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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .14 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .16 Art of the State . . . . . . .17

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .33 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Free Will Astrology . . . .42 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .43 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . .43

INCENT THIS See News, page 6.

THIS MUD’S

FOR YOU See Green, page 9.

A GRIMM

GIFT GUIDE See Arts&Culture, page 14.

WHAT’S IN A NAME? See Foodfinds, page 18.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 43

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DECEMBER 13-19, 2012


Stay Active, Stay Healthy There may not be a magic pill to address the aging process, but simple lifestyle changes ve longer. And the earlier you develop healthy y can help you feel better and potentially live ou’ll lower your risk for developing chronic habits like the following, the more likely you’ll conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and even cancer: • Get enough sleep. • Adopt a healthy, balanced diet. h day. • Do at least one productive activity each • Have fun. • Exercise regularly. mption. • Don’t smoke and limit alcohol consumption. • Find healthy ways to deal with stress. • Get recommended health screenings. • Ask your doctor how often you should visit.

Being socially and physically active helps us retain our mental agility so we can live longer, more fulfilling lives.

er aactivity ctivity help you stay healthy? Can your weekly bridge group or volunteer y active helps us retain our It just might! Being socially and physically mental agility so we can live longer, more fulfilling lives. That doesn’t mean you should take up jogging or bike riding if you don’t want to, or vities — and fun — to be had, are unable. There are plenty of other activities nt has slowed you down! even if arthritis, asthma or another ailment ed: Here are a few ideas to help you get started:

Sara Rogers, MSN, MSN ANP-BC, GNP-BC GNP-B

Sara Rogers is a board-certified nurse practitioner that specializes in adult and geriatric medicine. She enjoys helping adults of all ages live healthier. When not working, her favorite pastime is cruising with her husband in his 1929 Model A Roadster pick-up truck. To schedule a consultation with Sara Rogers, call 775-352-5300. Medicare and most of the area’s health plans are accepted.

• Take up gardening – It’s great exercise and can be a satisfying, productive activity. ss and lower blood pressure. • Take a yoga or tai chi class to reduce stress d, family member or group. • Schedule a standing date with a friend, Take turns choosing different activitiess that the other person(s) might enjoy. n one that already exists! • Start a movie, book or bridge club, or join ghbor. • Take a daily 10-minute walk with a neighbor. • Visit and spend time at the library. • Attend sporting events, plays, recitals or art openings to cheer d/or friends’ children on and support your grandchildren and/or and grandchildren. • Go fishing, golfing or dancing… often! • Volunteer in the community. You’ve got a lot more living to do, so why not make it healthier and more fun?

Make a Difference … Volunteer Make new friends and a difference in the lives of patients and their families as a Northern Nevada Medical Center volunteer. To learn more, call 356-4013.

Exceptional People. Exceptional Quality. Experience the Difference. 5070 Ion Drive, Suite 200 | Sparks, NV | 352-5300 | NNMC.com

Information is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to constitute medical advice or to be relied upon for the treatment of any particular condition. If you have concerns or questions about specific symptoms that may affect your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

2   |   RN&R   |   DECEMBER 13, 2012


EDITOR’S NOTE

Fiscal reboot Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. You’d be surprised how many conversations I’ve had on the topic of the fiscal cliff. I’ve talked to some people who are pretty smart about this sort of stuff. Almost to a person, they say that the Republicans and Democrats will get right to the edge, and then negotiate a way to avoid it. I don’t think so. I think they appear to want to go over the edge. I believe the “fiscal cliff” provides cover for these cowardly legislators who can’t risk angering their bases but recognize this country must increase revenues and cut spending. In a way, it’s the opposite of what happened when the Reno City Council decided to rethink the popular blackmail payout on the Aces Stadium. To me, the fiscal cliff is more like a fiscal reboot, and like a reboot on a computer, it will either solve a processor issue or, if the computer happens to be updating the operating system, can brick the whole thing. Hate to say it, but our tepid economic recovery is easily comparable to an update of the OS. I think those Democrats are planning to take up filibuster reform after the first of the year—right after the fiscal cliff is either avoided or embraced—because then they can immediately reinstate the middle class tax cuts, increase tax rates on the top 2 percent of Americans, add more stimulus money, close tax loopholes— there’s a whole laundry list of spending and cutting favorites in the Democratic playbook—all anyone has to look at is the “deal” Obama offered to Boehner on Nov. 29. Think those House Republicans will stand with their Senate cohorts and continue to block legislation when their constituents are suddenly paying more in taxes, losing their jobs, seeing businesses close? Fat chance. But we’ll see. This is all conjecture. Nobody really knows what unholy deals are being made behind closed doors on Capitol Hill.

LETTERS Support medical services A common misconception is Planned Parenthood just deals with abortions. They also offer birth control, women’s health services like breast and cervical cancer screenings, pregnancy education, and serve men who usually go for STD testing and treatment. Planned Parenthood is the largest U.S. provider of these services, and of their average 11 million services a year, abortions only account for 3 percent. Nationally, less than 7 percent of Planned Parenthood’s funding goes to abortion services, and most clinics only counsel and provide referrals, like many doctors. Many men and women go to Planned Parenthood because it’s less expensive and they can be seen without insurance. Getting rid of Planned Parenthood would mean more abortions due to unwanted pregnancies from not having affordable preventative methods. Without affordable and proper available services, many women could take it upon themselves to execute the abortion, damaging their bodies permanently, if not killing themselves. Bryann Whitley Sparks

Cold comfort On Nov. 17, the Nevada Republican State Central Committee (SCC) met in Pahrump. The meeting was a victory for Ron Paul supporters and lovers of liberty everywhere. In a nutshell, resolutions were passed stating that the binding of Nevada’s national delegates was in violation of party rules and federal election laws, and therefore the delegates were never truly bound. Because of this, the subsequent censuring by the state party of delegation chair Dr. Wayne Terhune, and the Nevada delegates who [voted for Paul] was totally improper. The RSCC also resolved that the “rules” passed at the national convention were never truly passed. If you watched the convention on TV, then you witnessed the chaos that ensued when a new set of draconian rules were swept into place, even though it

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intelligent, mature, well-thought-out and even impassioned argument about (of all things) socialism. But, how is it possible that Jake Highton has missed the last hundred years of human history? The rise and fall of the Soviet Union and the conversion of Communist China into Capitalist China. Everywhere communism and socialism are in retreat: shucks, even Fidel and Raul have seen the light and are courting the tourist dollar nowadays (or perhaps more correctly, the tourist Euro). Where has he been? Was he locked in an ivory tower? Could it be that he still is? Because he doesn’t even keep up with current events. The European Union and the Euro zone economy are collapsing under their own weight, much of that weight acquired as the result of the Greeks and French taking too many holidays. Ever since the end of World War II, the socialist governments of southern Europe have been encouraging their citizens to enjoy the good times. Now, the piper must be paid, and it’s not a pretty sight. I cannot think of two more unlikely heroes of the working class than Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. Karl Marx never worked a day in his life, unless you consider editing an academic journal to be work. He married the daughter of a rich man, and spent the rest of his life living on his wife’s money. As for Engels, he was the quintessence of the exploitive capitalist bourgeoisie. He became rich off the backs of the workers in his family’s textile mills. I do agree with Highton that the best possible form of human society, the one that is definitely worth striving for, is the society where each person gives according to their ability and takes according to their need. Capitalism is absolutely the worst possible form of human society, and yet it prospers everywhere, like a weed. It succeeds because, unlike communism or socialism, it appeals to the lowest common denominator of the human character. Marx was right, class struggle is one of the fundamental elements of human existence and human history: workers fight for their rights and cap-

seemed like a majority of the voice vote was “No!” In spite of the dissension, Convention Chair John Boehner continued to read the teleprompter, which scrolled up that the rules were unanimously adopted, when in actuality, they never were. These new rules, enacted ex post facto, required a plurality of eight states for a candidate’s presidential nomination. Therefore, since the 2012 rules were not accepted by the body, they were not in effect, and the 2008 rules were. Ron Paul was nominated as he did have the original required plurality of five states (actually six), and was never allowed the opportunity to give a nomination speech. These nefarious rules changes were the work of national party chair Rance Priebus. Since the Nevada RSCC meeting, 30 other states’ Central Committees have passed the “Resolution to Reestablish Republican Unity and Principles,” or a “Resolution to Restore the Power of the Grassroots.” This resolution throws out the rules that were forced upon the 2012 National Convention, and reinstates the rules of 2008. Next January’s RNC winter meeting in Charlotte, N.C., should be the final chapter for party chair Priebus. His take-over of the convention and abysmal direction of the Romney campaign left the party in ruins. Meanwhile, Ron Paul has taken over the leadership of the Campaign for Liberty, where his message of peace, sound money, and freedom continues to ring true for many. Cynthia Kennedy Virginia City

Expect the worst Re “That’s Capitalism, folks” (Feature story, Nov. 15): Over the years, I have come not to expect much from the feature articles in the RN&R, so when I saw the clever title for the feature article on capitalism, I assumed it would be the usual RN&R diatribe, this time about capitalism: something along the lines of Michael Moore. Imagine my surprise, and delight, when I finally had a chance to read this article and, instead of the usual sniggering adolescent sarcasm, I discover a serious,

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Bethany Deines Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Nora Heston, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Gil Egeland, Neil Lemerise, John Miller, Russell Moore, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Brian Breneman, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

italists fight for their profits. Do coal miners need a union? Absolutely! Do farm workers need a union? Without a doubt. Do college professors need a union? The answer to that is not immediately obvious. As Voltaire said, “History is the pattern of silken slippers, descending the staircase to the rumble of hobnail boots coming up from below.” This has been the course of human history from the very beginning, and I think it must always be this way. It is not Utopia, and it’s certainly not the best possible model of human society, but I think it’s the only one we can expect, human beings being what they are. Bill Nickerson Reno

Not necessarily Here in Nevada, alone among the 50 states, voters can cast a ballot for “none of the above.” This fall, Republicans tried to eliminate this option, thinking it might help Romney. Had they succeeded, the joke would have been on them. It wouldn’t have changed the presidential results. Obama won a clear majority of over 52 percent, nearly 68,000 votes ahead, with only 5,770 voters choosing “none of the above.” But eliminating the option might have given us a second Democratic Senator. Berkley lost to Heller by just 11,576 votes. Over 45,277 voted for “none of the above” in that race. Michael O. Campbell Reno

Corrections In the story, “Power brokers” (Feature story, Dec. 6), we misspelled Deirdre Mazzetto’s name. In the story, “General fund dollars” (News, Dec. 6), we incorrectly stated that Monarch Casino Resort Inc. owns both the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino and the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa. This is not true. We regret these errors and apologize for any confusion caused by them.

Business Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover illustration: Priscilla Garcia Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

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ARTS&CULTURE

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FILET OF SOUL

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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MISCELLANY

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by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

How bad is climate change? Asked at U.S. Post Office, 1674 N. Virginia St. Mike Vuver Homebuilder

It’s heating up, obviously, because the ice cap’s melting. I don’t think there’s anything you can do at this point. It’s the emissions from the cars, it’s the carbon footprint. It’s there. It’s going to increase.

Markus Kemmelmeier Professor

It’s a considerable concern. It goes slowly … and most people don’t feel the impact of it. It is a serious problem even though it’s stretched out over decades. Whatever actions we take now [won’t be felt until] decades from now.

Jill Adrian

Send me back in, coach We try to limit our commentary on national issues except when they directly affect us locally—for example, health-care reform. But this murder of Kasandra Perkins by Jovan Belcher seems worthy of note. Let’s hit it from a couple of points of view. First, according to the U.S. Department of Justice, more than three women are murdered by their husbands or boyfriends in this country every day. How many make national headlines? The only reason this story made the headlines was because Belcher was a professional football player. In fact, according to the National Network to End Domestic Violence, “On average, three women are killed by their intimate partners every day in the United States.” If there were two others killed on Dec. 1, we haven’t read about them. Second, about 6,000 people are killed every year with guns. In fact, Belcher reportedly bragged in a text about having eight guns “from hand Gunz to assault rifles” in his home. Add into this mix new science from the Boston University Center for Traumatic Encephalopathy that shows that even mild repeated head injuries among athletes and soldiers can trigger the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. “CTE is clinically associated with symptoms of irritability, impulsivity, aggression, depression, short-term memory loss and heightened suicidality.” Thought we were going after your guns, didn’t you? According to many sources, including the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress, “a strong predictor of domestic violence in adulthood is domestic violence in the household in which the person was reared.” People had the view that that result was purely social, in other words, kids saw that their caregivers got OPINION

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I read things about it, and I think I can be persuaded one way or the other. … I have to say when I was younger—I’m from Montana—we would have feet and feet of snow every year, and now that’s not the case.

results with violence, so as they grew up, they acted with violence. (Johnny saw Mom placate Dad when he acted violently. Dad smacked Johnny around when he didn’t mow the lawn.) But doesn’t this new science make a lot of sense in the context of American society? Why is our society so violent in comparison to most societies? Why are societies that are more violent in the home than ours more violent in their relationships with their neighbors? To borrow from the movie Lincoln, which borrowed from Euclid: “Things which are equal to the same thing are also equal to one another.” If repeated blows to the head from sports or soldiering cause aggression, why don’t repeated blows to the head from dad’s fist or from a “shock and awe” carpet bombing campaigns cause aggression? Many sports—boxing, soccer and football among them—feature repeated blows to the head. Is there a culture where violent sports are more a thread in the social fabric? It appears possible there may be a biological and evolutionary imperative to develop violent behavior in reaction to violence. In other words, by making changes in our physiology, nature enables us to protect ourselves from head trauma because head trauma can kill us, which would tend to take us out of the gene pool. The problem is, for the most part, we are not in a violent environment so those tendencies are not used defensively. Though probably not intended for this use, this new study offers a whole new way of looking at the root causes of violence in our culture. If we can identify and ameliorate the root causes of mild head injuries, issues regarding domestic violence and gun control may be made moot. Ω IN ROTATION

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FOODFINDS

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Jennifer Hagen Physician

I’m not sure. It seems like things have gotten warmer. The polar ice caps are melting, and that’s a problem. But when you look at [it] historically—that there were ice ages that covered a huge part of the planet, and they melted and came back and melted and came back, I’m not sure if this is a long-term thing or just part of that cycle.

Patricia Routhier College student

I think it’s very serious because the scientists who are investigating this, and have investigated it for some period of time, are not stupid. And I think they are using very sound techniques to decide if this is true.

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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DECEMBER 13, 2012

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Apple Inc., with the help of tax breaks, is reportedly planning to build a new assembly facility at this site near downtown Reno.

Voter photo plan defended Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, speaking before a luncheon meeting of the Nevada Women’s Lobby, denied that a program he has proposed was a “voter ID” program as it has been portrayed by the press. Miller said no one would be required to present identification at a polling place. Rather, election officials would obtain photos from the Department of Motor Vehicles of drivers and others holding state identification cards and use them to match with faces of people attempting to vote at polling places. While not all Nevadans have driver licenses or other state identification cards, most do. One political activist at the luncheon, Elisa Cafferata, urged support for the Miller plan, saying it was the best way to head off MILLER legislation requiring all voters to present identification in order to vote. But American Civil Liberties Union of Nevada representative Vanessa Spinazola objected to that stance, urging against any unnecessary impediments to voters. Miller acknowledged that voter fraud committed through individual voters is virtually nonexistent but said he was convinced that if the voter photo plan was not offered, enactment of a full fledged voter ID plan by the Nevada Legislature would be unstoppable. One person at the luncheon asked a seatmate what good are Democratic majorities in both state legislative houses if they cave in to conservatives on such an issue. Voter identification bills have been introduced at the Nevada Legislature but have always been defeated. At the 2011 Legislature, bills sponsored or cosponsored by Republicans John Hambrick, Ira Hansen, Lynn Stewart, Melissa Woodbury and Michael Roberson were all defeated. Voting fraud committed on the voter side—as opposed to the vote-counting side—is extremely rate. Nevada election officials say they can count instances with single digits, and that when it does occur, it is often innocent (“The fraud of voter fraud,” RN&R, Oct. 25), but conservatives encourage the notion that it is rampant in order to win enactment of voter identification laws whose burden falls heavily on low-income voters without driver licenses. Miller said about 15 percent of Nevadans do not have driver licenses, a relatively high number among states. Citizens without identification tend to be low-income people such as senior citizens. They also include many Latinos. Republicans dismayed by the low Latino vote for the GOP in last month’s election are trying to avoid issues that further alienate that group of voters. Asked about the privacy implications of public agencies swapping information on members of the public, Miller said reassuring the public of the security of elections was worth the breach of privacy. Voter identification laws are a high priority of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a conservative organization created under section 501(3)(c) of the Internal Revenue code. It is funded by right-wing millionaires and corporations such as R.J. Reynolds, State Farm and Koch Industries.

Prepaid tuition opens The current open enrollment period for the Nevada Prepaid Tuition program began on Dec. 1 and will end on Feb 28. The program allows parents and others to start paying tuition at today’s tuition payment levels for use when a child reaches college. Information is available at NVPrepaid.gov.

