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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .14 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .16 Art of the State . . . . . . .17

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .23 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Free Will Astrology . . . .34 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .35 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .35

YOUNG VS.

DELGADO See News, page 6.

IT’S NICE TO BE KIND TO FARMERS AND OTHER FOOD PEOPLE See Green, page 8.

LIVE! NUDE! ACTORS! See Arts&Culture, page 14.

TIME FOR A

SPOT OF TEA&A See Foodfinds, page 18.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 30

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SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2012


special aDVeRTising secTion

special aDVeRTising secTion

!

It’s happen ing in

WALK 'N' ROLL FOR A.L.S.

A fun and empowering opportunity for patients, families, friends, companies and organizations to raise significant funds to support comprehensive A.L..S. patient service programs. Walking and running is a great, visible way to generate awareness for A.L.S., telling others that you support the fight again Lou Gehrig’s Disease. This event is wheelchair, walker, kid and pet-friendly. Participants pay a minimum of $25; kids under 5 are free. Participants receive a t-shirt and continental breakfast after the event. Teams are encouraged ask your family, friends and co-workers to join you. Awards will be given out for those who raised the most money, immediately following the event. Sat, 9/15, 8AM-1PM. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive.

Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave.(775) 355-7711

BOXING

El Canelo. See it live! 6PM. Dance with live music of The Super Electra Band from Sacramento, CA Sa, 9/15, $5. New Oasis, 2100 Victorian Ave. (775) 359-4020

FALL PLANTING

Presented by Roxanne Martin. Fall is a great time to plant! Cooler temperatures mean less watering and less stress on plants. Sa, 9/15, 11AM and Su, 9/16, 1PM. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

LIVE MUSIC

Live music, dancing,singing at your favorite locals bar in Sparks. Sa, 9/15, 8PM, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave.(775) 356-9799

THE GOURDS & JAMES MCMURTRY

Sa, 9/15, 9PM, $15. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

SUPER ELECTRA BAND

Sa, 9/15, 9PM, no cover. New Oasis, 2100 Victorian Ave. (775) 359-4020

SIERRA DONATE LIFE WALK

This is the 5th Annual Sierra Donate Life Walk - a family-friendly event. Same-day registration begins at 7:30AM. Program begins at 8AM. Donor Family Recognition at 8:30AM. The Walk starts at 9AM. Registration:$30/person. Team registration (10+ members): $15/person. Registration includes t-shirt, water, goody bag, raffle ticket and a fun walk! Register at: Active.com. Sun, 9/16, 8AM-1PM. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive

GREAT BASIN THURSDAY NIGHT FARMERS’ MARKET

This farmers’ market celebrates the late-season Nevada harvests featuring produce from local Nevada farms. The market will be held every Thursday in September Th, 4:30-7:30PM through 9/27. Free.

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BUNCO PARTY AND OPEN HOUSE

Come see what all the excitement is about with the new Fall 2012 catalog from Temptations Parties! There will be no formal presentation, just fun! Su, 9/16, 4PM, free gift and raffle to everyone who stops by to say hi. Any order (no minimum) to play Bunco for prizes. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION

Improvisational music M, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

DREW SIMPSON

W, 9/19, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! SCHEELS BIKING CLUB

Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Rides will vary from 20-30 miles. Participants will need to sign a liability form when they attend. Th, 5:45PM through 9/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

SEND US YOUR SPARKS EVENTS!

MUSIC AT THE MARINA

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY!

JAZZ

CITY OF SPARKS Geno Martini - Mayor, Julia Ratti Ward 1, Ed Lawson - Ward 2, Ron Smith - Ward 3, Mike Carrigan - Ward 4, Ron Schmitt - Ward 5, Shaun Carey - City Manager, Tracy Domingues - Parks & Recreation Director.

Sing for fun or compete for prizes,depending on the number of contestants, with DJ John Graham. Th, 9PM and F, 9PM. No cover. Anchors Bar & Grill, 325 Harbour Cove Dr. (775) 356-6888

With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

BEADS AND BOOKS!

Learn basic beading techniques with volunteer beading expert, Jamie, and work on projects with other beaders. First Su of every month, 1-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

KARAOKE

ASPEN GLEN BAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd., Sparks, NV 89436 / (775) 3542400 STEVE STARR KARAOKE M, 8PM. No cover. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316 SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861

OPEN MIC

GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

E-mail to: sparks@newsreview.com

Mayor and Council members can be reached at 353-2311 or Sparks City Council Chambers, 745 Fourth St.

WEB RESOURCES: www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com www.thechambernv.org www.sparksitshappeninghere.com THis secTion anD iTs conTenTs aRe noT FUnDeD BY oR cReaTeD BY THe ciTY oF spaRKs


EDITOR’S NOTE

For more years Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I’m a little conflicted about this week’s cover story. I’m conflicted because I think Gary Johnson would be a good president. But I don’t want or expect to see him elected this time, although I probably won’t know how I’m going to cast my vote until I hit the polls. He, like Romney, would sign legislation that would undermine the Affordable Care Act. Obama is the only option who would veto any attempt to wreck the half-step toward real health care reform. We need four more years so that the most important aspects of Obamacare go into effect because once that train’s out of the station, there’ll be no going back. Nobody will be able to take away an entitlement once it’s given to the senior class of baby-boomer voters. And I’ll be honest, if I do vote for Obama, I’m going to be holding my nose. While I’ve had presidents through bad luck or poor management of Congress, who’ve had a negative impact on my life, I’ve never had one who, by lying, tried to destroy the company that feeds my child. And when Obama went after the legal medical marijuana trade in California—after stating categorically that he would not—that’s exactly what he did. He killed a big form of advertising for this company. He might as well have personally robbed me with a gun. I’ve got a lot to forgive this guy for. No real immigration reform. Guantanamo Bay still open. Legalizing indefinite detention without charge of Americans. Drone murders of American citizens abroad. Wall Street still essentially unregulated. Banksters not prosecuted for the fraud that destroyed the economy, my retirement and my home’s value. Corporate bailouts. “Too big to fail” still not broken into smaller companies. But I can feel which way the wind’s blowing, and in four years—if I’m still around—there will likely be no incumbent Democratic vice president running, and we can already guess what the majority of the Republican field is going to look like. And in four years, Libertarian Gary Johnson may just permanently alter both the Republican and Democratic parties.

LETTERS

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Tithe me up

Politics for the rich

Re “Reid’s attack on Romney” (Feature story, Sept. 6): It is unlikely that Mitt Romney didn’t pay any taxes; it seems more likely that he shortchanged the Mormon church tithing minimum requirement by under reporting his income (times 10 percent). I wonder if Harry Reid might be more interested in exposing Mitt Romney as a fraud and cheater to their common church, the Latter-Day Saints?

Re “Word games” (News, Aug. 30): I consider Mayor Cashell a friend, and I applaud the many good things he’s accomplished for the city we both love. But he’s wrong on ward voting. He’s worked to thwart the will of the people and the Legislature at every turn. Most recently, this came in the form of adopting ballot language that the Reno GazetteJournal editorialized as “confusing, a U-turn from the way questions normally are worded on a ballot, and the shift could well affect the vote by giving the edge to the status quo.” (8/24/12) The council adopted language designed to guarantee the outcome it wanted: to prevent voting by ward, which continues the dominance of developers and other special interests in elections. Our only recourse is to go back to the Legislature and, for the third session in a row, pass a bill to mandate voting by ward. Hopefully, the mayor won’t be able to convince the governor to veto it again.

John Whaley Carson City

Hurts Reno worse Re “Two more tribal casinos planned for California” (Upfront, Sept. 6): With two more casinos in California, they will have more foreclosures and more people filing bankruptcy or going out of business. I know this because I lost business when the lottery started. California will lose a lot of tax money. You have Custer’s Last Stand, now you will have California’s Last Stand without Sitting Bull causing it. Now you will have a lot of bull doing it. I was born and raised in San Francisco and lived there over 5o years till they put me out of business. Good luck, California businesses. Robert L. Cordero Sr. Reno

Bob Fulkerson Reno

He said, ‘pho dac biet’

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

Re “Eco-event” (Green Space, Aug. 30): The GEA Energy Expo is part of a larger meeting of the global geothermal community. The Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) will be hosting its 36th Annual Meeting Sept. 30-Oct. 3 at the Peppermill Resort Spa. More information at www.geothermal.org/meet-new.html Ian Crawford Davis, Calif.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

ARTS&CULTURE

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The wind’s blowing

Todd South Reno

In hot water

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Dewey Quong Reno

Re “Pho-nuts” (Foodfinds, Aug. 23): I couldn’t agree more! I’ve never tried the doughnuts, but the pho dac biet was just plain disgusting. Won’t be going back.

The old standards Re “And Jesus rose from the dead” (Letters to the Editor, Sept. 6): My comments aren’t about tax returns in particular. It is about his [Mitt Romney’s] political party and those who want/wanted Obama to release his birth certificate, his college application and any other record that has a box for place of birth or religious affiliation. It is about Romney criticizing Obama for his lack of transparency at the same time he says his tax records are between the church and him. That is why I brought up the Mormon church. Romney didn’t just say tax returns are between the I.R.S. and

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Amy Beck, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

him. He included the church. You spent a lot of words on the Mormon church. I have nothing for or against Mormons or any other religion. I do not mock or praise any religious belief. I do admire people who can accept their religion with such devotion; something that I do not/cannot do. Not sure if that is a deficit on my part. Sat in on many church services, and none of them did anything for me. Again, my letter was about Romney saying his tax records are personal, and that is the end of the subject and not telling other members of his party to stop asking for Obama’s records, and if Obama says the records are personal that should be the end of the subject. I am objecting to the double standard by the Republicans calling for Obama’s private life to be open for unconditional inspection while defending Romney for wanting to keep his private life private. If tens of thousands of Republicans can speculate and write about Obama— millions of hits on Google—with outlandish (and some valid) theories of why he is not releasing his records, why am I being silly with my delusions speculating about Romney and his tax returns?

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FILM

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Dan Porath Chiang Mai, Thailand

Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Russell Moore General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Brian Breneman, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

FOODFINDS

Re “A coalition of the competent” (Editorial, Sept. 6): I'm here in Thailand, and it's the rainy season. I realize my homeland is embroiled in politics, but I see the forces of nature as so much more interesting than politics. We know they will happen no matter what supplications we make to whomever. They can't be persuaded or shamed into change. They spare no one: the rich, the poor, the lame or the inconsistent. They are not subject to monetary contributions. The climate change debate doesn't affect their actions one bit. In an ideological debate with them, we lose.

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

So vote, already There are some who will consider sitting out this election because “there’s really no difference between the two parties, and if you think any of them won’t lie or do whatever it takes to get elected or keep their power, you’re naïve” or something like that. While I might grant the latter, the former is demonstrably false. Even if you believe it’s all a conspiracy theory, and that the new world order has complete control of everything, you cannot argue there is not a difference in the “flavor” of the control that’s being offered. Read the platforms of the two parties. Therein lie the heart and soul of two competing philosophies. The platforms are the written testimonials of what the two sides believe in, what they would do if they had complete control, and the fundamental flavor of each side’s vision for America and the world. Even if you buy into the “it ultimately doesn’t matter” argument, in the non-ultimate reality of everyday life, the flavor of the background noise makes a huge difference. Think wars, taxes, environment, work-place rules, etc. and think about those two platforms. There are, in fact, fundamental and significant differences in the direction the two sides want to take this country and the world. Either Obama or Romney will win this election. (Sorry thirdpartiers. Our time has not yet arrived.) Justices at all levels, including the supreme court, will be appointed or rejected, laws and regulations will be passed or not, the “flavor” of America and the world will be affected based on who controls the pursestrings, the veto pen, and the gavels. If your primary argument for not voting this November is that there is no difference between the two parties, read the two platforms. You’ll find plenty of differences that will become reality depending on who gets elected and who doesn’t. And those differences eventually will affect everyone directly and indirectly. Michel Rottmann Virginia City Highlands

Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Priscilla Garcia Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia Cover photo: Megan Berner

SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

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BIG HE A SMALL H

by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25kWould you like to OF beBIGpresident? SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% HE AD) Asked at UNR student union food court Rudy Leon Librarian

No. I like to sleep. I like having a private life. I can get stuff done without being the president. I might be able to get more done without being the president.

Colin Williams Fourth year student

No. I’d rather be a doctor instead, so I could help people. Yes, doctors have run, but none of them have won. You have to be a lawyer to be president.

Frank Boschi

To two good men

Graduate student

Not at this time. The Bush/Cheney administration dumped 20 years of financial problems and a war on [Obama], and he’s supposed to fix all their mistakes in four years. No way.

The timing for endorsements in political races can be Both men are likeable, seem nice to children, and crucial. In some instances, like the cases for the Reno have managed to avoid pedestrians in crosswalks. City Council or in the race for School Board, district E, In fact, the only things that seem to distinguish the Reno News & Review’s choices and reasons for them is that Dunlap is an old-school law-and-order making those choices were clear almost since the day guy—the type that sometimes assumes police are infalthe candidates announced their campaigns. lible—and that Freeman was a defense attorney, a guy Sometimes endorsements are held back because who often took on cases where the accused was even we, members of the omniscient media, can’t unlikely to get any justice without him—even though it decide if one or the other candidates is going to do sometimes washed him in a sort of associative guilt. something so incredible that any But that’s how justice works, or is supresponsible endorsement in the posed to work: You’ve got two smart We’d like to endorse race would require a nod to that men or women representing the state Scott Freeman and action. For example, we have an and the accused. endorsement written and in the Dunlap is 70, and Freeman is 57, if Cal Dunlap for can for the U.S. Senate race either of those numbers matter to between Dean Heller and Shelley District Court Judge. anyone. To be honest, in most circumBerkeley, but we’ve chosen not to stances we’d be inclined to give the nod publish it until any possible news in the race has hit to Freeman just because most judge seats are occupied the street. by prosecutors in this community. But Dunlap’s past And then there’s this race for Department 9 district public service seems to make irrelevant and disrespectjudge between Scott Freeman and Cal Dunlap. There’s ful that kind of kneejerk endorsement. no pressing need to endorse in the race. The candidates So, here’s the deal. We’re not going to endorse in seem to be doing a fine job getting the word out about the Department 9 District Judge race between Scott their campaigns. Both these attorneys are known in the Freeman and Cal Dunlap. This is the kind of race we community, and we don’t expect either to wind up sudlove to see: two respectful, intelligent, not acrimodenly embroiled in a sheep sex scandal or the like. Both nious, qualified, community-oriented people running men are eminently qualified: Dunlap has been a for an office out of a desire to perform public service respected and competent prosecutor and district attorney. and not because they can’t make more money in the Freeman has been a respected and competent defender private sector. and judge in various capacities. (Freemen currently Thanks to both these men for making the decision to serves on the District 9 bench, having been appointed to run, and congratulations to Washoe County and the state the seat by Gov. Brian Sandoval because of the unfortuof Nevada because no matter where this race ends up, nate passing of Judge Robert Perry.) our citizens are going to be the winners. Ω OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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Jeff Jowett Graduate student

Maybe in 2016. I need to formulate a coherent proposal first for methods to move the country forward. I’ll need four years to do that, so I’ll run in 2016.

Jasmine Jones First year student

No. I don’t really like to lead. It’s just not my thing. I’m not used to leading a whole bunch of people.

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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MISCELLANY

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SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

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RN&R

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Voters checked in at a Republican caucus site in Sparks in February.

