Issuu on Google+

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Election . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .14 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .16 Art of the State . . . . . . .17

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .23 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Free Will Astrology . . . .34 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .35 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .35

BALLOT QUESTION 1 See Election, page 7.

WILD HORSES COULDN’T DRAG ME AWAY See Green, page 8.

PIXEL PERFECT See Arts&Culture, page 14.

SOMETHING ROTTEN See Musicbeat, page 23.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 34

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OCTOBER 11-17, 2012


2   |   RN&R   |   OCTOBER 11, 2012


EDITOR’S NOTE

LETTERS

Goal to go

Support small colleges

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Where did this year go, anyway? It was a mediocre year in the garden, probably my own disengagement as much as anything. I need to build a section onto my yard irrigation system that better waters the vegetable garden automatically. But it’s October, one last week and then time to rebuild the hoophouse over my garden. October, first major projects are due in my class. October, rabbit brush! October, graduate applications must have been filed. October, it’s 95word fiction time. You know our 95-word short fiction contest? We have it every year, and every year you say, “You know, next year I’m going to write one of those stories.” Then you usually start emailing me in March asking when it’s going to happen. The rules are simple. Write us a story that’s exactly 95 words (counted by LibreOffice, or Google Docs), excluding title. We like stories that have a beginning, middle and an end. Lots of times they say something insightful. Sometimes they make us laugh. Sometimes they tug at our heartstrings. I can’t remember a poem ever winning—so don’t bother. Then, send the story to renofiction@newsreview.com with Fiction 2012 in the subject line. I prefer it if the story is pasted into the message field of the email. Sometimes our email server kicks out emails with attachments, so if you don’t get that call for a photograph and your story doesn’t appear in this august publication on Nov. 8, well, don’t say I didn’t warn you. Of course, it might also be because the piece was just bad. Speaking of Nov. 8— November!—I had to change the deadline for submission on this contest because initially I had us publishing the Thursday before the election. And you know, that just wouldn’t do.

Re “Higher education, lower population” (Election, Oct. 4): In last week’s article about the Board of Regents race in District 9, I was quoted as supporting the proposed new funding formula for Higher Education. Let me clarify: I support the need to address the equity issues resulting from the old formula. However, if the new formula were implemented as proposed, Northern Nevada institutions of higher learning—rural community colleges in particular—will suffer. In the case of the rural community colleges, losses will be devastating. I view the proposal as just that—a proposal, and a platform for a revitalized discussion about the importance of high quality universities and colleges throughout Nevada. I would hope that it will serve as an occasion for Nevada’s leaders to find the means to fund higher education without sacrificing the vital missions of our great schools. I was present at the founding of Western Nevada Community College, and I taught there for 28 years. I intend to protect it as well as to work toward a glorious future for all our Nevada universities and colleges. Michon Mackedon Fallon

Too cruel This is a letter to Tom Gorey at the Bureau of Land Management Washington office : No matter what we work for or on whose side we are—[we see online footage that] shows a horse running with a broken leg during a round up. We know accidents happen. But this is bad. You can’t possibly blow this off as just another bad luck event in the minority. If your wranglers are as professional as your agency claims, this would not happen. Trap pens would be better designed. There is a problem when horses break their necks and legs. For God’s sake, this must stop! This is America, not the third world of savagery. BLM must stop this cruel treatment and find better ways to prevent it. To you, it’s just a statistic. To this horse, it was his life, his freedom.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Kitty time I’m writing today to remind readers that along with brightly colored leaves, harvest festivals and cooler temperatures, fall also marks the second annual “kitten season” at local shelters and rescues. In most parts of the United States, kittens are born within a few weeks of tax day in April. They are ready to leave their mothers (if they have them) in June or July. Cats that are not spayed can have another litter in August, and those kittens are ready to be adopted in October. This large influx of cats can put excessive strain on local pet groups, who are still working to care for and adopt cats born in April. And while help is appreciated year round, now is a great time to support your local shelter, rescue or humane society by adopting, volunteering or donating resources. As a former Director at the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) for three years, and with 30plus years in the sheltering community, I know a common misconception is that national animal groups are umbrella groups for pet shelters and spend most of their resources on helping care for these animals. After all, that’s what the commercials full of needy dogs and cats imply. However, HSUS isn’t affiliated with pet shelters and sends just 1 percent of the money is raises to pet shelters, according to its tax return. Local shelters don’t just need money—they could also use supplies to help, like dog or cat food and towels. Whatever animal lovers can give, they should make sure their donations are staying local if they want to help care for pets.

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Michel Rottmann V.C. Highlands

Cancer in Washington Last week, I traveled to Washington, D.C., to represent cancer patients and survivors from Northern Nevada to call on Congress to make cancer a national priority. I joined more than 600 American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network volunteers from across the country to ask lawmakers in our nation’s capital to protect funding for cancer research and prevention programs. I met with Nevada representatives, Sen. Harry Reid, Rep. Shelly Berkley, Rep. Mark Amoedi, Rep. Joe Heck, and a representative of Sen. Dean Heller, and made it clear that Congress needs to put partisanship a side on behalf of the nearly 14 million cancer survivors in the United States and more than 1.6 million people in America who will be diagnosed this year.

Diana Culp Humane Society for Shelter Pets Frederick, Md.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Bethany Deines Contributors Amy Alkon, Amy Beck, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

FILET OF SOUL

Like everyone else, I’m getting a lot of polling calls. For many of them, you have to answer demographic questions before getting to the important stuff. And if you don’t answer those demographic questions, the robo-call gets stupid (I’ve even had a live robo-caller get stupid). I wonder, though, if all these metrics serve to emphasize and legitimize differences between us more than anything else they might be doing. It’s certainly the case that demographics are used by the campaigns, the media, and third parties to pit me against you, and us against a whole host of “thems.” I get it that demographic polling makes political ads effective and that campaigns must maximize the effect of their spending, but it’s also the primary fuel powering the engines of big-money politics and a lot of noisy talk shows. I think it’s important for the sides to ask our opinions, so I’ll be glad to answer questions about the economy, health care, how I plan to vote and why. For that, you don’t need to know anything about me other than I’m eligible to vote and I do. If you need more than that, buy me a beer sometime and we’ll chat.

Monika Courtney Evergreen, Colo.

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

Religion, politics, beer

He suffered horribly, and I cannot fathom the fact that anyone within your agency can allow such horrid mishaps. BLM must improve. Are we at least agreeable on this one part? And better sooner than later.

ART OF THE STATE

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Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Brian Breneman, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Russell Moore General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Funding for research at the National Institutes of Health and for cancer prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and through the new Prevention and Public Health Fund must be top priorities in the federal budget. Legislation recently introduced in Congress to improve the quality of life for cancer patients must also be an important priority. By making these lifesaving programs a priority, we will ensure that progress continues in the fight against cancer. Mark Savage Reno

Free love for half Re “Love the ones you’re with” (Letters to the Editor, Sept. 27): Let’s start a town where they practice polygyny. (Mormons don’t do this.) There are 100 men and 100 women. Then, 50 of the men take two wives each. Thus, 50 of the men have no place in the community, and they most likely leave (either before or after they make a run at one or more wives already taken.) Then, the 100 wives each have two children, 100 girls and 100 boys. Ignoring the fact that the men will probably take some of the girls as additional wives, that leaves 50 well connected boys with two wives each. That leaves 50 boys with no wife and no place in the community. No one spends much on educating boys with no place in the community, so the boys are taken away and abandoned, since they have no place in the community and no training or skills. Polygyny doesn’t work arithmetically. Now, the men who have two wives each normally can’t support two wives. Thus, the wives live on welfare and aid to dependent children. That means nonpolygamists support the polygamist lifestyle. That just doesn’t add up. (By the way, the things that are presented here is the way that USA polygamy actually works in the real world.) R. Richard Reno

Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Priscilla Garcia Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

OCTOBER 11, 2012

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RN&R

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Itʼs happen ing in

ART ADVENTURES FOR KIDS

It’s painting, collage, clay and more! Explore different media and techniques weekly. Give your child a sound base for a lifelong appreciation of the arts. Th, 4-5PM through 11/1. Opens 9/27, $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385

FUN WITH DRAWING

Give your child a lifelong gift learning the fundamentals of drawing. Your child will learn value, shading and an introduction to perspective while developing techniques. Th, 5:15-6:15PM through 11/1. Opens 9/27, $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385

DJ LARRY WILLIAMS

DJ Larry Williams at Trader Dick’s. No cover. F, 10/12, 10PM, Sa, 10/13, 10PM, F, 10/19, 10PM, Sa, 10/20, 10PM, F, 10/26, 10PM and Sa, 10/27, 10PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

SCARECROW BUILDING

Presented by Linda Hollis. Come and build your own special scarecrow. Fun for the whole family. Bring your own clothes or use what’s on-hand. Sa, 10/13, 10AM-2PM and Su, 10/14, 10AM-2PM, $12 per scarecrow. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

FALL POND CARE

Presented by Justin Meckley. Learn the proper tips and techniques for your pond or water feature for fall and winter. Free. Sa, 10/13, 11AM. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

SCHEELS KIDS KLUB: SKIING 101

Learn tips on how to pick out the right skis and equipment for crosscountry and downhill skiing. Please meet in the Ski Shop. All kids. M, 10/15, 6PM. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

PUMPKIN PAINTING

Presented by Linda Hollis. Come and make your own silly or scary pumpkin to decorate your house. Fun for the whole family. . Sa, 10/20, 10AM-2PM and Su, 10/21, 10AM-2PM, $7 per pumpkin. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

4   |   RN&R   |   OCTOBER 11, 2012

LORETTA LYNN

Country music legend Loretta Lynn and opener Chuck Mead perform at John Ascuaga’s Nugget! Sa, 10/20, 8PM, $79. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

PUMPKINPALOOZA

Celebrate all things pumpkin, when the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living kicks off PumpkinPalooza 2012. Su, 10/21, 12-7PM. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Ave. www.pumpkinpalooza. org

PUTTING YOUR GARDEN TO BED FOR THE WINTER

Presented by Roxanne Martin, this class will cover what you need to know to winterize your yard and garden. Plant protection, mulching, pruning, cleaning, creating micro-climates and more. Sa, 10/27, 11AM. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

HALLOWEEN HOEDOWN PARTY

John Ascuaga’s Nugget and KBUL Radio present Halloween Hoedown This free party will cast a spell on the Casino Cabaret from 9PM to midnight. Sa, 10/27, 9PM. No cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

ITCN 47TH ANNUAL CONVENTION

The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. (ITCN) will host its 47th Annual Convention, 10/29-11/1. Opens 10/28, 8AM-5PM. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

TRICK OR TREAT SAFELY AT SCHEELS

Play games! Get candy! Have fun! Scheels would like to create a safe atmosphere for your child to trick or treat in. Wear your costumes. W, 10/31, 5-7PM. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

ITCN 47TH ANNUAL HALLOWEEN DANCE

Come celebrate Halloween with the Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. There will be a costume contest, so dress in your scariest, most unique costume. Music. W, 10/31, 9PM-midnight. $10 at the door. Poolside Terrace Room, John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 3563300

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION

Improvisational music M, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

SEND US YOUR SPARKS EVENTS!

MUSIC AT THE MARINA

E-mail to: Sparks@newsreview.com

Sing for fun or compete for prizes,depending on the number of contestants, with DJ John Graham. Th, 9PM and F, 9PM. No cover. Anchors Bar & Grill, 325 Harbour Cove Dr. (775) 356-6888

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY!

JAZZ

With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

BEADS AND BOOKS!

Learn basic beading techniques with volunteer beading expert, Jamie, and work on projects with other beaders. First Su of every month, 1-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

KARAOKE

ASPEN GLEN BAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd., Sparks, NV 89436 / (775) 354-2400 STEVE STARR KARAOKE M, 8PM. No cover. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316 SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861

OPEN MIC

GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

CITY OF SPARKS Geno Martini - Mayor, Julia Ratti Ward 1, Ed Lawson - Ward 2, Ron Smith - Ward 3, Mike Carrigan - Ward 4, Ron Schmitt - Ward 5, Shaun Carey - City Manager, Tracy Domingues - Parks & Recreation Director. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 353-2311 or Sparks City Council Chambers, 745 Fourth St.

WEB RESOURCES: www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com www.thechambernv.org www.sparksitshappeninghere.com THIS SECTION AND ITS CONTENTS ARE NOT FUNDED BY OR CREATED BY THE CITY OF SPARKS


BIG HE A SMALL H

by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25kBiggest tech change in your SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HElifetime? AD) Asked at Archie’s Restaurant, 2195 No. Virginia St. Brent Boynton Journalist

The microprocessor. It’s made everything possible from personal computers to the systems that control commerce, recreation ... . That’s cheating a little bit because it’s allencompassing. It includes, email, internet, everything. It’s all possible because of the microprocessor.

Kody Crist Waitress

The IPad, I guess. It’s easier to carry around than a laptop. It’s smaller. I don’t use it as often as when I first got it. Every once in a while.

Tori Riggs

Elect Sheila Leslie The candidates for Nevada Senate District 15, Republican Greg Brower and Democrat Sheila Leslie, both served as assemblymembers in the 1999 and 2001 Nevada Legislatures. Thereafter, Brower was defeated for reelection and then returned to the 2011 Legislature as an appointed senator. But those first two sessions when Leslie and Brower served side by side are enlightening. During those two legislatures, Brower won enactment of four measures. One dealt with hospital districts. Another gave legislators who were also attorneys greater entitlement to stays of court proceedings during legislative sessions. Another dealt with how bills are paid by fire protection districts. And the last declared “Silver State Fanfare” the official state march. During those same two legislatures, Leslie won enactment of measures dealing with detox treatment, stalking, requirements for utilities to disclose information to consumers, requirements for school districts to accommodate parental involvement in schools, providing home energy assistance to low-income Nevadans, screening of newborns for hearing problems, allowing arrests for domestic abuse to be made at any hour (state law previously limited such arrests to daylight hours), expanding workers injury insurance coverage to contagious disease exposure in the workplace, providing increased access for patients to their medical records, allowing employers to obtain court protection orders against harassment in the workplace, providing loans for nursing students and also requiring planning for increasing the capacity of Nevada nursing training, expanding admissibility of expert testimony in domestic abuse cases, prohibiting intimidation and 5 | | OPINION

RN&R NEWS | GREEN|

11, 2012 | | OCTOBER FEATURE STORY

ARTS&CULTURE

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Waitress

The IPhone. I use it all the time. Like, I use the maps a lot. I moved here last year so I didn’t know my way around. IPhone got me everywhere. I use it to Google things. I don’t have a camera. I just use [the IPhone]. I do my banking through it.

harassment in public schools and providing information to students, major changes in Nevada gambling regulation, providing aids to members of the public making anatomical gifts, prohibiting racial profiling and ordering statistical study of profiling. What’s at issue here is not just volume of legislation. It’s also the nature of that legislation. Leslie was concerned with matters of greater moment, of more direct impact on the lives of Nevadans. When Brower returned to the Legislature a decade later, he won enactment of two resolutions memorializing deceased Nevadans, a measure covering distribution of fees for veterans’ license plates and a measure dealing with vending stands in regional transportation facilities. At that same Legislature, Leslie won enactment of legislation on eminent domain, state policy on the disabled, car ignition interlock devices in drunken driving cases, availability of records of abused and neglected children, alternative energy, prison mediation, designation of autism protocols, coordination of energy projects with wildlife concerns, protection of children in foster homes—well, you get the point and we’re running out of room to list all of Leslie’s accomplishments. The stark contrast between Brower and Leslie is no accident. Leslie functions well in a parliamentary process where members must work well with colleagues. Brower is distant and detached. This race isn’t even a close call. Brower was appointed to replace legislative giant William Raggio, and if Washoe County is to reclaim the kind of influence Raggio brought to the seat, there is only one choice. We urge the election of Sheila Leslie. Nevada cannot afford the loss of such a tireless achiever. IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

John Desaw Machine technician

That is a hard one. It would be manufacturing processes, perhaps. I can’t say anything about an IPhone because I don’t have one. I don’t have a cell phone. Everybody pounds on me on a daily basis: Get a cell phone, get a cell phone, get a cell phone.

Carol Scott Teacher

My Blackberry. I can do anything with it. It’s like something from Star Trek. I use it mostly for communications. I like it because it’s instantaneous. I like everything fast.