—Dennis Myers 6

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DECEMBER 13, 2012

Welfare rolls published Nevada scrutiny of state corporate aid challenged Published studies say Nevada state government is providing millions in subsidies and by incentives to businesses—and that Dennis Myers the state does not do follow-up assessments on whether those subsidies work in improving the state’s economy. Over a period of 10 months, the New York Times compiled and analyzed a searchable database of individual business incentives granted

“Nevada did not publish a document that evaluated the effectiveness of a tax incentive.” Pew Center on the States

The New York Times report on state subsidies of business can be read at http://tinyurl.com/ bmogd52 The Pew Center report on follow-up study of state subsidies can be read at http://tinyurl.com/ agvufvo

by all state governments, listing 150,000 grants and awards providing more than $80 billion in various subsidies to companies. In Nevada’s case, it found each state resident paying $12 to support incentives to corporations. Times reporter Louise Story also found states often not getting value for the incentives they offered. A few days after the Times report ran, the newspaper then editorialized on its findings: “Many governments don’t know the full value of the subsidies they hand out in the form of tax refunds, rebates, loans, grants and more. And they don’t know if the jobs created

would have been created anyway. The fact is, numerous studies show that such incentives result in only a small increase in jobs and that any gains usually come at the expense of other cities and states. Local governments would be much better off investing tax dollars in education and public works that would deliver long-term benefits to both businesses and workers. “The senseless race to give away billions in subsidies is, of course, hard to stop when elected leaders think a pledge of potential jobs might help in their next election. But even when attracting businesses is a legitimate goal, it has to be done in ways that are fair and transparent. The trouble with targeted incentives is that they are little more than transfers of wealth to a handful of powerful corporations from all other taxpayers, including other businesses. If the problem is excessive tax burdens on businesses in general, then the solution is broad tax reform that also benefits small business owners, who are more likely to stick around if the regional economy weakens and who are unlikely to hopscotch around the country in search of a bigger tax break.” Among the corporate beneficiaries of Nevada officials’ generosity in the Times list: Apple Inc., Starbucks, Georgia Pacific, Sherwin Williams, R.R. Donnelly, Ford, General Motors, INTUIT, Harley Davidson, TRW Vehicle Safety, Basalite Concrete, Ocean Spray, Overhead Door and

dozens of smaller enterprises. The Times list is likely to provide useful information to Nevada activists who have been critical of governments subsidizing businesses. State and local government websites do not currently provide such logs of Nevada officials’ generosity to corporations. The Times estimated that incentives account for a cent of every Nevada budget dollar, which means the state is no more generous with corporate welfare than welfare for the poor. This is not necessarily due to restraint by state officials, but by limitations in the state constitution on the incentives that can be offered. Most Nevada incentives are in the form of abatements—taxes that are not collected. The second study, a report by the Pew Center on the States, found that about half the states have not done the work “to produce and connect policy makers with good evidence of whether these tools deliver a strong return on taxpayer dollars.” Nevada is among those states. The report said Nevada did not measure the economic impact of incentives or draw clear conclusions about their impact. Pew found that 13 states are doing a good job “in generating muchneeded answers about tax incentives’ effectiveness. Twelve states have mixed results. Half the states have not taken the basic steps needed to know whether their incentives are effective.” Further, the Pew study reported, “Sixteen states ... and the District of Columbia did not publish a document between 2007 and 2011 that evaluated the effectiveness of a tax incentive.” Pew also reported that incentives are often offered not because they serve a state’s interest but because they keep a state competitive with other states. “Frequently, [incentives] are used as part of a bidding war between states over firms seeking to relocate or expand. If one state offers a tax credit, others often feel compelled to match it or risk being left behind.” It praised some states. “Oregon, for example, gives its incentives expiration dates, or ‘sunsets,’ which force lawmakers to examine them periodically. Arizona, Iowa and Washington also are trying to ensure their evaluations become part of the policy-making process.” Nevada incentives are not sunsetted. The Pew report went on, “In Connecticut, a study of the Job Creation Tax Credit provided evidence that the investment had benefited the state. … Louisiana’s


economic development agency discovered that one tax incentive it previously credited with creating more than 9,000 jobs had produced a third of that number.” Lt. Gov. Brian Krolicki, a member of the state Board of Economic Development, said the state does do follow-up work on making sure that incentives are used as intended. “Those companies that receive tax abatements are subject to audit procedures and actually claw-back procedures if they do not fulfill the terms under which they were approved,” he said. He said the state also looks beyond individual abatements and uses economic modeling for a broader look at incentives to make sure they are effective. He acknowledged that the incentives the state offers are driven by the fact that other states are offering incentives, and said that process has to be watched carefully. “We’re in competition with just about every other state and certainly those in the Western United States because, you know, a company’s decision often entails geographic positioning and then distance to customers and providers, often in a regional standpoint,” he said. “But ... there’s absolutely a break point when incentives outweigh the benefits and I’m not sure if that clear line is apparent to some in this business.” State economic development director Steve Hill said of the Pew study, “They’re kind of partially correct, and we are changing that. Some of their findings were based on 2010

“We’re in competition with about every other state.” Lt. Gov. Brian Krolicki information. Some of that analysis is done, but it has not been published. So if you want to go look to see if any analysis is performed, you can’t find it. That will be changed.” He said that traditionally, the state has not measured its abatements against effectiveness goals, and that too will be changing. In addition, a log of all abatements awarded by the state will be created where they can be found by the public. “That is a part of that reporting process.” he said. “We will post that information and then track it effectively.” Chuck Alvey, now a consultant who previously headed Economic Development of Western Nevada, which tries to lure businesses to the state, said his experience has been that incentives are closely watched. “If you give someone an abatement, it means that they’re going to be watched based on how fast you generate new tax money, that you have a certain pay level and a certain number of employees,” he said. There were instances when, if a business did not reach those thresholds, they would have to “pay that abatement back.” Nor is it all that easy to qualify. “It wasn’t just a matter of handing out abatements,” he said. “It was a very arduous process of qualifying.”Ω

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On a reviewing stand, announcers read a narrative script about the groups passing by in the Sparks Christmas parade. The parade was held Dec. 8 after being postponed from the previous week because of threatening floodwaters. OPINION

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Run amok Wild horse advocates held a protest last week to bring community awareness to concerns of wild horse abuse (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Running wild,â&#x20AC;? Green, Oct. 11). A small group of protesters held signs along Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parkway, claiming that captured wild horses are sent to slaughter. Two photos intended to capture abuse in action were taken by Reno residents and have been published on a popular horse advocacy blog. The blog, Straight from the Horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mouth, is curated by Wild Horse Freedom Federation president R.T. Fitch â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reno wild horse advocates are not only outraged by the Nevada Department of Agricultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s war against the Virginia Range horses, but also the documented cruelty exhibited with the manhandling of these wild horses upon capture,â&#x20AC;? wrote Fitch. One of the photos, of two men wrangling a foal, is blurry but the caption reads, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three week [old] foal being pulled with bailing twine by hired security.â&#x20AC;? The other shows a foal being pulled by the head with a yellow rope. The blog encourages people to contact Gov. Brian Sandoval and the DOAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jim Barbee to voice complaints. View the blog post at http://bit.ly/HorseBlog.

Flutterby The Mt. Charleston blue butterfly, endemic to Southern Nevada, is under consideration to be classified as an endangered species by the United States Fish & Wildlife Service. Other Nevada butterflies, including the lupine blue butterfly, Spring Mountains icarioides blue butterflies and Spring Mountains dark blue butterflies, are under consideration for â&#x20AC;&#x153;threatenedâ&#x20AC;? status because of their similar appearance to the Mt. Charleston. The butterfliesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wingspans often feature bold lines and spots on the outside, and a blue hue underneath. Threatened or endangered status is determined by five factors, according to the proposed status document filed by the FWS in Sept., including â&#x20AC;&#x153;the present or threatened destruction, modification, or curtailment of its habitat or range; overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific or educational purposes; disease or predation; the inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms; or other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence.â&#x20AC;? The report states that the Mt. Charleston blue butterfly is threatened by â&#x20AC;&#x153;habitat loss, collection, inadequate regulatory mechanisms and drought and extreme precipitation, which are predicted to increase as a result of climate change.â&#x20AC;? However, the report suggests that the habitat not be classified yet as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;critical habitatâ&#x20AC;? because that status can increase threats for endangered species. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Publishing the exact locations of the butterflyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s habitat will further facilitate unauthorized collection and trade,â&#x20AC;? the report states. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Its rarity makes the Mt. Charleston blue butterfly extremely attractive to collectors.â&#x20AC;? Land designated as critical habitat can also be difficult to access and maintain.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT The opportunity to recycle phone books will be available from Jan. 1-20 throughout Washoe County. The event, organized in part by Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful, will have drop off locations in Reno and Sparks, including Evelyn Mount Northeast Community Center, Neil Road Recreation Center, Sparks City Hall, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, and Rancho San Rafael Park, among others. For a full list of locations, visit www.ktmb.org, or call YP Real Yellow Pages Project ReDirectory information line at (800) 953-4000.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.


PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREEN

“We’re just mud farmers from Nevada,” says Egbert, stirring a jar of mud.

Mudslingers Down and dirty with Black Rock Mud For Shelly Egbert and Summer Powelson, creating a sustainable business requires getting dirty. Egbert and Powelson started Black Rock Mud Company, a company that makes a cosmetic cream created from the mud produced by by Ashley geothermal springs in the Black Rock Desert. Hennefer “I’ve always been an entrepreneur,” she says. “I just have ideas that I want to do something about. ... People are worried about the economy and ashleyh@ newsreview.com looking for jobs and we’re saying, ‘Look, we’ve got mud, let’s be inventive and be creative.’ This has been a dream of mine for about 12 years.” Egbert is also the director of nonprofit organization House Calls, a support system for ailing senior citizens. Black Rock Mud Company is a Gerlach-based family operation—Egbert and Powelson each have four children, ranging from age 2 to 20, who are home schooled and help with the business as part of their education. Egbert also has three children who attend college. The mud is harvested on 144 acres bought by Egbert’s father 12 years ago. A hunter green color, it has a creamy consistency that dries quickly on skin, and is essentially odorless. The mud is classified as an illite clay, commonly used in alternative healing because it creates a pulling sensation, For more information, stimulating the blood under skin. and photos of the “When you see that coming out of the ground it’s just gorgeous, so it was harvesting process, very intriguing,” Egbert says of her first impressions of the substance. “We visit www.facebook.com/ used to put it all over our bodies and our faces. It just felt wonderful. So for a BlackRockMudCo. long time I said, ‘We need to put this in a jar.’” Egbert and Powelson collect, process and jar the mud themselves. The mud is strained to remove excess moisture and organic material but is packaged as is to retain its natural properties. The owners must work around the natural patterns of the ecosystem, so the mud is only harvested twice a year. “The hard part is that this is all geothermal activity,” says Egbert. “It’s up to Mother Nature. Sometimes the springs throw the mud out, sometimes they don’t, sometimes they’re dry. So for 12 years I watched it constantly change, and eventually came up with a way to make it available based on harvests.” While the substance itself is organic, making the company entirely green was the top priority. Black Rock Mud’s facility is all powered by wind turbines, solar panels and geothermal energy. Egbert and Powelson also wanted every piece of the jars, lids, and box packaging to be sustainable. “We said we wanted it to be green, organic, recyclable, and the big one for me was made in the U.S.,” says Egbert. “That was the hardest for us. We spent two years trying to get it in a package.” The team eventually found the resources they were seeking, but acknowledge that their overhead costs for packaging is much more expensive “than if we had just gone with materials made in China, but we weren’t going to do that,” says Egbert. Their efforts won them an international green packaging design award. The small company has received national press, including a front page story in the Wall Street Journal last month. Egbert says they were even offered a reality television show deal, which they turned down. “We’re just mud farmers from Nevada,” she says, laughing. “Well, we prefer ‘mud whisperers.’ We’re just using what nature has gifted to us.” Ω OPINION

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BY MARC MAXIMOV

W

hile the election was looming and the northeastern United States was drying its socks from the latest semiannual “storm of the century,” author-turned-activist Bill McKibben was girding for battle. The day after the election would see the start of his consciousness-raising, coast-to-coast “Do the Math” tour, an attempt to recruit an army of college students to fight the fossil fuel industry—a rapacious behemoth that’s prepared to burn the last drop of oil on the planet, whatever kind of planet is left to burn it on. Shortly before the recent United Nations Climate Change Conference, journalist Marc Maximov spoke with McKibben about the tour, Hurricane Sandy, derelict millionaire ocean-dumpers and Elvis.

What is this tour about? The real point of it all, the reason we’re doing it the night after the election no matter who wins, is our sense is that the time has come to stop spending all our effort trying to reach our political leaders and instead reach the people who are really in charge of things, the fossil fuel industry. I wrote a piece for Rolling Stone [www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/global-warmings-terrifying-new-math-2012 0719] this summer that went oddly viral, became one of the most shared pieces. And it laid out the mathematics behind the fact that, really, the fossil fuel industry is turning into a kind of rogue industry at this point, doing enormous damage. They have in their reserves about five times the amount of carbon than even the most conservative government thinks would be safe to burn. So, as Desmond Tutu says in a video that he put together for this road show, after the fight against apartheid, this is the next great moral issue for the planet, and we need to bring some of the same kinds of tools to bear. One of the things we’ll be doing is trying to launch divestment campaigns on college campuses across America to get those institutions to get rid of their stock in fossil fuel companies.

Tell me what you think about the election. Are both sides too beholden to these industries? Both sides are too beholden. That doesn’t mean there [weren’t] differences between the candidates. Only one of them devoted his summer to mocking the idea that trying to slow sea-level rise might be a good idea, a line that wasn’t very funny when Mr. Romney used it at the Tampa convention, and sure as hell wasn’t very funny by the time Sandy had come ashore. … Our job is clear: It’s to build a movement that presses them to do things. Barack Obama, without pressure, won’t do the things that we need. With pressure there’s at least some chance that he’ll pay attention.

Since your article this summer about the math of climate change, you had another article in Rolling Stone about the Greenland ice sheet [www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-arctic-ice-crisis20120816]. How frequently do you speak to climate scientists? Have you heard anything since then?

BILL MCKIBBEN TALKS ABOUT THE FIGHT AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE

I keep up with climate scientists regularly. I saw yesterday, in Charlotte, N.C., Michael Mann, one of our great climate scientists, who was at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America. And Mike was there chairing a session on sea-level rise. And of course, that was given new pungency by the events of last week in New York and New Jersey. You know, that huge storm surge rode in on an ocean that was a foot higher than it would have been without climate change. So that’s of course one of the things that people are focused on right now.

“A HELL OF OUR OWN MAKING” continued on page 12 OPINION

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McKibben is the author of The End of Nature (1989) and The Global Warming Reader (2011).

Do you find it tiresome that talking about climate change in the media devolves into, whenever there’s a big storm, they have to have a controversy over whether an individual weather event can be chalked up to climate change? Do you think we’ll ever get past that?

PHOTO BY NANCY BATTAGLIA

“A HELL OF OUR OWN MAKING” continued from page 11

I think it defines irresponsible. Having altered the planet in profound ways by pouring carbon into the atmosphere, the idea that we would try to alter it in some other way by changing the oceans, or pouring sulfur into the atmosphere or something, is depressing and probably pointless. But the idea that we would do it just one person at a time is completely insane.

I think we’re slowly getting past that. It is amazing, the media’s ability to replay the same story over and over again. But each time the answer gets a little more definitive. I thought the cover of Businessweek last Thursday was the clearest indication we’re in a new world. It just says in huge letters, “It’s global warming, stupid.” It’s a great graphic. It’s really powerful. And this is Businessweek—it’s not The Nation or something.

It seems like we’ve gotten to where we are through relentless technological progress, and so many people are relying on that to continue to be our salvation.

I’ve heard that some environmental groups find it necessary to speak only in positive terms to the broader public, worried that they’re going to depress people or turn them off. How would you fit climate change into this? It’s funny, you know, I’ve never really had that trouble. I wrote what I think is probably still the best-selling book about climate change way back in 1989, and it has the cheerful title The End of Nature. We’ve just stressed reality above all. Neither alarmism nor Pollyannaism. We took our name, 350.org, from a scientific data point [which represents the target of efforts to reduce carbon in the atmosphere from its present level of 392 parts per million], and a pretty wonky one at that. But it hasn’t stopped anybody from being able to deal with it. People seem to me quite capable of dealing with reality. And we’ve had great good luck in the five years since we started 350.org, which at the time was myself and seven undergraduates. We’ve organized something like 15,000 rallies in every country on Earth except North Korea. So we don’t feel as if the point is to scare people or to cheer them up. The point is just to tell the truth about what’s going on and present a reasonable plan for how we might begin to get out of the hole we’ve dug ourselves.

Have you heard of the scenario presented by Gwynne Dyer in the book Climate Wars, that some scientists are saying that the Permian-Triassic extinction event happened because of high carbon levels that resulted from volcanism in Siberia? And that some scientists are saying that if we continue on our present carbon trajectory, we may trigger an extinction event of that magnitude? I think that the standard scientific assessment, at least for the last seven or eight years, is someplace between 40 and 70 percent of species would go extinct in a rapid warming scenario 12 | RN&R | DECEMBER 13, 2012

What do you think of the recent iron seeding action by Russ George? [George is a wealthy entrepreneur who attempted to single-handedly jumpstart geoengineering research by dumping tons of iron dust in the Pacific Ocean off Canada.]

like the one we’re entering. As I recall, that was the IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] account of a three-and-a-half-degree rise in temperature.