Poker faceoff U.S. Sen. Dean Heller, who previously said his colleague Harry Reid should take the lead in getting an online poker bill enacted, backed away from that stance this week. In a Sept. 10 letter, Heller objected to a deadline set by Reid and also said that “as discussed, it would be beneficial for the House of Representatives to first address this issue.” Reid has lined up between 40 and 50 Democrats in the Senate to support legislation making online poker legal and had asked Republicans Heller and Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona to bring 15 GOP senators on board. Because of Reid’s system of “imaginary filibusters” in which a single member of the Senate can impose a 60-vote threshold on the 100-member Senate, Reid and Heller need 60 votes to pass the measure. Reid also called on Heller to come up with the 15 votes by this week. This was “not a strategy we discussed,” Heller responded. In the letter, Heller said he and Kyl have approached about half the Republicans but didn’t say what the results were. Reid’s office issued a statement: “Several months ago Senator Reid asked Senator Heller to secure Republican votes to help pass an Internet poker bill, and to date, Senator Heller has not been able to secure any support.” Heller’s office did not respond. Reid and Heller are seeking to make online poker legal and all other forms of online gambling illegal to aid the Nevada casino industry.

Climate takes economic toll If the economic prognosis for Nevada is poor, the climate prospects are no better. The National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center warned “The Drought Outlook valid through the end of November 2012 indicates drought conditions will remain essentially unchanged in large sections of the central Mississippi Valley, the central and southwestern Great Plains, most of the High Plains, the central Rockies, the Great Basin, and parts of the Far West.” Nevada occupies most of the Great Basin. The relentless heat and nearly nonexistent rain is also compromising the nation’s ability to generate energy. On Sunday, the Washington Post reported that operators of Hoover Dam and other hydroelectric dams across the nation are scrambling “for ways to produce the same amount of power from the hydroelectric grid with less water.” Nor is hydroelectric generation the only casualty of the drought. “[L]ow water levels affect coal-fired and nuclear power plants’ operations and impede the passage of coal barges along the Mississippi River.” Business Insider reported that “virtually all power plants, whether they are nuclear, coal or natural gas-fired, are completely dependent on water for cooling. … Given the drought, many facilities are overheating, and utilities are shutting them down or running their plants at lower capacity. Few Americans know (or up to this point have cared) that the country’s power plants account for about half of all the water used in the United States. For every gallon of residential water used in the average U.S. household, five times more is used to provide that home with electricity via hydropower turbines and fossil fuel power plants, roughly 40,000 gallons each month.”

She was there Nevadan Jennifer Terhune, who attended the Republican National Convention in Tampa, has posted her account of Nevada delegation events. Though it sometimes assumes the reader’s knowledge of intra-party matters, it still makes interesting reading. It can be read at www.jenspen.com.

—Dennis Myers

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Caucuses still primary Early rumblings of changing system come to nothing After some reporters were inconvenienced in the Iowa and Nevada Republican caucuses in January and February, there by Dennis Myers was considerable agitation—especially by online sites—to do away with caucuses. “Unable to control how its county parties count and report results, state Republicans were scrambling Sunday to explain why, almost 24 hours after most caucuses ended, the votes still have not been counted,” Politico reported after the Nevada caucuses.

“You’re likely to get a more engaged voter in caucuses.” Ken Bode Political analyst As much as anything, the “problem” appeared to be young reporters who hadn’t understood that caucus vote-counting is slower than primary vote counting. “After back-to-back fiascos in Nevada and Iowa, the term ‘caucus’ may be on its way to becoming a bad word in the GOP lexicon,” reported the Associated Press in a story that quoted Nevada Assembly GOP Leader Pat Hickey: “The average voter does not want to go to an event that is going to take one, two or three hours.” But there was never any likelihood that the political parties—and least of

all the Republicans—would do away with caucuses. And that was something that many of their critics failed to understand—that the caucus process was under the control of the parties, not the government. Caucuses are only secondarily presidential selection events. They are, first, the way the political parties do business—electing officers and adopting policy positions every two years, not just in presidential years. In other words, they are events held not by the government but by private organizations, and those organizations make use of them for more than selecting presidential candidates. Some states have presidential primaries. All states have caucuses. But presidential selection—or rather selection of delegates to presidential nominating conventions—is when the caucuses get most of the attention.

The military vote

“Showing up is 80 percent of life,” Woody Allen once said. Nowhere is that truer than in caucuses, which demand a commitment of time. Participants arrive, register, meet with other people from their own neighborhoods, declare their support for a presidential candidate—and possibly for a second choice if their first choice does not meet a threshold—and elect delegates to a county convention. What happened in Tampa and Charlotte in the last couple of weeks

all began at these “local precinct meetings,” which is actually the legally correct term for them in Nevada. “Caucuses give you a real sense of democracy,” said Ken Bode, former NBC reporter and aide to several presidential candidates. “You have an opportunity to be with your neighbors. You probably get a more involved electorate. There’s diversity and interest in the process. It takes more time to sit in the caucuses, that’s for sure.” He said some people, including journalists, “don’t understand caucuses and haven’t taken the time to understand them.” Those who want caucuses replaced with primaries are often the people who oppose government spending. Primaries are paid for by the government, caucuses by the political parties. Nevada once had a presidential primary, but it was eliminated as too expensive. State law now allows the parties the option of holding primaries, but when the GOP did it in 1996, it cost more than half a million dollars and the turnout was poor. Last month, the Republican National Convention in Tampa did make a challenging change that future GOP caucuses will have to deal with. Beginning in the next presidential election—not the midterm conventions of 2014—state Republican Parties will have to make an effort to include absentee military voters and injured servicepeople in caucuses. “Time, distance, and military regulations preclude … service members from coming home to Iowa to participate in caucus night activities,” retired Navy officer Sam Wright wrote to Iowa GOP leaders. “Is it too much to ask that you make arrangements to give them a reasonable opportunity to participate in the nomination of a presidential candidate in 2016 and beyond?” It’s not clear how this will work in Iowa or any other caucus state. By their very nature, caucuses demand a physical presence. A succession of decisions by each participant is made on the spot, each dependent on the outcome of the previous one. How does an absentee participant choose who to vote to send to the county convention, since the county delegates are not nominated until the day of the caucus? How do they designate their presidential choices after the first round of voting at the meeting eliminates some candidates? Bode, who once served as research director for a Democratic Party delegate selection commission, said, “It’s a very impractical thing.” He considered and rejected in his comments ways the overseas voters could be accommodated.


Being there

Decision for the Council

up behind candidates that party leaders believe cannot win, as with Democrat Howard Dean in 2008 and Republican Ron Paul this year. Such highly motivated delegates were among those who successfully blocked the rule that would have allowed a candidate to overrule a state convention. But then a second rule was adopted that would allow the Republican National Committee to change the party’s rules before 2016. In the voice convention vote, it was not clear who won, but John Boehner—who was presiding— declared the rule passed. If that was not enough of a power play, convention officials decided to change the convention rules after the convention was already under way in order to prevent Ron Paul’s name from even being placed in nomination. It was a little like deciding in the second inning to require two strikes for an out by one of the teams. It was an affront to Paul and his supporters at a time when a party’s leaders normally are trying to bring losing candidates into the party fold. While most of the action on caucus rules this year is on the Republican side, the Democrats are more certain than Republicans to have a stake in how caucuses work next time around. That’s because whether Barack Obama wins or loses, the Democratic race will be open in 2016. But on the Republican side, it will likely be open only if Romney loses. If he wins, the 2016 GOP caucuses will probably be as pro-forma as were this year’s Democratic caucuses. Ω

Showing up is something that some candidates’ supporters do better than others. Ron Paul’s supporters appear to be the current champs. They turned a third-place showing in the Nevada caucuses in February into a Paul delegation from Nevada to the Republican National Convention this year by showing up in force at both county and state conventions while Romney’s supporters were less diligent. At the Tampa convention, Republican leaders wanted new delegate selection rules to keep that kind of thing from happening. One rule they proposed would have allowed a candidate to overrule state conventions and choose his or her own delegates. That was a bit much, with many delegates—certainly including the Nevadans—believing that would turn the process into even more of an insiders club and give still more advantages to candidates with money, blocking grass roots movements. The party leaders more or less gave up, agreeing to a rule that merely binds delegates to the candidates they are chosen to represent. The notion of binding delegates is a relatively recent one. During most of U.S. political history, delegates were free agents, able to move from candidate to candidate as the convention unfolded. In those days, the principal concern was selecting a leader for the party who could win the election, and the delegates were the experts since they ran the campaigns at the grass roots. Today, however, delegates are more issueoriented, and the most passionate, highly motivated delegates often line

Playoff PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

At the Reno Aces ball park last week, customers lined up for food before the start of the game. In a playoff series against the Sacramento River Cats, the Aces took a 3-1 win followed by a 0-1 loss in Sacramento, then a win, a loss and a win at home, 11-7, 3-4, and 7-4. Reno now goes to the Pacific Coast League championship series for the first time in the team’s short history. OPINION

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Cliff Young and Oscar Delgado survived the primary election to become the canby didates for Reno City Council in Dennis Myers Ward Three. Young comes to the race with a well known name—his father, also Cliff Young, was U.S. House member and state supreme court justice. The Council candidate ran for office once before, in an unsuccessful race in Assembly District 27. He has been identified with bicycling and issues like bike paths in Reno for decades. It’s Delgado’s first run for office. He sits on the Neighborhood Advisory Board Cliff Young f0r ward three and City of Reno Charter Committee and is also a member of the West of Wells Neighborhood Group. Both candidates are rooted in the community, born in Nevada and raised in Reno. They seek a job that may not be all that pleasant. A city councilmember serving in hard times with little expectation for economic recovery anytime soon, could end up being very unpopular. Both candidates speak of the limitations on the city, of not losing any more ground. “I’d certainly like to try to maintain the status quo as far as employment,” Young said. “I mean, you know, 85 percent of the budget is in salaries. We have a declining tax revenue so maintaining strong police and fire department is not going to be easy.” It shouldn’t be surprising that neither candidate speaks of launching new programs. Young speaks wistfully of flood projects but also of less expensive goals: “I think we can do more with volunteers and neighborhood advisory boards ... trying to beautify parks and the town … I think coordinating the volunteers for beautification projects would be one outreach that we might be able to [accomplish].” Delgado said job creation is high on his list, and he too thinks it is important to try to keep as many city employees as possible. “Making sure that we keep our general funds up for our general uses and making sure cops on the street and firefighters are Oscar Delgado working,” he said. “You know, [that] parks are up to safety standards for our residents and our community.” The candidates haven’t been critical of each other, in part because they have encountered each other in public forums only once. The closest thing to conflict involved education. Young heard Delgado link education to the Council race. “I’m not sure what the

City Council does on that,” Young said. Delgado: “We need to understand that as a region, we all need to work collaboratively together, working with the school district a lot more closely and seeing how we can be more supportive, working with our university to see how we can be more supportive.” He said he would want to do that not just with education but with the county and Sparks governments. Young has been something of a lightning rod for criticism. He practices family law—divorces—which always generates anger (nearly all courthouse violence involves family court) and until recently there was a website attacking him over such cases. He has also been attacked by some of the tenants at rental properties he inherited in low-income areas. But his critics have not been good at delivering promised documentation, and examination of some of the charges tend to make him look as much like a victim as a villain, as when his properties are marked with graffiti. He said that he has had problems with tenants and drugs and has evicted half a dozen tenants because of it. By contrast, Delgado tends to be “notorious for his affability,” as one observer put it. He is regarded as easygoing and able to work cooperatively with people of different viewpoints. The public images of both candidates could be marketable. In Young’s case, a candidate who keeps things stirred up could appeal to voters who think government doesn’t work. In Delgado’s case, affability could be seen by voters as a trait of someone who gets things done. Political analyst Fred Lokken said that in this particular race, the Reno City Council’s history will probably be a factor in Delgado’s favor. “The Reno Council, especially, has had a history of problems in working together,” Lokken said. “And you can be a great lone wolf in the process, but if you can’t convince the others sitting on the Council or the mayor to go along … then your leadership is less than inspired, whereas someone who’s more affable, willing to advocate and support compromise and not be about personality or having to be out in front of the pack frankly tends to be of a greater value on the [Council].” And he said the residents who vote in Council races are those who would likely remember that history. “[W]e have outrageously low voter turnout for local elections, and so it’s only a small percentage of the voters in Reno that are engaged. They tend to be the repeat participants and ... more aware of the problems we’ve had

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Lane merging More changes to driving and bike lanes are on the horizon in Reno after the Reno City Council held a meeting on Aug. 29 and voted to move forward with several road conversions. “During the Sutro Street presentation, the RTC showed where they were going to reconfigure vehicle travel lanes into sidewalks and bike lanes between Fourth Street and Oddie, and decrease the four travel lanes into two plus a turn lane,” Scott Hall, chairman of the Committee for Bicyclists on 4th Street, wrote to us in an email. “North of Oddie, there would be no bicycle lanes, but a shared parking [and] bike lane would go up the hill from Wedekind to Hug High School. ... The Reno City Council voted to adopt the RTC preferred alternative, which they said the neighborhood community supported.” Plans for Plumas Street were also discussed at the meeting, with council member Sharon Zadra supporting keeping four travel lanes and adding in bicycle lanes from Urban Street to Moana Lane. Reno city traffic engineers Steve Bunnell and John Flansberg agreed with Zadra. Others disagreed. “This configuration would be extremely tight, and put bicyclists next to high speed traffic with a curb blocking the side,” said Hall. Mayor Bob Cashell did not support a four lane plan for Plumas Street, but supported a plan to reduce Mayberry Street from four lanes to two in order to improve safety. Scott Gibson, a city traffic engineer, presented data showing that other Reno road conversions reduced traffic accidents by 40 percent. Ultimately, Hall said, the Council compromised with a three lane design for Plumas Street—two lanes southbound, and one lane northbound—which will be studied throughout the next year to determine safety and traffic conditions. “I think we are seeing more changes in the attitudes of Reno about bicycling and walking, and that our investments and decisions already made by the city of Reno, and supported today in Council meetings, mean that we will be benefiting more and more as a community in the rebirth of Reno,” Hall says.

Stacked up Sure, phonebooks are useful for some things, like keeping a door propped open, but with internet databases, the books have long been regarded as wasteful and outdated by environmental organizations, including recycling and sustainability non-profit Keep America Beautiful. According to local KAB affiliate Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful and YP Real Yellow Pages, it’s the time of year to opt out of receiving phone books. To do so, visit www.yellowpagesoptout.com to register your household. KTMB also notes that old phone books can be recycled through curbside recycling.

Washoe expands its web The Washoe County Health District is using web resources to encourage residents to participate in local health initiatives. The WashoeEats website, which allows residents to view food inspections conducted on regional restaurants, was launched in February and now has a mobile version that is designed to be used on smartphones and tablets. Visit http://m.eats.washoecounty.us/. Locals can also find smoke-free locations by using www.smokefreemeetings.org, which lists around 60 smoke-free places in Washoe County, Carson City and Storey County, according to the website. Each location is “100 percent smoke-free”: “A smoke-free meeting location is defined as a location where smoking is not permitted anywhere inside the entire facility or place of business,” the website says.

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT The sixth annual Green Living Festival will be held on Sept. 15 in Gardnerville. The event will offer activities for kids, food, music, exhibitors and presentations, and local organizations such as the Discovery Museum and Full Circle Compost will be on hand to lead demonstrations. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission and parking. Lampe Park, Gardnerville. For more information, visit www.greenlivingfest.org.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.

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PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREENSPACE

Attendees participated in an activity in which they discussed the resources their organizations possessed and lacked.