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 11, 2012

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RN&R

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Even a group of current and former journalists— a gathering of UNR Sagebrush alumni—paid little attention to the Oct. 3 presidential debate on two large screens at Louis’s Basque Corner.

TRPA critic softens stance Clark County Sen. John Lee said he has not dropped his support of his bill to pull Nevada out of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, but he hopes a pullout will be avoided. “Right now, the way things are going, we’re working so good together, I’m looking forward to solving any problems,” Lee said. The TRPA is a joint California/Nevada body authorized by Congress to oversee development in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Lee, a conservative Democrat who was defeated in the Democratic primary in June, sponsored legislation opposed by most northern legislators to pull the state out of the TRPA. He said he has met with various California officials and is “very satisfied” that an updated regional plan for the basin will be adopted in December. That might eliminate the need for a pullout, he said.

ACORN aftermath The Nevada Supreme Court has upheld a state law that prohibits putting a bounty on voter registrations. The case dates back to the 2008 presidential election. Under Nevada Revised Statute 293.805, it is a felony “to provide compensation for registering voters that is based upon: (a) The total number of voters a person registers; or (b) The total number of voters a person registers in a particular political party.” In Las Vegas in 2008, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, Inc. (ACORN) created a voter registration program that initially paid its workers a flat wage. ACORN official Amy Busefink later approved a recommendation by organizer Christopher Edwards that the group start paying workers an additional $5 for every 21 or more voter registration applications turned in. Busefink and Edwards were apparently unaware of the ban in state law. The bounty led to allegedly fraudulent voter registrations being turned in, though none of the workers has been convicted on that charge. But Busefink was convicted of conspiracy on an Alford plea (a guilty plea in which a defendant maintains innocence but concedes that the prosecutor has evidence that could lead to a conviction) and sentenced to 100 hours of community service and probation. Edwards pleaded guilty to a lesser, gross misdemeanor charge and drew probation. Busefink appealed on first amendment and vagueness grounds. The court ruled that NRS 293.805 is not vague and serves a state interest— the integrity of elections—without disrupting voter registration programs, and that the encumbrance imposed on the first amendment by the law is “minimal.” “Nevada’s interest in protecting the integrity of its election process and preventing voter registration fraud, when viewed in relation to this minimal burden, is sufficiently weighty to justify NRS 293.805’s restrictions,” wrote Justice Mark Gibbons.

Reid thriving U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, who has been relentlessly attacking Mitt Romney as out of touch with middle class people, substantially increased his wealth during the recession, according to a Washington Post/Center for Responsive Politics analysis of the finances of members of Congress. Since 2004 Reid’s worth has risen from about $3.8 million to about $6.8 million. The rise, however, was not steady. It had ups and downs. The study actually examined the finances of congressmembers well before the recession began. During 2004, 2005 and 2006, Reid was actually losing money. By mid-2006 he was down to about $3 million. But then his investments rebounded and by the end of 2007, when the recession began, he was up to about $4.4. Then he experienced another decline and by mid-2008 his worth was down to about where it had been in 2004. From then until 2010—the latest figures available— his wealth has risen sharply to about $6.8 million. The Post also reported some detail about Reid’s money: “In 2004 and 2005, the Senate majority leader secured [legislation providing] $21.5 million to build a bridge over the Colorado River, linking the gambling resort town of Laughlin, Nev., with Bullhead City, Ariz. Reid owns 160 acres of undeveloped land in Bullhead City.”

—Dennis Myers

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OCTOBER 11, 2012

Insider debates Small-party candidates can’t get arrested on television and radio Debates in the presidential and Nevada U.S. Senate races in the last two weeks have been exclusively a majorby Dennis Myers party affair. In the presidential debate on Oct. 3, Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson—a former New Mexico governor—was excluded by the Commission on Presidential Debates, a partisan group controlled by the Democratic and Republican parties.

“A one-on-one just works better.” Ed Pearce Television reporter In the U.S. Senate debate on Sept. 27, Independent American Party nominee David Lory Van Der Beek was excluded by a group of media sponsors, including the Nevada public broadcasting stations that carried the debate. “I’m sure you are well aware that this is typical treatment for thirdparty candidates in any important race,” Van Der Beek said. “If I was no threat to these mainstream politicians, why not include me?” From municipal office to the presidency, similar things are happening. However, small party and independent candidates are often included in community debates at schools and senior citizens centers. It’s broadcast debates that the less known candidates have trouble getting into.

Contrary to what some of the minor candidates think, it’s not a decision made lightly. “How many debate participants to include was a tough call,” according to KNPB news director Brent Boynton when he described planning for the U.S. Senate, U.S. House and state legislative debates on public broadcasting stations. “I debated that issue with my colleagues at the Reno Gazette-Journal and Reno Public Radio. We all wanted to be as inclusive as possible—inclusive of ideas as well as of candidates who otherwise would get little publicity. However, we had to ask which would offer the viewer the greater benefit—more candidates or more issues? … [W]e opted for depth of issues rather than depth of field, and it made sense to treat all races the same way. It was a decision made with some misgivings, yet one we tried to make in the best interest of the voter.” It’s a decision that has become more complicated with the proliferation of political parties. Nevada has four ballot-eligible parties—the Democratic, Republican, Independent American and Libertarian parties. Broadcasters believe debates become more unwieldy as more candidates are included. “Does that [limiting debates to major parties] make for a better exchange?” Reno television reporter Ed Pearce said. “Yes, a one-on-one just works better than a one-on-three or one-on-four.” Pearce was a longtime news director at both KTVN and KOLO and has

participated in a number of debates. He said that as more candidates are included, they are less likely to engage with each other, there are fewer back-and-forth exchanges—and fewer subjects discussed. “It doesn’t make a classic debate,” he said. “It just becomes questions and answers.” In that situation, the candidates are less likely to seek out weaknesses in each other’s positions, which is useful for voters. It’s also true that debates make better television and radio if the number of candidates is held to two. Pearce said he believes the multicandidate debates that have become routine in Republican and Democratic presidential primary seasons show their weaknesses. To minor party candidates it shows just the opposite—that such debates have been informative and still allowed candidates to bore in on each other. Boynton argues, “The U.S. Senate debate last week illustrates the reason we opted for more issues. In a full hour, the candidates answered only 11 questions, and that was with only one follow-up question. If we had twice that many candidates, as we could in the [U.S. House district 2] race, we’d only explore half that many issues.” Outsider candidates disagree. They say fewer candidates suppresses issues, it doesn’t foster them, because mainstream candidates, moderators and panelists explore mainstream issues. Only the presence in the Republican presidential campaign of Ron Paul elevated the issues of the Federal Reserve and casual warmaking, they argue. “There will be talk but the major policies—of war, the failed economy, continuing bank bailouts with tax dollars via the Federal Reserve, and the loss of liberty through the National Defense Authorization Act—will remain the same, issues that are ignored because the twin parties apparently agree on,” said Independent American Party leader Janine Hansen of Elko County, who is a candidate for the Nevada Senate. At the national level, the debate process is controlled by the two major parties through their Commission on Presidential Debates. It’s a private political organization, which its critics consider a classic conflict of interest. One of its members, Newton Minow, last week argued that it is becoming more independent of the parties, because it has refused some requests from major party contenders. “Critics have sometimes charged that the debates, and their format and substance, are controlled by the two


Separation of powers battle

Critics of both the League and the Commission say their exclusionary rules guarantee that money is always the determining factor in participation. They also say that the eligibility standard should be whether a candidate is on enough state ballots to get an electoral vote majority. In 1996 and 2000 the Commission barred Green Party nominee Ralph Nader, whose repu-

Ballot Question 1, an amendment to the Nevada Constitution, is the only statewide measure on Nevada’s ballot this year. If passed, it will allow two-thirds of the Legislature to call itself into special session for extraordinary purposes. by “Extraordinary occasions” is defined as “unexpected conditions or emerBethany Deines gency situations, to conduct impeachment, removal or expulsion proceedings for misconduct in office, or to reconsider bills vetoed by the Governor after the adjournment of a regular session.” It’s an idea that has been kicking around for years. In the 1980s, Sen. Jean Ford of Clark County introduced it but was unable to get it through the difficult process required to amend the state constitution. Her intent was shown in 1985 when an Alaska grand jury recommended removal of that state’s governor and the legislature was able to call itself into session. In Nevada, the governor has the sole power to call the lawmakers into special session—and he controls their agenda. Sponsored by Assemblymember Harry Mortenson of Clark County as Assembly Joint Resolution 5, Question 1 was approved by the 2009 and 2011 legislative sessions, which is required before it can go on the ballot. Mortenson said requiring the Legislature obtain the governor’s permission to convene a special session is counterintuitive to the proper Nevadans watch the 2011 Nevada functioning of state government. With only the Assembly from the balcony. governor able to call special sessions, the ability of all three houses of government to function independently and equally is diminished, he said. “In Illinois, the governor was discovered trying to sell a U.S. Senate seat,” Mortenson said. “The Illinois legislature convened itself to proceed with impeachment of their governor. This could not happen in Nevada.” In addition to requiring two thirds of each house sign a petition calling a special session, Question 1 requires that the petition must clearly state the business to be discussed. The session’s agenda would then be limited to that list. It would allow the same Legislature that first processed vetoed bills to vote on the override. Currently, bills vetoed after the Legislature adjourns are voted on by the next Legislature two years later. The Legislature would be allowed to stay in special session for a maximum of 20 days, except in cases of impeachment or expulsion from office. However, Question 1 can be read at the Legislature could call for additional special sessions, potentially allowing the http://nvsos.gov/index legislature to convene for an indefinite period of time. .aspx?page=1016 AJR 5 passed the Assembly in 2009 by 28-13 and in 2011 by 28-13. It passed the Senate in 2009 by 17-4 (a bipartisan vote) that became 11-10 (a straight party-line vote) in 2011, with every Republican voting no. Sen. Moises Denis, a Clark County Democrat, said he supports Question 1 because on occasion, there is a need for the Legislature to convene itself without the express approval of the governor. “I think it’s an opportunity for us to do things that we didn’t do at the legislature that are important,” Denis says. “The governor shouldn’t be the only one able to determine that.” Question 1 has met with a fair amount of opposition. Republican legislators have been particularly outspoken. Sen. Don Gustavson, R-Sparks, fears that the passage of Question 1 will change the very character of the Nevada Legislature. He says Question 1 is the first step in the direction of a year-round legislature. “The Republicans generally do not want a year-round legislature like California has,” Gustavson says. “This is one step more in that direction.” Legislators like Gustavson believe allowing the Legislature to call a special session is contrary to a part-time “citizen legislature.” “It’s a dangerous precedent to set, to have the Legislature meet whenever they want to,” Gustavson says. But supporters say the idea that legislators who have to interrupt their work and home lives would casually sign onto a special session is nonsense. Nevada is one of 18 states whose legislatures cannot call themselves into session and one of 11 that cannot decide its own special session agenda. Ω

“If I was no threat to these mainstream politicians, why not include me?” David Lory Van Der Beek U.S. Senate candidate

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

major parties and campaigns,” Minow wrote in the New York Times. “This was once true. … Once derided as a creature of the parties, the commission has gradually become independent of them. In 2004, President George W. Bush and Senator John Kerry tried to force us to accept a 32-page ‘memorandum of understanding’ setting out debate details. We refused, and they backed down. In 2008, Senator John McCain asked for a postponement of the first debate, citing the turmoil in the financial markets. We said we would hold it as scheduled, and he agreed to participate as planned.” But refereeing among teams is not the same thing as opening the tourney to other leagues—much less to independent teams. There is no danger that the Commission is evolving from bipartisan to nonpartisan. Chairing the Commission are former Clinton press secretary Mike McCurry and former Nevada and national Republican chair Frank Fahrenkopf. Fahrenkopf was one of the founders of the Commission. The Commission makes only candidates with more than 15 percent of the vote in opinion surveys eligible to participate in presidential and vice presidential debates. This exclusionary rule was originated by the League of Women Voters, former presidential debate sponsor. It creates the paradox—small party and independent candidates need recognition to qualify for the debate but being kept out of the debate denies them recognition.

tation matched or exceeded those of his opponents (Time magazine named Nader one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century) and had ballot status in all 50 states. In 2000, he was even barred from the debate audience by the two-party Commission, though he held a valid ticket. Last week three supporters of the Commission—ad agency BBH New York, tech conglomerate Philips North America and the Young Women’s Christian Association— withdrew their support in response to letters of complaint. “This is a triumph for the debate reform movement,” Open Debates director George Farah, said in a prepared statement. His group has been pushing for debates without partisan ownership. Ω

Real challenge PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Jehovah’s Witnesses believe, “Evolutionary theory and the teachings of Christ are incompatible,” and some JWs have been on the University of Nevada, Reno campus trying to get that message across. They are set up outside the student union building. OPINION

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Safe haven University of Nevada, Reno student-led group Envirohaven announced a prototype of an alternative energy powered house, funded by the $37,000 awarded to them at the Donald W. Reynolds Governor’s Cup (“Competitive edge,” April 19). The project is called the Haven, and according to Envirohaven’s website, a patent is pending. “The Haven home design is the first complete home designed specifically for living in areas without access to public utilities, ‘off-grid,’” the project website says. “You’ll find affordable options whether you are looking for a place to call home or you have commercial, humanitarian or military interests.” The standard model of the house is 1,400 square feet, with three bedrooms and two bathrooms. Other models provide the option to set up dormitory-style quarters which can accommodate up to eight people. The home will be sold as a package, which includes items like solar photovoltaic and solar thermal panels, dual-paned windows, gray water recycling systems, and other building materials, such as walls and doors. Constructed of triangular panels, the house is intended to be easily transported. Purchasing all materials and building the house is estimated to cost less than $200,000. Photographs of the prototype can be found on Envirohaven’s Facebook page, http://on.fb.me/Ra3GJ3.

Fly away home A recent Nevada Land Trust deal ensured the preservation of Silver Lake, more than 200 acres, for migratory birds. The habitat is located just outside of Stead. Due to a “purchase agreement” with the Land Trust and the Peter Echeverria Family Limited Partnership, the land has been preserved as “open space,” according to a statement. Several dozen species of birds flock to the lake bed every year as a migratory pit stop. The agreement will also allow for hiking trails and other recreation to be developed in the area. The Nevada Land Trust is the new name for the Nevada Land Conservancy. The non-profit was founded 14 years ago and works to keep wilderness open for local wildlife.

Have a gas The week of Oct. 15-21 is Federal Radon Awareness Week, in which the American Lung Association, National Cancer Institute and the Center for Disease Control encourage communities to test for radon, especially homes that have not been tested in the past two years. Radon is a naturally occurring odorless, colorless and tasteless radioactive gas, produced by the “breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water,” according to the Nevada Radon Education Program. It’s classified as a class A carcinogen. Test kits are available at the Nevada Radon Program Cooperative Extension Office at 4955 Energy Way, open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT The 13th annual Brews with a View Hike to benefit the Nevada Land Trust will be held on Oct. 13. The hike will be on the Spooner and Marlette Lake trail, around 9.5 miles round-trip. Participants will meet at the Marlette Lake Trailhead at 8:30 a.m. and should bring water. Hikers can park at the Spooner Lake Park parking facilities at the intersection of state route 28 and U.S. 50. The event is organized by Silver Peak Restaurant and Brewery. For more information, call the Nevada Land Conservancy at 851-5180 or Silver Peak Restaurant and Brewery at 324-1864.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@ newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/ RNRGreen for more.

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PHOTO/BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

GREENSPACE

The Reno-Tahoe tourism website highlghts wild horses as a sight to see in the area.

