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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . . .5 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .14 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .16 Art of the State . . . . . . .17

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .23 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Free Will Astrology . . . .34 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .35 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .35

PAYING FOR THE

WILDLIFE See News, page 6.

WHAT’S BIG AND WET AND BLUE ALL OVER? LAKE TAHOE EXPOSED. See Green, page 9.

THINGS THAT GO BUMP See Arts&Culture, page 14.

LETTER FROM

THE EDGE See Art of the State, page 17.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 29

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SEPTEMBER 6–12, 2012


Living with Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease, is the most common type of arthritis. Almost everyone is affected by it to some degree, especially as we age. It most frequently occurs in weight-bearing joints, mainly the knees, hips and ankles. This form of arthritis slowly and gradually breaks down the cartilage that covers the ends of each bone in a joint. Normally, cartilage acts as a shock absorber, providing a smooth surface between bones. But, with osteoarthritis, the smooth surface becomes worn, rough and pitted. In advance stages, it may wear away completely. Without gliding surfaces, the bones are forced to grind against one another, causing inflammation, pain, restricted movement and diminished coordination.

Although there is no cure, we now have dramatic new ways to help control and manage symptoms. Treatment Options During the early and middle stages of osteoarthritis, a treatment program of medicines, supplements, cortisone shots, ice or heat treatments, weight management, controlled exercise, hydrotherapy and/or physical therapy can be very effective under a physician’s supervision. Your doctor may recommend that you take supplements

such as vitamins C and E, to help prevent and reduce cell damage associated with joint breakdown and glucosamine to help reduce joint inflammation and improve your mobility. In late-stage and severe cases of joint deterioration, surgery may be recommended. Regardless, there is no need to suffer in pain. Ask your doctor which treatment option might be right for you based on your condition and medical history. Dr. Washington is board certified in internal medicine and is currently accepting new patients. After growing up in Chicago, Illinois, she earned her medical degree from the University of Illinois, Peoria and completed her residency at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. She loves living here in northern Nevada amidst the mountains and spectacular scenery. In her personal time, Dr. Washington enjoys painting abstracts, writing poetry, hiking, camping and exploring the beautiful west with her family. To schedule a consultation with Dr. Washington, call 775-352-5300. Medicare and most of the area’s health plans are accepted.

Ida Washington, MD Board Certified, Internal Medicine

5975 South Los Altos Parkway, Suite 100 | Sparks, NV | 775-352-5300 | www.NNMC.com Information is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to constitute medical advice or to be relied upon for the treatment of any particular condition. If you have concerns or questions about specific symptoms that may affect your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

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LETTERS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Change of diet

No time like the present Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Burning Man is going on as I sit here and write this Editor’s Note. It’s been a while, three years, since I’ve participated. I don’t mean to slag on the festival at all. It’s just the event is no longer the event I loved and that changed my perception of art and community, and I don’t care to have the new memories supersede my old ones. I guess I’m pretty hep when I’ve become too cool for Burning Man. Also going on as I sit here and write this Editor’s Note is the Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-off. I’m a judge. It’s my third year (the deal is, you get to remain a judge until you skip, then all bets are off). This event is every bit as cool as I remember it, year after year, particularly because the coolness is measured in pounds and flavors. The only thing I believe the rib cook-off needs is a media rib-eating contest. I believe it needs this because I would win, even if it takes place the day of the judging during which I probably eat one or one and a half racks of ribs. But then, I’ve won eating contests before. Also going on as I sit here and write this Editor’s Note is the university has started classes. I’m honored to teach a class, Journalism 107, multimedia reporting. Reporting and bartending are about the only things I’m qualified to teach, but you’d be amazed how many people want to teach me how to do journalism. It’s probably equal to the number who want to teach me how to sit on a bar stool. Also going on as I sit here and write this Editor’s Note is the Republican National Convention. You’ve got to know there are a million stories there. You won’t get to hear the best of them. You know what’s not going on as I sit here writing this Editor’s Note? I’m not out in the world experiencing the news first-hand. I remember when doing journalism was the most important thing to me. Feels like I need some time in the field.

This election is about the rich versus the rest. Will carnivorous corporations completely control us, or will there be some semblance of sanity? “They” want to shill small businesses so that they can buy/eat them up if they grow, and sell them at a tidy profit with a low tax rate. Probably overseas. That’s what our capitalism is all about. The strong/rich eat the weak/poor. That is their prime mandate. Their Bible. It’s time to put a stop to this bullshit. Please, vote for prosperity for all, not profit for a few. Craig Bergland Reno

You don’t say Discovery happens in time, and carbon dating is man’s reflection of what he has identified of himself in time, and in time many individuals, more than you can count on all your hands, including airplane pilots, ship captains and country bumpkins have brought forth their testimonies of unidentified experiences to include missing and recompensed time. Don’t look now, but you have just gained nine minutes. Kristin Smith via email

It’s that time thing Re “Cut off anti-doping funds” (Editorial, Aug. 31): Finally, someone has brought up a great point. Why are we paying for a rogue organization spending tax money on investigating an athlete who raced and passed all the tests thrown at him at the time of the competition? The athlete gets no do overs, but this organization does. I could care less if Lance Armstrong rode clean or juiced. Racing is racing, and once it is in the books, it is final, grey areas and all. This is equal to NASCAR having one of its spin-off organizations who is funded by our tax money investigating if Richard Petty ever ran a car out of legal spec, using the newest methods to evaluate, getting comments from past mechanics, then deciding to strip

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com him of 100 or all 200 of his victories. I sure would love to waste my tax money on that one. Tony Lineberry Raleigh, N.C.

And Jesus rose from the dead Re “Mitt and Joseph” (Notes from the Neon Babylon, Aug. 23): “Mitt and Joseph” or what should be called, “The religious biases displayed against Mormons.” Allow me to state that I am not a Mormon, but have attended Mormon Church services and have been invited into “The High Priest” classes on occasion. It was clear to all in attendance that I was not seeking a new church or looking for a reason to convert, but looking to learn more about a specific faith and their doctrines. Having grown up in the German Lutheran church, converted to Catholicism in my teens and having attended many other denominations services, I have found religion to be a fascinating intellectual exercise. Unlike many people, I don’t believe that intellect and faith are mutually exclusive. To address some of the Aug. 29 letters to the editor, I would like to make these comments. Could any writer be more disrespectful to people of faith than to refer to “the magic panties”? Has this individual ever heard a member of the Mormon faith refer to their garments in such a way? I seriously doubt that. Having asked a Mormon bishop as to the significance of these undergarments and why they are worn, it was explained to me that it is an expression of their faith to do so. It is meant as a constant reminder to keep the covenants of their faith and is not believed to be protection of any sort against anything. It is truly sad that the writer, Mr. Whaley chooses to revel in his ignorance. A grasp on reality check may also be in order for Mr. Whaley. Next comes the letter by Mr. Quong, another person who seems fascinated with Mr. Romney’s tax returns. Tax returns are, of course, no one’s business other than the taxpayer’s and the I.R.S., a fact that seems to have escaped so many citizens. Mr. Quong then proceeds to further speculate that Mr. Romney won’t release his returns

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Amy Beck, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

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because he’s cheating the church out of his 10 percent tithe. Could Mr. Quong be any sillier in his delusions, or is he a close friend of Senator Reid whose delusions have become more evident every day. By the way, does Mr. Quong realize that Mr. Reid is also a Mormon and based on Mr. Quong’s logic, certainly can’t be trusted because of his religious persuasion? But wait, it gets sillier and sillier. Then follows Mr. Arthur’s letter in which he refers to Mr. Romney as a billionaire, perhaps its time for Mr. Arthur to begin to understand the difference between a multimillionaire and a billionaire. By his logic billionaire seem to have all made their money by cheating other people out of their life savings. Can these letter writers get any denser? I doubt it. I congratulate the editor of the Reno News & Review for adding the following Editor’s note. “I don’t want to diminish these individuals’ rights to express themselves (or Bruce Van Dyke’s for that matter), but I want to point out two things: The First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America guarantees freedom of religion, but all religions require faith in incredible things. And a clause in Article IV, paragraph 3, of the Constitution declares “no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.” Considering that the newspaper is written and edited by what I consider to be people of liberal progressive persuasion, it’s good to see them quote the constitutional requirements for President. Perhaps, this is a good time to quote former presidential primary candidate, Mike Huckabee: “Let me say to you tonight, I care far less as to where Mitt Romney takes his family to church, than I do about where he takes this country.” I could not agree more. Maybe it’s time that we start judging politicians on their words and whether they keep their promises or whether they turn out to be hypocrites. Let’s start looking at what they actually do in their lives not just on their promises which politicians usually forget as soon as the ballot box closes.

ART OF THE STATE

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Fred Speckmann Reno Editor’s note: But if we’re so damned liberal, why do you find yourself agreeing with us so much? Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Russell Moore General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Brian Breneman, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

FOODFINDS

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But have you seen the Nexus 7 Re “Unplugged” (Feature story, Aug. 30): I loved Aaron Lake Smith’s article. Some college professors around the country are conducting class experiments, in which students are to do without their phones and computers for a week. The results of these class projects are fascinating. After the “withdrawals” the first day—and Aaron Lake Smith is correct in referring to our culture’s use of technology as nothing short of an addiction—students were suddenly awakened to a new reality. Number one, the participants in these class studies invariably become aware of how rude we are these days. I notice this myself, any time I’m in a restaurant, observing people sitting around tables, interrupting and ignoring one another with their smart phones. The other thing that soon becomes apparent is what a time and money parasite all this texting and internet surfing has become for us. In my own case, I have no home computer. I do have an employer-provided computer here at work, and my boss gives me a fancy iPhone4 to use. However, the internet access is severely restricted on my computer, and the texting feature on my phone is disabled. I see people obsessively texting all the time. I’m off that treadmill. In fact, I’ve never sent a text message in my life, and I feel happier for it. A common theme in science fiction is when the technology takes over a society. We’ve reached that point already in our society. We have much knowledge with our “information technologies.” Ah, but do we have the wisdom to use it properly? Lee Warner Reno

Correction Re “The new guy” (Feature, Aug. 23): We mispelled the name of DePaul University, where Superintendent Pedro Martinez attended graduate school. We regret the error.

Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Priscilla Garcia Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

SEPTEMBER 6, 2012

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BIG HE A BY TOM TOMORROW BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25kWatching the political SMALL H conventions SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) this year? by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

Asked at the Nugget Rib Cook-Off Don Werth Retiree

Yes. It’s interesting. It’s a close race. I’m Democrat, so I’ll be watching this one, too.

Dennis Samuelson Retiree

Not much. I watch what I see on TV news. I’m a Democrat. I just don’t care about all the—I listened to it on the Republicans, but I don’t care to watch the entire convention. I’ll see what the news media reports about it, and that’s enough.

Brenda Arnold

A coalition of the competent

Job service manager

Yes. I learned a lot about Romney, but I didn’t think I learned too much new information in regard to his plans, but I thought I learned a lot more about him as a person.

We shocked the skittish with our early endorsements in More than anything, we need to see a new power struclocal races, and so as not to allow a return to easy comfort ture on the Reno City Council. That’s going to require four and apathetic feelings toward our elected government, we people who are going to tend to see things the way the thought we’d throw in a couple more. average citizen see things. So far, we’ve endorsed Jenny First, we wholeheartedly endorse Kitty Jung for Reno Brekhus and Jung (and by the way, we were wholly seriCity Council, Ward 5. Now, a good many people would ous about Bernie Carter running for mayor in two years, question this decision, since a bunch of cowardly blackfor the reasons we stated). guards calling themselves the Washoe County Republican There are two other seats at play in the City Council Party, fearing her vote-getting prowess, election. In Ward 3, Oscar Delgado and attacked her in a very public advertise- We need to see a Cliff Young. Frankly, while we like ment in the Reno Gazette-Journal in an Young, personally, Delgado has new power structure received huge support from the effort to knock her out before the primary. But hey, that’s politics. They Hispanic community and from many on the Reno City brought up some legitimate questions other people who look at things in the Council. about the Washoe County commisways this newspaper does. We’re going sioner’s banal brushes with law to throw our support behind him. The enforcement. We read all the hysteria on their scandalous Reno City Council has represented a homogenized point website. One thing becomes clear: Jung is not one who’s of view for too much of the time. afraid to speak truth to power, which is probably not the The at-large race is frankly the toughest for us to message the WCRP intended. endorse in. Both David Ward and Hillary Schieve are sucSalaciousness aside, Jung is an effective commissioner. cessful business people with deep roots in the community And when times came for cooperation with the other juris- and this newspaper and would be capable councilmemdictions—Reno and Sparks—Jung was able to keep things bers. Both have shown deep commitment to personal lofty in ways that other members of the commission and volunteerism. But if we stick with that overarching idea of the Reno City Council were not. She’s smart, informed, a coalition of people who can work together to enact foreducated, experienced and not afraid of confrontation. And ward-looking ideas, we think Schieve is the way to go. she packs heat. Who better deserves our endorsement? She’s created two successful retail businesses in a down We don’t really have anything negative to say about economy, has been integral to the success of the Midtown her opponent, Neoma Jardon. Seems nice enough, but all District, has worked tirelessly and personally to bring one has to do is look at her supporters and donors to dozens upon dozens of young people into the workforce. understand she’s just a mouthpiece for the status quo—the She may not have David Ward’s gravitas, but she’s got a developers, electeds and gamers—that put the city of Reno backbone of steel and a heart of gold. She’ll be a great staring down the barrel of state financial control. member of the Reno City Council. Ω OPINION

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Jeanne Atteberry Warehouse clerk

Not really, no. I work too much. I would, if I could. I find it interesting what’s going on. I think it’s important.

Philomena Sawko Homemaker

Yes, I have. I like to hear what they have to say. I kind of wanted to hear what Romney had to say, and now I’ll watch Obama and see what he has to say.

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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PHOTO/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

U.S. Sen. Key Pittman of Nevada chaired the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and served as president pro tem of the Senate. His Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act is still protecting wildlife three-quarters of a century after its enactment. Pittman was photographed here with Massachusetts Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge (right) in February 1938

They didn’t pay for that Nevada Republicans held what they called “‘We Built It’ Convention Watch Parties” in Reno and Las Vegas where participants watched the Republican National Convention proceedings. The name of the parties was a reference to Barack Obama’s “You didn’t build that” comment about businesses using services provided by the public. What the local Republicans saw on the television screens was a convention paid for with $18.3 million in taxpayer dollars, held in a hall built by $140 million in taxpayer money, served by streetcars of the Hillsborough Area Regional Transportation Authority owned by the Tampa public and otherwise reachable on public roads, guarded by publicly-funded police and additional security provided by $50 million in U.S. Department of Homeland Security funds. The Democratic National Convention in North Carolina this week receives similar public assistance.