Is that sort of temperature rise unavoidable at this point? Nope, it’s not unavoidable. It’s only avoidable, though, with very hard work. A certain amount of climate change is clearly already baked in, and some of the effects are brutal. You know, this summer we saw the catastrophic melt of the Arctic. We’ve broken one of the world’s biggest physical features. But if we do what we need to do now to get off coal and gas and oil, then we can limit the damage. There’s still the possibility of keeping the rise of the planet’s temperature below two degrees, which is the line that governments have drawn as the red line. But that would take an all-out, focused, wartime-footing kind of effort, and most of all it would take ending the political power of the fossil fuel industry that’s forever delayed change.

Is this goal attainable? I don’t know if it’s attainable. I think if you were betting, you’d have to say the odds are not great. But the stakes are so high that anything we can do to

change those odds is sort of mandatory. And we’ve had great good luck in the last couple of years against those odds. We managed to stop—at least for a year—the Keystone Pipeline down out of the tar sands of Canada, when everybody who was theoretically politically realistic said it was definitely a done deal. It did take 1,253 of us going to jail, but we

“A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IS CLEARLY ALREADY BACKED IN, AND SOME OF THE EFFECTS ARE BRUTAL.” slowed them down. So I’m not ready to give up by any means. This is the most ambitious project we’ve ever undertaken; we’ll go to 21 cities in 21 nights, and then by springtime it’ll be

going fully international. We’ll be in Istanbul in the spring, with five or six young people from every country on Earth—probably not North Korea—launching the same drive all over the planet.

To me, it kind of reflects the fact that a lot of people are only going to care about climate change when it affects them directly and presently. Eighty percent of Americans—or more, now 85, I think—live in counties that have had a federally declared disaster in the last two years. So I think we’re reaching that point.

How much science is it going to take to convince people? The last climate deniers, you’re never going to convince. Their mind-set’s rooted in ideology, not science. But the polling data shows that about 74 percent of Americans now understand that the climate’s warming, which is a remarkably high percentage for anything. I mean, you know, this is a country where 40 percent of people think Elvis is still alive. So getting 74 percent to agree on something is very good.

We’ve got lots of good progress coming, it’s just much different than what we’re used to. So, solar panels are great. They’re highly technical, and they allow you to have a very spread-out, diffuse, democratic power grid. I’ve got them all over my roof, and they work great even in Vermont. Imagine how well they’d work in North Carolina. But there’s lots of other technology, too, that we sometimes forget about when we think about technology. When I was last in Copenhagen for that ridiculous failed climate meeting, the one really good thing was watching the fact that 40 percent of people in that very advanced city have adopted the bicycle as their way of getting to and from work. The bicycle is as technological as the airplane. And probably a lot better for you.

There are some critics who say that solar cells are great, but in order to achieve the same amount of power output from solar cells as from fossil fuels, we would need to make billions of them. Well, we can make a lot of them. The price has fallen 75 percent in the last three years—in fact, there’s a glut of them on the market at the moment, it’s a good time to go get one—so making them is not the problem. The problem is deploying them fast. And that requires ending the fossil fuel industry’s monopoly on political power. They’re the only industry on Earth that doesn’t have to pay to throw out their waste. They get to pour carbon into the atmosphere for free. And as long as that special break is there, sun and wind will always be working against economic gravity, as it were.

With your project now, using a similar strategy against the fossil fuel industry that was used against companies that did business in South Africa, with divestment ...


That’s right, that’s one of the things we’ll be doing. Above all else, it’s an excellent way to raise this issue that hasn’t been raised. Think about our campuses. That’s where we learned about climate change. You know, Duke is full of people over at Duke Forest and wherever else who’ve been busy studying the effects for a long time. They’re how we know what’s going on. It no longer makes sense, now that they’ve told us all that stuff, to keep funding our educations with investments in companies that guarantee there won’t be a planet to carry out those educations on.

[

“THE LAST CLIMATE DENIERS, YOU’RE NEVER GOING TO CONVINCE.”

think people are slightly less worried about the Gulf Stream actually shutting down at this point.

It’s been described that in a few hundred years people might be huddled near the poles, hoping that nothing further bad happens to them.

Well, we know that agriculture would be next to impossible. And we think at this point the data seems to indicate that every degree increase in global average temperature should cut grain yields about 10 percent. The ocean is already 30 percent more acid, and that’s causing havoc already with marine creatures. One oceanographer last month at the close of the big conference on ocean acidification in California said that by century’s end, at this pace, the oceans of the world will be “hot, sour and breathless.”

I think Hansen was talking more about the increasing sense that there’s a link between Arctic ice and the flush of freshwater as it melts, and weather—storms and extremes along the East Coast of North America and in Europe. I’m a little behind on the science, but I

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Which seemed to me a pretty powerful statement. Most frozen things will have melted or be in the process of melting. And we’ll see a huge increase in severe weather, to the point where my guess would be that civilization will just be a series of emergency responses to things.

You’ve said that global heating of 11 degrees Fahrenheit would create a planet “straight out of science fiction.” I know they can’t prove definitively what the planet would look like in that case, but what are some of the scenarios?

To go back to the possible future scenarios that you’ve talked about with scientists, in your article about Greenland you quoted James Hansen as saying that “all hell might break loose for eastern North America and Europe” if there’s more significant melting of the Greenland ice sheet. Was he talking about the deep Atlantic conveyor?

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I really do think it’s probably best not to indulge our worst fears. The job now—I mean, it’s going to be bad enough no matter what we do. The job now is to do the work to make sure that it doesn’t get any worse than it has to get. It’s going to be a difficult century in any event. Our job is to keep it from becoming an impossible one.

Can you talk about your personal transformation from someone who

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and build a divestment movement so that companies are called to account. They’re on your campus.

Well, I mean, it sort of came gradually. I thought my job for a long time was just to write about these things. And I was like 27 when I wrote The End of Nature. I think my theory of change was, “I will write a book, people will read it, and then they will change.” Actually, lots of people did read it! It came out in like 24 languages and was a best-seller in a number of them. But it turns out that’s really not how change happens, you know? So at a certain point I just figured out it would be necessary to go to work, trying to build a movement. Not something I knew how to do. But with my colleagues at 350.org, who are now in their midto late-20s, we’ve done what we can. And we will keep building it.

Is that going to be the main focus of your talks? That’ll certainly be a big part of it. We’ll talk about a lot of other things that people who aren’t students can do, too, right at the moment. We’re going to be really building as much of a resistance as we can to the fossil fuel industry.

It seems to me there might be certain happy congruences with some other cultural trends, like eating locally, which has the side effect that you get to eat better food, and better tasting food. Do you feel like there might be other trends that climate change action can take a hold of? I think that if we make up our minds, we’ll find a transition to a world past fossil fuel. Not easy or simple or cheap, but highly rewarding. I think the world on the other side is more localized, more human-scale, more compatible with who we really are than the very high-consumer world we’ve lived in for the last 50 years. I think that’s the aberration, not what we’re going to build in its place. Ω

What do you think is the most important thing somebody who feels strongly about this and wants to join in your efforts can do? Organize. It’s important to change your lightbulb, but it’s less important than coming together with other people to try and change the system. So if one’s on a college campus at Duke, at UNC, at Davidson, at wherever, the job is clear for the moment. It’s to try

e t a r b e l e C ebrate ❆

Much more about the citizens’ effort to slow global warming can be found at http://350.org.

l e C

wrote about this issue to someone who became politically active?

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In Rotation 16 | Art of the State 17 | Foodfinds 18 | Fi¬m 21

It’s the holidays, a time for giving people movies because you love the movie, and you want them to love the movie, too. by You are bullish and pushy by nature, Bob Grimm and this needs to stop. bgrimm@ This guide here assembles some newsreview.com of the best releases from the past year. Let it assist you in the art of not striking out when handing over a film for them to cherish and enjoy rather than using it as a coaster or squirrel decapitator. And, if you have a friend who would indeed ferociously fling a Blu-ray at a squirrel with the intention of taking the poor thing’s head off—perhaps you should reconsider this friendship. The prices listed are for Blu-rays unless otherwise noted. Also, these were Amazon.com listed prices at press time, and they change frequently. There are bargains all over right now, so shop carefully.

Spielberg!

Oh, the Spielberg fans had a good Blu-ray year. Oh, yes, they did. If I have a movie lover on my list, and if that movie lover isn’t one of those lousy snobs who think Spielberg is a hack, I just buy them two or three of these selections and call it a day. Jaws Universal $13.99 The greatest movie of all time is on Blu-ray, and it’s a winner. The transfer will bring tears to the eyes of those who were fortunate enough to see the film on the big screen in its heyday. It has some great documentaries on it, including “The Shark is Still Working.” Indiana Jones: The Complete Adventure Paramount $64.96 This has all of the Indiana Jones movies on Blu-ray for the first time 14

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in one affordable package. A perfect gift for that friend you sort of like but not to the extent that you’re going to go over a hundred bucks. Not recommended for Secret Santa office parties. Way too extravagant.

tures. You get Psycho, The Birds, Vertigo, North by Northwest and many more. This was my holiday present to myself.

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Anniversary Edition Universal $18.49 This is the old school version of the movie, without the damned walkietalkies replacing the shotguns.

Steve Martin: The Television Stuff (DVD) Shout Factory $29.99 This gathers together all of Steve’s TV specials from the early days, along with music videos and more recent awards show appearances. This is bliss for any Steve Martin fan, and includes new interviews with the man addressing each special and appearance. This is one of my favorite DVDs of the year.

Amazing directors, amazing packages! Tarantino XX 8-Film Collection Lionsgate/Miramax $89.98 All of the films directed by Tarantino these past 20 years, plus True Romance, which he wrote. For less than $100 dollars, you can give that Tarantino fan every movie he has made, or piss off the Tarantino hater for that same amount. You can’t lose! Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection (Limited Edition) Universal $149.99 Fifteen discs loaded with 15 Hitchcock movies and special fea-

Television: retro and new!

Get a Life: the Complete Series (DVD) Shout Factory $30.49 The great Chris Elliot TV show featuring him as a grown up paperboy living in his dad’s house and putting huge toy submarines in his bathtub. This is really weird and always funny.

Louie: Season 2 20th Century Fox $21.99 Louis C.K.’s comedic creation is the best thing on television, and the second season was as good as the first. The third season has aired, but doesn’t have a DVD or Blu-ray yet (although you can watch it on iTunes). Give the gift of laughing so hard their socks go through their nose. Metalocalypse: Season 4 Cartoon Network $21.83 You don’t have to be a fan of death metal to like this hilarious animated series. One of the year’s greatest special features has the Dethklok lead singer reading Shakespeare’s “A Comedy of Errors” for 90 minutes or so.

Complete their Alien collection! Prometheus 20th Century Fox $14.99 Ridley Scott’s return to his Alien universe was a stunner, and the Bluray is packed. Make sure to get 3-D Blu-ray, even if you don’t have 3-D capacity yet. That’s because there are many more bonus features on this disc, and they don’t require the glasses.


Superheroes!

The single coolest Blu-ray of the year!

The Avengers Walt Disney Video $24.96

Little Shop of Horrors: Director’s Cut Warner Home Video $17.99 For the real collector, this Bluray has the single best special feature of any disc this year. You get the original ending for this twisted musical in color, a huge change. Instead of Rick Moranis triumphing over his evil plant, he gets devoured by Audrey II who then proceeds to eat New York City and hump the Brooklyn Bridge.

The Dark Knight Rises Warner Home Video $24.98 The Amazing Spider-Man Paramount $18.96 For my money, The Avengers offered the best superhero ride of the year, with The Dark Knight Rises coming in a distant but solid second. I thought The Amazing Spider-Man was stupid, but I’m in the minority on that one, so I’m sure lots of folks would appreciate seeing it under the tree.

Great new movies they probably haven’t seen!

Magical Mystery Tour Capitol $24.99 George Harrison: Living in the Material World Ume $17.99

Titanic Paramount $21.49 A Night to Remember Criterion $17.81

Wes Anderson rules!

Here are two awesome films about the same thing, both on Bluray for the first time. One has Leonardo DiCaprio getting a couple of cold ones in glorious color, while the other has a bunch of English actors going down with the ship. Both are incredible moviemaking, and worthy of your average stocking.

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Moonrise Kingdom Universal Studios $19.99 While the Blu-ray itself doesn’t have nearly enough supplements, the movie is one of the year’s best, and is currently at the top of my list. It’s gift worthy. Ω

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January 18 & 19, 2013 John Ascuaga’s Nugget Call now for tickets: 356–3300

The Grey Open Road Films $7.96 This one came out early in the year, and I’m afraid the great Liam Neeson performance will get ignored come awards time. Oh well. It does have lots of snow, which is sort of holiday-like. It also has lots of wolves eating people, which might put a damper on somebody’s holiday joy. Give this one to the person who doesn’t mind drinking eggnog while seeing people getting eaten by wolves.

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Chances are, you have a Beatles lover on your list, and they would find great value in the above listed titles. Chances are, you also have a Beatles hater on your list. If, deep down, you actually hate the person as well, give them these discs and enjoy their “WTF?” face. Beatles haters suck, so make them real angry.

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Ruby Sparks 20th Century Fox $11.93 These two gems didn’t light up the box office this year, but they have the capacity of lighting up the various holiday things people put gifts under or around. Lovers of independent, intelligent cinema will see two of the year’s best performances by actresses (Zoe Kazan in Ruby and Aubrey Plaza in Safety).

Yellow Submarine Capitol $22.78

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The toys are back in town Furby

Easy-Bake Ultimate Oven

Hasbro has re-released the ultimate Pet Rock with a few updates. The original Furby’s most expressive features—its eyes—are now LCD displays which convey emotions through flashing hearts or flames. A decade ago, trying to get two cooing Furbys to recognize each other via their infrared signals felt like prodding two anti-social kids into being best friends. Now, instead of relying on infrared signals, Furbys use high-pitched sounds undetectable by the human ear. The switch from infrared to sound allows parents to interact with their Furby through a mobile app. Available for iOS—Android version coming soon—parents can feed their Furby or look up words in the Furbish/English dictionary. The Furby’s improved “memory” adapts the Furby’s behavior based on your interactions. Pet and feed it regularly and your Furby will be kind and playful. Treat it poorly—such as repeatedly pulling its tail—and your Furby will become mischievous and even rude. Continually treating your Furby poorly will bring about their imminent sentient uprising. $60.

Not every high tech update Hasbro introduces into their toy line is successful—we won’t talk about the Deluxe Battleship Movie Edition—but like the Furby, the Easy-Bake Oven receives a fresh revamp that takes the original spirit of the product and gives it a tech overhaul. Gone is the lightbulb-fueled cooking process. Instead, the Ultimate Oven works more like an electric toaster oven. It may seem odd that you still need Easy-Bake mixes—you can’t bake a normal batch of cookies—but Hasbro has remained faithful to the idea that young bakers receive a sense of ownership from a safe product that acts as a transition to the kitchen’s oven. Young bakers need little supervision, allowing them to fully own the creative process within safe limits. With a cupcake creation iOS app, an expanded menu list including pizza and pretzels, as well as everyone’s favorite desserts, and a remodel that recalls what 1950s America believed the future would look like, the EasyBake Ultimate Oven continues it’s almost 50-year reign as a classic holiday toy. $40.

www.hasbro.com

In this edition of our monthly Gadget column, we examine high-tech updates of classic toys.

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www.hasbro.com

Syma S102G Black Hawk Micro Helicopter www.symahelicopters.com

When I was a kid, my RC car had a battery pack the size of a brick— and almost as heavy—and a plastic controller that could double as a meat tenderizer, it was so hefty. Syma’s Black Hawk ditches the battery packs for a USB charging kit and lets you control this sleek, coaxial copter from the free iOS or Android app. Using an infrared attachment, your phone syncs with the copter allowing you to use 3-channel controls or your phone’s accelerometer for motionbased control. The infrared controls are great for dive-bombing the cat or a coworker, but don’t expect to hold the signal outside. The trade-off for losing the battery pack is you only receive a 1:5 ratio of flight to charge time, but it’s enough to allow a little procrastinating escapism. And isn’t that what toys are all about? $30.

—Matthew Craggs


PHOTO/KRIS VAGNER

Student bodies

Andrea Parks is a TMCC business student who curated Skin.