Running wild Rumors abound about wild horse roundups Last week, wild horses in Antelope Valley were rounded up as part of the Bureau of Land Management’s efforts to control and maintain wild horse population. But Deniz Bolbol, spokesperson for the American Wild Horse Preservation by Ashley Campaign, wonders why there are no GPS devices or video cameras in the Hennefer helicopters to show if all of the horses are being rounded up safely. And why roundups are the BLM’s go-to method of wild horse control when methods ashleyh@ newsreview.com of birth control and predator maintenance would be more effective, she says. Bolbol’s questions are not new, given that the BLM’s ethics of horse roundups have been a source of controversy for several years (“They kill wild horses, don’t they?” Oct. 27, 2011). A report run on NBC last week by ProPublica, an investigative journalism project, looked into the surplus of horses kept in long-term holding—where horses go after they are rounded up and haven’t been adopted. The report found that the BLM has been selling horses to kill buyers, who slaughter the horses and sell the meat. “We knew for a long time, but now we know,” Bolbol says of the report’s claims. “Basically, we’ve heard for years rumors about the BLM and Department of Interior selling wild horses to kill buyers. [They] ship horses to Canada, and this kill buyer sells them to Mexico.” The kill buyer Bolbol referred to in the ProPublica report is Tom Davis, To read the ProPublica report, visit and BLM records show the agency has sold Davis horses for several years. www.nbcnews.to/ Davis must sign a no-slaughter contract when he buys the horses, but he has PmqXM4. been on the record for years as a supporter of horse slaughter. The horses are protected under the 1971 Wild-Free Roaming Horses Act, which states, “It is the policy of Congress that wild free-roaming horses and burros shall be protected from capture, branding, harassment, or death.” According to the BLM, the drought is the primary reason for the roundups. Carson City Wild Horse and Burro Program Specialist John Axell says that the tentative schedule for roundups, expected to carry into early 2013, could change if drought conditions worsen for the horses. “We’ll have to see if the conditions there are worse for some horses that are a greater risk of dying,” Axell says. “Drought has affected some of these areas.” But Bolbol says that the drought is not considered an emergency, because a drought is not “unforeseeable,” given the frequency of droughts in the region. She says an emergency is the only reason for roundups. When asked what happens to the horses after roundups, “They go to some short term holding facility, the Palomino Valley Corral in Sparks,” Axell says. “The younger, more adoptable ones are put up for adoption. Older horses are sent to a long term sanctuary in the Midwest, where there are hundreds of acres of grass.” Bolbol says the Midwest facility is closed to the public, who cannot verify the horses’ living conditions. She says it’s one of many questionable decisions made by the BLM. “The whole problem starts with the BLM’s mismanagement of this program,” she says. “If they were managed in humane ways and not by removing them, they would not have this stock pile of horses they have today and they would not have to sell them to kill buyers.” Ω


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The MakerBot, seen here at Bridgewire, helped jumpstart the hackerspace movement.

A student-made design printed from DeLaMare Library’s Stratasys machine.

A REVOLUTIONARY IDEA WITH 3-D PRINTERS, USERS CAN MAKE ALMOST ANYTHING THEY DESIRE—MAYBE EVEN GUNS. MAYBE EVEN KIDNEYS. s t o r y a n d p h o t o s b y A S H L E Y H E N N E F E R | a s h l e y h @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

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first saw a MakerBot in action last year at Bridgewire, the hackerspace/makerspace in Sparks (“Life hacks,” Nov. 10, 2011). It was printing whistles. Then, this summer, the University of Nevada, Reno’s DeLaMare Library became the first academic library in the country to offer 3-D printing in its facility. Suddenly, Reno had become a hub for hackers, with 3-D printers at the helm.

SketchUp to design a case for a solar powered cell phone charger so I don’t have to keep modding Altoids containers. I’ve also planned to design and print my own wedding ring when the time comes. Oh, and by the way, I studied English in college, so I’m not exactly a pro at engineering. I do research technology in graduate school, so I guess I’m not a total noob, but really, if I can do this stuff, anyone can do it. I’m more interested in how 3-D printing, hackerspaces and the maker movement affect the way we think about the world and the way we choose to contribute to it. As I see it now, as a self-proclaimed technophile and cyberpunk, the future will come in pieces—either broken pieces, or parts of a whole, or perhaps both. And it will take everyone to put those pieces together.

The name “3-D printer” is kind of a misnomer. It’s more of a fabricator, using successive layers of fluid material, like plastic, to make shapes—either simple shapes, like a fork or a spoon, or complex single shapes like a mesh hand. Take it another step and make parts for more complex machines. The first item I printed was a companion cube, the iconic object from the video game franchise Portal. To do so, I went on Thingiverse.com, a huge database of open-source, usermade designs, and searched for the design I wanted. Then, I downloaded the file and the library staff showed me how to send the data to the printer. A couple of days later, my companion cube was ready. Recently, I’ve been using Google

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Despite its name, the MakerBot is not, in fact, a robot. It’s a 3D printing device that prints a variety of objects, including parts to build other MakerBots. The idea of robots creating other robots is certainly evocative of Terminator or Battlestar Galactica, which is either terrifying or awesome depending on how nerdy you are. The first model of the MakerBot cost less than $2,500. It was built a couple of years after the development of the RepRap, established back in 2005 by Adrian Bower, a professor at the University of Bath. Bower made the machine’s design open source, which means that anyone could |

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download the plans and build a RepRap of his or her own, which is exactly what people did. The MakerBot and the Fab@home project are also open source. 3-D printers had been around since the 1980s, but were limited to manufacturing firms, given that the printers cost around $200,000. But the creators of the RepRap and subsequently, the MakerBot, followed the path of the personal computer by making the machines affordable, compact and efficient. Depending on the object, it takes a matter of hours or days to create an item. Tod Colegrove, head of the DeLaMare Library, likens the process of printing to “squeezing frosting from a bag.” Material—DeLaMare’s printers use ABS plastic, the same used often in plumbing—is heated and squeezed out in layers, building upon each layer until the structure of an item forms. According to Colegrove, the two printers—the 3D Touch and the Stratasys uPrint SE+—have been going nonstop since they were opened to the university in August. The Stratasys has been printing for more than 2,000 hours, and Colegrove notes that the “+” means that the machine can print items with materials of different colors. On display at the library are objects printed, and sometimes designed by, students

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“A REVOLUTIONARY IDEA” continued from page 11

Tod Colegrove checks on the condition of items being printed in the Stratasys machine in the DeLaMare Library.

Yoda, printed on the 3-D Touch.

and faculty at the university, such as a skull, geometric shapes, an ice tray, and a little green bust of Yoda. Like the printing press and the personal computer, 3-D printers have been hailed as a revolutionary device that will ultimately transform the way the world operates. Chris Anderson, author and editor of Wired magazine, calls 3-D printing and the maker movement “the new industrial revolution” in his new book, Makers. Technology, Entertainment and Design (TED), the organization that hosts TED Talks, called 2012 “the year of the 3-D printer,” and hosted several popular talks on 3-D printers—including, most notably, a talk by surgeon Anthony Atala called “Printing a human kidney” about the potential to print organs. This year, people around the world have printed thousands of objects using the printer technology. Recently, architects printed pieces of a house, a new aspect of pre-fabricated homes. Hobby scientists printed shells for hermit crabs whose real shells have been destroyed, providing a reusable, more durable home for the creatures. Even food has been tested with the machines, including burritos constructed by the BurritoBot.

Like the printing press and the personal computer, 3-D printers have been hailed as a revolutionary device that will ultimately transform the way the world operates. But perhaps it’s not so much a revolution as an evolution—the natural progress of technology, manufacturing, computing, art and commerce. Given the resources of the internet, it’s not the only tool available transforming the way we access products, information or new businesses. Services like PayPal function like online banks, providing its own credit service and issuing debit cards. The popularity of self-publishing exploded after on-demand printing sites like Lulu and CreateSpace gave authors the opportunity to upload files, design covers using a template, and order copies of the book to distribute themselves, or list them for sale on the web. This, along with smartphones, ereaders and tablets, has allowed anyone to become a published author. Etsy, eBay and Amazon help people sell and trade goods, including handmade or vintage items. And websites like SkillShare or the Khan Academy provide free access to education through the form of open source videos and web-based meetups. “The beauty of the web is that it democratized the tools both of invention and of production,” writes Anderson in 12

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Makers. “Anyone with an idea for a service can turn it into a product with some software code (these days it hardly even requires much programming skill, and what you need you can learn online)—no patent required. Then, with a keystroke, you can ‘ship it’ to a global market of billions of people.” And such, the process of rapid prototyping has become a metaphor for the modern era—experimenting until a perfect item can be scientifically constructed, and using open-source plans to do so. It’s redefined what innovation means—not just development of new ideas, but building off of other’s ideas. It’s both collaborative and competitive. The process of 3-D printing is very much rooted in interdisciplinary skills—it takes knowledge of computer-aided design (CAD), engineering, graphic design, sculpture, architecture and materials science, to name a few. It’s equally about science and art, and anyone can be an artist, an inventor and an entrepreneur. 3-D printing, and the hacker/maker movement as a whole, is revitalizing the way people learn and what they want to learn. In that sense, it’s not just a new industrial revolution. It’s a renaissance.

NEW DIMENSIONS Lisa Kurt, engineering and emerging technology librarian at the University of Nevada, Reno’s DeLaMare Library (“Multidimensional,” 15 Minutes, Aug. 2), certainly thinks so. “We hear a lot, ‘How is this going to fit into a learning environment?’” Kurt says. “Part of it very much is that you often hear in a very general way, like ‘You’re preparing students today to get out into the work force but they will hold jobs that we don’t even know what those jobs are right now.’ It’s good to think that’s how the future is. That is how things are. I think the 3-D printer is sort of along those lines that we don’t even know yet or have even really tapped into what’s possible overall with 3-D printers—in society, like the big picture, not just in higher ed. I think in general we don’t even know yet where it’s going to take us.” Libraries have been quick to embrace the model of hackerspaces, revitalizing the library’s role in a community. Kurt says that by offering 3-D printing, among other innovative resources, libraries have a new purpose. Bridgewire member Jeremy Osborn first heard about open source 3-D printing three years ago when the RepRap was announced. He and two of his friends built one each. Most recently, Osborn has been handling much of the maintenance of the MakerBot at Bridgewire, but now also has his own MakerBot at home. Throughout the next couple of months, Osborn will be presenting on 3-D printers at most of the area’s public libraries. He says the libraries approached him about holding workshops after Bridgewire hosted an open house during Artown.

Students have been printing items to study, including diagrams of molecules or abstract shapes.

“Basically, I’ll be talking about the history of 3-D printing, what it’s used for, the role of hackerspaces and the maker movement,” he says. “But there’s also a lot to say about the consequences on intellectual property—the distribution of files being turned into physical options. Ideas which libraries are familiar with.” According to Osborn, some people take to the idea more quickly than others. “During Artown, people were interested in the art aspect of it,” he says. “Engineers tend to see the value immediately. The general public takes a bit longer to convince, mostly because they don’t really know what it is, but then they see products to put in their hands immediately. Kids see value immediately. They want to make custom toys as soon as they see it.” Kurt says that the word has spread fast about the printers, and students and faculty from all departments are thinking of uses for it in their fields. “Through this process, you just learn so much,” she says. “People are really delving into, ‘What is learning?’ I mean, it’s just interesting to see how much people are taking ownership over learning. Look at all the stuff that’s out there, like online courses where you can earn badges. That’s great incentive, but people are excited because they want to learn stuff. We have a lot of people here who have never heard of 3-D printing. We show them around. We point them to software to try out. … There’s a student building costumes for a movie he’s working on. This is a kid who’d never heard of 3-D printing. I think he studies criminal justice. But now he can also put 3-D printing on his resume.” The open, cross-disciplinary aspect of printing is also demonstrative for the transformation of the economy—by creating a more diverse, well-rounded workforce. “Tools are liberating design, but so are people,” writes Yves Behar in the newest issue of Wired magazine. “We have become participants on social platforms that allow us to collaborate and customize and create, and in the process we’ve become expert collaborators, customizers and creators. This ever-more-free design is speeding the adoption of new ideas, which in turn disrupt old industries. Designers, coders and entrepreneurs are challenging notions that sustainability is expensive, that technology is hard to use, that quality is exclusive. No segment of the economy will be left untouched.” In this sense, 3-D printing is antithetical to the free market, because open source is founded in the idea of redistribution. Manufacturing is democratized. But it also creates a new type of free market, where people have to think way outside the box in order to compete. In either case, it gives people direct access to their products. “There’s kind of an ‘anything’s possible’ attitude right now, which is awesome,” says Kurt. “And so I think people are trying to figure out new business models, small businesses,


going back to this idea that you’re kind of an entrepreneur and an inventor of something. Now you can actually build prototypes for yourself, and you can either pitch that to a company or you can outright make yourself a product. You can either make it available online and sell it that way, or make it open source, but there’s also things like Etsy where you can print things for people and sell things that way. If you are able to do large scale printing, for example, Nervous System [a design studio], they’ve come up with a model where they are able to print a number of things and offer jewelry and vases and artwork and lamps and all kinds of things they can sell. They sell them on their own website. There are numerous venues for those ideas. That’s what I feel is kind of changing, that it’s taking people that have these new ideas that are making things I think maybe, say 15 years ago, would be kind of stuck just going to their local craft fairs or open studios or trying to sell their stuff in this word-of-mouth way. But now they can have a web presence. The internet has changed a lot of the way people sell things”—things like electronic parts, tools or home decor, and yes, sex toys. And also, weapons.

weapons for decades before the information became available on the internet. But for most people, it’s an act of curiosity and a challenge to emulate the function of a firearm. Like lockpicking, a popular competition in hackerspaces (“Throw away the key,” Jan. 19), it’s more about learning the ins and outs of how guns work and less about intending to harm others. Kurt says that as a librarian, it’s important to her to not judge or censor what people want to print. To do so would go against her role to inspire creativity and curiosity in the library. The only weapons printed at the library have been throwing stars made from ABS plastic. But part of the hacker mentality is about protection against forces out of our control—knowing how we can build the infrastructure on which we depend—and the ability to print weapons seems to demonstrate the entire purpose of keeping 3-D printing open source. The Wiki Weapon’s website’s skirts the questions of legality and morality. In response to the question, “Are you making guns for people?” the site’s frequently asked questions replies “Is giving you a blueprint for a house the same as building that house for you?” The FAQ goes on to say, “Guns prove out some of our younger generations’ beliefs about information and sharing at an extremity. If we truly believe information should be free, that the internet is the last bastion of freedom and knowledge, and that societies that share are superior to societies that censor and withhold, then why not guns? The firearm has pride of place in underlining an individual’s significance as a moral agent.” Weaponry is not the only morally gray area of 3-D printing. Environmentalists are concerned with producing more objects made with non-recyclable materials. Others question the ethics and safety of printing human organs using biomaterials. And the legality of what can be printed and how—or if—to regulate products on the market has been an issue since

THE PEOPLES’ PRINTER For projects like the Wiki Weapon project—its tagline “Defense distributed”—embracing 3-D printing is an all-ornothing deal. The Wiki Weapon aims to make gun schematics free to download, where anyone could upload the designs to a printer and assemble their own gun. While working models of assault rifles have been built, it’s far from perfected technology. The project released a video in July, and the backlash was immediate. But despite the fear that surrounds the notion of the independent, mass producing weaponry, people have been building their own weapons—including guns and bombs—for decades using scrap objects and household chemicals. Publications like the Anarchist Cookbook have provided instructions for homemade

With apps like 123-D, a person can simply take photos of an object and upload it to a printer. What’s to stop someone from printing parts to build an iPhone? the early days of file sharing. With apps like 123-D, a 3-D modeling app created by Autodesk, a person can simply take photos of an object and upload it to a printer. What’s to stop someone from printing parts to build an iPhone? Theoretically, there will be a day where there is nothing that can’t be printed. Some researchers believe this will lead to a shift in perspective. Maybe it won’t be so important to trademark and protect designs. Maybe commerce will become less about unique, closed source designs and more like a trade economy. And Kurt says it’s unlikely that everyone everywhere will be even remotely interested in 3-D printing, especially since there are still many people worldwide without computer access. But for all of the movement’s gray areas, the world seems more excited about the potential of 3-D printers than concerned. Many information technology activists are starting to claim that having access a 3-D printer will become a right, similar to the fight to keep the internet uncontrolled and uncensored. Projects like 3D4D Challenge aim to use printing to solve problems around the world by holding a contest to find practical applications for 3-D printed objects. “It really seems to be a movement just continuously growing,” Kurt says. “So how do we support that? People are uncertain of how much this technology will really change. In a way, it’s revolutionary, but that depends on what we do with it. It’s kind of about having that spark of, ‘Maybe it won’t work’ in the long run. But maybe it will.” Ω

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In Rotation 16 | Art of the State 17 | Foodfinds 18 | Fi¬m 21 PHOTO/MEGAN BERNER

Prospectives ’12, the University of Nevada, Reno’s technological art festival, gets bigger as it demonstrates how the world keeps getting smaller by Kris Vagner Back when artists first started using computers en masse, “computer art” was its own medium. You made it with a clunky mouse on a small screen, and it trended toward a decidedly pre-ironic, old-school bitmappy look, a la ’80s arcade games like Asteroids. This was in the early ’90s, when only the deeply nerdiest academics knew about the internet. Mark Zuckerberg was just out of kindergarten and hadn’t yet founded Facebook, so if you wanted to use group interaction as part of your art piece, there was a good chance you were still doing it by snail mail or gathering audiences in a black box theater for live performances, sans digital anything. One of the next major iterations of digital art as a medium was digital photography, still a cutting edge phenomenon just a decade ago but now so integrated into the field of photography that it’s dropped the hyphenated prefix “digital,” and gone back to its maiden name, just “photography.” Not a single artist presents pixilated drawings or film-free camera technologies in Prospectives 12, a festival of digital art presented at venues around Reno.