Instant retribution for snub Republican National Convention officials suddenly changed the convention rules at the expense of presidential candidate Ron Paul, prompting Nevada Paulists to vote for him in violation of their pledge to support Mitt Romney on the first ballot. The Nevada delegates planned to vote for Romney—winner of the Nevada caucuses—on the first ballot until the rules change. The Paulists had worked to get five states to sign a petition that would have allowed Paul to be given nominating and seconding speeches from the podium. In the end, they got the support of six states, whereupon the rules were changed to require eight. At that point the Nevadans decided to vote for Paul as a protest. It was not the first time the Nevada Paulists were victimized by such tactics. In 2008 they won control of the Nevada Republican Convention and were about to elect national convention delegates when party officials shut down the convention, later electing delegates in a party committee.

Attn: Tourism officials At her No Upside website, blogger Renee DiResta has designed a U.S. map that logs the most common stereotypes of the 50 states. DiResta determined these stereotypes by harvesting information from Google’s auto-complete function, which tracks previous searches and shows the most frequent below the search field. DiResta typed “Why is [name of state] so” into the Google search field and then collected the commonly asked questions about each state under the field. She then created the map. When a reader makes the cursor hover over a state, it lists the most common questions about that state. In the case of Arizona, for instance, the most common questions asked by Google users are, “Why is Arizona so hot? … so racist? … so conservative? … so crazy?” In Nevada’s case, the questions are “Why is Nevada so dry? … so hot? … so dangerous? … so sparsely populated?” The question about danger may be related to Nevada’s longstanding place at the wrong end of so many national quality of life rankings, such as crime rates, suicide rates, tobacco use, firearms deaths, children’s health, toxic releases, infectious disease and so on. The map can be found at http://tinyurl.com/8z6n86c.

Success story A 75-year-old federal program is celebrated across the nation What the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation calls the “most successby ful conservation legislation in the Dennis Myers history of North America” turned 75 this week. Though it did not become effective until July 1938, President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act on Sept. 2, 1937, and that approval is being celebrated around the nation. “It’s the most important conservation act ever passed,” said Nevada Wildlife Department director Ken Mayer. “These dollars are essential to our agency. We wouldn’t be functioning without it.”

“These dollars are essential to our agency.” Ken Mayer Nevada Wildlife Director

Noose tightens California Gov. Jerry Brown, in concert with the U.S. Interior Department, has approved two new tribal casinos in that state. The Enterprise Rancheria nearl Marysville and the North Fork Rancheria near Frescno each plan casinos with 2,000 slot machines. The Enterprise casino is expected to have 1,900 permament employees, the North Fork 1,500.

—Dennis Myers

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A website commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Pittman-Robertson Act can be found at http://wsfr75.com/

Also known as the PittmanRobertson Act, the law has provided $7 billion over the decades, pulling species like the bald eagle, whitetailed deer, wood ducks and wild turkeys back from endangered status. It did not rely on federal action, instead giving state programs an assist. In Nevada, it has been instrumental in protecting populations of both game and non-game species like the mule deer, bighorn sheep, golden eagles and desert tortoise.

It provides for setting aside the excise tax on firearms and ammunition for allocation to states for wildlife restoration, assuming the states comply with certain guidelines such as the creation of a state fish and game department, enactment of wildlife conservation laws, and a ban on diverting of license fees paid by hunters for any other purpose. Mayer has high praise for that last regulation. “For me, the biggest thing is that in that law it said that a state was not eligible to take the dollars from sportsman unless they have a law that provides for security for those dollars,” he said. “From my perspective, that was a stroke of genius—can you imagine, with all the years, all the ups and downs, the temptation to tap those dollars for other things?” The law was a product of a convergence of influences—the first American Wildlife Conference called by Roosevelt in 1936, the agitation of a lawyer/newspaper editor/Oregon fish and game chief named Carl Shoemaker, the legislative sponsorship by Senators Key Pittman of Nevada and Willis Robertson of Virginia, father of television evangelist Pat Robertson. Pittman, president pro tempore of the Senate, died three years after the Act was enacted. That conference called by Roosevelt was actually the continuation of a series of 21 gatherings called American Game Conferences, the change in names reflecting an evolution of concerns in wildlife restoration.

“It is a central part of the North American Model of wildlife management and is a model envied by the rest of the world,” Nevada wildlife official Patrick Cates wrote about Pittman-Robertson earlier this year. “It is no exaggeration to say this act is largely responsible for bringing wildlife back from the brink in this country after the unregulated commercialized hunting of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.” Grants began in 1939. By 1941, all but two states participated in the program, splitting $2,530,000. With the 25 cents in state funds for each 75 cents provided by the feds, $3,373,333 was applied to wildlife restoration that year. That is $52,574,427.46 in 2012 dollars. Paradoxically, Pittman’s home state was not one of the 46 states participating. News reports said Nevada and Georgia had not yet enacted state legislation and funding. In 1944, syndicated outdoors columnist Johnny Mock suggested that the Pittman-Robertson program had been slowed by the war and urged that the money accumulated in the fund be put to work before the end of hostilities. “One of the best conservation measures ever passed by Congress was the Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid to State Wildlife Restoration Act,” Mock wrote. “Only the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty and Act has been of greater benefit to the wildlife restoration program. … With a great deal of work possible in the conservation field, before Johnny comes marching home, Congress should be urged to appropriate the $9 million now lying idle in the treasury at Washington. The fund was earmarked for such purposes and should be put to work.” Nine million dollars in 1944 is $117,155,454.55 in 2012 dollars. Mock also wrote, “All states but Nevada have given consent to the act.” As late as 1945, the Sportsman’s Club of Mineral County published a statement in the Hawthorne newspaper that was critical of the legislature for failing to provide the small state contribution. “Refusal for participation in the immense federal allotment of funds created by the PittmanRobertson act has placed Nevada in the position of ‘cutting off her nose to spit her face,’ and the reduced quantities of game in the hills is a clear indication that something is suffering because of this backward and indifferent attitude,” it read. “It would appear


2.5x12 that Mineral county’s delegation to the Nevada state legislature would be making a very valuable contribution to the development of the state if at the next meeting of the legislature they would introduce and sponsor bills enabling Nevada to participate in the Pittman-Robertson funds, enjoy a centralized state control of game reserves and remove for all time this phase of natural resources from the local ‘political football’ lists.” However, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies has figures that say Nevada received $16,823 from Pittman-Robertson in 1939 and $43,456 in 1941. There is no explanation for the conflict. Nevada received about $8 million from Pittman-Robertson in fiscal year 2010. In spite of Nevada’s initial disinterest in the program, Nevada Democrats to this day embrace the Act as a party legacy because Key Pittman—for whom Harry Reid named one of his sons—and Willis Robertson were Democrats. The Nevada Outdoor Democratic Caucus—an arm of the state party—has a page posted on its website describing the act in detail and calling it “assurance of a steady source of earmarked funds [that] has enabled the program’s administrators, both state and federal, to plan projects that take years to complete, as short-term strategies seldom come up with lasting solutions where living creatures are involved. … Areas famous for their wildlife have directly benefited from this spending, but so have sporting goods and outdoor equipment manu-

“One of the best conservation measures ever passed by Congress.”

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF!

Johnny Mock (1944) Columnist facturers, distributors and dealers. Thousands of jobs have been created.” Across the nation, state governments have been celebrating the Act. The Oklahoma Wildlife Department issued a glossy history of the Act, “The Greatest Conservation Story Never Told.” The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced a year-long celebration. Pennsylvania, New Jersey and other states have observed the anniversary. The National Shooting Sports Foundation has put up a commemorative website at http://wsfr75.com/. Tahoe Films has posted an online video on the anniversary. The Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation scheduled a commemoration at its Las Vegas national convention. Just as Nevada was apparently slow using the act, its commemoration is also coming late, but the governor is expected to issue a proclamation and hold a ceremony. The Act has been amended a number of times during its history—the tax was extended to archery equipment, for instance— and there is an effort underway now to use some of the funds to build shooting ranges. Ω

Coexistence PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

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Gay and Catholic displays had side by side places at a University of Nevada, Reno campus recruitment event last week. Dozens of campus organizations were set up around the university quad at the start of the fall semester to try to attract new members. OPINION

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Funds go to waste The U.S. Department of Energy granted University of Nevada, Reno professor and researcher Miles Greiner $745,000 to study storage technology for nuclear waste. Greiner is a mechanical engineer, and will work on a three-year program focused on the drying process of the waste, which could help in transporting and storing the waste safely. The grant is part of the DOE’s Nuclear Energy University Program, which helps fund more than 40 projects around the country. Two doctoral candidates and one post-doctoral will work with Greiner. Greiner has had past projects funded by the DOE and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, including one that lasted from 2010 to September of this year, for which his research team received $1,500,000 from the DOE to research “advanced heat and mass exchanger technology for geothermal and solar renewable energy systems,” according to Greiner’s faculty webpage.

App adventure A new app for smartphones and tablets will give locals and visitors a chance to explore Sierra Nevada. The app is called the National Geographic MapGuide and can be found by searching for “Sierra MapGuide” in the Apple and Android stores. Created by National Geographic, the Sierra Business Council and the Sierra Nevada Conservancy, the resource provides information about restaurants, hiking trails, travel tips and more. The information is crowd sourced, meaning that locals provide the tips and suggestions. The app is part of National Geographic’s Sierra Nevada geotourism efforts, which also include the Tahoe Expo (see right).

Cool schools for outdoorsy folk Outdoor enthusiast magazine Outside named the University of Nevada, Reno one of the 25 Colleges for Outside Readers. The article cites the close proximity of outdoor attractions like the Sierra Nevada mountain range, Lake Tahoe, the Black Rock Desert and the Truckee River, and also highlights some of the university’s academic programs such as forest management, engineering and ecohydrology. Other schools on the list include several University of California institutions, as well as some smaller colleges such as Green Mountain College in Vermont and Warren Wilson College in North Carolina. To see the entire list of schools, visit http://bit.ly/OVA4jf.

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

www.newsreview.com

GIFT CERTIFICATES FROM RESTAURANTS, BARS, CLUBS, TATTOO, RETAIL, THEATER, SALONS, SPAS, GOLF, VACATIONS & MORE 8

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ECO-EVENT Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful is looking for volunteers to help with the 15th annual Truckee River Cleanup Day on Sept. 29 from 8:30 a.m.noon. Last year, more than 600 volunteers helped clear 12.5 tons of trash from the Truckee River. Cleanup sites include Crystal Peak Park, Mayberry Park, Oxbow Nature Study Area, Lockwood, Fisherman’s Park, Rock Park, Glendale Park, Cottonwood Park, Reno Sparks Indian Colony Health Center, McCarran Ranch and Gateway Park. A barbecue will be held afterward at Rock Park. To sign up, visit www.ktmb.org or call 851-5185.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@ newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/ RNRGreen for more.


GREEN

Kayaking through marshes is on of many activities offered at Tahoe Expo

Tourist attraction Tahoe Expo Lake Tahoe is already a world-wide tourist destination, especially during the summer, with its serene beaches, and in the winter, when the ski resorts are filled with new snow. But local environmental advocates want to keep by Ashley visitors coming to Tahoe throughout the year by facilitating geotourism— Hennefer tourism focused on sustainability and ecofriendly activities. Sustainable Tahoe, the crew behind the Tahoe Expo, an immersive ashleyh@ newsreview.com showcase of Lake Tahoe, is working toward establishing the region with the National Geographic Sierra Nevada Geotourism project. But it first has to prove how Lake Tahoe will encourage geotourism. “There are a few steps we need to do before we can become a part of the project,” says Jacquie Chandler, track coordinator for the expo. “The first is identifying assets of the area. And then part of becoming a geotourism destination is creating an annual showcase that draws people to geotourism, so that’s what we’re doing with the expo.” This is the second year of the Tahoe Expo, held from Sept. 8-9. The expo offers “tracks” for which participants can sign up, focused on different aspects of conservation and wildlife. For instance, the Water Quality Track will take visitors on a research boat with the Tahoe Environmental For more information Research Center, who will then take the group kayaking. Some tracks will on the expo, or to be held at a later date, including the Tahoe Beneath the Surface track, in sign up for a track, which participants will will go boating an snorkeling to learn about what visit http://www.tahoe lives within the lake. The tracks last for most of the day on either Saturday expo.com/. or Sunday, but participants can sign up for one on each day. “It’s a little bit evolved from last year,” says Chandler. “Last year, it was an open house, and we encouraged people to take public transit. But this year we have specific tracks with guides who will lead people.” Chandler says that the entire event aims to be as sustainable as possible, which means that participants should use the public transportation provided by the event. Each track has a different meeting point which will transport visitors to events. Depending on the track, visitors may be transported with a shuttle or a water taxi. “We recognized last year that when 60 people showed up for the bear hike, we needed to do something different,” says Chandler. “People struggled taking transit. They just wanted to show up and be taken on a guided tour, so that’s what we’re doing this year.” Students from the Sierra Nevada College helped to plan out each track, and Chandler says that Sustainable Tahoe reached out to local businesses. The tracks are headed by researchers, environmental advocates and members of local nonprofits. “Those people have so much passion about meadows, bears and wildlife, why not put them in the front?” she says. “We’re aiming to make education, recreation and conservation a fun adventure.” Chandler hopes that geotourism can bring money back to the community, while also emphasizing the importance of conservation. “This is a historic moment for Tahoe,” Chandler says. “We will be able to sustain our environment and economy. The expo is an incredible demonstration of the future of how we can sustain the area.” Ω

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O

n Oct. 4, 1974, Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Harry Reid held a news conference at Reno’s Riverside Hotel where he released his tax returns and those of members of his family who had business dealings with him. Politicians releasing tax returns was all the rage that year, President Nixon’s dubious personal finances having made it popular. Reid called on his Republican opponent, Paul Laxalt, to do the same.

by DENNIS MYERS

After serving a term as governor, Laxalt and some of his family members had built a Carson City casino hotel, the Ormsby House, prompting wide speculation about its financing, much of that speculation involving reclusive billionaire and casino owner Howard Hughes. As governor, Laxalt’s sweetheart relationship with Hughes—who once planned to make Laxalt president of the United States—had come to the attention of Watergate investigators. They took particular interest in Laxalt allegedly intervening with the U.S. Justice Department to protect Hughes from anti-trust charges and Hughes’ use of the Nevada governor to deliver a briefcase containing $50,000 to Richard Nixon. In an effort to neutralize the issue, in September Laxalt began accusing Reid of having made a deal with his Democratic primary opponent, Maya Miller, in exchange for her endorsement. What Miller wanted, Laxalt claimed, was for Reid to make an issue of Ormsby House financing in the fall campaign. An angry Reid immediately accepted an offer to debate the Hughes/Ormsby matters and began asking the question that Nevadans had been asking for several years: “How did a small town attorney parlay one term as governor into a $7 million hotel?” Reid also scheduled the Riverside news conference. At that event, I was standing against the back wall. Near me was Laxalt’s brother Robert, sent to monitor the proceedings. After Reid took questions and began leaving the room, Robert Laxalt blocked his way. I heard him say, “You’ve practically accused us of criminality.” Reid responded, “We didn’t bring it up, so let’s finish it.” It backfired on Reid. Although he had limited his request for financial information to family members who were in business with Laxalt, Laxalt portrayed it as a case of Reid trying to get financial information from a Laxalt sister who was a nun under a vow of poverty. It wasn’t true, but reporters loved the nun angle and ran with it. The public reaction cost Reid the election and delayed his entrance into the Senate until 1986. It was a storied moment in Nevada politics, but Reid had carefully stayed within the available information and documentation about Laxalt, though that caution had not protected him. So I was surprised last month when Reid, this time without documentation or substantiation, again tore into a Republican about his personal financial information. It came in an interview with Sam Stein and Ryan Grim for Huffington Post. Reid claimed an investor in Mitt Romney’s former firm Bain Capital told him, “Harry, he didn’t pay any taxes for 10 years.” Reid then went on: “He didn’t pay taxes

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for 10 years. Now, do I know that that’s true? Well, I’m not certain. But obviously he can’t release those tax returns. How would it look? You guys have said his wealth is $250 million. Not a chance in the world. It’s a lot more than that. I mean, you do pretty well if you don’t pay taxes for 10 years when you’re making millions and millions of dollars.” Note that third sentence invalidates everything else he said. In the Huffington interview, he said his source was a Bain investor. In comments to Nevada reporters it was “a number of people.” In another statement on the Senate floor—he was criticized for using an official setting for a political attack—he said that “the word is out.” The best thing that could be said about this last is that he was quoting himself.