Skin “I was expecting the tattoos,” says Andrea Parks, a business administration student at by Truckee Meadows Community College. Kris Vagner Some of the moles, scars, stubble, veins were a surprise though. So was the tumor. Turns out there’s a lot going on with skin. And with Skin, an exhibit of photographs, curated by Parks, submitted via email by students, staff, faculty and alumni of TMCC. The pictures show anonymous hands, palms, nails, feet, arms, abrasions, freckles, stubble and unidentiSkin is on exhibit until fied patches of skin of all colors and Jan. 15 in the Sturm textures. Parks made 8-by-11-inch digital Gallery inside the prints of each image, 74 so far and countElizabeth Sturm Library ing. (She’ll accept submissions for the at Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 duration of the show.) She hung them edge Dandini Blvd. For to edge, quilt-style, in the Sturm Gallery, information, call the which is a spacious, nicely lit wall in an Visual Arts office at inconspicuous study nook in the Elizabeth 673-7291 or visit www.tmcc.edu/ Sturm Library. To find it, enter the library artgalleries. and turn left after the drinking fountain. Any member of the TMCC community can participate, Parks explains. “Just shoot a picture with a cell phone,” she says. “Teachers have been energetic

about participating.” Some art instructors worked with their students, encouraging them to submit images. Art-major status is not required for inclusion, however. “She got nursing and dental hygiene departments involved,” says Candace Nicol, art instructor and Interim Gallery Curator at the college. “It went a little deeper than what I had envisioned,” Nicol says, noting that the photos collectively show a surprisingly intimate representation of the community’s identity. Nicol conceived the Skin exhibit, which she initially intended to be a visual survey of the campus community’s diversity. She also intended it as part of an effort to build bridges between art students, the campus community, and the entire region’s community. Since taking over the gallery-head position in summer 2011, she’s overseen, for example, an exhibit of photographic prints by adults with severe cognitive disabilities who are involved with the non-profit group Trinity Services.

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As part of her community involvement plan, Nicol has put a couple art exhibits on TMCC’s 2013 schedule that sound like they’ll appeal to a wide slice of Reno culture-makers and image consumers: Art of Cars and Burning Man Culture. She plans to have student involved in the organizational processes for both. She believes her efforts to be inclusive are working. “I kind of stirred things up a little,” she says. “Our attendance is up at receptions.” Her next goal: “I”m trying to figure out ways for galleries to have students more involved.” In addition to the TMCC

Main Gallery, the college’s several hallway galleries offer plenty of opportunities. “I already know how to curate,” Nicol says. “I wanted to hand over a learning experience.” So she invited Parks to receive and organize the email submissions for this show and take care of the administrative duties. The cheerfully professional Parks is employed in the campus art department office and helped with last spring’s Reno Open Studios, so she struck Nicol as a perfect candidate. Another action Nicol hopes to take is to get Skin, a symbol of inclusion itself, on permanent display on campus. “We have tons of wall space on campus,” she says. She sees that space as a one more opportunity for community. If you’re a TMCC student, staff or faculty member, or alumnus, it’s not too late to join the community effort by sending in some skin. Email photos to aparks@tmcc.edu. Ω

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Top shelf Macho Tequila’s Homestyle Mexican Food 2144 Greenbrae Drive, Sparks, 870-1177 Going to a place called Macho Tequila’s, I figured I needed to gather my rowdiest friends since I could only by K.J. Sullivan assume we would drink mucho tequila. With that in mind, I brought ksullivan@ Casey, Kira and Brett to Macho newsreview.com Tequila for a night of tequila drinking and Mexican food. Macho Tequila’s has only been open since September and is run by a fatherand-son team that has struck the

PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

feel better along with some Pacificos and Modellos ($3.99). The Margaritas were very good and did not have that fake mix taste to them. The beers arrived quickly, which tided us over while we reviewed the menu and munched on chips. Red and green salsas were offered, and the red had almost a mole taste to it. I love having meals with a group because I can try a little bit of everything. Casey went with the combo plate ($11.99), which he ordered with a chicken taco, beef enchilada and chile relleno. I had a bite of the relleno, and I liked the spice on it. The taco was fat, and the chicken had a smoky spice to it. Brett got a twoitem combo ($9.99), and ordered a chile relleno and shredded beef enchilada. Weirdly, his chile relleno was not as spicy as Casey’s, which I guess shows they use fresh ingredients. Kira went with the grilled chicken chipotle ($11.95), which was two chicken breasts marinated in chipotle salsa. The chicken was moist and flavorful with a nice chipotle rub. I went with the Danny Boy Mix Fajitas ($12.99), which came with shrimp, chicken and steak. The fajitas were steaming when they arrived at the table. I was impressed by the amount of meat served with the dish, especially the shrimp, but unfortunately, the steak was a little dry. The peppers were nice and crunchy, and the tortillas seemed fresh. Kira and I definitely had the best dishes of the evening. My night out with friends ended up being more subdued than it could have been had we had straight tequila, but we still had a good time and a good meal. The owners are giving this place everything they have and seem open to suggestions. As soon as they add more tequila, I would definitely come back and give them another “shot.” Ω

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gene pool lottery as they both look about 25. The father cooks, while the son seems to do just about everything else, including serving as the waiter and bartender. Macho Tequila has taken over a space in a small strip mall in Sparks and has done some major renovations as the place is comfortable but still has an older feel to it. Since I brought my rowdy crew, I figured the first thing we needed was tequila. I hate to report that Macho Tequila does not live up to their name, as the best tequila they Macho Tequila is open had was Hornitos. We talked to our 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. waiter about it, and he explained that the last bottle of Patrón had been consumed by the table next us. Look, Patrón is fine but certainly not the “best” bottle I was expecting from a place called Macho Tequila. Unfortunately, they didn’t have much as far as tequila options and nothing top shelf. Our waiter indicated they were trying to get more and were open to suggestions, so our table gladly offered what we would like to see in the future. I was feeling a little miffed about the tequila but figured a pitcher of Margaritas ($19.99) would make us

Father-and-son team Ricardo “Ricky” Gutierrez and Daniel “Danny Boy” Galaviz Arriaga run Macho Tequila’s.

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Direct foul

1

Playing for Keeps In assessing Playing for Keeps, I noticed something about the title. The first word contains the letters P-A-I-N. Oh, I felt pain watching this. I felt a distinctive pain in my face as it protested the admittance of this shit into my eyes and ears. I’m on precarious terms with my own face at this time. It may never trust me again after putting it through such an atrocity. Gerard Butler is a very likeable actor who by can’t find a good script to save his life. This Bob Grimm one has him as an ex-pro soccer player lookbgrimm@ ing to make amends with his wife (Jessica newsreview.com Biel) while trying to break into the world of sports broadcasting. He winds up coaching his kid’s soccer team while selfishly pursuing his engaged wife. Meanwhile, a bevy of soccer moms try to bed him. We’re talking high art here. The soccer moms are played by Catherine Zeta-Jones, Uma Thurman, both former A-list

producer in the credits. Maybe he used his distinct, snarly Scottish charm to seduce them into something beneath their station. Or maybe they got paid a shit-pile of money. We are talking “swimming pool in the living room next to the golden cow” money. I’m going to assume that a shit-pile of money was used to lure Dennis Quaid into this thing. Then again, who knows? It’s Hollywood. Anything can happen. Seduction by Butler is not out of the question. Gabriele Muccino, who made the reasonably good The Pursuit of Happyness but then farted in cinemagoers’ faces with Seven Pounds directs the movie. With Seven Pounds equated to a fart, I can tell you that Playing for Keeps is much worse. I won’t type what it can be equated to, but you don’t want it in your face, unless you are very strange. One of the few good things about the film is that Butler is allowed to keep his real accent, rather than doing one of his piss poor American accents. Granted, it’s difficult to understand him at times, and there’s no way ESPN would ever hire him to do sports announcing unless they want their viewers squinting and saying, “What?” a lot. Still, being that Butler usually sounds like a Bmovie gangster when he tries to sound American, his real accent is an improvement. Of all the stars here, Thurman fares the worst as a crazily jealous wife looking to get revenge sex on her hubby (Quaid). As I watched her embarrass herself mightily, the phrase “She was in Kill Bill!” kept repeating in my head. Greer has a couple of cringe-worthy scenes where she throws herself at Butler and cries, while Zeta-Jones simply delivers bad material with a certain amount of grace. Butler and Biel are actually OK, and this movie would’ve been much better had it just been about them and their little soccer playing brat. Their story arc eventually goes to that ridiculous place where most crap romances go, but had they actually had a decent script to go with their decent screen chemistry, this might’ve stayed off my year’s worst list. As it stands, Playing for Keeps will be on my year’s worst list with bells on, and so be it. It seems that every year somebody sneaks a junk movie like this into the awards season. This one gets an award all right: Biggest Waste of Talent and Time. Ω

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“Do you like movies about gladiators?”

OPINION

actresses, and the usually reliable Judy Greer. All three wonderful actresses are reduced to stereotypes. Their roles are nothing short of degrading. Zeta-Jones plays the “I will help your career if you do me” soccer mom, Thurman plays the “My husband is cheating on me, so please do me” soccer mom, and Greer plays the “I’m all alone and crazy … there are venomous snakes in my purse that recite poetry about bugs and the voices say I will choke you … so please, just do me” soccer mom. As this thing played out, I wondered how all of this talent got attached to such wretched cinematic excrement. I saw that Butler was a

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This piss poor Saw rip-off had me missing Saw movies—and I hate the Saw movies. After an interesting opening where a young girl (Emma Fitzpatrick) survives a dance club massacre, things go relentlessly downhill. This features yet another serial killer that has the time and resources to create huge Rube Goldberg killing machines and traps. This guy, who wears an oily black mask, actually turns an entire building into a deathtrap full of trip wires, swinging blades and squishing elevators. It’s all extremely tedious, and for lovers of a good gore movie, the bloodletting in this film is highly unimaginative. It’s strange that a studio would release total garbage like this in the middle of the holiday season. It’s a total bummer. I totally don’t want any eggnog now. Nobody is getting anything for Christmas this year.

3

I love Steven Spielberg, I love Daniel Day-Lewis, but I do not love this movie. In fact, I don’t even like it. While Day-Lewis is astoundingly good in the title role, the movie around him is a drab, lifeless retelling of the final days of Abraham Lincoln’s life. Spielberg makes this a darkened room political potboiler, chronicling how Lincoln and his staff managed to get slavery abolished in the waning days of the Civil War. Sally Field is cast as Lincoln’s troubled wife. While Mary Todd’s plight deserves a movie of its own, it’s not given much consideration here, nor is the life of Lincoln’s eldest son (an utterly wasted Joseph Gordon-Levitt). The movie’s final act treats the death of Lincoln like a strange afterthought. They would’ve been better off ending the film before his assassination. I expect Day-Lewis to be in the Oscar hunt. He could actually win for this movie, a film that doesn’t live up to his magnificence.

Flight

Denzel Washington stars and Robert Zemeckis directs this uneven film about an airline pilot with mad flying skills and a mad problem with alcohol and drugs. Washington is Whip Whitaker, a man who ties one on the night before a flight that first requires him to pilot through a horrible storm and then results in a spectacular crash. Whip performs miraculous feats as the plane goes down despite an alcohol level off the charts. Washington is great in the role, keeping the movie worth watching even when it gets a bit trite. The first half hour of this movie is a powerhouse. The remaining nearly two hours are OK, but nothing like the punch of that flight sequence. Sure to score Washington on Oscar nomination. A decent return to live action for Zemeckis, who had gotten all caught up in those creepy motion capture animation films like The Polar Express.

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Killing Them Softly

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This is an amazing achievement in filmmaking. It’s one of the year’s best movies, and easily one of the best uses of the 3-D medium. Director Ang Lee is a creative force that cannot be deterred or stopped. Life of Pi is his most splendorous and enchanting film to date, and this is the guy who gave us Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Suraj Sharma plays Pi, a young man who winds up on a lifeboat with a tiger after a storm sinks a ship carrying his family and its zoo animals. Pi must learn to appease the tiger, the tiger must accept or eat him, and that’s the plot of the movie. The story is told in flashback with an older Pi (Irrfan Khan) being interviewed by a writer (Rafe Spall). This is a great screen adventure full of countless magical moments and a sure contender for Best Picture.

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Skyfall

This officially stands as my all-time favorite Bond film. That’s coming from somebody who really hasn’t cared much for the Bond films. Daniel Craig had been my favorite Bond since Sean Connery and, with this fine entry, has actually become my favorite Bond. Sam Mendes directs this installment with a depth and level of excitement I haven’t detected before in the series—although Casino Royale came close—and Javier Bardem, as a former British agent gone bonkers, is a Bond villain for the ages. Great action scenes, fun homages to the series and a nice supporting turn from Judi Dench as M make this a Bond to be reckoned with, and truly enjoyed. Also stars Ralph Fiennes and a decent song from Adele. I don’t know how many Bond films Craig has left in him, but I hope it’s a lot.

Life of Pi

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Red Dawn

This one languished on the studio shelf for three years; I wish it had stayed there. I would say it’s the equal of the 1984 original, for they are both pieces of shit. Chris Hemsworth and Josh Peck replace Patrick Swayze and Charlie Sheen as two brothers who become experts in guerrilla warfare after the Pacific Northwest is invaded. This time the culprit is North Korea, although that happened in post-production, because they shot the movie with China as the invading enemy. The movie shows some promise in the buildup, but goes off the rails in the second half, becoming too much like its ridiculous and melodramatic predecessor. If I had to choose, I would say this one is better than the John Milius original. I really hated this new movie, so that’ll give you an idea just how much I hated the first crack at it.

Brad Pitt stars as Jackie, a shady type brought in to clean up a mess after an organized crime card game is robbed. His solution is to kill some people and get the game back on track, and he does it in a way that’s both scary and fascinating to watch. Directed by Andrew Dominik, who also directed Pitt in The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, this is a good-looking movie that takes it sweet time. It’s also ultra violent, with Ray Liotta enduring a screen beating unlike anything you’ve seen before. James Gandolfini shows up as a grouchy hitman who’s similar to a washedup Tony Soprano after the wife and kids have left. Pitt is just a bona fide movie star here, commanding all of his screen moments with seemingly effortless authority. It’s a great movie to look at, but it isn’t for everybody.

5

Lincoln

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2

And with this, the suffering of discerning moviegoers finally ends. No more Bella pouting, no more Edward swooning, no more Taylor abs (OK, I admit the Taylor abs are wonderful). Bella is now a super vampire capable of taking down mountain lions and sitting in a chair real fast. The head vampires of the world hear that Bella has had a baby—and a weird-looking CGI baby at that—and they look to start a vampire war with Dakota Fanning and Michael Sheen as their overacting leaders. The previous film showed some promise, but this one (both directed by Bill Condon) tosses that promise aside and reverts to the awfulness that pervaded the earlier films. Stephenie Meyer has hinted the saga could go on with Taylor’s Jacob and the grown up Bella Baby. No, this needs to stop. It needs to stop now.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

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Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

!

Itʼs happen ing in

FAMILY CITY OF SPARKS TOY DRIVE The City of Sparks, Swire Coca-Cola, KTVN and the Reno News & Review are sponsoring the inaugural City of Sparks Toys for Tots Toy Drive. Everyone is encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped gift to toy drop-off locations in the area, through 12/14: All Walmart, Toys-R-Us and Babies-R-Us locations, City of Sparks City Hall, Swire Coca-Cola, KTVN, Intuit, John Ascuaga’s Nugget, ToysR-Us Express and Scheels at Legends, Games Galore at Meadowood Mall, Alf Sorensen Community Center and the Reno News & Review. The City of Sparks will also join KTVN for the Share your Christmas Drive, encouraging people to bring toys to thetrain station on Victorian Avenue on 12/14 from 6AM-6PM. http://www. CityofSparks.us or (775) 353-7856 HOLIDAYS AROUND THE WORLD Celebrate the holiday season with the Reno Pops Orchestra! This popular annual concert will feature several of the best holiday arrangements from Carmen Dragon and more! F, 12/14, 7:30PM. Free. The Rock Church, 4950 Vista Blvd. (775) 355-7888 THE NOTE-ABLES Come hear a heartwarming performance of holiday favorites by the Note-Ables. The Note-Ables is a nonprofit organization that provides music programs and music therapy services. Sa, 12/15, 1-2PM, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700 MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET: THE MUSICAL Tahoe Players present the holiday favorite. Sa, 12/15, 2 & 7PM and Su, 12/16, 2 & 5PM, $15-$18. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 THE NUTCRACKER Reno Dance Company Productions presents its annual performance of the Nutcracker Ballet. F, 12/21, 8PM, Sa, 12/22, 2 & 8PM, Su, 12/23, 2 & 7PM and M, 12/24, 2PM. $21.95+. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

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FUN WITH DRAWING Give your child a lifelong gift learning the fundamentals of drawing. Your child will learn value, shading and an introduction to perspective while developing techniques. Th, 5:15-6:15PM through 12/20. Opens 11/8, $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385 BEADS AND BOOKS! Learn basic beading techniques with volunteer beading expert, Jamie, and work on projects with other beaders. First Su of every month, 1-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 DEEP FREEZE SOFTBALL LEAGUE Softball enthusiasts ages 20-60 brave freezing temperatures and wet conditions to pursue their love of the sport. Individual shirts will be awarded to first place... M-Su through 12/13, $400 per team. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385