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“The emphasis of the festival is to celebrate the diversity of using computers as a tool as opposed to a medium,” says Joseph DeLappe, Digital Media Professor at the University of Nevada, Reno and one of the festival’s organizers. So what qualifies as digital art that uses technology as a tool? “It’s very broad,” says DeLappe. “As long as the work somehow involved intrinsically in its creation some element of digital processes, it qualifies. That can range from highly processed works in the gallery to video work shot using digital media.” He and a selection committee reviewed proposals by graduate and doctoral students from universities and art schools around the world and selected 40 of them to present their work in Reno. DeLappe is hesitant to identify strong aesthetic or thematic trends among them. In that regard, digital art is “anything goes.” While “digital art” could be pretty much anything, though, a lot of the artists share a common interest in interactivity or interconnectivity of one sort or another. It could be among cultures, between individuals, or between things that might not even seem related.

Rena Katz, a student at Parsons/The New School for Design in New York, sets up sound stations in the streets. Passersby listen to recordings of demonstration chants from national boundary lines where there are conflicts and walls (Israel/Palestine; U.S./Mexico border). Listeners choose a chant they like, Katz coaches them on tone and inflection, they rehearse, then they perform the chants online. Another example: New York University’s Phan Visutyothapibal lets sound dictate the movements of his organic, geometric, animated images. In the piece, he plans to show sounds that come from his own heart beating, and the resulting video images are what he calls “a synesthetic view of a human heartbeat.”

Artists in the festival have found several other ways to play around with this neurological phenomenon, using it a metaphor for social structures or an interactive way to cross-reference movement, sounds and visuals. Louisiana State University’s Nick Hwang describes his project with this invitation: “Add, move, and replace the cubes. Their placement and number affect the sound.” Clinton Sleeper, a former Reno resident who’s now a student at Simon Frazer University in Canada, is planning a performance where he deals and shuffles playing cards and translates each card’s movement into a sound, which gets incorporated into a sound collage. In a live performance at the Nevada Museum of Art, David Simons from New York University augments the sound from an olderthan-your-grandfather “technologically experimental” musical instrument, the theremin, with an algorithm that creates feedback, which gets mixed back into the performance.

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) Visutyothapibal’s “synesthetic” refers to synesthesia, the process by which the brain cross-wires sensory pathways, making it feel like a person is hearing colors or seeing sounds. With the multi-sensory potential of technological equipment, synesthetic systems seem like a natural avenue for digital artists to explore.

An image from “04302011,” a video projection by Sophie Kahn.

For more information on the festival, visit www.unr.edu/art/ prospectives12.html.


Prospectives is, on one hand, a gathering of academics. Of the 40 participating artists, the university plans to fly in 27. Travel for artists comprised the biggest chunk of the event’s budget. Some artists were too expensive to import or just not available to attend, and a few of those are being Skyped in from Hong Kong, the UK, Estonia and Ohio. “Part of the requirement for them is attending everything. I like to call it kind of a temporary community of media artists,” says DeLappe. While a large part of the goal is to help grad-school artists connect with their peers, each presentation is also open to the public, despite the fact that many take place during banker’s hours. As a potential festival-goer, don’t be fooled by the lack of a detailed program. It may require some detailed research on the festival’s site—and maybe YouTube, Google and Vimeo—to figure out where to go when and what exactly it is you’ll be attending. The event does have a Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ Prospectives2012. Many presentations are listed just by artist’s name, so you might be shooting in the dark when deciding which events to attend. If you’re not game for that level of randomness, your best bet is to drop by the Fleischmann Planetarium on Oct. 16, 6 p.m. and Oct. 17, 7 p.m. But fear not: shooting in the dark is a perfectly good strategy here. The artists’ proposals ranged from pretty cool if slightly inscrutable to extremely, eye-openingly cool. Plus, this is likely your only chance to catch a lot of these artists in Reno any time soon. Ω PHOTO/MEGAN BERNER

Rachel Armstrong, interim director of the Sheppard Gallery, Jeanne Jo, guest curator, and Joseph DeLappe, festival director stand behind Liat Berdugo’s “Switch.”

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Prospectives is a triennial event that’s been held since 2006. DeLappe reports that the event’s spirit has remained constant, but that it’s seen two main changes. One is a growth spurt. “This is our most ambitious festival to date, for sure,” he says. He and a review committee received 84 entries from Master’s of Fine Arts and doctoral students around the world and selected 40 to showcase their work. That's about twice as many as the second festival in 2009. The event has also made some strides in growing into the potential of its high-tech venues. When it began in 2006, for example, organizers were hoping to make use of the projection dome at the Fleischmann Planetarium, just a few buildings over from the art department on campus. “Producing video for full-dome projection is a pretty specific process,” DeLappe says, and no one submitted anything that year. In 2009, they screened a demo reel of full-dome-specific work, which DeLappe says may not have represented the best in cutting edge art pieces, but it gave audiences and artists a sense of what full-dome could do. “We also started showing sound pieces in there,” DeLappe notes. “That was really something. It was really intense because basically you’re sitting in the space in the dark [listening to sound art.]” This year, the planetarium is the most talked about venue—others include UNR’s Sheppard Gallery and the Nevada Museum of Art.

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Aztec support The Mexican on the Aztecs and regional Mexican stereotypes Dear Mexican: Why do so many Chicanos claim to be Aztec? Dear Gabacho: You’re right. The beaner love for everything Aztec mostly stems from the Chicano Movement, which appropriated various Mexican iconography—the stylized United Farm Workers black eagle, the concept of Aztlán, the airbrushed paintings of warriors and scantily clad heinas on car trunks and by Gustavo Arellano blankets—to make a long-vanquished culture their own during an era where gustavoa@ they were searching for an ethnic hernewsreview.com itage. They, in turn, got the idea from indigenismo, the Mexican intellectual movement from the 1920s that took pride in Mexico’s Indian past. And the indigenistas, in turn, went with the Aztecs because they’re the Lost Cause of Mexico. There is more known about the Aztec empire than other Mexican indigenous groups because the Conquest—the foundation myth of Mexico—involved battles between the Aztecs and Spaniards that featured

copious documentation, both in the codices that survived and the Spanish chronicles. The ultimate symbol of Mexico—the golden eagle perched on a cactus, snake in its beak—references the Aztec legend of the foundation of Tenochtitlan. And Nahuatl words are muchos in Mexican Spanish—for the gabachos at home, any word that ends with the suffix “–te” (chocolate, tomate, cacahuate, aguacate) came from the Nahuatl suffix “–tl.” But the Mexican must admit that he cringes at Aztec worship. For one, all that obsession comes at the expense of other tribes, tribes that the Aztecs probably would’ve killed or subjugated if they were still around—they were the Romans of Mexico, and I don’t mean that as a compliment. In addition, that romanticizing has problematic roots: indigenismo was part of bigger project of justifying modernity at the expense of the past. “Indigenismo was … a means to an end rather than an enduring mission,”

wrote David A. Brading in his 1998 paper “Manuel Gamio and Official Indigenismo in Mexico.” “If incorporation was its aim, then essentially it sought to destroy rather than fortify the peasant culture of native communities. Modernizing nationalism of the brand advocated by [Mexican intellectuals] found consolation in past glories but its inner vision was based in the liberal resolve to transform a backward country into a modern nation able to defend itself from foreign hegemony.” But, hey: if you want to change your name from Jose Gonzalez to Nezahualcoyotl Moctezuma and go to sweat lodges on weekends even though you’re lighter-skinned than a Southern belle, be my guest! I’m sure your ancestors who fought the Aztecs—both indigenous and Hispanic—would’ve approved! Why do Mexicans in Mexico refer to each other by certain traits when they are from different towns? For

example, I heard people from Monterrey are codos (stingy)? And I heard people from Guadalajara are usually blond. What about Mexicans from Durango, Michoacán, and Sonora? Dear Wab: It’s not a Mexican trait— look at how Americans stereotype Midwesterners, Southerners, New Yorkers, even people from pinche Maine. But I’ll answer your pregunta because this is a teaching column for gabas, so let me bust out a bunch of otros Mexican regional stereotypes. People from Durango have a cowboy mentality, michoacanos are trashy, and those from Sonora are rugged individualists. Sinaloans are nuts, folks from Jalisco are stuck up, and gente de Veracruz talkative. Los de Oaxaca are stubborn, Chihuahua residents are tall and light-skinned, and people from Guerrero are born outlaws. Finally, people from the mighty state of Zacatecas are the greatest people on God’s green Earth. Ω

Gustavo Arellano’s column “¡Ask a Mexican!” runs every week on our website at www.newsreview.com/ reno/All?oid=310599

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PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

Haunt for red October

Actors Kyle Crawford an Nicolle Crouse are bloody and scary in the Slaughter House.

Slaughter House A good, properly frightening haunted house, like Slaughter House, which opens Oct. 11 in by Meadowood Mall, is like a multimedia art Brad Bynum installation—bringing together acting, makeup, set design, sound design and bradb@ sculpture—all for the purposing of eliciting newsreview.com primarily one emotion: fear. “It’s kind of a Nada Dada Hotel kind of a thing, because we have all these other artists coming in,” says Eli Kerr, the owner and director of Slaughter House. “We have live acting. We have artistic The 2012 Slaughter painting. We have sculpting. … Just about House opens at every art that’s out there is incorporated Meadowood Mall, 5000 into the house.” Meadowood Mall Circle, Slaughter House is a disorienting maze on Oct. 11 at 7 p.m. For of phobias, more than 8,000 feet, where more information, visit www.facebook.com/Reno visitors are confronted by one frightening HauntedHouse room after another. Whatever you fear— from spiders and corpses to clowns and dogs—there’s a good chance you’ll find it in the Slaughter House. There are innumerable props, many of them customized objects made specifically for the haunted house, and dozens of actors, most of whom are decked out in gruesome makeup and all

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of whom are volunteers. This is the seventh year of the Slaughter House, though it has changed locations a few times, and since surprise is a crucial element of fear, every year the house is different. “We take people to several levels this year, raising people up off the ground, and putting stuff over their head,” says Kerr. “We even take people on an elevator ride. … We’re trying to scare people from different levels—kind of getting away from just a guy jumping away and saying “boo”— which still does work, though. Too much of that is too much of that, and changing isn’t always better, but we try to embrace the things that still work and the things that people do expect. … Nothing’s worse than going to see your favorite singer and he doesn’t do your favorite song, just because everyone’s already heard it.” Kerr’s also a well-known illusionist, and his new magic show Eli: the Magic of Eli Kerr opens Oct. 19, at Harrah’s. He’s the figurehead of Slaughter House, but the house is a collaboration among dozens of volunteers, many of whom

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wear multiple masks: acting, building sets and designing makeup. “This is about as close as you can come to doing film without actually doing film,” says Jeremy Trader, a volunteer involved with just about every aspect of the house. “This is the best outlet for anyone creative.” Reactions to the house vary—from sorority girls who have to be escorted out after the first room to 10-year-old boys who, upon finishing, immediately want to go back through. “It’s a study in human nature every year,” says Kerr. “People, as much as they don’t admit it, like to be scared. It’s a rush.”

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“We have had good reactions over the years,” says Trader. “Just about any bodily fluid that can be expelled, has been.” For that reason, he recommends going to the bathroom before entering, and maybe not eating or drinking immediately beforehand. “Just for our sakes, we hate to have to shut down to clean,” says Trader. The house will be open through October 31, with discounted ticket prices for donations to Food Bank of Northern Nevada. On Sunday afternoons from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., the house is presented as a kid-friendly “Laughter House.” What attracts the volunteers to participate in a haunted house like this? “Scaring people keeps up the energy,” says Kyle Crawford, an actor in the house. “You get excited to scare the next person.” “This is stuff we love to do,” says Javon “Buddha” Padillo, one of the house’s lead builders. “This is how we celebrate Halloween.” Ω

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Bronx Pizzeria

7698 S. Virginia St., 853-1111 I will admit I’m a pizza snob. I spent my early career in the Big Apple, and as a result, I was taste-washed—similar by Dave Preston to brainwashed—and not even time in a gulag could change me. To me, davep@ Bronx Pizzeria is the Valhalla of the newsreview.com pie. Dave Nicol is a born-and-bred Manhattanite, whose dad had small restaurants and coffee shops in New York, so the business was in his blood. After a stint in the Marines, he eventually made his way West and became the director of catering for the iconic Bill Graham Productions in the Bay Area.

Owner Dave Nicol with a personal-size cheese pizza at Bronx Pizzeria.

Bronx Pizzeria is 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.bronxpizzeria.com.

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is limited but nice ($5). Service is very good since all pies are made to order, on-the-spot. These are 18-inch pies, the way it’s supposed to be, and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., you can get slices for $2. A full pie starts at $18 and each topping is $1.50 each. Their specialty pies run up to $25. What makes a pizza is the crust— not too thin and crisp like a cracker nor doughy like white bread. It needs to be a cushion with the consistency of a sponge, with just a bit of a salty flavor. You don’t want to taste yeast, nor flour, but rather a texture that supports a topping or two, with tomato tang, basil and oregano spice, and warm cheese that blends with the crust cushion to marry in the mouth. When you masticate this combination, that flavor profile fills your mouth with layers of a salty, sweet, savory, cheesy pleasure. This dough is made fresh every day, but is then cold fermented for 24 hours. Retarding dough is the act of placing it in a cold environment in order to slow down the activity of the yeast. At cool fridge temperatures, yeast behaves differently, producing more of the desirable flavor and texture. The sauce is also simple, with tasty, homemade ingredients. The tomatoes come from a small, family run farm in Stanislaus, Calif. The garlic is sweated—a sweat is similar to a sauté in that the goal is to cook small, uniform pieces in an open pan at a low heat to preserve the garlic flavor, not making it bitter. Sausage comes from the New York Sausage Company in Sunnyvale, Calif., and the pepperoni is from Tony’s Fine Foods and Sierra Meats. The whole-milk mozzarella is from the North Beach Cheese Company. Nicol’s approach to restaurateuring is simple: “create, and don’t compete.” He grew up eating New York pizza and serves the food he ate as a kid, and it tastes just as good today as it did then. The good news is you don’t have to travel 2,600 miles for an authentic piece of NYC pie—fuhgeddaboudit!Ω PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

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Peace of the pie

He came to Reno in 2006 to retire, but that didn’t last long. In February, he opened this pie house. The place offers pastas and sandwiches, but I was there for one thing: Neapolitan-style pie. Pizza is Greek in origin, but modern pizza originated in Italy as the Neapolitan pie with tomato and herbs. Cheese was added in 1889, the same year Queen Margherita of Italy visited Naples and was served a pizza resembling the colors of the Italian flag: red (tomato), white (mozzarella) and green (basil). This kind of pizza has been named after the Queen, as Margherita pizza, and is one of the most common types of pizza served today. Bronx is a simple, comfortable spot that holds about 75, including a small dining room and a bar, where you’ll find a variety of bottled beers, imported ($5), micro ($4.50), and domestics ($3.50). Wine by-the-glass

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Dream cast

End of Watch

4

Seven Psychopaths Writer-director Martin McDonagh’s Seven Psychopaths is one of the best films since the Coen brothers’ Barton Fink about the art of writing or, more precisely, not being able to write a movie screenplay. This is an ingenious, wildly engaging movie from the man who brought us the brilliant In Bruges (my personal pick for the year’s best movie in 2008). Like Quentin Tarantino, Paul Thomas Anderson and Wes by Anderson, McDonagh creates movies that Bob Grimm transcend genres. While I can compare him to bgrimm@ other directors, I can only compare him to the newsreview.com unique ones who make movies that are decidedly theirs and theirs alone. McDonagh makes movies like no other. Colin Farrell gets the second best role of his career—the best being the starring role in In Bruges—as Martin, a character obviously modeled after the director himself. Martin is trying to write a screenplay called Seven Psychopaths, and he’s wracking his brain for seven characters with distinctive killing methods. The way these characters appear to him is very much part of this film’s unending fun.

