger version of Bruce Willis, who time travels backward to give his Colin Farrell is one of seven psychopaths in Martin McDonagh’s latest flick.

younger self a bitch of a hard time. Rian Johnson delivered on the promise of his directorial debut, Brick, and gave us one of the year’s best looking, best acted, best scripted films.

6. SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED Aubrey Plaza stars in the film year’s other great time travel yarn. She’s an investigative reporter checking out an advertisement placed by an allegedly crazy man looking for a time travel partner. When she meets the wannabe time traveler (played wonderfully by Mark Duplass), a great, quirky relationship commences. Jake Johnson delivers a breakthrough performance as Plaza’s boss. 7. RUBY SPARKS Zoe Kazan has an interesting heritage. Her grandpa was Elia Kazan, director of a little film called On the Waterfront. Nice to know she has inherited some of his talent for storytelling. As Ruby, literally a dream girl who enters the life of a confused author (Paul Dano), she’s a stunner. She also wrote the winning script that results in one of the more unique and fun film experiences of the year. 8. SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS Dare I compare thee to Barton Fink, the Coen brothers masterpiece about the rigors of scriptwriting? Colin Farrell stars as a screenwriter trying to put together a story about a bunch of psychopaths, based on people he actually knows. Sam Rockwell and Christopher Walken provide supersonic support. Writer-director Martin McDonagh has another great effort on his hands after In Bruges. 9. BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Child actress Quvenzhané Wallis shines in this moving fable about a motherless child living near a levee with her sick father (Dwight Henry). One of the best directorial debuts of the year from Benh Zeitlin.

Lovesick crooners, played by Eddie Redmayne and Amanda Seyfried, gaze at each other in Les Misérables.

10. THE GREY There has been a lot of whining about the end of this movie, and how it didn’t jibe with the marketing campaign. So what? Liam Neeson delivers career best work as a troubled plane crash survivor who tries to protect fellow survivors (including Frank Grillo and Dermot Mulroney, both excellent) from a pack of hungry wolves in a snowy wilderness. One of the more interesting meditations on death and the value of life you are liable to see. Also, one majorly cool wolf movie! That’s the top 10. Now grab your favorite beverage and a salty snack, because we’re going to 20!

11. LIFE OF PI Did you think this one looked like it would be stupid? Having not read the book, I saw the preview for Ang Lee’s film, and while it looked incredible,

the idea of a kid on a lifeboat with a tiger seemed odd to me. It all makes beautiful sense in the end in what amounts to one of the year’s great visual experiences.

12. THE AVENGERS Hulk punching Thor might be 2012’s funniest screen moment. Director Joss Whedon took a project I felt was impossible to do well and knocked it out of the park. I preferred this to the also very good but flawed The Dark Knight Rises. (Damn that Bane voice!) 13. SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence are the year’s craziest couple, for sure. Cooper plays a former mental patient trying to get back with the wife, while Lawrence plays the woman who doesn’t think that’s a very good idea. Robert De Niro does his best work in decades as Cooper’s obsessive dad. 14. AMOUR Man, oh man, this is a tough one to watch. From the director of the brutal Funny Games (both the foreign and the American versions) we get a film about old age so honest, it guts you. Many of us know a couple like Georges and Anne (Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva). Seeing a couple like this dealing with terrible illness is heartbreaking, and director Michael Haneke takes a terribly honest approach to impending death. Don’t watch this if the truth scares you. 15. BERNIE Jack Black gets his movie career back on track with this true story of a nice, humble man who shoots his elderly lover (Shirley MacLaine) in the back and stuffs her in a freezer. Fun for the whole family!

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16. SMASHED While many will dub Denzel Washington’s Flight as the year’s best movie about alcoholism, I submit this little movie starring Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Aaron Paul as the winner. Winstead owns her part as an elementary school teacher who likes to party, but clearly needs to stop. 17. ARGO Ben Affleck continues to distinguish himself as a director and takes some nice strides as an actor in this spellbinding period piece about the Iran Hostage Crisis. It must also be noted that his bangs in this film are the stuff of legend. 18. 21 JUMP STREET Remaking a crappy Johnny Depp TV show proves to be comic gold for Channing Tatum, Jonah Hill and Ice Cube. Contains one of the year’s best cameos.

THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER

19.

A great movie about high school in the ’90s featuring tremendous ensemble work from Logan Lerman, Emma Watson, Ezra Miller and Paul Rudd.

20. KILLER JOE Matthew McConaughey stars as an evil lawman in what qualifies as the sickest movie of the year. It’s also wildly and strangely entertaining. If you see this movie and make a fried chicken run soon thereafter, you might have some difficulties finishing dinner that evening.


BOB’S WORST OF THE WORST

Oddly enough, the worst film of the year did not involve found footage, tween vampires or fighting robots. Nope, the honor goes to an art house film with a striking pedigree and all the makings of an Oscar contender.

1. HYDE PARK ON HUDSON I just stand in awe regarding how stinking awful this movie is. Bill Murray wastes his time as FDR getting handjobs from his cousin Daisy (a terrible Laura Linney) in his car. After seeing this movie, I want to puke at the mere mention of hot dogs. 2. THE DEVIL INSIDE Laura Linney’s infuriating voiceover in Hudson helped put that movie over the top as the year’s worst, narrowly edging this found footage, nightmarish mess. 3. BATTLESHIP Once promising director Peter Berg decides he wants to be Michael Bay. That’s a shit goal to start. The fact that his movie isn’t even as good as a Michael Bay film—even shittier. 4. TWILIGHT: BREAKING DAWN PT. II Hey, look at this. The latest Twilight movie managed to not be the worst movie of the year! Taylor, Kristen, Robert … give yourselves a medal, you crazy, kooky vampires and werewolves. After your medal ceremony, please go away. Go away forever. Thank you. 5. RED HOOK SUMMER Sometimes when I walk in fields of holly, or barley, or weeds, or whatever the fuck happens to be growing in the particular field I’m walking in, I reminisce. I reminisce about things like the golden age of fast food tacos. (Taco Bell used to be food that was cooked on site with fresh ingredients!) I reminisce about past pets. (I miss Entwhistle and Townshend, my cockatiel and parakeet!) Finally, I reminisce about how Spike Lee used to make great movies. Spike Lee’s movies have gone the way of the Taco Bell taco. They are useless, pale imitations of their former selves.

6. TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE Any baseball lover who watches this film will laugh for all the wrong reasons. This may be Clint Eastwood’s final acting effort. Not a good swan song. 7. RED DAWN Hated the original, and I hate the new one. You know you have a problem when you find yourself missing the killer acting combination of Charlie Sheen and C. Thomas Howell.

BEST ACTORS: Hugh Jackman (Les Misérables) Liam Neeson (The Grey) Daniel Day Lewis (Lincoln) Joaquin Phoenix (The Master) Bradley Cooper (Silver Linings Playbook)

8. TAKEN 2 (Whispering as if through a phone trying not to be heard) Listen to me, reader. Read carefully. Be quiet … and pay attention. The number 8 slot in Bob Grimm’s year’s worst list. … it’s going to be Taken!

Best Actresses:

Paul Williams Still Alive

Best Animated Movie: Paranorman

Sam Rockwell (Seven Psychopaths) Robert De Niro (Silver Linings Playbook) Jake Johnson (Safety Not Guaranteed) Tom Cruise (Rock of Ages) Edward Norton (Moonrise Kingdom)

Best Supporting Actresses: Anne Hathaway (Les Misérables) Emily Blunt (Looper) Shirley MacLaine (Bernie) Frances McDormand (Moonrise Kingdom), Jacki Weaver (Silver Linings Playbook)

In 2013, we will see a new Superman movie (Man of Steel), a couple of more Marvel hero installments (Iron Man 3 and Thor 2), more Star Trek and part two in the Hobbit trilogy. Oh, dear Lord, please don’t let the next Hobbit installment stink like Gollum doo-doo. Please don’t do that to me. If parts 2 and 3 rally, I can forgive the dull part 1, something I managed to do with the Harry Potter series. Please, dad of Jesus or Buddha or whoever runs the film destiny division up there … please keep it from sucking. Amen. On the artier side, we might get one of those Terrence Malick movies I was so hyped up about last year. That would be very nice. Ω

Most Annoying Geek Psychobabble: Best Documentary:

Best Supporting Actors:

10. THE PAPERBOY John Cusack and Nicole Kidman jerk each other off without touching in this film. That’s probably the best thing I can say about the movie.

C. Thomas Howell and his prophetic cranes (The Amazing Spider-Man).

Complaints about The Grey ending.

Naomi Watts (The Impossible) Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty) Emmanuelle Luva (Amour) Jennifer Lawrence (Silver Linings Playbook) Mary Elizabeth Winstead (Smashed)

9. PLAYING FOR KEEPS With the exception of Victory, the so-so Sly Stallone movie, has there ever been a decent soccer movie? Gerard Butler, as a former soccer star turned kid’s coach, puts this one in the bad corner, as do Catherine Zeta-Jones, Uma Thurman and Judy Greer embarrassing themselves in the supporting cast.

Single Dumbest Thing in a Movie This Year:

Worst Actor: Shia LaBeouf (Lawless)

Best Movie Title That I Just Made Up: In My Time of Dying, I Worship Hamsters

Overrated: Lincoln, The Amazing Spider-Man The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Lawless The Hunger Games

Underrated: John Carter Hit and Run Safe House Wanderlust

Most Amazing 2012 Cinematic Factoid:

Worst Actress: Laura Linney (Hyde Park On Hudson)

Best Actor in a Bad Movie:

Nicolas Cage was only in two movies (Stolen and Seeking Justice).

