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Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .23 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Free Will Astrology . . . .34 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .35 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .35

TAHOE AGENCY

TARGETED See News, page 6.

MINED OVER

MATTER See Green, page 8.

SWIMMING HOLE

LOTTA LOVE See Arts&Culture, page 14.

JOIN THE PACK See Special Guide, inside.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 27

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AUGUST 23–29, 2012


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2   |   RN&R   |   AUGUST 23, 2012

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TROPICANACASINOS.COM


EDITOR’S NOTE

Touching on humanity

School boy Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review! Nope, D. Brian Burghart didn’t suddenly sprout bushels of hair. The Bald One is taking a much needed vacation, leaving me, along with news editor Dennis Myers and special projects editor Ashley Hennefer, to cover the bases. And I think we’ve put together a good paper, our annual Back to School issue, complete with our Join the Pack guide for University of Nevada, Reno students. This is a time of year, especially when working on an issue like this one, when I always wax a little nostalgic, fondly recollecting my school days. I’m a product of local schools, having graduated from Galena High in ’98 and UNR in ’03. I can’t believe it’s already almost been 10 years. I still feel like a recent graduate. I definitely don’t look back at my school years as the best of my life, and even the best parts of those times didn’t necessarily have anything to do with my education, but there is something romantic and appealing about school for those of us who have been out of it for a few years. It’s sort of beautiful when you can measure your progress through life by simple, acheivable goals, one semester at a time. You focus on the tasks and assignments at hand, and with every class you get a little better at it. You think more clearly, develop better work habits, and retain more knowledge. It requires a lot more effort to keep that sort of disciplined, open-minded academic interest away from the ivory tower—though working at a newspaper like this one certainly helps. Finally, on behalf of everyone at the RN&R, I’d like to congratulate our calender editor, Kelley Lang, on the birth of her third child—and first boy—Ethan, who was born on Friday, Aug 17. Congrats, Kelley!

—Brad Bynum BradB@NewsReview.com

OPINION

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LETTERS

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The Ryan Ayn Randers are crawling out of the woodwork lately, touting the manifold virtues of Capitali$m. But here’s a list of the things I see Capitali$m is consistently, systemically lacking: Truth, compassion, goodness, honesty, morality, a sense of fair play, generosity, sharing, caring, giving, loving, and ... generally being nice. You know, good ol’ human virtues. But then in the “real” world, these things don’t have a good bottom line. And, the big bad gubbmint is their enemy because it “dampens” profits and restricts their nefariousness. Oh, profit. Oh, great profit, our God. When we trade our Prophets for profits, there’s something buggy-wrong. Jesus was a socialist, you know, and I don’t think he was in error. Craig Bergland Reno

Combat the profane Support your community colleges, Nevada. You will do best to become the pioneers in what you have available, namely wind, geothermal and mineral energies. Attract business with your investments in this kind of infrastructure, and you will succeed. Let business have its influence, but also keep the liberal arts. To say, “Why should I pay for other people’s educations?” is a sure way to shoot yourselves in the feet. That is shortsighted and self-defeating. If we do not fund this we lose our advantage. Don’t let the greedy have their short-sighted way. If they had any value in their investments, they would be wise enough to convert them. Why we are not the progenitors of green energies is beyond me. Given the scope of our resources, it seems a bit somnambulatory to me. We should so invest, and I think it is a wise course to do this in sustainable enterprises, because without those, Nevada has not much else. What, gambling? Are we that stupid? That is moral, not resourceful!

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

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D. Kubiak Reno

Scott Harvey by email

Tyrants are atheists Re “Are You There God? It’s Me, Jake.” (Feature, June 28): Jake Highton’s diatribe against God makes two invalid arguments: 1) God can’t exist because he doesn’t prevent tragedies like mass murder, and 2) people of all religions behave terribly. First, I agree that it would be nice if God would prevent all the tragedies in the world, but God doesn’t have to account to us for what he does or doesn’t do. What Jake is saying is that God doesn’t meet his expectations, therefore He can’t exist. The conclusion does not in the least follow from the premise. On the second point, yes, people of all religions have behaved badly, but as long as governments acknowledged the existence of God, there were limits to how far they could go. Atheism had to precede totalitarianism, but making it possible for governments’ to demand their subjects’ supreme allegiance, and providing theoretical justification for

On the children Re “Word games” (Upfront, Aug. 16): I don’t know much about the welfare/work program. However, I believe that if a young mother is getting welfare for five years, she should be able to stay home and parent her child—not be forced to send the child to day care or some babysitter so she can work at some lousy job that will not give her a foot up when she returns to work. Children need their mothers. That said, it would be good if the media would stop showing baby mommas as something to aspire to. Maybe we could share the bill for welfare with the media. Estelle Melendez Reno

Say, what? Re “Are You There God? It’s Me, Jake.” (Feature, June 28): Which “God” are you referring to—a supreme being or his original

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Amy Beck, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

IN ROTATION

revealed religion founder representatives who came to an era and a people? You have a University of Nevada, Reno president, then there are “teachers” like you, as an analogy. If students fail, is it the UNR president’s fault, yours or the students’? Where did “energy” itself originate from that the universe and man uses? If a supreme being (God) as the cause of existence does not exist and all of nature has opposite poles to exist, not devil exists either and neither do you. By your own words you have admitted mankind is not what he was expected to be, evolved. Your collection of quotables disproves mans’ understanding of God. It does not disprove “God”: Furthermore, atheists babble in denial of God, waiting for someone to prove him. Mans’ radio band is tuned to himself, not God. No wonder nothing is heard.

Invest wisely. Do not forget your pioneering spirit, because every one of your entitlements depends on their continuations. Do not exclude the immigrants who come here to work hard and better themselves, because they better all of us, they represent our future and fear has no place backseat driving is what we want to become. If we look back on our history, we should welcome this influx, because every one of our entitlements depend on a thriving population not given to entropy. Otherwise, we have no claim to the plaque on the Statue of Liberty, or the joy our ancestors felt upon seeing her. Education is liberation, and our founders hoped we would carry that forward. They depended on our discernment to carry the ideals of this democracy forward, no matter how the power elites (read: addicts) attempt to profane us. No nation in history has ever so valued this, or stood has stood in danger of such Liberty being stripped away via carelessness and apathy.

ART OF THE STATE

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Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Russell Moore General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Brennan Collins, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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the murder of millions who wouldn’t “fit in.” Weren’t all the mass murderers of the last century atheists? Christians recognize that human nature is corrupted by original sin. The bad behavior of Christians—and those of other faiths—is therefore explicable in terms of the Christian view of human nature, but how does Jake explain the behavior of such nice atheists as Hitler and Stalin? Finally, Jake totally evades the logical conclusion to be drawn from his position. If there’s not God, no afterlife, and we’re just leading meaningless lives in a meaningless existence, why should we go on living? Isn’t suicide the only sensible thing to do? Bill Hamma Reno

Marriage as a political act? Re “Imitation Elvis and real cash” (Notes from the Neon Babylon, June 28): After reading Bruce Van Dyke’s column reminding us that the Citizens United Supreme Court decision has put our so-called election system into the hands of the rich and powerful, My first reaction was depression. But depression is not the answer, I told myself. I must take action. So I started making a list: (1.) Spread the truth about Mitt Romney because he has been on every side of every issue. (2.) Marry the first women under 30 who says, “I love you, Brad.” Or maybe the first one under 40. (3.) Encourage everyone to vote the straight Democratic ticket in November. (4.) Remind everyone that President Obama has kept us out of war with Iran. (5.) If I can’t find a wife, get a dog. (6.) Let everybody know about Romney’s job killing tactics at Bain. After I mail this letter I will continue making this list and I will work as hard as I can to do what I should. Brad MacKenzie Reno

Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Priscilla Garcia Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

AUGUST 23, 2012

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4   |   RN&R   |   AUGUST 23, 2012


by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

Ready for summer to end? Asked at Yellow Submarine, 920 Holman Way GayLynne McCaw Homemaker

Absolutely. This summer I have health issues that need to be taken care of and the sooner I get through it the better.

Ryan Kandell Events producer

I am ready for winter. I can’t wait to ride the powder. It’s awesome. That’s why we live in Tahoe.

Ronde Allen

The dollar value of your vote From what spotty information I’ve been able to gather, it is estimated $6 billion to $8 billion will be spent on the 2012 election campaigns at all levels. In the presidential campaign alone, it’s estimated the Obama and Romney campaigns will each spend about $800 million. This is just the campaigns, and does not include spending by special interest groups, PACs and SuperPACs, which will push the totals far, far higher thanks to the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling. Here’s where things get interesting. by There are about 150 million registered voters Mike Bohling in the U.S. At $6 billion in spending, we’re talkMike Bohling is an ing $40 per vote. Gallup’s daily tracking poll outdoor enthusiast shows the number of undecided voters in the who has lived and worked in Carson City presidential race hovering between six and eight since 1992. percent, so we’re looking at approximately nine to 12-million undecided voters in the 2012 presidential election. It is to these “undecided voters” that the $6 billion is directed. The majority of dollars will be spent in eight Have a comment? swing states (populations in millions noted in parenthesis, followed by percent of U.S. populaExpress your views in 475 words on a tion), including Colorado (5.0/1.61), Florida local topic of interest. (18.8/6.02), Iowa (3.0/.97), New Hampshire Send an e-mail to (1.3/.42), Nevada (2.7/.86), Ohio (11.5/3.69), brianb@ Virginia (8.0/2.56) and Wisconsin (5.7/1.82), newsreview.com. giving this group of states a total population of approximately 56 million. Applying the 50 percent “registered voter rate” we see in the general U.S. population, this gives us roughly 28 million registered voters in the swing states. Applying the six to eight perOPINION

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IN ROTATION

Jewelry maker

I am ready for summer to be over, ready for winter and snow and hopefully a bigger season of snow, because I’m ready for the mountains. I get to ride snowboards.

cent “undecided” factor gives us somewhere between 1.62 and 2.24 million undecided voters in these states. These voters will decide the presidential election. Now, let’s attach a dollar amount to each of these undecided votes. Using what I believe to be a modest figure, let’s say $4 billion will be spent on the presidential election attempting to sway undecided swing-state voters. That comes out to between $1,785 and $2,469 per vote. Consider this, and allow it to sink in when contemplating the figures above: Over the past week, I’ve asked about 40 friends and acquaintances, people from all walks and political persuasions, how much money they’ve contributed toward local, state and national elections this year. The grand total was one contributor who gave $25 for a local election. Ask yourself and your friends the same question and see if it has an impact on how you feel about campaign spending in America today. Elected offices are being purchased in this country, and it ain’t by you and me. It all boils down to this: If you think your vote is worthless, think again. On a national scale, it’s already worth $40. If you live in a swing state like Nevada, it’s worth up to $2,469. You wouldn’t flush $2,469 down the toilet, would you? A very small handful of people put a very high price tag on your vote. They’re betting they can buy it because you are “too uninformed” to keep it and use it wisely, and they’re betting a lot. Ω |

ART OF THE STATE

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MUSICBEAT

Jason Simpson Construction framer

No. I’m still enjoying the good weather. I enjoy going to the lake … going to Wild Waters with my kids and having a good time

Melissa Humphrey Patient transporter

Not really, no, because the school starts and work-and-school, and life gets crazier. Things get a lot more hectic and less time to be outside and be in the water.

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AUGUST 23, 2012

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

For half a century, planning and growth at Lake Tahoe have been regulated by a bi-state agency that now faces shutdown at the hands of Nevada lawmakers.

Fernley bill proposed U.S. Rep. Mark Amodei has introduced H.R. 6236 to give the Fernley a chance to purchase federally managed islands of land within the city limits for multi-use development. “As is the case in many of Nevada’s communities, Fernley is a complicated checkerboard of public lands controlled by different federal land managers, which can make planning and economic development a difficult proposition,” Amodei said in a prepared statement.

How Nevadans view their lives The annual findings of a Gallup survey have found that Nevadans do not have a favorable view of their well being, though that view has improved slightly. Their jobs seem to be a source of much of their discontent. The survey is based on 1,000 interviews every week during 2011. The same long-term survey was done during 2010. Respondents were asked to evaluate their lives, their emotional and physical health, their behaviors, their work environments, and their basic access to clean food and water, this last factor expected to become a growing concern in the U.S. The overall figure for Nevadans’ sense of well being was 65.0, up from 64.2 in 2010. Nevada went from 43d to 40th among the states. Hawaii placed first, with a 70.1 ranking. West Virginia is 50th, with a 62.3 ranking. Nevadans ranked their emotional and physical health, their behaviors, and their basic access fairly high. But they ranked their work environments very low. That appeared to determine their overall evaluation of their lives—only 46.7. Interestingly, Las Vegans seemed to have changed little in their evaluation of their lives from 2010 to 2011, but Reno residents recorded a substantial decline.

Tax subsidies drain localities The Atlantic magazine has reported online that Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s—noted for building their stores with other people’s money—“have received or are promised more than $2.2 billion from American taxpayers over the past 15 years.” Author Scott Reeder reported, “Cabela’s has received $551 million in local and state assistance during the past 15 years. ... The federal government helped ensure liquidity for Cabela’s’ credit card division by providing $400 million in financing for the purchase of the company’s securitized debt.” There was additional detail on other subsidies. But the Atlantic quotes experts saying that the chains do not produce jobs or economic growth. “Retail is not economic development,” Good Jobs First director Greg Leroy said. “People don’t suddenly have more money to spend on hip waders because a new Bass Pro or Cabela’s comes to town. All that happens is that money spent at local mom and pop retailers shifts to these big box retailers. When government gives these big box stores tax dollars, they are effectively picking who the winners and losers are going to be.” Good Jobs First is a research organization in D.C. While taking tax subsidies, Cabela’s and Bass also ship capital out of the areas where they operate. Cabela’s is based in Nebraska, Bass in Missouri.

Employment drops The upbeat spin put on recent minor Nevada job gains did not help much. Joblessness increased to 12 percent in July, up from 11.6 percent in June. The Washoe jobless rate rose from 11.7 percent in June to 12 percent in July, with 26,200 jobless. Carson City was at 12.2 percent in July compared to 11.8 in June.

—Dennis Myers

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Water fight Playing chicken with public policy gets serious The Nevada Legislature’s vote last year to pull Nevada out of the Tahoe Regional by Planning Agency (TRPA) shocked Dennis Myers many Nevadans and is a campaign issue now. Last week, the Toiyabe chapter of the Sierra Club cited the vote as key to its endorsement of several candidates in legislative races this year (“Club vote,” RN&R, Aug. 16). Senate Bill 271 was approved by the lawmakers in the a.m. hours of June 7 during the final moments of the 2011 legislature and signed by Gov. Brian Sandoval on June 17. It would withdraw Nevada from TRPA in 2015 unless California and the federal government meet Nevada demands to make development at the lake easier, in part by changing voting procedures on the TRPA board.

“Being members of bi-state teams is the best solution.” Marsha Berkbigler County commission candidate/R The vote was seen by some legislators as a “free” vote, one they could cast that would please big campaign contributors but without doing any immediate policy damage, since the final decision on pulling out of TRPA will fall to a later legislature. In fact, several legislators who voted for the bill said at the time that Nevada will never pull out of TRPA

and that if there had been a straight vote on that issue, the measure would have failed. “The two-step plan was genius,” one Las Vegas lawmaker said.