Justice league Rural & Urban Nevada Social Justice Institute The local and organic food movements are just as much about people as they are about the environment—especially when they can aid in tackling the food crisis by in Nevada’s rural counties. Ashley The food insecurity and nutrition workshop, held at the Joe Crowley Hennefer Student Union on Sept. 7, was part of the Rural & Urban Nevada Social ashleyh@ Justice Institute, and addressed how “food security is related to social jusnewsreview.com tice,” according to speaker Christy McGill, director of the Healthy Communities Coalition. The workshop brought together local food and outreach leaders, including members from Urban Roots Garden Classroom, Washoe County School District, local food banks and area non-profits such as Justice for Immigrants. McGill and Freida Carbery, volunteer coordinator with Healthy Communities Coalition, spoke of collective impact and individual impact. The Healthy Communities Coalition focuses on the general wellness of Lyon and Storey counties, and has several food initiatives. According to McGill, much of Nevada is a “food desert”—communities in which healthy food is difficult to obtain, largely due to economic status—and many residents of Lyon and Storey counties rely on the food provided by the counties’ food closets. Carbery talked about the importance of empowerment, ensuring that residents know what to do with the foods they are given to make healthy For more information about Healthy meals for their families. Communities Coalition’s “We want to empower the people using the services,” she said. “Who efforts, visit knows better how it feels than those who use the service? … It’s about how a www.healthycomm.org. person feels when they walk out of that room [at the food bank]. We need to ask them, ‘Can you confidently cook those green beans?’” Many of the plans discussed at the workshop included collaboration between food banks, schools and farmers—providing farmers with a larger market by bringing their produce into schools and growing essentials needed by the community. In Silver Springs, children from the local schools collaborated with farmers to host a farmers’ market, where residents were able to use coupons distributed by the Northern Nevada Food Bank. An electronic benefits transfer (EBT) machine was also available, allowing for the use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to purchase locally grown produce. McGill talked about the goals for the “Good food for all” plan, which includes “access to quality food for the Western Nevada region; economic vitality for regional producers, manufacturers, distributors and purveyors; natural resources used well; [and] citizens are a part of a healthy food system where eating, growing and cooking healthy, sustainable food becomes more important in daily community life and common knowledge.” McGill closed the workshop by saying, “A two track food system is not healthy or profitable for Nevada,” she said. A “two track food system” is often used to describe the imbalance between members of the public who can afford to buy healthy and organic foods, and those whose economic status prevents them from doing so. Ultimately, the message of the day was simple—Nevada needs more farmers and more individuals who can contribute to the state’s demand for healthy food. “Befriend a farmer,” McGill said. “It’s worth your time.” Ω


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by D. BRIA B R IA N B @

N BURGH

N EW SR EV

IE W.C O M

ART

p h o to s b y MEGAN B ERN

ER

ary Johnson was the Republican governor of New Mexico from 1995-2003. He’s 58 years old, and he’s running for president of the United States on the Libertarian ticket. Republicans all over the country are waging a war against him, using underhanded methods attempting to keep him off the ballots. Right now, he’s on the ballot in all 50 states but with challenges remaining in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Oklahoma. While he was governor, he got the nickname Governor Veto for vetoing legislation sent for a rubber stamp more than 200 times in his first 180 days. Somehow, when the same technique was tried here, it just earned the administrator the reputation for being a dick. One thing seems odd, though: Why is the GOP so afraid of losing votes to this man when the old-school conservative seems to be on the right side of so many “liberal” issues?

G

short. It’s only one or two, and we’re not expecting that to be the case.

Why should Republicans vote for you? So let me just point out the differences between me and the other two guys: I don’t want to bomb Iran. I want to get out of Afghanistan now. Bring the troops home. I do support marriage equality. I think that it’s a constitutionally guaranteed right. I support ending the drug wars and legalizing marijuana. I would like to repeal the Patriot Act; I think we have a growing police state in this country. I would have never signed the National Defense Authorization Act allowing for indefinite detention of U.S. citizens without being charged. I also believe that we need to balance the federal budget now. If we don’t, I think we’re going to find ourselves with a collapsed government. I am also advocating kicking crony capitalism in the rear end by eliminating corporate tax, income tax, the IRS and replacing all of that with one federal consumption tax. In this case, I’m advocating the FairTax. Those are the big differences between myself and my two opponents. [Editor’s note: The FairTax is a 23 percent federal retail sales tax collected at the final point of purchase of new goods and services for personal consumption.]

In this interview, I want to talk to you about issues. I realize you were in town not too long ago, but this will be the first introduction most people have to you. So let’s go, why should Democrats vote for you? You know what? I’m more liberal than Obama, and I’m more conservative than Romney. I think that’s where the majority of Americans fall—into the broad brushstroke of fiscally responsible and socially accepting. OK, that being said, there are big differences between me and the other two candidates. And I am talking as someone who’s going to be on the ballot in all 50 states. There are only three candidates that are in that category: me, Obama and Romney. I want you to know that we do have issues with several states, but we believe that we’re going to resolve the issues. But anyway, in second place when it comes to third-parties being on the ballot, I believe the Green Party will be on the ballot in about 30 states. No one is going to come close to 50 states. If we fall short in one or two states, then we fall OPINION

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What made you run as a Libertarian when you were apparently a lifelong Republican and had two terms as Republican governor? Well, I would say that I’ve actually been a lifelong Libertarian. I registered as a Republican and ran as a Republican outside the Republican Party and

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So completely leave it as it stands?

“PREZ”

Yes.

continued from page 11

What is your policy regarding indefinite detention, and while you did mention NDAA, could you expand on that a little bit? I would never have signed NDAA, and we need to bring to an end the practice of arrest and detainment without being charged.

Where do you come down on things like waterboarding? We should not allow torture. I think these issues are why we’ve gone to war with other countries. We’re not a country that does this.

Johnson chatted with locals at Bibo Coffee on Record Street on Aug. 7.

got elected Republican governor of New Mexico in a state that’s 2-to-1 Democrat. So arguably, I’ve been a Libertarian all my life, kind of under the guise of being a Republican.

of the majority of Republicans but, you know, like I say, I wasn’t given a real chance to air these views. I think the majority of Republicans are disillusioned with Republicans.

Does a third-party candidate have a shot at winning the presidency?

All right, let’s get into the issue stuff. What should America do regarding illegal immigration?

Yeah. I wouldn’t be doing this if I didn’t have that chance or belief that it is possible. The only way that I have a chance of winning it is to be in an actual debate against Obama and Romney. Short of that, I have the opportunity here to change the national dialogue on all those issues that I mentioned earlier, and I don’t think that that is insignificant. For anybody that says they don’t want to waste their vote ... I just think that wasting a vote is voting for someone you don’t believe in.

Have you asked Ron Paul for his endorsement as a Libertarian candidate? No, and I’m not going to, but I would just like to point out that he asked me for mine in 2008, and I gave it to him. When I dropped the Republican Party, I asked everyone who was going to vote for me to vote for him, and in the second debate that I was in, I was asked, “Who on stage would be your vice president if you had to pick one from those on stage,” and my response was, “Ron Paul.” I thought that was obvious.

Running this time, I mean as a dark horse, if you don’t win, in four years, you are on the national stage. There is no way they could freeze you out. In four years, I could well return as the Libertarian spokesman again. This is a permanent change for me. I think Republicans have really lost it, and I think I’m speaking on behalf 12

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We should make it as easy as possible for someone who wants to come into this country and work to get a visa. We should acknowledge that immigration is a good thing; it’s not a bad thing. We shouldn’t build a fence, and for the 11 million illegal immigrants that are here in this country right now, I think we need to set up a grace period where we can get them working visas. That would entail a background check and a Social Security card so that applicable taxes would paid. If we adopt the FairTax, taxes will not be an issue because whether you’re illegal, legal, a visitor to the U.S., or a U.S. citizen, you’re not going to be able to avoid paying one federal consumption tax. And then legalize marijuana and arguably 75 percent of the border violence in Mexico goes away. That being the estimate of the drug cartel activities that are engaged in the marijuana trade. There have been 40,000 deaths on the border over the last four years. These are disputes that are being played out with guns rather than the courts.

I am interested in this idea. We, at the threat of Saddam Hussein having weapons of mass instruction that he might kill some of his own people or he might kill somebody else, we went halfway around the world and started killing people. And yet on our own borders, as you say, 40,000 deaths in the last four years, and there has been no threat of military

action. How do you feel about this kind of cognitive dissonance? Well you know that there are politicians that want to answer the issue of guns on the border with more guns. I would suggest that the root cause of border violence has to do with the prohibition of drugs. Let’s deal with the prohibition of drugs. That’s the disconnect.

Would you expand on your policy on gay marriage a little bit? We should adopt marriage equality. I maintain that it is a constitutional issue, constitutionally on par with the civil rights of the ’60s. Marriage equality is one of those constitutional rights we should guarantee.

What is your policy on gun ownership? The Second Amendment could not be clearer. As governor of New Mexico in 1995, I actually got to sign legislation allowing for concealed carry in New Mexico. I have nothing that I want to legislate when it comes to gun control.

Do you have a concealed weapons permit? No, but I will tell you that as a result of Aurora, I made a personal pledge to myself that when this campaign is over that I’m going to get my concealed carry permit.

What is your policy regarding SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) and PIPA (Protect IP Act), and basically legislation to control or censor the internet? There is nothing I want the government to control when it comes to the internet. There is nothing I want the government to fix when it comes to the internet.

Do you have a general policy regarding war? When is it acceptable? Nonintervention. Because of our military intervention we have hundreds of millions of enemies to this country that except for our military intervention, we would not have those enemies.

Does your drug policy extend beyond just simple legalization of marijuana? I am just advocating the legalization of marijuana, but I think we’re at a tipping point on the marijuana issue. I think we’re going to legalize marijuana. I think the tipping point is going to be Colorado this fall. It’s on the ballot to regulate marijuana like alcohol. I think that once we legalize marijuana in the country, and it’s going to have to be 50 states that are going to have to do this, but once we do that, I think we turn our head of the rest the drug issue and clearly look at some alternatives that would start—start—with looking at drugs as a health issue rather than a criminal justice issue.

So that means treatment in some cases? I believe that 90 percent of the drug problems are prohibition-related, not use-related. That is not to discount the problems with use and abuse, but that should be the focus. The issue today with treatment is that the government is giving you and me an option when we’re arrested: You can either go to treatment or you can go to jail. Well, in a situation like that, I would hope to offer that alternative in about a hundred out of a hundred cases, but does that work? Does a forced treatment model work? No way. It doesn’t work. People are going to smoke pot. Do we really want to send these people to jail, or do we really want to put them in treatment for an issue that they don’t need treatment for? No. No. Treatment right now, as a forced model of treatment, really

doesn’t work. It prevents people from going to jail but it doesn’t ... the notion of preventing people from doing drugs? Come on. But now I’m back to the fact that some people really do want treatment. It’s got to start with that. It can’t be forced, but for people that want to address the issues with a fraction of the amount of money that we spend on the war on drugs—that would be money effectively spent.

What is your policy on Obamacare? If you would reform health care how would you do so, especially considering unregulated health care is what got us in the mess we’re in? I would argue that the mess that we’re in has to do with regulated health care, that health care is about as far removed from free market as it possibly can be, and that government has restricted the availability of choices when it comes to health care, and it’s restricted the supply of health care available to us. Those would be government policies that could turn this around. I have heard, and I know that this is a disputed figure, that we’re going to have 15,000 new IRS agents to enforce President Obama’s health care plan. Where was the legislation to create 15,000 more doctors and expanding the medical schools? To me, that’s more effective use of government policy.

OK. So how about Obamacare as it was passed? What would you do? First off, I think that it’s completely unaffordable—and I don’t want to cast Democrats as the party of big spending because Republicans just a few years earlier passed prescription health care benefit, which at that time was the largest entitlement ever passed in the country—but it’s unaffordable. I believe that if we don’t balance the federal budget that we’re going to experience a monetary collapse. I think everybody recognizes that, but somehow we think that Santa Claus is coming this Christmas, or the

Gary Johnson Presidential candidate


Easter bunny after that, and you know what? We have to fix this ourselves, and that means mutual sacrifice on the part of all of us, and the key word here is “mutual” sacrifice. And you’ve got both parties talking about who’s going to spend more on Medicare? Look, we have to spend less on Medicare. We have to slash Medicare’s spending. If we don’t, we’re going to find ourselves with no health care at all for those over 65.

served. Those commitments need to remain in place. But that doesn’t apply to military spending in general, which has to be, in my opinion, reduced by 43 percent, which takes us back to 2003 spending levels. I would just start with the premise that we need, and government has the responsibility to provide for a strong national defense. I would take umbrage over the word “defense.” We are anything but defense. We are offense, and we are nation building, and that needs to all come to an end.

You spoke to the idea of entitlements for medical reasons, but do you have an idea regarding ending entitlements for volunteer military when they end their time of employment?

What is your policy regarding taxation? I think we should abolish the IRS, eliminate income tax and corporate tax, tax withholdings from your payroll check. I am specifically supporting the Fair Tax, which is one federal consumption tax. I think it really reboots the American economy. It ends up being cost-neutral. It’s really the answer when it comes to American export.

That is the only area of government that I can think of where I would not advocate a reduction. These are commitments that have been made to servicemen and women that have

What is your policy regarding abortion? I support a woman’s right to choose.

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In all cases? Yes. As governor of New Mexico I did sign a bill banning late-term abortion. It was a bill that didn’t attach criminal penalties to any of it. I happen to concur personally with the law of the land. The law of the land is Casey vs. Planned Parenthood, which I don’t think people really understand. The law of the land in this country is that woman has the right to choose up until viability of the fetus. The Supreme Court has defined “viability of the fetus” as being able to sustain the life of the fetus outside of the womb even if by artificial means.

Johnson climbed the wall at CommRow on Aug. 7.

What can American citizens do to end or fix the dysfunctional two-party system? I think voting for me would be a big shot across the bow that business as usual cannot continue. We need leadership. We don’t need Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum.

Why are so many uneducated and stupid people elected to public office through the two-party system? [Laughs.] Well, it is what it is. And ... I don’t know. If you can come up with the answer to that one, I want to hear it. Ω

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In Rotation 16 | Art of the State 17 | Foodfinds 18 | Fi¬m 20 is in a similar vein, though more dramatic. As UNR Theater Department Chair and Company Director Rob Gander explains, “Such important, life-changing things happen in hospital settings. People are at critical moments of their lives.” The hospital serves as a backdrop for eight stories guided by student directors. Tickets and information: unr.edu/nevadarep

Death and taxes: Reno Little Theater

by Jessica Santina photos by Diana Bradbury

If your theater diet has been lean on the classics, or if you simply prefer the tried and true, this is the season for you. With only a couple of exceptions, local performing arts companies are going back to basics for the latter half of 2012, bringing you beloved Broadway musicals, Elizabethan classics and favorite fairy tales. This fall’s lineup will remind you of what’s wonderful about live theater.