Daniel Day Lewis (Lincoln)

Best Actress in a Bad Movie: Olivia Williams (Hyde Park on Hudson)

Worst Actor in a Good Movie: Quentin Tarantino (Django Unchained)

Worst Actress in a Good Movie: Juliet Rylance (Sinister)

Worst Beating Ever in a Movie: The pummeling of Ray Liotta in Killing Them Softly

Typical viewer reaction to Hyde Park on Hudson.

Best Director: Tom Hooper (Les Misérables)

Single Coolest Thing in a Movie This Year: Hugh Jackman’s singing!

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In Rotation 18 | Art of the State 19 | Foodfinds 20 | Fi¬m 22

After coaching the U.S. National Snowboarding team, teaching at-risk kids for the school district, and co-founding Bootleg Courier Co., Doug E. Moore started a company handcrafting custom jewelry

by Brad Bynum

bradb@ newsreview.com

PHOTOS/ALLISON YOUNG

“This economy is a problem,” says Doug E. Moore. “But people are still getting married … and guys are still getting into trouble and then trying to get out of the doghouse.” Moore is the founder, proprietor and fabricator of D Street Designs, a local custom jewelry company. Moore meets with his customers, plans and creates original one-of-a-kind handD Street Designs is at crafted jewelry pieces—rings, 45 St Lawrence Ave. necklaces, bracelets, earrings and For more information, more. He’s worked in the industry off visit http://dstreet designs.com. and on since the mid-’90s but just launched D Street Designs in 2011. There is no D Street in Reno—and Moore’s small workshop isn’t located in Sparks. The D Street is a reference to his first name, and his shop is located on St. Lawrence Avenue in Midtown—in the same building as Reno Public House.

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One Moore time

Moore is an interesting guy—he walked a labyrinth of different paths before becoming a full-time jeweler. He graduated from McQueen High School back in 1990, and then spent 10 years in Park City, Utah, snowboarding and coaching snowboarding—including a stint coaching for the U.S. national team. In 1996, he took a jewelry fabrication class at the Kimball Art Center in Park City. “That was the beginning of the end,” he says. He quickly developed a passion for the art and craft of jewelrymaking. In 2000, he moved back to Northern Nevada. He considered pursuing jewelry-making full time, but decided against it. “I fell for that old artists’ stigma, that artists can’t make a living doing art—I maintained that for years,” he says. Instead, he went to work as an educator for the Washoe County

School District, working primarily with at-risk kids. Then, in 2008, he cofounded Bootleg Courier Company, a bicycle messenger service. All the while he maintained jewelry fabrication as a hobby, and, after his partners bought him out of Bootleg in 2010, he spent a couple of years working for Robert Ince, another local jeweler. And then he launched D Street Designs in 2011. The company’s logo is a crooked star. “I’m always a little off, whether it’s oppositional defiance disorder, I don’t know, but I’m always a little skewed,” he says. Though centrally located in Midtown’s locally oriented retail area, Moore’s shop is definitely more of a work space than a retail front. There’s a work bench, but no display case. That’s because the emphasis is on custom jobs rather than selling premade stock—though Moore does limited runs of signature pieces, like a crow’s skull necklace, and he’s currently developing a Valentine’s Day

line that will include a few cheeky pieces, with black diamonds and lewd designs—“for those who are jaded about love.”

As is the custom

Moore says that though he enjoys working with precious metals, like gold and silver, that’s not his favorite part of designing and fabricating jewelry. “It’s art,” he says. “I like creating art in whatever medium. I love the start-to-finish process of completing a project.” That creative process of seeing a project through from the shadow of an idea to a blazing, shining completion is something he says was lacking from his experiences as an educator. “I just saw a one-year sliver,” he says. “I never saw where they came from or where they went. … I want to create all day and make people happy. At the school district, not many people are happy.”

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Above, Doug E. Moore at work in his studio. At right, his workbench and examples of his jewelry.


For much of his work, Moore uses the technique of lost-wax casting, a process dating back thousands of years, wherein an artist crafts a design out of wax, makes a mold of that design, and then uses that mold to create the final piece. His designs are usually custom for the specific customers, often arising out of brainstorming sessions that happen during initial consultations.

For example, a woman wanted to make a ring to commemorate her deceased husband. She wanted the ring to include three diamonds that he had given her, including her engagement ring and two from earrings. The woman didn’t have a clear concept in mind when she first came to Moore’s shop, so Moore started asking questions about her husband. The ocean kept coming up—he was a surfer from Southern California. So Moore concocted a design that evoked the ocean, golden waves cresting over each stone. “Now, every time she sees me she tears up,” says Moore with a mix of pride, bemusement and embarrassment. Other original designs include wedding rings made by melting down the gold from three different generations’ jewelry—a mother, a grandmother and a great-grandmother, and an engagement ring made to resemble a flamingo—an unusual request that Moore was excited to fulfill. For Moore, those examples of unusual, unique pieces represent the difference between buying a custom, handcrafted piece of jewelry made by a local artist rather than buying something mass produced by inexpensive overseas labor and sold in a retail chain. He says that in addition to the creative difference, there’s also a noticeable difference in quality. OPINION

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“There’s more time spent on custom pieces,” he says. “Everything’s going to be a better. The prongs are all going to be just a little thicker.” That said, he acknowledges that jewelry is basically the dictionary definition of a luxury item. He asks questions about budget early and often. He did 91 custom jobs in 2012, and the prices ranged from the rather exorbitant, $10,000, to the more affordable, $100. And though his work has attracted widespread attention— he’s sold pieces to customers in New York, Los Angeles and beyond—he estimates that 75 or 80 percent of his customers are Reno locals. He’s done very little promoting or advertising, instead relying on word-of-mouth and social media—he says he gets a lot of interest just by posting images of completed on Facebook and Instagram.

11505 SO VIRGINIA ST RENO, NV 89511 “I believe the energy we put into 775-851-6464 something—whether positive or negative—is going to manifest itself 11505 SO VIRGINIA ST somehow—whether positively or negRENO, NV 89511 atively,” he says. 11505 SO VIRGINIA ST MINIOFRENO.COM And though many Northern 775-851-6464

Nevadans are still famously economiRENO, NV 89511 cally depressed, as Moore says, people are still getting married,775-851-6464 getting in trouble, and crossing various thresholds that might need to be commemorated by durable objects. That, says Moore, is part of the appeal of creating jewelry—creating the objects that will be the physical representations of somebody’s most important memories. “It’s going to become sentimental to someone,” he says. Ω

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Once upon a timepiece Kisai Polygon LCD Watch

Qlocktwo W

i’m Watch

Why wear a watch when our ever-present smartphones provide the same time-telling service? Tokyoflash Japan believes the answer is in the presentation. Their website, which sells high-tech watches from multiple designers, states their goal is to “turn time into art,” and Kisai’s Polygon watch does so beautifully. The designer ditches the numeric watch face in favor of geometry by using a series of lit polygons to communicate the hour and 10-minute mark. A single numeral skirting the inside edge of the center hexagon subtly indicates the minute mark and when you put it all together you can gladly reply, “Why, yes, I do have the time.” $129.

Try reading the time—literally. In place of numerals, Qlocktwo W’s 35-millimeter-by-35-millimeter display uses a grid of 110 letters to spell out the time. The polished, brushed or black stainless steel case reports the time as we might say it, such as “half past six” or “ten to five.” What at first appears to be a word search strapped to your wrist also provides the calendar day at a push of the button. Some may find the watch face a little large for their wrists, however, there’s no denying the font exudes a simplistic confidence that lands somewhere between James Bond and Don Draper. Those who find the watch’s price tag—approximately $770—a bit unreadable may opt for the hourly wage–friendly iOS app, which comes in under a dollar.

The i’m Watch knows the wristwatch can’t beat smartphones, so it joins them. With a version of the Android operating system, i’m Watch offers access to Facebook, Twitter, a music player, phone calls, news and photos. Using the i’m Droid open source OS, i’m Watch will support any app, so the possibilities are limitless. The user interface is clean— keeping the apps simple and uncluttered—and smartphone operating systems should take note of the straightforward approach. Rumors suggest that January’s Consumer Electronics Show will see the debut of a new OS version, but until the price drops, the i’m Watch will remain as much of a dream to the average consumer as Dick Tracy’s 2-Way Wrist Radio was in the 1940s. Starting at $399.

In this edition of our monthly Gadget column, we examine watches.

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PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

Show your work

Hug High School student artists Oscar Adame and Marisa Medina.

The Young Blood Showcase According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, 60 percent of small business owners fail within by their first four years. Of businesses that surJessica Santina vive, 85 percent of them are run by people who have formal business training. Making a living as an artist is hard, so school-aged youth who intend to pursue careers in art need all the support and professional training they can get. The Holland Project offers many opportunities, including the Scholastic Arts Awards program for school-aged artists, The Young Blood held each spring in coordination with the Showcase will be on Nevada Museum of Art, and The Stranger display at Holland Show, a program in which Hug High Project, 140 Vesta St., School artists are each paired with a profesfor one night only on Jan. 11 from 6 p.m. to 9 sional working artist to produce p.m. For more collaborative work for an exhibit at information, visit Holland’s gallery. hollandreno.org. The Young Blood Showcase, a onenight-only pop-up exhibit held at the Holland Gallery is a step to provide another such opportunity. “The concept is to do a seasonal open gallery, a time when the gallery is open to artwork from any artist under 21, in any

media, any genre, with no constraints on the work,” explains Sarah Lillegard, the Holland Project’s arts and programming director. “Just an open opportunity for young emerging artists to have their work in a space and have their friends and families see it without any constraints or pressure.” Any number of artists may appear— though advance sign-ups are encouraged. Artists interested in participating are asked to show up at the gallery on Thursday, Jan. 10 between 4 and 8 p.m. with their work, to hang or display it with the help of gallery volunteers. The exhibit and reception, with music by DJ Murder Leopard and pizza provided by Noble Pie, take place from 6-8 p.m. the following night. The experience will provide students with valuable lessons in exhibiting their work. They’ll discover the intricacies of hanging art in a gallery space, including hanging, framing, placement and spacing, as well as what it means to label a work and put a price on it. And, of course, the experience of standing next to their work,

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answering questions about it and discussing their process, is a valuable lifelong skill for any working artist. Lillegard says that Holland is loosely shooting for about 15 artists to participate. At press time, 11 artists had signed up. Several of them were referred by Hug High School’s art teacher Meredith Arp, including Oscar Adame, a pen-and-watercolor artist of what he calls “surreal, monster-type, gory drawings.” Adame won the judges’ award at The Stranger Show in 2012. He plans to pursue a degree from the Art Institute in San Francisco.