At the start

The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency was created in 1969 during the governorships of Paul Laxalt of Nevada and Ronald Reagan of California. It was prompted by growing degradation of the Tahoe Basin, a setting about which Mark Twain had waxed lyrical, known around the world for its beauty. The bi-state compact was negotiated for Nevada by Washoe County Sen. Coe Swobe. It was a recognition that when a state degraded water or air on one side of the lake, it affected both shores, though in 2012 some candidates assert that “our” jurisdiction is our business. After it was approved by Congress and signed by President Nixon, Swobe said, “The problem for people who want to protect the lake will be to slow down development until a master plan is developed and help the agency adopt beneficial guidelines. The developers and other special interest groups are going to attempt to water the guidelines down and push like hell for development before they are adopted.” The problem was that, in the end, the agency just didn’t work. The TRPA board, made up of members from both states, was essentially stymied on substantial issues by the voting arrangements. It was not enough for a motion to be supported by a majority of the board. A dual

majority was required—a majority within each state’s delegation. And the Nevada side was far less oriented to protecting the lake. In less than a decade the agency’s failure was apparent. Degradation of the lake continued. Development did, too. The Nevada Legislature in 1977 and 1979 proposed changes to the bistate compact that California lawmakers rejected as too soft on development. California Gov. Jerry Brown began talking about a federal solution. Nevada state legislators Thomas “Spike” Wilson and Joe Dini started negotiating with California legislators for reforms in the bi-state compact in 1979. The two sides reached an agreement that included elimination of the dual majority requirement and the changes were approved by both states—Nevada in a special one-day session of the legislature on Sept. 13, 1980—and passed by Congress. President Carter signed it on Dec. 19. The agency’s new configuration did exactly what it was supposed to do—slow development—and developers and business interests were not one bit happy. The wanted to undercut the Wilson/Dini changes. Some of those who supported the original compact, including Swobe and Laxalt, did not support the amended one. “But I will also say that TRPA has gotten a bit of control bureaucracy-wise, and we’ve got to reel it in,” Swobe said in July 2007.


But times had changed in Nevada. As the state grew, pro-environment sentiment became stronger and the Nevada Legislature over the years rejected six attempts to pull the state out of TRPA. Between Democratic and Washoe votes, such measures always failed. But that was before the casinos got serious about throwing their weight around. In 2011, the attack was made through a new avenue—Clark County. With 400 miles between Las Vegas and Lake Tahoe, the casinos and other pro-development interests decided southerners had no stake in the lake and could be used to break TRPA.

Dems take a dive

It worked like a dream. The bill was sponsored by conservative Democrat John Lee, but he had plenty of help from non-conservative Democrats. A very powerful casino lobbyist, William “Billy” Vassiliadis, who orchestrates substantial campaign contributions, was in the middle of the battle. More than a dozen supposedly pro-environment legislators voted to pull out of the bi-state agency unless “Nevada” got its way on issues affecting development at the lake—though it is dubious that the bill represents real Nevada popular sentiment. “If the agency does not adopt an updated regional plan and the proposed amendments [Nevada’s demands] are not approved by October 1, 2015, Nevada’s withdrawal from the Compact will become effective on that date unless the Governor issues a proclamation extending the deadline for withdrawal until October 1, 2017,” the new law reads.

Lee said Nevada “resorts” had difficulty getting improvements through the TRPA board. He portrayed those kinds of requests as representing the state: “Every time we’d go before the [TRPA board], the votes were always there to destroy what Nevada was doing.” His use of the term “we” suggested he identified closely with interests remote from his legislative district, which is smack in the middle of Las Vegas. In the votes that followed some raucous public hearings, not one Republican in either house of the legislature opposed 271. But nine Democrats in the 42-member Assembly voted for the bill, giving it an overwhelming majority. They were Elliot Anderson, Kelvin Atkinson, Irene Bustamante, Marcus Conklin, Marilyn Dondero Loop, Jason Frierson, William Horne, Marilyn Kirkpatrick, Harvey Munford, Dina Neal and John Oceguera. All are from Southern Nevada and Oceguera is speaker of the Assembly. In the 21-member Senate, another nine Democrats joined with Republicans. They were Shirley Breeden, Allison Copening, Steven Horsford, Ruben Kihuen, John Lee, Mark Manendo, David Parks, Michael Schneider and Valerie Weiner. Again, all are from Southern Nevada. Horsford was the Democratic floor leader in the Senate. The only Senate Democrats to oppose the bill were Sheila Leslie and Mo Denis. Most of the Democrats who supported 271 normally portrayed themselves as pro-environment. Some Nevada bloggers had a name for Lee’s legislation: Screw Lake Tahoe.

Youth shield begins PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

At a gathering in Reno last week to mark the start of “deferred action,” Reno residents held signs thanking President Obama. Deferred action gives young immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as infants or children and have clean records some protection from immigration enforcement and deportation. OPINION

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IN ROTATION

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Another legislature heard from

Diss: “Yes, there are a lot of changes that I would like to see made including changing the super majority vote requirement, speeding up the permit review process, and of course updating the regional plan, but threatening a complete pullout of the bi-state compact is not the solution. … I believe pulling out of the compact will open the door to over-development of the Tahoe basin which could in turn reduce the clarity of the lake and create other harmful environmental impacts.”

It was not received well in California. Senate president pro tempore Darrell Steinberg agreed to appoint negotiators, but he also gave Lee a piece of his mind in a letter made public: “I want to share with you and your colleagues the displeasure many in California … have with the recent unfortunate and rather provocative actions taken by the state of Nevada following decades of cooperation over matters relating to our mutual interests in the environmental and economic well being of the Tahoe basin. [Nevada’s S.B. 271] is both unnecessarily inflammatory and deeply counterproductive to the collegial relationship our two states have had on these matters. One can only imagine how leaders in Nevada would react if California were to take similar action. It is both surprising and disappointing to see a national treasure as important as Lake Tahoe become a political hostage to the agenda of special interest groups who have little interest in the many values the region provides.” The kind of rancor, dogmatism and inflexibility that characterize Congress and some legislatures threatened to invade the bi-state relationship. Since then TRPA has made substantial progress on a master plan, which one northern legislator said will give the lawmakers political cover to stop the withdrawal effort. Meanwhile, Clark County progressives this year organized to send a message to Democratic Party leaders that they would not be taken for granted. Their target: John Lee. He was swept out of office in the Democratic primary election. Within the three eastshore county governments, which are more directly affected than the legislature, 271 is also a subject of concern. In the contested race for Washoe county commissioner in district 1, Democrat Andrew Diss and Republican Marsha Berkbigler agree that the new law was a mistake. Berkbigler: “I generally work on the theory that being members of bipartisan, or in this case bi-state, teams is the best solution. I think it’s always best to be on the inside knowing what your opponent is planning than on the outside wondering! That being said, if SB 271 was intended to get the California members of TRPA to move forward on an updated plan with improved economic efforts while retaining the environmental protections then it was successful. … Lake Tahoe is a very valuable resource to Nevada, most particularly to the continued growth of northern Nevada and I believe we should be active in the caretaker role.”

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“Threatening a complete pull out of the bi-state compact is not the solution.” Andrew Diss County commission candidate/D What follows is a list of legislative offices and their districts and whether the candidate is for or against S.B. 271, according either to the 2011 vote or subsequent statements. Senator 13 Kathy Martin (R) undeclared Debbie Smith (D) against Senator 15 Greg Brower (R) for Sheila Leslie (D) against Assembly 24 David Bobzien (D) against Heidi Waterman (R) undeclared Assembly 26 Randy Kirner (R) for Rodney Petzak (D) undeclared Assembly 27 Teresa Benitez-Thompson (D) against Tom Taber (R) undeclared Assembly 30 Ken Lightfoot (R) see below Michael Sprinkle (D) against Assembly 31 Richard “Skip” Daly (D) against David Espinosa (R) for Assembly 40 Rich Dunn (D) against Pete Livermore (R) for In his comments, Assembly candidate Ken Lightfoot declined to take a position on the specific provisions of S.B. 271 without studying them more, but did say, “Nevada needs to be part of a bi-state cooperative organization at Lake Tahoe. I just have issues with the current structure of TRPA.” Ω

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AUGUST 23, 2012

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Holley family healing Last Wednesday, three members of the Holley family, who own and operate Holley Family Farms, were involved in a two-truck accident on highway 50. Four people were killed, including Ford Tucker, 18, of Fallon and three Fernley residents, Noel (Mike) Sotka, 52, Troy Sibson, 47, and Douglas (Jason) Counterman, 30. Robert Holley and his 9-year-old daughter, Anna, received minor injuries and were able to go home. The Holley’s son Daniel, 19, is currently in the burn unit at University of California, Davis, where he is being treated for burn wounds. One cow was killed and seven were injured. Fourteen were taken to Fallon and treated by a veterinarian. Two of the Holley’s trucks were also destroyed in the accident. Local farmers have organized a donation fund for the Holley family, as well as volunteer work parties at the Holley Farm. Donations can be made at Wells Fargo Bank to the Holley Family Farms Donation Fund, account number 815083344, or through PayPal, http://tinyurl.com/hffdonationfund. Work parties will be held on Aug. 23, Aug. 30, Sept. 6 and Sept. 13 at 9 a.m. at the Holley Farm in Dayton. Each work day will be limited to 15 people. To RSVP or arrange a carpool, email amber@greatbasinfood.coop.

Tahoe afloat The sixteenth annual Lake Tahoe Summit helped to establish some bipartisan goals for the future of Lake Tahoe and the surrounding ecology, even as conflict exists between Nevada and California legislatures. Held at Edgewood Tahoe, much of the summit focused on the need for public-private funding to plan for Tahoe’s future after federal funding decreases. In attendance were Sen. Dean Heller, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval, California Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr. and Nevada Lt. Gov. Brian Krolicki. The officials each issued statements at the end of the summit. Brown’s read, in part, “This year’s summit reminds us that the health of the Lake is dependent on what we do on the land. After years of debate, California and Nevada are finally getting their act together. The prospects for Lake Tahoe are bright.” But the debate over the vote to remove Nevada from Tahoe Regional Planning Agency suggests that conflict still looms. For more about the fight over the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, see “Water fight” in News, page six.

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT Great Basin Brewing Company, along with NevadaGrown, will host the Great Basin Local Nevada Farmers Market every Thursday in September, starting on Sept. 6, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Nevada farmers will be share fresh produce, and the brewery will host live music on its outdoor stage, handcrafted local brews, and popular dishes using fresh and local ingredients.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.

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GREENSPACE

“Stop open pit mining” signs can be seen on houses throughout Storey County.

Digging deeper Comstock Mining Inc. Despite community opposition, Comstock Mining Inc. has begun hauling ore on Route 342 (“Mineshafted,” July 26). But that doesn’t mean the Comstock Residents Association will keep quiet about it. by Ashley Recently, Storey County officials decided not to enforce the open pit Hennefer mining permit, essentially allowing CMI to “circumvent the BLM [Bureau of Land Management],” says Steve Funk, spokesperson for the ashleyh@ Comstock Residents Association. newsreview.com “Obviously, given the state of the economy of Northern Nevada, given the desire for jobs to appear out of nowhere and to appear without repercussion, counties are eager to do something about it,” Funk says. “But this is a poor tradeoff. There are bigger consequences here. When you get down to the numbers, the true economic engine is tourism, which is what has sustained this community for over 100 years.” According to testimonies from Storey County residents, the ore hauling has already made life difficult. CMI is hauling on the main route, 342, rather than the designated truck route, 341. The company has been detouring visitors to take 341, essentially bypassing the local businesses which depend on that traffic. Will Rose, owner of Doodads Cybercafe and Emporium, says that he and his wife were depending on the tourists in town for Hot August Nights, but the detour prevented any possible business. “I’m a fourth-generation Nevadan and my family was in mining,” Rose said in a statement. “I’m not anti-mining. You can’t bullshit me on the greatness of mining, I get it, but you can’t just let these guys do anything they want. Just look at the history … in places like Weed Heights or outside of Ely where there are just huge scars … and I’ve never known any of them to really clean up after themselves, despite their promises.” The amount of dirt and dust stirred by the hauling is also in violation of the community’s requests. “They promised they would cover those trucks,” Funk says. “But if you go up there and look, only about one in six trucks are covered. The county won’t hold them to any standards.” The CRA has taken their concerns to the Nevada legislature. “The community has been working with the Nevada congressional legislation, talking to them about our concerns about the local ecology, and our concerns about the encroachment of big business in small communities,” says Funk. Comstock Mining Inc. owns more than 6,000 acres of property in the Comstock, and is expected to develop new mining projects in neighboring counties throughout the next few years. “They have a plan to tear up the Virginia range all the way from Silver City to Dayton,” Funk says. “We’ve had this happen before. Sites that were mined in the early part of the last century were left in very toxic conditions. That was the same idea Houston [Oil and Minerals Co.] had. Then the price of gold tanked so they left. That’s the history of the way these businesses operate. There’s plenty of ethical mining happening in Nevada, but this isn’t it.” Ω


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YOUR CHILD can

Thrive

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VISIT K12 .COM/NVSCHOOLS CALL 866.912.3353

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PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

BY ASHLEY

HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

New Washoe County School District superintendent Pedro Martinez hits the books

I

t’s quite possible that new Washoe County School District superintendent Pedro Martinez is the busiest man in Reno this week. After taking over for former superintendent Heath Morrison on August 1, Martinez has been going nonstop organizing community meetings and visiting area schools. Washoe County schools on the traditional schedule are back in session on August 27. Martinez holds an MBA from DuPaul University and attended the Broad Superintendents Academy. Born in Mexico, he moved to Chicago and spent 35 years working in the business and education sectors. In 2003, he was the budget director for the Chicago Public Schools District. Then, in 2009, Martinez was the deputy superintendent for the WCSD. He then went off to Clark County School District for a quick 15 months before he ended up back here when Morrison moved to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District in North Carolina. We managed to catch Martinez while he was at the airport preparing to board a flight to Las Vegas.

You’re a hard man to get in touch with. How’s the first month been? It’s going great. It’s been exciting to just be out in the community. I’ve already had eight community meetings. It’s been great to outreach to the parents and staff. So I’ve been doing a lot of outreach. There’s a lot of things to look at.

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ment for teachers, are what’s important. At the end of the day, not being a teacher has made me a great listener. I see myself in a support role. Central offices have a tendency to put on programs and we become very shut down. The problem solving has to happen at a school level. We need to make sure we put support resources for teachers. Those for me are a priority and frankly we need to get our community more invested.

Formerly you were the deputy superintendent for Washoe County. What’s the difference between being a deputy superintendent and the superintendent of the schools? Is it like being a vice president? I was driving many of the academic initiatives day to day. The biggest difference is now I’m working with the legislation and many of our stakeholders and staff, making sure the community sees our vision. Outreach to the community, to key stakeholders, so they know what our vision is, know where it’s going for the future. Making sure that they know where we’re going with our goals.

Martinez spoke to a public meeting at Sepulveda Elementary School.

Let’s talk about you. Tell me about yourself. Not just as a superintendent but as a person. I am married. I have a 21-month old. In ’09 my son was born here as a native Nevadan, and I’m very proud of that. I grew in Chicago, spent 35 years in Chicago. I was deputy in here back in ’09, and then went to Clark County, and then ended up back here.

You weren’t in Clark County for very long. How’d you decide to come back? I was there for 15 months. Everyone was surprised when Heath decided to leave. It’s rare when you get to come back to a district. For me, I’m excited and honored. I have a very strong belief system in ensuring that students are ready for college. I was here in ’09 and we energized the community around the district. And then this opportunity came up.

Much of your education is in business, and which is a large part of being a superintendent. But how do you apply

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this to education? What is your experience working with educators? What did you do to prepare to be a superintendent after coming from a business background? So I started in the private sector, and was very happy at Price Warner Cooper. When I was right out of college, you know, I was an inner city kid, so when I got to work at a big corporation as an advisor and consultant, it was really good. Unexpectedly, I got a chance to work in Chicago on a project, Catholic Charities, and that started my formal entrance into education. So then I was recruited by Arne Duncan [current U.S. Secretary of Education] to work with public schools. I was recruited to public schools. And I was there almost seven years, around six years, and it became my dream to be a superintendent. I did some work at the Broad Academy and then some summer training at Harvard. That was my formal training. Then I got the opportunity to come to Washoe.

]

WE REFLECT ON WHAT WE’RE DOING WELL, WHERE WE HAVE PROGRESS, AND WHERE WE HAVE GAPS.

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You and Heath Morrison both went to the Broad Superintendents Academy. Were you classmates? We were both part of class of 2009. Yes, we were classmates.

The Broad Academy has received its share of criticism from teachers, parents and education researchers— particularly, that it encourages a sort of “corporate” model for schools that doesn’t seem to fit with the purpose of learning. The Broad Academy focuses a lot on the idea of “reforming” schools. What does this mean to you? What would reform look like here in Washoe County? I would say it was much more applicable in 2009. We were uniting school and staff around a common vision. We’re on a five year plan. We reflect on what we’re doing, well, where we have progress, and where we still have gaps. I helped to develop that with Heath. Here’s an example. We have some very high rates of remediation. Students are graduating but having high rates of remediation, so we’re working with UNR and TMCC to help reduce this earlier. We want to take the district to the next level.