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“Oh my gosh! That dog is so cute! I just want to hold him! Can I please? He’s just so fluffy and adorable. Ooh! Ooh! Please! Good doggie! So cute! You just have the cutest little face, don’t you, little cutie patootie puppy!”

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He’s friends with a true nutball named Billy, and when your nutball is played by the magical Sam Rockwell, you just know it’s going to be good. And it is. Billy wants to help his buddy write his screenplay. He’s a struggling actor making money on the side kidnapping dogs with Hans (Christopher Walken—oh, this cast is just a dream). They swipe the pups, and turn them in for rewards. They make a big mistake when they grab an adorable Shih Tzu owned by the psycho-

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pathic Charlie (Woody Harrelson—do I hear best cast of the year?). Terrible behavior and violence ensues, and nobody is safe in McDonagh’s crazed world. When Martin describes the Seven Psychopaths, the movie depicts them in an almost fairytale fashion. Anybody familiar with McDonagh’s body of work will see similarities to his Tony Award-winning play The Pillowman. There are other elements similar to the play in this film, and I won’t give them away. I will tell you that a prominent member of the Broadway cast makes an awesome cameo. The movie doesn’t skimp on the violence, which is often delivered during stylized depictions of the seven psychopaths and their killing ways. This could almost be a children’s movie, if everybody wasn’t getting their heads shot off in it. Farrell is at his best when his Irish accent is in full force and he’s allowed to show his comic edge. Martin’s constant drinking helps fuel a Farrell performance that isn’t stereotypically drunk, just obviously impaired. And I love the almost immature, childlike attitude that Farrell injects into his work when McDonagh is around. Perhaps he should just make movies with McDonagh from here on out. Rockwell and Walken are basically playing the character types they excel at. They are stereotypical Rockwell and Walken, and what’s better than that? Rockwell is constantly delivering his lines with a wide-eyed, bigassed grin and Walken delivers his in that, well, unmistakably Walken way. These roles seem tailor-made for these actors. And if you think their presence isn’t enough, here comes Tom Waits holding a white bunny rabbit and regaling you with tall tales about executing serial killers. And there’s Gabourey Sidibe as a teary-eyed former dog sitter who’s about to get fired in a most unfortunate way. Ultimately, the film is about the struggle to create, presented in a very creative way. I mentioned the Coens’ immortal Barton Fink up above because it was a brilliant take on writer’s block written when Joel and Ethan actually had writer’s block. McDonagh’s Seven Psychopaths is about making something artistic and respectable out of trashy themes. Martin is trying for depth and beauty, while Billy screams for shootouts. Both characters get their wishes in hugely entertaining ways. Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña shine in this absorbing cop drama from writerdirector David Ayer (Harsh Times). They play Los Angeles police officers who go above and beyond the call of duty, and sometimes bend the rules just a little bit. Their willingness to put their necks on the line eventually leads to trouble with a drug cartel, and their lives are threatened. Gyllenhaal and Peña make for a great screen duo. The movie is often very funny simply because of the way they interact. Ayer uses the old “cops videotaping themselves on the job” gimmick a little bit, but it never becomes too distracting. He also fills his movie with great action and chase sequences. The movie is a shocker in many ways, and truly makes you think about what cops go through on a daily basis. Nice supporting performances from Anna Kendrick and America Ferrera.

Finding Nemo 3D

4

Nine years after its original release, this Pixar charmer comes back to screens with a nice 3-D presentation. Honestly, I felt like I was watching it for the first time. The Pixar films are primed for 3-D. The movie looks like it was always intended to be this way. Albert Brooks voices Marlin, a paranoid clown fish who loses his kid Nemo to human divers. While Nemo sits in a dentist’s aquarium, Marlin frantically races across the ocean with new friend Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) in tow. For me, DeGeneres is the true star of this movie. Her voice work will always stand as a favorite cartoon character of mine, especially when she speaks whale. Other voice actors include Willem Dafoe as a growling angelfish and Brad Garrett as a puffer fish. I know I sound a bit clichéd saying this, but this is a real treat for the entire family.

Frankenweenie

3

Tim Burton directs this enjoyable blackand-white stop-motion animated movie based on his own short film about a family dog being resurrected … Frankenstein style! Burton made the short film 28 years ago. While the story isn’t an especially electric one, the art direction is superb, and there are enough good laughs to make it worthwhile. Also worth noting: Winona Ryder voices a young girl character that looks suspiciously like Lydia, her character in Burton’s Beetlejuice. Other voices include Burton alumni such as Catherine O’Hara and Marin Landau, once again using his Bela Lugosi voice from Ed Wood. A finale sequence involving a giant, Gamera-like turtle and rabid sea monkeys gives the film a nice retro-horror feel. It’s a little sleepy in spots, but too impressive in other ways to completely overlook.

Hotel Transylvania

2

This animated take on Dracula (Adam Sandler) and other big monsters like Frankenstein’s monster (Kevin James) and the Werewolf (Steve Buscemi) has a fun setup and some great gags. But its overall feeling is that of total mania in that it barely slows down long enough for you to take it in. It’s often unnecessarily spastic in telling the tale of a nervous Dracula dealing with his daughter on her 118th birthday—young in vampire years). A human (Andy Samberg) shows up at the title place, a building Dracula created to keep dangerous humans away, and his daughter (Selena Gomez) falls for him. The overall story is hard to digest, but there are some great moments, such as every time the vampires turn into bats (cute) and a werewolf baby knowing what plane flight somebody is taking by smelling his shirt (unbelievably cute). Even with the cute moments, there were too many times when I just wanted to look away because the animation was far too frantic.

Looper

5

Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays Joe, a loner living in 2042 who has actually been sent back from the year 2072 to kill people that organized crime wishes to dispose of. He

Reno Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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stands in a field with his gun aimed at a tarp, waiting for his hooded victim to zap back from the future and receive a very rude greeting. Very bad, and very entertaining, things happen when the man sent back to be executed is actually Joe’s future self (Bruce Willis). Willis is great here as a tired and scared old criminal hell bent on fixing his future. GordonLevitt is even better as an embittered, callous young man looking to preserve his future and get his older self out of the picture. GordonLevitt, made up to look like a younger Willis, does a nice job of capturing the Willis stare and growl. Emily Blunt is on hand as a mother trying to protect her child, and Paul Dano lights up the screen with a pivotal supporting role. This is one of the year’s most ingenious films, and one of the best time travel yarns you’re going to see.

The Master

3

Joaquin Phoenix plays Freddie, a troubled World War II vet who returns from a stint with the Navy a little messed up in the head. He’s having trouble finding his place in the world, and he’s constantly swigging lethal alcohol drinks made of anything he can find in the medicine cabinet or tool shed. He’s prone to major mood swings and violence. His relationships and jobs aren’t working out, and his drinking is getting him into a lot of trouble. He winds up a stowaway on a luxury yacht where he meets Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman), leader of The Cause, a cult-like movement with more than a few similarities to Scientology. The two wind up strangely dependent on one another as they both battle different demons. Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson (There Will Be Blood) the film features great performances, but also has a vibe of been there, done that. It’s worth seeing for the Phoenix-Hoffman fireworks, but not one of Anderson’s best.

The Possession

2

As far as demon possession movies go, I’d have to count this as one of the better offerings in recent years. That still doesn’t make it all that good. Based on a “true story”—bullshit!—it stars Jeffrey Dean Morgan as a basketball coach who moves his two daughters into a new house. They go to a yard sale, where the youngest daughter (an impressive Natasha Calis) grabs a mysterious box that has dead moths and spooky stuff in it. She winds up getting possessed by a demon, requiring the help of a Hasidic Jew instead of Roman Catholic priests for a change. And, of course, that Hasidic Jew is none other than Matisyahu. Director Ole Bornedal provides some genuinely creepy moments—I especially liked the very spooky CAT scan—but he also provides a little too much bad melodrama that drags the film down. Still, Morgan and Calis are good here, and the possession portions of the movie do have a decent freak-out factor. (Love those hands coming out of mouths!) A hearty “Screw you!” to the dumbass who decided to make this a PG-13 affair. This one should’ve shot for an R.

Resident Evil: Retribution

1

In the fifth chapter of the popular zombie franchise, things get so sloppy, disorganized and frantic, it’s as if one of the TVirus zombies bit the movie on the leg and it got all crazy and infected. This is the third installment directed by the much-maligned Paul W.S. Anderson, who has been involved with the franchise from the beginning in various capacities. He directed the first movie, took a couple of movies off, and returned for 2010’s lousy Afterlife, and now this even worse monstrosity. He has the dubious distinction of having directed the best and worst films in the franchise. Milla Jovovich returns as Alice, zombie killer, and her efforts are all for naught. The movie makes little to no sense, the action is haphazard and clumsy, and this franchise seriously needs to call it quits. It got off to an OK start with the first two films, but things have deteriorated mightily since then.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe

OCTOBER 11, 2012

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ine u n e G

Northern Nevada IT’S NOT RUST! metal art show

free reception

FRI, OCT 12 | 4–7pm saT, OCT 13 | 10am–4pm

Unique Steel, Copper, Brass & Bronze Work Handcrafted from local Artisans

250 Court St | Lake Mansion Garden Pavillion Sponsored by TMCC Art Welding Advisory Group

NATURAL ADVANTAGE

Health Shoppe Your local expert on

HERBS, SUPPLEMENTS, CUSTOM BLENDS & CONSULATIONS 1104 California Ave. (California and Booth)

775-322-4372(HERB)

Tuesday – Friday 10am to 5:30pm, Saturday 9am to 4pm

Changing office computers? Donate your old equipment! • We’ll pick up from you for just $25 • Your donation supports schools, low-income families, non-profits, locals with disabilities and small business

THE MOANA CONSTRUCTION SUCKS!

WE DON'T! the Take a break from our traffic & stop by Kietzke Lane store. Our new MidTown ! store is open, too

• Responsible recycling of non-usable parts

(775)329-1126 new2ucomputers.org

822 S. Virginia

Think Free 22   |   RN&R   |   OCTOBER 11, 2012


Mr. Rotten John Lydon The one-time Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols was the most recognizable face and voice of British punk rock in the mid by Brad Bynum 1970s, and, as John Lydon, he went on to lead one of the best, most musically bradb@ diverse and challenging post-punk newsreview.com groups, Public Image Ltd. (PiL), which has been a going concern off and on since 1978. This is PiL, the band’s first album since 1992, came out in May, and the group is playing Reno’s Knitting Factory on Friday, Oct. 26.

Public Image Ltd., featuring the indomitable John Lydon, second from right.

Public Image Ltd. performs at the Knitting Factory, 211 N. Virginia St., on Friday, Oct. 26. For a longer, better version of this interview, visit www.newsreview.com.

OPINION

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NEWS

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Have you played in Reno before? Yeah, I have, years back. Years and years back. It was in one of those casinos, very strange. I don’t like doing gambling venues. … I don’t believe in gambling. … If there’s such a thing as temperate as luck, I think it’s pointless putting money on it. I think it will either happen or it won’t. I think gambling leads to all kinds of social problems. And if you came from a British working class family, you’d understand that. The new album seems like part of the tradition of PiL, but a departure too. If PiL has a tradition at all, it’s that every album sounds very different from the one before, but there is a constant thread and that’s the character of me. I’m there. That’s the maypole which all this dances around, because, you know, it’s the story of my life’s experiences, and that’s the unification necessary for it to work. That’s the substantive matter, and of course my life story is very, very close to Bruce [Smith], the drummer’s, or Lu Edmonds or the bass player, Scott [Firth]. At the same time, we’re vastly different characters, but we’ve all been through the grind of what we know is humanity and life, and come out someGREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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how smiling. The point being, don’t let the bastards grind you down no matter what. … I’m just a human being trying to get by and tell his life experiences in the most honest way possible. Short, sharp, to the point and directly. I don’t have no time for lies and liars. Where do you see dishonesty? Every politician, every institution, and every political party, because once you get that amalgamation of juxtapositions, what they deal with then is compromise, and in compromise really lies the roots of deceit. That can be very challenging for me, because I don’t see the need for it. For me, the more varied we all are, the better it is. Why can we not agree to disagree? Some of my best friends don’t agree with anything I have to say on anything at all, and that’s fantastic company for me. … Because it keeps you constantly alert and aware that your agenda is not other people’s, and that can be fine. We’ve all got very many different interest or points of view or opinions, but when you open yourself to debate with people that have challengingly different points of view, it’s educational, because from time to time, you can actually learn that you might be wrong. And learning to admit that you’re wrong is one of your greatest achievements, it’s certainly been mine. When have you been wrong? Off the top of my head, arguing at school with the teachers! But I found it very useful because I got to the answer at the end. I don’t like to lay down a proposition and it be based on just a belief system rather than a truth, and hence debate at all times. Songs are debates. ... because you’re declaring your point of view or you’re trying to see the world through another person’s point of view, and you can either be wrong about this or you can be right about it, but either way it will spur other people into commenting. So what you’ve done is that you’ve opened a new subject to them. For me, the people that hate me and can’t stand whatever it is I get up to are just as valid as those that hero worship me. It’s about the same thing. At least they’re discussing something. That’s a hell of a lot more valid than just being called a nice person … that’s the worst insult you could ever face, “Oh, he’s really nice.” Ω IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 11, 2012

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THURSDAY 10/11 3RD STREET

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

FRIDAY 10/12 Drinking with Clowns, 10pm, no cover

SATURDAY 10/13

SUNDAY 10/14

The Whiskey Haulers, The Mofo Party Band, 9pm, $5

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT THE ALLEY

KnappSacc, 8:30pm, $10

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-0806

Rubles Plunge, Uprising, 8:30pm, no cover Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic,, 8pm, Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover Teriaoke w/ Teri, Tu, 7pm, no cover

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB

Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

Oct. 11, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

THE BLACK TANGERINE

Bike Night Blues Jam w/live music, 7pm, no cover

Seeing Eye Dogs, 9:30pm, no cover

Cowboys from Hell, Buried, A Surrogate Band,9:30pm, $5

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

Chapel Tavern Oktoberfest, 4pm, $30

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

COMMA COFFEE COMMROW

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

1) Teton Gravity Research: The Dream Factory, 8pm, $123-$20

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Steven Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Comedy

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

1) Forbidden Fridays, 10:30pm, $10 2) Marc Yaffee, Adam Stone, 8pm, $14.95, DJ Double B, 10pm, no cover

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover 1) Extravaganza, 7pm, $10, $30, Ill Eesha, 1) Hoobastank, RadioDriveBy, 7pm, $5, Unlimited Gravity, Cobraconda, 11:30pm, $8, Dark Star Orchestra, 8pm, Tu, $10, $15 2) DJ Double B, 10pm, no cover $28-$55

Steve Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY Virginia St., 329-4777: Collin Moulton, 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917 Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, FRESH KETCH $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; 2435 Venice Dr., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 541-5683 Max Dolcelli, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Souled Out 775, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Days Off, 9:30pm, no cover

New World Jazz Project, 7pm, no cover

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys FUEGO Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: 170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800 James Stephens, Tari Lynn Crompton, Th-F, GREAT BASIN BREWING CO. Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Allan 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711 Havey, Scott Kennedy, W, 9pm, $25

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover Reno Blues Society Get ’Em to Memphis, 4pm, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer 8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300 Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Utility Players, Th, 7:30pm, $12, THE HOLLAND PROJECT $16, Comedy Contest Semi-Finals, F, 9:30pm, 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858 $9, Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Ron Osbourne, Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, JAVA JUNGLE $13, $16 246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

Mark Castro Band, 10pm, no cover Saving Alleya, Fighting the Future, The Dweller in Me, 7pm, $5

SIC ALPS, Memory Motel, Cat Jelly, 8pm, $7

Iron Lung, The Process, Elephant Rifle, Pissmixer, Fathoms, 7:30pm Tu, $5 Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

Just

THESE DON’T

MIX

Think you know your limits? Think again.