Arp also referred Marisa Medina, an artist who does small pencil portraits of beautiful people made ugly. “I like turning models into clowns, that kind of thing,” she says. Like Adame, Medina intends to pursue a career in art. “The Holland Project and their volunteers have brought so many great opportunities for my students,” says Arp, whose Advanced Placement art class works each year on The Stranger Show. “The Young Blood show is going to be a great way for my AP students to learn how to display their work professionally.” For the blossoming artists who participate in the Young Blood Showcase, there’s no telling what doors such an opportunity could open. ”I’m hoping to get the idea of hanging my work and presenting it,” says Medina. “The way you lay it out and the way you speak about it—that can make or break your work. It’s not your work alone, it’s how your present yourself. It’s about getting more comfortable presenting my work.” Ω

Price does not include $345 dealer doc fee, taxes and license fees. Offers expire 01/16/13. |

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January 18 & 19, 2013 John Ascuaga’s Nugget Call now for tickets: 356–3300

Beauty and the bistro Un Caffé Italian Bistro 9333 Double R Blvd., 853-7801

Before going to Un Caffé Italian Bistro, I checked the website to find the address. I saw that their motto is by K.J. Sullivan “Where good friends meet for great food.” I like that motto, and it seemed fitting that I was bringing an old friend of mine, Casey, to have lunch with me. Un Caffé Italian Bistro is a fairly large space split into a more formal restaurant area on the left with a smaller bistro area on the right. The bistro area is cozy and comfortable with high-top tables and a large

PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

tion of food. The portabella mushrooms arrived looking wonderful, with two decently sized portabellas baked with mozzarella cheese and red sauce. The mushrooms tasted fresh, and I loved all the cheese and garlicky red sauce. For entrées, I went with the pear and gorgonzola pizza ($13), which came with a creamy white sauce and lots of arugula. The pizza was large and could easily feed two people so I decided to share some with Casey, this being a restaurant of friends and all. The pizza had a nice, thin crust but it definitely needed more pears. The gorgonzola paired with the arugula was wonderful, and I wouldn’t hesitate to order another one of those pizzas. Casey went with the chicken Parmesan panini ($7.50), which came with a side of homemade chips. The panini was a little small, and the basil, while fresh, seemed to overwhelm the flavors of the sandwich a bit, but the red sauce had that same garlic flavor that I enjoyed with the portabella mushrooms. I really liked the chips, which had a subtle barbecue flavor to them. Service throughout was exceeding friendly, if a bit slow, especially considering we were the only ones in the restaurant, although the bistro side seemed to have some customers. Regardless, it was a leisurely lunch so we weren’t in any hurry to leave. We decided to have another glass of wine, and I noticed that the second pour was a bit small, so I remedied this by drinking the rest of Casey’s wine. Gotta love good friends willing to share their wine with you. Speaking of wine, I noticed that on Tuesdays and Saturdays, there is no corkage fee, which makes me want to come back just to take advantage of that. There might have been a few missteps with our meal, but overall, the beautiful atmosphere, tasty dishes and friendly service would bring me back, as this is definitely a nice place to have a nice meal with friends. Ω

Chef Cheri Rhodes and hostess Ashley Rhodes at Un Caffé Italian Bistro.

Un Caffé and Bistro is open Monday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Tuesday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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glass pastry case filled with lots of tasty-looking bakery items. Casey and I decided to have lunch in the restaurant area, which was deserted since we were in at an odd time and the snowy weather outside seemed to be keeping people at home. The restaurant is gorgeous, with a large wooden bar against the brick wall, comfortable booths and soothing colors. The floors are a dark wood, and the walls are adorned with large black and white photos of Italy taken by the chef. Casey and I were escorted to a corner booth by our very friendly waitress, Alma. The menu offers pasta dishes, sandwiches, salads, pizzas and even loaded baked potatoes. We decided to start with a couple of glasses of the house wine from Backhouse Winery of St. Helena, Calif. ($6), and the grilled, stuffed portabella mushrooms ($7). The wine was decent and improved with the addi-

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Modern manhunt Zero Dark Thirty The controversial Zero Dark Thirty, director Kathryn Bigelow’s excellently crafted version of the hunt for Osama Bin Laden, has a bunch of politicians and CIA officials crying foul. This makes me think the movie must contain some harsh truths and grim realities about the war on terror. It’s virtually absent of politics, or any of that “America, fuck yeah!” nonsense. It gives a filmmaker’s interpretation of the steps that were by taken, and the deeds that were done, to rid the Bob Grimm world of a true menace. Many of those deeds bgrimm@ are presented in a calm, calculated and perhaps newsreview.com even cold manner that is, at times, spooky to watch. The people depicted in this movie mean business, and will do whatever it takes to get a job done. That includes waterboarding and literally scaring the shit out of detainees. The film starts with a black screen, and some terrifying messages left by 9/11 victims as they were close to death in the Twin Towers. The sequence definitely put me in that “OK, something needs to be done about this” mode that I, and many world residents, felt that day. It definitely sets the tone for the unsettling film.

5

After killing that dude, her future’s so bright, she’s got to wear shades.

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We see Maya (Jessica Chastain) a new, determined CIA officer—apparently a composite character of actual people—on the Bin Laden case, about to witness a torture chamber. Dan (Jason Clarke), another CIA agent, will use waterboarding, isolation boxes, dog collars and psychological mind games to try and draw some names out of a strong-willed detainee (a powerful Reda Kateb). He eventually gets a big one, and a long hunt that will see many casualties, including CIA agents, begins in earnest.

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4 VERY GOOD

5 EXCELLENT

Is the movie “pro torture”? I would say most definitely not. Is it “anti-torture”? It isn’t that either. The film is supposedly being investigated for using classified information when it comes to American interrogation tactics. What the film depicts seems like it could be pretty authentic. Thankfully, I am no expert on the matter. This is a movie that leaves it up to the viewer to decide whether these types of interrogation methods were necessary in the pursuit of Bin Laden. But, and I want to make this perfectly clear, it’s a brutal exercise that Bigelow shows here—unsettling in many ways. Zero Dark Thirty clocks in at 157 minutes, with all but 40 of those devoted to Maya’s behind-the-scenes, dogged pursuit of Public Enemy No. 1. The last 40 minutes completely switches gears, becoming an intense depiction of the Team Six mission that ended with “Geronimo.” All 157 minutes are top notch, provocative, incendiary filmmaking. Bigelow has most certainly topped herself, including her Oscar-winning effort The Hurt Locker. As for the raid itself, it’s very dark and quiet. From the muffled “fwup, fwup, fwup” of the experimental helicopters—one of which crashed—as they swerve through mountain ranges, to the quick and decisive shots ending lives in that now very familiar white structure in Pakistan, it’s all very precise and stealthy. The aspect of the raid that unsettled me the most was the way Navy SEALS are depicted quietly and invitingly calling out the name “Osama?” before they shoot him. Chastain, in just a couple of years, has become one of the world’s more dynamic, downright reliable actresses. From her Oscar nominated turn in The Help, to her beautiful supporting work in The Tree of Life and Take Shelter, she creates one memorable character after another. Maya is her crowning achievement, and should get her another Oscar nomination. Ultimately, Zero Dark Thirty is a film epic and efficient enough to be compared to the great films of Coppola, Scorsese and Kubrick. It’s an important and engaging piece of work from a director who looks like she’s just starting to hit her stride. Ω

Django Unchained

3

Man, it bugs me that Quentin Tarantino’s latest is only passably entertaining. I have loved his past films. This is the first one I’m not in love with. Jamie Foxx plays Django, a slave purchased by a bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) two years before the Civil War. Django is purchased because he has seen some targets the bounty hunter is pursuing. Django is promised his freedom after they find those targets. When those targets are gotten, they pursue Django’s wife (Kerry Washington) on a plantation owned by the repellent Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). This one follows some of the same blueprints as Tarantino’s own Inglourious Basterds. It feels as if he is repeating himself a bit. There are some great performances, especially from Waltz and DiCaprio. It just doesn’t have the heft of past Tarantino efforts. Perhaps this has something to do with this being the first Tarantino movie edited by someone other than the late Sally Menke.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

2

Oh damn, this one hurts to write. Damn! I waited and waited for Peter Jackson to return to Middle-earth. I so wanted to see this film that its previous lack of existence in my life has probably contributed to a myriad of social problems I just can’t explain right now. And after all that waiting, we get this, a nearly three-hour mess that lacks focus and anything resembling pizzazz. Jackson, as we all know by now, has stretched a relatively small book into what will be somewhere in the neighborhood of nine hours after three films and, so far, it’s a big mistake. Martin Freeman is fine as Bilbo Baggins, the little hobbit who decides to go on an adventure. In the book, that adventure is a quick, crisp, wonderful thing. In this movie, it’s a bunch of indistinguishable dwarves acting all goofy and stuffing their faces for half the running time, and then a bunch of battles that have no sense of meaning. Smaug the dragon doesn’t really factor yet—Jackson is leaving that for Part Two—and Bilbo gets lost in the shuffle. The movie achieves its only true great heights when Gollum (Andy Serkis) finally shows up for a game of riddles. Until then, the movie doesn’t catch fire, it meanders. And, brother, I’m heartbroken over it. I watched this in standard 3-D. I’ll try to see it in the much debated 48fps— twice the normal film speed and definition—and give an update on how this looks at a later date.