I study education in grad school so I talk to a lot of teachers on a regular basis, and I hear a lot about this tension between teachers in the classroom and the administration that makes many of the choices that impact what teachers do. How do you plan to minimize this tension? There’s no magic bullet in education. I’ve been doing public education for 10 years. The lessons I’ve learned are good teachers, good principals, good supportive environ-

And before that, you worked in Chicago. What are the differences between there and here? I think one is that here in Washoe County, we have a very close knit community and very developed community. The community has really embraced the schools. I’m amazed at just the amount of support from community and legislators and from the staff. In Chicago, we had to build that trust. Trust had broken because of failed leadership. We had to build that trust again. As you can imagine it’s difficult to build that. Even though the community knows we can do better, they really embrace our schools. They want to be part of the process with us. We’re more nimble.

You mentioned the five-year plan, and how we’re three years into it. What is the five-year plan, and what will the next two years look like? The five-year plan is about getting children college and career ready, providing good learning environment for children, have a good culture internally for staff, hold staff to high levels. Where we’re at now in third year, we’ve had some good success. Our graduation rate went from 56 to 70 [percent], so now it’s time for the next level of work. Now children are graduating, so what does it mean to be college and career ready? If they choose to be an engineer, we want them to get into the engineering school at UNR. If they want to study business, we want them to get into the business school at UNR. If they want to do biotechnology, we want them to go to TMCC, or if they want to do education, then we can get them into the college of education. We want them to know what opportunities they are going to have. And we want to start closing achievement gaps, especially with special education students, students with disabilities, multilingual children, children in poverty. We got to get people involved.


You’ve worked with Heath on several projects before, but what are some things you want to do differently from him? What ideas of his do you plan to keep? I definitely want to build the support that has been generated from the community. Heath did very well, so I want to build on that. I don’t have major changes. But I want to look at where schools are at now compared to where they were in 2009. McQueen is at 89 percent [graduation rate]. Before, they were at 70 percent. How do you build on that? Are they getting into UNR or TMCC or higher programs? At Hug, the principal just finished her first year, so we have a bit more to work on. We have to go lower to elementary and middle schools to find where students are at today.

So how do you feel about the rising technological education movement— new technologies, online learning, digital resources. How does that fit into this? One of the things I want to do, Ashley, is expand the use of technology and the amount of magnet programs. Around the country, there are some amazing ideas that we can steal from. Aviation programs, STEM [science, technology, engineering and math] academics, extending math and science. We’re in the beginning of those conversations but we need more, especially at the secondary levels. Many children are proficient but are not being challenged. It was different from a few

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years ago when we were trying to get rates up, but when schools make progress, how do we continue that? Technology is a big part of it. I plan to pursue it aggressively with legislation. I am a believer in how children learn today is very different than how I learned 30 years ago. Technology is a big part of getting them engaged or motivating them.

schools. There’s no reason we shouldn’t be doing that. So it’s my time to talk to the community. It’s part of my vision, getting people into the work we’re doing and learn how to build on our previous success. So a lot of it is talking to community members, parents, legislators. I think what’s going to happen [is] that as the community understands it, they’re going to embrace it.

Obviously, the budget is an ongoing problem. How do you plan to recruit teachers, improve school facilities, implement new programs, etc. on a limited budget? Where does the money come from for new projects or hiring?

Do you plan to keep programs around such as the Northern Nevada Writing Project, which has gone through some serious budget cuts, around? Is there a place for these in the district? What’s the plan of action for that?

It is building on community, making sure they’re embracing us. I’ll give you an example. In Southern Nevada, Rancho High School has one of the most amazing aviation programs I’ve ever seen. A group of children won design awards. There’s no reason why those programs don’t exist in Northern Nevada. We need capital dollars so we can have the technology, so we can have the buildings. Part of it is that it’s going to be an investment in our community.

My plan is not to add a bunch of new programs, but to be more aware of how we’re applying them. If students are high performing but not growing, we need to focus on using resources that help them to grow using our growth model. So we’ll ask teachers, are you implementing these programs? How are you pushing rigor? For students falling behind, we want to use these resources to catch children up so they can grow faster. So basically it’s the same initiative but the way we apply them will be different. The programs have to be customized for where schools are at. That’s what I want to change. In ’09 we were putting out initiatives one size fits all, which we had to do just to get things going. Now three years later, we see how we’ve been successful, and now we can start to customize programs based on schools.

How do you plan to show them that these projects are important? You’ll see me, Ashley, doing a lot of outreach, giving them tangible examples, giving them the possibilities of what we can do. There’s a pre-med program where students can get a bachelor’s degree in the first year as they’re in medical school. We need to get pre-med program in high

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[ ] I WANT TO LOOK AT WHERE SCHOOLS ARE NOW COMPARED TO 2009.

So I have to ask: What are your thoughts on No Child Left Behind? I am very excited that we got the waiver. It embraces the growth model that we’ve established as a state. My problem with No Child Left Behind is that it forced teachers to focus on kids with low proficiency. We need to measure the growth of all children. If a child is already proficient, we still need to know how to challenge that child. Some children, they just need more time, or they have disabilities and obstacles like not speaking English as a first language.

So to sum up—what are your short term goals? Long term goals? This year I plan to work with our families, do a lot of outreach, work closely with staff. I’m very intent on how to support teachers and students. If we do that well, hopefully we’ll start to see some more progress. Ω

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In Rotation 16 | Art of the State 17 | Foodfinds 18 | Fi¬m 20

Renoite Jerry Snyder swings into the water at Emerald Pools.

he leisurely days of summer are slipping away fast. We’re back up against back-toschool dates. The classic cars that convened to heat the already sweltering streets during Hot August Nights are gone, and I think I felt a leaf crunch under my foot this week. But there are still a few hot August days left, and that means there’s time for one last splash. Lake Tahoe and Donner Lake are understandably popular, but the Sierra Nevada that contains them is a treasure trove of secret swimming holes just a short trek from those two favorites, all within a two-hour drive of downtown Reno.

A GEM OF A SPOT: EMERALD POOLS Don’t confuse Emerald Pools near Emigrant Gap with Emerald Pool in Yosemite, where illegal swimming occasionally leads to an unplanned ride down nearby Vernal Falls, which occasionally leads to death. This Emerald Pools boasts 8-to-10foot vertical ledges for those who seek thrills but are aware of their 14

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mortality, plus 1-to-2-footers for beginners. The electric, antifreezegreen waters—colored by algae, not automotive fluids—are tens of feet deep and clear enough to see what you’re diving into. Enough of the pool is surrounded by bare, dark red rock faces that it can look almost otherworldly, yet there’s enough shade for dozens of visitors to lounge under comfortably near a babbling creek. Rippled, striped expanses of rock, sculpted by erosion, are excellent for trouncing. Distance from Reno: 1.5-hour drive plus a 5-minute walk How to get there: Take I-80 west to Exit 161. Go slightly right onto Highway 20 west. After 3.5 miles, go right on Bowman Lake Road. About 1.5 miles in, where the road crosses the South Fork of the Yuba River, pull into a small parking area on the right. The trail is not marked, but it’s easy to see.

ALPINE DREAM: ISLAND LAKE A few miles past Emerald Pools begins the Grouse Lakes Basin Area, closed to vehicles, open to backpackers, and dotted with cool, pristine, boulder-skirted lakes. All but a couple of shallow, marshy ones are

good for swimming, including Carr Lake, a stone’s throw from the parking lot. Put in an extra two miles on foot and the payoff is Island Lake, where three small islands protrude from cerulean waters like miniature mountains. Each one is a quick swim from shore but remote enough to make you feel like Robinson Crusoe for a few minutes, only instead of contending with cannibals, just wave to the occasional canoe paddler. If you find this spot is so beautiful you don’t want to go home at night, you’re in luck. There are backpacking sites within a few feet of the lake. Distance from Reno: About 2 hours, plus a moderately strenuous 2-or-more-mile hike each way. How to get there: From Emerald Pools (see above), continue up Bowman Lake Road for a few miles. Go right on Forest Road 17, which becomes rutted and slowgoing toward the end but is, at present, doable in a low-clearance sedan. There are a few potentially confusing turn-offs, so be sure to follow the signs to Carr Lake/Feely Lake. Park where the road ends, at the trailhead. Hike 1/4 mile up the fire road past Carr Lake and turn left just before the restrooms onto Crooked Lakes Trail. Island Lake is visible and accessible from Crooked Lakes Trail, but to get

closer to the islands turn left on the more subtle Hidden Lakes Trail. Be warned: The miles of trails that crisscross this forested wonderland are not all marked and do not appear on all maps. Island Lake isn’t among the hardest to find, but do your cartographic homework and brush up on your orienting skills in advance for this one.

KEEP TAHOE TOPLESS: SECRET COVE What? “Lake Tahoe” and “secret” in the same mouthful? That’s right, even the landmark lake has a lessertraveled spot. The cozy inlet, accessible by a 3/4-mile hike, has the same picturesque boulders and azure waters as nearby Sand Harbor State Park. Secret Cove lacks the wide, sandy beaches of nearby swimming spots and has almost no shade, but its clothing-optional policy attracts self-sufficient adventurers who carry in beach umbrellas or opt for sunbathing. On one Sunday afternoon this summer, the 30 or so visitors almost all opted for swimsuit-free tanning. Secret though it may be, Secret Cove has a remarkably well organized and informative web site at secretcovenevada.com. Read up on


clothing-optional-beach etiquette (no staring; no sexual activity; no photography without consent; pack out your trash; no glass bottles) and follow it religiously. The occasional scofflaw is swiftly scolded and reported to authorities. Distance from Reno: 1-hour drive plus a 10 to 15-minute hike How to get there: Head up Mt. Rose Highway (Hwy. 431) to Incline Village. Turn left on Hwy. 28, and drive about 9 miles south. About 3/4 mi. south of Chimney Beach, look for an inconspicuous parking area on the right. The trail is on the south side of the lot.

AROUND THE BEND: ILLINOIS CROSSING

TRAIL MIX: LOCH LEVEN LAKES The 3.6-mile trail to this idyllic pair of lakes can be easy to lose at first. Snow covered it well into springtime this year, at which point a GPS app (EveryTrail, for example) was helpful, as were the three or four bars of cell service. After the snow melts, the view over much of the boulder-piled slope is wide open during the initial ascent, and the area is popular enough that hikers can usually follow the cairns and the other hikers to a well-worn, easier-to-follow forest trail. Pass the train tracks, keep ascending, and behold a pristine alpine lake, where the swimming is primo. Lakeside boulders offer picnic seating with a view and a sunwarmed surface to lounge on. Distance from Reno: 1-hour drive and an hour or two to hike. Emerald Pools is a perfect place for those who seek thrills but are aware of their mortality.

were fast enough for short-distance tubing, shallow enough for kids. Deep, still pools and a view of view of foliage-lined canyon walls make for exquisite floating and lounging. Distance from Reno: 1.75-hour drive plus a 1-mile hike. How to get there: From Nevada City, follow State Highway 49 to North Bloomfield Road. Head north about 10 miles to South Yuba Trailhead. Don’t be confused when the pavement ends and you begin a quick, winding descent. You’re still in the right place. After the one-lane bridge at Edwards Crossing, look for the parking lot. From there, hike one

How to get there: From I-80 west, take Exit 168 toward Big Band/Rainbow Road. Turn left on Donner Pass Road, go under the freeway, and turn right on Hampshire Rocks Road. The trailhead and parking area are a couple miles up on the right. Beware: With its 1,250 feet of elevation gain and neat-o geology, this hike is steep enough and picturesque enough to take extra time. Novice hikers and sturdy children hike this trail frequently, but allow extra time. Brush up on your trailfinding skills. Ω

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Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

In the deep-forested foothills of the Sierras’ western slope lies the carcamp site of your dreams, South Yuba Campground, spacious and shady, nestled in a Yuba-River-carved canyon, out of cell-phone range, but not hard to get to. These BLM-run sites are a bargain $5 per night. But the real draw here is a little spot on the river called Illinois Crossing, a mile hike form the main parking area down the South Yuba Trail. Tiny beaches line the shores. Take your pick of sun or shade, willows or pines. In July, the water was cool enough to give relief from the afternoon heat but warm enough to splash in for hours. Rapids

mile downhill to Illinois Crossing. (Toward the end of the trail, an inattentive hiker could pass the sharp turnoff to easy river access. It’s very close to the pit toilets.) Beware: Be prepared for copious, bushy poison oak along the trail. You’ll almost certainly brush against it in spots where the trail narrows. Know how to identify it, avoid it and treat exposure before you go. Bring mosquito repellent.

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Splendor in the graphs TI-83 Plus

TI-Nspire CX Handheld

Algeo Graphing Calculator

In my high school clique, your graphing calculator acted as a status symbol. A Texas Instrument (TI) 83 was a Toyota, a TI-85 was a Lexus, and if graphing calculators could have 24-inch rims, you’d find them on the TI-86s. Yeah, I ran with a dangerous crowd. The TI-83 has maintained its place in the market and it’s no surprise. The sturdy design withstands a backpack beating and the buttons and controls are as straightforward as possible. Though it has slimmed down over the years, the layout and display are largely unchanged. Students will find they can use this calculator from algebra through advanced calculus, and it’s allowed in PSAT, ACT, IB, SAT and AP testing. Nowadays, the TI-83 can download apps, but don’t expect Angry Birds as the limited selection tends toward function and education. Compared to the smartphones most students carry, the TI-83 is archaic, clunky and single-purposed. But this bare bones approach holds nostalgic. $100.

This updated TI graphing calculator boasts 3-D graphing, a thinner design, a wider range of uses, including chemical and advanced mathematical computations, and a full-color screen that supports photos—for when you really need to display hot air balloons behind a graph. Unlike most TIs, this features a rechargeable battery and a touchpad that replaces the D-pad on the TI-83 Plus. You can’t help but question if TI is trying to appeal to a smartphone world—as evident even in the overly convoluted name—but it remains obvious, from the 100MB of internal memory to the screen, this is no smartphone. These additions make the TI-Nspire the Lamborghini of this generation of graphing calculators. There’s a lot of flash and some added functionality, but, as with the TI-86 of my school years, it’s mostly just to show off. $160.

If you can convince a teacher to allow a smartphone in class, there’s no reason it can’t do everything a graphing calculator does. There’s a wide variety of free graphing calculator apps for Android and iOS, but the Algeo Graphing Calculator caught my eye for its simplistic approach. The app doesn’t guide your hand as much as a TI product, so someone struggling with the concepts won’t find it very helpful, but it’s intuitive, and easy to edit/review formulas and equations. Did we mention it doesn’t cost $100? Don’t count on using it during the SATs or any other formal test, but if you’re looking for something that’ll get you through a college course or as an aid as you help your kids with homework, go with Algeo or another free app and save the money. You’ll need it for tuition. Free.

www.education.ti.com

In this extra nerdy back-to-school edition of our monthly Gadget column, we examine graphing calculators.

Sunday, August 26 Wingfield Park 1st. St. & Arlington Ave., Reno

Festival: 11am - 5pm Duck Race: 4pm

Live Entertainment Pet Adoptions Food Family Fun & More! Adopt a rubber duckie! Fastest ducks win cool prizes All entRieS hAve A chAnce to win $400K cASh

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PHOTO/KRIS VAGNER

Under the influences

John Molezzo at the Keno Motel, which he likes to photograph.

John Molezzo “When you’re 18, if you don’t want to get the hell out of wherever you are, there’s something by wrong with you,” says Reno native John Kris Vagner Molezzo. If that’s where his story as a professional artist begins, his exhibit at Sierra Arts, Biggest Little City, gives away the ending: He’s been back with a vengeance for a while now. Molezzo was born in 1964. As a kid, he was a confirmed daydreamer who loved the seediness of downtown Reno and environs. “I used to get in trouble as a kid,” he John Molezzo’s Biggest says. “Mom used to say, ‘You have to get Little City is up at Sierra your head out of the clouds.’” Arts Gallery, 17 S. As a father of three, he has plenty of Virginia St., through help remembering how his own childAug. 30. For more information, visit hood perception combined the literal www.sierra-arts.org. and the fantastic. “As a kid, everything’s bigger than life,” he says. “Just seeing the name Bucket of Blood Saloon [in Virginia City]—it seemed like the most amazing place to go to.” His youthful imagination ran wild with images of what a place with such a name could possibly contain.