REACTION

The inflammatory words crackled across the political world. Romney flatly denied Reid’s hearsay. “I did go back and look at my taxes and over the past 10 years I never paid less than 13 percent. I think the most recent year is 13.6 or something like that. I paid taxes every single year. … Harry Reid’s charge is totally false.” Democrats, who for years had whined about unsubstantiated attacks by Republicans, decided they had been too finicky. They now found they had no objection to such attacks when made by Democrats. Although invited to do so, Democratic National chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and President Obama all declined to repudiate Reid, this is in spite of the admirable example set 13 days earlier by Republicans John McCain, John

“MR. ROMNEY DIDN’T MAKE THE LAW.” JAMES B. STEWART Financial author Boehner, Marco Rubio, Ed Rollins and Scott Brown, who repudiated a Michelle Bachmann smear of an Obama administration official. (McCain, whose 2008 presidential campaign examined Romney’s finances when he was being considered for vice president, said he “can personally vouch” that there was nothing in Romney’s taxes that would be disqualifying for a candidate.) Pelosi’s comments were particularly striking—“Harry Reid made a statement that is true. Somebody told him. It is a fact.” The word “it” 12

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appears to be referencing the fact that someone told Reid, not the accuracy of what he was told. In other words, she attested to his using genuine gossip, though how she knows Reid has a real live source is anyone’s guess. Maybe she has a source. “In allowing Reid to air an unsourced allegation from the floor of the United States Senate and then to argue that the burden of proof lies with the accused and not the accuser, Democrats have set a new low for modern political campaigns,” wrote RealClearPolitics founder Tom Bevan. In Republican circles, meanwhile, Reid was characterized as “a dirty liar” (Republican National chair Reince Priebus) and “making things up” (Sen. Lindsay Graham). The poisonous term McCarthy began to be heard, and Reid did his best to help it along, as with his comment on the Senate floor: “Let him prove that he has paid taxes—because he hasn’t.” “By challenging Romney to prove his innocence, Reid has turned the traditional American standard of ‘innocent until proven otherwise’ on its head, just like [U.S. Sen. Joseph] McCarthy did,” wrote Peter Roff in U.S. News & World Report. The strangeness of these ethical backflips was highlighted when liberal columnist Frank Rich argued that Romney should prove his innocence and Human Events magazine—long a defender of Joseph McCarthy—sanctimoniously criticized Democratic leaders for “endorsing Reid’s twisted McCarthyite reasoning.” Reid consistently refused to defend his claims by responding to questions, instead turning each time to the issue of Romney’s taxes, and reporters were unable to hold his feet to the fire. Several leading fact-checking sites examined Reid’s comments and all found, in the words of one, “an extreme claim with nothing to back it up.” When Reid was confronted with that finding, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning site PolitiFact, he denounced the site without addressing the substance of its finding—a non-denial denial. Some reporters tried to come up with Reid’s source—if there was one—and David Axelrod and Jon Huntsman Sr. were the prime candidates. Both denied it.

JOURNALISM TAKES A DIVE

In 1972, without any evidence, Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern accused the Republican campaign of trying to suppress the Latino vote. James Naughton of the New York Times asked him, “As a student of history, how do you distinguish what you are doing from what Joseph McCarthy used to do?” No reporter put it that bluntly to Reid, who could not have been happier about the way most journalists behaved. It began with the original interview. There’s a scornful term in journalism—stenographer. It refers to

PHOTO/DAVID ROBERT

“HARRY REID”

U.S. Sen. Harry Reid’s claims about Mitt Romney’s taxes dominated political news for a week.

a reporter who does nothing more than write what s/he’s told and then passes it along raw to readers, no matter how irresponsible the content. That kind of stenographic reporting helped empower U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1940s and 1950s. As a result, new reporting techniques were developed, of providing analysis and context, to guard against such manipulation by politicians. But Sam Stein and Ryan Grim didn’t use those techniques. They wrote down what Reid said and put it out there, doing no other work except adding information on Romney’s response. The big question is why they reported Reid’s words at all. Reid himself gave them no substantiation, so why didn’t they ignore his attempt to plant an unsourced rumor? Huffington Post received one of the most dreaded awards in journalism—a “Dart” from the Columbia Journalism Review—for running the gossip. CJR said it was unfortunate that “there are reporters willing to write up” hearsay and distribute it to a wide audience. Syndicated columnist Jules Witcover wrote, “It’s part of the plague of new-media laxness these days for sources, named or unnamed, to make allegations without specifically substantiating them, and for news organizations, print, audio or video, to run with them.” Even if they decided to go ahead and report Reid’s remarks, CJR argued, Stein and Grim should not have buried their lead—the new fact that a major Democrat was spreading unsourced rumors instead of the old news of Romney’s taxes. They could have “foregrounded … the untrustworthiness of Reid’s account,” according to the journal. Imagine if the lead sentence had dealt with what was new: “In a Democratic turn to new tactics, U.S. Sen. Harry Reid made a hearsay accu-

sation against likely Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney while admitting the accusation may be false.” That would have set a very different tone for everything that followed. Instead the two reporters wrote the story in exactly the way Reid would have. But CJR, Witcover and a few others were in the minority. Most journalists gave heavy coverage to the controversy, and did it badly, fostering the impression that national political reporting has been overtaken by amateurs. Reporter Richard Reeves once wrote “The press is a child, essentially an immature institution. It’s a lovable little thing, distracted by bits of color and light, eager and irresponsible, honest in its simple way. And it has trouble concentrating on more than one thing at a time.” Never was this truer. Few kept straight for voters who—accuser or accused—had an obligation to provide proof, much less addressed privacy. Most reporters were unable to separate the issues of Reid’s conduct and Romney’s taxes. One was an ethical issue, the other financial, but like someone unable to chew gum and walk at the same time, reporters jumbled them together, accommodating Reid. He played them like a violin. Many reporters did not look at the substance of either issue—Reid’s ethics or Romney’s taxes. Instead, they treated it as a contest between the two men and focused on who was “winning.” The Los Angeles Times’ James Rainey, the Christian Science Monitor’s Linda Feldman, and the Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza all ran stories like that. A CJR writer showed how the story could be handled by reporters willing to invest a little work. Brendan Nyhan compared the original Stein/Grim story for Huffington with a report on Reid’s claim by William

Douglas for McClatchy Newspapers. In an online presentation, he overlaid “credulous” reporting with red and analytical, skeptical reporting with green. The Douglas story was mostly green. The Stein/Grim story was mostly red. Douglas’s story contained reactions from scholars on civility in politics and fact-checking and information about Reid’s own refusal to release his tax returns. Stein and Grim’s story provided no reaction except from Romney and nothing on Reid’s tax bashfulness. Because reporters use unnamed sources all the time, some may have been uncomfortable calling a U.S. senator on doing the same. But most reporters will do backup research on information provided by confidential sources before printing or broadcasting. They look for documentation and red flags. For instance, Reid could have obtained the Romney tax return that had been released and his financial disclosure and had them analyzed for evidence of whether they showed that what the “Bain investor” said was true. Reid could also have considered the red flag—the improbable notion that a mere investor in Bain would know anything about Romney’s personal taxes. Nothing Reid has said indicated that he did any of that.

ROMNEY’S TAXES

But others did. Salon asked prominent tax attorneys and accountants to examine Romney’s 2010 return and analyze whether the document suggested what Reid was claiming. Their conclusions ran under the subhead “Several tax attorneys believe Harry Reid’s claims are nothing short of ludicrous.” PolitiFact examined IRS studies and interviewed a Stern School of Business economist and found the possibility of Romney paying no taxes unlikely: “Romney has denied the claim, and tax experts back him up,


saying that the nature of Romney’s investments in Bain make it highly unlikely he would have been able to avoid paying taxes altogether—especially for 10 years.” These were conclusions that mattered only if reliable analysis based on facts has a claim to credibility over hearsay. Long before Reid’s comments, Romney had released his 2010 income tax return and promised to release 2011 (release is scheduled for Oct. 15). The 2010 return showed the Romneys paid about $3 million in federal income taxes. Their estimated taxes for 2011 are in the same range. Reid convinced some national reporters (who didn’t bother checking this claim, either) that Romney’s father George, running for president in 1968, had set “three decades of precedent” by releasing a dozen years of his tax returns. “His poor father must be so embarrassed about his son,” Reid said. (George Romney died in 1995.) If reporters had checked, they would have found that while George Romney released multiple years, it did not become precedent. According to the Tax History Project, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter and George Bush I did not release their tax returns when they were presidential candidates. Bill Clinton and Bush II released a single year when they were running for president. McCain released two years. Not until Barack

Obama came along did anyone join the elder Romney—and even he released only nine years. (On the subject of fathers, sons, and embarrassment, the right-wing Investors Business Daily published a claim that Reid’s father’s 1972 suicide was caused by embarrassment over his son, who was then lieutenant governor. It was despicable, but Reid had put himself in no position to complain about the newspaper’s tactics.) Moreover, Romney has complied with federal law on disclosure, giving a financial statement to the Federal Elections Commission—plus release of two years of tax returns. Reid, by contrast, has filed a Senate financial disclosure and no years of tax returns. Romney has said he has no intention of releasing additional years only to have the Democrats manipulate what they find. Given the fact that during the Reid/Romney contretemps, an Obamasupporting SuperPAC was running television commercials that accused Romney of helping kill a woman, that is not an unreasonable position. In addition, in one of his most effective

responses, Romney said that when he ran against Ted Kennedy, Kennedy refused to release his tax returns, citing privacy. Romney said he came to believe Kennedy was right, and says his religious contributions should remain private. But Democrats, except for situations of political advantage like the Bork hearings or issues like abortion, have been contemptuous of personal privacy issues for decades. Reid himself as a state legislator cosponsored legislation to require the

already be done—and has been done—with the returns and financial information he has disclosed. There is one side note concerning Romney’s taxes that is of interest, though it never came out during the Reid dispute. Romney, as part of his tactic of kissing up to the far right of his party, said that no one who pays more taxes than he owes is fit to be president. “I pay all the taxes that are legally required and not a dollar more,” he said. By contrast, in June 1977 President Carter said that because of investment credits and deductions, he owed no tax on his 1976 gross income of $55,000. Nevertheless, “because of my strong feeling that a person should pay some tax on his income,” Carter paid $6,000. Ronald Reagan biographer Lou Cannon told us last week, Reagan “directed William French Smith, then his personal attorney, to make sure he paid taxes … whether he owed them or not.” In addition, when a leader of the party of Franklin Roosevelt and John Kennedy implies that the great wealth

of a candidate has some negative meaning in a campaign context, it is fair to question that automatic linkage. One of the best pieces of journalism to come out of the Reid dispute was written by James B. Stewart, author of financial best sellers Blood Sport and Den of Thieves (one of his books is subtitled How False Statements are Undermining America). After reviewing the laws that allow wealthy people to go without paying taxes and pointing out that of the 400 individual income tax returns reporting the highest incomes the United States, six paid no taxes at all, Stewart pointed out, “Mr. Romney didn’t make the law, and he’s called for broadening the tax base, which presumably means eliminating some of the breaks that benefited him. He could easily speak to that issue, since who would know better than he does which loopholes should be closed?” It’s the same argument once used for Roosevelt and Kennedy. But during the entire Reid clash over Romney’s taxes, not a single reporter asked the senator why he had not, if he felt so strongly about wealthy people not having to pay taxes, reformed the system that allows it—particularly during the 2009-2011 Congress when the Democrats held overwhelming majorities in both houses plus the presidency. Ω

“HE DIDN’T PAY TAXES FOR 10 YEARS.” HARRY REID

“HARRY REID’S CHARGE IS TOTALLY FALSE.” MITT ROMNEY use of social security numbers on driver licenses. Privacy is not an argument that resonates with Democrats so they have trouble understanding it. While some analysts, such as Kathleen Hall Jamieson, said release of Romney tax returns would help determine how “his tax plan could affect people like him,” in fact that can

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In Rotation 16 | Art of the State 17 | Foodfinds 18 | Fi¬m 20

WHO YOU GONNA CALL? by Ben Garrido

T

HIS IS A STORY ABOUT GHOSTS. ACCORDING TO THE MOST HOLY BOOK OF CULTURAL CLICHÉ, I’M SUPPOSED TO EITHER TELL YOU ABOUT HOW THE GHOST HUNTERS ARE A BUNCH OF SUPERSTITIOUS CHARLATANS OR PASSIONATELY DEFEND THE PARANORMAL POSSIBILITIES OF THE UNIVERSE. I’M SUPPOSED TO EITHER DENY THE EMOTIONAL AND SUBJECTIVE TRUTH OF THE EXPERIENCE OR I’M SUPPOSED TO DISMISS THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD BECAUSE, YOU KNOW, THOSE THINGS ARE SOMEHOW MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE.