The Impossible

5

A family struggles to survive in Thailand after the massive 2004 tsunami that claimed over 230,000 lives. Naomi Watts is Oscar-worthy as Maria Belon and Ewan McGregor is equally good as her husband Henry. The two are on Christmas vacation with their children when the tsunami hits, and become separated. Tom Holland gives one of the great breakthrough performances of 2012 as their oldest son. Amazingly, the film is based on real people and their actual experiences. Director Juan Antonio Bayona has made a respectful film about one of the worst recorded disasters in human history. It’s a testament to the people who lost their lives, and those who survived. Watts will tear your heart out, especially when she lets out her first, terrifying scream. Of all the images that stuck in my head from 2012 films, that one might be the one I’ll remember the most.

Jack Reacher

3

Tom Cruise brings the popular action novel title character to the big screen, and while he isn’t as physically big and imposing as the Reacher portrayed in the novels, boy howdy, is he ever mean. When civilians are disturbingly shot by a sniper, it seems to be an open-and-shut case. That is, until the suspect summons investigator Jack Reacher, who has an unorthodox approach to homicide investigation that occasionally involves the snapping of somebody’s leg. This is Cruise in nasty mode, but he mixes in some good humor that makes Reacher a well rounded character for him. Rosamund Pike delivers a memorable performance as the attorney representing the accused

Reno Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

sniper, as does Richard Jenkins as her father. On top of the good performances, this is a decent mystery that will keep you guessing. This is a violent one, so know what you are getting into when you go to see it.

Les Misérables

5

This is a grand, beautifully shot adaptation of the legendary musical, directed by Tom Hooper and starring Hugh Jackman in the heavy-lifting role of persecuted bread thief Jean Valjean. Set in 19th century France, the musical calls for nearly every word to be sung, and it’s a major undertaking. Hooper had his cast sing live on the set rather than prerecording in a sound booth, and this results in a moving musical experience. Jackman has a spectacular voice, and you get at true sense that he and his costars are acting these songs, rather than lip-synching. Anne Hathaway will probably win an Oscar for her work as Fantine, singing her big number in one take and summoning honest, heart-wrenching tears. Russell Crowe, as Valjean’s lawman nemesis Javert, doesn’t have half of Jackman’s voice, but there’s something about his interpretation that’s appropriate and amplifies the character’s loneliness. Every number is treated with a majestic grace that makes this one of the greatest movie musicals I’ve ever seen.

Promised Land

2

Just what the hell is this film trying to say? Matt Damon plays a corporate man who goes to a small farming town to buy up their land for natural gas mining. His corporation intends to use fracking, a drilling method that cracks stone far beneath the Earth’s surface and releases natural gas. It’s a method with some known environmental side effects, and I think this movie is preaching against it. Or is it? In the end, the film seems more concerned with salvaging the Damon character as virtuous rather than tackling the bigger questions it seems to be asking. John Krasinski, who cowrote the screenplay with Damon, also plays a strange, strange character in the movie who serves to do nothing but puzzle the viewer. Damon was supposed to direct, but had to call upon friend Gus Van Sant to take over. The result is the second bad film in a row, after Restless, from Van Sant, normally a very reliable director.

Silver Linings Playbook

4

Bradley Cooper is on fire as Pat, a troubled man recently out of a mental institution and obsessed with his ex-wife. He’s so obsessed hat he can’t see the value in Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a recently widowed neighbor trying to befriend him. Directed by David O. Russell, the movie is a funny, slick treatment of people with real problems that works because Russell and his performers find the right balance. Robert De Niro does his best work in years as Pat’s obsessive father, and Chris Tucker gets big laughs as Pat’s former mental institution buddy. Cooper and Lawrence make for one of the year’s most interesting screen couples. They are certainly unique. Russell is establishing himself as one of the industry’s most reliable and innovative directors.

Texas Chainsaw 3D

1

This movie starts directly after the events of the 1974 original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, where we see some murderous townspeople burn down the Sawyer house, home of Leatherface, and steal a baby. Cut to years later, when a woman (Alexandra Daddario) finds out she has inherited a house, and that she’s the baby stolen in 1974. Wait a minute? That’s 38 years ago, Daddario is 26— and looks 23—and this movie is most definitely set in 2012 (it says so on a gravestone and there are smart phones). Oh, never mind. It has bigger problems than that. There are a couple of good scares after Leatherface is unleashed but, oh lordy, do things get mega-stupid in the end. I liked Daddario, and I think director John Luessenhop has put together one of the better-looking Chainsaw films. Unfortunately, he’s also made one of the dumbest.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe


Space is the place Bazooka Zoo Just as our ancestors looked to space for the answers to their terrestrial dilemmas, some of the great musicians of our by Marvin Gonzalez times have looked to space for inspiration. From David Bowie to Sun Ra to Kool Keith, it seems a musician’s obsession with space accompanies a desire for innovation. Sometimes the space-thing can be disingenuous and kitschy, but when it’s done with honesty, it works. Because, let’s face it, nothing kicks more ass than Bowie’s “Space Oddity” or the Corvette that descends from space at the beginning of Heavy Metal.

The members of Bazooka Zoo rest between psychedelic journeys.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ BazookaZooMusic.

OPINION

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NEWS

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So, when the members of Bazooka Zoo—Zac Haley, J.D. Christison, Evan Tune and Scott Turek—say, over slabs of greasy pizza, that they play “space rock,” one doesn’t question their intentions, because, though their music comes from outer space, these dudes are definitely down to Earth. Like many musicians who came of age post-millennium, you can hear a wide variety of influences in their music. At once, there are hints of hard rock, psychedelic rock and funk, but deep down you can hear a desire to create something distinctly singular. “It’s all about making something you’ve never heard before, that’s the whole object,” says Haley. And, like most rock bands who try to break free of the conventional guitar, bass and drums prison, their use of electronics allows them to keep their sound fluid and malleable. “We respect the capability in this day in age of what you can do with electronics,” says Turek. “There are endless possibilities of where we can go with our sound.”

GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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And, that’s precisely what allows Bazooka Zoo to keep their sound fresh and new. Their sound is definitely hard-hitting, but at times it can plunge into the trippy, ambient realms of the best variety of stoner rock. For instance, their instrumental song “Color Theory” incorporates many elements of electronic music of the past 20 years, and sounds like what dubstep would sound like if it weren’t so aurally encroaching and obnoxious. Songs like “Enjoy the Scene,” on the other hand, fall into the territory of trip-hop, easy listening, fusion, jazz and flamenco, but somehow it all comes together and works in the end. But, though theirs is a progressive rock sound, and they occasionally mention spaceships and extra-terrestrials, their lyrics keep Bazooka Zoo’s message grounded in the here and now and reality. “A lot of the lyrics are anthropologically based,” says Turek. “But some of our stuff is almost political,” says Christison. “‘Wicked Ways’ is not in league with our other stuff taking about nature, but it’s a direct representation of what’s going on in the world.” “We try not to take a personal approach with our lyrics,” says Tune. “We try to include the world.” However, when you break it all down, what you hear in their music is frustration. Not that cheap frustration that people get just for the sake of being frustrated, but a frustration with the contemporary state of music. Rather than complain about it, they have gone out and made a unique blend of music to counter it. There’s also a sense that they’re waiting for something cataclysmic to occur. They talk about the end of times and spaceships coming out of the skies. It seems, like many young people, they are also frustrated with the state of the world. They are tired of seeing what a horrible state past generations have left the world. They are tired of the noise and obfuscation. And, so if nothing more their music is vessel into space, not only for them but for their listeners. To get off this crowded rock for a minute. And, like all good music they offer a personal journey into space, so you are guaranteed to go where no man has gone before. Ω

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JANUARY 10, 2013

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RN&R

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23


1UP 214 W. Commercial Row,

THURSDAY 1/10

FRIDAY 1/11

SATURDAY 1/12

EDM Thursday, 10pm, no cover

EDM Night, 10pm, no cover

’90s Night, 10pm, no cover

3RD STREET

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

Loud As Folk hosted by Spike McGuire, 8pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

BAR-M-BAR

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

Jan. 10, 8 p.m. John Ascuaga’s Nugget 1100 Nugget Ave. Sparks 356-3300

Anti-Social, Machine Gun Vendetta, Out For War, 8:30pm, $6

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

COMMA COFFEE

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

CORKSCROO BAR AND GRILL

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) Doc’s Holiday, 9pm, no cover

Steven Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

10 E. Ninth St., (775) 284-7270

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Dunn and Bias, 7pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Dan Copeland, 7pm, no cover Twitch Angry, 9:30pm, no cover

Live music, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

GRATE THYME KITCHEN

150 E. Main St., Fernley; (775) 575-5220

Thursday Night Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300 1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Live Jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

MO & SLUGGO’S PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

1) Soultorn, Krippler, After the Flesh, We Predict A Riot, 8pm, $6

1) LBC, Long Beach Rehab, Eph Bee Cee, 8:30pm, $13-$20

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Live music, 8pm, no cover

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED ROCK BAR

Comedy Night hosted by Patrick Shillito, 9:30pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Student Night, 10pm, $10, $5 w/college student ID after 11pm