SIMPLE, FRESH, SEAFOOD the way the sea intended - for 35 years -

If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

Zombie crawl Sat Oct 13 | 6 –10pm | Well’s Ave StArt & End At ryAn’S SAlOOn • $5 Punch card • raffle Prizes • drink sPecials

ryAn’S SAlOOn & BROILER 924 S. Wells Ave. | 323-4142 24

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OCTOBER 11, 2012

DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm, Tu, no cover Jazz Night, 7:30pm, Tu, no cover

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

Chevelle

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/15-10/17

1555 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV

www.Rapscallion.com

FeAturin

g

zomboo

775-323-1211 • 1-877-932-3700 Open Monday - Friday at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm Sunday Brunch from 10am to 2pm

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm M, no cover


THURSDAY 10/11 JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

FRIDAY 10/12

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

SATURDAY 10/13

SUNDAY 10/14

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/15-10/17

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Stabby Unicorn, Candyshoppe, 9pm, $3

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

1) Chevelle, Turbogeist, 8pm, $25-$50 2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover 1) FuntCase, 8:30pm, M, $18-$39.50, The Word Alive, Born of Osiris, 6pm, Tu, $20-$45,

2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Dale Poune, 7pm, no cover

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm, W, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

Rumble, 8pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RED ROCK BAR

Thursday Jam Session, 9pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468 1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm W, no cover

Andrew Burrons, 1pm, Silver Wing, 8pm, no cover

Wells Avenue Zombie Crawl, 6pm, no cover

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Spontaneous Combustion, 8:30pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Skaraoke, 9pm, no cover

Last to Leave, Feather Merchants, 9:30pm, no cover

The Deadly Gallows, Handsome Vultures, Sunday Night Strega Mic, The Fucking Buckaroos, 9pm, no cover 9pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

E4 Haunted House, 7pm, no cover

Oktoberfest w/DJs Filthy One, Penn7, others, 8pm, no cover

Fall Down w/DJs Joe Snarky, Couch King, Boggan, 10pm, no cover

VASSAR LOUNGE

Saxaholic, 8pm, no cover

Chadillac, 8pm, no cover

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Live music, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993 1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Oct. 13, 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay 833-6333

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Second Sundays Open Mic w/The Westside Digs,6:30pm, no cover

Zepparella

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Drinking with Clowns, 9pm, W, no cover

Hoobastank Oct. 14, 7 p.m. CommRow 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

MACBETH

OPENS FRIDAY at BRÜKA THEATER CHOOSE YOUR ADVENTURE a ski odyssey

Main List of Characters Jake Sakson | Noah Howell | Hugo Harrison | Andrew Mclean | Dylan Freed | Chris Davenport | Seith Wescott | Matt Reardon | Darrell Finlayson | Bob Athey | PY Leblanc | Drew Stoecklein | Ian Provo | Mathieu Theriault | Neil Provo | Chuck Mumford | Jason Thompson | Forrest Coots | Todd Stuart Locations Cerro Castillo, Chile | La Grave, France | British Columbia, Canada | Antarctic Penninsula | Mount Foraker, Alaska | Svalbard, Norway | Wasatch Mountains, Utah

POWER INTRIGUE DEVASTATION WRITTEN BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE DIRECTED BY JOE ATACK

OCTOBER

Friday October 19th, 7:30pm

12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26 @ 8PM 14 - SUNDAY MATINEE @ 2PM

Patagonia Outlet, Reno

PRE-MATINEE SHAKESPEARE CONVERSATION @ 1PM POST-MATINEE TALK BACK WITH COMPANY

Tickets $12 ($15 at the door)

$16-S/S $18-G $20-DOOR

Purchase online at sierraavalanchecenter.org Proceeds to benefit Sierra Avalanche Center and SheJumps For additional tour dates & info visit www.powderwhore.com

WWW.BRUKA.ORG 775-323-3221

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 11, 2012

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 10/11

FRIDAY 10/12

SATURDAY 10/13

SUNDAY 10/14

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/15-10/17

2) Soul Experience, 8pm, no cover

2) Soul Experience, 4pm, Cook Book, 10pm, no cover

2) Soul Experience, 4pm, Cook Book, 10pm, no cover

Cook Book, 8pm, no cover

1) American Made Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Henhouse Prowlers, 7pm, no cover

2) After Dark, 8pm, no cover

2) After Dark, 8pm, no cover

California Band, 10pm, no cover

California Band, 10pm, no cover

1) Juno What, Sophistafunk, 9pm, no cover

1) Zepparella, 10pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+ 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 8pm, $19.95+ 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, 9:30pm, $19.95+ 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

4) Chris Gardner Band, 9pm, no cover

1) Anthony Cools, 9pm, $10 4) Chris Gardner Band, 9pm, no cover

4) Chris Gardner Band, 9pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Dave Mason, 7:30pm, $33 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

2) Live local bands, 10pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

2) Live local bands, 10pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

2) Felix and the Soul Cats, 7pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

2) Felix and the Soul Cats, 8pm, no cover 5) DJ Larry Williams, 10pm, no cover

2) Felix and the Soul Cats, 8pm, no cover 5) DJ Larry Williams, 10pm, no cover

4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

4) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

4) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

2) Superbad, 9pm, no cover

2) Superbad, 9pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

Dave Mason

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Highway 50 Stateline 588-6611

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+ 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm Tu, W, $19.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm M, DJ Chris English, 10pm Tu, no cover 3) Spindustry Wednesdays, 9pm, W, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

Karaoke

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2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

OCTOBER 11, 2012

The RN&R no longer a ccepts emailed or phoned-in listings. Post show s online by registering at www.ne wsreview.c om/reno. Deadline is the Friday b efore publication .

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover


OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 11, 2012

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SweetdealS are in your future Save up to 75% on dining, shopping & services! Scan to view dozens of gift certificates available now!

Visit www.newsreview.com Gift CertifiCateS froM reStaurantS, BarS, CluBS, tattoo, retail, tHeater, SalonS, SPaS, Golf, VaCationS & More 28   |   RN&R   |   OCTOBER 11, 2012


For Thursday, October 11 to Wednesday, October 17 A NIGHT WITH THE SPIRITS: Paranormal investigators Mark and Debby Constantino of Spirits-Speak will lead a guided ghost hunt to see if they can make contact with any sprits in the collection, which features rare and exotic relics from around the world. The tour includes wine and hors d’oeuvres. This event is limited to 25 people per night. F, 10/12, 711pm; Sa, 10/13, 7-11pm. $60. Wilbur D. May Museum, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park; 1595 N. Sierra St.; (775) 785-5961; www.maycenter.com.

To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., Oct. 25, is Thursday, Oct. 18. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

PET NETWORKS PURSES FOR PETS: Pet Network Humane Society hosts its fourth annual fundraiser. Donations of gently used purses, clutches, bags and jewelry will be auctioned off from 1-4pm at the Atlantis Casino’s Paradise Ballroom. All proceeds benefit Pet Network Humane Society’s rescue and rehabilitation efforts. Su, 10/14, 1-4pm. $10. Atlantis Casino Resort Spa; 3800 S. Virginia St.; (775) 832-4404 ext. 114; www.petnetwork.org.

Events 5K RUN/WALK TIGER DASH FUNDRAISER RACE: This 5k run/walk in the Humboldt range canyons is a fundraiser to support Safe Haven Rescue Zoo’s animal rescues. The event will take place at Safe Havens facility with additional activities, including silent auction/raffle, scheduled tours to meet our resident lions, tigers, cougars and other animals and food and beverages, including wine and beer for purchase. Animal enrichment demonstrations provided. Pre-registered runners receive an admission discount, free T-shirt, parking and raffle ticket. Check in is 10am to 10:45am. Sa, 10/13, 11am-5pm. $15-$85. Safe Haven Rescue Zoo; 9605 Highway 400, Imlay; (775) 538-7093; www.safehavenwildlife.com.

RANCHO SAN RAFAEL FALL BULB PLANTING: Help KOH and Rail City Garden Center make spring color come alive at Rancho San Rafael Park at the fourth annual planting event. Sa, 10/13, 10am-noon. Free. Rancho San Rafael Regional Park; 1595 N. Sierra St.; (775) 355-1551; www.railcitygardencenter.com.

RENO GEM & MINERAL SOCIETY CRAFT FAIR: The Reno Gem & Mineral Society’s Fall Craft Fair will feature the handiwork of members such as gemstone jewelry, mineral specimens, bookends and more for sale, along with locally found gems and minerals on display. F, 10/12, 10am-6pm; Sa, 10/13, 10am-5pm; Su, 10/14, 10am-3pm. Free. Reno Town Mall; 4001 S. Virginia St.; (775) 823-4680; www.renorockhounds.com.

COMMUNITY BULB PLANTING DAY: Volunteers are needed to help plant thousands of daffodil bulbs throughout the Wilbur D. May Arboretum & Botanical Garden. Bring the whole family and learn how to plant and care for these spring flowers. Refreshments will be served. Sa, 10/13, 10am-noon. Free. Wilbur D. May Arboretum and Botanical Garden, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park; 1595 N. Sierra St.; (775) 785-4153; www.maycenter.com.

classes. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion; 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

FUN WITH DRAWING: Students will learn value, shading and an introduction to perspective while developing techniques and skills to practice on their own. One-hour workshops, Thursdays, Sept. 27-Nov. 1. Th, 5:15-6:15pm through 11/1. $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center; 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

INTERMEDIATE SEWING: Have fun learning how to sew multiple projects. Classes are held every Thursday through Nov. 8. Th, 4-5:30pm through 11/8. $55 for seven classes; supplies not included. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion; 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100, ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

KIDS ACTING: Learn to act while gaining selfconfidence and poise. Classes are held every Wednesday, Oct. 3- Nov. 7. W, 4-5pm through 11/7. $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center; 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

LATTIN FARMS FALL FESTIVAL & CORN MAZE: Lattin Farms celebrates the fall harvest with a pumpkin patch, hayrides, corn maze, fresh-from-the-farm produce, home-baked goods and more. Build your own scarecrow for $5 during the Scarecrow Factory, Oct. 13 & 20. Proceeds go to Fallon Parks & Rec (Oct. 13) and Goats-R-Us (Oct. 20). F, 5-8pm

through 10/26; Sa, 10am-8pm through 10/27. Corn maze: $7 adults, $5 children

ages 4-14; free for children under age 4. Lattin Farms; 1955 McLean Road, Fallon; (866) 638-6293; www.lattinfarms.com.

LEARN TO SEW: Have fun learning how to sew

All Ages ANIMAL ARK LAST CHANCE CHEETAH DASH: Animal Ark’s last cheetah run of the season features the large cats running off-leash across the desert into the sunset pursuing an enticing lure, going from 0-45 mph in three seconds, with 22-foot strides and a top speed of 60 mph. Reservations are required. Must must be age 10 or older to participate. Su, 10/14, 4:30-6pm. $40 adults; $35 seniors; $30 children 10 and older. Animal Ark Wildlife Sanctuary and Nature Center; 1265 Deerlodge Road; (775) 970-3431; www.animaark.org.

DONNER PARTY HIKE: Explore the Truckee Donner Area on interpretive walks and hikes. Choose a hike and explore Truckee’s history. In the afternoon enjoy a Chautauqua performance by David Fenimore as he portrays Captain John Sutter. Sa, 10/13, 7am. $50 after Sept. 28. Sugar Bowl Ski Resort; 629 Sugar Bowl Road, Norden; (530) 587-8808; www.truckee.com.

ART ADVENTURES FOR KIDS: Explore different media and techniques weekly. All supplies are included. One-hour workshops, Thursdays, Sept. 27-Nov. 1 and or Nov. 8-Dec. 20. Pre-registration required. Th, 4-5pm through 11/1. $45 for six classes. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion; 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100, ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

E4 HAUNTED HOUSE TOURS: Get tour cup and hop in a free pedal-cab to tour each haunted house for art displays, music, drink specials, contests, prizes and more. Participating locations include Hobson Square Gallery, Abby’s Highway 40, Davidson’s Distillery, Dilligas Saloon, Ruben’s Cantina, Studio on 4th, Symbiosis Reno and Cadillac Lounge. Finish at the Cadillac Lounge for the allnight after party. Th, 10/11, 8pm. $2 cup for drink specials. East Fourth Street District; 14 Businesses Along East Fourth St.; http://renoredlight.com.

ART ADVENTURES FOR KIDS: Explore different media and techniques weekly. All supplies are included. One-hour workshops, Thursdays, Sept. 27-Nov. 1 and or Nov. 8Dec. 20. Pre-registration required. Th, 4-5pm through 11/1. $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center; 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

EWOMEN NETWORKS ACCELERATED NETWORKING EVENT: The next eWomenNetwork dinner

BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble; 5555 S. Virginia St.; (775) 826-8882.

event features author and meditation trainer Pragito Dove. W, 10/17, 5-8:30pm. $40-$60. Hidden Valley Country Club; 3575 E. Hidden Valley Drive; (775) 853-2120; www.ewomennetwork.com/chapter/reno.

CLAY, CLAY, CLAY (AGES 8+): Explore hand building and glazing techniques. Classes are held every Wednesday beginning Oct. 3. W, 4-5:30pm through 11/28. $95 for eight classes. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion; 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

LECTURE: WHEN TECHNOLOGY FAILS: Bestselling author Matthew Stein presents When Technology Fails: Self-Reliance and Surviving the Long Emergency. Richard Alan Miller will follow Stein with a talk titled Critical Decision Making: Rapid Intuitive Decision Making Tools Developed for the U.S. Navy Seals. F, 10/12, 6:308pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music; 121 California Ave.; (775) 786-1188; www.sundancebookstore.com.

FUN WITH DRAWING: Students will learn value, shading and an introduction to perspective while developing techniques and skills to practice on their own. One-hour workshops, Mondays, Sept. 24-Oct. 29. M, 4-5pm through 10/29. $45 for six

multiple projects. Classes are held every Wednesday through Nov. 7. W, 4-5:30pm through 11/7. $55 for seven classes; supplies not included. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion; 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

R.I.S.E. AND DINE: PEOPLE FEEDING PEOPLE: Each week Reno activists and volunteers shop, prepare and cook for local persons and families without a home. On Saturdays at 5pm, volunteers meet outside of the Community Assistance Center and serve about 250 or more of Reno’s most poverty-stricken until 6pm. All assistance and donations are appreciated. Sa, 5-6pm through 12/29. Free. Community Assistance Center; 335 Record St.; (775) 322-7143; www.renoinitiative.org.

SCARECROW BUILDING: Build your own special scarecrow with your own clothes or what the garden center has on hand. Pre-payment is required. Sa, 10/13, 10am-2pm; Su, 10/14, 10am-2pm. $12 per scarecrow. Rail City Garden Center; 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks; (775) 355-1551; www.railcitygardencenter.com.

SCHEELS KIDS KLUB: SKIING 101: Learn tips on how to pick out the right skis and equipment for cross-country and downhill skiing. Meet in the Ski Shop. All kids will receive a free ride on the Scheels Ferris Wheel. M, 10/15, 6pm. Free. Scheels; 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks; (775) 331-2700; www.scheels.com/events.

H

alloween is just around the corner. Can you think of a better time for Reno Psychic Fair 2012? This year the event lands on Oct. 13-14, and as usual, it will mostly be held at the Reno Sparks Convention Center— that’s the one down by Kietzke Lane and South Virginia Street. This year’s theme is The Galactic Center, and event organizers say, “It is 2012, and we are in the Year of Transformation! Explore the way that we transform as the Universe shifts. Ancient secrets that have laid dormant come alive before our eyes as we learn to see the simple truths of our soul. The overwhelming distress of these times becomes the door to reclaiming our destiny! Explore new science, ancient mysteries, alternative health, and spiritual seminars. Learn about tarot, palmistry, angels and spirit guides. Get a psychic reading, a spiritual healing, or a Reiki massage. Buy books, crystals, jewelry or goddesswear.” I don’t know what all that means, but it sounds pretty cool, if you ask me. Tickets are $8 for a one-day pass and $12 for a two-day pass. Workshop passes are $20. For more information, check out www.renopsychicfair.com, or call Laura Peppard at 324-2872. —D. Brian Burghart BREWERY ARTS CENTER: Nevada Artists

obstacle course, rock climbing wall, pieeating contest, sweet treats, bake sale, silent auction, raffles and tumble bus. All activities require a minimum charge. Su, 10/14, 10am-4pm. Free admission. Verdi Elementary School; 250 Bridge St., Verdi; (775) 345-8100; www.washoecounty schools.org/verdi/pumpkin.html.