GRAVE EXPRESSIONS I parked my motorcycle at the Pub N Sub, just west of the University of Nevada, Reno, right at dusk. I was there to meet the Boogie Men of Nevada. Kelly Latham, 58, Joe Stout, 59, and Peter Wardlaw, 38, sat drinking beer outside and welcomed me over. Wardlaw has been hunting ghosts since the mid-’90s. He asked if I think I’m ready for the “hardcore stuff.” I said I was. 14

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The sun disappeared behind the mountains. I could see only splotchy islands of landscape under yellow streetlights. We started talking about ghost sightings, and I could almost feel the observable world shrinking. Wardlaw brought out his laptop and showed me some of the highlights from previous hunts: a floating black cross in the desert; something that looks like cotton ball ferret wrapping around Latham’s jacket; an angry, growling voice repeating, “go away, go away, GO AWAY!” I could feel my stomach tightening while my eyes adjusted to the glow of the computer screen, as my imagination filled in more and more sensory blank spots. We picked up and headed to the old graveyard on Nevada Street, right behind the fraternity houses on University Terrace. Brown, sickly light trickled in from the casinos below and accentuated the weedy, dry, dead ground surrounding the derelict, granite headstones. Few, it seemed, remember these dearly departed. Latham and Stout headed for the far reaches of the graveyard to set up voice recorders. Peter stayed behind and laid out a Ouija board in case the spirits wanted to contact us. I walked alone to the northwest corner of the graveyard and became intensely aware of sounds:

crickets, dead plants beneath my feet, frogs, my own heartbeat. Finally, I joined Latham at the Blethen grave. A dark granite pillar stood in the middle, while around it, a badly weathered and heavily cracked concrete pad fought to hold off the weeds. A gnarled, low tree hung over it and cast weak shadows in the distant, artificial light. The creepiest spot in the graveyard, by far. Stout’s very bright flash went off in the distance, and soon Peter and Kelly joined in the photography. I asked why, and they explained that ghosts manifest on cameras much better than they appear to the naked eye. “We take pictures of each other,” Stout said. “The apparitions tend to show up near us.” I joined in with my digital camera and noticed something peculiar. The more open the area I walked through, the better the lighting, the more relaxed the vibe. The more I talked and the closer I got to the graves—particularly the Blethen grave—the heavier I felt.

an extraordinarily deep and angry, labored human voice. Hearing this dead man’s malicious voice rising up from the depths scared me more than anything else. I had to consciously release the tension in my diaphragm and remind myself to breathe normally. The three ghost-hunting pros discussed it and decided the spirit said, “Go away!” We also got a picture, from Joe’s camera, of a cotton creature floating in the air above and behind me. I have absolutely no doubt that ghosts are real to the people who see them, hear them and experience them. However, suggestion is a powerful force. From the moment I arrived at Pub N Sub, there were dozens of factors suggesting creepiness and fear to me. The darkness altered my perceptions. The quiet invited me to notice the tiny noises—mice scurrying, leaves falling, dirt crunching—I normally ignore. And that doesn’t even get into the tales Latham, Stout and Wardlaw told me about demons, ghosts and hellish apparitions. If ever I was primed to find something supernatural, it was that night. The graveyard itself heightened my suggestible state. It’s morally icky to imagine oneself traipsing over unseen, forgotten graves. It’s sad to think of all

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) NORMAL ACTIVITY After about two hours, we retreated from the graveyard and headed back to the Pub N Sub. Two sound recorders, both near the Blethen grave, picked up


Is it a ghost? Or simply a trick of the camera?

fact all of the cotton-like ghosts they showed me, came from Joe’s camera with an extremely bright flash. I know, from testing it, that this camera and flash combination will bleach a black camera strap white and render it suspiciously similar to the spirit that followed me. And that voice saying, “Go away,” we picked up on those two sound recorders? I made a point not to share what I thought the voice was saying and, before the pros decided, I thought it had said “I’m awake.” Perhaps the voice wasn’t actually as clear or well enunciated as it seemed later, after we’d had the chance to create order from possibly random growling sounds. Anything we believe, we believe out of faith. Those who accept Christ, or the cycle of reincarnation, or the redemption of Allah, do so because of faith outside the purview of science. Those who accept the primacy of science do so out of a faith in the objective accuracy of our observations, or, even more basically, our senses. You cannot scientifically prove the validity of science. The same applies to philosophy—you cannot reasonably prove the primacy of reason. In fact, the best reasons for accepting science or philosophy basically come down to “it seems to work.” I mention this because the ghosts and apparitions seem to me a lot like old religious beliefs that didn’t quite make the cut in Judeo-Christian theology. More than that, ghosts, demons and spirits seem to me like ways to explain human death—that great curtain of the afterlife we can neither pierce with reason nor part with science. The paranormal functions a lot like religion that way. Ω

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those people who have not only died, but been forgotten, in that derelict place. It’s natural to sympathize with those dead folks’ “resentment” at how we’ve forgotten them now. Most of all, it’s nearly impossible to avoid thinking of one’s own mortality in a home for the dead. If we do go on after death—and who doesn’t want that?—does it not make sense we’d reach back into the physical world? I could feel these suggestions pulling on my fear, but I also felt their opposites. It was amazing how quickly things like the sounds of traffic, the sight of passing car lights, and looking out over the city alleviated my fears. It seems odd the ghosts or demons would immediately stop twisting my guts because I heard a car drive by. It seems unlikely they’d care if I watched the Circus Circus turn pink. Further, most people, including myself, don’t want to ruin somebody else’s day. Latham, Stout and Wardlaw are nice people, and I wanted them to like me. I wanted to share their experiences. Saying something like, “I think it’s all in your head” is a social-graces equivalent to calling a bride a heifer. If a reporter who is supposed to remain objective and distant felt this social pressure, imagine what close friends must feel. Lastly, people have a hard time accepting chaos. It’s not hard to argue that this urge to impose order on the world, to make sense of our surroundings and find patterns in our environments is the entire point of having a brain. The cotton ghost that followed me and the growly, angry voice are good, if incomplete, examples of the human tendency to create order, whether or not there is any to begin with. My ghost, and in

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Dirty. Real. Grind Mark Maynard, Torrey House Press You know that song from The Music Man, “Wells Fargo Wagon”: “O-ho the Wells Fargo Wagon is a-comin’ down the street/Oh by D. Brian Burghart please let it be for me!”? I don’t bring this up because I know brianb@ anything about musicals (although I know newsreview.com this one from high school), but because it illustrates pretty well the way I feel when I get a book in the mail that proudly declares itself “Uncorrected Proof.” There’s no way of knowing if it contains maple sugar, a cross-cut saw or a court summons, but there’s something about the additional words and numbers that are on the cover of an uncorrected proof, that makes it more exciting. It begs for the book to be judged. (Plus readers get the joy of finding grammatical errors and wondering if they’ll be caught on final edit.) This one, Grind, is a collection of short stories by Mark Maynard, who teaches composition and creative writing at Truckee Meadows Community College. It includes stories about casinos, homeless winners, wild horses, prosti-

tutes, air races, long-haul truck drivers— you know, the stuff that makes Northern Nevada great. Grind is exactly what I like in a locally based book. Lots of stories about the gritty realism in and around Reno. Plenty of those characters who make a visit to the environs of Reno both an exciting potential and an illicit affair. In fact, the way urban and rural cultures collide here is an underpinning of this book. I don’t think Maynard is judging. I think the stories are more existential than that: “That’s just the way things are around he-ah.” I found myself looking for things that cemented the stories into place here, things that couldn’t have been created about another locale and just had the names changed to reflect the place the author landed when he published his first collection. They’re here. This is a Northern Nevada book. Even some of the things I made mental notes to check into—for example, was Reno City Hall really a hotel at some point? I remember

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when the Cal-Neva had offices there, but a hotel?—required a certain knowledge of place. In fact, there were some businesses that had their names changed, and I had to wonder at these decisions. I mean, aren’t we Renoites kind of a built-in market for this book? I always find myself looking for themes when I read books by local authors. It’s a way of trying to connect with the author. From this book’s assemblage of down and out personalities, I’m going to say that Maynard is making the statement: Off-the-wall people deserve sympathy, too. And I like this idea.

Nearly all of my favorite authors have written from this point of view. Some, like Raymond Carver, made it their focus. In fact, now that I’m thinking about it, I see a definite Carver influence in some of this work; “Letdown,” a very short story about a mother who loses a baby to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome comes to mind, and the resemblance is not just theme or topic, although it is more about cadence and rhythm than stylistic choices. I really liked this collection, and I’ve got to add it to my “local must reads” list. I don’t want to make too much of it, but I’ve really noticed an uptick in the quality of locally written fiction in the last year or two. As I look through 2012’s book reviews, I see four works of literature produced by Northern Nevadans (in some cases, former Northern Nevadans) that I think are worthy of note, and maybe even national awards. Mark Maynard is one local author from whom I think we can expect to hear in the future. Ω

Think Free


PHOTO/KRIS VAGNER

Wish you were here

Burners mingle on the playa.

A postcard from Burning Man Dear Reno, I reached Black Rock City at by lunchtime on Aug. 27, the Monday before Kris Vagner Labor Day. The weather was lovely. The mile-wide dust plumes stirred up by a line of arriving vehicles were relatively stationary, blinding our driver only for a few seconds at a time now and then when the wind kicked up. And there wasn’t much anxiety in the air over the conflicts that had thus far marked 2012. In February, a ticket lottery had iniFor more tially left so many long-time Burners information, visit without tickets that the San Francisco Bay www.burningman.com. Guardian was compelled to ask, “Is it the end of Burning Man as we know it?” In August, one event-related lawsuit was settled when a federal jury ruled that the burning of La Contessa, a school-bus sized replica of a Spanish Galleon that had last sailed the playa in 2005, did not constitute arson but rather a rancher legally clearing his property of debris. Another lawsuit opened Aug. 23, when Burning Man sued Pershing County over a proposed ordinance that would raise

permitting fees, ban nudity, and cease to allow children. By the time this news reaches you, reader, if all goes according to plan, crews will have put the finishing touches onto hundreds of huge art installations in this empty desert. Otic Oasis 2.0, an elegant, multi-tiered lookout tower made of curvy, laminated plywood shapes by Culver City, Calif., artist Gregg Fleishman and crew, is held secure by notches, with no screws or nails, and supports dozens of climbers. The Temple of Juno points and swoops into the sky like a sacred building from a guidebook to Thailand or Laos; San Francisco’s David Best and his building team say it’s “the most detailed temple we’ve ever built.” It is, of course, scheduled to have gone up in a glorious blaze by the time this issue hits the stands. Otto Ewan of Oakland, a.k.a. Otto Von Danger, and his team built a row of exaggeratedly large facades of Wall Street Buildings for a project called Burn Wall Street. You having noticed a pattern by now, reader, I will leave its fate for you to surmise.

As of Aug. 30, tickets were listed on Reno and San Francisco Craigslist at the lower end of the retail price range. There was still nudity, and there were still children. The ones I saw were dusty and ecstatic, with orange Gatorade mustaches staining their upper lips. And in place of the incinerated, roving Spanish Galleon was a shipwrecked one, crashed at an angle into a 300-foot-long pier, shooting fire from its mast after dark. I must intervene here, reader, to disclose that my friends built Pier 2, and I helped with a few administrative tasks, which qualifies this mention as a conflict of interest. But alas, as bearer of the eyes

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and ears sent by RN&R to witness the artistic marvels of the desert, I would be remiss to omit this wonder from my tales. Centrally located, tall as a beacon, it appeared to be stealing the show, even according to impartial onlookers. Local artist Matt Schultz of Reno estimated that about 1,000 of them at once crowded its decks Monday night. So, does 2012 truly signify “the end of Burning Man as we know it?” Well, change has been constant ever since the first 20 Burners assembled on Baker Beach in San Francisco in 1986. Many have complained that the event has “sold out” or “gone commercial.” These mean different things to different people, so I can’t give you a conclusive take. I can report that there are still no Pepsi sponsorships, but I did notice for the first time art cars designed around themes that already exist in mass culture, a Flintstones car and a Sponge-Bob-mobile. But for now, there is much fun to be had in this temporary place. Wish you were here, Kris Ω

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Saturday, September 15 10am – 10pm Bertha Miranda’s celebrates its 28th Anniversary & Mexican Independence day!

enjoy bertha’S food & bar SpecialS and live entertainment!

Dinner and a show Wild Horse Saloon and Cabaret 1000 Wild Horse Canyon Drive, Sparks, 343-1003 My friend Jared works for a company that used to have an office out by the brothels east of Reno along Interstate 80. He by K.J. Sullivan told me he used to go to the Wild Horse Saloon for lunch because ksullivan@ there weren’t a lot of options in the newsreview.com area, and the food was really good. Jared is a bit of a lothario, so I figured he was full of shit and used the “location” of his work as a good chance to ogle girls during his lunch hour. PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

Manager Tara Cann and Executive Chef Jeff Probus with the Malibu Chicken Sandwich.

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Come for the girls, stay for the food. Manager Tara Cann and executive chef Jeff Probus invite us to take a gander at the Malibu chicken sandwich.