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Comedy Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Al Lubel, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Dave Mencarelli, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Charles Fleischer, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Greg Fitzsimmons, Jonny Loquasto, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Utility Players, Th, 7:30pm, $12, $16; Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Myles Weber, F, 9:30pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm; $13, $16

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Live music, 9:30pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Karaoke with Steve Starr, 9pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

Bonding Blue & BettyBondage Burlesque, 9pm, $5

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Farewell Belladonna, Tovah Goodman, 7pm, no cover

WILD RIVER GRILLE

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Hollywood Trashed, 9:30pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Mark Sexton Band, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Ladies ’80s Night w/Jimmy Klein, 9pm, $5, no cover charge for women The Hell Busters, 8pm, no cover

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

VASSAR LOUNGE

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5, no cover charge for women before midnight

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

1) Sum 41, Hunter Valentine, IAmDynamite, 7:30pm, W, $20-$45

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

110 W. Telegraph St., Carson City; (775) 885-1888

Jan. 16, 7:30 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Sum 41

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Jan. 12, 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

SambaDá

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 1/14-1/16 1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

Traj Hardie’s EP Release Party, 8:30pm, $5

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

Steve Earle

Seasons of Insanity, 9:30pm, no cover

SUNDAY 1/13

Ladies Night w/DJ, 9pm, W, no cover Dark Tuesdays, 7pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 7pm, W, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com 24

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RN&R

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JANUARY 10, 2013


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 1/10

FRIDAY 1/11

SATURDAY 1/12

SUNDAY 1/13

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 1/14-1/16

2) Midnight Riders, 8pm, no cover

2) Midnight Riders, 4pm, Joey Carmon Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Midnight Riders, 4pm, Joey Carmon Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Joey Carmon Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Brian Andrews, 7pm, no cover

2) Brian Andrews, 8pm, no cover

2) Brian Andrews, 8pm, no cover

2) Joe Buonanno, 6pm, no cover

2) Joe Buonanno, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Tyler Brothers, 10pm, no cover

Tyler Brothers, 10pm, no cover

1) The Brothers Comatose, 10pm, no cover

1) SambaDá, 10pm, no cover 2) Igor & Red Elvises, 11:30pm, no cover

2) Red Wanting Blue, 9pm, no cover

1) Trampled by Turtles, Honey Honey, 9pm, M, $20-$40

1) Aladdin, 5:30pm, 8pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ Ikon, 10pm, no cover w/local ID r

1) Aladdin, 3pm, 7pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10

1) Aladdin, 3pm, 7pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Left of Centre, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Mimic, 10pm, W, live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

4) Rustlers’ Heat, 9pm, no cover

4) Rustlers’ Heat, 9pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

1) Aladdin, 7pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Left of Centre, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 4) Rustlers’ Heat, 9pm, no cover 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Jonny Lang, 7:30pm, $61.60 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) The Magic of Eli Kerr, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Maxx Cabello Jr., 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Magic of Eli Kerr, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Maxx Cabello Jr., 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) Steve Earle, 8pm, $28 2) Last Lane, 7pm, no cover 3) Eric Anderson, 5:30pm, no cover

2) Last Lane, 8pm, no cover 3) Eric Anderson, 6pm, no cover 5) Jeff Jones, 6pm, no cover

2) Last Lane, 8pm, no cover 3) Eric Anderson, 6pm, no cover 5) Jeff Jones, 6pm, no cover

5) Jeff Jones, 6pm, no cover

3) Jay Rowe, 6pm, W, no cover

2) Kyle Williams, 7pm, no cover 3) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

2) Atomika, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Atomika, 9pm, no cover 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

2) Eric Anderson, 7pm, no cover

2) Eric Anderson, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

2) Maxxt Out, 9pm, no cover 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

1) Gabriel Iglesias, 8pm, $55.50-$75.50 2) Maxxt Out, 9pm, no cover 2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Dance party w/DJ Teddy P, 9pm, 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover no cover 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

Jonny Lang

|

FILET OF SOUL

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Highway 50 Stateline 588-6611

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm Tu, no cover 3) Sin Biggest Little Locals Night, 4pm, M, Step This Way (dubstep, house), 8pm, W, no cover

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Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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For Thursday, January 10 to Wednesday, January 16 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

points for each basket made. Go to www.harlemglobetrotters.com to vote for which ground-breaking rule you want to see implemented in the game. Tu, 1/15, 7pm. $21-$83. Lawlor Events Center, 1500 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4444, www.unr.edu/lawlor.

MEET THE ARTIST: JEAN-PIERRE BONFORT: The

Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., Jan. 24, is Thurs., Jan. 17. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

Events BOWLING IS LOTSAFUN 2ND ANNUAL FUNRAISER: Tickets to this event include three games of bowling, shoe rentals and a chance to purchase raffle tickets and bid on silent auction items. Camp Lotsafun is a non-profit organization that provides recreational, educational and therapeutic services to people with disabilities. All proceeds will benefit Camp Lotsafun’s scholarship program. Sa, 1/12, 10am-3pm. $15 presale; $10 kids under age 12; $20 at the door. National Bowling Stadium, 300 N. Center St., (775) 827-3866, www.camplotsafun.com.

CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING: Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful holds its annual tree recycling program. Drop off trees at Bartley Ranch Regional Park and Rancho San Rafael Regional Park in Reno and Shadow Mountain Sports Complex in Sparks. Volunteers are needed to unload trees, keep traffic moving in the dropoff areas and collect donations. Trees must be free of decorations and not flocked. Recycled trees are chipped into mulch to be used year-round for weed abatement projects and to prevent soil erosion in park, river and open space projects. Mulch can also be picked up for free by residents. M-Su, 9am-4:30pm through 1/13. $3 donation. Call or visit website for details, (775) 851-5185, www.ktmb.org.

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: The world-famous basketball team brings its “You Write the Rules” World Tour to Reno. Fans will decide the rules for the game that could affect the final outcome. This could be anything from playing with two basketballs at once, to getting double the

French photographer will talk about using a cell phone camera to create the journey documented in his photographs. He will be joined by Denis Bisson, the cultural attaché to the French Consulate in San Francisco. F, 1/11, noon. $10; free for NMA members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

PHONE BOOK RECYCLING: The annual YP Real Yellow Pages Project ReDirectory phone book recycling program runs through Jan. 20. YP Real Yellow Pages will donate new trees to area parks when phone books are recycled at select Reno, Sparks and Washoe County park locations. In addition to the park locations, phone books can be recycled at area Scolari’s, Sak ’n Save, Waste Management Recycle America or with curbside recyclables. Visit website for a list of park locations. Residents who no longer wish to receive phone books can opt out by visiting www.yellowpagesoptout.com. M-Su through 1/20. Call or visit website for details, (800) 953-4400, www.ktmb.org.

RADON AWARENESS PRESENTATION: Learn more about radon, how to test for radon, get a free radon test kit and hear from a certified radon mitigator. Th, 1/10, 6:30pm. Free. Incline Village Library, 845 Alder Ave. Building A, Incline Village, (775) 336-0252, www.unce.unr.edu.

SLIDESHOW: BIKING THROUGH THE AMAZON: Hans Frischeisen talks about his adventures riding his bicycle from the city of Manaus on the Amazon River across all of Brazil to the Iguazu Falls. Tu, 1/15, 7pm. $7; $5 for members, bicyclists and students. Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

All Ages

SOUTH VALLEYS TODDLER TIME: This event is

BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

GALENA KIDS: Galena Creek Visitor Center offers this presentation and craft session for kids ages 2-10 on the second Saturday of each month. Second Sa of every month, 10-11am. $5 suggested donation. Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, (775) 849-4948, www.galenacreekvisitorcenter.org.

LUNAR NEW YEAR: SNAKE LANTERNS AND DRAGON CRAFTS: Celebrate the Year of the Snake at this month’s hands/On! family program. The Chinese Lunar New Year is celebrated in January or February depending on the lunar calendar. Ring in the new year with hands-on art projects, performance and storytelling. Sa, 1/12, 10am-4pm. Free. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

MOVIE MATINEE: Watch Ice Age 4: Continental Drift. Tu, 1/15, 4-6:30pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

SMALL WONDER WEDNESDAY: Families with children 5 years old and younger are invited to play, explore and listen to stories read by the museum’s educators. Only children age 5 and younger are admitted to Small Wonder Wednesdays, which start at 9am, an hour before the museum opens. Older siblings may join at 10am. Third W of every month, 9am. $8 per person; free for members and babies under age 1. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

SNOWMAN FAMILY PROGRAM: This winterthemed family program celebrates the art of the snowman. Make snowman crafts to take home. Depending on the weather, the group may even step outside to create some full-size snowmen. All ages welcome. Su, 1/13, 1-2pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

designed to encourage a love for books and stories, listening skills and interaction with others. Stories, songs, finger plays and wiggle action are part of the fun. For children ages 18 months to 3 years. Th, F, 10:30-11am through 2/15. Free. South Valleys Library, 15650A Wedge Parkway, (775) 851-5190, www.washoe.lib.nv.us.

SPANISH SPRINGS STORYTIME: Stories and activities especially for the preschool child. M, 10:30-11am through 1/28. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

SPANISH SPRINGS TODDLER TIME: This event is designed to encourage a love for books and stories, listening skills and interaction with others. Stories, songs, finger plays and wiggle action are part of the fun. For children ages 18 months to 3 years. Th, 10:30-10:50am through 1/31. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF RENO: Watercolor Demonstration by Don Fotine. Sierra Watercolor Society brings the award-winning Minden artist to Reno for a demonstration of his unique style of painting inspiring landscapes of Lake Tahoe and the Sierra. Sa, 1/12, 1-3pm. Free. 627 Sunnyside Drive, (775) 852-1583, www.sierrawatercolorsociety.com.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: An Artisan January. The Artisan Shop artists and guests will exhibit a special selection of their work that reflects the beauty of Lake Tahoe. M-Su, 11am-4pm through 1/22. Free. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

NORTHWEST RENO LIBRARY: Life in Color. Working in spray paint, acrylics and other media, artist Bryce Chisholm was recently awarded as the RAW Reno Visual Artist of the Year. The art reception and opening is Jan. 12. Sa, 1/12, 2-3pm; Tu-Sa through 2/23. Opens 1/12. Free. 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 787-4100.