SMALL WONDER WEDNESDAY: Families with children 5 years old and younger are invited to play, explore and listen to stories read by the museum’s educators. Only children age 5 and younger are admitted to Small Wonder Wednesdays, which start at 9am, an hour before the museum opens. Older siblings may join at 10am. Third W of every month, 9am. $8 per person; free for members and babies under age 1. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum; 490 S. Center St.; (775) 786-1000; www.nvdm.org.

VERDI ES PUMPKIN FESTIVAL & CRAFT FAIR: Th festival includes pumpkin patch, carnival games and prizes, more than 25 craft vendors, glitter tattoos, bounce houses,

Art ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Wings and Waves, Air and Water Features. Ann Weiss and Larry Jacox are the featured artists for October. Their show-theme is planes, birds, skies and water. The reception Sunday, Oct. 7, from 1-4pm. The co-op also hosts three guest artists: Sandi Burke, Marilyn Newton and Jenny Antonucci. Through 10/31, 11am-4pm. Free. Contact Eileen Fuller (775) 322-8896, eileen.fuller@sbcglobal.net, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com for details on this exhibit. 627 Mill St.; (775) 322-8896; www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

Association Show. The Nevada Artists Association presents its Early Fall Featured Artists Show featuring work by Nancy Clark and Joanne Wood. Clark will show her landscapes and national parks paintings through Sept. 28. Woods works of flowers and lanscapes will be on disply Oct. 1-19. The works of other NAA artist are also on display. M-Sa, 10am-4pm through 10/19. Free. Contact Bob Hickox (775) 882-0189, bobhickox@sbcglobal.net, www.nevadaartists.org for details on this exhibit. 449 W. King St., Carson City; (775) 883-1976; www.breweryarts.org.

CHARLIE B GALLERY: Watercolor Group Exhibition Opening. Work by Terrie Allen, Carley Blim, Charles A. Blim Jr., Kathy Colegrove, Dotti Cullen, Donna Emerson, Christine Hurd, Maggie Jimenez, Arlie McCoy, Shereena Owen, Bruce Serpa and Lynn Schmidt is on display. F, 10/12, 5-8pm. Free. 200 E. Main St. Ste. 101, Fernley; (775) 575-7333.

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FILM

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HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: 80 Million Gallon Summer, 40 Million Gallon Winter. Sculptor Cait Finley combines found objects with ceramic fauna and flora, presenting them like a natural science museum. The work is a physical merging of the relics of mankind along with delicacies of nature. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 10/26. Opens 10/8; Th, 10/11, 6-8pm. Free. Contact Sarah Lillegard (775) 742-1858, sarah@hollandreno.org, www.hollandreno.org for details on this exhibit.Third Annual Stranger Show. This project and exhibition pairs Hug High students with local artists for a month to collaborate on and create an art piece. The opening reception on Oct. 11 will be catered by Hug High School’s culinary class.

Tu-F, 3-6pm through 10/26. Opens 10/8; Th, 10/11, 6-8pm. Free. Contact Sarah Lillegard (775)

742-1858, sarah@hollandreno.org, http://hollandreno.org for details on this exhibit. 140 Vesta St.; (775) 742-1858; www.hollandreno.org.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Bits & Pieces: A Sculpture & Mosaic Exploration. North Tahoe Arts features five sculpture and mosaic artists whose body of work includes glass, ceramics, wood, canvas, found objects and paint swatches. M, W-Su, 11am-5pm through 10/29. Free. Fall Cornucopia and Teapots & Teas. North Tahoe Arts embraces the changing of the season with an exhibition of fall-inspired photography by awardwinning photographer Geoff McGilvray and an exhibit of teapots, tea accessories by Nancy Olson, a selection of locally made teas and wall art by Heidi Reeves, Deb Rich and Eileen Blodgett in the Main Gallery. View several private teapot collections. Artists reception is Friday, Oct. 12, 5-7pm. M, W-Su, 11am-5pm through 10/29. Free. 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, Tahoe City; (530) 581-2787; www.northtahoearts.com.

OXS GALLERY, NEVADA ARTS COUNCIL: A Study of

Human. Eunkang Koh uses intaglio printmaking to depict creatures that are part human and part animal. Through 11/16, 8am-5pm. Free. 716 N. Carson St., Ste. A, Carson City; (775) 687-6680.

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Mid-Way Exhibitions: Benjamin Poynter. Poynter’s Mid-Way exhibition comments on Apple Computers use of Chinese labor to assemble products, and it features a video game created for the project. Visitors can stroll through a cardboard Apple store constructed within the gallery. M-F, 10am-5pm through 10/19. Opens 10/8. Free. Contact UNR School of the Arts (775) 7844278, forrest@unr.edu, www.unr.edu/arts for details on this exhibit. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120; (775) 329-2787; www.sierra-arts.org.

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Prospectives: International Festival of Digital Art. The University of Nevada, Reno presents the highly anticipated third iteration of the Prospectives International Festival of Digital

Hell in a hen basket

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Seven months ago, when I met my boyfriend, I had no idea he had so many female friends. I’m 26. He’s 30. I understand having opposite-sex friends to get perspective on dating, but he’s like one of their girlfriends. He gabs on the phone with them constantly, and they treat him like their little teddy bear, inviting him to baby showers, bringing him leftovers and baking him cookies. He only understands my jealousy as fear that he will cheat. But, these are married girls he’s known for years, and he’s not a sleazeball. I’m not scared of catching him in bed with another woman; I’m terrified I’ll overhear him discussing what color she should paint the baby’s room. I know he won’t be comfortable telling his girlfriends that he picks out nail polish with only one woman from now on—me! He isn’t just your man. He’s the married hens’ pet mandroid. From the way you describe the guy, it sounds like his testosterone level is somewhere between zero and “crying softly while hiding under the bed.” But you apparently didn’t find him under-manly when you started dating him and apparently don’t now. You’re just upset to learn that he’s been moonlighting as a gay decorator. Odd as it is to have a boyfriend whose homies are a bunch of suburban homemakers, outside friendships can help keep a relationship alive. No one person shares their partner’s every interest or meets their every need. Outside friendships can also go too far—like if your boyfriend’s confiding things he’d otherwise confide in you, ditching you to hang with them, or answer-

ing the phone during sex as their first responder for nail polish emergencies. Maybe the real problem is insecurity on your part. It’s understandable that you feel a little jealous. When you get into a relationship with a guy, you expect to be his one-and-only, and not feel like you need to get in line behind the housewife harem bringing him plates of homemade brownies. Stamping your foot and ordering him to ditch the biddies is a bad idea. Even if you got him to cave, resentment would surely rise up in him to fill the void. What you can do is tell him what you need. Explain that you aren’t worried he’ll cheat, just anxious that he’s got a bunch of women in his life who mean a lot to him, who do kinda girlfriendy things for him, who have a history with him that you don’t. Get him to tell you what he sees in you and why he’s with you. This should help you recognize that these women are special to him, but not special-special, like you, which should help you rest easier when he comes home smelling like he spent the night singing into hairbrushes with the girls.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


75% TreaT yourself To gifT cerTificaTes up To

OFF! Art, to be held on and around the university campus. The festival is focuses entirely on the work of graduate student artists, from a range of disciplines, who use and experiment with digital media. This years offering includes a month-long exhibition in the universitys Sheppard Gallery (Church Fine Arts Building) and other campus and off-campus venues. Through 11/2. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St.; (775) 784-1110; www.unr.edu.

bicyclists, students. Midtown Good Luck Macbeth; 713 S. Virginia St.; (775) 337-9111; www.artemisiamovies.org.

Poetry/Literature EMMA SEPULVEDA BOOK SIGNING: Dr. Sepulveda signs and discusses her book Converging Dreams: Why Latinos Support Obama. Th, 10/11, 6:30-8pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music; 121 California Ave.; (775) 786-1188; www.sundancebookstore.com.

VSA NEVADA AT LAKE MANSION: It’s Not Just Rust Art Sale. All original art handmade by local artists—metal sculpture, fused glass, yard art and jewelry. A portion of sales go to VSA. F, 10/12, 4-7pm; Sa, 10/13, 10am-4pm. Free. Contact Jon Carpenter (775) 322-7023, typhared@yahoo.com, 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100; www.vsanevada.org.

Music CARPENTERS MUSIC WORLD MONTHLY MUSIC PROGRAM: Carpenter’s Music World presents its monthly music program open to all ages, styles and skill levels. Performers must call in advance with their name or name of group, song title, instrumentation and length of performance. Performances must fit the theme of the month. August’s theme is “Latin music.” Second Th of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Carpenters Music World; 2700 S. Virginia St.; (775) 391-7757; www.carpentersmusic.com.

Call for Artists HOLLY ARTS CALL TO ARTISANS: North Tahoe Arts invites artisans to participate in this year’s Holly Arts. This exhibit will run November and December. Work includes all types of gift-giving items like cards, painting, ornaments, pottery, knitted items, etc. All work must be original and ready to hang or display. A $20 non-refundable application fee and a $25 per month gallery participation fee applies. All work will be subject to a jury committee. You can download an application online or email for a schedule of important dates and information. Deadline is Tuesday, Oct. 16, by noon. M-Su through 10/16. North Tahoe Arts Center; 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, Tahoe City; (530) 581-2787; www.northtahoearts.com.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Jorinde Voigt: Systematic Notations. W-Su through 1/6. 1-$10. Ice Music. W-Su through 10/28. $1-$10.Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper. W-Su through 1/1. $1-$10.Arthur and Lucia Mathews: Highlights of the California Decorative Style. Tu-Su through 10/14. $1-$10. Juvenile-In-Justice: Photographs by Richard Ross. W-Su through 1/13. $1-$10.The Light Circus: Art of Nevada Neon Signs. W-Su through 2/10. Opens 10/13. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St.; (775) 329-3333; www.nevadaart.org.

CARRIE UNDERWOOD: The Grammy award-winning country singer performs. F, 10/12, 7:30pm. $42.50-$62.50. Reno Events Center; 400 N. Center St.; (775) 335-8800.

L-CUBED: LUNCH, LOOK & LISTEN: Each Wednesday during the fall semester, the departments of music and art at the University of Nevada, Reno team up for free lunchtime concerts and exhibitions. W, noon through 11/28. Opens 10/17. Free. Randall Rotunda, Matthewson-IGT Knowledge Center; 1664 N. Virginia St. University of Nevada, Reno; (775) 784-4278; www.unr.edu/arts.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church; 200 Island Ave.; (775) 329-4279; www.trinityreno.org.

WILD HORSE BENEFIT CONCERT: This benefit is to help protect and preserve the wild horses of Northern Nevada. Entertainment presented by Lacy J. Dalton, David John of The Comstock Cowboys, Willis Lamm & The Mountain Outlaw Band and cowboy poets Harold Roy Miller and Buck The Big Man Helton. There will also be a silent auction, art vendors and a bar available. Sa, 10/13, 11am4pm. $20 in advance; $25 at door. Pipers Opera House; 12 N. B St., Virginia City; (775) 220-6806; www.wildhorsepl.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM: A Salute to Our Military. This exhibit commemorates the nation’s battles from the Civil War to the Global War on Terrorism. The show includes photos, weapons, artifacts, models and uniforms donated by more than 30 local veterans and their families. Tu-Su through 11/17. $5 adults; free for children under age 12, museum members, active duty military. 814 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-1144; www.sparksmuseum.org.

Sports & Fitness 30/30 (CARDIO MAT/STRETCHING): Thirty minutes of Cardio Mat Pilates and 30 minutes of intensive stretching. Intermediate-level strength, stamina and flexibility are required for this class which emphasizes the principle of fluidity. Call to reserve your spot. M through 12/31. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates; 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B; (775) 745-4151; www.yogareno.com.

Film THE LADY VANISHES: Artemisia Moviehouse presents a screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1938 comedy-mystery starring Margaret Lockwood, Michael Redgrave and Paul Lukas. Tu, 10/16, 7-10pm. $7 general; $5 members,

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ple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka; 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121; (775) 337-2990; www.yogalokareno.com.

ANNUAL BEER HIKE FOR LAND CONSERVATION: The hike from Spooner to Marlette Lake is roughly 9.5 miles round trip with a 1,200-foot elevation gain and no more than 5 percent grade. Participants can bike or ride horses up the trail, and hike-in camping is available near the lake. Participants can enjoy a Silver Peak beer at Marlette Lake at the end of the hike. The event benefits Nevada Land Conservancy. Sa, 10/13, 8:30am. $5/pint suggested donation. Spooner Lake State Park, Glenbrook; (775) 851-5180; www.nvlc.org. three Pilates principles for the seven exercise in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/25. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates; 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B; (775) 745-4151; www.yogareno.com.

FRIGHT FIGHTS: Live Pro Wrestling featuring local pro wrestling company Reno Wrestle Factory.

F, 10/12, 7-10pm. $10 adults free for children

age 10 and younger. Evelyn Mount Northeast Community Center; 1301 Valley Road, (775) 762-2078; www.renowrestlefactory.com.

PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/27. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates; 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B; (775) 745-4151; www.yogareno.com.

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB: Runners and walkers are invited to join this Tuesday night group run. Water and snacks will be available. Meet in the men’s sport shoe shop. Tu, 6:30pm through 11/27. Free. 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks; (775) 331-2700; www.scheels.com/events.

VARIETY YOGA: Each week the Sunday class is taught by a different instructor. Su, 10:3011:20am through 12/30. $15 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates; 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B; (775) 745-4151; www.yogareno.com.

Onstage DEATH OF A SALESMAN: Reno Little Theater presents Arthur Millers timeless classic drama about a man struggling to succeedto support his family and to earn respectduring challenging economic times. Th-Sa, 7:30-

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Voices from the Past

The Virginia City Cemetery comes alive with the 19th century Comstock residents. They share their stories, lives, and deaths. The performance will last 90 minutes as you walk through the cemetery with the widow of Silver Terrace as your guide.

10th Anniversary making Comstock History Come Al ive

Two shows daily on Saturday & Sunday 10am & 1pm

AdmiSSiOn $20 THIS WEEK

people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multi-

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- Funtime theater Presents -

Performances start Saturday, Sept 29th and runs each weekend until Sunday, Oct 14th.

10pm through 10/13; Su, 2-4:30pm through

10/14. $16 general adult admission; $13 seniors, students, military. Reno Little Theater; 147 E. Pueblo St.; (775) 813-8900; www.renolittletheater.org.

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for

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EXTRAVAGANZA: Toliver Productions presents this variety show. Sa, 10/13, 7pm. $10, $30.

wheel, focusing on wedging, shaping, trimming and simple glazing techniques. Ages 15+. Classes are held every Wednesday, Oct. 3Nov. 28. Register online or call. W, 5:45-7:45pm through 11/28. $145 for eight classes. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion; 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

CommRow; 255 N. Virginia St.; (775) 398-5400; www.commrow.com.

FRANKENSTEIN: Good Luck Macbeth presents its humorous and original take on Mary Shelley’s classic tale of an experiment gone horribly wrong. F, 10/12; Sa, 10/13; Su, 10/14; Th, 10/18; F,

HEARTSAVER FIRST AID: The Heartsaver First Aid

10/19; Sa, 10/20; Su, 10/21; F, 10/26; Sa, 10/27; Su, 10/28; W, 10/31. $17 general; $14 students, sen-

Course teaches how to manage illness and injuries in the first few minutes until professional help arrives. Th, 10/11, 5:30-8:30pm; Th, 11/15, 5:30-8:30pm; Th, 12/13, 5:30-8:30pm. $45. REMSA Education & Training Center; 230 S. Rock Blvd., Ste. 23; (775) 858-5700; www.remsaeducation.com.

iors, military; $20 at the door. Midtown Good Luck Macbeth; 713 S. Virginia St.; (775) 322-3716; www.goodluckmacbeth.org

Classes

KID CARE: The Kid Care babysitting class is designed to teach adolescents the basics of caring for young children. Techniques for setting up babysitting opportunities, diaper changes, bottle-feeding, playtime activities and taking charge of situations while babysitting are covered. The course also includes pediatric first aid and CPR training. Sa, 10/13,

BEGINNERS CERAMICS ON THE POTTERY WHEEL: Learn to throw on the pottery wheel making cups, bowls and ashtrays. This three-session class will take you from a ball of clay to a finished piece of work. Th, 10/11, 5:30-8:30pm; Th, 10/18, 5:30-8:30pm. $90. The Wedge Ceramics Studio; 2095 Dickerson Road; (775) 770-4770; www.thewedgeceramics.com.