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At 11 or 12, Molezzo learned to shoot black-and-white film with his parents’ manual Nikons and Canons. He shot photos for the Bishop Manogue High School yearbook. As a teen and young adult, he immersed himself in the writing of Raymond Chandler, Elmore Leonard and Sam Shepard and developed a taste for films from the ’70s and earlier. “Scorsese, Humphrey Bogart, Orson Welles.” You can practically hear his pulse quicken when he mentions A Touch of Evil: “It’s like some kind of master palette.” As soon as he was old enough to act on his wanderlust, he followed his curiosity to Portland for film school, then to San Diego, where he was involved in theater productions and shared a warehouse space with some buddies. They formed an anythinggoes art group, and Molezzo drew busy pictures on canvas. “Kind of like Basquiat or Hockney,” he says. When discussing his work, Molezzo lists his influences spontaneously. Among them are Picasso, Van Gogh, and photogra-

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phers who cataloged different periods of 20th-century life with intensity: Richard Avedon; Edward Weston; Weegee. “That all just mixes in with your psyche and it stays with you in certain ways,” he says. “You don’t always know how. You become obsessed. You have to take pictures.” He also likens making his collages to writing stories: “You figure out the characters, the setting, then just let them go.” His own story brought him back to Reno in 2000 with a family and a full-time job as a court reporter. His sense of fascination hadn’t waned a bit. He remembers, “When I started shooting Reno it was like I was seeing it new all over again.” He shoots downtown motel signs and street scenes to rearrange later in Photoshop. He’ll often paste images together into a cacophony of neon and nightfall.

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“Some have 120 layers,” he says. He prints the images on canvas and adds accents with oil paint or bold, black wax crayon. They come off half documentary, half fantasy, romantic and realistic, distinctly unironic, and celebratory of all Reno’s grit and glory. “To me Reno has so many looks, so many images.” Some of his works have an indulgent, Times-Square dizziness. Others, a shot of a motel parking lot on a gray, winter day, for example, are sparse almost to the point of Hopperesque. That piece has a distinct sense of anticipation, as if it could not remain devoid of human drama for more that another few seconds, a way of seeing things he honed in film school. “Reno just lends itself to the cinematic type quality,” he says. Not to mention fiction, documentary, and collage. Or, in Molezzo’s words, “Reno is the perfect place for the confluence of influence.” Ω

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Pho-nuts Pho Noodle

454 South Meadows Parkway, 853-4009 When I headed to Pho Noodle with my friend Brett on a scorching evening, I wondered how in the world I would eat by K.J. Sullivan pho in 100-plus degree weather. But Pho Noodle might be a good place ksullivan@ to combine strange things because newsreview.com the restaurant shares space with a Donut Bistro. Pho and bear claws? Hey, if I can like soup on a hot day, then why not?

PHOTO/MEGAN BERNER

forgotten that the sun was baking down. The weather is not the boss of me and cannot tell me when I can have pho! If you couldn’t tell, I really love pho. When the food arrived, I tried the broth before going to work doctoring it with the lime, cilantro, sprouts and sauces. I wish I had just gone ahead and dumped some Sriracha sauce in, because the broth tasted like dirty beef water. Nothing some fixings couldn’t help, so I went to work on it. While I improved the broth, I unfortunately couldn’t do anything for the beef, which lacked flavor and was too chewy. The dish was heavy with tripe and skimpy on the other cuts. Brett went with the Singapore street noodles ($8.95) which came with a decent portion of chicken and shrimp. The dish was OK, but it needed a stronger curry, as it lacked either spiciness or a sweetness that one would expect. The vegetables, which consisted of onions, carrots and green onions, were crisp and fresh but overall, this plate had too much egg and not enough variety on the vegetables. Service throughout the meal was great. The waitress was friendly and kept our water glasses filled, commenting that it was hot out so she knew we needed to hydrate. We took a look at the doughnut case on the way out and saw a maple doughnut with real pieces of bacon. For some reason, we didn’t grab this one, but decided on a cherry “burrito” donut and a chocolate glazed bar ($2.38 for both). The cherry burrito was great, with a crisp sugared tortilla wrapped around cherry pie filling. The chocolate glazed bar was simple but good, with a light sugary dough and thick layer of chocolate. Unfortunately, the great service and doughnuts didn’t balance out the rest of the food at Pho Noodle, so I don’t see myself making a return visit. Ω

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Pho Noodle is open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The two businesses co-occupy a space in a strip mall in south Reno. The space is small, but set up well, with a donut case by the counter and the rest of the area set with booths or small tables. The ceilings are high, and there are windows surrounding the front, so the space feels larger than it is. We were greeted immediately by a friendly woman who escorted us to a booth and gave us some menus. Pho Noodle serves both Vietnamese and Chinese food, and the menu is fairly expansive. We started with an order of pot stickers (six for $4.95), which looked large and puffy on arrival. The pork and vegetable filling was flavorful and you could distinguish the ingredients. The dough around it was … dare I say doughy, like a doughnut? There was a dipping sauce that I thought tasted too sweet, but these pot stickers were good alone, so they didn’t need a sauce. Brett stared at me in disbelief when I ordered the small pho dac biet ($6.95), which is pho with various cuts of beef including tripe, tendon, flank and meatballs. He kept motioning outside as if perhaps I had


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When The Expendables was released a couple of years ago, I proclaimed my unabashed addiction for all things Sylvester Stallone, even when they are bad (as was that movie). I shouted to the movie gods that I wanted a sequel and I wanted that sequel to be better than the sloppy first offering. Not only do we get the sequel ‌ IT HAS CHUCK NORRIS!!! The Expendables 2 learns a lot from the by mistakes of the first installment, while capitalBob Grimm izing on the ideas that should’ve made the first installment good fun. It gathers up a bunch of bgrimm@ newsreview.com old goons, gives them big guns, and tells them to shoot things. And, this time out, they do it better and with much aplomb. It’s obvious before the opening title credit, in a sequence where many a man is shredded via gunfire from aging American action superstars, that The Expendables 2 is going to get things right and deliver the crazy-gory goods.

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Much of the credit must go to newly anointed Simon West, who replaces Stallone in the directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chair. West made the ridiculously enjoyable Con Air, which combined stellar action with funny, dumb dialogue to much success. Unlike Stalloneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort with the first movie, Expendables 2 gets real laughs from its boneheaded dialogue rather than groans. The action involves some nonsense where Church (Willis) angrily orders Ross (Stallone) and his men to retrieve something from a plane wreck. That something turns out to be a computer containing information about bomb materials that could knock the world on its

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ass. On top of these secrets falling into the wrong hands, one of the Expendables is viciously murdered right before their eyes, which kick-starts a nice revenge subplot. The action, in the hands of West, plays much better. Stalloneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort featured slapdash editing that made the action hard to follow, while this installmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set pieces get you pumped. And the fake-looking cartoon gore from the first has graduated to better-looking cartoon gore in the second. The script calls for a reduction in emphasis on the Jason Statham characterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;hooray!â&#x20AC;&#x201D; while giving bigger parts to Arnold Schwarzenegger and Bruce Willis. They are still bit players, but they do more here than the funny cameo in part one. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the aforementioned Norris, known as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;lone wolf,â&#x20AC;? a nice nod to his unintentionally hilarious 1984 effort, Lone Wolf McQuade. Other new additions include Liam Hemsworth as a sniper, a young handsome gun clearly added for the ladies (the woman I attended a screening with was very happy with the sight of this gentleman). Nan Yu tags along as the first woman to join the Expendables on a mission, and she kicks ass with the best of them. Most notably, Jean-Claude Van Damme, who passed on the first movie, turns up as a sunglasses-wearing bad guy. Van Damme, as the quite obviously named Vilain, is the one stealing lots of uranium and killing Expendable guys. Of course, he and Stallone have an epic smackdown near filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end that calls for Van Damme to do some rather impressive high kicking. The man still gets lots of air. If box office returns warrant a third chapter, rumor has it that Nicolas Cage is already signed up for it, with Harrison Ford and Clint Eastwood being offered gigs. Even if Expendables 2 comes up a little short at the theaters, I have a feeling a second sequel will get a green light if Ford or Eastwood sign on. Getting either of those guys would mean coming up with big bank, because they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come cheap. As for Cage, they probably lured him in with a toy duck and a box of crackers. Whether or not they continue the franchise, at least it can be said that one of these Expendables things worked. Things blow up real good this time outâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;real good. Ί


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The Bourne Legacy

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Brave

Ice Age: Continental Drift

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When Universal decided to forge ahead with the Bourne franchise after Matt Damon, a.k.a. Jason Bourne, decided to call it quits, they were most assuredly looking for a glorious changing of the guard—something akin to when Daniel Craig took over for Pierce Brosnan as 007. What they get with The Bourne Legacy is something closer to the vibe when Roberto Benigni replaced Peter Sellers in the Pink Panther franchise. Jeremy Renner taking over for Damon in this franchise feels like the underwhelming switcheroo that occurred when Andrew Garfield took over for Tobey Maguire as Spider-Man. Renner, like Garfield, is a good actor. But he doesn’t command a movie like Damon can, no matter how good The Hurt Locker was. Renner isn’t nearly as good as Damon as the Bourne centerpiece. The plot feels like a poor, scrapped together excuse for keeping a franchise alive longer that it should be.

The animated wooly mammoth (Ray Romano), saber-toothed tiger (Denis Leary) and sloth (John Leguizamo) take yet another journey to the land of the suck in this fourth, and undoubtedly not last, installment of the popular kiddie adventures. When the continents crack, the mammoth winds up on a floating piece of ice far away from the wife and kid, so he spends the movie trying to get back. Along the way, he does battle with a stupid pirate monkey (Peter Dinklage) that sings the dumbest song you will hear this or any year. Because this is in 3-D, the film offers a lot of action sequences, sacrificing plot for a whole lot of “whoosh.” In a summer that offers the likes of Brave, parents are better off just taking their kids to that movie twice than subjecting their prepubescent eyes to this thing. I actually got tired watching this due to all of the frantic 3-D movement. I fear these Ice Age movies are going to keep on coming.

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Director Jonathan Demme likes to make movies with Neil Young, and that’s turning out to be a very good thing. In this, their third collaboration, Young returns to the city of his birth in Toronto, Ontario, Canada to perform a solo show at Massey Hall. And when I say solo, I mean solo. Young does it all with the acoustic guitar, powerful electric guitar, harmonica and that wonderful organ. He serves up classics like “Ohio” and “After the Gold Rush” and new ones, like the beautiful “Leia,” with no accompaniment. Demme cuts in footage of Young driving around the city, following his brother Bob’s Cadillac and seeing the sights. As for the way Demme shoots a concert, nobody does it better. He has a camera aimed right under the brim of Young’s hat, so you get Neil’s awesome scowling face punching your eyes. I hope these guys keep making these movies, because they are damn good.

The Campaign

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While this falls into the category of weaker Will Ferrell comedies, it’s still funnier than most of the stuff thrown out there with the intent of making us laugh. Ferrell stars as a congressman running for reelection who is surprised by the candidacy of an unknown candidate looking to unseat him (Zach Galifianakis). Ferrell is basically doing a riff on his Ron Burgundy character, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. He has a few shining moments, including a profane phone message left for the wrong person and a classic baby punching incident. Galifianakis is funny, but his character’s two dogs, heavy breathing pugs, are funnier. This one is frontloaded, with most of the funny stuff happening in the first half. While it misses out on the opportunity to really skewer the American election process, it does have some good giggles involving refrigerator sex and petting zoos, so it’s got that going for it.

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Total Recall

Just when I was starting to really like Colin Farrell, he’s become the poster child for pointless remakes of great films. Granted, his turn as a sexy-nasty vampire in the Fright Night remake was fun to watch, but that movie didn’t live up to the original. Now we get this junk, with Farrell occupying the role of Douglas Quaid/Hauser, made famous by a little guy named Arnold Schwarzenegger. This remake jettisons the humor, crazy gore, and Mars locations, resulting in one majorly dull sci-fi chase film. Kate Beckinsale is the best thing in the movie, stepping into the role made famous by Sharon Stone and wearing underwear like a true champ. There are a few nods to the Paul Verhoeven original—a three breasted hooker and a twist on the infamous airport security scene—and they feel unjustified. Wiseman’s film has little nods to the far better original scattered throughout. These nods create a craving to leave the theater and watch the original on Blu-ray.

Director Christopher Nolan wraps up his Batman trilogy with a rousing, though occasionally clunky, conclusion. Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) has retired Batman, and is living a reclusive life in his mansion when Gotham is besieged by the masked revolutionary Bane (Tom Hardy). Batman is eventually forced out of retirement, and meets his physical match in Bane while also facing off against a crafty cat burglar (Anne Hathaway as Selina Kyle, never referred to as Catwoman in the film but obviously playing that part). Hardy makes Bane a great physical adversary, but his performance is marred by a terrible voice dub that makes him sound cartoonish and out of place. Hathaway has a lot of good fun in her role, as does Gary Oldman returning as Jim Gordon. The movie has a lot of good action, and Bale has never been better as Batman. It’s not as good as the previous chapters in the trilogy, but it’s still very good and a fitting conclusion to a great story.

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Here’s a stop-animation movie that isn’t afraid to be creepy for the kids. Norman (voice of Kodi Smit-McPhee) can see dead people and has premonitions, for which he gets picked on at school and yelled at by his parents. As it turns out, he’s the only one who can save the town from a curse involving zombies and witches. Directors Chris Butler and Sam Fell have put together a great-looking movie. And Butler’s script actually pushes the limit of the PG rating to the point where adults might be surprised by what they have taken their kids to see. As for this being too scary for kids, let me tell you that the kids were screaming with delight at my screening. They love this stuff. Also features the voices of John Goodman, Leslie Mann, Casey Affleck and Christopher Mintz-Plasse. One of the year’s best animated films.

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After the severe misstep that was Cars 2, Pixar gets back to goodness with this, the tale of Merida (voice of Kelly Macdonald). Merida is a princess who doesn’t want to conform to tradition, shooting arrows better than any of the boys in or around her kingdom, and not really too keen about marrying any of them under arranged circumstances. When a spell is cast on family members, she must search for a way to restore normalcy, while convincing her mom (Emma Thompson) that she has the right to choose her own destiny. Merida is a fun character, and Macdonald is the perfect voice for her. As for the look of this movie, it is beautiful for its entire running time. While I’ve liked many Pixar films more than this one, that is not a dig on this movie. It might not be one of the best the studio has offered, but it is still a highly entertaining piece of work.

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Strings attached K.P. Many local music fans might know Kristin Pitman as a violinist. She’s played violin in a variety of contexts—from by Brad Bynum heavy metal to bare-bones folk to hiphop—but she’s recently discovered bradb@ her voice as a guitar playing singernewsreview.com songwriter. And now she’s making the transition from instrumental accompanist to Western chanteuse. She started playing violin at age 11, while growing up in Austin, Texas. Later, she studied music history at the University of Cincinnati CollegeConservatory of Music. There, she was especially focused on very early, pre-medieval music. PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

“Songwriting is about having something I need to say,” says Kristin Pitman.