Museums Art BUSINESS RESOURCE INNOVATION CENTER (THE BRIC): BRIC Art 3. Capital City Arts Initiatives exhibition features Jill Altmann’s fiber art, Steve Davis’ photography, Andy Gallian’s prints, Mimi Patrick’s ceramics, Stephen Reid’s drawings and watercolors and Gus Bundy’s paintings. M-Su. 108 E. Proctor St., Carson City, (775) 283-7123.

CCAI COURTHOUSE GALLERY: Living in El Norte. The Capital City Arts Initiative presents Blanco de San Roman’s exhibit featuring large oil on canvas portraits of two of Blanco’s friends, Alma and Ramiro, both of whom have lived with the difficulties of immigration status. Blanco’s paintings continue the centuries-long Spanish tradition of monumental portrait painting with a few contemporary substitutions: Alma in the Nevada landscape and Ramiro in front of classical architecture at the University of Nevada Reno. M-F through 1/18. Carson City Courthouse, 885 E. Musser St., Carson City, www.arts-initiative.org.

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Juvenile-InJustice: Photographs by Richard Ross, W-Su through 1/13; Kim Abeles: From Studio to Street, W-Su through 4/14; Rebeca Méndez: At Any Given Moment, W-Su through 1/20; Jean-Pierre Bonfort: Travelling, W-Su through 5/5;The Light Circus: Art of Nevada Neon Signs, W-Su through 2/10; Ciel Bergman: Sea of Clouds What Can I Do, W-Su through 2/10; Hoor Al Qasimi: Off Road, W-Su through 1/27; The Way We Live: American Indian Art of the Great Basin and the Sierra Nevada, W-Su through 3/3. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

Music CARPENTERS MUSIC WORLD MONTHLY MUSIC PROGRAM: Carpenter’s Music World presents its monthly music program open to all ages, styles and skill levels. Performers must call in advance with their name or name of group, song title, instrumentation and length of performance. Second Th of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Carpenters Music World, 2700 S. Virginia St., (775) 391-7757, www.carpentersmusic.com.

The

Reno Philharmonic presents its first concert of the new year and the fourth of its Classix 2012-2013 season. Internationally renowned pianist Ingrid Fliter (pictured) will join the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra for a performance of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major, op. 58. Fliter, who was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, rose to international prominence when she was awarded the prestigious 2006 Gilmore Artist Award, the first woman to win this music award given to pianists of exceptional artistry. She has also won various awards in her native country and Europe, including the silver metal in the 2000 Frederic Chopin Competition in Warsaw, Poland. She made her American debut as a featured soloist on a tour with the Warsaw Philharmonic and Kazimierz Kord in 2002. She has performed with various orchestras across the world and has released six albums under the VAI and EMI labels. The Classix Four concert— which will also feature Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6. op. 74, “Pathétique”—begins at 4 p.m. on Jan. 13 and 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 15 at Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $25-$74. Call 323-6393 or visit www.renophil.com. —Kelley Lang

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Recycle this paper

CARSON CITY MUSIC CLUB: This is a forum for

LAST CHAIR MUSIC FESTIVAL: The festival continues

musicians and music lovers to gather and share their love of music. The club offers opportunities to perform individually and to participate in collaborative events and expand musical knowledge. Second M of every month, 7pm. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 882-9517, http://breweryarts.org.

place in private homes. Proceeds will go to help defer costs for TOCCATA’s eighth winter season kick-off series as well as their outreach program, “Discovering Classical Music in the Public Schools.” The other soirees are 2pm on Jan. 13 in Truckee and 6pm on Jan. 18 in South Lake Tahoe. Sa, 1/12, 2pm; Su, 1/13, 2pm. $100 per person. Call for directions, (787) 602-2121, www.toccatatahoe.com.

with Lettuce and NiT GriT on Jan. 5, Foster The People (DJ set) with Eliot Lipp on Jan. 11 and Bonobo (DJ set) with Emancipator and Random Rab on Jan. 12. F, Sa, 9pm through 1/12. $99 lift ticket and music festival ticket; $35 music fest ticket only. Olympic Village Lodge, 1901 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, (530) 581-6078, www.squaw.com.

JOE CRAVEN TRIO: The trio pays tribute to tradi-

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime con-

tional American folk, blues, New Orleans, swing, funk, as well as the music of Brazil, Haiti, Ireland, Cuba and Puerto Rico. Craven will be joined by keyboardist John R. Burr and percussionist Kendrick Freeman. F, 1/11, 7pm. $25 in advance; $30 at the door. CVIC Hall, 1602 Esmeralda Ave., Minden, (775) 782-8207, http://cvartscouncil.com.

VILLAGE APRÈS MUSIC SERIES: Finish a day on the

cert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

TOCCATA SOIREES MUSICALES: TOCCATA, Tahoe

slopes with free live après ski music at The Village Events Plaza. Sa, 3-5pm through 3/30. The Village at Squaw Valley USA, 1750 Village East Road, Olympic Valley, (866) 818-6963, www.squaw.com.

Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, will hold three “soiree musicale” fundraisers featuring Elizabeth Pitcairn, violinist, as well as vocalists Joy Strotz, Liudmila Mullin and Irina Kasimova performing Russian arias and Broadway tunes. The soirees will take

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Not just another pimply face I’ve loved my fiancée for her intelligence and beautiful personality since the day we met five years ago. However, I don’t think I was ever really attracted to her. In fact, lately, I’m increasingly repulsed by her. She constantly has pimples, her breath smells, and her lips are always dry and chapped. I go through the motions with her in bed, but it’s become very unsatisfying. She has a great body, beautiful eyes and a beautiful smile, and I really do love her and feel absolutely horrendous for sounding so superficial. I could never actually cheat on her, but I’ve been having thoughts of it. OK, so your fiancée could win inner beauty contests, but beauty on the inside just isn’t enough unless you’ve been reincarnated as an endoscopy camera and sent on safari down her digestive tract. Then it wouldn’t matter that your favorite thing to do in bed is roll over and realize she’s away on business or that your sexual fantasies involve picturing her fully clothed, scribbling out a purchase order for a warehouse of zit cream. Looks are especially important when getting into a long-term relationship, because if you’re careful crossing the street, you’ll be spending a really long time looking at the person. The ultimate in wellintentioned cruelty is marrying somebody you aren’t attracted to and will come to despise as you find her increasingly physically repellent. You should instead

OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

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figure out what your “type” is and only get together with someone who fits solidly into it. We all have a type. For some people, it spans a broader spectrum of humanity (and in some cases, farm animals). For others, the range is smaller, which is fine, as long as they accept that they’re narrowing their options—and don’t narrow them so far that the only woman they could ever go out with is Jessica Biel. The least hurtful thing you could do now would be to hop a bus back in time and sleep in on the morning you met your girlfriend. Barring an ability to bend the laws of physics, you should break up with her immediately. Tell her the relationship just isn’t working for you anymore. When you love a woman you aren’t also in lust with, you should resolve to love her only as a friend—same as you would some loyal hairy guy you know who’s also “beautiful on the inside.” Nothing comes between the two of you, either—save for the feeling that a roll in the hay with him would pale in eroticism to a roll in a river of cat vomit.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

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E-READER CAFÉ: Learn how to download library e-books and audiobooks to your electronic device. Please bring your library card, device with USB cable and a basic understanding of how to use your device. Call to schedule your 30-minute appointment. Th, 4-5pm through 3/28. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 352-3200.

FREE QI GONG CLASS: An Introduction to the principles of breathing, posture, flexibility, movement and still meditation of Qi Gong. F, 1/11, 11am-noon. Free. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com

RENO PORTRAIT SOCIETY: There will be a live model for artists to paint or draw in the medium of their choice. No formal instruction, but participants can learn from experienced artists. The event is open to all ages and abilities. W, 9am-12:30pm. $10. Nevada Fine Arts, 1301 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-1128, www.nvfinearts.com.

Community BREAST CANCER—ON WITH LIFE: This support

Sports & Fitness

LEARN TO SKI & SNOWBOARD CELEBRATION: Learn to ski and snowboard at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. Learn the basics and feel comfortable on the slopes. The package includes beginner lift access, lesson and equipment rental. Sa, 1/12, 10am & 1pm; Sa, 1/26, 10am & 1pm. $39. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, (800) 4030206, www.squaw.com; Su, 1/13, 10am & 1pm; Su, 1/27, 10am & 1pm. $39. Alpine Meadows Ski Resort, 2600 Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City, (800) 441-4423, www.skialpine.com.

30/30 (CARDIO MAT/STRETCHING): Thirty minutes of Cardio Mat Pilates and 30 minutes of intensive stretching. Intermediate-level strength, stamina and flexibility are required for this class which emphasizes the principle of fluidity. Call to reserve your spot. M, 4:30pm through 12/30. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

NATIONAL WINTER TRAILS DAY: Join the Tahoe Rim Trail Association for National Winter Trails Day this free day of guided snowshoe hikes, safety presentations, gear demonstrations, snow shelter building, snow science activities and more. Register online for the general event or for a snowshoe hike. Sa, 1/12, 10am-3pm. Free. Tahoe Meadows, 1 mile west of Mt. Rose Summit, off State Route 431, (775) 298-0238, www.tahoerimtrail.org.