20/20 vision: Brüka Theatre

Brüka launches its 20th season with “sound and fury,” returning to its roots with Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the same show Brüka opened its downtown Reno venue with in 1997. Shakespearean actor and Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Director of Education Joe Atack lends his Bardsavvy to this production, which runs through the second half of October. Atack will lead a Shakespearean workshop for actors as well as a preshow talk on that tricky Elizabethan style that often eludes audiences. Then, revisit two local favorites. For the 15th Annual Freakers Ball on Oct. 27, come as your favorite character from a Brüka show (or … do your own thing). And on Nov. 16, Brüka gets back to the Buttcracker. Retaining its original premise— Brüka has hired a professional dance company to perform The Nutcracker, and they don’t show up, so now dance-challenged actors must put the

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show on themselves—this fourth installment was given the subtitle Zombie Apocalypse, and adds a parody of the end of the world. Brüka also kicks off its “Artist in the House” series, an effort to embrace regional artists in all genres and give them space in which to perform. Mark Growden, a singer, composer, songwriter, record producer and visual artist starts things off Sept. 13 with a concert of original songs. Tickets and information: bruka.org

Flying faustus: Nevada Repertory Company

If you happen to feel antiShakespearean this October, why not check out his supposed nemesis, Christopher Marlowe, whose classic, philosophical piece, The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus, hits the Nevada Rep stage on Oct. 19. It’s the story of a man who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for 24 years of power, wealth, fame and glory. Thanks to a $750,000 renovation in the company’s University of Nevada, Reno-based Redfield Proscenium Theatre, Faustus will feature flying angels and hell-worthy pyrotechnics. On November 29, Nevada Rep opens The Hospital Plays: An Evening of Student-Directed OneActs. In the wake of last year’s popular The Beach Plays, this series

Reno’s longest-running theater company opens its 78th season at the end of September with another Pulitzerprize-winning, just-off-Broadway play, Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. Doug Mishler directs the story of Willy Loman, the miserable salesman who’s failing at work and at home. Spirits lift in November when RLT presents Michael Cooney’s Cash on Delivery, a comedy/mystery about a man whose extravagant attempts to bilk the government out of its money are coming back to bite him. RLT’s holiday show is Inspecting Carol, a spoof on holiday shows about a theater troupe trying to put on A Christmas Carol for an important critic, despite everything going wrong. Then the drama picks back up in January with Rabbit Hole, a sobering story about a couple mourning the sudden death of their young son. For “Thirsty Thursdays,” buy a ticket for a Thursday night show and get a free drink. Tickets and information: renolittletheater.org

Moon over midtown: Goodluck Macbeth

Goodluck Macbeth has relocated to 713 S. Virginia St., hoping to capitalize on the new Midtown energy and growing sense of community among its business owners. GLM opened its new location with Eugene O’Neill’s last drama, A Moon for the

Casey Burke-Ruhl as the devil and Ethan Leaverton as Doctor Faustus.

Misbegotten. This sequel to Long Day’s Journey into Night continues the story of the Tyrone family after the death of its matriarch, and wraps Sept. 30. Almost immediately following Misbegotten comes GLM’s original version of Frankenstein. Local writer and RN&R contributor Marvin Gonzalez crafted this modernized adaptation of the story that follows Frankenstein’s monster (“Frankie”) home after his first eye-opening semester at college. In November, GLM launches its student-performed children’s show, The Princess and the Pea, as part of a new, educational collaboration with Sierra School of Performing Arts, which will involve productions, classes and workshops. GLM will present two different holiday shows. The first, Truman Capote’s A Christmas Memory, is a mid-November benefit for several charities. The second is Christmas My Way: A Sinatra Holiday Bash, a musical revue of favorite Rat Pack Christmas tunes. Tickets and information: goodluckmacbeth.org

Reprising its role: Brewery Arts Center

Apparently, Carson City residents were confused. According to Director of Programs Tami Shelton, the fact that BAC had in-house performance groups made it a perceived competitor, rather than a supporter, of other local groups. The recent decision to take on resident companies instead gives it a greater opportunity to fulfill its role and embrace other groups. Wild Horse Theater Company and Proscenium Players, Inc. have taken up residence, with the former BACStage Kids branching off as an independent nonprofit entity, Youth Theater Carson City. Wild Horse kicks off its fall with Bob Reid’s original play, a political spoof called None of the Above.

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DISCOVERING HEALTH CARE CAREERS

Bryce Keil and Zach Bartot rehearse Death of a Salesman at Reno Little Theatre.

High standards: TMCC Performing Arts

Beloved classics are the name of the game for this musical theater troupe. Starting off its season is Guys and Dolls. This musical romantic comedy about high rollers, missionaries, and love birds, all set against a New York City backdrop, opens Oct. 26, and features well-loved songs like “Luck, Be a Lady” and “Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat.” C.S. Lewis’ imaginative fantasy The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe comes to the stage in midDecember. Tickets and information: performingarts.tmcc.edu

Witness a miracle: Tahoe Players

Tahoe Players offers an appealing holiday alternative to Dickens with something slightly more modern— the little girl who doesn’t believe in Santa Clause until she meets him. Miracle on 34th Street comes to John Ascuaga’s Nugget Dec. 3-7 to give more than 6,000 school children an opportunity to see live theater. The public are invited to attend one of three performances on Dec. 15 and 16. Tickets and information: tahoeplayers.org

Dinner to die for: TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada

TWNN presents its 3rd Annual Murder Mystery Dinner on Oct. 21 at the Atlantis Casino Resort and Spa. The show, titled You Have the Right to Remain Dead, is an audience participation-required mystery that closely resembles, strangely enough, an episode of Hee Haw, and is silly enough to be appropriate for all ages. Tickets include the play, dinner, silent auction and Western-themed dance and funds benefit TWNN’s outreach drama classes for the Kid’s Kottage and the Volunteers of America Family Shelter. Tickets and information: Call (775) 284-0789 Ω

Put on your Sunday clothes: Western Nevada Musical Theatre Company

Another Broadway favorite, Hello, Dolly!, is coming to the Carson City Community Center in November. It’s the story of a lovable matchmaker, Dolly Levi, who finds herself a match. This fall’s show features choreography by Gina Kaskie Davis and accompaniment by a live orchestra conducted by Kevin Murphy. Tickets and information: wnmtc.com OPINION

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Then, on Nov. 30, it will present its children’s offering, Disney’s The Little Mermaid, Jr. PPI will open its holiday show at the end of November as well—A Christmas Chaos, a spoof of Dickens’ classic Christmas tale. BAC will also handle the dramatic end of the V&T Railroad’s Polar Express Train, which runs Nov. 23-Dec. 23. Finally, Festivale de Navidad, a celebration of the holidays for the Latino community including dance, music, storytelling, theater, visual arts and food, takes place Dec. 8. Tickets and information: breweryarts.org

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Operation Health Care Bound is a FREE event for middle school and high school students and their parents. Students will have the opportunity to explore many available health care careers and participate in hands-on demonstrations and break-out sessions. Save the date for the 5th annual event and come out and learn about all of the health care careers available to you.

Anticipated Hands-On Learning Experiences • Interaction with local health care professionals • University and community college representatives • Break-out sessions presented by health care providers • CPR awareness courses • Anatomy lab • Educational, scholarship and career guidance • Health and wellness education • Public safety demonstrations • Giveaways

www.facebook.com/operationhealthcare

SAVE THE DATE 5th Annual Operation Health Care Bound Saturday, September 29, 2012 | 10am-2pm University of Nevada, Reno | Joe Crowley Student Union FREE Event parking at the Brian Whalen Parking Garage

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Crystal clear The Mexican on “Latino” vs. “Hispanic,” and “Crystal Blue Persuasion” Dear Mexican: Is it just me, or has what to call our friends from south of the border become a partisan issue? While taking in both political conventions over the last couple of weeks, I’ve noticed that Republicans invariably use the word “Hispanics” while Democrats are far more likely to say “Latino/a.” What gives? Is there some nefarious semantic plot afoot, such as when rightwing comby Gustavo Arellano mentators dropped the “ic” from “Democratic?” Or is there a more innocent explanation? How do Hispanics and/or Latinos refer to themselves? Dear Gabacho: Man, I can write a whole book on your pregunta—and I did! It’s called Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America—so let me be brief. While you over-generalized a bit—Latinos from the East Coast tend to call themselves “Hispanics” regardless of political affiliation, while Republican Latinos usually call

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themselves vendidos—you’re on to something. It’s not just a political ideology litmus test but also a gabacho one, and it boils down to is this: any gabacho who calls brownies “Hispanics” is usually clueless about them, while any gabacho who calls us “Latinos” is a fellow traveler of the Reconquista. Voila—there’s your explanation to why the GOP favors “Hispanic,” while Dems like “Latino”! A gross generalization, yes, but apply this rule to the gabachos, Democrats and Republicans in your life, and I guarantee you’ll be pleasantly surprised. What is the relationship with the Chicano culture to the song “Crystal Blue Persuasion?” I’ve seen Tommy James and the Shondells perform it numerous times and never got goosebumps or teared up or anything. But Chicanos always request that song. Why? What’s the connection? Did Tommy James have a

Chicana heina on the side and it’s about her? Was it a 1970s drug, a bottle of wine (like Boone’s Farm)? What? Dime, por favor! Dear Readers: This question comes from Danny Valenzuela, who co-hosts along with Ricky O the “Latin Soul Party” every Friday night on KUVOFM 89.3 in Denver and worldwide on publicbroadcasting.net/kuvo. It’s an awesome show spinning the best oldies-but-goodies and new Latin Soul tracks—puro desmadre, so tune in! Anyhoo, I’m surprised he doesn’t know his Chicano-soul history: While it’s true that hippy-dippy gabachos Tommy James and the Shondells recorded the first—and best—version of the best-seller in 1969, multiple soul groups with a Chicano fan base quickly covered it, as did Latin soul pioneer Joe Bataan. From there, it lived on in muchos oldies-but-goodies compilations, including Art Laboe’s Dedicated to You and Oldies but Goodies anthologies, in Thump

Records’ Old School Love Songs album, and even that Barrio Oldies series with the pink covers that everyone’s cholo cousin had a pirated version of in the 1980s. It got a new lease on life in 1990, when A Lighter Shade of Brown incorporated it into its classic “On a Sunday Afternoon,” and just got major play on Breaking Bad. But the question remains—why do Chicanos love the song so much, and how did it transition into the pantheon of Chicano-favored oldies-but-goodies? It’s basically a Mexican song—the bongos and the acoustic guitar arpeggios come from Latin America, while the dreamy electric guitar and dramatic organ riffs sound like “96 Tears,” another Chicano classic, after a couple of bong hits and the horns and harmonies straight out of Eastlos. Perfect cruising music and perfect love song equals a canción that’s more Mexican than Vicente Fernandez’s mustache. Ω

Gustavo Arellano’s column “¡Ask a Mexican!” runs every week on our website at www.newsreview.com/ reno/All?oid=310599


PHOTO/MEGAN BERNER

Between the bars

Curator Glynn B. Cartledge with artwork by Nevada prisoners.

Art from the Inside For prisoners, life behind bars can often be isolating. Cut off from the rest of the world, their by lives are defined—from the outside—by Megan Berner the acts that led to their incarceration. Inside prisons, with few resources other than time, many inmates have found ways to cope, be creative and express themselves through art. There’s a long history of prison art in this country, and more and more groups that promote awareness and provide outlets for prisoner artists are coming into existence. Lawyer and artist Glynn B. Cartledge Art from the Inside is at the Lake Mansion, 250 has worked with many inmates through Court St., through Oct. her own practice and decided that it was 30. The opening time to highlight some of Nevada’s reception is Sept. 13 from 4 to 6 p.m. For artists who do their work from prisons more information, visit around the state. For more than a year, www.vsanevada.org. Cartledge has been in contact with various penitentiaries and individuals who have spread the word about an art show she wanted to put together to exhibit the art of prisoners. The exhibition, Art from the Inside, consists of over 50 pieces done by adult men incarcerated in Nevada prisons on

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display at VSA Nevada. The premise of the event is to show that these people are not defined just by this one act that landed them in prison but that they are human beings just like the rest of us. “I’d like to showcase their art and give them a little dignity,” says Cartledge. Cartledge is a painter herself and will also be displaying her portraits of former inmates alongside the other work. She started this particular series of paintings in conjunction with her efforts to showcase art from prisoners and plans to continue working on it after the exhibition. Some of her subjects are former clients and even people she has met through her church. Painting them allows Cartledge to interact with them and get to know them. Often, it leads to an ongoing relationship where they continue to correspond via letters and telephone. The majority of the work she received for this show is drawing, done with graphite or pen and ink on paper. Most of the prisoners have few supplies to work with, so they work with what they have.

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One example from the show is an incredibly detailed model ship done by a death row inmate. The ship is made from found objects such as pieces of ballpoint pens, cardboard and thread. The cardboard has been cut into small planks and assembled and painted to form the hull, and the rigging, made out of black thread and hand-pressed paper, is modeled after a working ship. As part of the process, the inmates send their work in with a letter about their art. With help from volunteers Merilee Engelmann, Genevieve Krause and Michael Martin, Cartledge has been cata-

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loguing the work and responding to all of the letters. One prisoner writes, “My name is Matthew Romero and over the years, I’ve learned how to draw, and with that talent I’ve been able to live in here a little better.” Another inmate, Francisco Rivas-Bonilla writes, “I have been drawing for four years. Sometimes I wish I had started sooner. I would be a lot better. Besides, art is a way of freedom. When I’m drawing I forget about things, and [it] makes my time easier and, at the same time, I’m doing something positive.” “I just want to give them some dignity that they don’t get otherwise,” Cartledge says. “They are just told how bad they are and that they have done the wrong things and I want to give them a little hope. I understand that I do have guilty clients, that they have done something bad, but this is not the complete picture of who they are.” Ω

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Saturday, September 15 10am – 10pm Bertha Miranda’s celebrates its 28th Anniversary & Mexican Independence day!

enjoy bertha’S food & bar SpecialS and live entertainment!

Model tea The Isles

809 S. Center St., 384-1804 “There is no trouble so great or grave that cannot be much diminished by a nice cup of tea,” wrote Bernard-Paul Heroux, a by Dave Preston writer best known for the remark. When sister/brother owners Terry davep@ Fegan and Tom McCormick—second newsreview.com generation Irish Americans—opened The Isles five years ago, it was their heritage and that tea-loving thought that inspired this quaint bungalow.

PHOTO/DIANA BRADBURY

The Isles seats 24 inside. It has high tables and a room with high-back chairs and tea tables. The patio holds 24. It’s an eclectic hodge-podge of furniture giving the place its cozy character. On Sunday, there’s a High Tea menu ($14.95; children, $10) with assorted traditional tea sandwiches, cakes and a “bottomless” pot of tea. During the week, a menu with sausage rolls ($3), curry chips ($2.75), pasties ($8.25), cucumber and watercress sandwich, of course ($6.50), corned beef ($7), roast beef ($7), and apple and cream cheese sandwich ($6.50). I wanted to try the Ploughman’s Lunch: pork pie, cheese, Branston pickle, piccalilli, pickled onions and coleslaw ($9.25). I got a half pie that was moist, savory and filled with nice chucks of pork from The English Pork Pie Company. A side of House of Parliament sauce—HP sauce— added a tangy-sweet taste. It has a malt vinegar base, blended with tomato, dates, tamarind extract, sweetener and spices. The Branston pickle is made up mostly of small pieces of fruit and vegetable—mainly cauliflower, cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, rutabagas, apples, and dates—in a tangy sweet sauce made of pepper, mustard, coriander, nutmeg, garlic, cinnamon, cayenne and cloves. Piccalilli is yellow from turmeric grown throughout India, and it’s common in curry powders, mustards and cheeses. Also, Hayward’s Pickled Onions are crunchy, large marblesized onions pickled in malt vinegar—a lot of tart, a theme of this lunch offering. Dubliner is a sweet mature cheese, aged over 12 months, and named after the city of Dublin, although it’s made in County Cork. It combines the sharpness of mature cheddar, the nuttiness of Swiss cheese, and the bite of Parmesan. And the tea, Barry’s Gold Blend Loose Leaf Tea, has a bright, golden color made by blending some of the finest teas from the high mountain slopes of Kenya and the Assam Valley of India. It’s a luscious, proper cup of tea. Most Americans have not experienced this Victorian ritual, and it’s too bad. There’s a place to share a pot of tea, really talk to one another, and take an imaginary voyage to another time, another place. It’s called The Isles. Ω

Customer Heidi Adkins eyes the Ploughman’s Lunch across the table at The Isles.