MUSIC JOEL EDWARDS Th, 12/13, 5:30PM , F, 12/14, 6PM and Sa, 12/15, 6PM , no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget (775) 356-3300 SHAKA F, 12/14, 6PM , Sa, 12/15, 6PM and Su, 12/16, 6PM , no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget (775) 356-3300 PATRICK COOPER W, 12/19, 6PM , no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ROSENDO Th, 12/20, 5:30PM , F, 12/21, 6PM and Sa, 12/22, 6PM , no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget (775) 356-3300 MAYAN MAYBE? END OF THE WORLD PARTY It’s the party to end all parties. Great Basin Brewing Company, in conjunction with the Mayan calendar, has scheduled an End of the World extravaganza... F, 12/21, 3PM , no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! TYLER STAFFORD F, 12/21, 6PM , Sa, 12/22, 6PM and Su, 12/23, 6PM , no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 END OF THE WORLD WINTER SOLSTICE PARTY With Renegade and the Wicked Hicks F, 12/21, 7PM , no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 RENEGADE HOLIDAY SHOW F, 12/21, 9:30PM , no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 GREG GOLDEN BAND HOLIDAY BASH Sa, 12/22, 7PM , no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 JACK PRYBYLSKI W, 12/26, 6PM , no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 SCOT MARSHALL Th, 12/27, 5:30PM , F, 12/28, 6PM and Sa, 12/29, 6PM , no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 DJ LARRY WILLIAMS DJ Larry Williams at Trader Dick’s. No cover. F, 10PM, Sa, 10PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 JAZZ With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 KARAOKE ASPEN GLEN BAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd. 89436 / (775) 354-2400 SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861 OPEN MIC GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY! CITY OF SPARKS Mayor: Geno Martini. Council members: Julia Ratti, Ed Lawson, Ron Smith, Mike Carrigan, Ron Schmitt. City Manager: Shaun Carey. Parks & Recreation Director: Tracy Domingues. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 3532311 or through the City of Sparks website. WEB RESOURCES: www.sparksitshappeninghere.com www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com THIS SECTION IS PROVIDED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE BY THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW AND IS NOT FUNDED OR AFFILIATED WITH THE CITY OF SPARKS


Season of

Giving

We're extremely fortunate to live in a community which supports – in a big way – charitable and non-profit causes and organizations. This time of year, people give more of their time, money and resources more than any other season. The need, however, for most non-profits, extends well beyond the holiday season. So please take a few minutes to learn about some of our region's non-profit organizations on the following pages as we celebrate the “Season of Giving”, while keeping them in mind throughout the year. ACCEPT American Red Cross, Northern Nevada Chapter Angels in the Community Animal Ark Artown Austin's House Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada Boys & Girls Club of Truckee Meadows Boys & Girls Club of Western Nevada

Capital City Arts Initiative Capital City Circles Initiative CARE Chest of Sierra Nevada Carson City Symphony Association Casa de Vida Children’s Cabinet* Citicare Committee to Aid Abused Women Community Foundation of Western Nevada Family Promise*

Please join the RN&R in congratulating board members from the following organizations, recognized by the Community Foundation of Western Nevada as exemplary and generous leaders in the field of philanthropy, with their “100% Giving Board Award” for 2012 . This list consists of 71 organizations led by 975 board members who have contributed a total of $2,000,000 to support their organizations’ operating expenses:

First Tee of Northern Nevada FISH Emergency Services Food Bank of Northern Nevada For Kids Foundation Friends of Nevada Wilderness Friends of Washoe County Library Girl Scouts of the Sierra Nevada* Great Basin Outdoor School HAWC Community Health Center Hometown Health Hosanna Home

Junior League of Reno Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful* KNPB Lassen Land and Trails Trust Mile High Jazz Band Association National Automobile Museum National Judicial College Nature Conservancy Nevada Diabetes Association Nevada Health Centers, Inc. Nevada Humane Society

Organizations in BOLD are featured in our “Season of Giving” section, on the following pages *these five organizations have received the 100% Board Giving Award for five consecutive years

Renown Health Renown Health Foundation Renown Regional Medical Center Renown South Meadows Medical Center River Wranglers Ronald McDonald House Charities of Northern Nevada Safe Haven Rescue Zoo Special Recreation Services Step 2 Tahoe Institute for Natural Science

Nevada Land Conservancy Nevada Museum of Art Nevada Rural Counties RSVP Program Nevada Wilderness Project Nevada Women's Fund Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer Foundation Pet Network Humane Society* Reno Chamber Orchestra Reno Little Theater Reno Philharmonic Association

Tahoe Rim Trail Association Tahoe Youth and Family Services Tahoe-Pyramid Bikeway Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum Truckee Donner Land Trust Truckee Meadows Tomorrow United Way Veterans Guest House Volunteers of America Greater Sacramento & Northern Nevada

500 E. Fourth St. rEno, nV 89512 Po Box 5099 rEno, nV 89513-5099 (775)322-7073 www.CatholiC CharitiESnorthE rnnEVada.org Catholic Charities of northern nevada has been serving those in need since 1941. with nine programs and services, we offer hope and help to people with services and resources that promote self sufficiency. the nine programs offered are the St. Vincent’s dining room, St. Vincent’s Food Pantry, Emergency assistance, adoptions, immigration assistance, St. Vincent’s thrift Shop, holy Child Early learning Center, Kids to Seniors Korner, and the St. Vincent’s affordable housing Program. last year, we were able to help over 519,000 people who were facing obstacles such as food insecurities or loss of employment.

“No One Does More to Ease the Pain of Poverty.”

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With the increase in demand for our services, our supporters have never been as important in our mission to help ease the pain of poverty amongst our neighbors. Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada is committed to meet the demand, and in order to do this, we rely on volunteer, in kind, and monetary support from our fellow community members. In any given month, over 40,000 people will come to us for food, and, at the same time, over 5,000 volunteer hours are logged in all nine programs. Whether you would like to volunteer in the Food Pantry delivering food to families or donate items to our Thrift Store, your support is critical in our efforts to help the disadvantaged in our community.

Volunteer: With nine programs, there is a variety of work to be done. From serving food in the Dining Room to sorting donations in the Thrift Shop, you will contribute, first hand, in fulfilling our mission.

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Donate: Both in kind and monetary donations are important in our everyday operations. Our Thrift Shop accepts donations of furniture, clothing, electronics, and other household items to sell in our store to support other programs. Monetary donations allow us to purchase items that are in high demand at a lower cost, such as food. Host an Event: Whether it be a food drive for the pantry or a school dance to raise dollars for our agency, we will support your efforts to help. We are always looking for groups to help us raise awareness of the work we do.

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CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER 8 5 3 H A S K E L L S T, R E N O 7 7 5 - 8 2 6 - 5 1 4 4 • W W W. P R E G N A N C Y R E N O . C O M Crisis Pregnancy Center exists to help women who are facing unplanned pregnancy and need answers. We’re here to talk to you about your situation, provide accurate information and help you explore all your options. Our Earn While You Learn program helps first time moms (and dads) learn how to be the best parents they can be. This program helps you to understand what to expect in pregnancy & beyond. Through regular lessons that include videos & worksheets, you’ll learn important & interesting information about your pregnancy and your baby. There are a number of topics to choose from and our staff will put together a lesson plan that is unique to your needs. You will work with a parenting instructor who will be able to help you better understand the challenges and joys that lie ahead for you and your baby. As a part of our Earn While You Learn parenting program, you will earn credits to “purchase” materials like maternity & baby clothes, blankets, diapers, formula and other much needed supplies. We now offer Vantage Point School For Men– creating honorable men for our time. We can help with fatherhood, identity, self worth, preparing for the future, providing for loved ones, anger & more.

WAY S T O V O L U N T E E R

Here to help, not to judge.

• Serve as a volunteer counselor, receptions or office volunteer • Plan a workday for your youth or women’s group at the center

• Host a baby shower at your church • Volunteer your computer & organizational skills at our administrative office • Donate maternity clothes & 0-24 months clothes

FINANCIAL SUPPORT OPPORTUNITIES • Designate your United Way pledge to to CPC • Make a monthly or annual pledge to CPC

• Tax Deductive gifts of any kind • Includes us in your planned giving

C H A N G I N G T H E L I V E S O F C AT S I N O U R C O M M U N I T Y ( 7 7 5 ) 5 4 4 - 4 4 7 5 • W W W. F R O N N . O R G Feline Rescue of Northern Nevada is a 501c3 non-profit organization that serves as a safe haven and placement partner for geriatric, disabled and special needs cats. In addition, our Cats in Crisis program provides food for over 700 feral cats in maintained colonies, cat care packages distributed through St. Vincent’s Food Pantry and temporary boarding for families in transition. We also provide low cost spay/ neuter vouchers with no income or geographic restrictions.For more information about the valuable services we provide in our community, visit our website at www.FRONN.org or like us on Facebook.

! Kiwi is a cancer survivor and amputee who resides at our Feline Sanctuary & Adoption Center.

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HELP MAKE A DIFFERENCE Donate - Your monetary donation of any amount helps grow our community programs & provide veterinary services. You may donate online at www.FRONN.org or mail a check to P.O. Box 6322 Reno, NV 89513 Sponsor - Meet our residents and provide sponsorship on our website for your favorite FRoNN cat.

WISH LIST • Clay cat litter • White vinegar • Paper towels • First Class postage stamps • Ziploc sandwich & quart size baggies • Fancy Feast canned food • Dry cat food

• Gift cards for Wal-Mart, Costco, PetSmart • Trash bags, kitchen size • Liquid laundry detergent (HE) • Dish soap (E-mail us at info@fronn.org for drop-off locations)

Boarding - Your boarding fees at our Cozy Cattery Boarding Resort generate income for our community programs. Learn more about our fabulous resort at www.COZYCATTERY.com


M AKIN G H UN G E R H IS TORY

(775)331.3663 • www.fbnn.org The Food Bank of Northern Nevada is a regional food distribution and support system for more than 130 partner agencies serving northern Nevada and the eastern Sierra. The Food Bank helps to serve an average of 97,000 people each month, and half of those are children and seniors, the most vulnerable members of our population. The Food Bank’s partner agencies include emergency food pantries, senior centers, low income day care centers, emergency shelters and more.

The Food Bank of Northern Nevada’s mission is to end hunger in our region through direct services, advocacy, outreach and education.

Get Involved

Ways to help:

The Food Bank of Northern Nevada could certainly not accomplish what we do without the tremendous support of the caring people, businesses and organizations in this community. The people and organizations that choose to spend their money, time and effort supporting the Food Bank are creating hope for the many people in need right here in our region.

Advocate: Use your voice to educate others about the issues of hunger in our region. Each person that joins the fight against hunger brings us that much closer to solving it. Donate: With each dollar donated, the Food Bank can help provide 4 meals to the hungry. Every can of non-perishable food donated makes a difference in the lives of those who are hungry. You can organize a food drive of your own any time of year. Volunteer: It would be impossible to distribute over 10 million pounds of food without the help of many caring hands. The Food Bank of Northern Nevada is always looking for the hands to help us feed the hungry in our region. The full volunteer schedule is available at www.fbnn.org.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

WWW.BLACKROCKDESERT.ORG (775) 337-1717 Friends of Black Rock / High Rock is the only local organization whose sole focus is protecting more than 1.2 million acres of the National Conservation Area and surrounding public lands in Northwestern Nevada. These magnificent lands need cleaning up, trail work, and new education and community outreach programs to better share its unique assets. Friends of Black Rock / High Rock has a strong vision and newly inspired partners to meet the needs for restoration and stewardship of the land you so love. We love them, too. Our projects support everyone who loves and cherishs their freedom to roam and discover something which is hard to find today - solitude and open space. These are your public lands and we are honored to be the caretakers on your behalf in northwestern Nevada. Thank you for your faith in our work ahead.

MAKE A REAL DIFFERENCE A few of our new programs in 2013 to support this valuable work include: New volunteer projects: Volunteers are the cornerstone of conservation. Thousands of hours of donated time are logged in each year providing support to land stewardship, wildlife and mitigating impacts from climate extremes. For the full 2013 schedule of projects: email us at volunteer@blackrockdesert.org

• Creating clean safe, spaces for families and your children to camp and explore. • Providing the delicate task of removing invasive weeds chocking out threatened fish species in Soldier Meadows.

• Removing tens of thousands of tons of non-historical metal and debris from open spaces where wildlife deserves to roam free. • Improving hiking trails at Steven’s Camp in High Rock Canyon.

• Creating new workshops, educational programs and film events sharing the archeology, palentology, geology and rick cultural history with our young people.

Donate today with your financial gift and your time • www.blackrockdesert.org

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Please give me a...

Adult Cats $10 Adult Dogs $45 Kittens $30 All animals spayed/neutered, vaccinated and microchipped.

Nevada HumaN e Society 2825 LoNgLey LaNe, ReN o, 775-856-2000 www.N evadaH umaNeSociety.oRg Nevada Humane Society (NHS) is an open-admission, no-kill animal welfare organization. their mission is to create a no-kill community in washoe county through innovative adoption programs, low-cost spay/neuter services and a free animal Help desk. they strive to provide excellent animal care, great customer service and involve the community in our work. in 2011, NHS adopted out 9,340 pets with a 94% community-wide save rate for all animals coming into local shelters, making washoe county the safest metropolitan area in the country for homeless pets.

upcomiNg eveNtS: A No Kill Shelter Creating a No Kill Community

adoptioN HouRS: SuN-FRi 11am-6:30 pm, Sat. 10am-6:30pm

Home 4 tHe HoLidayS pet adoptioN dRive Now tHRougH JaNuaRy 1 our goal is to find homes for 1,200 pets. adoptions fees are $45 for adult dogs, $10 for adult cats & $30 for kittens under 4 months of age. every dog, cat & kitten is spay or neutered, vaccinated & microchipped. Senior citizens may adopt pets 6 years of age & older for free.

LigHtS oF Love a special Holiday Light display in remembrance & in honor of our pets. Honor your 4-legged loved ones, past & present and help homeless animals this holiday season. $10 contribution for a white light for each pet you wish to remember or colored light for each pet you with to honor.

NORTHERN NEVADA HOPES 775-786-4673 • WWW.NNHOPES.COM

OUR MISSION: Northern Nevada HOPES is dedicated to building a healthier community by providing coordinated care and support for individual and family wellness. Our community health center combines primary care, medical specialties, behavioral health and prevention with a team of experienced professionals who are committed to high-quality care. Northern Nevada HOPES is your local Community Health Center, providing an integrated, teambased approach to affordable healthcare and support services in downtown Reno. Whether you have great insurance coverage, or none at all, we’re here to serve you. Make an Appointment: (775) 786-4673 • nnhopes.org

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: Get the friendly, quality care you need – all in one convenient location.

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• Primary Care • Specialty Care • HIV, Hep C, STI Testing • Mental Health Counseling • Substance Use Counseling • Support Groups • Food Pantry and Garden

HOW YOU CAN HELP: Donate: Give individuals and families the care they need today. Donate online at www.nnhopes.org/donate, and make a positive, lasting impact in our community. Volunteer: You can help build a healthier community by volunteering at HOPES. Whether it’s helping with street outreach or filling our food pantry, you can make a difference. Visit www.nnhopes.org/get-involved/volunteer to learn more.


ImmunIze nevada 5250 neIl Road, SuI te 103, Reno, n evada 89502 P: (775) 870-4338| F: (775) 870-4638 www.I mmunIzenevada.oRg Immunize nevada is a statewide non-profit organization committed to protecting the health of nevada residents and decreasing the incidence of vaccine preventable diseases. as our state continues to experience immunization gaps at all ages – a baby’s first years, adolescence and adulthood – Immunize nevada works to raise awareness about the importance of timely immunizations and resources throughout the lifespan. Families struggling with the cost of immunizations are most likely facing additional problems related to food, housing, employment, transportation, lack of insurance and more. through community partnerships, advocacy, and immunization education for parents, health care professionals and community members, Immunize nevada works to alleviate these and other barriers, so that nevadans can stay safe and healthy.

Spread Joy not Influenza during the Holiday Season. If you haven’t received

way S t o g e t I n v o l v e d

your flu vaccine, it’s not too late.

a donation of just $15 provides a flu vaccination to a child keeping him healthy, in school and learning. other needs include clinic supplies such as band-aids, alcohol wipes, hand sanitizer, tissue and stickers. volunteers are always welcome to help with office tasks such as mailings, database input and accounting services, as well as assistance at community clinics by helping families fill out paperwork and providing educational information. Bilingual volunteers are especially important at community events.

NortherN Nevada ChildreN’s CaNCer FouNdatioN 3550 BarroN Way, #5 a, reNo, Nv 89511 P: (775) 825-0888 | F: (775) 825–4726 e: iNFo@NvChildreNsCaNCer.org W: WWW.NvChildreNsCaNCer.org Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer Foundation (NNCCF) is the region’s only organization dedicated solely to childhood cancer. our mission is to enhance the quality of life for children with cancer and their families by providing financial assistance and compassionate support programs while advocating for increased research funds and raising public awareness. Programs and services include: Family assistance Fund, inspire survivorship program and scholarships, emotional support, family outings, a holiday adopt-a-Family program and the st. Baldrick’s head shaving event to raise funds for research. all programs and services are given at no cost to the families. to date, the foundation has helped local families with more than $1.6 million in direct financial assistance and raised $1.2 million for research by hosting a local st. Baldrick’s head shaving event. Twig & Turtle Photography

Way s t o h e l P

Make a big difference for a little hero!