CLASSIC INTERMEDIATE MAT PILATES: Students learn to build on the basic mat routine. Modified intermediate to intermediate exercises will be added to the repertoire as students progress. Maximum of 10 people per class. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 8:309:20am through 12/31. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.pilatesreno.com.

PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 5:15-6:05pm through 12/26. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

DAWN PATROL: Dawn Patrol is a unique early morning mountain experience that includes exclusive access to untouched corduroy or fresh powder depending on the weather. Dawn Patrollers arrive before the general public and take the Tram to High Camp before anyone else. Sa, Su, 7:40am through 3/24. $12-$29. Squaw Valley USA, 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, (800) 403-0206, www.squaw.com.

EXPRESS MAT PILATES: A quick 45-minute Mat

PRANA FLOW YOGA: Morning yoga that stretches and strengthens the body from the inside out. This class will start your blood flowing and help you body remain toned and flexible. M, W, 8:30-9:45am through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

RINK ON THE RIVER: Operation of the ice skating rink is dependent on weather and ice conditions. Call the Rink on the River Hotline prior to visiting the rink to ensure that it is open and operating. Holiday hours may vary. M-Su through 2/3. $7.50 ages 13-54; $5.50 kids ages 3-12, seniors age 55+. Reno City Plaza, 10 N. Virginia St., (775) 334-6268, www.reno.gov.

Pilates class to get the body moving with concentration, control, centering. All levels welcome. M, W F, 12:15-1pm through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT CLASSES: Gain flexibility, strength and balance while improving cognition, coordination and overall well-being with The Feldenkrais Method. Sa, 3-4:30pm through 12/21. Opens 1/12. $12 drop-in fee. ACHIEVE Fitness, 600 S. Center St.; Th, 5:30-6:50pm through 12/20. Opens 1/10. $12 drop-in fee. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

SNOWSHOE SKILLS & RUNNING CLINIC: Improve your snowshoe skills as you prepare for Northstar’s Snowshoe Social & Race Series. Sa, 1/12, 11:30am-1pm. Clinic is free; $15 for rentals. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (866) 466-6784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

TURTLENECK TUESDAY SKATE NIGHTS: Hear your favorite grooves from the ’70s and ’80s while you skate round the 9,000 square-foot rink. Tu, 6-9pm through 3/19. Free admission; $15 for skate rentals. The Village at Northstar, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (866) 466-6784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

FELDENKRAIS PELVIC FLOOR SYSTEM CLASS: This class is recommended for people of all ages who are concerned with pelvic floor and/or urogenital function, pelvic structure imbalance, injury and/or surgery, scoliosis, spinal problems, low back pain, and/or problems with balance or breathing. Th, 4-5pm through 12/20. Opens 1/10. $12 drop-in fee; need-based discounts. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

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JANUARY 10, 2013

three-stop tour consists of halfpipe, slopestyle and cross for both freeskiing and snowboarding. The tour is designed to serve as a stepping stone for athletes making the transition from competing at the grassroots level to the elite level. 1/13-1/18, 8am-5pm. See website. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (866) 466-6784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

WOLF PACK MEN’S BASKETBALL: The University of Nevada, Reno plays University of Wyoming.

Sa, 1/12, 3pm. $10-$44. Lawlor Events Center, 1500 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-7225, www.nevadawolfpack.com.

YOGA ALL LEVELS: Classes teach the fundamental principles and therapeutic application of a healthy yoga practice. Classes are designed to give you the time and support to understand the proper alignment of yoga postures (asana) and breathing techniques. M, 5:306:30pm through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

YOGA FLOW: This class is designed to get a quick 45-minute workout in over your lunch break. Instructors will help students master form, understand how to breathe and help them build confidence in the postures and explore the wonders of yoga. Tu, Th, 12:15-1pm through 12/31. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

Onstage RLT SOLICITS DIRECTOR PROPOSALS FOR 2013: Reno Little Theater requests directors’ and play proposals for RLT’s 2013-14 season, both main-stage and fringe shows of any genre, preferably ones which have not been performed in Reno recently or at all. Submission deadline is Jan. 11. M-Su through 1/11. Free. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 348-7091, www.renolittletheater.org.

Auditions AUDITIONS FOR NOISES OFF: Reno Little Theater holds auditions for Noises Off, a comedy that combines physical shtick, sight gags, mistaken identities and fast-paced fun. Several men and women, ages 18-60, are needed to fill roles. The auditions will consist of cold readings from the script and scene play in small groups. Contact director Doug Mishler to schedule an audition time slot. Su, 1/13, 59pm; M, 1/14, 7-10pm. Free. Reno Little Theater Rehearsal Hall, 246 E. Arroyo St., (775) 348-7091, www.renolittletheater.org.

PETER PAN BALLET AUDITIONS: A.V.A. Ballet Theatre will hold open auditions for its upcoming production of Peter Pan, a storybook favorite choreographed by artistic director Alexander Van Alstyne. Su, 1/13, noon. Free. Conservatory of Movement, 75 W. Plumb Lane, (775) 762-5165, www.avaballet.com.

Classes THE BREASTFEEDING FORUM: Breast-feeding mothers are invited to join this support group. Mothers exchange their experiences and discuss concerns such as milk supply, pumping, going back to work, sleeping or lack of sleep, etc. RSVP at http://doodle.com/cy5nrur23mbg6pie. Tu, 45pm. $10 drop in; free for first-time attendees. Renown South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., (775) 240-9916, www.wellnourishedbaby.com.

group provides a highly educational approach to looking at breast cancer. The latest research is discussed, along with alternative therapies, side effects of chemotherapy, reconstruction and community services. The group meets on Tuesdays at Saint Mary’s Center for Health’s Radiation Oncology Department. Tu, 4:306pm. Free. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave., Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

CROCHET CONNECTION: Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 45:45pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

DIABETES AWARENESS SUPPORT GROUP: This group is for people with diabetes and their families. Second Th of every month, 9:30-10:45am. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave., Ste. 100, (775) 770-3600, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

FRIDAY NIGHT BALLROOM DANCING: Every Friday night The Senior Dance Club of Nevada presents ballroom dancing featuring live music by the Ninth Street Band. Singles and beginners are welcome. F, 8-10:30pm. $7 members; $9 non-members. Washoe County Senior Center, 1155 E. Ninth St., (775) 828-1993, www.lreidenbaugh@washoecounty.us.

KNITTING CLUB: Both beginners and pros are

welcome. Sa, 1/12, 1-3pm; Sa, 1/19, 1-3pm. Northwest Reno Library, 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 787-4100.

LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETINGS: Expectant mothers who are considering breastfeeding or mothers who are currently breastfeeding are invited to attend La Leche League meetings. Second M of every month, 6:30pm. Free. Casa de Vida, 1290 Mill St., (775) 335-6757, http://lllnorcal.org/Groups/NorthernNevada.html.

LIFESCAPES: The memoir writing program for seniors meets. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 10:30am. Free. South Valleys Library, 15650A Wedge Parkway, (775) 851-5190, www.washoe.lib.nv.us.

MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: This support group is available to any male who has been impacted by cancer, including survivors and caregivers. Every other Th, 4:15-5:15pm. Saint Mary's Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave., Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

NEW MOTHERS SUPPORT GROUP: This group offers support to first-time mothers in dealing with the changes and issues that come with having a new baby. Th, 10-11:30am. Saint Mary’s Regional Medical Center, 235 W. Sixth St., (775) 770-3843, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

NORTHERN NEVADA ENVIRONMENTAL PROFESSIONALS: This networking group meets monthly. Second Th of every month, 6-8pm. Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Parkway, (775) 828-1991.

RENO DOWNTOWNERS TOASTMASTERS: Weekly meetings provide a forum for developing and practicing public speaking skills in a supportive environment. Participants range from experienced speakers to novices. Tu, 12:15-1:15pm through 3/6. Free for first-time visit. Round Table Pizza, 4007 S. Virginia St., (775) 750-5256.

SOUTH VALLEYS BRIDGE GROUP: Basic bridge knowledge preferred. F, 1-4pm. Free. South Valleys Library, 15650A Wedge Parkway, (775) 851-5190, www.washoe.lib.nv.us.

SUICIDE LOSS SUPPORT GROUP: This support group is open to people who have lost loved ones to suicide. M, 6-8pm. Free. Call for location, (775) 784-8085.


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IF IT WERE ANY FRESHER, you’d smell like 12 12 the boat 12

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BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Writing at

www.io9.com, Charlie Jane Anders provides “10 Signs You Could Be the Chosen Savior.” Among the clues are the following: “Give yourself one point for every time someone comes up to you on the street, points at you, gibbers something inarticulate, and runs away”; “How many robot/clone duplicates of yourself have you come across lately?”; “Is there a blurry black-and-white photo/drawing from history that sort of looks like you?”; and “Have you achieved weird feats that nobody could explain, but which nobody else witnessed?” Now would be a good time for you to take this test, Aries. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when your dormant superpowers may finally be awakening—a time when you might need to finally claim a role you’ve previously been unready for. (Read Anders’ article at http://tinyurl.com/AreYouChosen.)

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Dear Rob the 12

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Astrologer: I have a big question for you. If I could get access to a time machine, where would you suggest I should go? Is there a way to calculate the time and place where I could enjoy favorable astrological connections that would bring out the best in me? —Curious Taurus.” Dear Curious: Here are some locations that might be a good fit for you Tauruses right now: Athens, Greece, in 459 B.C.; Constantinople in 1179; Florence, Italy, in 1489; New York City in 2037. In general, you would thrive wherever there are lots of bright people co-creating a lively culture that offers maximum stimulation. You need to have your certainties challenged and your mind expanded and your sense of wonder piqued.