Wild Horse Saloon and Cabaret’s restaurant is open Sunday through Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Thursday through Saturday, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

I decided to try the place for myself—for work reasons only, of course—and wasn’t surprised when both Jared and another friend, Brett, volunteered to check it out with me. Where’s this enthusiasm when I’m headed to non-bordello restaurants? When we walked in to the large, dimly lit space, we were greeted by a taut young woman in some kind of skimpy zebra dress. The bartender then gave us a rousing greeting and told us to sit wherever, so we took a seat at a back table with wingback chairs and a prime view of the empty pole in the corner of the room. The Wild Horse has a lodge theme, with deer heads and animal

skins on the wall, wood rafters and a large fireplace. The zebra dress fit right in. The space is masculine but comfortable. The menu had typical grill items ranging from omelets to burgers. All the food was reasonably priced. I guess they want you to save your money for other activities. We started with some beers ($5 for draft) and settled in as one of the girls took to the pole. Wow, dinner and a show! For entrées, Jared went with the Buffalo chicken sandwich ($8) and Brett ordered the Malibu chicken sandwich ($9). I went with the carne asada tacos ($11) and was given a choice of “soft or hard,” so I went with hard. I can’t make this stuff up! To be honest, I have no idea how much time passed between our order being placed and served as I was distracted by the dancing women. When the food arrived, I was pleasantly surprised by the way it all looked. The tacos were large and crammed full of carne asada that had a nice spice to it. The tortillas were lightly fried and had a slight crispness to them and the meat was piled with lettuce, tomatoes and onions. The rice and beans were a little dull, though, and lacked any real flavor. Jared’s Buffalo sandwich had a crispy chicken breast coated in a spicy sauce. Piled on top were fresh slices of lettuce, tomato and onion and the sandwich was served with a large portion of crispy fries. Brett’s sandwich was the winner, with layers of ham, Swiss cheese and avocado piled on top of the chicken. Every bite seemed to have a different combination of flavors and the toppings were plentiful. I had to apologize to Jared, which is something I try to never do, as he was right about the food here, though I still think he came for the girls. And speaking of the girls, several ladies danced throughout our meal and chatted with us while we ate. They were all very friendly and never pushy, and we were even given a tour of the entire facility. The whole experience was a lot of fun. I never thought I would say this about a cathouse, but this is definitely a place I would go back to. Ω

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It makes the mistake of positioning LaBeoufâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youngest brother Jack as the primary character, when his older brothers Forrest (Hardy) and Howard (Jason Clarke) are far more compelling. LaBeouf isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily bad in the role; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just that Hardy and Clarke are way better and far more interesting to watch. Whenever the screenplay (written by Nick Cave) turns to Jack, it dulls out. When Forrest takes center stage, things light up. As Charlie Rakes, a lawman sent from Chicago to Virginia to mess with bootleggers, Pearce goes the cartoon villain route. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun to watch at times, but much like Michael Shannon in the recent Premium Rush, the nutty, overblown performance seems out of

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place (Trivia note: Shannon was originally cast in the production but left it after financial problems caused it to stall). Pearce is appropriately nasty at times, but clownish in others. There were moments where I was reminded of Joe Piscopoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Danny Vermin from Johnny Dangerously (â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mother kicked me in the balls once â&#x20AC;Ś once!â&#x20AC;?). Yeah, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an obscure reference, but an accurate one, nonetheless. The Pearce performance also reminded me of Gary Oldmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s villainous, outlandish, and far superior scene chewing in The Professional and, wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you know it, Oldman shows up here as the gun-toting Floyd Banner. I liked Oldmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s villain more than the Pearce one but, like Hardy taking a back seat to LaBeouf, Oldmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s baddie gets less attention. Hardy is perhaps the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best ingredient as the big brother who refuses to play ball with dirty lawmen and refuses to die no matter what they throw at him. As I mentioned earlier this summer, Hardyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance in The Dark Knight Rises as Bane left me underwhelmed, but that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really his fault (I blame the sound man!). Here, he is without a mask and allowed to act his ass off. He does so quite nicely. The movie does actually have a couple of high profile actresses in it, basically acting out roles that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t contribute much to the story. Jessica Chastain plays Maggie, the girl with the mysterious background who takes a job waiting tables and fancies Forrest. I love Chastain in almost anything she does, but she is given nothing memorable to do here unless you count a more than surprising nude scene. I repeat â&#x20AC;Ś Jessica Chastain is partially nude in this movie. Mia Wasikowska fares a little better as Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love interest, a religious manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter who likes the bad boys. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lift to her performance here that has been missing from some of her other recent roles, most notably her droll turn in Alice in Wonderland. LaBeouf just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit in this time out. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a drawl that sounds like he watched too many Larry the Cable Guy movies before the cameras started rolling, and his big dramatic moments feel far from effortless. He has enough decent screen minutes to warrant a supporting performance, but not enough to make him the movieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus. So, when I tally up this year, Lawless will be far away from my yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worst list. But it will rank high on my list of greatest disappointments. So much for that late summer cinematic booster shot. â&#x201E;Ś


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The Campaign

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Celeste & Jesse Forever

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The Dark Knight Rises

When Universal decided to forge ahead with the Bourne franchise after Matt Damon, a.k.a. Jason Bourne, decided to call it quits, they were most assuredly looking for a glorious changing of the guard—something akin to when Daniel Craig took over for Pierce Brosnan as 007. What they get with The Bourne Legacy is something closer to the vibe when Roberto Benigni replaced Peter Sellers in the Pink Panther franchise. Jeremy Renner taking over for Damon in this franchise feels like the underwhelming switcheroo that occurred when Andrew Garfield took over for Tobey Maguire as Spider-Man. Renner, like Garfield, is a good actor. But he doesn’t command a movie like Damon can, no matter how good The Hurt Locker was. Renner isn’t nearly as good as Damon as the Bourne centerpiece. The plot feels like a poor, scrapped together excuse for keeping a franchise alive longer that it should be.

Dax Shepard writes, co-directs and stars as Yul Perkins, a.k.a Charles Bronson, a former getaway driver in the witness protection program who risks his life to get his girlfriend (Shepard’s real-life main squeeze, Kristen Bell) to a job interview on time. Along the way, he is chased by a friendly but clumsy US Marshal (Tom Arnold) and a former crime partner (Bradley Cooper), who isn’t happy and wants to shoot him. The best thing about the movie is the sarcastic, playful rapport between Bell and Shepard, who make for a great screen couple. Some of the scenes where Bell’s character interrogates Shepard as they drive are real winners. As for the driving, there are some well-filmed chases in the movie, making it OK as far as action flicks go. Arnold and Cooper are both funny in their supporting roles. Cooper’s scene involving his character’s treatment in prison has to qualify as the year’s most awkward scene.

ParaNorman

4

Here’s a stop-animation movie that isn’t afraid to be creepy for the kids. Norman (voice of Kodi Smit-McPhee) can see dead people and has premonitions, for which he gets picked on at school and yelled at by his parents. As it turns out, he’s the only one who can save the town from a curse involving zombies and witches. Directors Chris Butler and Sam Fell have put together a great-looking movie. And Butler’s script actually pushes the limit of the PG rating to the point where adults might be surprised by what they have taken their kids to see. As for this being too scary for kids, let me tell you that the kids were screaming with delight at my screening. They love this stuff. Also features the voices of John Goodman, Leslie Mann, Casey Affleck and Christopher Mintz-Plasse. One of the year’s best animated films.

Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg play the title characters, a married couple going through a divorce but trying to stay friends. They are trying to stay friends so much that they hang out with each other all of the time and still live in the same house, much to the chagrin of friends and coworkers. Jones co-wrote the screenplay with Will McCormack (who also plays a supporting role), and the movie has a fresh feel to it. Jones goes all out with her performance. She’s funny, but also awkward and nasty when her script asks her to be. Samberg does his best screen work yet as the confused artist type who likes to dig deep holes for himself and then go surfing. It’s nothing altogether groundbreaking, but different enough to make it a relatively unique romantic comedy experience.

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Premium Rush

Yeah, it’s another bike messenger movie. Not learning anything from Kevin Bacon’s blunder starring in Quicksilver, Joseph GordonLevitt wastes his time as Wilee, a failed lawyer turned bike messenger who likes speed so much he has no brakes. When he gets a mysterious parcel, he must race through the streets of Manhattan avoiding an overacting villain (Michael Shannon, in a rare less-than-great performance). As cool as some of the sequences are, they are servicing a plot that goes nowhere and feels derivative. The movie actually plays like an unofficial remake of Quicksilver, which also featured an upwardly mobile young man taking to the streets on his bike because it makes him feel better than wearing a suit all day. There are many moments of bike riders recklessly dodging cars, running red lights, and generally causing street mayhem. At one point, Shannon’s character tells Wilee’s that everybody in New York hates him and could care less about him. There are no truer words spoken by a character in Premium Rush.

Director Christopher Nolan wraps up his Batman trilogy with a rousing, though occasionally clunky, conclusion. Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) has retired Batman, and is living a reclusive life in his mansion when Gotham is besieged by the masked revolutionary Bane (Tom Hardy). Batman is eventually forced out of retirement, and meets his physical match in Bane while also facing off against a crafty cat burglar (Anne Hathaway as Selina Kyle, never referred to as Catwoman in the film but obviously playing that part). Hardy makes Bane a great physical adversary, but his performance is marred by a terrible voice dub that makes him sound cartoonish and out of place. Hathaway has a lot of good fun in her role, as does Gary Oldman returning as Jim Gordon. The movie has a lot of good action, and Bale has never been better as Batman. It’s not as good as the previous chapters in the trilogy, but it’s still very good and a fitting conclusion to a great story.

Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

3

Hit and Run

Here’s a sequel that learns a lot from the mistakes of the first installment, while capitalizing on the ideas that should’ve made the first installment good fun. It gathers up a bunch of old goons, gives them big guns, and tells them to shoot things. And, this time out, they do it better and with much aplomb. It’s obvious before the opening title credit, in a sequence where many a man is shredded via gunfire from aging American action superstars, that Stallone and friends are going to get things right and deliver the crazy-gory goods. Much of the credit must go to newly anointed Simon West, who replaces Stallone in the director’s chair. West made the ridiculously enjoyable Con Air, which combined stellar action with funny, dumb dialogue to much success. Unlike Stallone’s effort with the first movie, Expendables 2 gets real laughs, rather than groans, from its boneheaded dialogue.

While this falls into the category of weaker Will Ferrell comedies, it’s still funnier than most of the stuff thrown out there with the intent of making us laugh. Ferrell stars as a congressman running for reelection who is surprised by the candidacy of an unknown candidate looking to unseat him (Zach Galifianakis). Ferrell is basically doing a riff on his Ron Burgundy character, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. He has a few shining moments, including a profane phone message left for the wrong person and a classic baby punching incident. Galifianakis is funny, but his character’s two dogs, heavy breathing pugs, are funnier. This one is front-loaded, with most of the funny stuff happening in the first half. While it misses out on the opportunity to really skewer the American election process, it does have some good giggles involving refrigerator sex and petting zoos, so it’s got that going for it.

Reno

3

The Expendables 2

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

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Gift certificates make great gifts! Visit www.newsreview.com

2

The Bourne Legacy

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Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe

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ine u n e G

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1960 N. Sierra • 323.2251 (located between The Car Wash & 7-11) Book online at amethystsalonreno.com

Need a computer for school? Can’t afford a new one?

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WE DON'T! the Take a break from our traffic & stop by Kietzke Lane store. Our new MidTown ! store is open, too

822 S. Virginia

Think Free 22   |   RN&R   |   SEPtEmbEr 6, 2012


Under cover Precariously Stacked There’s an art and a skill to the cover song. First, a band must choose a song it likes well enough to explore, to live by Brad Bynum inside, and hopefully to discover something new within, something bradb@ for the band to bring out of the song, newsreview.com a new angle from which to see an old song. PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

The title track of The Strokes’ 2001 album Is This It is the rare new millennium song that has become something of a standard because it has been covered so often by so many different bands with so many different approaches. Royal City’s forlorn, banjo-led version comes recommended. There’s something about its open-ended melody that lends itself readily to reinterpretation. Reno rock band Precariously Stacked’s version highlights the For more information, reggae inherent though subliminal in visit www.facebook.com/ the original’s bouncy bass and synPrecariouslyStacked. copated guitar parts. “That reggae thing was already there,” says bassist Gabe Sheehy. “We just brought that to the forefront.” He sings the song slowly and deliberately, though less lazily than Julian Casablancas’ sleepy-eyed approach. In the early days of rock ’n’ roll, large portions of bands’ sets were covers—even big bands like the Stones and the Beatles. At some point, probably around the advent of punk rock, the well-chosen, interesting cover became uncool, and many contemporary bands only play original tunes. Precariously Stacked are agreeable throwbacks in the sense that 50 percent or more of their material is covers. Guitarist Jake Mausling, drummer Luke Fuller and bassist Gabe Sheehy make up Precariously Stacked.

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“We choose songs we like and want to play,” says drummer Luke Fuller. “People want to hear songs they know.” The band’s cover repertoire includes some classic rock, like Jimi Hendrix, as well as current stuff, like Cage the Elephant, and a lot of ’90s material, like Blur’s “Song 2.” The band members have the attitude that musicians should learn to play their instruments first, then learn songs they like, then develop their own approach to those songs, then start to write their own songs, and then only perform those songs in front of an audience once the songwriting is solid. (Their first show was almost all covers.) It’s a refreshing, if thoroughly unpunk, attitude. One original is “Offbeat,” a hooky power pop song written and sung by guitarist Jake Mausling. He and Sheehy divide vocals duties about equally. Mausling’s guitar playing sometimes sounds like the poppier side of Kurt Cobain, and sometimes has a more spacious, reggae-influenced quality. Sheehy’s slippery, jazz-trained style evokes the John Entwistle Rule: A rock band needs only one guitar player if the bassist is willing to get busy. In songs like their cover of Cake’s “Love You Madly,” Fuller holds down the groove and throws in some tricky fills. The band takes its adverb-laden name from its practice space in Mausling’s mother’s home in suburban Reno. It’s a former playroom, with old stacks of VHS tapes, board games and other familiar miscellanea, the walls now also adorned with Sex Pistols, Nirvana and Bob Marley posters. The band members are all still in their late teens, but talented and educated, so it’ll be interesting to see how this band develops. “Most of it’s about girls,” says Mausling about his lyrics. “It’s either a love song or a hate song. But I try to make it cryptic.” Sheehy says most of his songs are autobiographical. “I can only write about how I feel,” he says. “I can’t really know how anyone else feels. … It’s the same with the covers. I can’t know how Julian Casablancas felt when he wrote something, I only know how I feel when I’m singing it.” Ω

IN ROTATION

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THURSDAY 9/6 3RD STREET

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

FRIDAY 9/7

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

THE ALLEY

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

MiaKoda, 8pm, no cover

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-0806

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB

Against Me!