K.P. performs at Walden’s Coffeehouse, 3940 Mayberry Drive, 787-3307, with Wayne Carlson and Jonie Blinman. 7 p.m. No cover. For more information, visit www.reverbnation.com/ kpfolkmusic

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She first moved to Reno five years ago. In that time, as a violinist, she’s played in numerous projects, including the hip-hop group Knowledge Lives Forever and in folk-rock groups with her partner, Jonie Blinman. She currently plays violin with Lucas Young & The Wilderness, a project she’s very excited about. “His music just opens up this box in me,” she says of songwriter Lucas Young. “I want to write music like that!” Two years ago, Pitman and Blinman moved to New York, a place that Pitman found challenging to live. Blinman had a full-time job, and Pitman was only working parttime and wasn’t playing in a band, so she found she had a lot of time on her hands. So, for the first time in many years, she tried her hand at songwriting. “I’ve always been surrounded by songwriters, so I thought I would try it,” she says. She started playing and writing on guitar as well as banjo. She also tried mandolin, through she says she didn’t GREEN

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gel with that instrument—even though it’s traditionally tuned the same as a violin. “I think it’s the frets,” she says. “It’s so close to violin that it just doesn’t feel right, whereas guitar is this whole other thing.” Last September, after a year or so in New York, the couple moved back to Reno. By that time, Pitman had written enough songs that she was proud of to start playing in front of people. “I started playing at the open mics and everyone was like, what the hell happened?” she says. She had found a narrative-andmelody-driven songwriting voice that draws on old country, like Hank Williams, Western folk in the Townes Van Zandt tradition, and hints of radiofriendly contemporary singer-songwriters like Florence Welch of Florence and the Machine. She credits her scholarly background with helping her facility with language in writing lyrics. And she also avoids the common folksinger weakness of writing from a point of limited perspective. Her songs are often written from the perspective of unusual characters, like the creepy, psychotic stalker who narrates her song “Without Her”: “Uneasy, watch her watch you sleep/and she’s next to you when you should be next to me/and my patience has been stretched beyond my means/But there’s a remedy.” “I tell a lot of stories, but I give ’em room for people to interpret,” she says of her approach to writings songs. As a songwriter, she felt like she needed a new identity, which is why she started just going by her initials, K.P. But her role as an instrumentalist, particularly in the context of Lucas Young & the Wilderness, is still something she takes a lot of pride in. “What typically draws people to the sound of the violin is the human-ness of the instrument,” she says. “It’s the most like the human voice in terms of expressiveness. Violin is so versatile in terms of range and volume and tone.” But she says her role as a violin player and her role as a songwriter aren’t separate coins, but two sides of one. “As an instrumentalist, it’s all about accompanying music I care about,” she says. “Songwriting is about having something I need to say.” Ω

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THURSDAY 8/23 3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

FRIDAY 8/24

SATURDAY 8/25

SUNDAY 8/26

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 8/27-8/29

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm Tu, no cover

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Jazz Night, 7:30pm Tu, no cover

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

THE ALLEY

Grieves & Budo, 8:30pm, $15

BAR-M-BAR

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-0806

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB

Wild Things, 9pm, $3

BLITZKRIEG POP! w/DJ Endif, Hyperkarma, 9pm, $5

The Cat Like Reflexes, 9pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

DJ Tigerbunny Aug. 23, 7 p.m. Chapel Tavern 1099 S. Virginia St., 324-2244

THE BLACK TANGERINE

Bike Night Blues Jam w/live music, 7pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

CLUB BASS

Ladies Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 for women

535 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-1774

COMMA COFFEE

Jimmy Grant, 7:30pm, $8, $10

Celtic/American Tune Session, 7pm, no cover

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

1) Metal Echo, Mimic, 8:30pm, $5

2) DJ Double B, DJ Luciano, 10pm, no cover

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Splitrock 128, 6pm, no cover

Hunter Merritt, 6pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Comedy

COMMROW

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Rocky Whatule, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; RC Smith, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Joel Lindley, Avi Liberman, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Charles Fleischer, W, 9pm, $25

2435 Venice Dr., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 541-5683

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Ladies of Laughter w/Carla Rea, F, 9:30pm, Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Doug, 9pm, no cover

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Greg Bennick, Codexred, Breaking Ground, Jim Williams, 7pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Large Bills Accepted, noon M, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover; Open mic, 9pm W, no cover

Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Alex, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm M; Karaoke with Alex, 9pm Tu Karaoke with Tony,

Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm M, no cover

Praying for Greater Portland, Lucas Young, Maribelle, Movie Land, 7:30 p.m.

JAVA JUNGLE

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

“It’s hot, mysterious, emotional & romantic.”

Celtic Sessions, 7pm Tu, no cover

Graveyard Jaw, 9:30 p.m., no cover.

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover Mark Sexton Band, 7pm, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

Jack Ruby, 9:30 p.m., no cover.

FUEGO

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

College Night w/DJs (dubstep, house), 10pm, $5 with college ID

Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

2) The Wicked Hicks, 7pm W, no cover

New World Jazz Project, 7pm, no cover

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

2) DJ Double B, DJ Luciano, 10pm, no cover

FRESH KETCH

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Bobaflex, Sil Shoda, Takin’ Names, Down Time, 8pm Tu, $10

Protomen, 8pm, $12

A RENO tRAdItION fOR 40 YEARS!

-Gypsy Style Jazz

hILLBILLY BANdItS thursday 9pm • blues! VISIt OuR NEw wEBSItE www.RyansSaloon.com SuBScRIBE tO OuR mAILINg LISt!

Best rs Burge o n e in R

RYAN’S SALOON

& BROILER

924 S. Wells Ave. Reno 323-4142

Postcards from Gypsyland show!

Saturday, August 25th • 7pm Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, Reno, NV

Tickets $35

Tickets available at ftloj.org L’uva Bella Wine Gallery at The Summit or at the door

Presented by:

For the Love of Jazz Rotary Club Of Reno

24

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AUGUST 23, 2012

THESE DON’T Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

MIX


THURSDAY 8/23 JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

FRIDAY 8/24

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

SATURDAY 8/25

SUNDAY 8/26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 8/27-8/29

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm M, no cover; Cranium, Stupid Man Suit, 9pm Tu, $3

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

1) Immortal Technique, Diabolic, Swave Sevah, Akir, DJ GI Joe, 8pm, $19-$50; 2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Boot to the Kool, The Firebombing, Miracle Drugs, The Kanes, Merkin, 8pm, $6; 2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Hank 3, 8pm, $19-$36; 2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Saving Abel, Authmentis, 8pm Tu, $9$30

1) Yelawolf, Roach Gigz, 8pm, $20-$40

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL 405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Dale Poune, 7pm, no cover

John & Cherie Shipley, 8pm, no cover

Rocky Tatarelli & Judith Ames, 8pm, no cover

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm W, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke Idol singing competition, 9pm, $10 contest entry fee

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm W, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm W, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Karaoke w/Steel & the Gang, 7:30pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm W, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED DOG SALOON

Praying for Greater Portland Aug. 25, 7:30 p.m. Holland Project 140 Vesta St. 742-1858

Jay Goldfarb, 7pm W, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RED ROCK BAR

Thursday Jam Session, 9pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover for women before midnight

RYAN’S SALOON

Hillbilly Bandits

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm Tu, no cover; Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm W, no cover Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Otis, M; Live jazz, 7:30pm W, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Crush, Zack & Smiley, 8:30pm, no cover

SIERRA GOLD

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Moondog Matinee, Elephant Rifle, Them Sonsabitches, 9 p.m., no cover.

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030 680 S. Meadows Pkwy., (775) 850-1112 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

The Firebombing

STREGA BAR

Garrett Grow Band, 9pm, no cover

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Wayne Carlson, Kristin Pitman, Jonie Blinman, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Colin Ross, 7pm, no cover

Milton Merlos, 7pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Erika Paul Carlson, 6:30pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Spontaneous Combustion, 8:30pm M, no cover; Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm Tu

Bluegrass w/Strange on the Range, 7pm M; Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm Tu.er Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

Local Band Listening Party, 9pm M, no cover; Dark Tuesdays, 9pm Tu, no cover

Tyler Stafford, 6:30pm, no cover

Colin Ross, 6:30pm M, Tyler Stafford, 6:30pm Tu, Moon Gravy, 6:30pm W.

Recycle

Aug. 24, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Voted Reno’s

this paper

best seafood house

10 years running!

Custom Tattooing :: Body Piercing Clothing walk-ins welcome 11am-10pm 7 days a week

(775)786-3865

www.evolutiontattooreno.com

Where have you been?

1555 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV

www.Rapscallion.com

775-323-1211 • 1-877-932-3700 Open Monday - Friday at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm Sunday Brunch from 10am to 2pm

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FEATURE STORY

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AUGUST 23, 2012

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THURSDAY 8/23

FRIDAY 8/24

SATURDAY 8/25

SUNDAY 8/26

2) Kick, 8pm, no cover

2) Kick, 4pm, no cover; 2) Steppen Stonz, 10pm, no cover

2) Kick, 4pm, no cover; 2) Steppen Stonz, 10pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Melissa Dru, 7pm, no cover

1) Billy Richards’ Coasters, 8pm, $22; 2) Melissa Dru, 8pm, no cover

2) Melissa Dru, 8pm, no cover

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+ ; 2) Left of Centre, 10pm, no cover ; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Jersey Nights, pm, $19.95+; 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover; 3) Skyy High Fridays w/Roni Romance, DJ Dragon, 9 pm, $10; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm and 9:30pm, $19.95+; 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm; 3) Addiction Saturdays 9pm, $10; 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm.

1) Jersey Nights, 7pm Tu, W, $19.95+; 1) Jersey Nights, 7pm, $19.95+; 2) Left 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm M, no cover; of Centre, 10pm, no cover; 4) Live piano, 2) DJ Chris English, 10pm Tu, no cover; jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 2) Garage Boys, 10pm W, no cover.

4) Tom Drinnon, 9pm, no cover

1) Cirque ’84, 9pm, $10

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm, $22; 2) Big Red, 9pm, no cover; 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm, $22; 2) Big Red, 9pm, no cover; 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm, $22

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm M, $22

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 ; 2) Spike

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30; 2) Spike Tobin, 8pm, $15; 2) Live local bands, 10pm, no cover; 3) Club Sapphire, 9pm; 4) The Metal King, 8pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30

1) Taylor Hicks, 7pm M, Tu, W, $25-$50

5) DJ Chris English, 10pm, no cover

5) Cash Only, 9:30pm M, no cover; 5) DJ JBIRD, 9:30pm Tu, no cover

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

Jimmy Cliff

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Ultimate Reno Combat 36, 8pm, $251) Cirque ’84, 9pm, $10 ; 4) Tom Drinnon, 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge $100 ; 1) Cirque ’84, 9pm, $10 ; 4) Tom 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 9pm, no cover Drinnon, 9pm, no cover 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover

Tobin, 8pm, $15; 2) Live local bands, 1) Persuasion, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 9pm, $25, $30 ; 2) Spike Tobin, 8pm, $15 10pm, no cover; 3) Club Sapphire, 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 9pm, no cover 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE

18 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 427-8397 1) Cabaret 2) Tahoe Live 3) The Improv 4) Outdoor Arena 5) Cabo Wabo Cantina Lounge

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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RN&R

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm M, Tu, W, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

Aug. 25, 6 p.m. Montbleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3353

26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 8/27-8/29

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1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

5) Cool Black Kettle, 9:30pm, no cover

5) Mad Karma, 10:30pm, no cover

5) Mad Karma, 10:30pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 7pm, no cover ; 3) Paul Covarelli, 5:30pm, no cover ; 5) Ladies ‘80s w/DJ BG, 6pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 8pm, no cover; 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover; 5) Namolokama, 5:30pm, no cover; 5) DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm,

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 8pm, no cover; 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover; 2) Buddy Emmer Band, 7pm, no cover ; 5) Namolokama, 5:30pm, no cover; 5) DJ 5) Namolokama, 5:30pm, no cover BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm.

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

6) Jimmy Cliff, 6pm, $39.50 3) John Ponzo, 7pm, no cover; 4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

3) Tony Vee, 9pm, no cover; 4) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7pm, $10 3) Tony Vee, 9pm, no cover; 4) Rogue after 8pm ; 4) DJ Chris English, 10pm, Saturdays, 10pm, $20 $20

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover ; 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

1) Brian Regan, 8pm, $46, $61 ; 3) Live music, 5pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

AUGUST 23, 2012

2) Steppen Stonz, 7pm M, W, no cover

3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover ; 3) Live jazz, 4pm, $10 ; 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover

1) Jeff Foxworthy, 6:30pm and 9:30pm W, $55, $75 ; 2) DJ Tom, 9pm M; 2) DJ I, 10pm Tu, W; 3) Dudes Day, 7pm Tu; 3) Mix it Up!, 10pm W, no cover


You may not see us, but your mining industry is with you. Every day. Using environment-conscious methods we: ࠮ *YLH[LTVYL[OHU 60,000 high-paying jobs

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And most importantly, we’re proud to be a major source of ÄUHUJPHSZ\WWVY[MVY5L]HKH»ZJOPSKYLUMHTPSPLZHUKLK\JH[PVU

OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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AUGUST 23, 2012

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69 L

A SPECI

Open Mon-Sat 10am -7pm • Se Habla Espanõl

827-2667

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28   |   RN&R   |   AUGUST 23, 2012

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Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

Reno’s ONLY

EATEES R F M I EST


For Thursday, August 23 to Wednesday, August 29 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

BLU SKY COMMUNITY ART FAIR: Gallery Blu Sky presents a community art fair featuring live performances and artist demonstrations. Live performances by Kriston Prater at noon and Terraplane at 1pm on the deck at Spindleshanks American Bistro, 6873 North Lake Blvd., and live DJ sets by Changoloco Productions all day in front of Gallery Blu Sky. Sa, 8/25, 11am-7pm. Free. Gallery Blu Sky, 6883 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe Vista, (831) 251-6845.

Listings are free, but not guaranteed. Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

BLYTHE AWARDS: Each year Reno Little Theater audiences receive ballots in their programs to vote for their favorite actors, sets, costumes and productions. RLT will honor the best of the best in this gala event featuring live music for dancing, hors d'oeuvres and awards ceremony. Su, 8/26, 6-8:30pm. $40). Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 813-8900, www.renolittle theater.org.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., Aug. 30, is Thursday, Aug. 23.

Events BEST IN THE WEST NUGGET RIB COOK-OFF: Cookers from across the country compete for prizes and bragging rights to the best ribs in the West at the 24th annual rib festival. The six-day event features the Nugget World Rib Eating Championships, live entertainment, a kids’ area, arts and crafts vendors, and lots of rib. Headliners include Jelly Bread on Aug. 29, The Wood Brothers on Aug. 30, Spin Doctors on Aug. 31, Gloriana on Sept. 1, Molly Hatchet on Sept. 2, and Doug Kershaw on Sept. 3. W,

BURNING MAN: The annual gathering is a celebration of community, art, selfreliance and self-expression. The art theme of this year’s event is “Fertility 2.0” M-Su through 9/3. Opens 8/27. Black Rock City, 9 Miles Northeast from Gerlach in Black Rock Desert, (415) 8635263, http://burningman.com.

CARSON MINT COIN SHOW: The show features 22 coin dealers, numismatic education, gold panning, a children’s treasure chest, food sales and valuable raffle prizes. F, 8/24, 8:30am-4:30pm; Sa, 8/25, 8:30am-4:30pm. $8 adults; free for children.

8/29, 11am-9pm; Th, 8/30, 11am-9pm; F, 8/31, 11am-9pm; Sa, 9/1, 11am-9pm; Su, 9/2, 11am-9pm; M, 9/3, 11am-5pm. Free

admission. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave. 14th Street to Pyramid Way in Sparks, (775) 356-3300, www.nuggetrib cookoff.com.

Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 687-4810 ext. 237, http://museums.nevadaculture.org/dm documents/2012coinshowraffleprize.pdf

EXPEDITION MAN: Northern Nevada’s first Ultra Distance Triathlon traverses a 194.2-mile course from South Lake Tahoe to the Legends at Sparks Marina. Participants begin with a swim at Zephyr Cove, Lake Tahoe, followed by a challenging bike course through Carson City into Reno, culminating with three fast out-and-backs around the Sparks Marina. Sa, 8/25, 6am-noon. Call or visit website for details, Locations vary. www.expeditionman.com.

FALLON HEARTS OF GOLD CANTALOUPE FESTIVAL: The annual celebration of Fallon’s agricultural history and Hearts of Gold cantaloupe features a farmers’ market, arts and crafts, live music and entertainment, cantaloupe-eating contests and more. Th-Su through 9/2. Opens 8/30. Call for ticket info. Churchill County Fairgrounds, 325 Sheckler Road, Fallon, (775) 972-8263, www.fallonfestival.org.

THE HUMAN PERFORMANCE PROJECT: Hundreds of athletes compete in more than 15 different sports all in one place for one weekend. Competitors will face off in Olympic, mixed martial arts, bodybuilding, outdoor and action sport categories. Th-Su through 8/26. Opens 8/23. $10 per day. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000, www.humanperformanceproject.com.