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Celebrate this holiday season by giving the gift of hope to families in need. Please consider making a one-time or recurring donation of $5, $10 or any amount to help ensure families receive the financial and emotional support to get them through their difficult journey. donations can be accepted online at www.nvchildrenscancer.org, by calling 775-825-0888 or by texting NNCCF to 56512 and clicking the link to donate. |

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KIWANIS CLUB OF DOWNTOWN SPARKS 2500 VALLEY ROAD SUITE A, RENO (775-337-1717) WWW.KIWANISBIKES.ORG Kiwanis Club of Downtown Sparks serves the children of the world and their families! Our club volunteers teach Bicycling Education and Repair Programs. This allows us to donate over 1,000 bikes and helmets to the children of our local schools and youth programs annually. We join with local schools to empower Future Leaders through the Builders Club at Sparks Middle School and the Key Club at Spanish Springs High School. Our Aktion Club for adults with disabilities is co-sponsored with Renown Skilled Nursing. Other club activities include Community Book Shelf, PTP Dolls, Make and Take Crafts for kids and the ELIMINATE Project.

Kiwanis Bike Program...teaching bike safety, bike repair and giving back to the community!

WAY S T O V O L U N T E E R

WAY S T O G I V E

• Teach crafts • Sew and deliver PTP dolls • Collect and deliver books • Donate supplies, money or time for craft events

• Help teach • Donate bikes and parts • Donate $10 – provides a helmet for child • Donate $25 – provides a bike and helmet for child

Thank you to ALL our Business, Government agencies and Community Partners who support us. A special thanks to the Fire and Police Dept., RTC and Waste Management who collect bikes. Thanks to our financial donors, American Family Insurance, Grassroots Books, Burning Man local and national, Reno and Sparks Save Mart, Walmart and LDS Trucking. Thanks to all of you who partner with us!

Life can unravel in a momentespecially when a child gets sick. This holiday season help RMHC keep families together when their worlds unravel. Donate

Give the Gift of Togetherness. Donate Online: www.RMHC-Reno.org 28   |   RN&R   |   DECEMBER 13, 2012

Give the gift of togetherness by donating to RMHC today. Donate online at www.RMHC-Reno.org.

Give the Gift of Time

Donate your time by making a meal, baking or volunteering so that our families have more time to spend together. Call 775-322-4663


Ve ter ans Guest H o use 880 Lo cust stree t, ren o 89502 (775)324-6958 • w w w.Ve ter ansGuestH o use.orG Happy Holidays from the Veterans Guest House! the Veterans Guest House provides temporary housing to veterans and their families who are receiving medical treatment in the reno/sparks area. the Guest House was founded in 1994 when a group of Veterans realized that other Veterans were receiving care at the Veterans Hospital and their family members were sleeping in their cars. they did not have the means to stay anywhere else. today the Guest House has 17 beds in two homes and provided nearly 4,500 guest nights of lodging in 2012. while guests are encouraged to donate $25 per night, in order to defray costs, no one is turned away for an inability to pay. the Guest House relies entirely on donations and does not receive federal or state funds for its operating costs, which total approximately $300,000 a year.

way s t o s u p p o r t t H e G u e s t H o u s e

“All gave some, some gave all.” The Veterans Guest House gives all U.S. military veterans and their families the honor and support they deserve!

• Donations – The Guest House relies on donations from the community for its operations. please consider including the Guest House in your charitable giving. • Volunteer – Throughout the year the Guest House has events, projects and other ongoing volunteer opportunities for those who wish to help our veterans and their families. • Wish List – Food, household cleaning products, paper products and gift cards are always greatly appreciated. wish List items help make the Guest House feel more like home for our veterans and their family members. please log on to www.veteransguesthouse.org or call 775-324-6958 for more information on the Guest House, who we serve and how you can help support the Guest House.

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30   |   RN&R   |   DECEMBER 13, 2012

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Good times, bad times The Big Bad The Big Bad, which has undergone numerous style, lead singer and name changes, has been together for roughly a year by Nora Heston and a half, but according to drummer Morgan Hough, the band almost didn’t happen. Hough originally blew off bandmate Spencer Kilpatrick (guitar, tambourine and vocals), when Kilpatrick approached Hough about jamming together.

PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

can, and none of that will change even if we’re joined by another man [or] woman.” “As of right now, our style of music is R&B,” adds Kilpatrick. “But it’s kind of like how the Stones would do R&B, like how they did ‘Ain’t Too Proud to Beg.’” It’s a good thing The Big Bad, previously known as both Boogie Monster and The Big Bad Boogie Monster, have been able to stick together through their ever-changing group, because without music, their futures look bleak. According to the group, career options for the band members outside of music include experimental drug tester and/or being homeless. “If I weren’t a musician I’d be sad … more so than I am being a musician,” says Philbin. “I’d have a valuable college degree, a savings account and more money.” Kilpatrick and Philbin both agree that they want their listeners to dance when they hear their music, but Hough admits he makes music for more selfish reasons. “I’m a needy bastard,” he says. “I don’t care what people get from my music. I just care about what I get from what people get from my music.” The band’s resúmé includes playing at Se7en, BLCC, Strega, Shea’s, Street Vibrations, The Holland Project, Lincoln Lounge and The Alley, with upcoming shows at Knitting Factory and Ruben’s Cantina. “My favorite gig I’ve played as a part of The Big Bad continues to be the most recent spot we’ve played,” Philbin says. “With each show, the band gets even tighter, and the crowd continues to get more and more excited with what we have to show.” Kilpatrick says the band works well together, because they get along, collaborate as a cohesive unit, and have a really laidback vibe. The band members all agree that a lot of musical talent exists in the biggest little city. “Seriously ... really, seriously, I love the Reno music scene,” Kilpatrick says. “Reno has too much talent for one city. It’s almost unfair. I can’t wait ‘til all of the good bands in Reno break and tour the country so that we can just play all of the clubs by ourselves.” Ω

Morgan Hough, Spencer Kilpatrick and Clint Philbin make up The Big Bad.

The Big Bad performs at the Knitting Factory, 211 N. Virginia St., on Dec. 28. For more information, visit http://thebigbadreno. bandcamp.com.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

“At the time, I was in three bands, working two jobs and going to school full-time, so my response was something like, ‘Mmmm— nope,’” he says, via email. However, after seeing Kilpatrick jamming at an open mic a few months later, Hough wanted in, and endured several months of cold shoulder treatment before they “began [their] courtship as heterosexual life-mates,” as Hough puts it. Kilpatrick says the band started before Hough was even added, when he and Clint Philbin (keys and bass) met by chance in Missouri. “I told [Clint] I was starting a band in Reno because I was starting a band in Reno,” says Kilpatrick. “Later on we found Morgan, he was cool, so we said, ‘Bro, you fittin’ to be a drummer?’ He was like ‘Yeah.’” The evolution of their music, and constant revolving door of front men, has allowed the band to explore blues, soul, R&B, rock and even hip-hop, but Hough says his favorite description of their current sound is “drunken James Brown.” “Our style of music since the beginning has been a turbulent mix of rock ‘n’ roll, blues, soul and hip hop, depending on our ever-changing front man,” Philbin says. “Today, we’re a three-piece rock band jamming the hardest tunes we GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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DECEMBER 13, 2012

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RN&R

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32   |   RN&R   |   DECEMBER 13, 2012

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THURSDAY 12/13 1UP 214 W. Commercial Row,

FRIDAY 12/14

SATURDAY 12/15

EDM Night, 10pm, no cover

Santa Pub Crawl after party 10pm, no cover

3RD STREET

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Jason King Band (Santa Pub Crawl), 9:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

3 Inches of Blood, Huntress, The Hookers, Big Remote, J French Project, Love Like Knightfall, Envirusment, 7pm, $15, $17 Wes, Bazooka Zoo, 8pm, $5

Ostracized, Undenied, Enslave the Creation, Up Against It, 8:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

BAR-M-BAR

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB 188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

Bike Night Blues Jam w/live music, 7pm, no cover

BUCKAROOS

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover Music Trivia w/Chris Payne, 8:30pm, W, no cover Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

CLUB BASS

Ladies Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 for women

COMMA COFFEE

Steven Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

535 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-1774 312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COMMROW

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

Comedy

College Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 with college ID Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover

2) DJ Double B, 10pm, no cover (21+)

2) Blues Jam Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Train Wreck—AD, 9:30pm, no cover

Soultorn, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

FRESH KETCH

New World Jazz Project, 7pm, no cover

FUEGO

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Dec. 14, 8 p.m. Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. 325-7401

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

1) Strangeworld, Fortress, Cowboys from Hell, 9pm, $5 , $8

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Daniel Tosh

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

CEOL IRISH PUB

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

1435 Highway 395, Gardnerville; (775) 782-9693 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/17-12/19

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

THE BLACK TANGERINE

SUNDAY 12/16

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: JJ Ramirez, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Shane Mauss, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Bias & Dunn, 7pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

2435 Venice Dr., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 541-5683 170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Bob Zany, Suli McCullough, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Gary Valentine, Shayla Rivera, W, 9pm, $25

Tre and Chango Hip Hop Experience, THE GRID BAR & GRILL 8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Monday Funday w/Gurbtron, 9pm, M, Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

JAVA JUNGLE

Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Recycle this paper

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

TH

n for Driials Spec

SAT DEC 15TH

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Utility Players’ A Very Merry Murder Mystery, Th, 7:30pm, $12, $16; Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Justin Rupple’s Not So Silent Night, F, 9:30pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

WRECK TRAIN –A.D.

FRI THE DEC 14 YEAH, I’M QUITE TALENTED BLUES MUSICIAN. I ONCE SHARED THE STAGE WITH STEVIE RAY

Santa l PuCbuCpsr$a5kw

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

FRI 10PM

Audible Bias for RENO SOCIETY

Santa Pub Crawl with Santa’s Metal Elfs

Soul Torn TUES 9PM

Karaoke

WED 9PM

OPEN MIC

OPINION | NEWS | GREEN | FEATURE STORY | ARTS&CULTURE | FILET OF SOUL | ART OF THE STATE | FOODFINDS | FILM | MUSICBEAT | NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | THIS WEEK | MISCELLANY | DECEMBER 13, 2012 |

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THURSDAY 12/13

FRIDAY 12/14

SATURDAY 12/15

SUNDAY 12/16

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

1) DJ Dan, 7pm, $10-$125 2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

1) 2 Chainz, Cap 1, 9pm, Tu, $27.50-$200

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

DJ Dan Dec. 15, 7 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

PONDEROSA SALOON

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm W, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Live music, 8pm, no cover

DJ TH1ZL, 9pm, no cover

306 E. William St., Carson City; (775) 301-6200

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Comedy Thursdays w/Comedy Mafia, 8:30-10:30pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

RYAN’S SALOON

Hellbilly Bandits, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

REMEDY’S

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

Student Night, 10pm, $10, $5 w/college student ID after 11pm

Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10 Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SHEA’S TAVERN

Drag Me Under, Otis, The Harvest and The Hunt, 8pm, $5 or one unwrapped toy Heather Meyer’s B-Day Party w/Melvin Makes Machineguns and others, 7pm, $5

715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover Open Mic Sundays, 8pm, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Jelly Bread

SIERRA GOLD

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

680 S. Meadows Pkwy., (775) 850-1112

Dec. 14-15, 9 p.m. Harrah’s Reno 219 N. Center St. 788-2900

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

34

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DECEMBER 13, 2012

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/17-12/19

The Bradfords, 7pm, no cover

’80s Big Hair Band & New Wave Night, 8pm, $5; no cover charge for women

DJ Abear, 7pm, no cover

3-17, Friday @ 1, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Dark Tuesdays, 7pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 7pm, W, no cover

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover


THURSDAY 12/13

FRIDAY 12/14

SATURDAY 12/15

SUNDAY 12/16

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/17-12/19

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 8pm, no cover

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 4pm, Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 4pm, Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 8pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 7pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) The Saddle Tramps, 10pm, no cover

1) Dead Winter Carpenters, 9pm, $15

1) Dragon Smoke, Jelly Bread, 9pm, $17, $20

1) Aladdin, 7pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Aladdin, 5:30pm, 8pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays 9pm, $10

1) Aladdin, 3pm, 7pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10

1) Aladdin, 3pm, 7pm, $19.95-$24.95 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

4) Rustlers’ Heat, 9pm, no cover

1) Ultimate Reno Combat 38, 8pm, $25-$100 4) Rustlers’ Heat, 9pm, no cover

1) Red Hot Superstars, 9pm, $12-$25 4) Rustlers’ Heat, 9pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Christmas with Aaron Neville, 7:30pm, $44 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Aladdin, 7pm, M, Tu, W, $19.95-$24.95 2) Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm,Tu, Audioboxx, 10pm, W, no cover

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) 1) Red Hot Superstars, 9pm, $12-$25

1) Red Hot Superstars, 9pm, M, Tu, $12-$25

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

1) The Magic of Eli Kerr, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Jelly Bread, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Magic of Eli Kerr, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Jelly Bread, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

3) Joel Edwards, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

3) Joel Edwards, 6pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 6pm, no cover

1) Tahoe Players’ Miracle on 34th Street: 1) Tahoe Players’ Miracle on 34th Street: 3) Patrick Cooper, 6pm, W, no cover The Musical, 2pm, 7pm, $15-$18 The Musical, 2pm, 5pm, $15-$18 3) Joel Edwards, 6pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 6pm, no cover

Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge

2) Patrick Major, 7pm, no cover 3) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

2) Tony Vee, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Tony Vee, 9pm, no cover 3) Scrooged Party, 10pm, $25, free w/canned food, toy or coat donation

3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

1) Daniel Tosh, 8pm, $59.50-$75 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

3) Dance party w/DJ Teddy P, 9pm, no cover 4) Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

OPINION |

NEWS |

GREEN |

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

1) Daniel Tosh, 9pm, $55-$75

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE | FILET OF SOUL |

ART OF THE STATE |

FOODFINDS |

Dec. 16, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover

1) The Magic of Eli Kerr, 8pm, $25, $35

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

Dragon Smoke

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover

FILM | MUSICBEAT |

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Sin Biggest Little Locals Night, 4pm, M, Step This Way (dubstep, house), 8pm, W, no cover

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | THIS WEEK |

MISCELLANY |

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

DECEMBER 13, 2012 |

RN&R

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35


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Join Us for Christmas Paradigm Millenia CT A modern system that fills your room with sound – not components. Paradigm says CT stands for Compact Theater, but there is nothing compact about the way this powered speaker system sounds. The Millenia CT three-piece design deliver true high-fidelity for a plug-and-play world – no receiver required. The system comes with everything you need for quick, easy setup.

sunday, dEcEmbEr 16

5:00pm – Festival of Carols & Community Sing-a-long (free)

sunday, dEcEmbEr 23

5:00pm – Quintessence Harp Ensemble of Carson City (free)

chrisTmas EvE * monday, dEcEmbEr 24

3:00pm – Holy Eucharist for Children 5:00pm – Family Holy Eucharist 7:30pm – Musical Offering followed at 8:00pm – Festival Holy Eucharist (with incense) 10:30pm – Musical Offering followed at 11:00pm – Festival Holy Eucharist (with incense)

chrisTmas day * TuEsday, dEcEmbEr 25 10:30am – Holy Eucharist with Hymns

TriniTy Episcopal church

200 Island Avenue

(along the Truckee River)

275 Hill Street, Suite #140 • Downtown Reno (775) 322–6400 • www.encoreavdesign.com Mon–Sat 11am–6pm Any purchase over $599.00 no payment for 18mos. o.a.c.

36   |   RN&R   |   DECEMBER 13, 2012

Reno NV 89501 (775) 329-4279 www.trinityreno.org

Celebrate the Spirit of Christmas


For Thursday, December 13 to Wednesday, December 20 Events

To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

CANDY CANE LANE: This custom outdoor drive-thru holiday features thousands of seasonal lights and a variety of scenes depicting traditional characters and images getting ready for Christmas. Accompanying music can be heard by tuning your FM radio to the frequency posted at the entrance. To experience this visual and musical salute to the festive holiday season, pull into the Carson Valley Inn parking lot at the RV Resort Entrance, between the Carson Valley Market and the inn’s electronic sign. The lighted arches mark the way. The lightshow begins at dusk. M-Su through 12/31. Free. Carson Valley Inn, 1627 Highway 395, Minden, (775) 782-9711, www.carsonvalleyinn.com.

Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., Dec. 27, is Thurs., Dec. 20. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

HEAVENLY HOLIDAYS: Celebrate the 13 days of Christmas at Heavenly Holidays, a twoweek festival for the whole family at the Heavenly Village featuring professional ice skating shows, ice sculptors, carolers, local artists and a 16-foot snow globe where kids can get their photos taken with Santa Claus. It all starts on Dec. 19 and culminates Dec. 31 with A Heavenly New Year’s Celebration including ice sculptors, live music,

fire dancers and a 9pm ball drop and fireworks show. M-Su through 12/31. Opens 12/19. Heavenly Ski Resort, 3860 Saddle Road, South Lake Tahoe, (775) 586-7000, www.skiheavenly.com.

HOLIDAY GINGERBREAD CONTEST AND FESTIVAL: The May Arboretum Society hosts the fifth annual holiday festival. There will be musical performances, a gingerbread contest and activities for all. Sa, 12/15, 12-3pm. Free admission. Wilbur D. May Museum, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961, www.mayarboretumsociety.org.