188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

Sept. 10, 7:30 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks 358-8891

THE BLACK TANGERINE

Bike Night Blues Jam w/live music, 7pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Ladies Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 for women

Comedy

COMMA COFFEE

Open Mic Night, 7:30pm, no cover

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Rocky Whatule, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; RC Smith, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Joel Lindley, Avi Liberman, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Charles Fleischer, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Ladies of Laughter w/Carla Rea, F, 9:30pm, Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

COMMROW

1) RAW: Natural Born Artists presents Ensemble, 8pm, $11 advance, $16.50 day of show

SUNDAY 9/9

VooDoo Dawgs, 9:30pm, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

CLUB BASS

535 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-1774

SATURDAY 9/8

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/10-9/12 DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm Tu, no cover Jazz Night, 7:30pm Tu, no cover Against Me!, Andrew Jackson Jihad, Joyce Manor, The Wild, 7:30pm M, $15, $17

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm Tu, no cover

College Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 with college ID Large Bills Accepted, noon M, no cover

2) DJ Double B, DJ Luciano, 10pm, no cover

1) Future of Forestry, Into The Pacific, Zimmerman, 8pm, $10-$20; 2) DJ Double B, DJ Luciano, 10pm, no cover

1) VooDooDogz, 6pm Tu, no cover 2) Blues Jam Wednesdays, 7pm W, no cover

Hard rock ‘n’ roll, 9:30pm, free

Country Rock, 9:30pm

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover; Open mic, 9pm W, no cover

Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Alex, 9pm, no cover

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Doug, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm M, no cover; Karaoke with Alex, 9pm Tu, no cover

ELBOW ROOM BAR

2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-9799

FRESH KETCH

New World Jazz Project, 7pm, no cover

FUEGO

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Last to Leave, Cotton Tails, Deadly Gallows, 7pm, TBA

2435 Venice Dr., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 541-5683 170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Mac Demarco, Royal Noble, Surf Curse, 8:30 pm, TBA, Mo

IF IT WERE ANY FRESHER, you’d smell like 12 12 the boat 12

0

12

12

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’12

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1555 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV

www.Rapscallion.com

775-323-1211 • 1-877-932-3700 Open Monday - Friday at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm Sunday Brunch from 10am to 2pm

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THURSDAY 9/6

FRIDAY 9/7

SATURDAY 9/8

SUNDAY 9/9

JAVA JUNGLE

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/10-9/12

Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm M, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

1) Serpent and Seraph, Soultorn, Dedvolt, Restrayned, 8pm, $6; 2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Rehab, Moonshine Bandits, 8pm, $13-$25

2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

Boggan

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL 405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm W, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Dale Poune, 7pm, no cover

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm W, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke Idol singing competition, 9pm, $10 contest entry fee

POLO LOUNGE

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Sept. 6, 11:30 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm W, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

RED ROCK BAR

Thursday Jam Session, 9pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468 1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm Tu, no cover; Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Spontaneous Combustion, 8:30pm M; Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pmTu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

SIERRA GOLD

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

680 S. Meadows Pkwy., (775) 850-1112

B-52s

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Bluegrass w/Strange on the Range, 7pm M, no cover; Tuesday Night Trivia, Tu

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-6460

Interzone 2nd anniversary w/DJs Endif, TV1, Skarkrow, Hyperkarma, 9pm, $3

Skarkrow, Hyperkarma, 9pm, $3

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Crush, Ruby Jaye, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

3940 Mayberry Drive, (775) 787-3307

Local Band Listening Party, 9pm M, Dark Tuesdays, 9pm Tu, DJ Ahn, 9pm W

Sept. 8, 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Hwy. 50, Stateline (775) 588-6611

Custom Tattooing :: Body Piercing Clothing walk-ins welcome 11am-10pm 7 days a week

(775)786-3865

www.evolutiontattooreno.com

A RENO tRAdItION fOR 40 YEARS!

pINkY pOLANSkI!

saturday 9pm • no cover! visit our NEw wEBSItE THESE DON’T MIX THESE DON’T MIX www.RyansSaloon.com subscribe to our mailing list! Think you know your limits? Think again. estdon’t drive. Period. If youB drink, 924 S. Wells Ave. ers

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

OPINION

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Burg o in Ren

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Reno 323-4142

& BROILER

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THURSDAY 9/6

FRIDAY 9/7

SATURDAY 9/8

SUNDAY 9/9

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 4pm, no cover; 2) Decoy, 10pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 4pm, no cover; 2) Decoy, 10pm, no cover

2) Decoy, 8pm, no cover

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

2) Under the Radar, 7pm, no cover

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

Erin McKinney Band Sept. 6, 7 and 8, 9 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. 789-2000

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 8pm, $19.95+; 3) Skyy High Fridays w/Roni Romance, DJ Dragon, 9pm, $10; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm and 9:30pm, $19.95+; 3) Addiction Saturdays w/Roni Romance,(((xm fredie))), Jessica the Ripper, 9pm, $10; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

4) Erin McKinney Band, 9pm, no cover

4) Erin McKinney Band, 9pm, no cover

4) Erin McKinney Band, 9pm, no cover; 7) Pretty Lights, 7pm, $30, $75

3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) B-52s, 7:30pm, $71.50; 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30; 2) Live local bands, 10pm, no cover; 3) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30; 2) Live local bands, 10pm, no cover; 3) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion 15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

Karaoke

HARRAH’S RENO

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Persuasion, 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 9pm, $25, $30 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center 18 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 427-8397 1) Cabaret 2) Tahoe Live 3) The Improv 4) Outdoor Arena 5) Cabo Wabo Cantina Lounge

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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1) Jersey Nights, 7pm Tu, W, $19.95+; 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm M, no cover; 2) DJ Chris English, 10pm Tu, no cover; 3) Spindustry Wednesdays w/Roni Romance,(xm fredie), 9pm W, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

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2) George Pickard, 6pm M, Tu, W, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

26

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/10-9/12

5) DJ Chris English, 10pm, no cover

5) Cash Only, 9:30pm M, no cover; 5) DJ JBIRD, 9:30pm Tu, no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

4) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 10pm, $20 7pm, $10 after 8pm ; 4) DJ Chris English,

4) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

SEPTEMBER 6, 2012

2) DJ I, no cover; Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

3) Live music, 5pm, no cover

3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover


Sep 7-9, 53rdAnnual 2012 Race Times Fri & Sat: 1PM M

Camel Races

(Camel Parade at Noon Sat)

Sunday:12PM y:12PM 12PM M Tickets kets ke ts Adults ~ $12 $1 Seniors 62+, Military,, Kids (5-12) ~ $8 Family Pack ~ $30

VIP Tickets

$40

(Includes VIP Tent, t, BBQ Buffet, and one drink)

Tickets & Info

VCCamelRaces.com

(775) 847-7500

Charge By Phone

(888) 695-0888

Family Fun for Everyone! Live music, camel rides, ostrich races, Living Legends, vendors!

Produced by OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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For Thursday, September 6 to Wednesday, September 12 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

Meadows, competitions such as Balloon Blackjack and the early morning Glow Show and Dawn Patrol events on Saturday and Sunday, which start at at 5am and 5:30am. Mass ascension begins at 6:45am Friday-Sunday. F, 9/7; Sa, 9/8; Su, 9/9. Free. Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 826-1181, www.renoballoon.com.

Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

GREAT YERINGTON YARD SALE: Eighty-five to 100 locations across the MasonYerington area will hold yard sales, including rummage bazaars in all the church parking lots. Check website for listing of yard sales and link to maps. Sa, 9/8, 7am-2pm. Free admission. Downtown Yerington, 100 Main St., (775) 463-3699, www.greatyeringtonyardsale.com.

Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., Sept. 19, is Thursday, Sept. 12.

INTERNATIONAL CAMEL RACES: The 53rd annual races feature international jockeys racing camels, ostriches and emus. The event combines an annual entertainment tradition with Gold Rush-era nostalgia. The Camel Parade heads down C Street in downtown Virginia City at noon on Sept. 8. F, 9/7, 1pm; Sa, 9/8, 1pm; Su, 9/9, noon. $12 adults; $8 seniors, active duty military, kids ages 5-12; free for kids age 4 and younger. Silverland Inn & Suites, 100 E St., Virginia City, (775) 846-1130, www.nvshows.com.

Events 2012 TAHOE EXPO: This geotourism showcase is a collection of fun, educational, and sustainable adventures at Lake Tahoe, as well as Truckee, Reno and Pyramid Lake. The weekend event offers guided Adventure Tracks ranging from wild mustang and bear photo safaris to boat tours of Lake Tahoe’s underwater world. Most of the Adventure Tracks will take place on Sept. 8. On Sept. 9, visitors can tour a “green makeover” of a local residence or check out the 10th annual Tour de Tahoe in which more than 2,500 cyclists will bike around all 72 miles of Lake Tahoe starting from the south shore of the lake. Sa, 9/8; Su, 9/9. Prices vary. Call or visit website for details, www.tahoeexpo.com.

LITERARY RENO WALKING TOUR: Travel downtown streets encountered by traditional writers like Will James. Robert Laxalt and Joanne Delongchamps, then walk the haunts of contemporary writers such as Bernie Schopen, Willy Vlautin and Susan Palwick. Reservations required. Sa, 9/8, 10am-noon. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. Riverside Artist Lofts, 17 S. Virginia St., (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

GREAT BASIN THURSDAY NIGHT FARMERS MARKET: This farmers’ market celebrates the late-season Nevada harvests featuring produce from local Nevada farms. The market will be held every Thursday in September on the plaza next to the Great Basin Brewing Company. Th, 4:30-7:30pm through 9/27. Opens 9/6. Free. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 351-2551, http://greatbasinbrewingco.com.

LIVE SKYTONIGHT TALK: Learn about the nighttime sky during this informal presentation with the aid of state-ofthe-art digital technology, followed by telescope viewing (weather permitting) at Rancho San Rafael Park. First F of every month, 6pm. $6 adults; $4 children, seniors. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812, http://planetarium.unr.edu.

THE GREAT RENO BALLOON RACE: Some of the nation’s top hot air balloonists participate in multiple competitions during the 31st annual race. Highlights include the mass ascension of more than 100 balloons over the Truckee

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AIR RACES: The 49th annual air races and air show features five days of racing action with six classes of aircraft, as well as static displays of aircraft, aerial acrobatic performs and military aircraft demonstrations. W, 9/12,

8am-4:30pm; Th, 9/13, 8am-4:30pm; F, 9/14, 8am-4:30pm; Sa, 9/15, 8am-4:30pm; Su, 9/16, 8am-4:30pm. $5-$80; free admission for children age 7 and younger with paid adult admission. Reno Stead Airport, 4895 Texas Ave., Stead, (775) 972-6663, http://airrace.org.

PAINT AND SIP: Suellen Johnson guides you in transforming a David Hockney painting into your own 16x 20 acrylic masterpiece. This class is open to all levels. Art supplies are included. Bring your own wine/beverage and snacks. Register online or call. Tu, 9/11, 5:308:30pm. $30 for three hours. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion, 250 Court St., (775) 826-6100 ext. 3, www.vsanevada.org.

PRESERVING YOUR HARVEST: Urban farmer Craig Frezzette discusses the many ways to preserve the bounty from your garden and shares a few tips for extending the growing season. Seating is limited to 60 and is first come, first served Sa, 9/8, 10am. Free. Moana Nursery Landscape & Design Center, 1190 W. Moana Lane, (775) 825-0600.

RENO FOOD TRUCK FRIDAYS: Reno Food Truck Fridays is a gathering of the areas mobile food vendors and features live music and family activities. Reno Food Truck Fridays will be held on the First Friday of the month from April through October. First F of every month, 5-9pm through 10/5. Free. Former RTC Citicenter, https://www.facebook.com/ RenoFoodTruckFridays.

UNR VALLEY ROAD FIELD DAY: Tour the University of Nevada, Reno Greenhouse Complex, experimental wine vineyard and bio-fuels production facilities. Students and faculty will present their research and answer questions. The High Desert Farming Initiative will have representatives present to discuss techniques that extend the growing season in Northern Nevada. Children are also welcome with a hands-on science area, hay rides and souvenir shingle branding. Sa, 9/8, 9am2pm. Free with registration. University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-1660, www.cabnr.unr.edu/fieldday.

All ages BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children.

Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

KIDS CERAMICS CLASS (AFTER SCHOOL): This is a hand-building class to familiarize kids with the studio and clay. Kids 7- 13 years old will learn and use techniques with clay that explore texture, shape and structure. All materials, firings, clay are included. W, 9/12, 3:30-5:30pm; W, 9/19, 3:305:30pm; W, 9/26, 3:30-5:30pm. $120 for four classes. The Wedge Ceramics Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

TAHOE STAR TOURS TRIBUTE TO CARL SAGAN: Join star guide and poet Tony Berendsen for a unique and educational night under the stars. F, 9/7, 8-10:30pm; Sa, 9/8, 8-10:30pm. $30 adults; $15 children age 12 and younger. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784, www.northstarcalifornia.com.

MATHEWSON-IGT KNOWLEDGE CENTER: Far Out:

Oh … my … god. How am I supposed to decide? One event? The best event of the week? The best event we have a clip photo for? Can’t do it. In Northern Nevada, there are two events that can’t be missed on the weekend of Sept.7-9. The first, the Great Reno Balloon Race takes place at Rancho San Rafael. It’s the balloon event’s 31st year, and it’s really the only place it’s considered socially acceptable to be hammered on champagne at dawn. The second event, which takes place in Virginia City, is the International Camel Races, which is in its 53rd year. It’s really the only place it’s considered socially acceptable to hump a quadruped. The only thing that could be better than seeing these events individually would be to see them combined. And the only thing that would be better than that would be to see them combined with the National Championship Air Races—talk about carnage. More information about the balloon races can be found at www.renoballoon.com, and more information about the camel races can be found at www.visitvirginiacitynv.com. More information about the air races can be found at www.rgj.com/section/news53.

TRUCKEE MEADOWS COMMUNITY COLLEGE: RECON|STRUCTURE|NATURE. Five exhibitions will showcase the explorations of our natural world. The TMCC Main Art Gallery will feature fabrics, paintings and sculptural vessels by Tuscarora, Nev., artists Ben Parks and Marti Bein. The Red Mountain Gallery will feature watercolors and prints by Reno artists Carol Neel and Penny Pemberton. The Erik Lauritzen Gallery will feature printmaking and watercolors by Reno artist Lynn Schmidt. The Red Mountain Student Gallery will feature drawings by TMCC student William Johnson. The Meadowood Center will feature artwork by TMCC students relating to the theme of nature. M-F, 9am-9pm through 9/7. Free. Contact Andrea Parks (775) 673-7291, vparts@tmcc.edu, www.tmcc.edu/vparts/artgalleries for details on this exhibit. 7000 Dandini Blvd., (775) 673-7000, www.tmcc.edu.

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM, RANCHO SAN RAFAEL REGIONAL PARK: Sierra Watercolor

Art

Two big to fail

includes glass, ceramics, wood, canvas, found objects and paint swatches. There will be an artist reception on Friday, Sept. 14, 5-7pm. M, W-Su through 10/1. Free. 380 North Lake Blvd., Art Gallery & Gift Shop, Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

The University Art Scene from 1960-1975. The Special Collections department at the University of Nevada, Reno presents this sequel to the acclaimed 2011 exhibit PostWar Bohemians in Northern Nevada. Far Out will highlight the next generation of leading edge visual artists at the university during the 60s and 70s. M-Sa, 9am-5pm through 9/9. Free. Contact Special Collections Department (775) 682-5665, specoll@unr.edu, http://knowledgecenter.unr.edu/ materials/specoll for details on this exhibit. 1664 N. Virginia St. University of Nevada, Reno, (775) 784-4636, http://knowledgecenter.unr.edu.