Donate $100 to the Bertha Miranda Scholorship Foundation and receive a Dinner Special & a Margarita or Beer

Bertha Miranda’s Mexican restaurant 336 Mill st. in Downtown Reno

(775) 786-9697

786-2525 fax

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The Isles is open Wednesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Traditional English lunches, High Tea, a modest assortment of British imported foods and a curio shop representing Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales make this small house on Center Street ideal for a British tea house. Prior to the introduction of tea into Britain, the English had two main meals: breakfast and dinner. Anna, the Duchess of Bedford (1788-1861), is credited as the creator of teatime. The Duchess suffered from “a sinking feeling” at about 4 o’clock in the afternoon. At first the Duchess had her servants sneak her a pot of tea and a few breadstuffs. Adopting the European tea service format, she invited friends to join her for an additional afternoon meal at 5 o’clock. The menu centered around small cakes, bread and butter sandwiches, assorted sweets, and, of course, tea. During the second half of the Victorian Period, working families would return home tired and exhausted before a dinner of meats, bread, butter, pickles, cheese and of course tea—none of the dainty finger sandwiches. Because it was eaten at a high dining table rather than the low tea tables, it was termed “high” tea.

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Please join us for

Writing wrongs American Business

Women’s Day!

Wednesday September 26, 2012 Atlantis Casino.Resort.Spa 3800 South Virginia Street, Reno Doors open at 11AM. Event ends at 1PM Join our annual celebration recognizing the achievements of working women. Network with other Northern Nevada business professionals. Experience the dynamics of JoAnn Corley in this fun, interactive, and relevant presentation.

The Words I’m OK with a film telling a story within a story. You know, one of those movies where a narrator in the present day reads from a book, and we see his story play out, with occasional revisits to the narrator and whatever they have going on in their life. The Princess Bride totally rocked that format. Again, I’m OK with this. But, when you go to a story within a story within a story … well, you start to lose me. That actually happens in The Words, a film by boasting a decent cast and at least one good Bob Grimm storyline out of the many it throws at you. bgrimm@ Dennis Quaid, in story number one, is a big newsreview.com author at a conference doing a reading of his book. Story number two would be the depiction of the book itself, which is about a writer (Bradley Cooper) who finds a crumpled novel in an antique briefcase and decides to publish it as his own.

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Story number three features Jeremy Irons as the man who wrote the crumpled novel. He makes himself known to the plagiarist, and we get a little of his present day story. Then, the Jeremy Irons character tells his freaking backstory, and we find ourselves in a flashback inside a narrative being told by somebody in the present day. Confusing … perhaps. Unnecessary … I think so. Boring … definitely. The biggest problem here is that you just don’t give a shit about the “real” character, Dennis Quaid’s obviously disenchanted author. As the film plays out, it tries to be clever regarding his character, giving him more purpose, but his existence within this film is unneeded.

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The more interesting story is the Cooper and Irons one. I’m not saying their tale has the makings of a great movie, but their tale alone makes for a more coherent and streamlined one. Every time the movie popped back to the Quaid character I lost interest. And every time the Irons character took me into a flashback, I found it to be one story level too many. Cooper tries dutifully to make something of this mess. His character calls for him to be insecure, guilt-ridden and cowardly. He’s effectively subtle at times, but comically bad at others. He has one drunken scene with his screen wife (Zoe Saldana) that earns an instant place in his “When I Totally Sucked!” reel. Honestly, I enjoyed him more as the dreadlocked criminal in the recent Hit and Run The film does perk up when Irons shows up on a park bench and ridicules the young author for stealing his story. I was hoping there would be more interaction between Cooper and Irons, but this is where directors Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal screw up. (The directors also co-wrote the convoluted screenplay.) Instead of focusing on Irons and Cooper, they bring the story back to a younger version of Irons in post-war Paris, and details about how he lost his book. Until the moment when these Irons flashbacks started, I was hanging in with the film and sort of enjoying it. But that flashback took me out of the movie, and it was followed by another lengthy visitation with the Quaid character. I started thinking about stuff like backgammon and how I haven’t really played it in a very long time. Then I remembered how I hated playing backgammon and preferred chess. Then I reminded myself that I was supposed to be concentrating on this overstuffed movie. Of the women in the movie, Saldana fares best with a typically good performance in a movie beneath her station. Olivia Wilde is a dud as the grad student basically stalking Quaid’s author. The writing for her character is bloody awful. If you take out Quaid, the drunken Cooper scene, the whole Irons flashback and the stupid Wilde character you still wouldn’t have much to watch with The Words. It would be about half an hour long, and a trite 30 minutes at that, but at least it would be over fast, and Quaid would be freed up to make that Breaking Away sequel I’ve always wanted him to do. Ω


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The Bourne Legacy

The Expendables 2

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When Universal decided to forge ahead with the Bourne franchise after Matt Damon, a.k.a. Jason Bourne, decided to call it quits, they were most assuredly looking for a glorious changing of the guard—something akin to when Daniel Craig took over for Pierce Brosnan as 007. What they get with The Bourne Legacy is something closer to the vibe when Roberto Benigni replaced Peter Sellers in the Pink Panther franchise. Jeremy Renner taking over for Damon in this franchise feels like the underwhelming switcheroo that occurred when Andrew Garfield took over for Tobey Maguire as Spider-Man. Renner, like Garfield, is a good actor. But he doesn’t command a movie like Damon can, no matter how good The Hurt Locker was. Renner isn’t nearly as good as Damon as the Bourne centerpiece. The plot feels like a poor, scrapped together excuse for keeping a franchise alive longer that it should be.

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Celeste & Jesse Forever

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The Dark Knight Rises

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I was hoping for a late summer powerhouse that would top off a mediocre season with something to remember. I figured a film with John Hillcoat at the helm and featuring the likes of Tom Hardy, Jessica Chastain, Guy Pearce and Shia LaBeouf couldn’t fail. While it isn’t a complete failure, it is a bit of a letdown. Considering the star power and the director at hand, I was expecting much more than your typical backwoods moonshine thriller. John Hillcoat (The Road) telling the “true story” of the Bondurant brothers, Depression-era bootleggers who stood up to the law, had a great amount of appeal. It makes the mistake of positioning LaBeouf’s youngest brother Jack as the primary character, when his older brothers Forrest (Hardy) and Howard (Jason Clarke) are far more compelling. LaBeouf isn’t necessarily bad in the role; it’s just that Hardy and Clarke are way better and far more interesting to watch. Guy Pearce overdoes it as the bad guy in a film that ultimately feels empty and misdirected.

While this falls into the category of weaker Will Ferrell comedies, it’s still funnier than most of the stuff thrown out there with the intent of making us laugh. Ferrell stars as a congressman running for reelection who is surprised by the candidacy of an unknown candidate looking to unseat him (Zach Galifianakis). Ferrell is basically doing a riff on his Ron Burgundy character, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. He has a few shining moments, including a profane phone message left for the wrong person and a classic baby punching incident. Galifianakis is funny, but his character’s two dogs, heavy breathing pugs, are funnier. This one is front-loaded, with most of the funny stuff happening in the first half. While it misses out on the opportunity to really skewer the American election process, it does have some good giggles involving refrigerator sex and petting zoos, so it’s got that going for it.

ParaNorman

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Here’s a stop-animation movie that isn’t afraid to be creepy for the kids. Norman (voice of Kodi Smit-McPhee) can see dead people and has premonitions, for which he gets picked on at school and yelled at by his parents. As it turns out, he’s the only one who can save the town from a curse involving zombies and witches. Directors Chris Butler and Sam Fell have put together a great-looking movie. And Butler’s script actually pushes the limit of the PG rating to the point where adults might be surprised by what they have taken their kids to see. As for this being too scary for kids, let me tell you that the kids were screaming with delight at my screening. They love this stuff. Also features the voices of John Goodman, Leslie Mann, Casey Affleck and Christopher Mintz-Plasse. One of the year’s best animated films.

Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg play the title characters, a married couple going through a divorce but trying to stay friends. They are trying to stay friends so much that they hang out with each other all of the time and still live in the same house, much to the chagrin of friends and coworkers. Jones co-wrote the screenplay with Will McCormack (who also plays a supporting role), and the movie has a fresh feel to it. Jones goes all out with her performance. She’s funny, but also awkward and nasty when her script asks her to be. Samberg does his best screen work yet as the confused artist type who likes to dig deep holes for himself and then go surfing. It’s nothing altogether groundbreaking, but different enough to make it a relatively unique romantic comedy experience.

The Possession

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As far as demon possession movies go, I’d have to count this as one of the better offerings in recent years. That still doesn’t make it all that good. Based on a “true story”— bullshit!—it stars Jeffrey Dean Morgan as a basketball coach who moves his two daughters into a new house. They go to a yard sale, where the youngest daughter (an impressive Natasha Calis) grabs a mysterious box that has dead moths and spooky stuff in it. She winds up getting possessed by a demon, requiring the help of a Hasidic Jew instead of Roman Catholic priests for a change. And, of course, that Hasidic Jew is none other than Matisyahu. Director Ole Bornedal provides some genuinely creepy moments—I especially liked the very spooky CAT scan—but he also provides a little too much bad melodrama that drags the film down. Still, Morgan and Calis are good here, and the possession portions of the movie do have a decent freak-out factor. (Love those hands coming out of mouths!) A hearty “Screw you!” to the dumbass who decided to make this a PG-13 affair. This one should’ve shot for an R.

Director Christopher Nolan wraps up his Batman trilogy with a rousing, though occasionally clunky, conclusion. Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) has retired Batman, and is living a reclusive life in his mansion when Gotham is besieged by the masked revolutionary Bane (Tom Hardy). Batman is eventually forced out of retirement, and meets his physical match in Bane while also facing off against a crafty cat burglar (Anne Hathaway as Selina Kyle, never referred to as Catwoman in the film but obviously playing that part). Hardy makes Bane a great physical adversary, but his performance is marred by a terrible voice dub that makes him sound cartoonish and out of place. Hathaway has a lot of good fun in her role, as does Gary Oldman returning as Jim Gordon. The movie has a lot of good action, and Bale has never been better as Batman. It’s not as good as the previous chapters in the trilogy, but it’s still very good and a fitting conclusion to a great story.

Reno Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

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FEATURE STORY

Gift certificates make great gifts! Visit www.newsreview.com

3

The Campaign

Here’s a sequel that learns a lot from the mistakes of the first installment, while capitalizing on the ideas that should’ve made the first installment good fun. It gathers up a bunch of old goons, gives them big guns, and tells them to shoot things. And, this time out, they do it better and with much aplomb. It’s obvious before the opening title credit, in a sequence where many a man is shredded via gunfire from aging American action superstars, that Stallone and friends are going to get things right and deliver the crazy-gory goods. Much of the credit must go to newly anointed Simon West, who replaces Stallone in the director’s chair. West made the ridiculously enjoyable Con Air, which combined stellar action with funny, dumb dialogue to much success. Unlike Stallone’s effort with the first movie, Expendables 2 gets real laughs, rather than groans, from its boneheaded dialogue.

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Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe

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ine u n e G

Northern Nevada NATURAL ADVANTAGE

Health Shoppe

GRAND OPENING EVENT Friday, Sept. 21 & Saturday, Sept. 22 st

nd

• FREE Samples of natural products • FREE refreshments, tea or organic coffee • A chance to win a natural health gift basket • Reiki attunements on Saturday with Denise Sheehan! • Schedule an appointment with herbalist/nutritionalist Linda Lindenmuth for a $10 discount on your visit

Changing office computers? Donate your old equipment! • We’ll pick up from you for just $25 • Your donation supports schools, low-income families, non-profits, locals with disabilities and small business • Responsible recycling of non-usable parts

1104 California Ave. (California and Booth) 775-322-4372(HERB)

Tuesday – Friday 10am to 5:30pm, Saturday 9am to 4pm

(775)329-1126 new2ucomputers.org

THE MOANA CONSTRUCTION SUCKS!

WE DON'T! the Take a break from our traffic & stop by Kietzke Lane store. Our new MidTown ! store is open, too

A local business owner? Sell your products and services at Reno’s Buy Local Marketplace.

Saturday, November 3rd National Automobile Museum 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. To get vendor information go to the City of Reno website www.reno.gov.

822 S. Virginia

ine u n e G

Northern Nevada 22   |   RN&R   |   SEPTEMBER 13, 2012


Long, strange The Paisley Brain Cells “We’re the oldest band in Reno,” says Jeff Laakso, the keyboard player of the band The Paisley Brain Cells. by Brad Bynum He’s only half joking. Laakso and lead guitarist Chip Billharz bradb@ formed the band more than 20 newsreview.com years ago, way back in 1991. Over the years, the group has gone through innumerable lineup changes—Laakso estimates that they’ve had 30 drummers—but the current lineup has been in place for three years. It consists of Laakso on keys and sax, Billharz on guitar, Fisher on bass, Ken Clark on guitar, and Clay Wilson on drums and percussion. Laakso, Billharz, Fisher and Clark all sing, sometimes building nice vocal harmonies. PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

A band that’s been running for more than 20 years: left to right, Ken Clark, Kevin Fisher, Jeff Laakso, Chip Billharz and Clay Wilson are The Paisley Brain Cells.

The Paisley Brain Cells perform at the Great Escape, 1575 S. Virginia St., at 7 p.m. on Sept. 21. Free.

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“In the current lineup, we’re all motivated,” says Fisher. “Everyone is on the same page.” “We’re an eclectic B-side rock band,” says Laakso. They band plays mostly covers of classic rock vintage—Pink Floyd, Rolling Stones, Johnny Cash—but choose deeper cuts and approach them in unexpected ways. Among the hundreds of available Stones songs, for example, the band is more likely to do “Time Waits for No One,” a relatively deep cut from It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll than, say, “Satisfaction” (Though they also do “Dead Flowers” and “Sympathy for the Devil.”) The band members never use a set list, instead tailoring their sets to the reactions of the crowd. “It depends on who’s grooving, who’s dancing, who are the familiar faces down front,” says Fisher.