HOLIDAY EVENTS IN DOWNTOWN TRUCKEE: Through December, downtown merchants will host holiday events every Friday evening. Guests are invited to peruse the downtown shops from 58pm on Dec. 14 for Girls Night Out and Dec. 21 for Couples’ Shopping. F through 12/21. Historic Downtown Truckee, Bridge Street, between Donner Pass Road and Church Street, Truckee, (530) 587-3161, www.historictruckee.com.

LAKE TAHOE: STATE OF THE LAKE: Geoff Schladow, director of the Tahoe Environmental Research Center, gives a presentation on the “State of the Lake.” The report summarizes how natural variability, long term change and human activity have affected the lake’s clarity, physics, chemistry and biology over the previous year. The data reveals a unique record of trends and patterns— the result of natural forces and human actions that operate at time scales ranging from days to decades. Th, 12/13, 5:30-7pm. $5 donation suggested. Rooms 139 & 141, Tahoe Environmental Research Center, 291 Country Club Drive, Incline Village, (775) 881-7566.

RIVERWALK DISTRICT WINE WALK: Visit any Riverwalk District Merchant on Wine Walk day to get a map of participating Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, with a valid photo ID, you'll receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Every month offers a different theme and part of all proceeds are donated to a local charity. Third Sa of every month, 2-5pm. $20. The Riverwalk District, downtown Reno along The Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

SHARE YOUR CHRISTMAS DRIVE-BY FOOD DRIVE: KTVN will hold its annual food drive event. Drop off non-perishable food items at these locations: Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., the Governor’s Mansion, 606 N. Mountain St., Carson City, and Carson Valley Inn, 1627 Highway 395 north, Minden. F, 12/14, 6am-6pm. Call or visit website for details, (775) 858-2222, www.ktvn.com.

All Ages ART ANGELS COMMUNITY WORKSHOP: This free watercolor workshop for 50 children ages 6-12 provides small-group instruction, painting supplies and an opportunity to have fun while creating a unique holiday gift(s) for someone special. Reservations required. Sa, 12/15, 9:30-11:30am. Free; canned food donation requested. Wilbur D. May Museum, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961, www.maycenter.com.

BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

12/16, 10am-8pm. Children’s Museum of Northern Nevada, 813 N. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 884-2226, www.cmnn.org.

SMALL WONDER WEDNESDAY: Families with children 5 years old and younger are invited to play, explore and listen to stories read by the museum’s educators. Only children age 5 and younger are admitted to Small Wonder Wednesdays, which start at 9am, an hour before the museum opens. Older siblings may join at 10am. Third W of every month, 9am. $8 per person; free for members and babies under age 1. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

WINTER STARS AND PLANETS: Bundle up and join the Reno Astronomy Society for views of and information on the winter sky. Hot cocoa provided. Sa, 12/15, 6:308pm. $5 suggested donation. Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, (775) 849-4948, www.galenacreekvisitorcenter.org.

Art

KIDS’ NIGHT OUT, PARENTS’ NIGHT IN: Enjoy a

ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: I’m

quiet night in or do some holiday shopping while the kids have fun swimming, playing games and eating pizza during this action-packed holiday activity for kids ages 7-12. Sa, 12/15, 7-11pm. $10 for Sparks residents; $12 non-residents. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, (775) 353-2385, www.cityofsparks.us.

R.I.S.E. AND DINE: PEOPLE FEEDING PEOPLE: Each week Reno activists and volunteers shop, prepare and cook for local persons and families without a home. On Saturdays at 5pm, volunteers meet outside of the Community Assistance Center and serve about 250 or more of Reno’s most poverty-stricken until 6pm. All assistance and donations are appreciated. Sa, 5-6pm through 12/29. Free. Community Assistance Center, 335 Record St., (775) 322-7143, www.renoinitiative.org.

SANTA, CRAFT SALE AND PERFORMANCE: The museum will have its first Holiday Craft Sale. From 11am to 2pm, children can pose for a photo with Santa, and Mrs. Claus will be there decorating cookies. Free admission to sale. Santa photo free with admission $5 adults, $4 seniors, $3 children. At 6:30pm on Dec. 15-16, the Performing Arts Project of Northern Nevada will perform Christmas in Snowflake County—Hope in a Humble Stable. Tickets are $12 adults, $6 children ages 4-12. Sa, 12/15, 10am-8pm; Su,

Dreaming of a Reno Christmas. The Christmas show and sale features a variety of ornaments, paintings, gourds, glass, jewelry, photography, holiday cards, hats, scarves and more. The gallery is open daily except on Christmas Day. Through 12/27, 11am-4pm. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

BUSINESS RESOURCE INNOVATION CENTER (THE BRIC): BRIC Art 3. Capital City Arts Initiatives exhibition features Jill Altmann’s fiber art, Steve Davis’ photography, Andy Gallian’s prints, Mimi Patrick’s ceramics, Stephen Reid’s drawings and watercolors and Gus Bundy’s paintings. M-Su. 108 E. Proctor St., Carson City, (775) 283-7123.

CCAI COURTHOUSE GALLERY: Living in El Norte. The Capital City Arts Initiative presents Blanco de San Roman’s exhibit featuring large oil on canvas portraits of two of Blanco’s friends, Alma and Ramiro, both of whom have lived with the difficulties of immigration status. Blanco’s paintings continue the centuries-long Spanish tradition of monumental portrait painting with a few contemporary substitutions: Alma in the Nevada landscape and Ramiro in front of classical architecture at the University of Nevada Reno. M-F through 1/18. Carson City Courthouse, 885 E. Musser St. Carson City, www.arts-initiative.org.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF NORTHERN NEVADA: Carson City Pottery Sale. Support local potters and artists and finish up your holiday shopping at Carson City Pottery in the Children’s Museum. Sa, 12/15, 10am-4pm. Free. 813 N. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 884-2226, www.cmnn.org.

’Tis better to give Ditch the Christmas sweater for some festive finery at Yulesteam! The Third Annual Steampunk Victorian Christmas Party. The event, presented by High Desert Steam, features a variety of Victorian-style entertainment: parlor games, holiday ghost stories and even a hosted absinthe bar. Visitors are encouraged to wear steampunk or Victorian-era attire for an evening of holiday merriment. Raffle tickets will be given in exchange for toy donations to benefit the Christmas on the Corridor program, a charity event organized by the Washoe County Sheriff’s Office and Reno

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Basement Eyes.

Sparks Corridor Business Association. Donations of toys and other items will be passed out to disadvantaged residents living in the corridor of Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Streets during the Christmas on the Corridor Parade on Dec. 22. Yulesteam! begins at 7 p.m. on Dec. 14, at Wildflower Village, 4275-4395 W. Fourth St. Admission is free, but bring a toy to donate. Visit www.highdesertsteam.org. —Kelley Lang

The exhibit features work by Jaron Coxson, Denali Lowder, Aubrey Banks and Joshua Dean Hageman. The opening reception is Dec. 21. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 1/4. Opens 12/18; F, 12/21, 6-8pm. Free; These Truths. The Holland Project Gallery hallway will feature books by local artist Megan Matthers. Comprised into three hand bound books, These Truths showcases a collection of both images and selected writings from the artists journals documented over the past two years. Working in analog and Polaroid photography, Matthers work expresses a tender and poignant perspective of Nevada and the longing of exploration. The opening reception is on Dec. 21. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 1/4. Opens 12/18; F, 12/21, 6-8pm. Free. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

THIS WEEK

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LIBERTY FINE ART: Advent. Painting, photography and jewelry. M-Su through 12/30. 100 W. Liberty St., (775) 232-8079.

NEVER ENDER: Holiday Cash & Carry. Seven local artists using various mediums will show and sell their art. M-Su through 12/28. 119 Thoma St., (775) 348-9440, http://myneverender.com.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Holly Arts, a Winter Celebration. North Tahoe Arts presents its holiday exhibit featuring original winterthemed art, cards, decorated trees, hand-crafted wreaths, felted goods, leather goods, wood-carved and glass ornaments, as well as jewelry, organic botanical potions and homemade soaps and creams. M-Su, 11am4pm through 12/31; Holiday Open House. The Artisan Shop and the Holly Arts artists host an open house. Sa, 12/15, 12-4pm. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

SHEPPARD FINE ARTS GALLERY, CHURCH FINE ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Amy Sacksteder Exhibition. M-Th, 11am-5pm through 12/14; F, 11am-2pm through 12/14. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6658.

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Peter Goin: Codices of Nevada and Beyond, Sierra Arts Gallery presents the work of photographer Peter Goin. Goin’s current body of work deals with the development of symbol and language. The visual narrative panels of Nevada Codices are chronicles of the evolution of a visual language. Interpreting the style, format and seriousness of pre-Columbian book-style codices, Nevada Codices are panels printed on high quality Hahnamuhle watercolor paper, 44” x 60” or larger. The artist reception is Thursday, Nov. 29, 5–7 pm. M-F through 1/3. Free. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

STUDIO ON 4TH: Cheyenne Leigh, A viewing of handcrafted wares from artist Cheyenne Leigh. Jewelry, hair fascinators, home decor and more, followed by Americana folk music by The Bradfords. Th, 12/13, 7pm. Free. 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Ciel Bergman: Sea of Clouds What Can I Do, W-Su through 2/10; Hoor Al Qasimi: Off Road, W-Su through 1/27; The Way We Live: American Indian Art of the Great Basin and the Sierra Nevada, W-Su through 3/3; Rebeca Méndez: At Any Given Moment, W-Su through 1/20; Jorinde Voigt: Systematic Notations, W-Su through 1/6; The Book of the Lagoons: Helen Mayer and Newton Harrison, W-Su through 1/6; The Light Circus: Art of Nevada Neon Signs, W-Su through 2/10; Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-Su through

The son almost never rises

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Two years ago, after dating a wonderful lady for a year, I married her and moved in with her. The problem is her 23-yearold son. He lives with us, has never held a job, doesn’t go to school, and does nothing but eat, sleep and poop. I’ve worked since I was 14, my wife and I both work hard now, and it’s grating to have such laziness always in my face. My wife knows this and says he’s been trying to get a job for more than two years. (He shows no signs he’s looking.) I’m starting to feel played by my wife. How long should I put up with this? Of course it grates on you, providing free room and board to an adult man whose main source of income is birthday cards from grandma. And yes, you’ve been played—not by your wife, but by what economists call “optimism bias.” This is the human predisposition to believe things will work out for the best and to gloss over worrisome details, like how your wife’s layabout son would suddenly become industrious at something besides being a role model for moss. Your wife has confused coddling with love— maybe for 23 years or maybe since feeling guilty about getting a divorce. After years of go-rightahead mommying, it’s no small task to inspire your step-slug to expand his life goals beyond napping more, watching more interesting porn, and trying all the varieties of Doritos. (The guy standing in the traffic median holding a sign asking for spare

change shows more autonomy and dignity. At least he wrote a message on a piece of cardboard and is ambulatory.) Give your wife props for trying to be a good mother, but explain that by supporting the kid as she has been, she’s actually holding him back. He may not get his ideal job (video game tester or human slipcover), but he’ll get on the road to self-sufficiency by flipping burgers or bagging groceries if it’s either that or sleeping in a doorway. Propose that she gives him 30 days to get a roommate situation and tells him she’ll pay two months of his rent while he job-hunts and gets working, and then he’s on his own. Propose that she also acts like she means it, but be prepared for him to test her and for her to cave. Ultimately, you need to decide whether you’d rather live with La-Z-Boy than without your wife. If push comes to nap, it may come to that—assuming you’re unsuccessful with various passive-aggressive measures, like installing a coin slot on the bathroom, refrigerator, and cable TV. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


A Nevada tradition, “Sheep Dip” is a bath in which sheep are literally dipped. In the Sheep Dip Show, local news-makers, politicians and the like are “dipped” in the satirical “Vat of Sheep Dip” to cleanse them of their past deeds.

1/1; Bovey Lee: Undercurrents, W-Su through 1/2; Juvenile-In-Justice: Photographs by Richard Ross, W-Su through 1/13. $1-$10. 160 W.

https://www.facebook.com/nevadagmc.

THE NOTE-ABLES: Hear a performance of holiday favorites by members of the Note-Ables, a nonprofit organization that provides music programs and music therapy services for children and adults of all ages and abilities. F, 12/14, 1-2pm. Free. Meadowood Mall, 5000 Meadowood Mall Circle, Ste. 1; Sa, 12/15, 12pm. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 324-5521, www.note-ables.org.

Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM, RANCHO SAN RAFAEL REGIONAL PARK: Celebrating the Season, Sierra Watercolor Society’s new show is an exhibit of original watercolor paintings for sale by local artists. W-Sa, 10am-4pm through 12/15. Free. 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

Film STRANGE DAYS: ENDTIMES: Churchill Arts Council concludes its film series with a screening of The Truman Show. F, 12/14, 7pm. $7 CAC members, $10 non-members. Barkley Theatre, Oats Park Art Center, 151 E. Park St., Fallon, (775) 423-1440, www.churchillarts.org.

RENO WIND SYMPHONY: This adult community band of 80 musicians explores all areas of wind band literature. The purpose of this organization is to improve technical playing, overall musicianship, work ethic and motivation through challenging literature. Su, 12/16, 3pm. $5 general, free for University of Nevada, Reno students. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

Music BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER: Nevada Opera presents this musical play featuring members of the Nevada Opera Youth Program on Dec. 15, 2012. Directed by Linda Saxton, this play centers on the Herdman family of hellions who decide to be part of a traditional church Christmas production and includes songs like “Holly Jolly Christmas,” “Silver Bells,” and “Santa Claus is coming to Town.” Sa, 12/15, 7pm. $15 adults; $10 children, seniors. First United Methodist Church, 209 W. First St., (775) 786-4046, www.nevadaopera.org.

RINGING IN THE HOLIDAYS: A holiday handbell concert filled with all your favorite holiday tunes performed by Tintabulations Handbell Ensemble. Sa, 12/15, 1pm. Free. Carson City Library, 900 N. Roop St., Carson City, (775) 371-3927, http://tintabulations.com.

Sports & Fitness

CARPENTER’S MUSIC WORLD MONTHLY MUSIC PROGRAM: Carpenter’s Music World presents

30/30 (CARDIO MAT/STRETCHING): Thirty minutes of Cardio Mat Pilates and 30 minutes of intensive stretching. Intermediate-level strength, stamina and flexibility are required for this class which emphasizes the principle of fluidity. Call to reserve your spot. M through 12/31. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

its monthly music program open to all ages, styles and skill levels. Second Th of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Carpenter’s Music World, 2700 S. Virginia St., (775) 391-7757, www.carpentersmusic.com.

HANDEL’S MESSIAH: TOCCATA, Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, will present its annual holiday production which includes selections from parts 1 and 3 of Handel’s Messiah and favorite carols that the audience is also invited to sing. F, 12/14, 7pm. $5-$25; free for youth under age 19. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 313-9697.

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

HOLIDAYS AROUND THE WORLD: The Reno Pops Orchestra presents its annual concert featuring several of the best holiday arrangements from Carmen Dragon and Leroy Anderson. The Reno Pops will be joined by the Reno Latin Branch Choir and the Tintabulations hand bell choir for festive favorites from around the world. This evening will culminate in a sing-along, including some classic carols and popular favorites. F, 12/14, 7:30pm. Free. The Rock Church, 4950 Vista Blvd., Sparks, (775) 673-1234, www.renopops.org.

ADVANCED MAT PILATES: This class focuses on intermediate and advanced Pilates mat exercises. Must have very good knowledge of Pilates. Call to reserve your spot. F, 9-9:50am through 12/28. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

BASIC MAT PILATES: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercise in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 6-6:50pm through 12/25. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

HOW GREAT OUR JOY! HOLIDAY CONCERT: Nevada Gay Men’s Chorus presents a blend of traditional holiday music, mixed with multicultural numbers and even a little bit of camp. Sa, 12/15, 7pm. $15 general admission; $10 students, seniors. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Drive, (775) 240-6962,

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DEEP FREEZE SOFTBALL LEAGUE: Softball enthusiasts ages 20-60 brave freezing temperatures and wet conditions to pursue their love of the sport. Individual shirts will be awarded to first place of each division along with the coveted Ice Cube Trophy. Registration for the eight-week league will be held through Dec. 13. $400 per team. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, (775) 353-7836, www.cityofsparks.us.

This annual comedy show – now in its 49th year – is an evening of skits, songs and dance performed by locals, including members of the media and even a few of our famous (and infamous) politicians.

EXPRESS MAT PILATES: A quick 45-minute Mat Pilates class to get the body moving with concentration, control, centering. All levels welcome. M, W F, 12:15-1pm through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

THE GREAT SANTA DASH: Runners and walkers of all levels are encouraged to participate in this festive holiday 5k run/walk near downtown Reno. Wear your best Christmas costume—Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus or Santa's helper, etc. The Great Santa Dash supports the Make A Wish Foundation. Sa, 12/15, 10am. $32 adults, $22 youth age 17 and younger. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., www.athleteinyou.com.

PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 5:15-6:05pm through 12/26. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

PRANA FLOW YOGA: Morning yoga that stretches and strengthens the body from the inside out. This class will start your blood flowing and help you body remain toned and flexible. M, W, 8:30-9:45am through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

RINK ON THE RIVER: Operation of the ice skating rink is dependent on weather and ice conditions. Call the Rink on the River Hotline prior to visiting the rink to ensure that it is open and operating. Holiday hours may vary. M-Su through 2/3. $7.50 ages 13-54; $5.50 kids ages 3-12, seniors age 55+. Reno City Plaza, 10 N. Virginia St., (775) 334-6268, www.reno.gov.