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JANUARY 10, 2013

CANCER (June 21-July 22): There’s a spot

in the country of Panama where you can watch the sun rise in the east over the Pacific Ocean. In another Panamanian location, you can see the sun set in the west over the Atlantic Ocean. Nothing weird is involved. Nothing twisted or unearthly. It’s simply a quirk of geography. I suspect that a similar situation will be at work in your life sometime soon. Things may seem out of place. Your sense of direction might be off-kilter, and even your intuition could seem to be playing tricks on you. But don’t worry. Have no fear. Life is simply asking you to expand your understanding of what “natural” and “normal” are.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Metaphorically speak-

ing, a pebble was in your shoe the whole past week. You kept thinking, “Pretty soon, I’ve got to take a minute to get rid of that thing,” and yet you never did. Why is that? While it wasn’t enormously painful, it distracted you just enough to keep you from giving your undivided attention to the important tasks at hand. Now, here’s a news flash: The damn pebble is still in your shoe. Can I persuade you to remove it? Please?

painted images in caves 30,000 years ago did a pretty good job of depicting the movements of four-legged animals like horses. In fact, they were more skilled than today’s artists. Even the modern experts who illustrate animal anatomy textbooks don’t match the accuracy of the people who decorated cave walls millennia ago. So says a study reported on LiveScience’s website (http://tinyurl.com/CaveArtMagic). I’d like to suggest this is a useful metaphor for you to consider, Libra. There’s some important task that the old you did better than the new you does. Now would be an excellent time to recapture the lost magic.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): After evaluat-

ing your astrological omens for the coming months, I’ve decided to name you Scorpios the “Top Sinners of the Year” for 2013. What that means is that I suspect your vices will be more inventive and more charming than those of all the other signs. Your so-called violations may have the effect of healing some debilitating habit. In fact, your “sins” may not be immoral or wicked at all. They might actually be beautiful transgressions that creatively transcend the status quo; they might be imaginative improvements on the half-assed way that things have always been done. To ensure you’re always being ethical in your outlaw behavior, be committed to serving the greater good at least as much as your own selfish interests.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Here’s the horoscope I hope to be able to write for you a year from now: “Your mind just kept opening further and further during these past 12 months, Sagittarius—way beyond what I ever imagined possible. Congrats! Even as you made yourself more innocent and receptive than you’ve been in a long time, you were constantly getting smarter and sharpening your ability to see the raw truth of what was unfolding. Illusions and misleading fantasies did not appeal to you. Again, kudos!”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What

does it mean when the dwarf planet Pluto impacts a key point in your horoscope? For Capricorn gymnast Gabrielle Douglas, it seemed to be profoundly empowering. During the time Pluto was close to her natal sun during last year’s Summer Olympics, she won two gold medals, one with her team and one by herself. Luck had very little to do with her triumph. Hard work, self-discipline and persistence were key factors. I’m predicting that Pluto’s long cruise through the sign of Capricorn will give you an opportunity to earn a Gabby Douglas-like achievement in your own sphere—if, that is, you can summon the same level of willpower and determination that she did. Now would be an excellent time to formally commit yourself to the glorious cause that excites you the most.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Diplomacy

is the art of saying ‘nice doggie’ until you can find a rock,” said humorist Will Rogers. I hope you’ve been taking care of the “nice doggie” part, Aquarius—holding the adversarial forces and questionable influences at bay. As for the rock: I predict you will find it any minute now, perhaps even within an hour of reading this horoscope. Please keep in mind that you won’t necessarily have to throw the rock for it to serve its purpose. Merely brandishing it should be enough.

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gists find definitive evidence of the magical lost continent of Atlantis in 2013? Probably not. How about Shambhala, the mythical kingdom in Central Asia where the planet’s greatest spiritual masters are said to live? Any chance it will be discovered by Indiana Jones-style fortune hunters? Again, not likely. But I do think there’s a decent chance that sometime in the next seven months, many of you Geminis will discover places, situations, and circumstances that will be, for all intents and purposes, magical and mythical.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Artists who

CODE: PN24

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Even when you

know exactly what you want, it’s sometimes crucial for you not to accomplish it too fast. It may be that you need to mature more before you’re ready to handle your success. It could be that if you got all of your heart’s desire too quickly and easily, you wouldn’t develop the vigorous willpower that the quest was meant to help you forge. The importance of good timing can’t be underestimated, either: In order for you to take full advantage of your dream come true, many other factors in your life have to be in place and arranged just so. With those thoughts in mind, Virgo, I offer you this prediction for 2013: A benevolent version of a perfect storm is headed your way.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do you know

the word “cahoots”? Strictly speaking, it means to be in league with allies who have the same intentions as you do; to scheme and dream with confederates whose interests overlap with yours. Let’s expand that definition a little further and make it one of your central themes in the coming week. For your purposes, “cahoots” will signify the following: to conspire with like-minded companions as you cook up some healthy mischief or whip up an interesting commotion or instigate a benevolent ruckus.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Tracie Douglas PHOTO/TRACIE DOUGLAS

Bend over backward Johanna McClain

No! Because I don’t believe there is a decline in the economy. I just don’t believe the money has left the planet. It has moved and shifted, but it’s still here. The people who want to make changes or move forward or grow their business will find the resources to make it happen. When a business owner comes to me, and I’ve got a solution for them, then I get a yes from them.

Are you making a living? Yes, I am! Woo hoo!

What is your advice to business owners in 2013?

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*** Time for a Neon Babylon shoutout to a guy who we pretty much take for granted because he’s a local who’s been here for decades. But in the grand scheme of things, Coach Ault really has had a helluva career here. In terms of alltime winningest college coaches, he’s got a tidy little record of 233-109, which puts him ahead of Jim Tressel and Steve Spurrier, and just behind Woody Hayes and Lou Holtz. Sure, about 30 of Ault’s wins came by playing New Mexico State every year, but hell, all the great ones have their favorite cupcakes to chomp on annually. And don’t be shocked if in the next five years, Ault’s Pistol offense becomes what Walsh’s West Coast offense has been. That is to say, possibly the next big thing in football strategy. Especially with guys like RG3, Russell Wilson and our own CK7 emerging as stars. Ω

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brucev@newsreview.com

took them to the gym, and shot them dead. Sixteen kids plus the teacher and, of course, himself. So you know what those crazy Brits did? They passed the 1997 Firearms Act, which, for all intents and purposes, banned handguns forevermore in the United Kingdom. In fact, the ban was comprehensive to the point where now, their athletes competing in Olympic shooting events have to leave the country to train, meaning they have to go to the Isle of Man and places like that. I only bring this up because, well, can you imagine us doing anything like this? I mean, it’s utterly unthinkable that anyone in any kind of position of power would float such a notion even in the steam room of the U.S. Senate Fitness Center, much less during a jawjack on Meet the Press or The Situation Room. Hell, we’re in a zone where we would consider it a major triumph for civility if we banned 50-round ammo clips. By the way, in 2010, there were 8,775 gun murders in the U.S. and 58 in the U.K.

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I’m going to write the book Yoga Off the Mat: Applying Ancient Principles to Modern Business. I’m working on launching a new business that I can’t talk about just yet, and of course, I’m going to expand my coaching practice. These are three things I’m very passionate about, I have the tools I need, and I’m sure of the actions I need to take to accomplish my goals. It’s going to be a great year. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

It’s just all very curious. About marijuana, that is. I mean, here we have a Schedule One drug—Schedule One, I tell you!—and two states in our stony union just legalized its use? For comparisons, check out some of these well-known and still popular Schedule Two drugs (meaning these are technically less mean, nasty, and your-brain-in-hot-skillet than Schedule Ones). Morphine is a Two, so is coke, then you got your Team Codone (Hydro and Oxy), and then there’s meth. Meth! The great scourge of modern America! A schedule Two dope, while big bad reefer remains solidly entrenched in the DEA Superbad List, along with heroin, LSD and mushrooms. So whatever it is they still continue to smoke over there at DEA World HQ ... shit, I bet it’s a Schedule One! *** Back in ’96, some evil ding dong in Britain snapped and did the same thing that Adam Lanza just did. He went to a school with two handguns (not assault weapons), hijacked a classroom of kids, NEWS

What are your goals for 2013?

There are three steps that I recommend they

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They are looking for clarity in what direction they should take and what plan to put into place—not a business plan, but they want a starting point or a platform to begin from. I’m seeing this with both new business owners and established business owners. One of my clients wants to raise her rates, but she’s afraid if she does, she’ll lose business. When I looked through her records, I found she hadn’t raised her rates for many, many years. I asked her to consider two attorneys, one who charges $125 and hour and one that charges $450 an hour. Then I asked her who she would want to use—her reply was the one who charged $450 because she believed that attorney mostly likely had more experience and was a better attorney. She hadn’t looked at herself as

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Johanna McClain is a certified business coach who, with her business Yoga Off The Mat, applies the ancient principles of yoga to change the way business is done. She believes that anyone can have a profitable business that is purpose and passion driven, rather than just profit driven. For more information, check out www.johannamcclain.com.

Find out the

take. First, write down three things they want to accomplish. They need to look at their business and determine what it is they want to move in a positive direction. The key is to decide on something they want to happen, not something they know should happen. When people focus on what they know they should be doing, it seems to always get placed on the back burner. So it’s extremely important that they choose things they want to happen. Next, they need to determine if they have the tools to accomplish those three things. They need to take an inventory to decide if the computer system will support the new programs they want to buy, or if they need a smartphone or a tablet. They need to make sure they have all the tools they need to accomplish their goals. Last, they must decide what actions they will need to get them there. Maybe they will need to take a class on how to use a new program, or maybe they need to join a local club that supports their ideas. In the long run, people have more passion for something they want to accomplish and are more inclined to actually get there.

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