NEVADA HUMANE SOCIETY DUCK RACE & FESTIVAL: Watch 15,000 bright yellow rubber ducks race to the finish line to raise money and awareness for the cause of homeless pets in the

Art

community. The festival includes music and dance, games, clowns, face painting and refreshments. Su, 8/26, 11am-5pm. Free admission. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 856-2000 ext. 335, www.nevadahumanesociety.org.

ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Piecing It Together: A Celebration of Glass and Mosaics. Artists Co-op of Reno Gallery member Bryn McCubbins and other artisans present a display of glass and its many shapes and forms. Work by guest artist Scott Harvey is also on display through August. There will be an artists’ reception on Aug. 5, 1-4pm. MSu, 11am-4pm through 8/31. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artists co-opgalleryreno.com.

PRE-ELECTION: WEALTH TRANSFER NOW: Jamie Kalicki, principal attorney of Kalicki Law Offices, will join Mark Smallhouse of New Venture Attorneys to help guide participants in securing their assets in today’s volatile political climate. W, 8/29, 12-1pm. $15 per person, includes lunch. Bosma Business Center, 401 Ryland St., Ste. 300, (775) 852-2600, www.thebosmagroup.com.

CCAI COURTHOUSE GALLERY: New Crop. Capital City Arts Initiative presents its summer exhibition featuring work by Northern Nevada artists Amy Aramanda, Kaitlin Bryson, Logan Lape, Kath McGaughey, Emily Rogers and Karl Schwiesow. M-F through 9/4. Free. 885 E. Musser St., Carson City, www.artsinitiative.org.

REYNOLDS SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE: The public is invited to a free tour to celebrate the rededication of the Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism and Center for Advanced Media Studies. The $7.9 million project, funded through the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, has retained the building’s character while enhancing the school’s multimedia, broadcast and digital technology capabilities. Th, 8/23, 2:30-4:30pm. Free. Reynolds School of Journalism, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 682-6012, http://bit.ly/NnAvFH.

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Heavy Forever. This collaborative exhibition features new work by local artists Nick Larsen and Omar Pierce. The show, comprised mostly of photography, sculpture and video installation, is rooted in the idea of potential, both realized and not. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 8/31. The Trading Tortoise. The Trading Tortoise is a traveling art project created by Souther Salazar and Monica Choy. Their sculptural installation features a trading post where people are invited to bring an object, story or creation and exchange it for something else special Choy & Salazar have found or traded for along the way. The idea is to connect people in different places around America through a network of traded treasures. Come early; each stop is limited to 50 trades. Sa, 8/25, 3-5pm. Free. Contact Sarah Lillegard (775) 7421858, sarah@hollandreno.org, http://tradingtortoise.com for details on this exhibit. 140 Vesta St., Suite 330, (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

VALHALLA ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL: The 32nd annual celebration of the arts includes musical and theatrical performances, visual art exhibits, fairs, cultural festivals and art workshops. M-Su through 9/2. Prices vary. Tallac Historic Site, Highway 89 2.5 miles north of Highway 50, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4975, http://valhallatahoe.com.

WHOLE FOODS SPARKS FARMERS MARKET: The 20th annual farmers’ market is a family-friendly and farmer-focused event. New highlights include a gourmet food truck court and expanded food area. Th, 8/23, 3-8pm. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 746-5024, www.shirleys farmers markets.com.

MATHEWSON-IGT KNOWLEDGE CENTER: Far Out: The University Art Scene from 19601975. The Special Collections department at the University of Nevada, Reno presents this sequel to the acclaimed 2011 exhibit Post-War Bohemians in Northern Nevada. Far Out will highlight the next generation of leading edge visual artists at the university during the ’60s and ’70s. M-Sa, 9am-5pm through 9/9. Free. Contact Special Collections Department (775) 682-5665, specoll@unr.edu, http://knowledgecenter.unr.edu/materials/specoll for details on this exhibit. 1664 N. Virginia St., University of Nevada, Reno, (775) 784-4636, http://knowledgecenter.unr.edu.

All ages

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BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

et’s Ascuaga’s Nugg been Man and John r years, we’ve Fo ff. -O ok Co ck Ro k ac the West Rib Bl the trekking out to aying st torn between or al iv st fe pagan art e of Desert for the the wide rang and sampling e m ho to r t, succuec rf close pe t os m of nature’s ns of ways to flavors of one . There’s doze rib e th ls: se or lent m rent sauces to , dozens of diffe m— cook the things ways to eat ’e and dozens of ill tell you w throw on ’em, n ica er Am d-blooded though any re is with your y to eat them wa st be e th that ess as possible. m a g aking as bi hands, while m e now expensive Man tickets ar Since Burning free festival in is th , mmodities and rarified co ts cookers from , which attrac ks ar Sp . The n ow nt dow the better deal tion, is easily pt. 3, Se h ug ro all over the na th ns from Aug. 29 event, which ru n side dishes, ic and other fu us m e features liv l that delicious action is the al tr at n ai m e th but visit e information, meat. For mor . om f.c of ok co um www.nuggetrib —Brad Byn .com bradb@newsreview

KIDS DISCOVERY ROOM: Discovery Room Volunteers will open the Discovery Room three days a week during the summer months. Each week, activities will focus around a different theme, ranging from dinosaurs to pioneers. Regular activities include “Crafts on the Porch” on Wednesdays and story time at 11am on Fridays. W-F, 10am-1pm through 8/24. Free. Great Basin Adventure, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961, www.washoecountyparks.com.

NEVER ENDER: Now & Never. The exhibit features Megan Berner’s layered photographic and digital prints made while thinking about mapping and migration, time and travel, moments and memory, and presence and permanence—all packed into neat little boxes. M-Su through 8/30. Free. Contact Melanie Crane (775) 348-9440, neverender reno@yahoo.com, for details on this exhibit. 119 Thoma St., (775) 348-9440, http://myneverender.com.

TAHOE STAR TOURSSHOOTING STARS & COMETS: Experience

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Nature’s Colors in Fiber and Glass. North Tahoe Arts presents a collaborative exhibit featuring sister artists Catherine and Linda Strand. Catherine’s fused glass and Linda’s fiber-based wall hangings are distinctive yet complementary media celebrating color and design with nature themes. The opening reception is Friday, Aug. 3, 5-7pm. M, W-Su through 8/27. Free. End of an Era. Jay Thelin creatively depicts the golden age of wooden powerboats (1930-1960) using fragments of these boats in artistic arrangements. The exhibit will be held in the Corison Loft Gallery. The artist’s

the starry skies above Northstar Resort. Join star guide and poet Tony Berendsen for an educational night under the stars. Each Star Tour will take place from 8pm to 10:30pm. F, 8/24; Sa, 8/25; F, 8/31. $30 adults; $15 children age 12 and younger. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784, www.northstarcalifornia.com.

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reception is Aug. 3 from 5pm to 7pm. M, W-Su through 8/27. Free. 380 North Lake Blvd.,

collection of work by collaging an assortment of digital images together, printing them onto large canvases, and then painting over them with oils and wax pens. M-F through 8/30. Free. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.north tahoearts.com.

NORTHWEST RENO LIBRARY: A Very Special Art Exhibit. Work by young artists created in VSA Nevada workshops during the 2011-12 school year is on display in the gallery at Northwest Reno Library. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Wednesday 11am-7pm, ThursdayFriday 10am-6pm and Saturday 10am-5pm. Tu-Sa through 8/24. Free. Contact Administrative Assistant (775) 826-6100 ext. 3, info@vsanevada.org, www.vsanevada.org for details on this exhibit. 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 787-4100.

TRUCKEE MEADOWS COMMUNITY COLLEGE:

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Biggest Little City. Reno artist John Molezzo’s artwork primarily depicts vintage motels, neon signs and iconic architecture. He presents a unique

RECON|STRUCTURE|NATURE. Five exhibitions will showcase the explorations of our natural world. The TMCC Main Art Gallery will feature fabrics, paintings and sculptural vessels by Tuscarora, Nev., artists Ben Parks and Marti Bein. The Red Mountain Gallery will feature watercolors and prints by Reno artists Carol Neel and Penny Pemberton. The Erik Lauritzen Gallery will feature printmaking and watercolors by Reno artist Lynn Schmidt. The Red Mountain Student Gallery will feature drawings by TMCC student William Johnson. The Meadowood Center will feature artwork by

TMCC students relating to the theme of nature. M-F, 9am-9pm through 9/7; Sa, 9am5pm through 9/1. Free. Contact Andrea Parks (775) 673-7291, vparts@tmcc.edu, www.tmcc.edu/vparts/artgalleries for details on this exhibit. 7000 Dandini Blvd., (775) 673-7000, www.tmcc.edu.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Gail Wight: Hydraphilia. Wight prepared agar slides tinted with nontoxic dyes, added slime mold and began videotaping the resulting growth patterns. The video is a microscopic time-lapsed view (30x) of the physarum polycephalum or slime mold. Polycephalum is Latin for “many-headed,” and Wight’s title for her video installation references a mythological nine-headed monster, the Hydra of Greek myths that grew two heads when one was

The dark mite I’ve been separated from my wife for three years, but I crave her. I say “crave” because I don’t think I ever really loved her. We only got together 15 years ago because she asked me out. I would never have approached her, as I’m not attracted to her. She’s overweight, has a 10th-grade education, and is irresponsible with money. I’ve been in five one-sided relationships that started like this one, with my fear, insecurity or laziness allowing me to be led in. I’ve been spending time with my wife and realized that nothing about her has changed, and there’s little chance of our being happy together. I guess I should’ve had a bunch of dates with attractive single women, but I haven’t been with anyone since our separation. What’s my problem? The Declaration of Independence talks about “the pursuit of happiness.” You actually have to chase it. That takes having the guts to go after what makes you happy instead of going home with whatever plucks you off the dessert table and drops you in her purse like a miniature cupcake among men. Unfortunately, on the alpha male scale, you’re pretty much Hello Kitty. Let’s be clear: You don’t crave your wife; you crave the easy way out. You’d rather go back to a woman you find physically repellant than risk being rejected by one you actually want, probably because you feel your worth is determined by whether people like. In The Six Pillars of SelfEsteem, a book you need to read, therapist Nathaniel 30

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Branden writes that self-esteem— feeling worthy of happiness and competent to deal with what life throws you—comes out of self-acceptance: choosing to value yourself, to treat yourself with respect, and to stand up for your right to exist. If you’re shipwrecked on one of those little islands in a New Yorker cartoon and you ask the lone woman there, “You wanna climb the coconut tree with me?” and she says no, you have a problem. Otherwise, a no is just reason to ask the next woman out—and the next, and the next—until one you like says yes. Statistically, if you approach a lot of women you want, you should eventually get one—and, in the meantime, get to the point where rejection is something you mostly find boring. Yes, you do need to work on your self-worth, but you can’t wait for it to be all shiny and great. Fixing yourself takes time. Acting fixed takes only guts and a clean shirt, and then, if all goes well, making moves that suggest you’ll be an animal in bed, and not the kind that stands frozen in headlights in the middle of a country road.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


$6-$30. Reno Aces Ballpark, 250 Evans Ave., (775) 334-4700, www.renoaces.com.

the story of the Best Actress nominee Swanky Shampane, a fierce, fearless, ridiculously neurotic but fabulously unforgettable character, who is obsessed with changing her public image prior to the night of the Academy Awards, when she will be taking the front row, center seat next to her bitterest rival Meryl Streep. Th-Sa, 7pm through 9/22; Su, 2pm through 9/23. Pace-Menante Theatre, 3702 S. Virginia St. in the Sierra Marketplace, (775) 229-7077, www.swankyshampane.com.

RURAL RUMBLE 2012: The Vasquez brothers of Reno will anchor the boxing part of the show. Oscar Vasquez returns to Fallon after an action-packed win over Vincente Medellin last year. Oscar’s younger brother, Santos, will be making his professional debut at Rural Rumble 2012. Santos is slated to fight Julio Gomez of New Mexico in a four-round, Junior Flyweight bout. Sa, 8/25, 7pm. $7-55; $500 VIP tables. Churchill County Fairgrounds, 325 Sheckler Road, Fallon, (775) 423-4556, www.visitfallonnv.com/fallonfights.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA: Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival’s 40th anniversary season commences with Shakespeare’s comedy. Bosom buddies Valentine and Proteus are Verona’s closest comrades, but their friendship is put to the ultimate test when Proteus forsakes his beloved Julia and competes for the affections of Valentine’s newfound love, the strong-willed Silvia. TuSu, 7:30pm through 8/26. $20-$80. Sand Harbor State Park, 2005 Hwy. 28 in Incline Village, (800) 747-4697, http://laketahoe shakespeare.com.

SCHEELS BIKING CLUB: Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Rides will vary from 20-30 miles. Participants will need to sign a liability form when they attend. Helmets are required. The rides depart from the southeast corner of the parking lot by Best Buy. Th, 5:45pm through 9/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB: Runners

lopped off. W-Su through 8/26. $1-$10. Gregory Euclide: Nature Out There. Using traditional methods of landscape painting combined with natural materials and found objects, Euclide constructs three-dimensional encapsulated worlds where pristine notions of landscape meet the reality of our current environment. W-Su through 9/2. $1$10. Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper. The contemporary artist was commissioned to create a large-scale, site-specific artwork to hang in the Donald W. Reynolds Grand Hall and Atrium. Hashimoto’s sculptures—fabricated from thousands of small “kites”—are made from bamboo-stiffened rice papers not unlike those used for centuries to make traditional Japanese kites. The three-dimensional cascading form is suspended by nylon mono-filament and responds specifically to the museum’s unique architecture and changing light. W-Su through 1/1. $1-$10. Arthur and Lucia Mathews: Highlights of the California Decorative Style. Arthur and Lucia Mathews are considered two of California’s most prolific artists working in what is known as the California Decorative Style during the early 20th century. The aesthetic they fostered incorporated classical references, idyllic landscapes and a muted tonal color palette applied to a variety of works from murals and paintings to wooden frames and decorative objects. All of the artwork in this exhibition is from the collection of the Oakland Museum of California. Tu-Su through 10/14. $1-$10. Southwest PotteryFrom Anasazi to Zuni: Selections from the Brenda and John Blom Collection. This exhibition features more than 100 pieces of Southwestern pottery produced by some of the most active pottery-producing Native American tribal groups in the Southwest region of Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. The objects on display trace the art of indigenous pottery making from its prehistoric beginnings almost 2,000 ago to the present. W-Su through 9/9. $1-$10. Andrew Rogers: Contemporary Geoglyphs. Australian sculptor and photographer Andrew Rogers completed his series of contemporary geoglyphs in 2010, after finishing 47 sculptures in 13 countries with the help of nearly 7,000 people. The photographs in this exhibition were either taken by Rogers from an aircraft or obtained from commercial satellite imagery. W-Su through 8/26. $1-$10. Tim Hawkinson: Totem. Made from bronze, Hawkinson’s single sculpture evokes the forms of discarded plastic bottles or jugs, inviting conversations about water, land and the challenges Native American cultures have faced related to these natural resource. W-Su through 10/7. Jorinde Voigt: Systematic Notations. Nevada Museum of Art presents a solo exhibition of drawings by German artist Jorinde Voigt, recent winner of the prestigious Guerlain Drawing Prize in 2012. This will be her first solo exhibition at an art museum in the United States. W-Su through 1/6. 1-$10. Ice Music. Composer, multimedia artist and writer Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky that Subliminal Kid, creates bridges between sound art and con-

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temporary visual culture. Through music, photographs and film stills from his journey to the Antarctic, along with original artworks and re-appropriated archival materials, Miller uses Antarctica as an entry point for contemplating humanity’s relationship with the natural world. W-Su through 10/28. $1-$10. Edward Burtynsky: Oil. From 1997 through 2009, Burtynsky traveled internationally to chronicle the production, distribution and use of this critical fuel. In addition to revealing the rarely seen mechanics of its manufacture, he photographs the effects of oil on our lives, depicting landscapes altered by its extraction from the Earth and by the sprawl generated around its use. The images tell an epic story of mankind expressed through our discovery, exploitation and celebration of this vital natural resource. W-Su through 9/23. $1-$10. Juvenile-In-Justice: Photographs by Richard Ross. Ross’ series of 50 photographs documents and examines the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities in the United States. By photographing the children from behind or by obscuring their faces, the children’s identities are always kept anonymous. W-Su through 1/13. Opens 8/24. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 3293333, www.nevadaart.org.