NEVER ENDER: 4 DECAYDES, 40 Years of Ron Rash, an Art Reception. Th, 9/6, 6pm. Contact Melanie Crane (775) 348-9440, neverenderreno@yahoo.com for details on this exhibit. 119 Thoma St., (775) 348-9440, http://myneverender.com.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Nature’s Colors in Fiber and Glass Exten, North Tahoe Arts presents a collaborative exhibit featuring sister artists Catherine and Linda Strand. Catherine’s fused glass and Linda’s fiber-based wall hangings are distinctive yet complementary media celebrating color and design with nature themes. M, W-Su, 11am-5pm through 10/1. Free. Bits & Pieces: A Sculpture & Mosaic Exploration, North Tahoe Arts features five sculpture and mosaic artists whose body of work

Society Exhibit & Sale. The SWS Exhibit & Sale, in conjunction with the Reno Balloon Races, features watercolor paintings by local artists, as well as a silent auction to benefit the Art Angels program, which provides free watercolor instruction and supplies to Washoe County School District elementary schools without art. This exhibit will be judged by renowned California artist Dale Laitinen. Visitors can vote for their favorite painting. F, 9/7, 7am3pm; Sa, 9/8, 7am-3pm; Su, 9/9, 7am-1pm. Free. Contact Nancy Podewils (775) 3438100, podewils@pyramid.net, www.sierrawatercolorsociety.com for details on this exhibit. 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

Call for Artists OCTOBER PHOTOGRAPHY CALL EXTENDED: North Tahoe Arts will showcase photography of the fall season. This exhibit will feature original photography that invokes warmth, the tastes and hungers of the harvest season. Extended deadline for application is Sept. 14. M-Su through 9/14. North Tahoe Arts Center, 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

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— D. Brian Burghart OPINION

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TEAPOTS & TEAS CALL EXTENDED: The call includes original work: an actual teapot in form and function, cups maybe or a collage, painting, fabric art and accessories that go with the custom. All mediums welcome. Extended deadline for application is Sept. 14. Applications available online. M-Su, 11am-5pm through 9/14. North Tahoe Arts Center, 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Arthur and Lucia Mathews: Highlights of the California Decorative Style, Tu-Su through 10/14. $1-$10. Southwest Pottery from Anasazi to Zuni: Selections from the Brenda and John Blom Collection, W-Su through 9/9. $1-$10. Jorinde Voigt: Systematic Notations, W-Su through

1/6. 1-$10. Ice Music, W-Su through 10/28. $1$10. Juvenile-In-Justice: Photographs by Richard Ross, W-Su through 1/13. $1-$10. Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-Su through 1/1. $1-$10. Tim Hawkinson: Totem, W-Su through 10/7. Edward Burtynsky: Oil, W-Su through 9/23. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

Film SUMMER WITH MONICA: Artemisia Moviehouse presents a screening of Ingmar Bergman’s sensual and ultimately ravaging tale of young love. Tu, 9/11, 7-10pm. $7 general; $5 members, bicyclists, students. Midtown Good Luck Macbeth, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM: A Salute to Our Military, This exhibit commemorates the nation’s battles from the Civil War to the Global War on Terrorism. The show includes photos, weapons, artifacts, models and uniforms donated by more than 30 local veterans and their families. Tu-Su through 11/17. $5 adults; free for children under age 12, museum members, active duty military. 814 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 355-1144, www.sparksmuseum.org.

Music 9/11 MEMORIAL SERIES: TOCCATA—Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus wraps up its summer season with a series that commemorates the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 tragedy. The series features violinist Elizabeth Pitcairn performing Brahms’ Violin Concerto on the Red Stradivarius Violin and features the TOCCATA Chorus in Brahms’ German Requiem. W, 9/12, 7pm. $5-$40; free

Catfight club My boyfriend of two years is best friends with his ex. During their 14-year relationship, he says they had a codependency, becoming each other’s social world. They were still roommates when we started dating, and she refused to even let me into their house. He says he’d like us to become casual friends and includes us both in events like a recent hike. On it, I tried to be friendly, but she ignored me. Afterward, I told him it was awkward spending the day with someone who has issues with me. He became angry, saying it was more difficult for her. She seems to require a level of emotional support that I don’t. He’ll go to events and not invite me because she’ll be there. I’m positive they’re done romantically, but he’s abnormally protective of her, always defending her feelings over mine. When I try to discuss this, he blows up. Our relationship is otherwise good and loving. When two become as three, it isn’t so much a relationship as the beginning of a parade. Assuming you aren’t members of a polygamous religious cult or regular guests at parties where everyone throws their keys into a big bowl, a relationship is generally understood to mean two people prioritizing each other over all others. If one of these people wants more creative terms, he needs to arrange for them by mutual agreement and not just stick them on his girlfriend and hope she doesn’t notice, or at least doesn’t complain. In favoring the ex-girlfriend with the perpetually broken wing, your boyfriend isn’t just being unfair to you. He’s creating what therapist B. Janet Hibbs, Ph.D., calls “a chronic climate of unfairness.” Hibbs feels fairness violations are at the root of most rela30

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tionship problems, noting in Try To See It My Way that you can’t trust your partner if you don’t expect to be fairly treated. Unfairnesses left unrepaired leads partners to “withhold care, love, affection and finally, themselves.” Your boyfriend talks like he wants you girls to sit around braiding each other’s hair—yet foments conflict by making clear that you come second to a woman who treated you like a poo-covered dog she didn’t want in her house. His being so codependently cozy with his needy ex is less risky than being interdependent with you. So, of course he blows up when you broach the subject. Write him a note explaining that you two need to talk in a calm way about something that’s bothering you. It’s impossible to have a relationship with somebody who goes all sixth-grade science project volcano whenever there’s a discussion he’d rather not have. Tell him that you understand his friendship with his ex means a lot to him, but that you find it painful to always come second. If he wants to remain your boyfriend, he needs to get his loyalties in order and treat you more like his girlfriend than some woman in line behind him at 7-Eleven. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


5pm-midnight through 12/31. Free. Comic

speakers who want to improve their speaking skills. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that involve everyday activities. W, 4:30-6pm. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 829-7323.

Kingdom, 595 E. Moana Lane, (775) 827-2928, www.facebook.com/renocomickingdom.

BREAST CANCER ON WITH LIFE: This support group provides a highly educational approach to looking at breast cancer. The latest research is discussed, along with alternative therapies, side effects of chemotherapy, reconstruction and community services. The group meets on Tuesdays at Saint Mary’s Center for Health’s Radiation Oncology Department. Tu, 4:30-6pm. Free. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave. Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org/ inthenews/195174.

HEARTSAVER CPR AED: The Heartsaver AED Course teaches one-rescuer CPR, Automated External Defibrillator use and relief of choking in adults, children and infants. The use of barrier devices for all ages will also be covered. W,

9/12, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 9/29, 9am-1pm; W, 10/10, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 10/27, 9am-1pm; W, 11/14, 5:309:30pm; Sa, 11/17, 9am-1pm; W, 12/12, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 12/15, 9am-1pm. $45. REMSA Education &

Training Center, 230 S. Rock Blvd. Ste. 23, (775) 858-5700, www.remsaeducation.com.

BRIDGEWIRE MAKERSPACE OPEN SPACE NIGHT: Learn about this member-funded, non-profit makerspace, hackerspace workshop. Th, 6-9pm through 12/27. Bridgewire, 1055 Industrial Way Ste. 20, Sparks, (775) 219-7987, http://renobridgewire.org.

HEARTSAVER FIRST AID AND CPR: The Heartsaver First Aid Course teaches how to manage illness and injuries in the first few minutes until professional help arrives. CPR and AED, and environmental emergencies will also be covered in this course. Sa, 9/8, 9am-3pm; Sa,

FRIDAY NIGHT BALLROOM DANCING: Every Friday night The Senior Dance Club of Nevada presents ballroom dancing featuring live music by the Ninth Street Band. Singles and beginners are welcome. F, 8-10:30pm. $7 members; $9 non-members. Washoe County Senior Center, 1155 E. Ninth St., (775) 828-1993, www.lreidenbaugh@washoecounty.us.

9/22, 9am-3pm; Sa, 10/6, 9am-3pm; Sa, 10/20, 9am-3pm; Sa, 11/10, 9am-3pm; Sa, 12/8, 9am3pm. $65. REMSA Education & Training niques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

for youth age 19 and younger. St. Theresa Catholic Church, 1041 Lyons Ave., South Lake Tahoe, (775) 313-9697, www.laketahoeshakespeare.com/tickets.

BRAP: RENO NOISE NIGHT: Realtime experimental

BASIC MAT PILATES: This mat class focuses on

sound performances by Endif, Chopstick, Audity and Oh Gnosis. Sa, 9/8, 8-10pm. $3. Reno Art Works, 1995 Dickerson Road, (775) 225-7295, www.renoartworks.org.

three Pilates principles for the seven exercise in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/25. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St. Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

CARSON CITY MUSIC CLUB: This is a forum for musicians and music lovers to gather and share their love of music. The club offers opportunities to perform individually and to participate in collaborative events and expand musical knowledge. Second M of every month, 7pm. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 882-9517, http://breweryarts.org.

PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/27. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St. Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

CLASSIX ONE: Reno Philharmonic announces its 2012-2013 Classix (formerly MasterClassics) season. The first concert of the season features guest pianist William Wolfram. The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra will perform selections from Michael Gandolfi’s The Garden of Cosmic Speculation, Sergey Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor, op. 18 and selections from Suites 1 and 2 of Sergey Prokofiev’s Romeno and Juilet. Su, 9/9, 4pm; Tu, 9/11, 7:30pm. Call for info. Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 323-6393, www.renophil.com.

SCHEELS BIKING CLUB: Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Rides will vary from 20-30 miles. Participants will need to sign a liability form when they attend. Helmets are required. The rides depart from the southeast corner of the parking lot by Best Buy. Th, 5:45pm through 9/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

GLENN LITTLE TRIO: Glenn Little, formerly of the

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB: Runners

Reno Municipal Band, and fellow musicians Gene Albright and Harry Stover perform Dixieland tunes and music from the ‘30s and ‘40s. The Lake Mansion is will be open for tours from 11am-2pm. F, 9/7, 12-1pm; F, 9/14, 12-1pm; F, 9/21, 12-1pm. Free. VSA Nevada at Lake Mansion, 250 Court St., (775) 826-6100 ext. 3, www.vsanevada.org.

and walkers are invited to join this Tuesday night group run. Water and snacks will be available after the runs. Meet in the mens sport shoe shop. Tu, 6:30pm through 11/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

VARIETY YOGA: Each week the Sunday class is taught by a different instructor. Su, 10:3011:20am through 12/30. $15 drop-in fee. Mind

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St. Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

A MOON FOR THE MISBEGOTTEN: Good Luck Macbeth debuts its new space with a production of Eugene O’Neill’s powerful drama.

F, Sa, 7:30-10pm through 9/29. Opens 9/7; Th, 9/13, 7:30-10pm; Su, 9/16, 3-5:30pm; Su, 9/30, 35:30pm. $14-$20. Midtown Good Luck Macbeth, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

Sports & fitness 30/30 (CARDIO MAT/STRETCHING): Thirty minutes

SWANKY SHAMPANE: Boogie Woogie Productions

of Cardio Mat Pilates and 30 minutes of intensive stretching. Intermediate-level strength, stamina and flexibility are required for this class which emphasizes the principle of fluidity. Call to reserve your spot. M through 12/31. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St. Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

presents this comedy by David Creps set in Reno, Beverly Hills and Malibu. The play tells the story of the Best Actress nominee Swanky Shampane, a fierce, fearless, ridiculously neurotic but fabulously unforgettable character, who is obsessed with changing her public image prior to the night of the Academy Awards, when she will be taking the front row, center seat next to her bitterest rival Meryl Streep. Th-Sa, 7pm through 9/22; Su, 2pm through 9/23. Pace-Menante Theatre, 3702 S. Virginia St. in the Sierra Marketplace, (775) 229-7077, www.swankyshampane.com.

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing tech-

NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID, JR. AUDITIONS: Wild Horse Children’s Theater seeks actors, singers and dancers ages 5-18 to audition for the Northern Nevada premiere of Disney’s The Little Mermaid, Jr. Those auditioning should bring a short (one minute or less) Broadway-style song with accompaniment on tape, CD, or iPod that showcases vocal ability (no background vocals). Wear comfortable clothes and shoes and plan to arrive promptly to fill out forms, including parental consent forms. Bring a current photo. Call for an audition slot. Auditions will be held on Sept. 6 and Sept. 8. Call backs will be Sunday, Sept. 9, at 1pm. Th, 9/6, 4pm; Sa, 9/8, 1pm. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 8870438, www.wildhorsetheater.com.

LADY BIGHORNS DANCE TEAM WORKSHOP AND TRYOUTS: The Reno Bighorns announces Lady Bighorns dance team tryouts as well as a pretryout workshop. The pre-tryout workshop take place on Aug. 19. The workshop will act as a mock audition and will feature the choreography style that will be taught at auditions. Participants are asked to come with full performance hair and makeup, as well as an audition outfit to get individual feedback on appearance and performance. The cost for the workshop is $50, and any girl who participates will have the regular tryout fee waived. The Lady Bighorns tryouts will be held Sept. 9. Registration starts at 9am with tryouts beginning at 10am. Participants will learn dance routines from 10am to 1pm, at which point they will break for two hours and return at 3pm to perform routines in front of a team of judges. For participants not attending the pre-tryout workshop, the cost for tryouts is $35 before Sept. 5. After that, the cost for tryouts is $45. Su, 9/9. $35-$50. FIT Reno, 5301 Longley Lane, Ste. C-81, (775) 853-8233, www.renobighorns.com.

HOOP HOUSES: Learn the ins and outs of making and using hoop houses. Hands-on demonstrations will be held both days. Covering raised beds and different hoop house sizes will also be discussed. The class is free, but a donation of a can of food for the local food bank is requested. Sa, 9/8, 11am; Su, 9/9, 1pm. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks, (775) 355-1551, www.railcitygardencenter.com.

LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETINGS: Expectant mothers who are considering breastfeeding or mothers who are currently breastfeeding are invited to attend La Leche League meetings. Second M of every month, 6:30pm. Free. Casa de Vida, 1290 Mill St., (775) 335-6757, http://lllnorcal.org/Groups/ NorthernNevada.html.