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Depending on the venue, the time of the day, and the mood of the crowd, the band can be either a straight, cohesive classic rock band or tour guides for a long psychedelic journey. It might be best to see The Paisley Brain Cells outdoors, at night, after smoking a joint or two, but even when the band when jams out on a long, strange sonic trip, it’s not just repetitive, directionless noodling. “We’re always aiming somewhere in the jams,” says Laakso. “Though we’re not always aiming the same place,” says Fisher, with a laugh. Many contemporary jam bands are more rooted in bluegrass than rock ’n’ roll, but Paisley Brain Cells are unquestionably a rock band—though significantly more psychedelic than most. They’ll start with the Grateful Dead’s “Scarlet Begonias,” build up head of steam, then transition straight into an upbeat take of The Beatles’ “I Am the Walrus.” Billarz’s guitar leads have the swirling, curlicue quality of Jerry Garcia, and no matter how far out his playing gets, melody never suffers. The group’s next big show will be a free celebration for Billharz’s 50th birthday at the Great Escape, 1575 S. Virginia St., at 7 p.m. on Sept. 21. The show will include multiple sets from the band, including an acoustic one, and a slew of guest musicians sitting in. Laakso uses a variety of different pre-programmed keyboard sounds—from rock organ to electric piano. The bridge of the original tune “Doesn’t Matter,” written by Billharz, features a polyrhythmic groove lead by a clavinet-like keyboard part, and answered by a taut pattern by Wilson. The other band members credit relatively recent recruit Wilson for the band’s current wave of energy. A band like this, with a propensity to rocket off into the stratosphere, needs a solid drummer to keep it grounded, and Wilson provides that sort of solid foundation. “You need a platform to take off from,” says Clark. So how does a band like this keep the flame burning after all these years? “Have fun,” says Laakso. “Don’t let the business side take over.” Ω

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3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

THURSDAY 9/13

FRIDAY 9/14

SATURDAY 9/15

SUNDAY 9/16

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Chango, Mener, Serg Rockwell, DJ Sulli, Infinite Luv, 5657, 9pm, $5

Renegade, 9:30pm, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT THE ALLEY

The Old Firm Casuals, City of Vain, Toughskins, Old Glory, 7pm, $TBA

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-0806

Sept. 14, 7 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks 358-8891

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB

City Faire, 9pm, $3

THE BLACK TANGERINE

Bike Night Blues Jam w/live music, 7pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm Tu, no cover Jazz Night, 7:30pm Tu, no cover

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

The Old Firm Casuals

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/17-9/19

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover Clock’s Magic Bandits, 8pm, $3

Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

Fox Field Four, 9pm M, $5

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm Tu, no cover Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

CLUB BASS

Ladies Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 for women

Comedy

COMMA COFFEE

Steven Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

2) DJ Double B, DJ Luciano, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ Double B, DJ Luciano, 10pm, no cover

2) VooDooDogz, 7pm W, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Rocky Whatule, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; RC Smith, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

Original Metal, 9:30pm, free

Great rock n roll, 9:30pm, free

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover; Open mic, 9pm W, no cover

Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Alex, 9pm, no cover

535 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-1774 312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COMMROW

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Joel Lindley, Avi Liberman, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Charles Fleischer, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Ladies of Laughter w/Carla Rea, F, 9:30pm, Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

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EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Doug, 9pm, no cover

College Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 with college ID Large Bills Accepted, noon M, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm M, no cover; Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover; Karaoke, 9pm W, no cover

Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm M, no cover

ELBOW ROOM BAR

2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-9799

FRESH KETCH

New World Jazz Project, 7pm, no cover

FUEGO

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

2435 Venice Dr., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 541-5683 170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

JAVA JUNGLE

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

HOLLAND PROJECT

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

The Vibrators, Elephant Rifle, Boats!, The Firebombing, 7:30 pm, $10, all ages


THURSDAY 9/13 JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

FRIDAY 9/14

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

SATURDAY 9/15

SUNDAY 9/16

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/17-9/19

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm W, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Dale Poune, 7pm, no cover

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm W, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

PONDEROSA SALOON

Karaoke Idol singing competition, 9pm, $10 contest entry fee

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm W, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm W, no cover

ViennA, 9pm, $5

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm Tu, no cover; Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm W, no cover

Erik Lobe Sept. 15, 11:30 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Karaoke w/Steel & the Gang, 7:30pm, no cover

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED ROCK BAR

Thursday Jam Session, 9pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468 1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Spontaneous Combustion, 8:30pm M, no cover; Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm Tu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

SIERRA GOLD

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

680 S. Meadows Pkwy., (775) 850-1112

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Bluegrass w/Strange on the Range, 7pm M, no cover; Tuesday Trivia, 8pm Tu, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Allfree & Davis, Lizzie Cates, 7pm, no cover

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Allfree & Davis Sept. 14, 7 p.m. Walden’s Coffeehouse 3940 Mayberry Dr. (775) 787-3307

Local Band Listening Party, 9pm M, no cover; Dark Tuesdays, 9pm Tu, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

You don’t come to Rapscallion for dinner, you come to

THESE DON’T

Dine

MIX

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

1555 S. Wells Ave Reno, NV www.Rapscallion.com (775) 323-1211 • (877) 932–3700 Open Monday – Friday at 11:30am 12 Saturday at 5pm Sunday Brunch from 10am to 2pm

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THURSDAY 9/13

FRIDAY 9/14

SATURDAY 9/15

SUNDAY 9/16

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/17-9/19

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

1) Susan Jones, 8:30-10pm W, $10, $15

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

Olivia Newton-John Sept. 15, 8 p.m. Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. 3257401-2000

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

4) Aces Up, 9pm, no cover

4) Aces Up, 9pm, no cover

4) Aces Up, 9pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30; 2) Live local bands, 10pm, no cover; 3) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30; 2) Live local bands, 10pm, no cover; 3) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm Tu, W, $19.95+; 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm M, no cover; 2) DJ Chris English, 10pm Tu, no cover; 3) Spindustry Wednesdays w/Roni Romance,(((xm fredie))), 9pm W, no cover; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm W, no cover

18 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 427-8397 1) Cabaret 2) Tahoe Live 3) The Improv 4) Outdoor Arena 5) Cabo Wabo Cantina Lounge

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

RN&R

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm and 9:30pm, $19.95+; 3) Addiction Saturdays w/Roni Romance,(((xm fredie))), Jessica the Ripper, 9pm, $10; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

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1) Jersey Nights, 8pm, $19.95+; 3) Skyy High Fridays w/Roni Romance, DJ Dragon, 9pm, $10; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

Karaoke

26

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

5) DJ Chris English, 10pm, no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

5) Ladies ‘80s w/DJ BG, 6pm, no cover

5) DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

1) The Gourds, James McMurty, 9pm, $15; 5) DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

4) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7pm, $10 after 8pm; 4) DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

4) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover; 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

1) Olivia Newton-John, 8pm, $65, $85; 3) Live music, 5pm, no cover

3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

5) Cash Only, 9:30pm M, no cover; 5) DJ JBIRD, 9:30pm Tu, no cover


loCAlly owNED & oPERATED

SEE HUNDREDS moRE GREAT PRICES AT www.BensNevada.com RENO 3480 Lakeside - 825.0244 | Fourth & Keystone - 323.6277 | 4700 N. Virginia - 322.0588 | 10870 S. Virginia - 853-2367 SpaRkS 2990 Sullivan - 337.2367 | CaRSON City 444 E. Williams - 885.9463 | www.bensfinewineandspirits.com prices effective thru 9/28/12. please use our products in moderation

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THIS WEEKEND ONLY! Presented in part by:

THE ELECTRIC AUTO ASSOCIATION, PLUG IN AMERICA AND SIERRA CLUB

Sunday, September 23rd 10am-2:30pm Idlewild Park | 1900 Idlewild Drive, Reno (Idlewild Drive at Hunter Lake Drive, near Reno High School) ✦ Learn about and ride/drive electric vehicles ✦ See electric bikes, scooters, motorcycles and more ✦ Support local Non-Profits groups by visiting their many booths ✦ Eat from GourMelt Grilled Cheese Truck

FREE

so bring your family and friends!

RAFFLE!

CHANCE TO TEST DRIVE AN ALL-ELECTRIC,

0-60 IN 3.9 SECONDS TESLA MOTORS ROADSTER!

LOCAL PARTNERING ORGANIZATIONS: Sierra Club Great Basin Group | NV Energy | Air Quality Management Division Washoe County Health District | Reno-Sparks Indian Colony | City of Reno | Young Professionals in Energy - Nevada (YPE) | Clean Energy Center | RTC SMART TRIPS | Envirolution | Sunrise Sustainable Resource Group | Nissan of Reno | Kiwanis Bike Program GourMelt Grilled Cheese Truck | Black Rock Solar | American Lung Association | Reno-Sparks Local Business Co-op | greenUP!

SEPTEMBER 14 - 16

FOR TICKETS CALL 775-686-6600 OR VISIT WWW.PIONEERCENTER.COM OR AT THE PIONEER CENTER BOX OFFICE (MON. - FRI. 11AM-6PM) RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE FOR GROUPS OF 20+. TICKETS $44-$79 (PLUS SERVICE FEES) BROADWAY COMES TO RENO AT THE PIONEER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS -SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE-

Truckee River Foundation · Tahoe Whitewater Tours · Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada · The Chamber · Starbucks

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For Thursday, September 13 to Wednesday, September 19 Events

To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

BRICKS AND STONES WALKING TOUR: A walk in the Humboldt and Lander Streets Neighborhood. Discover the architectural treasures of this area—a mix of bungalows, Tudor and mission revivals and cottage styles. Reservations required. Sa, 9/15, 10am-noon. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. My Favorite Muffin, 340 California Ave., (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

Listings are free, but not guaranteed. Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

CONSTITUTION DAY STROLL THROUGH HISTORY: Project Americans Coming Together (PACT) celebrates the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution with a “Stroll through History” on the grounds of the Nevada State Capitol and Legislative Building. Walk from station to station and see and hear the Constitution come alive. Even “George Washington”ù will be there to share his thoughts. M, 9/17, 3-7pm. Free. Nevada Legislative Plaza, 400 Block, Carson Street, Carson City, (775) 841-1533.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., Sept. 27, is Thursday, Sept. 20.

E-WOMEN ACCELERATED NETWORKING EVENT: Venus Opal Reese will discuss Breaking the inner glass ceiling: Five keys to raise net worth through self-worth at the next eWomenNetwork Reno/Carson/Tahoe Chapter event. The evening also features dinner, networking and a business expo. W, 9/19, 5-8:30pm. $50-$70. Hidden Valley Country Club, 3575 E. Hidden Valley Drive, (775) 853-2120, www.ewomennetwork.com/chapter/reno.

EXTENDING THE GROWING SEASON: Learn what you need to be doing in your garden now to make the most of your efforts: successive plantings, row covers, hoop houses, fall crops, cover crops, planting onion seeds for next year and more. Certified arborist Lisa Braginton shares her knowledge and personal experiences. Seating is limited to 60 and is first come, first served. Sa, 9/15, 10am. Free. Moana Nursery Landscape & Design Center, 1190 W. Moana Lane, (775) 825-0600.

FUNDRAISER TO SUPPORT SPECIAL OLYMPICS: This benefit, titled “Film, Fashion and Music through the Decades,” will highlight a reception and silent auction with a live stage performance that features current students and staff of the Take 2 Performers Studio. Su, 9/16, 6 & 7pm. Call for info. Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 343-6117, www.take2performersstudio.com.

GHOST WALKING TOUR WITH MADAME CURRY: Experience Carson City’s Victorian era and diverse past during this guided walking tour of the downtown district’s historic homes. Hear about lingering

spirits of the past and paranormal stories. The 90-minute guided walking tour leaves rain or shine. Tours depart from Third & Carson streets next to the St. Charles Hotel (Firkin & Fox Pub). Sa, 9/15, 6:30pm. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Call or visit website for details, http://carsoncityghostwalk.com.

GREAT BASIN THURSDAY NIGHT FARMERS’ MARKET: This farmers’ market celebrates the late-season Nevada harvests. The market will be held every Thursday in September on the plaza next to the Great Basin Brewing Company. Th, 4:30-7:30pm through 9/27. Free. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 351-2551, http://greatbasinbrewingco.com.

HENRY ROLLINS 2012 CAPITALISM TOUR: The spoken word artist, writer, activist and singer-songwriter hits the campaign trail this fall for a two-month tour hitting all 50 state capitals, including Carson City. The tour starts Sept. 6 in Honolulu, Hawaii, and wraps up on the eve of the U.S. Presidential election in Washington D.C. F, 9/14, 8pm. $22. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976, www.jmaxproductions.net.

THE KNIT & CROCHET SHOW: The Knit & Crochet Show offers 102 crochet and knit classes by 25 of the nations top designers and instructors. F, 9/14, 10am-

6pm; Sa, 9/15, 10am-6pm; Su, 9/16, 10am-3pm. $10. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (740) 452-4541, www.knitandcrochetshow.com.

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AIR RACES: The 49th annual air races and air show features five days of racing action with six classes of aircraft, as well as static displays of aircraft, aerial acrobatic performs and military aircraft demonstrations. Th,

9/13, 8am-4:30pm; F, 9/14, 8am-4:30pm; Sa, 9/15, 8am-4:30pm; Su, 9/16, 8am-4:30pm.

$5-$80; free admission for children age 7 and younger with paid adult admission. Reno Stead Airport, 4895 Texas Ave., (775) 972-6663, http://airrace.org.

RIVERWALK DISTRICT WINE WALK: Visit any Riverwalk District Merchant on Wine Walk day to get a map of participating Wine Walk merchants. Bring a valid photo ID, and you'll receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Every month offers a different theme and part of all proceeds are donated to a local charity. Third Sa of every month, 25pm. $20. The Riverwalk District, Downtown Reno, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

STREET VIBRATIONS FALL RALLY: The 18th annual celebration of music, metal and motorcycles offers tours, live entertainment, ride-in shows, stunt shows and more. Major event venues are planned at Reno, Sparks, historic Virginia City, Lake Tahoe and Chester’s Reno HarleyDavidson Dealership. W-Su through 9/23. Opens 9/19. Free for most events. Call or visit website for details, (775) 329-7469, http://roadshowsreno.com.

WALK IN MEMORY, WALK FOR HOPE: The Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention sponsors this annual walk to raise awareness and money for education in mental health and suicide prevention, research and survivor programs. Sa, 9/15, 8am. Donations accepted. Idlewild Park, 1900 Idlewild Drive, (775) 443-7843, www.nvsuicideprevention.org.

All ages BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

Nobody ever reminds me about the wine walk down on the river, so I always forget to go. But not this time! It’s the first wine walk of the University of Nevada, Reno school year, so you know there’s going to be a lot of eye candy for those cougars who make a habit of getting plowed in the Riverwalk District on the third Saturday of every month. The best reason to stay sober is to watch the entirely inappropriate behavior that goes on with everybody sloshed downtown and walking around with open containers. It crawls from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., and only costs $20 plus tips. Bring your ID. One fun game is to shoot a glass every time you see a pair of scraped knees. Reno: Keeping it classy since 1868. For more information, call 825-9255 or check out www.renoriver.org/wine.html. —D. Brian Burghart

brianb@newsreview.com

OCTOBER PHOTOGRAPHY CALL EXTENDED: North Tahoe Arts will showcase photography of the fall season. This exhibit will feature original photography that invokes warmth, the tastes and hungers of the harvest season. Extended deadline for application is Sept. 14. M-Su through 9/14. North Tahoe Arts Center, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

TEAPOTS & TEAS CALL EXTENDED: The call includes original work: an actual teapot in form and function, cups maybe or a collage, painting, fabric art and accessories that go with the custom. All mediums welcome. Extended deadline for application is Sept. 14. Applications available online. M-Su, 11am-5pm through 9/14. North Tahoe Arts Center, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Jacob Hashimoto:

KIDS CERAMICS CLASS (AFTER SCHOOL): This is a hand-building class to familiarize kids with the studio and clay. Kids 7- 13 years old will learn and use techniques with clay that explore texture, shape and structure. All materials, firings, clay are included. W, 9/19, 3:30-5:30pm; W, 9/26, 3:30-5:30pm. $120 for four classes. The Wedge Ceramics Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

SMALL WONDER WEDNESDAY: Families with children 5 years old and younger are invited to play, explore and listen to stories read by the museum’s educators. Only children age 5 and younger are admitted to Small Wonder Wednesdays, which start at 9am, an hour before the museum opens. Older siblings may join at 10am. Third W of every month, 9am. $8 per person; free for members and babies under age 1. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper. W-Su through 1/1. $1-$10. Arthur and Lucia Mathews: Highlights of the California Decorative Style. Tu-Su through 10/14. $1-$10. Juvenile-In-Justice: Photographs by Richard Ross. W-Su through 1/13. $1-$10. Tim Hawkinson: Totem. W-Su through 10/7. Jorinde Voigt: Systematic Notations. W-Su through 1/6. 1$10. Ice Music. W-Su through 10/28. $1-$10. Edward Burtynsky: Oil. W-Su through 9/23. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM: A Salute to Our Military. This exhibit commemorates the nation’s battles from the Civil War to the Global War on Terrorism. The show includes photos, weapons, artifacts, models and uniforms donated by more than 30 local veterans and their families. Tu-Su through 11/17. $5 adults; free for children under age 12, museum members, active duty military. 814 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 355-1144, www.sparksmuseum.org.