Film CORAL REEF ADVENTURE: The SkyDome 8/70 largeformat film presents the real-life expedition of ocean explorers and underwater filmmakers Howard and Michele Hall as they guide viewers to the islands and waters of the South Pacific. M-Su, 1, 3, 5 & 7pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 children ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., north of Lawlor Events Center, (775) 7844812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

DARK SIDE OF THE MOON: Pink Floyd’s legendary rock ’n’ roll masterpiece, is recreated in full-color HD animation with surround sound and new footage and effects. F, Sa, 8pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 kids ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., north of Lawlor Events Center, (775) 784-4812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

TALES OF THE MAYA SKIES: The full-dome digital planetarium show travels to the ancient jungles of Mexico and features the ancient complex of Chichén Itzá, the “seventh wonder of the modern world,” in a rich combination of science, culture and legend. Spanish language showing at 6pm on Wednesdays. M-Su, 12, 2, 4 & 6pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 seniors age 60 and older, children ages 3-12. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., north of Lawlor Events Center, (775) 7844812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

THE WAY I SPENT THE END OF THE WORLD: Artemisia Moviehouse presents a screening of this film by Martin Scorsese and Wim Wenders, who teamed up to co-produce this story of

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Romanian life in the year leading up to the fall of Nicolae Ceausescu. Tu, 8/28, 7-10pm. $7 general; $5 members, bicyclists, students. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

and walkers are invited to join this Tuesday night group run. Water and snacks will be available after the runs. Meet in the mens sport shoe shop. Tu, 6:30pm through 11/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

Auditions RENO TAHOE COMEDY SHOW US YOUR TALENT! CONTEST: Auditions are open to everyone, but you must register first so that you can be assigned an audition time. Prizes range from gift certificates to local restaurants to a three-day/two-night Lake Tahoe stay. The contest takes place on Sept. 8, 15, 22. F, 8/24; Sa, 8/25. $7 advance; $9 day of show; free to audition and perform. Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St. Pioneer Center plaza on Virginia and Mill streets, (775) 322-5233, www.renotahoecomedy.com.

VARIETY YOGA: Each week the Sunday class is taught by a different instructor. Su, 10:3011:20am through 12/30. $15 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

Music LAZY 5 SUMMER MUSIC SERIES: THE BUBBAS: The summer concert series winds down with a performance by the rock/alternative country band. W, 8/29, 6:30pm. Free. Lazy 5 Regional Park, 7100 Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs, (775) 823-6500.

Onstage STEEL MAGNOLIAS: The Proscenium Players will present Robert Harling’s comedy-drama focusing on the friendship among six southern women and a celebration of love, loyalty, strength and the bonds of sisterhood. On opening night, Aug. 17, the cast and crew will host an Opening Night Party following the show. Treats from the play such as red armadillo cake and cuppa, cuppa, cuppa will be served. Admission to the party is free with a purchased ticket, however reservations are required. Please e-mail co-producer, Dianna Lightfeather at lovelightfeather@gmail.com. F, 8/24, 7:30pm; Sa, 8/25, 7:30pm; Su, 8/26, 2pm. $15 general; $12 members, students, seniors. Maizie Jesse Harris Black Box Theatre, Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976, www.breweryarts.org.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinity reno.org.

Sports & fitness 30/30 (CARDIO MAT/STRETCHING): Thirty minutes of Cardio Mat Pilates and 30 minutes of intensive stretching. Intermediate-level strength, stamina and flexibility are required for this class which emphasizes the principle of fluidity. Call to reserve your spot. M through 12/31. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

Classes BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT: Breast-feeding mothers are invited to join Breastfeeding Cafe. Mothers exchange their experiences and discuss concerns such as milk supply, pumping, going back to work, sleeping or lack of sleep, etc. Tu, 4-5pm through 12/18. $10 drop in; free for first-time attendees. Renown South Meadows Medical Center, 10101 Double R Blvd., (775) 240-9916, www.wellnourishedbaby.com.

CONVERSATION CORNER: Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions ideal for non-native English speakers who want to improve their speaking skills. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that involve everyday activities. W, 4:30-6pm. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 829-7323.

SWANKY SHAMPANE: Boogie Woogie Productions

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for

presents this comedy by David Creps set in Reno, Beverly Hills and Malibu. The play tells

people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

BASIC MAT PILATES: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercise in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/25. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yoga reno.com.

ECSTATIC DANCE: This free-form dance class allows participants to explore different motions, rhythms and pattern of movement. Fourth Tu of every month, 7:15-9:15pm. $8-$10, free for first-time visitors. Tahoe Yoga & Wellness Center, 1085 S. Virginia St., (775) 348-9642, www.tahoeyoga.com.

PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/27. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

RENO ACES: The minor league baseball team plays Fresno Grizzlies. Th, 8/23, 7:05pm; F, 8/24, 7:05pm; Sa, 8/25, 7:05pm; Su, 8/26, 1:05pm.

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Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you know

what a controlled burn is? Firefighters start small, manageable fires on purpose so as to eradicate brush that has accumulated too close to wooded areas. With less fuel around, bigger fires are not as likely to ignite accidentally and turn into conflagrations. I encourage you to use this as a metaphor for your own life, Aries. How? First, identify a big potential problem that may be looming on the horizon. Then, in the coming weeks, get rid of all the small messes that might tend to feed that big problem. Make sure it’ll never happen.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Jungian sto-

ryteller Clarissa Pinkola Estés advises us to take good care of the untamed aspects of our nature. “The wild life must be kept ordered on a regular basis,” she writes. One way to do this is to keep our uncommon and unruly ideas clear and organized. It’s also important to give them respect, and understand that they’re crucial to our spiritual and psychological health. How are you doing in this regard, Taurus? What’s your relationship with the untamed aspects of your nature? According to my reading of the omens, now is prime time for you honor and nurture and cultivate them.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): By my astrological reckoning, you’re not nearly wet enough right now. I recommend that you take immediate and intensive steps to remedy the situation. There should not be anything about you that is high and dry; you need to soak up the benefits that come from being slippery and dripping. If you’re suffering from even a hint of emotional dehydration, you should submerse yourself in the nearest pool of primal feelings. For extra credit, drink deeply from the sacred cup that never empties.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the 16th

century, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor ruled over a vast swath of land that included 12 modern European nations. According to some historians, he once said, “I speak Spanish to God, Italian to women, French to men, and German to my horse.” This is the kind of attitude I recommend that you adopt in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Tailor your language to the people and creatures you’re speaking to. Address them on their own level of consciousness, respecting their limitations and appealing to their particular kind of intelligence. Of course, this is always a good policy, but it’s especially important for you to observe now. Fluency and flexibility will be rewarded in ways you can’t imagine.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Would you like to

enhance your relationship with money? If so, do you have any specific ideas about how to do it? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to identify and implement those ideas. Let me make an initial suggestion: Keep your magical thinking to a minimum, but don’t stamp it out entirely; a small amount of frisky fantasizing will actually boost the likelihood that your more practical intentions will achieve critical mass. Here’s another tip: Imagine the presents you’d get for people if you had some extra cash. Stimulating your generous urges may help motivate the universe to be generous to you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A guy I know

was invited to hang one of his paintings in a New York gallery—on one condition. It had to be a piece he created on the spot, in the gallery, on the day the show opened. That would be way too much pressure for me to handle. I need to spend a long time on the stuff I make, whether it’s music or writing. I’ve got to fuss over every little detail as I constantly edit and refine and add layers. What about you, Virgo? Could you quickly come up with some new wrinkle or fresh creation that would show the world who you really are? I’m guessing we will soon find out.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you’ve been

reading my horoscopes for a while, you know I’m not a decadent cynic who thinks “no pain, no gain” is the supreme formula for success. On the contrary. I think it’s quite possible to enjoy tremendous growth spurts when you’re happy and healthy. Pleasurable events can be great learning experiences. Joy and freedom may activate

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potentials that would otherwise remain dormant. Having said that, I want to make a suggestion that may seem at odds with my usual approach, even though it’s not. For the next two weeks, I encourage you to explore the necessary power of decay. Harness the archetypes of breakdown and dissolution as you put an end to things whose time is up. This work is key to your future rejuvenation and renaissance.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I’m going to

ignore the Urban Dictionary’s more modern definitions of the word yeast, and stick to the original meaning: an agent of fermentation that brews alcoholic drinks and makes bread dough rise. Metaphorically speaking, Scorpio, you should be like that for your gang or crew or tribe. I urge you to stir up group morale. Provoke deeper thought and stronger feelings. Instigate some bubbly new trends and effervescent interactions. Be yeasty!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Sussex is a county in southeast England. Its official motto is “We wunt be druv,” which is Sussex dialect for “We won’t be pushed around.” It’s not bad as mottoes go, I guess. There’s power in announcing to the world that you’re not going to allow anyone to manipulate you or bully you. But I’d like to see you come up with a more robust battle cry for yourself, Sagittarius—one that doesn’t focus on what you won’t do, but rather on what you will do. It’s an ideal astrological moment to articulate your driving purpose in a pithy formula that will give you strength whenever you invoke it.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“Most people consider global warming somewhat of a mixed blessing,” wrote Aaron Sankin on The Huffington Post. “On one hand, there’s ocean acidification, deserts gobbling up wide swaths of farmland and the massive die-off of the innumerable species unable to cope with the effects of the world’s rapidly rising temperature. But, on the other hand, you’ll be able to wear shorts for literally the entire year.” Sankin is being deeply sarcastic, of course. Let’s make his satire a jumping-off point as we consider some sincerely worthwhile trade-offs you might want to implement in your own sphere. Would you be willing to sacrifice a trivial comfort for a new privilege? Would you shed a small pleasure to gain a much bigger pleasure? Might you divest yourself of a pocket of resentment if in doing so you’d attract a cleansing epiphany?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I don’t

expect your travels in the coming weeks to be like a smooth luxury cruise in a stretch limousine. Your route is not likely to be a straight shot through breathtaking scenery with expansive views. No, my dear Aquarius, your journeys will be more complicated than that, more snakey and labyrinthine. Some of the narrow passages and weedy detours you’ll need to navigate may not even resemble paths, let alone highways. And your metaphorical vehicle may resemble a funky old 1967 Chevy pickup truck or a forklift bedecked with flowers. It should be pretty fun, though. Keep in mind that your maps may only be partially useful.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In medieval

times, you didn’t need a priest to get married, nor did you have to be in a church or recite a set of vows. You didn’t even have to round up witnesses. All that was required was that the two people who wanted to be wed said “I marry you” to each other. Those three words had great power! In the coming days, Pisces, I’d love to see you draw inspiration from that lost tradition. Your assignment is to dream up three potent declarations that, while not legally binding, express the deepest and most loving intentions you promise to be faithful to in the coming years.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Candidate Virgil Goode of Virginia served a decade in the U.S. House, achieving an unusual niche, serving at different times as a Democrat, then an independent, then a Republican. He is running for president as the nominee of the Constitution Party. He had hoped to also pick up the nomination of the American Independent Party, but it went this month to Tom Hoefling. This interview with Goode was recorded during a visit to Reno.

What makes you take on a race like this? The belief that several things need to happen in this country ASAP for us to be a progressive, forward-going, positive growth country. First of all, we need to follow the Constitution. For example, not become involved in foreign wars unless Congress declares those wars. Second, we need a balanced budget now, not a decade down the road. Our deficit this year is over a trillion dollars. The debt is 16 trillion. You can’t balance the budget and reduce the debt unless you cut spending and I will do that, submit a balanced budget to the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate. Third, jobs—we need jobs in this country, particularly for U.S. citizens. I support ending Obamacare. I think that’s a stranglehold on small businesses. … I am the only candidate in the race among the Democrats, Republicans or most third parties that has advocated a moratorium, nearly complete, on green card admissions to the United States. We must end illegal immigration and reduce legal immigration by having a near-complete moratorium on

green cards. Green cards last year managed a 1.2 million being issued, the year before that about the same number. … When our unemployment rate is 8.3 percent, we should [be] preserving jobs in the United States for citizens first. We’re not doing that. It would greatly help those who have paid taxes and been in the country for a while if they had first crack at jobs. Lastly, I support term limits. I think term limits would make the atmosphere better in Washington. It would be less emphasis on constantly raising money for the next election and making the other side to look bad to enhance one’s position for the next election.

Why take on what is essentially an education campaign, rather than one— Not for me. I’m running to win. We are going to be on the ballot, I hope and expect, in enough states so that we can win the electoral college. In 1860 Abraham Lincoln wasn’t on the ballot in a number of states but he won the electoral college.

some, sits right there with Jesus and God judging the afterlife fates of all expired Earthlings? Um, gee, lemme get back to ya on that! I’m struck by the description of the way Smith translated the gobbledygook on the golden plates shown to him by the angel Moroni. Joe’s M.O.—he would drop his favorite “seeing rock,” described as “a chocolate colored stone,” into his white stovepipe hat and then, bringing the hat to his face so as to cut off as much light as possible, observe and record the emanations coming off the rock, which were linked mystically to the plates, I guess. So the translations of the engravings were never done directly, with some kind of Rosetta Stone apparatus. They were done indirectly, with Joe “reading” the information as it came off the rock at the bottom of his hat. Seriously. For real. How well would that act play today? If you saw a story about a guy looking for followers because he just

OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

What ever made you think you were a Democrat? Well, when I was elected the Democrats were the conservative party. The Republicans in Virginia were the liberal party. Linwood Holton was governor, very liberal. And the Democrats were conservative. They weren’t Franklin Roosevelt Democrats. They were Harry Byrd Democrats. Ω

brucev@newsreview.com

I’m a very tolerant person when it comes to religions and spiritual practices. If you want to travel on your chosen path of salvation, I’m pretty much OK with it as long as you’re not, you know, impaling geese on an altar in your back yard. Bottom line—I’m a man of the 60s. Do your own thing, dude. Just don’t get any of it on me while you’re doin’ it. But if you told me that a guy running for POTUS is a follower of a religion founded by a guy who could very easily be described as the Jim Jones of the 19th century, well, that gives me pause. And, conveniently enough, fodder for a column. Actually, it’s probably more accurate to describe Joseph Smith, the founder of the Mormon church, as a hybrid of deranged preacher Jim Jones and crafty science fiction author L. Ron Hubbard. A dynamic, vital, interesting fella, seething with creative juices and male hormones? You bet. A divine entity who now, claim

NEWS

—the two major parties with all their money? That is a chief problem in the United States today. Big money superPACs control the Democratic candidate, Obama, and the Republican candidate, Romney. Huge amount of money being poured in on both sides. I think 2012 is going to be the year the American public wakes up and says, “I’ve had enough of this control by superPACS, by large PACS. … It’s time we had a grass roots president focused on the average citizen.” I would be that president. …

∫y Bruce Van Dye

Mitt and Joseph

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How would you do it? How would you get past—

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IN ROTATION

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got the Word of God from some buried plates that he found and translated with the help of the magic rock in his stovepipe hat? You know what we used to call guys with that kind of rap back in ‘78? Deadheads! These were not people you followed. Not if you didn’t want a horrific colony of crabs living on your loins. These were people from whom you purchased LSD. (Indeed, the Dead have a wonderful song about this very kind of messianic character— Estimated Prophet). Let me reiterate. If you want to be a member of Joe’s congregation, be my guest. I have no problem whatsoever with your choice. Well, I do, actually, but that’s not the point. The point here is—what the hell is Mitt thinking? Or is he even thinking at all? Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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10

DORMITORY STORY

CAMPUS EATS 3 TECHIE TIPS 5 WELL ORCHESTRATED 7 WHO YOU GONNA CALL? 12 COOL KIDS’ CLUBS 13 TAKE MY ADVICE 15

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e c r u o S Your , t r a e h For d n i M & , Head

Join the Pack 2012 Fire up your brain and get ready to hit the books

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When I’m not here at the RN&R providing you with the lowdown on Reno’s green scene, you’ll most likely find me in the library trudging my way through graduate school. I’ve been a University of Nevada, Reno student since 2006, and have spent most of the past six years on campus. I’ve worked in almost every library—even Getchell in the good ol’ days— written for every student publication, and lived in several of the residence halls, so I like to think that by now I’ve learned a thing or two about being a UNR student. The most important thing I’ve learned is that college is what you make of it. It’s a cliché, but it really can be the best years of your life if you get involved, challenge yourself and immerse yourself in what you love, inside and outside the classroom. It’s up to you to take control of what you want your experience to be. And here in this year’s guide, we’ve provided plenty of information to get your school year off to a good start, including roundups on campus eats, helpful web resources and cool clubs. Our campus map will help you find your way to class. Brad Bynum chats with music man Jason Altieri, UNR’s director of orchestras. We also share a peek at the new living learning community residence hall, and I share some tips I learned from my time as a resident assistant. Whether you’re a new undergrad fresh out of high school, a transfer student needing a change, or a graduate student delving into advanced academia for the first time, there’s plenty for you to experience at the University of Nevada, Reno. Welcome to the Pack!