9am-4pm; Sa, 11/3, 9am-4pm; Sa, 12/1, 9am-4pm.

$40. REMSA Education & Training Center; 230 S. Rock Blvd. Ste. 23; (775) 858-5700; www.remsaeducation.com.

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT: Breast-feeding mothers

KIDS CERAMICS CLASS (AFTER SCHOOL): This is a hand-building class to familiarize kids 7-13 with the studio and clay. All materials and firings are included. W, 10/17, 3:30-5:30pm; W, 10/24, 3:305:30pm; W, 10/31, 3:30-5:30pm. $120 for four classes. 2095 Dickerson Road; (775) 770-4770; www.thewedgeceramics.com.

CONVERSATION CORNER: Washoe County Library

PLEIN AIR OIL PAINTING (AGES 15+): Join local artist

presents a series of English language learning sessions ideal for non-native English speakers who want to improve their speaking skills. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that involve everyday activities. W, 4:30-6pm. Free. Sparks Library; 1125 12th St., Sparks; (775) 829-7323.

Erik Holland to capture fall colors and light. Painting will be done both outside (weather permitting) and in the studio from photographs. Classes are held every Friday, Sept. 14- Nov. 16. Register online or call F, 1-4pm through 11/16. $145 for eight classes. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion; 250 Court St.; (775) 826-6100 ext. 3; www.vsanevada.org.

FALL POND CARE: Learn the proper tips and techniques for your pond or water feature for fall and winter. Please bring canned food donation for the local food bank. Sa, 10/13, 11am. Free. Rail City Garden Center; 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks; (775) 355-1551; www.railcitygardencenter.com.

RENO PORTRAIT SOCIETY: There will be a live model for artists to paint or draw in the medium of their choice. No formal instruction, but participants can learn from experienced artists. The event is open to all ages and abilities. W, 9am-12:30pm. $10. Nevada Fine Arts; 1301 S. Virginia St.; (775) 786-1128; www.nvfinearts.com.

FUNCTIONAL-DECORATIVE POTTERY: This class includes an introduction to the potter’s

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are invited to join Breastfeeding Cafe. Mothers exchange their experiences and discuss concerns such as milk supply, pumping, going back to work, sleeping or lack of sleep, etc. Tu, 4-5pm through 12/18. $10 drop in; free for first-time attendees. Renown South Meadows Medical Center; 10101 Double R Blvd.; (775) 240-9916; www.wellnourishedbaby.com.

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2012

BY ROB BREZSNY

95 WORD

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Ten percent of

all sexually suggestive text messages are delivered to the wrong number. Take precautions to make sure you’re not among that 10 percent in the coming weeks. It will be extra important for you to be scrupulous in communicating about eros and intimacy. The stakes will be higher than usual. Togetherness is likely to either become more intensely interesting or else more intensely confusing—and it’s largely up to you which direction it goes. For best results, express yourself clearly and with maximum integrity.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If it were

FICTION CONTEST

O

swald William Lawrence was hungry. It was a powerful, deep-down hunger. He always felt like this when he first awoke, as the last red rays of the sun died in the west. The night air felt good. This was his time. But he needed to feed. His yellow eyes glistened in the moonlight as he scoured the cityscape for prey, something young, fertile and full of blood. And then he saw her, strutting unaware along the sidewalk. He swept down, talons outstretched, to take the mouse, devour her, digest her, and drop her as pellets.

within my power, I’d help you identify the new feelings you have not yet been able to understand. I would infuse you with the strength you would need to shed the wornout delusions that are obstructing your connection to far more interesting truths. And I would free you from any compulsion you have to live up to expectations that are not in alignment with your highest ideals. Alas, I can’t make any of these things happen all by myself. So I hope you will rise to the occasion and perform these heroic feats under your own power.

There it is: 95 words exactly! It’s 95-word fiction time. We, the editors of the Reno News & Review, ask you, the readers of the Reno News & Review, to send us your short fiction—a short story, preferably with a beginning, a middle and an end—and exactly 95 words. That’s excluding title, and as counted by OpenOffice Writer or Microsoft Word. Your published story and the envy of all your friends will be your reward.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Dutch graphic

artist M.C. Escher (1898-1972) was a Gemini. He liked to depict seemingly impossible structures, like stairways in which people who climbed to the top arrived at the bottom. I nominate him to be your patron saint in the coming week. You should have his talent for playing with tricks and riddles in ways that mess with everyone’s boring certainties. Here are four Escher quotes you can feel free to use as your own. 1. “Are you really sure that a floor can’t also be a ceiling?” 2. “My work is a game, a very serious game.” 3. “I think it’s in my basement. ... Let me go upstairs and check.” 4. “Only those who attempt the absurd will achieve the impossible.”

To get an idea of what we’re looking for, and to size up the competition, last year’s winners can be found at www.newsreview.com/reno/95/content?oid=3703514. Send your entries to 95-word fiction contest, c/o rn&r, 708 n. Center st., reno nv 89501. Or via email to renofiction@newsreview.Com, with fiction 2012 in the subject line. All entries must be received by 9 a.m. on Oct. 18. Selected entries will be published on Nov. 1. Provide contact information, including name, address and telephone number.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Venus fly-

trap is a remarkable plant that gobbles up insects and spiders. Its leaves do the dirty work, snapping shut around its unsuspecting prey. Evolution has made sure that the flowers of the Venus flytrap sit atop a high stalk at a safe distance from where all the eating takes place. This guarantees that pollinators visiting the flowers don’t get snagged by the carnivorous leaves below. So the plant gets both of its main needs met: a regular supply of food and the power to disseminate its seeds. I’ll ask you to derive a lesson from all this, Cancerian. Be sure that in your eagerness to get the energy you need, you don’t interfere with your ability to spread your influence and connect with your allies.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A sinuous and shim-

mering archetype that begins with the letter “S” has been trying to catch your attention, Leo—sometimes in subliminal and serpentine ways. Why haven’t you fully tuned in yet? Could it be because you’re getting distracted by mildly entertaining but ultimately irrelevant trivia? I’m hoping to shock you out of your erroneous focus. Here’s the magic trigger code that should do the trick: Psst! Now, please do what you can to make yourself very receptive to the slippery, spidery signals of the simmeringly sublime surge.

will need to serve exactly 152 people. My agent will pick it up at 11 a.m. Please have it ready on time. —Ms. Lori Chandra.” Dear Ms. Chandra: I am an astrologer, not a caterer, so I’m afraid I can’t fulfill your order. It’s admirable that you know so precisely what you want and are so authoritative about trying to get it, but please remember how crucial it is to seek the fulfillment of your desires from a source that can actually fulfill them. You’re a Libra, right? Your birthday is this week? Thanks for giving me an excuse to send this timely message to all of your fellow Libras.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here comes

the big reveal of the month, the trick ending of the year, and maybe the most unusual happiness of the decade. Any day now you will get the chance to decipher the inside story that’s beneath the untold story that’s hidden within the secret story. I won’t be surprised if one of your most sophisticated theories about the nature of reality gets cracked, allowing you to at recover at least a measure of primal innocence. I suggest you start practicing the arts of laughing while you cry and crying while you laugh right now. That way, you’ll be all warmed up when an old style of give-and-take comes to an end, ultimately making way for a more profound new give-and-take.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

There’s almost nothing about the dandelion that humans can’t make use of. People of many different countries have eaten its buds, leaves and greens. Besides being tasty, it contains high levels of several vitamins and minerals. Its flowers are the prime ingredient in dandelion wine, and its roots have been turned into a coffee substitute. Herbalists from a variety of traditions have found medicinal potency in various parts of the plant. Last but not least, dandelions are pretty and fun to play with! In the coming weeks, Sagittarius, I invite you to approach the whole world as if it were a dandelion. In other words, get maximum use and value out of every single thing with which you interact.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“Intellect confuses intuition,” asserted painter Piet Mondrian. I don’t think that’s always true, even for creative artists. But in the coming week, I suspect it’ll be important for you to take into consideration. So make sure you know the difference between your analytical thinking and your gut-level hunches, and don’t let your thinking just automatically override your hunches. Here’s more helpful advice from painter Robert Genn: “The job of the intellect is to give permission to the intuition, and it’s the job of intuition to know when intellect is once again appropriate.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s time to seek help from outside the magic circle you usually stay inside. You need to call on extracurricular resources—people and animals and deities who can offer useful interventions and delightful serendipity and unexpected deliverance. The remedies that work for you most of the time just won’t be applicable in the coming days. The usual spiritual appeals will be irrelevant. I’m not saying that you are facing a dire predicament—not at all. What I’m suggesting is that the riddles you will be asked to solve are outside the purview of your customary guides and guidelines.

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t burn down a bridge you haven’t finished building yet. OK, Virgo? Don’t try to “steal” things that already belong to you, either. And resist the urge to flee from creatures that are not even pursuing you. Catch my drift? Stop yourself anytime you’re about to say nasty things about yourself behind your own back and avoid criticizing people for expressing flaws that you yourself have, and don’t go to extraordinary lengths to impress people you don’t even like or respect. Pretty please? This is a phase of your astrological cycle when you should put an emphasis on keeping things simple and solid and stable.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Hello, Dear Sir: I

would like to place a large order for yellow chicken curry; cherry cream-cheese cupcakes; and sour, malty Belgian golden ale. It’s for my birthday party this Saturday, and it

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): These days

lobsters are regarded as a luxury food, but that wasn’t the case among early Americans. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the large crustaceans were meals that were thought to be suitable only for poor people and prisoners. Wealthy folks wouldn’t touch the stuff. After examining your astrological omens, Pisces, I’m wondering if your future holds a similar transformation. I think there could very well be a rags-to-riches story in which an ignored or denigrated thing ascends to a more important role.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart PHOTO/D. BRIAN BURGHART

Hop on over Dale Mills

OK, I have to admit it. Cary DeMars, a two-time recipient of our Best Bartender award in the Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada popularity contest, collared me at our Best Of party and asked me if I’d talk to his friends Dale Mills and Jeff Wassmer about their new frozen yogurt franchise. Not one to break my word, even after a few cocktails, I caught up with Dale Mills at his new Sweet Frog Premium Frozen Yogurt. By the way, FROG is actually an acronym, according to the company website at www.sweetfrogyogurt.com, that stands for Fully Rely on God.

So you’ve opened a new frozen yogurt store. The first of our four stores is at 6637 S. Virginia St., Suite B. It’s next to the Total Wine and BFW Shoes and the Guitar Center, in that shopping center.

How did you come to open a frozen yogurt store or eventually a series of them in Reno? I’m an MBA candidate right now. I’m just a few months out, and my partner—we’re both military veterans, and we’re just kind of fortunate guys who were in the right spot at the right time. We basically wanted to open some of these amazing shops. They’re kind of from back East, and they’re really taking off back there. We’re just trying to create jobs in Reno. ...

Do you have to pay to build out the building?

So would that be considered a franchise? Yes it is. We just became a franchise. It was a kind of a corporate-run entity, and then a group of guys got together and said, “Hey, this is amazing. Let’s franchise the brand.” So they did. Our store is Store No. 1, basically. There are about 50-55 stores currently in the pipeline, they’re going through the permitting process and stuff like that, so we’re going to go and hopefully open a hundred stores by next year all over the United States. I personally am not, we’re just [opening] four in Reno.

OK, so how does that work? You pay them a franchise fee, right? You pay a franchise fee. They currently have this successful brand and know all the ins and outs to ensure profitability. They come up with the concept. We have these mascots, so basically we’re frogged. Our theme—Cookie and Scoop are our mascots, the boy frog and a girl frog. We have all the point-of-sale stuff for the kids. We have bracelets, key chains, hats, T-shirts, hoodies. ... It was funny, a cou-

came to his cancer treatment. By being a stubborn adherent of freaky alternative fruitarian and vegan diets and fasting and all this other acidhead nutritional stuff (only acidheads, as far as I can tell, ever use the word “mucousless”), he refused to have the surgery he should have had immediately upon diagnosis of his peculiar form of pancreatic cancer. If he had gone for the surgery right away, instead of waiting months and wasting precious time, he would, I have little doubt, be alive today. Valuable lesson—the AMA, on occasion, does have its place. But when you think about it—the iMac, the MacBook, iTunes, the Apple Stores, the iPhones, the iPads, all masterminded and shepherded into existence by this one man and his teams—wow. Extraordinary. • Reading the Jobs book reminded me that I’ve lived through two bonafide cultural revolutions in my

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Do you personally have to pay for the refrigeration units and chairs and ... Exactly. They say an average Sweet Frog costs an average of $250-300,000 per location to open a store.

That’s a lot of money for a couple of new vets. Exactly. My one veteran friend, my partner, he is a Nevada Air Guard guardsman. He retired from the Nevada Air Guard. He had started a company out of his garage. It was basically a communications company, and over the years, he’s built that into an amazing corporation, employing 350 people for government contracts. He’s the perfect example of an entrepreneur. He didn’t have rich parents, he just worked hard.

brucev@newsreview.com

I just finished reading the Steve Jobs bio, and found it compelling and certainly recommendable. In fact, if you’re a part of the modern digital world, it’s not going out of bounds to call this book essential reading. By being the life story of Jobs, it’s also necessarily the life story of Apple and the personal computer, and how those early, clunky home machines rapidly morphed into the current gizmoverse of tablets, smartphones and data clouds. It’s a mind-boggling tale of which we’re all a part. Some things the book makes clear about Jobs. (1) Totally brilliant man. (2) Flaming asshole. Often. (3) A raging crybaby. Literally. Numerous spurts of crying when enraged or emotional. (4) Maybe the most influential and powerful acidhead ever. A serious devotee of the true psychedelic experience and a genuine product of the ’60s Bay Area. (5) For being as smart as he was, he completely blew it when it NEWS

We go in and lease out a building, find the right location, and then negotiate the lease with the landlord. Hopefully, he’ll give you some TI money. That’s “tenant improvement” money to help turn the space into our brand. And then you just hire a contractor, because it’s a commercial space, and he puts all the plumbing and electrical and the walls where you need them, and then you brand it, use their exact colors. That’s basically it.

∫y Bruce Van Dye

Bay matters

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ple of days ago, a little boy, about 4-years-old, came in with his dad and mom, and he’d never seen it before. Their mom and dad loved the yogurt as did the little kid. Two days later, his dad said he said, “Hey, let’s go to that frog place.” Perfect marketing there from a 4-year-old.

lifetime—The Psychedelic Revolution of the ’60s and the Computer Digital Gizmo Revolution that began in the ’80s and is ongoing. What’s striking, upon reflection, is both of these revolts were centered in the same place on the planet—the San Francisco Bay Area. Indeed, as the Jobs story makes clear, the second revolution (featuring a major transformation of modern lifestyles due to computers, gizmos, data processing, etc.) was umbilically connected to the first (from which we get feminism, environmentalism, new ageism, racial egalitarianism, sexual explosionism, drugism, rehabism, and lots of blinky lights), and both had their Ground Zeroes, so to speak, in The City. San Francisco, man. What a place. Ω

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 11, 2012

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RN&R

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35


WHO ARE THE

NEONISTS SEE HOW NEVADA RAISED NEON TO AN ART FORM. THE LIGHT CIRCUS : Art of Nevada Neon Opening October 13, 2012 Experience a bygone era and see this stunning collection of vintage neon signs that have graced some of Nevada’s most iconic restaurants, casinos, and businesses.

Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts E. L. Wiegand Gallery 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno 775.329.3333 | nevadaart.org

Lead sponsorship provided by The Bretzlaff Foundation. Major sponsorship provided by Earl and Wanda Casazza, Casazza SLV, IGT, E. L. Cord Foundation and George and Irene Drews. Supporting sponsorship provided by E. L. Wiegand Foundation.


R-2012-10-11