Art

Film

AQUA SALON AND DAY SPA: Dotty Molt

BOYS AND MEN HEALING: Artemisia Moviehouse

Photography Artist Reception. Work by the landscape photographer is on display. Th, 9/13, 4-7pm. Free. Contact Aqua Salon (775) 851-3377, Dotpixels@aol.com, www.Carpepixels.com for details on this exhibit. 18603 Wedge Pkwy., Ste. I, (775) 851-3377.

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Modern Ciphers.

Wine crawl

Call for Artists

Seattle glass artist Tyler Kimball and Reno collage artist Gordon Magnin explore the alchemy of images and connectivity of symbols across media. Featured in the gallery will be Kimball’s large glass shuttlecocks as well as multiple diptych collages by Magnin. Tu-F through 9/28. Opens 9/10. Free. Contact Sarah Lillegard (775) 742-1858, sarah@hollandreno.org. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Natures Colors in Fiber and Glass Exten. North Tahoe Arts presents a collaborative exhibit featuring sister artists Catherine and Linda Strand. Catherine’s fused glass and Linda’s fiber-based wall hangings are distinctive yet complementary media celebrating color and design with nature themes. M, W-Su, 11am-5pm through 10/1. Free. Bits & Pieces: A Sculpture & Mosaic Exploration. North Tahoe Arts features five sculpture and mosaic artists whose body of work includes glass, ceramics, wood, canvas, found objects and paint swatches. There will be an artist reception on Friday, Sept. 14, 5-7pm. M, W-Su through 10/1. Free. 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop in Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

presents a screening of this documentary film about the impact the sexual abuse of boys has on both the individual and society, and the importance of healing and speaking out for male survivors to end the devastating effects. Tu, 9/18, 710pm. $7 general; $5 members, bicyclists, students. Midtown Good Luck Macbeth, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

Music 9/11 MEMORIAL SERIES: TOCCATA—Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus wraps up its summer season with a series that commemorates the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 tragedy. The series features violinist Elizabeth Pitcairn performing Brahms’ Violin Concerto on the Red Stradivarius Violin and features the TOCCATA Chorus in Brahms’ German Requiem. Th, 9/13, 7pm. 10930 Alder Drive, Truckee. Sa, 9/15, 4pm. North Tahoe Hebrew Congregation, 7000 Latone Ave., Tahoe City. M, 9/17, 7pm. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave. $5-$40; free for youth age 19 and younger. (775) 313-9697, www.laketahoeshakespeare.com/tickets.

CARPENTER’S MUSIC WORLD MONTHLY MUSIC PROGRAM: Carpenter’s Music World presents its monthly music program open to all ages, styles and skill levels. Performers must call in advance with their name or name of group, song title,

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instrumentation and length of performance. Performances must fit the theme of the month. August’s theme is “Latin music.” Second Th of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Carpenter’s Music World, 2700 S. Virginia St., (775) 391-7757, www.carpentersmusic.com.

GIVE ME THE NIGHT: A tribute to George Benson featuring Michael Coleman and special guest Jakki Ford. W, 9/19, 7pm; Th, 9/20, 7pm. $10. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 770-8768, http://musicolewmichaelc.com.

GLENN LITTLE TRIO: Glenn Little, formerly of the Reno Municipal Band, and fellow musicians Gene Albright and Harry Stover perform Dixieland tunes and music from the 30s and 40s. The Lake Mansion is will be open for tours from 11am-2pm. F, 9/14, 12-1pm; F, 9/21, 12-1pm. Free. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion, 250 Court St., (775) 826-6100 ext. 3, www.vsanevada.org.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

RENO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA: Theodore Kuchar begins his 10th season as RCO music director, leading the orchestra in Kodály’s Dances of Galánta and the Second Symphony by Camille SaintSaëns. Elena Urioste, renowned violinist and first-place laureate of the Sphinx Competition, concludes the concert with Beethoven’s Violin Concerto. Sa, 9/15, 8pm; Su, 9/16, 2pm. $5-$40. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-9413, www.renochamberorchestra.org.

Sports & fitness 30/30 (CARDIO MAT/STRETCHING): Thirty minutes of Cardio Mat Pilates and 30 minutes of intensive stretching. Intermediate-level strength, stamina and flexibility are required for this class which emphasizes the principle of fluidity. Call to reserve your spot. M through 12/31. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

Alive and welded What’s an appropriate amount of togetherness time for a couple? My 9-year-old son spends half the week with me, plus every other weekend. My girlfriend of a year wasn’t happy with only the other half of my time, so she started joining me and my son. She and I are now together five and a half days a week (three and a half of which are also with my son). I’m never alone. I have no time to go grocery shopping, etc., and no one’s happy. My son prefers being alone with me. She enjoys him but feels she’s sacrificing our time together. On Saturday, I had an important business meeting at 10 a.m. and a 2 p.m. coffee with a visiting friend, meaning I’d be away from her from 9 to 5. She was upset, acting almost betrayed, and wanted me to reschedule everything. I said no. She then said she’d come for coffee before my meeting, lunch afterward, and join me and my friend. I’m normally nonconfrontational, but I again said no. She complained all weekend. Now I’m afraid to even schedule a haircut. Your girlfriend makes intestinal parasites seem like slackers. It sounds nice when a woman tells you she always wants to be by your side—until you realize that she means like your ear or your arm. Contrary to what you’ve been led to believe, your needing a haircut or wanting to spend time with your son or a friend without supervision isn’t a sign that you’re a failure as a man and a boyfriend. And beyond needing to be off-leash long enough to hit the grocery store, a man needs time to sit on the pot like “The Thinker” or grunt and drool a little in front of the TV.

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Don’t mistake this woman for someone who loves you just because she’s in a relationship with you. A woman who loved you would want you to be happy and comfortable, and would respect that you’re trying to be a good dad, even if it meant seeing you less. If that didn’t work for her, the loving approach would be ending it with you. Did you, by some chance, forget your testicles on a picnic table? There’s something very wrong with your girlfriend. She might’ve been compelled to get cracking on the repair job had you stood up to her from the start. But, by wimping out, you enabled her, basically giving her the go-ahead to colonize every moment of your time and giving her a year to get used to it. At this point, doing what you obviously need— getting time to yourself and quality time alone with your son—should go over like ripping a Band-Aid off a burn victim. But, if you want things to change, you have no other choice than to lay down limits and stay firm. It’s possible you’ll lose her, but that surely beats slapping a police officer and tripping a jail guard just to get a few days of alone time in a cramped, windowless cell. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


DHARMA BOOK GROUP: This group meets to read

OPEN THROW CERAMICS: This is a community night

and discuss books of interest to Buddhists. Check the website for the current offering. For beginning and long-time Buddhists alike. Enter the building by the Taylor Street entrance. First and Third W of every month, 6-7pm. Free. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 348-6603, www.renobuddhistchurch.org.

where people can come work on a pottery wheel or hand-build ceramics in a ceramics studio. Experience in a ceramics studio is preferred. The fee includes clay, studio time, tools and a bisque firing. W, 6-9pm through 12/26. $20 for non-members; free for members. The Wedge Ceramics Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

DIABETES AWARENESS SUPPORT GROUP: This group is

RENO DOWNTOWNERS TOASTMASTERS: Weekly meet-

for people with diabetes and their families. Second Th of every month, 9:30-10:45am. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave. Ste. 100, (775) 770-3600, www.supportsaintmarys.org/ inthenews/195174.

ings provide a forum for developing and practicing public speaking skills in a supportive environment. Participants range from experienced speakers to novices. Tu, 12:151:15pm through 3/6. First-time free, then dues. Round Table Pizza, 4007 S. Virginia St., (775) 750-5256, www.facebook.com/pages/ Reno-Downtowners-Toastmasters/ 144836042254990?sk=info.

FRIDAY NIGHT BALLROOM DANCING: Every Friday night The Senior Dance Club of Nevada presents ballroom dancing featuring live music by the Ninth Street Band. Singles and beginners are welcome. F, 8-10:30pm. $7 members; $9 nonmembers. Washoe County Senior Center, 1155 E. Ninth St., (775) 828-1993, www.lreidenbaugh@washoecounty.us.

ROSICRUCIAN ORDER OPEN MEETING: Meet with local Rosicrucian students to learn more about the Rosicrucian Order, AMORC. The order teaches its students about natural laws that enable people to achieve their highest potential in all areas of life. F, 9/14, 6:30-7:30pm; F, 9/28, 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Washoe Masonic Hall, 601 W. Peckham Lane, (775) 376-1278, http://washoe35.org.

LAWYER IN THE LIBRARY: The Volunteer Lawyers of BASIC MAT PILATES: This mat class focuses on

ROCK OF AGES: Broadway Comes to Reno kicks off

three Pilates principles for the seven exercise in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/25. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

its 2012-2013 season with the Tony Award-winning, 80s arena-rock love story between a small town girl and a big city rocker who meet in Los Angeles’ most famous rock club on the Sunset Strip. F, 9/14, 8pm; Sa, 9/15, 2 & 8pm; Su, 9/16, 2 & 7pm. $44-$79. Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 686-6600, www.pioneercenter.com.

EDIBLE PEDAL 100: Reno Sunrise Rotary Club and

SWANKY SHAMPANE: Boogie Woogie Productions

Edible Reno-Tahoe Magazine host this bike ride that showcases the beauty of Northern Nevada and benefits local youth organizations. Rides include a 10-mile route through Washoe Valley, a 50-mile loop and a 100-mile ride up Kingsbury Grade from Carson Valley to Lake Tahoe. Su, 9/16, 6:30am. $35-$65. Bowers Mansion Regional Park, 4005 Old Hwy. 395, Washoe Valley, (775) 393-9158, www.ediblepedal100.org.

presents this comedy by David Creps set in Reno, Beverly Hills and Malibu. The play tells the story of the Best Actress nominee Swanky Shampane, a fierce, fearless, ridiculously neurotic but fabulously unforgettable character, who is obsessed with changing her public image prior to the night of the Academy Awards, when she will be taking the front row, center seat next to her bitterest rival Meryl Streep. Th-Sa, 7pm through 9/22; Su, 2pm through 9/23. Pace-Menante Theatre, 3702 S. Virginia St., Sierra Marketplace, (775) 229-7077, www.swankyshampane.com.

LAKE TAHOE BIG BLUE ADVENTURE RACE: The Tahoe Big Blue Adventure Race offers two adventure races. The Tahoe Big Blue Sprint is ideal for the beginner adventure racer, while still providing a challenge to veterans. The full-length Tahoe Big Blue is designed for finishing times of six to 10 hours. Following the race there will be a racer barbecue at the finish line. Sa, 9/15. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784, www.bigblueadventure.com.

Classes BEGINNERS CERAMICS ON THE POTTERY WHEEL: Learn to throw on the pottery wheel. This threesession class will take you from a ball of clay to a finished piece of work. Open Throw on Wednesday nights is included free for three weeks. Materials, clay and firings are all included. Class begins on Sept. 6. Th, 9/13, 5:308:30pm; Th, 9/20, 5:30-8:30pm. $90. The Wedge Ceramics Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/27. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT: Breast-feeding mothers are invited to join Breastfeeding Cafe. Mothers exchange their experiences and discuss concerns such as milk supply, pumping, going back to work, sleeping or lack of sleep, etc. Tu, 4-5pm through 12/18. $10 drop in; free for first-time attendees. Renown South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., (775) 240-9916, www.wellnourishedbaby.com.

SCHEELS BIKING CLUB: Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Rides will vary from 20-30 miles. Participants will need to sign a liability form when they attend. Helmets are required. The rides depart from the southeast corner of the parking lot by Best Buy. Th, 5:45pm through 9/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

CONVERSATION CORNER: Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions ideal for non-native English speakers who want to improve their speaking skills. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that involve everyday activities. W, 4:30-6pm. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 829-7323.

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB: Runners and walkers are invited to join this Tuesday night group run. Water and snacks will be available after the runs. Meet in the mens sport shoe shop. Tu, 6:30pm through 11/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

FALL PLANTING: Learn the best planting techniques, selection and care and watering requirements. Class is free but a donation of a can of food for the local food bank is appreciated. Sa, 9/15, 11am; Su, 9/16, 1pm. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks, (775) 355-1551, www.railcitygardencenter.com.

VARIETY YOGA: Each week the Sunday class is taught by a different instructor. Su, 10:3011:20am through 12/30. $15 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

HEARTSAVER FIRST AID: The Heartsaver First Aid

Onstage

Course teaches how to manage illness and injuries in the first few minutes until professional help arrives. Th, 9/13, 5:30-8:30pm; Th,

A MOON FOR THE MISBEGOTTEN: Good Luck Macbeth debuts its new space with a production of Eugene O’Neill’s powerful drama. F, Sa, 7:30-

10/11, 5:30-8:30pm; Th, 11/15, 5:30-8:30pm; Th, 12/13, 5:30-8:30pm. $45. REMSA Education &

10pm through 9/29; Th, 9/13, 7:30-10pm; Su, 9/16, 3-5:30pm; Su, 9/30, 3-5:30pm. $14-$20. Midtown

Training Center, 230 S. Rock Blvd., Ste. 23, (775) 858-5700, www.remsaeducation.com.

Good Luck Macbeth, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

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KID CARE: The Kid Care babysitting class is designed to teach adolescents the basics of caring for young children. Techniques for setting up babysitting opportunities, diaper changes, bottle-feeding, playtime activities and taking charge of situations while babysitting are covered. The course also includes pediatric first aid and CPR training. Sa, 9/15,

9am-4pm; Sa, 10/13, 9am-4pm; Sa, 11/3, 9am4pm; Sa, 12/1, 9am-4pm. $40. REMSA Education & Training Center, 230 S. Rock Blvd., Ste. 23, (775) 858-5700, www.remsaeducation.com.

Washoe County present a Lawyer in the Library program where lawyers provide general guidance on a variety of legal topics. W, 5-7pm. Free. Washoe County Law Library, 75 Court St. inside Washoe County Courthouse, (775) 328-3250, www.washoecounty.us/lawlib.

SUICIDE LOSS SUPPORT GROUP: This support group is open to people who have lost loved ones to suicide. M, 6-8pm. Free. Call for location, (775) 784-8085.

LIFESCAPES: The memoir writing program for seniors meets. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 10:30am. Free. South Valleys Library, 15650A Wedge Pkwy., (775) 851-5190, www.washoe.lib.nv.us.

WEST COAST SWING DANCING: High Sierra Swing Dance Club sponsors dancing event. Dance lesson begins at 5:45pm. No partner necessary. Practice your swing moves or just check out the dance at this fun, non-structured event. Tu, 5:45-9pm through 10/1. $8 for lesson; free admission to dance. El Charro Avitia, 4389 S. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 629-9369, www.highsierrasdc.org.