Sheep Dip, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation. To date, over $410,000 has been donated to local scholarships and charities through Sheep Dip. Funds raised from this year's show and program will support these local charities:

WOLF PACK MEN’S BASKETBALL: The University of Nevada, Reno plays the University of San Francisco. Sa, 12/15, 3pm. $10-$44. Lawlor Events Center, 1500 N. Center St., (775) 348-7225, www.nevadawolfpack.com.

WILD WEST SHOOTOUT: The event brings together top high school basketball teams from Northern Nevada, along with Las Vegas and Mesa, Arizona. The tournament will end with the championship game scheduled to start Saturday at 7pm. Funds raised through the Wild West Shootout basketball tournament will go toward helping families with an autistic child attending the University of Nevada, Reno

ART OF THE STATE

THIS WEEK

Join us for an evening of Nevada-style mockery! See who gets this year's “Shaft Award”! Call now for tickets! (775) 356-3300 www.SheepDipShow.org

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Early Childhood Autism Program. Th-Sa, through 12/15, 7pm. $5-$20. Bishop Manogue Catholic High School, 110 Bishop Manogue Drive, (775) 284-2847, www.sierrakidsfoundation.org.

YOGA ALL LEVELS: Classes teach the fundamental principles and therapeutic application of a healthy yoga practice. Classes are designed to give you the time and support to understand the proper alignment of yoga postures (asana) and breathing techniques. M, 5:306:30pm through 12/30. $16 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

Onstage BUTTCRACKER IV—ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE: Brüka dances its pants off in this high-octane parody based on the holiday favorite The Nutcracker. This original performance experience is laced with Brüka’s theatrical style and features favorites from the past three productions. The final production coincides with the scheduled “end of the world” on Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, and will be followed by an end of the world party. Th, 12/13, 8pm; F,

12/14, 8pm; Sa, 12/15, 8pm; W, 12/19, 8pm; Th, 12/20, 8pm; F, 12/21, 8pm. $20 general; $18 students, seniors; $25 at the door. Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org.

CHRISTMAS MY WAY: A SINATRA HOLIDAY BASH: Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company present this holiday tribute to Ol’ Blue Eyes. Four singers serve up cool versions of Sinatra mainstays like “Fly Me To The Moon,” “New York, New York,” “That’s Life,” “Love and Marriage,” “I Get A Kick Out of You,” “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” and “The Lady is a Tramp,” as well as holiday hits like “Mistletoe and Holly,” “The Christmas Song,” “Christmas Memories,” “Winter Wonderland,” “Silver Bells” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” Th-

Sa, 7:30-9:30pm through 12/22; Su, 3-5pm

through 12/16. $14-$17 pre-sale, $20 at the door. Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org. DISNEY'S THE LITTLE MERMAID, JR.: Adapted from Disney’s 2008 Broadway production, Wild Horse Children’s Theater presents the Northern Nevada premiere of this musical that centers on the beautiful young mermaid Ariel who longs to leave her ocean home to live in the world above. But first, she’ll have to

defy her father King Triton, make a deal with the evil sea witch Ursula and convince Prince Eric that she’s the girl with the enchanting voice. F, 12/14, 7pm; Sa, 12/15, 2 & 7pm; Su, 12/16, 2pm. $12 general admission; $10 students, seniors; $6 kids ages 4-12. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 887-0438, www.wildhorsetheater.com.

INSPECTING CAROL: Reno Little Theater presents Daniel Sullivan’s Christmas comedy about a theater group on the verge of a nervous breakdown as they try to stage A Christmas Carol with virtually no money and no talent while awaiting an inspection from the National Endowment for the Arts. For mature audiences. Th-Sa, 7:30-10pm through 12/22; Su, 2-4:30pm through 12/23. $16 general admission; $13 seniors, students, military. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 813-8900, www.renolittletheater.org.

THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE: TMCC Performing Arts presents this play for the young at heart based on the stories of C.S. Lewis and dramatized by Joseph Robinette.

F, 12/14, 7:30pm; Sa, 12/15, 7:30pm; Su, 12/16, 2pm. $5-$10. TMCC Redfield Performing Arts Center, 505 Keystone Ave., (775) 789-5671, www.showtix4u.com.

MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET: THE MUSICAL: Tahoe Players present the holiday favorite. Sa, 12/15, 2 & 7pm; Su, 12/16, 2 & 5pm. $15-$18. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks, (775) 831-0379, www.tahoeplayers.org.

THE NUTCRACKER ACCORDING TO THE DUKE AND THE COUNT: The Sierra Nevada Ballet and Reno Jazz Orchestra will perform this jazz Nutcracker ballet based on Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn’s arrangements from the original theme. Set in 1950s Reno, The Nutcracker According To The Duke and The Count tells the story of a magical reunion between a father and long lost daughter. The production also features international tap star Sam Weber, former Joffrey Ballet principal Domingo Rubio and Sierra Nevada Ballet principal Ananda Bena-Weber. The Reno Youth Jazz Orchestra will open this holiday performance followed by a big band jazz set from the Reno Jazz Orchestra. Sa, 12/15, 7:309:30pm. $25 adults; $10 students. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 848-4417, www.renojazzorchestra.org.


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BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Can you

manage to be both highly alert and deeply relaxed? Could you be wildly curious and yet also serenely reflective? Can you imagine yourself being extra hungry to crack life’s secrets but also at peace with your destiny exactly the way it is? If you can honestly answer yes to those questions, you’ll get a lot of help in the coming week. The universe may even seem to be conspiring to educate you and heal you. You will receive a steady flow of clues about how to get closer to living your dreams.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the

24/7 EVERYDAY • (530) 414-8335 www.NorthwestNevadaCourier.com Delivery area from Reno to San Francisco

Think Free

coming week, you would be wise to deal with your vulnerability, your fallibility, and your own personal share of the world’s darkness. If you refuse to do that, either out of laziness or fear, I’m worried that you will reinforce a status quo that needs to be overthrown. You may end up rationalizing your mistakes, clinging to false pride, and running away from challenges that could make you smarter and stronger. Don’t do that, Taurus! Be brave. Be willing to see what’s difficult to see. There will be big rewards if you choose to explore the weaker and less mature parts of your personality.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the 1968

Summer Olympic Games, Bob Beamon broke the world record for the long jump. His leap was so far beyond the previous mark that the optical device designed to calculate it didn’t work. Officials had to resort to an old-fashioned measuring tape. After that, the word “Beamonesque” came to signify a feat that vastly outstripped all previous efforts. According to my analysis, you Geminis will have an excellent chance to be Beamonesque in 2013. I expect that you will at least surpass your own peak levels of accomplishment. If you have not yet launched your ascent, get started now.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The fire ants

City of Sparks Toy Drive

Thanks to everyone that brought a toy to the Intuit Hometowne Christmas Parade and helped us kick off the first annual City of Sparks Toy Drive. You can still participate! Bring your toy to any of the following locations and know that your generosity is bringing joy to a child this Christmas. Or join us at the train on December 14th for the Share Your Christmas food and toy drive with our friends at KTVN.

Toy Drop Off Locations All Walmart, Toys-R-Us and Babies-R-Us locations Alf Sorenson Community Center Games Galore at Meadowood Mall Intuit John Ascuaga’s Nugget Scheels at Legends Sparks City Hall

Sponsored by

For more locations: www.toysfortots.org

www.sparksrec.com

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DECEMBER 13, 2012

that invaded the southern United States back in the 1930s are an annoyance. They swarm and bite and sting. The venom they inject makes their victims feel like they’ve been burned. Two communities have decided to make the best of the situation. Auburn, Georgia, and Marshall, Texas, both stage annual fire-ant festivals with events like the Fire Ant Calling Contest, the Fire Ant Roundup and the Fireant CASI Chili Cook-Off (to win the latter, your dish must contain at least one fire ant). Maybe their example could inspire you, Cancerian. Is there any pest you could develop a more playful and festive relationship with? Could you possibly turn into the equivalent of a fire-ant whisperer?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): While reading William Kittredge’s book The Nature of Generosity, I learned about the oldest known sentence written in ancient Greek. It was inscribed on a wine jug that dates back to 740 B.C. Translated into English, it says, “Who now of all dancers sports most playfully?” Another possible translation is, “Which of these dancers plays most delicately?” I’d love to make something like that be your mantra in the coming week, Leo. The time is right for you to do more dancing and playing and sporting than usual—and to seek out companions who’d like to help you achieve record-breaking levels of those recreational activities.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the movie

Groundhog Day, Bill Murray plays a man who gets trapped in a time loop. Over and over again, he experiences the same 24 hours. When he wakes up each morning, it’s still February 2. At first, it drives him crazy, pushing him to attempt suicide. But, eventually, he decides to use his time wisely. He becomes a skilled pianist and fluent in speaking French. He does good deeds and saves people’s lives. He even learns what he needs to do to win the heart of the woman he desires. This transformation turns out to be the key to gaining his freedom. Near the end of the film, he escapes to February 3. A comparable opportunity is looming for you, Virgo. You have a chance to break a spell you’ve been under or slip away from a rut you’ve been in. Generosity may play a major role.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Events in the

immediate future may have resemblances to reading a boring book that’s packed with highly useful information. You might feel that there’s a disjunction between the critical clues you need to gather and the ho-hum style in which they are offered. It’s OK to be a bit disgruntled by this problem as long as you promise to remain alert for the partially disguised goodies. Don’t fall asleep in the middle of the unspectacular lesson.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Instinct

tells us that sharks are more deadly than delicious fatty foods,” writes Jason Daley in Discover magazine. But “instinct is wrong,” he adds. In fact, eating food that tastes good but is actually bad for us is a far greater threat than shark bites. That’s just one example of how our uneducated urges can sometimes lead us astray. I invite you to keep this possibility in mind during the coming week, Scorpio. It’s by no means certain that you will be misled by your natural inclinations, but it is crucial that you monitor them with acute discernment.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For

the last six decades of his life, Pablo Picasso created art that was adventurous and experimental. He didn’t invent abstract painting, but he was instrumental in popularizing it. And yet in his early years he was a master of realism and had an impressive ability to capture the nuances of human anatomy. Commenting on Picasso’s evolution, travel writer Rick Steves says that when he was young, “he learned the rules he would later so skillfully break.” I suspect you’re in a phase of your own development when you could profit from doing the same thing. So I ask you, Sagittarius: What are the rules that are so ripe for you to bend and twist as you graduate to a more mature level of self-expression?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Through some cosmic intervention, a sad or bad or mad story will get tweaked prior to the final turn of the plot. Just as you’re getting ready to nurse your regrets, an X-factor or wild card will appear, transforming the meaning of a series of puzzling events. This may not generate a perfectly happy ending, but it will at least result in an interesting and redemptive climax. What is the precise nature of that X-factor or wild card? Perhaps a big secret will be revealed or some missing evidence will arrive or a mental block will crumble. And it’s likely that you will have an epiphany abut how valuable your problem has actually been.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Be

honest. Have you had any of the following symptoms? 1. Lack of interest in trivial matters and a yearning for big, holy mysteries. 2. Unfamiliar but interesting impulses rising up in you and demanding consideration. 3. Fresh insights into people and situations you’ve known a long time. 4. An altered sense of the flow of time. 5. Outof-the-blue recall of long-forgotten memories. If you haven’t experienced any of the above, Aquarius, I must be totally off in my analysis and this horoscope isn’t for you. But if you’ve had even two of these symptoms, you are on schedule to get what those of us in the consciousness industry call a “religious experience.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You just

might be able to teach a statue to talk this week—or at least coax a useful message out of a stonelike person. You could also probably extract a delicious clue from out of the darkness or wrangle a tricky blessing from an adversary or find a small treasure hidden in a big mess. In short, Pisces, you now have a knack for accessing beauty and truth in unexpected sources. You can see what everyone else is blind to and love what everyone else has given up on. You’re practically a superhero. Use your powers wisely, my friend. Be benevolently unpredictable.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Brad Bynum

Music source

Who are some of the bands that have submitted so far? Right now we have 23 songs. … I can just go down the list: Suckapunch, Twelve Gauge Facelift, Vampirates, The Bradfords, Jazz Van Gough, The Deadly Gallows, Blunderbusst, Elephant Rifle [the author’s band], Crushstory, My Flag is on Fire, The Die Ads, Beercan, The Firebombing, Prima Volta, Manacle, The Wax Models, Think in French, I put a Zoinks tune up there, 28db, and namefollowedbynumber.

Bob Conrad

Bob Conrad is the Energy Outreach Coordinator at the Governor’s Office of Energy. Additionally, he’s the drummer in several local bands, including The Firebombing, The Die Ads and formerly Zoinks. He’s also a cofounder of the This is Reno website, which recently launched a Reno Music online playlist, featuring a diverse slate of local music. For more information, visit thisisreno.com/reno-music.

The thing I’m most interested in is the Reno Music radio station. We just had the idea of putting up an mp3 player and having bands submit songs so that there would be one location that people could go to to hear local bands online. Every band that I’m aware of, they all have Reverbnation accounts or Facebook pages or Myspace accounts, and if you want to go and listen to them, you have to go to every single band’s individual account to hear their music, and it’s this constant war for attention, and what this page does on This is Reno is allows for bands to submit an mp3, and anyone who wants to can go and listen to it.

What is This is Reno? It’s a news website that myself and Ryan Jerz cofounded in 2009. The idea behind the site was to kind of level the playing field of what is considered news. We accept news release submissions and original content from theoretically anyone.

So, it’s like a crowd-sourcing aggregator? I would say crowd-sourcing, but not an aggregator, because we’re not aggregating anything. Everything we post is sent to us.

Any criteria as far as audio quality or a limit to the number of submissions? Or can bands upload 500 home recordings?

Who are the people submitting? Government agencies, public relations agencies, politicians, other journalists on occasion, people that just have an opinion about something, pundits.

Very little criteria. The most we’ve put on there for any one band is two songs. You don’t want any one band to monopolize the mp3 player.

OPINION

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A Droid. OK, so you’ll have to exit the mobile edition of the website and look at as a standard website and then you should be able to play it. I brought it up on my Droid, and I’ve been able to play it. And it comes up fine on an iPad, so it should be fine on an iPhone. … Personally, I think the premise behind the site in general is pretty interesting. We’ve won some awards for it. ... I think what we’re doing is helping to redefine what is considered news in our own little niche of the world. Which isn’t to say, that I think you shouldn’t visit the other news outlets. In fact, I think if you want to become well-rounded in the community, you should visit as many as you can to see what people are saying and how they’re interpreting it in different ways. But the idea behind This is Reno is to let people read news direct from sources. Ω

brucev@newsreview.com

pray harder for touchdowns and interceptions than you pray for the souls of your closest friends. You pray to me for homes, field goals, rallies, even injuries to the opponents, and you’re as serious as a CAT scan. Pretty twisted. “Second, realize that the other team’s fans are sending exactly the same number of prayers My way, asking for exactly the same thing. Capisce? What would you do it you were standing in my shoes, assuming you could shoe the unfathomably Almighty? What call would you make? “Which leads Me to this: How many times have you heard a quarterback say something like, ‘That pass in the end zone with four seconds to go! I didn’t think it was gonna get to Rodney, but it did! I think the good Lord was watching out for us tonight!’? Well, hold on, my misguided friend. I wasn’t. I didn’t even watch. I love you and the other team and everybody on the field and everybody on the bench and in the stands and so |

What kind of phone do you have?

∫y Bruce Van Dye

The word from on high Bruce is MIA this week, so we offer this epistle he wrote for these pages in 1998, when Tim Tebow was 11 years old. OK, heads up, all you athletes, jocks and rabid sports fans. God’s had it up to here with a strain of baloney He constantly sees in the sports pages of the western world. He has a few things to say at this time. “I just would really like to tell all of you who are involved in professional and amateur sports¡ ªI don’t care who wins your crazy little games. OK? You got that? I don’t care. Really. So, please, stop clogging the prayer waves with this endless begging to have Me help your favorite hockey team or your favorite football team or your favorite dog sled racer. And you horse racers are especially bad. “Look, I don’t mean to whine. It’s just that when you pray for your football team to win a close game in December, it’s stunning how many of you jokers are actually hoping for some metaphysical intervention. You

What’s the listening experience like? I just noticed it last night, and I tried to get it to play on my phone, and I couldn’t get it to play, so I haven’t listened to it yet.

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on. In fact, I love the bleachers y’all were sitting in. That’s just My way, you know? “But hey, pal, you made the throw and you did it with your muscles, blood, nerves and brain. No divine intervention whatsoever. Way to go. Go ahead and take the credit. Trust Me when I say our time will come, and when it does, I’m not going to be all that worked up about your touchdown totals. “All right. I feel better. Just had to vent. One other thing: Quit killing tigers and bears in this hysterical search for things that will give old men erections. That’s really pissing Me off. You people are so hung up about sex. Now get outta here, stay busy and avoid those who are always searching for methamphetamine. Help somebody once in a while. Nothing fancy, just help. You’ll know what to do. Vaya con dios.” Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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