RENO PORTRAIT SOCIETY: There will be a live

LAWYER IN THE LIBRARY: The Volunteer Lawyers

model for artists to paint or draw in the medium of their choice. No formal instruction, but participants can learn from experienced artists. The event is open to all ages and abilities. W, 9am-12:30pm. $10. Nevada Fine Arts, 1301 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-1128, www.nvfinearts.com.

of Washoe County present a Lawyer in the Library program where lawyers provide general guidance on a variety of legal topics. W, 5-7pm. Free. Washoe County Law Library, 75 Court St., (775) 328-3250, www.washoecounty.us/lawlib.

MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: This support

SELF-HELP FORMS COMPLETION CLINIC: Nevada

group is available to any male who has been impacted by cancer, including survivors and caregivers. Every other Th, 4:15-5:15pm. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave. Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org/inthenews/195174.

Legal Services offers general instructions and assistance on completing self-help forms. An attorney will be present to answer questions for qualifying clients. A notary will also be available at all clinics.

First Th of every month, 4:30-6:30pm; Second W of every month, 11am-1pm; Third Th of every month, 4:30-6:30pm; Fourth W of every month, 11am-1pm. Free. Nevada Legal Services, 654

NEW MOTHERS SUPPORT GROUP: This group offers support to first-time mothers in dealing with the changes and issues that come with having a new baby. Th, 10-11:30am. Saint Mary’s Regional Medical Center, 235 W. Sixth St., (775) 770-3843, www.supportsaintmarys.org/ inthenews/195174.

Tahoe St., (775) 284-3491 ext. 214.

Community BOARD AND CARD GAMES: Bring one of your own games or choose one from Comic Kingdom’s game library. Sa, 12-6pm through 12/30; Tu,

BEGINNERS CERAMICS ON THE POTTERY WHEEL:

Onstage

renowned guitarist and his protege perform. Su, 9/9, 6pm. $20. Swill Coffee and Wine, 3366 Lakeside Ct. (behind Moana West), (775) 530-2940, www.renomusicproject.com.

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Auditions

Classes

THOMAS LEEB & ADAM MERRY: The internationally

OPINION

Center, 230 S. Rock Blvd. Ste. 23, (775) 858-5700, www.remsaeducation.com.

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Learn to throw on the pottery wheel. This three-session class will take you from a ball of clay to a finished piece of work. Open Throw on Wednesday nights is included free for three weeks. Materials, clay and firings are all included. Class begins on Sept. 6. Th,

9/6, 5:30-8:30pm; Th, 9/13, 5:30-8:30pm; Th, 9/20, 5:30-8:30pm. $90. The Wedge Ceramics

Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT: Breast-feeding mothers are invited to join Breastfeeding Cafe. Mothers exchange their experiences and discuss concerns such as milk supply, pumping, going back to work, sleeping or lack of sleep, etc. Tu, 4-5pm through 12/18. $10 drop in; free for first-time attendees. Renown South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., (775) 240-9916, www.wellnourishedbaby.com.

CONVERSATION CORNER: Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions ideal for non-native English

ART OF THE STATE

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Enviroscientists, Inc. is seeking an Environmental Scientist for Reno, NV. Qualified candidate will conduct research and perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, evaluating, and minimizing sources of air pollutants. Use knowledge of environmental science and study, report, and recommend actions based on data derived from measurements of air quality. Review dispersion modeling analysis and other documentation filed to obtain Title V and minor source Permits for State and/or Federal regulatory air quality compliance. Create and run computer models developed on Trinity Breeze software for compliance with applicable provisions of State and Federal Clean Air Act requirements and related permit applications. Prepare air quality analysis required for acquiring air quality permits (Title V, PSD, Minor Source, NSRs) for industrial manufacturing facilities. Prepare dispersion modeling analysis (AERMOD) for point, area and volume sources, environmental reporting including Tier II, TRI, and EIQ for industrial manufacturing facilities, preparing CAM plans, Annual and Semi-Annual Compliance certifications, and preparing mercury control plans and dust control plans for industrial activities. Interested applicants should email resumes to: info@enviroincus.com.

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BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Life tests you

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all the time. Sometimes its prods and queries are hard and weird; they come at you with nonstop intensity. On other occasions, the riddles and lessons are pretty fun and friendly, and provide you with lots of slack to figure them out. In all cases, life’s tests offer you the chance to grow smarter, both in your head and heart. They challenge you to stretch your capacities and invite you to reduce your suffering. Right now, oddly enough, you have some choice in what kinds of tests you’d prefer. Just keep in mind that the more interesting they are, the bigger the rewards are likely to be.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): According to the religion of ancient Egypt, Tefnut is the goddess of moisture. In the natural world, she rules rain, dew, mist, humidity and condensation. For humans, she is the source of tears, spit, sweat, phlegm and the wetness produced by sex. In accordance with the astrological omens, I nominate her to be your tutelary spirit in the coming week. I suspect you will thrive by cultivating a fluidic sensibility. You will learn exactly what you need to learn by paying special attention to everything that exudes and spills and flows.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m guessing

that you don’t know the name of the person who sent the first email. It was Ray Tomlinson, and he did it in 1971. You’re probably also unaware that he originated the use of the @ symbol as a key part of email addresses. Now, I’d like to address your own inner Ray Tomlinson, Gemini: the part of you that has done valuable work hardly anyone knows about; the part of you that has created good stuff without getting much credit or appreciation. I celebrate that unsung hero, and I hope you will make a special effort to do the same in the coming week.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Busy editor

Katie Hintz-Zambrano was asked in an interview what she does when she’s not working at her demanding job at Refinery29. She said she likes to get together with her “article club,” which is like a book club, except it’s for people who don’t have time to read anything longer than articles. I would approve of you seeking out shortcut pleasures like that in the next few weeks, Cancerian. It’s one of those phases in your astrological cycle when you have a poetic license to skip a few steps, avoid some of the boring details, and take leaps of faith that allow you to bypass complicated hassles.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Imagine you’re living

Visit www.newsreview.com

in 1880. You’re done with work for the day, and are at home enjoying some alone-time leisure activities. What might those be? By the light of your oil lamp, you could read a book, sing songs, compose a letter with pen and paper, or write in your diary. Now transfer your imaginative attention to your actual living space in 2012. It might have a smart phone, tablet, laptop, TV, DVD player and game console. You’ve got access to thousands of videos, movies, songs, social media, websites and networked games. Aren’t you glad you live today instead of 1880? On the other hand, having so many choices can result in you wasting a lot of time with stimuli that don’t fully engage you. Make this the week you see what it’s like to use your leisure time for only the highest-quality, most interesting and worthwhile stuff.

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SEPTEMBER 6, 2012

“Disappointments should be cremated, not embalmed,” said the aphorist Henry S. Haskins. That’s good advice for you right now, Libra. It’s an auspicious moment for you to set fire to your defeats, letdowns and discouragements—and let them burn into tiny piles of ashes. I mean all of them, stretching back for years, not simply the recent ones. There’s no need to treat them like precious treasures you have an obligation to lug with you into the future. The time is right for you to deepen your mastery of the art of liberation.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Columnist

Sydney J. Harris told the following story: “I walked with a friend to the newsstand the other night, and he bought a paper, thanking the owner politely. The owner, however, did not even acknowledge it. ‘A sullen fellow, isn’t he?’ I commented as we walked away. ‘Oh, he’s that way every night,’ shrugged my friend. ‘Then why do you continue being so polite to him?’ I asked. And my friend replied, ‘Why should I let him determine how I’m going to act?’” I hope you’ll adopt that approach in the coming week, Scorpio. Be your best self, even if no one appreciates it or responds. Astrologically speaking, this is prime time to anchor yourself in your highest integrity.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In

the 1960 Summer Olympics at Rome, Ethiopian runner Abebe Bikila was barefoot as he won a gold medal in the marathon race. Four years later, at the summer games in Tokyo, he won a gold medal again, this time while wearing shoes. I’m guessing this theme might apply to you and your life in the coming weeks. You have the potential to score another victory in a situation where you have triumphed in the past. And I think it’s even more likely to happen if you vary some fundamental detail, as Bikila did.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Wikipedia has extensive lists of the biggest unsolved problems in medicine, computer science, philosophy and nine other fields. Each article treats those riddles with utmost respect and interest, regarding them not as subjects to be avoided but rather embraced. I love this perspective, and urge you to apply it to your own life. This would be an excellent time, astrologically speaking, to draw up a master list of your biggest unsolved problems. Have fun. Activate your wild mind. Make it into a game. I bet that doing so will attract a flood of useful information that’ll help you get closer to solving those problems. (Here’s Wikipedia’s big list: http://tinyurl.com/ListofProblems.)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There’s a

certain lesson in love that you have been studying and studying and studying—and yet have never quite mastered. Several different teachers have tried with only partial success to provide you with insights that would allow you to graduate to the next level of romantic understanding. That’s the bad news, Aquarius. The good news is that all this could change in the coming months. I foresee a breakthrough in your relationship with intimacy. I predict benevolent jolts and healing shocks that will allow you to learn at least some of the openhearted truths that have eluded you all this time.

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’ll bet that

34

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

“aha” experiences will arrive at a faster rate than you’ve seen in a long time. Breakthroughs and brainstorms will be your specialty. Surprises and serendipitous adventures should be your delight. The only factor that might possibly obstruct the flow would be if you clung too tightly to your expectations or believed too fiercely in your old theories about how the world works. I’ve got an idea about how to ensure the best possible outcome. Several times every day, say something like the following: “I love to get my curiosity spiked, my hair mussed, my awe struck, my goose bumps roused, my dogmas exploded and my mind blown.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A mother

wrote to the Car Talk columnists to ask whether it’s possible to cook food on a car engine. She wanted to be able to bring her teenage son piping-hot burritos when she picked him up from school. The experts replied that yes, this is a fine idea. They said there’s even a book about how to do it, Manifold Destiny: The One! The Only! Guide to Cooking on Your Car Engine! I suggest you engage in this kind of creative thinking during the coming week, Pisces. Consider innovations that might seem a bit eccentric. Imagine how you might use familiar things in unexpected ways. Expand your sense of how to coordinate two seemingly unrelated activities.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart

A meaty job

That was an incredible sight. I have never seen anyone eat that much meat at one time. My eyes are definitely wide open now.

Lauren Garber

How does that work? What is the method that you guys use to get them the ribs that they eat?

Talk about a baptism in fire. Lauren Garber is the new public relations manager at John Ascuaga’s Nugget, and this was her first time steering the Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-off. She’s a relative newbie to Northern Nevada, having only been here a couple of years. Some readers will recognize her from her stint as a reporter from KOLO. It’s been awhile since she’s had a day off, but she says she gets three in a row off next weekend, “And I’m really looking forward to it.”

These ribs aren’t the ribs that you’d get on the street. These are Nugget ribs that those competitors are eating. We bring them out. They’re in a bunch of trays. Some of the staff here, we measure them out. We put about four pounds in each tray. We weigh them beforehand, and then after the fact, and that’s how we figure out how much meat off of those bones that those eaters ate. It is a lot of meat.

How many ribs do you think were used this year? Can you come close with pounds or tons?

Anything that surprised you this year? This was my first year being here for the year cook-off—doing the P.R. at the Nugget for it. There were a lot of things that were surprising to me. I was on stage watching Joey Chestnut eat eight pounds of ribs.

We don’t have a final count yet this year. It goes up almost every year, as far as I know. Last year, it was

∫y Bruce Van Dye

Sex glands in the sand Bruce is MIA this week. Here are some of his 1995 musings. A week in the weeds. Seven days of precious summer. Out there in the hills, somewhere between Reno and Elko, Rye Patch and Oregon. Ever wonder what it’s like to poke around in that sea of sage? Recently, I killed a week in some previously unexplored territory in that section of the Great Basin. Nothing big happened. But the small stuff added up. There was the slow, switchback drive up a decent dirt road to a 7,400-foot summit, with entire hillsides along the route smothered in purple and blue delphiniums, nettleleaf horsemints, Indian paintbrush, crimson columbines, desert buckwheat and more. There was the hike on one outrageously brilliant mountainside where the air was made thickly sweet with the subtle gas of thousands and thousands of white and yellow lupine blossoms—the total Julie Andrews Sound of Music flashback. The hillside was choked with the GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

Awww. [Laughs.]

We do. We did a study last year, actually. It brings almost $25 million to our local economy, and of course, it’s not just here at the Nugget. It is all over our area, and all the local casinos really benefit from this large event.

We don’t have the final count in for this year yet, but we do expect about 500,000 people every year, and we think we at least hit that.

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I do, really! (Internet research says a baby back rack is about 12-14 ribs, and weighs about 1.75 pounds. Each pig has two racks. So 233,400 divided by 3.5 pounds is about 66,686 pigs. That’ll do, pig; that’ll do.)

And do you guys have an estimate of the financial impact on the economy around here?

What are we talking about as far as people numbers?

NEWS

You don’t want to know.

Twelve minutes is what they have to consume all that meat. It’s incredible. Eight pounds of meat in 12 minutes, that’s almost a pound a minute.

The Rib Cook-off was fabulous this year. We had people come in from out of town—I even heard we had some people here from as far away as New York. And we’re so excited that so many people could come and enjoy our fabulous ribs.

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How many pigs is that?

How long do they have?

So how did the Rib Cook-off come off this year?

OPINION

233,400 pounds consumed. We’re thinking we hit at least that again this year.

brucev@newsreview.com

little bastards, a display of floral sex organs stretching for at least two thousand vertical feet. The small cold creek that flows out of a canyon in these smooth green mountains is maybe seven-feet wide and six-inches deep. Cottonwoods can’t get a hold here for some reason, but the coyote willows can, and their branches make shade for the brook trout. You can sit in the clear water to cool your weary haunches, and the fish, after scattering, will slowly resume their positions in the stream, never getting within five feet of you, swimming in a stationary position, waiting for whatever it is they’ve been waiting for centuries and centuries. I even saw a badger. He was trundling down the road, in the gulley on the side. If ever a beast trundled, the badger is the one. I pulled alongside of him in the truck and then kept pace. He looked at me, got bugged and kept heading down the road. Best look I’ve ever had at one of these

critters, besides that one unfortunate sumbitch that wound up as Utah roadkill. Finally, this one veered off into the desert and vanished into the pygmy forest of threefoot sagebrush, fed up with the gawking good in the hell machine. About a mile down the road, one of the trailer tires ruptured. I instantly went into my pissed-off and oh-so-put-out mode. I cursed and swore as if I had just popped a flat on a rush-hour freeway and then realized I hadn’t. What I had was a Flat on a Dirt Road in the Weeds in the Summertime, witnessed only by the kestrel on the power line. A cranial voice calmly directed me to cool off, slow down and shut up. Get into it. An opportunity for your basic Zen fire change here in Nowhere, Nevada. The first tool for this job comes not from the box, but from the ice chest. Ω

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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