LIFESCAPES: The writing program provides sen-

PLEIN AIR OIL PAINTING (AGES 15+): Join local artist Erik Holland to capture fall colors and light. Painting will be done both outside (weather permitting) and in the studio from photographs. Classes are held every Friday, Sept. 14- Nov. 16. Register online or call F, 1-4pm through 11/16. Opens 9/14. $145 for eight classes. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion, 250 Court St., (775) 826-6100 ext. 3, www.vsanevada.org.

iors an opportunity to write and share their memoirs. First and Third W of every month, 13pm. Free. Northwest Reno Library, 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 787-4100.

NEW MOTHERS SUPPORT GROUP: This group offers

RENO PORTRAIT SOCIETY: There will be a live model for artists to paint or draw in the medium of their choice. No formal instruction, but participants can learn from experienced artists. The event is open to all ages and abilities. W, 9am12:30pm. $10. Nevada Fine Arts, 1301 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-1128, www.nvfinearts.com.

support to first-time mothers in dealing with the changes and issues that come with having a new baby. Th, 10-11:30am. Saint Mary’s Regional Medical Center, 235 W. Sixth St., (775) 770-3843, www.supportsaintmarys.org/ inthenews/195174.

Volunteer BLOOD DONATIONS: Give the gift of life and donate blood. Donors must be healthy, weigh at least 110 pounds and be at least 17 years old. Call to make an appointment. M-Su. United Blood Services, 1125 Terminal Way, (775) 324-6454, www.unitedbloodservices.org.

NORTHERN NEVADA ENVIRONMENTAL PROFESSIONALS: This networking group meets monthly. Second Th of every month, 6-8pm. Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Pkwy., (775) 828-1991.

Community BOARD AND CARD GAMES: Bring one of your own games or choose one from Comic Kingdom’s game library. Sa, 12-6pm through 12/30; Tu, 5pm-midnight through 12/31. Free. Comic Kingdom, 595 E. Moana Lane, Moana East Shopping Center, (775) 827-2928, www.facebook.com/renocomickingdom.

BREAST CANCER ON WITH LIFE: This support group provides a highly educational approach to looking at breast cancer. The latest research is discussed, along with alternative therapies, side effects of chemotherapy, reconstruction and community services. The group meets on Tuesdays at Saint Mary’s Center for Health’s Radiation Oncology Department. Tu, 4:30-6pm. Free. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave. Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org/ inthenews/195174.

BRIDGEWIRE-MAKERSPACE OPEN SPACE NIGHT: Learn about this member-funded, non-profit makerspace, hackerspace workshop. Th, 6-9pm through 12/27. Bridgewire, 1055 Industrial Way, Ste. 20, Sparks, (775) 219-7987, http://renobridgewire.org.

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP: Jean Peters guides this class for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

CROCHET CONNECTION: Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 4-5:45pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway located at Lazy 5 Regional Park in Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

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Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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2012

95 WORD FICTION CONTEST

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There it is: 95 words exactly! It’s 95-word fiction time. We, the editors of the Reno News & Review, ask you, the readers of the Reno News & Review, to send us your short fiction—a short story, preferably with a beginning, a middle and an end—and exactly 95 words. That’s excluding title, and as counted by OpenOffice Writer or Microsoft Word. Your published story and the envy of all your friends will be your reward.

swald William Lawrence was hungry. It was a powerful, deep-down hunger. He always felt like this when he first awoke, as the last red rays of the sun died in the west. The night air felt good. This was his time. But he needed to feed. His yellow eyes glistened in the moonlight as he scoured the cityscape for prey, something young, fertile and full of blood. And then he saw her, strutting unaware along the sidewalk. He swept down, talons outstretched, to take the mouse, devour her, digest her, and drop her as pellets.

To get an idea of what we’re looking for, and to size up the competition, last year’s winners can be found at www.newsreview.com/reno/95/content?oid=3703514. Send your entries to 95-word fiction contest, c/o rn&r, 708 n. Center st., reno nv 89501. Or via email to renofiction@newsreview.Com, with fiction 2012 in the subject line. All entries must be received by 9 a.m. on Oct. 18. Selected entries will be published on Nov. 1. Provide contact information, including name, address and telephone number.

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OPINION

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BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You will never

when was your last massage & facial?

be able to actually gaze upon your own face. You may, of course, see a reasonable likeness of it in mirrors, photos and videos. But the real thing will always be forever visible to everyone else but not you. I think that’s an apt symbol for how hard it is to get a totally objective view of your own soul. No matter how sincere you may be in your efforts to see yourself clearly, there will always be fuzziness, misapprehensions and ignorance. Having said that, though, I want you to know that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to see yourself better than ever before.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I’ve got four

39

related pieces of advice for you, Taurus: 1. The most reliable way for you to beat the system is to build your own more interesting system. 2. The most likely way to beat your competitors is not to fight them, but rather to ignore them and compete only against yourself. 3. To escape the numbing effects of an outworn tradition, you could create a fresh tradition that makes you excited to get out of bed in the morning. 4. If you have a problem that is not only impossible to solve but also boring, find yourself a fascinating new problem that will render the old problem irrelevant.

$

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Dear Doctor

of Love: My heart is itchy. I’m totally serious. I’m not talking about some phantom tingle on the skin of my chest. What I mean is that the prickling sensation originates in the throbbing organ inside of me. Is this even possible? Have you heard of such a crazy thing? Could it be some astrological phenomenon? What should I do? —Itchy-Hearted Gemini.” Dear Gemini: I suspect that it’s not just you, but many Geminis, who are experiencing symptoms like yours. From what I can tell, you have a lot of trapped feelings in your heart that need to be identified, liberated and dealt with.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you make a

conscious decision to combine plaids with stripes or checks with floral patterns or reddish purples with greenish oranges, I will wholeheartedly approve. If, on the other hand, you absentmindedly create combinations like that, doing so because you’re oblivious or lazy, I will soundly disapprove. The same holds true about any hodgepodge or hybrid or mishmash you generate, Cancerian: It’ll receive cosmic blessings if you do it with flair and purpose, but not if it’s the result of being inattentive and careless.

0

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Should we boycott the writing of Edgar Allan Poe because he married his 13-year-old cousin when he was 27? Should anti-drug crusaders stop using their iPhones when they find out that Steve Jobs said, “Doing LSD was one of the two or three most important things I have done in my life”? Should we stop praising the work that Martin Luther King Jr. did to advance civil rights because he engaged in extramarital affairs? Those are the kinds of questions I suspect you’ll have to deal with in the coming days, Leo. I encourage you to avoid having knee-jerk reactions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Arthur Turner, a

butter’s role on our planet’s movements. Round up the best help you can, yes, call on all the favors you’re owed and be aggressive in seeking out brilliant support; but only for a truly important cause.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): September 16 is the first day of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. So begins 10 days of repentance. Whether or not you’re Jewish, Scorpio, you are entering an astrological phase when taking stock of yourself would be a brilliant move. That’s why I invite you to try the following self-inventory, borrowed from the Jewish organization Chadeish Yameinu. 1. What would you like to leave behind from the past 12 months? 2. What has prevented you from living up to your highest standards and being your very best self? 3. What would you love to bring with you into the next 12 months? 4. Who served as a teacher for you in the past year? 5. Were you a teacher for anyone? 6. Is there anyone you need to forgive? 7. How will you go about forgiving?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If

I’m accurately interpreting the astrological omens, the coming months will be a soulful feast in which every day will bring you a shimmering revelation about the nature of your soul’s code and how best to activate it. Reasons for grateful amazement will flow so freely, that you may come to feel that miracles are routine and naturally occurring phenomena. And get this: In your dreams, Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty will get married, win the lottery and devote their fortune to fostering your spiritual education until you are irrevocably enlightened. (I confess there’s a slight chance I’m misinterpreting the signs, and everything I described will be true for only a week or so, not months.)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A

reader named Marissa begged me to insert a secret message into the Capricorn horoscope. She wanted me to influence Jergen, a guy she has a crush on, to open up his eyes and see how great she is. I told her I wouldn’t do it. Why? For one thing, I never try to manipulate people into doing things that aren’t in alignment with their own desires. For another, I faithfully report on my understanding of the tides of fate and refuse to just make stuff up. I urge you to have that kind of integrity, Capricorn. I suspect you may soon be invited or coaxed to engage in what amounts to some tainted behavior. Don’t do it. Make an extra effort to be incorruptible.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The far

away, the very far, the farthest, I have found only in my own blood,” said poet Antonio Porchia. Let’s make that thought your keynote, Aquarius. Your assignment will be to search for what’s most exotic and unknown, but only in the privacy of your own heart, not out in the great wide world. For now, at least, the inner realm is the location of the laboratory where the most useful experiments will unfold. Borrowing from novelist Carole Maso, I leave you with this: “Make love to the remoteness in yourself.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It would be

an excellent time for you to elope, even if you do so with the person to whom you’re already mated. You might also consider the possibility of wearing a wedding dress everywhere you wander, even if there is no marriage ceremony in your immediate future, and even if you’re a man. And if neither of those ideas appeals to you, please at least do something that will symbolize your intention to focus on intimacy with an intensified sense of purpose. Fling rice at yourself. Seek out someone who’ll give you lessons in how to listen like an empathetic genius. Compose and recite vows in which you pledge to become an utterly irresistible and reliable ally.

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Virgo reader from Austin, is upset with my recent horoscopes. In his email, he wrote the following: “You’re making me mad with your predictions of non-stop positivity, Brezsny. I need more dirt and grit and muck. I’ve got to have some misery and decay to motivate me. So just please shut up with your excess projections of good times. They’re bringing me down.” Here’s my response to him and to any other Virgo who feels like him: I’m afraid you’re scheduled to endure even more encounters with cosmic benevolence in the coming week. If these blessings feel oppressive, try to change your attitude about them.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The humorous sci-

ence journal Annals of Improbable Research published a paper titled “The Effects of Peanut Butter on the Rotation of the Earth.” Signed by 198 Ph.D. physicists, it came to this conclusion: “So far as we can determine, peanut butter has no effect on the rotation of the earth.” If possible, Libra, I suggest you summon a comparable amount of high-powered expertise for your own purposes. But please make sure that those purposes are weightier than the question of peanut

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Brad Bynum PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

Merchkin Scotty Roller

Local music fans know Scotty Roller as the guitarist and vocalist of the Saddle Tramps and Them Sonsabitches, and the owner of Scotty Roller Designs, a company that does graphic designs for concert posters and other merchandise. Roller recently co-authored, with Bill West, the book Your Band Name Here: The Musician’s Guide to Merch. At 4 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15, at Bizarre Guitar, 2677 Oddie Blvd., Roller will teach an hour-long $10 seminar on merchandise for musicians, followed immediately by a book signing. For more information, visit www.scottyroller.com.

made it in a format that a musician would be comfortable reading through.

So simple words and short paragraphs?

What inspired the book?

[Laughs] Yeah, and lots of pictures.

I kept getting phone calls on a weekly basis from local bands and other bands I knew from touring and everything, asking me questions about merch and T-shirts ... it got to the point where I was like, OK, now all my time is being monopolized by this, which is fine, that’s a great thing. It evolved into sit-down consultations. Then I just figured there’s enough people who are asking the same questions that there’s got to be a book out there about this and maybe I can refer them to that. Well, I went digging—there are no books. There are some books that touch on it briefly, but not enough to really give anybody any concrete foundation to make solid choices for merch. So after digging and digging, I realized I need to be the guy to write this. So I took a year, and I wrote the book. I researched the stuff I didn’t know. I got the history in there. I

OPINION

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The number-one mistake I’ve seen is they make merch for themselves and not merch that their fans want. If a band is making what their fans want they’re going to sell more. At any time, a band can make hats and shirts that they like. That was a hard lesson to learn. Case in point, we fought tooth and nail not having T-shirts with any sort of skull on it. We were just sick to death of seeing it. We just took this total hard stance that we don’t want a shirt with a skull on it. And then, after being so reluctant, we noticed our fans were wearing nothing but shirts with skulls on it. We need to do this. We did it, and they sold hand over fist. ... The fans want certain things. And if they don’t get it, then they’re not going to buy it. It’s the number-one supply-anddemand rule: give the people want they want.

Why were these bands calling you?

One of the functions of merch is that it’s a promotional tool.

I think the reason they would call me is because locally with the Saddle Tramps, we always had merch. ... And on the road, it would always be the same thing. Even some headliner bands that we would play with would only have CDs and that would be it. Or they wouldn’t even have anything. And we always made it a point to have shirts out, CDs out, whatever we could possibly pull together, we would have it out. And we made more money in merch over the years than in guarantees. Or close to one-for-one. I think a lot of bands see that stuff, and they’re perceptive enough to realize OK, these guys are making money. How are they making money? And then they dig into and say, oh, it’s in merch. ...

It is advertising for your band. Ultimately, that’s what it is. It’s a moving billboard. ... The fans get a souvenir that attaches to their experience with a good time, and then they have something cool to wear. So, are panties a good idea for band merch? Well, yeah. As a main source of band merch? No. It’s kitsch, so if you have all your other bases covered first, then doing stuff like that, great. … A lot of times, bands lose sight of what they are, and that’s a band. Music should be the number-one place to put your focus and your effort and your energy. A lot of times it goes the other way, and we need buttons and stickers and all this stuff. Well, yeah, but if you don’t have any music then none of that stuff is going to do you any favors. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

Hurry up and stop

brucev@newsreview.com

Republicans who took the art of Senate filibustering to Barry Bondsian levels. Imagine President Obama getting to the White House in January ’09, and immediately grabbing a hose. A perfectly reasonable action, because he’s got, as you’ll recall, one helluva fire to put out. But, as he works that hose and tries to drown a mega-blaze that includes a crippling recession, a flailing stock market, a ruined housing industry, and the looming doom of General Motors (Gee, that’s it? Piece-a-cake!), he also has to deal with an ornery new bunch of tea-pissing Repubs, who constantly crab about what a lousy job he’s doing of putting out these fires (fires that began, ironically enough, on Republican watch). And while they gather behind the Prez, bitching, and complaining, they also manage to stand on The Hose of Help, bending it and kinking it and making damn sure that the flow is reduced to a puny and ineffective trickle. No, their actions weren’t exactly treasonous, but, then again, they’ve shown they won’t hesi-

There’s a new television ad now being shown around the country, an ad in which the Mittster claims that the last four years have been filled with disappointments and failures and political missteps. I would agree. But there’s one thing, one small detail here that really needs to be included in order to fairly and accurately flesh out this entire train of thought. All these disappointments, failures, and missteps were exactly what the Republican Party wanted to make happen. It’s disingenuous of the Repubs to suggest that the country’s economic sluggishness is due to failed ideas/programs put forth by the President and the Dems in Congress. What programs? Nothing’s been tried! In the last two years, no less than 19 attempts to do something about jobs/unemployment in this country—19!—have died in Congressional committee limbo. Simply put, President Obama has been the victim of the most obstructionist, do-nothing Congress in recent memory, a Congress that was made essentially dysfunctional by

What are some common mistakes you’ve seen bands make?

tate to compromise the health of the country in order to play political hardball. And really, what kind of attitude is that for a senator or member of the House? As New York Times columnist Paul Krugman wrote on Sept. 9, “All of this puts the White House in a difficult bind. Making a big deal of Republican obstructionism could all too easily come across as whining. Yet this obstructionism is real, and arguably the biggest single reason for our ongoing economic weakness.” Exactly. Whining doesn’t play all that well with the electorate. It’s very thin political ice to skate upon. But it has to be acknowledged that the last two years have been dominated by a political approach that can best be labeled as Obstructional Dysfunctionalism. And if you want to keep America in its sluggish economic swamp, this strategy is obviously quite effective in doing just that. Ω

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