775-324-2787

218 Vassar Street Reno, NV open every day 10am-7pm Sunday 11am-6pm

–ASHLEY HENNEFER RN&R special projects editor

Table of Contents 3

BRAIN FUEL: What to eat and where

5

GEEK SQUAD: Apps and software on campus

7

CODE OF CONDUCT: Music man Jason Altieri

8

CAMPUS MAP

10 LIVING AND LEARNING: UNR’s new residence hall 12 MAKE THE CALL: Numbers to know 13 CLUB HOPPIN’: Cool clubs to join at UNR 15 RESIDENT ASSISTANCE: Advice from a former RA

455 W. 5th Street | Reno | 775.688.5555

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Editor D. Brian Burghart Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Designer Priscilla Garcia Design Manager Kate Murphy Contributors Casey O’Lear, Allison Young Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Office/Distribution Manager/Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill

Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Russell Moore General Manager John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Director of Human Resources Tanja Poley Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.


PHOTO BY ALLISON YOUNG

In the UNR library, a student makes a purchase at Bytes, a coffee cafe.

Brain fuel Like any proper university campus, UNR has no shortage of food options. From tiny cafes to full restaurants, here’s a breakdown of what is offered and what we recommend. Don’t spend all your WolfBucks in one place. You might want to invest in a Lombardi gym pass, too, just to play it safe.

THE OVERLOOK

WHERE: North of Manzanita Lake and left of Frandsen Humanities. GOOD FOR: English majors. What to get: Soups change daily, but in the fall and winter, get the Italian Wedding soup and ask for cheesy breadsticks. It’s the perfect comfort food. OPEN: Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

ELEMENTS

WHERE: Davidson Math and Science Center, main floor. GOOD FOR: Math, science and engineering students. WHAT TO GET: Chai and a chiabatta sandwich. Ask for it heated. OPEN: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Where and what to eat on campus

BYTES

WHERE: Main floor of the Knowledge Center. GOOD FOR: A pick-me-up before delving into that term paper. WHAT TO GET: An iced raspberry mocha. Friendly barista Gonzalo makes it the best—sometimes he won’t let you put a lid on your cup until you take a sip of your drink first and give him a thumb’s up. OPEN: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday, 7:30-5 p.m. Sunday, noon-9 p.m.

From coffee to eggplant, omelets to pesto, getting educated is a hungry business. D-C STORE

WHERE: Argenta Hall, bottom floor. GOOD FOR: Late night cram sessions or House marathons. WHAT TO GET: Chicken strips are a rite of passage for students living in the res halls. OPEN: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-1 a.m. Friday, 7:30 a.m.-midnight. Saturday, 1:30 p.m.-midnight. Sunday, 1:30 p.m.-1 a.m.

THE DOWNUNDER CAFÉ

WHERE: Argenta Hall, bottom floor. GOOD FOR: Dorm dwellers. WHAT TO GET: It’s worth getting up before noon for the awesome breakfast spread, especially the epic omelet bar. Sometimes they also have French toast sticks. Remember those? OPEN: Monday-Friday, 7 a.m.-7:30 p.m. SaturdaySunday, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. for brunch, 4:306:30 p.m. for dinner.

PATHWAYS CAFÉ

WHERE: Center for Molecular Medicine. GOOD FOR: Vegans or organic food fans. WHAT TO GET: The Veghead—eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash and more veggie goodies doused with a pesto aioli. Get a side of the Totally Tomato Soup, too, if you’re really feeling adventurous. OPEN: Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

JOLT N JAVA

WHERE: The pathway in front of the closed Getchell Library building. GOOD FOR: Engineers heading to the engineering quad or to DeLaMare Library. WHAT TO GET: Green tea and an everything bagel with cream cheese. And eat it on the steps of Getchell or on the quad for an authentic college experience. OPEN: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

BY

Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

LAS TROJES EXPRESS

WHERE: Ansari Business GOOD FOR: Business majors, or anyone passing through the lower quad. WHAT TO GET: A Las Trojes breakfast burrito makes for great pre-test grub—especially for those early Core Humanities classes. OPEN: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

NORTHSIDE CAFÉ

WHERE: Fitzgerald Student Services Building. GOOD FOR: Grabbing a snack to console yourself after visiting the financial aid office. WHAT TO GET: A piece of cheese pizza and a cup of Seattle’s Best coffee—black, of course. OPEN: Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday 7:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

JOE CROWLEY STUDENT UNION

The Joe has a food court with popular chains, including Einstein Bros. Bagels, Port of Subs, Panda Express and Villa Fresh Italian Kitchen. For fall hours, visit www.unr.edu/union/aboutthe-student-union/hours. On the third floor, the Cantina Del Lobo offers Mexican food with special days like Taco Tuesday, Wing Thursday, Burger Friday and $5 Meal Deals. Open Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

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Discover where you’ll study abroad at usac.unr.edu

Nevada students, it’s affordable, practical, and valuable to live without regrets and learn without borders. Come to the USAC office in the Virginia Street Gym to begin an invaluable, undeniably life-changing chapter in your education: •

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Pick up program and advising materials to find the classes you need

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We’re open 8-5, Monday through Friday. Come speak to a peer advisor or pick up information. 4 | Join the Pack 2012 |

august 23, 2012 | a special supplement to the reno news & review

Best: Pizza, Wings, New Business, Late Night and many more.


Geek squad Tech tips to help you save time and money

Technology just keeps getting better and better for college students. If you plan smart and take advantage of cheap and free resources, you can prevent racking up those cringe-worthy bills for school supplies.

Get an e-reader If you don’t already have an e-reader, the devices are not as pricey as they used to be and can save you some serious cash in the long run. A hundred bucks will get you a Kindle or a basic tablet, which, compared to a stack of textbooks, is pretty inexpensive. Depending on your major, you may be able to get many of your required readings in e-book form. In any case, many classic novels— required for classes like Core Humanities— are in public domain, which means they are often free to download or available to check out through the local UNR and public libraries. You can also lend books to friends or peers, and take notes on texts without damaging a book’s pages.

Use open source software There is no point shelling out hundreds of dollars for programs that have open source equivalents. Free programs like OpenOffice or LibreOffice have an entire suite that match Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint. GIMP

is a decent option for photo editing. ReplicatorG is a popular open source modeling program.

Use the school’s programs If you have to use a specific program like Adobe Photoshop or Solid Works, the university has all the programs students need to use for class. The ECC lounge, located on the second floor of Scrugham Engineering and

Team projects are a drag. They require students with completely different schedules to meet and work, and a few people end up doing most of the work. Mines, offers AutoCAD, ChemCAD, Matlab, Solid Works and dozens more. The @One in the Knowledge Center has computer labs with the latest photo, design and video editing software.

BY

Ashley Hennefer

ashleyh@newsreview.com

Work on team projects online Let’s face it—team projects are a drag, even if a professor means well. They require students with completely different schedules to find time outside of class to meet and work on an assignment, and ultimately a few people end up doing most of the work. But it’s possible to get most of the work done online without having to meet in the dead of night or the crack of dawn. Google, especially, has a variety of free tools. Use Google Chat to talk as a group. Google Documents allows multiple people to work on a paper at the same time, and it also has a chat bar if you need to instant message while you’re working. And, by using web tools, it’s easier to keep a paper trail of who has done what to hold teammates accountable.

Download the UNR Library app If you use the resources provided at the Knowledge Center, it’s worth downloading the UNR Library app. The app provides information on library hours, and you can also check your account and renew books, reserve rooms, scan a book to see if it is in the UNR Libraries database, call campus escort, and find an open computer in the library. It also has a resource guide available for different majors. Visit the app store for Apple or Android and search for “UNR Library.”

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Join the Pack 2012 | 5


6 | Join the Pack 2012 |

august 23, 2012 | a special supplement to the reno news & review


PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

at the University of Nevada, Reno Jason Altieri is the Director of Orchestras at the

BY

Brad Bynum bradb@newsreview.com

Well, usually I try to decide where we have our strengths and where we have our weaknesses in the orchestra. The thing that makes it challenging is that every year the orchestra is different, because we graduated about 20 students last year. And we graduated some really good players. So I just hope that decent freshmen come in.

the younger kids, who are pretty inexperienced on how to use a conductor. They’re used to a director who just sort of bangs on a stand and keeps them on time. Then, we have the Youth Symphony Orchestra. Those are more advanced students. But still, as younger students, you have to tell them what you want, and then you have to tell them again, and then you have to tell them again. And then again [laughs]. There’s a lot of repetition in asking them for what you want. Once they get to college, that changes, because … the brain is a little more developed on how to study quickly, so they’re able to retain instructions a lot quicker. … That way, we can get away with more concerts with less rehearsals in college. And sometimes I conduct the Atlanta Pops Orchestra or even the Reno Philharmonic, where we’ll have a concert and we’ll only have one rehearsal, which is a different kind of pressure entirely.

How long have you been at UNR?

When you lead rehearsals, what’s the process?

University of Nevada, Reno, a job he describes as a combination of conductor, “administrator, the guy who rehearses everything, the librarian, the cheerleader, the preacher,” and more. He leads UNR’s two orchestras, the symphony orchestra and the more elite chamber orchestra, through a couple of rehearsals a week and a couple of concerts a semester.

How do you choose pieces for the orchestra?

Four years. Originally I came from Atlanta. My parents are musicians. They met in the Atlanta Symphony. I decided to be a musician myself. My parents are string players, and for some reason I decided to be a trombone player. I guess that was my little bit of rebellion [laughs]. I grew up in music. I went to the University of Georgia and got a music education degree. Then I moved to Michigan, lived in real winter weather, and got my master’s and my doctorate. After that, I was on a bus for six years. I was doing tours, conducting an opera company here or there, or doing an orchestra on tour. I’ve conducted in every state except for Nebraska, Alaska and Hawaii. ... I’ve been to China three times, conducting mostly movie music. They love that stuff over there. I’ve also been to Japan, Taiwan, Malaysia, and I just got back from the Philippines. So a lot of the travel has been in Asia, but I also had occasion to work in opera in the Czech Republic, which was really great.

How does conducting change based on the size of the orchestra, the ages of the musicians, and the piece of music? A lot of it, where the rubber hits the road, is always with rehearsal. I also conduct the youth orchestras for the Reno Philharmonic. I have two different levels of youth orchestra. I have

Think Free

Code of conduct Jason Altieri, Director of Orchestras

Well, usually with college and the Youth Symphony Orchestra—some of the more advanced musicians—I’ll run through a piece. We’ll go from front to back, just to see the lay of the land, just to dive into the deep end and see who comes out the other side with limbs intact. … You have to do a lot of study even before the first rehearsal. You can’t sight read in rehearsal. It’s never a good idea. So, I’ll find places in the score that are tricky, and I’ll pinpoint those. After we go ahead and just bash through, I’ll find the little spots and work the tricky spots, so that way they practice the tough things, and they’re not shocked by it. ... [O]ftentimes, you’ll look through the score and you’ll go, well, this is a pretty tricky spot, I bet they’re going to have a problem with that, but then all of a sudden, they’ll play it well. And you’re like, oh! And then you’ll see something else and you think, well I didn’t think they’d have a problem with that, but for some reason the orchestra will have difficulty with a certain section. So it’s like anything else, you have all the best plans in the world, but once you’re in the heat of the battle, those plans go out the window. That isn’t to say you shouldn’t have a plan when you go into rehearsal, but that’s the beauty of a living, breathing orchestra, you never can really tell what’s going to happen next. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | AUGUST 23, 2012 |

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The 2012-2013 resident assistants participate in summer training to prepare for the coming year.

Inside UNR’s new residence hall

A

living learning community, also known as an LLC, combines academics and socializing to give students a chance to make friends while focusing on school. Students who live in an LLC attend some of their classes within the same building in which they reside. UNR has had living learning communities before—usually reserved to a particular floor in a few of the residence halls—but it now has it’s own building devoted to the idea. Known as the Nevada Living Learning Community, the new building has four classrooms and television lounges, libraries and living rooms on each floor. It can house 320 residents in its five stories, and residents living in suites with two or three bedrooms. There’s also wireless internet in each room. Students must be accepted into an LLC program in order to live in this hall. Our photographer Allison Young checked out the building to give the rest of us a peek into what an LLC looks like. For more information, visit http://www.unr.edu/housing/on-campushousing/residence-halls/nevadallc.

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LIVING & LEARNING

AUGUST 23, 2012 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

BY

Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

PHOTOS BY

Allison Young


One of the larger in-building classrooms.

A two-person bedroom in a three-bedroom, six-person dorm suite.

The lobby of the building also gives residents another place to hang out.

One of the smaller lounge areas is a place for students to work on homework.

A quiet study room provides tables where students can collaborate on group projects or work independently.

A duo sink in a dorm suite includes a recycling bin.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | AUGUST 23, 2012 |

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Club hoppin’ Four of UNR’s coolest clubs They always tell you that the best way to

make friends in college is to join clubs and organizations based on your interests. And every university has sororities, fraternities, multicultural clubs and mathletes. But only at the University of Nevada, Reno will you find Burners wielding flaming fans out on the Quad every Friday night and flesh-eating zombies lying in wait outside of Cain Hall to take down unsuspecting human soldiers. Here is a rundown of just a few of the unique and interesting clubs and organizations UNR offers its students:

Humans vs. Zombies A human and a zombie sit next to each other in Math 120. During class, they are civil, but once they hit the doors, the human has to run for his life lest he become assimilated into the growing army of zombies that threatens to take over the university campus. Humans vs. Zombies—one of UNR’s newest clubs—organizes a campus-wide games that last for two to three weeks at a time. The games start with one zombie intent on infecting the other players by tagging them one-by-one. The human army aims to take down the zombies with Nerf guns and sock grenades in an ongoing battle that spans the entire campus, except in academic buildings and residence halls, and does not come to a halt until one side has taken down the other.

BY

Fire Spinning Considering the integration of Burning Man culture in everyday Reno life, it was only a matter of time before the university gained a fire-spinning club — which it did about two years ago. No experience is necessary for club members, as more experienced firespinners are willing to teach newcomers all

Only at UNR will you find Burners wielding flaming fans out on the quad every Friday night. their best tricks, including juggling, hulahooping, poi-spinning and using rope darts. The group meets weekly in the Quad on campus to put on a flaming display to attract new members. After a few practices, the members plan to put on formal performances on campus and around town.

FemSex While technically a club, FemSex was offered as a class for the first time during the spring 2012 and will be offered as a class

Casey O’Lear caseyo@newsreview.com

again this fall. The concept for FemSex was inspired by a similar student-facilitated group offered at the University of California, Berkeley. With its focus on female sexuality, the FemSex group hopes to build a strong network of women within the university and its surrounding community. The club covers all topics regarding women’s issues, sex and health, but its purpose is greater than simply gathering college-aged women to have discussions. The club aims to help women explore and learn about their bodies and sexuality, but it also aims to facilitate social change in the community.

Dragon Indulge your inner fantasy fanatic and work on your roleplaying skills in Dragon Club, UNR’s one and only club centered on tabletop roleplaying games (like Dungeons & Dragons, for example). The group specializes in so many different games—from Warhammer to World of Darkness—and has so many members that there is a game available for you to join nearly every day of the week. The club welcomes expert players and novices alike, and its members will gladly help walk you through a myriad of fantastic lands as your Goliath Barbarian smashes everything in its path.

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Resident assistance Advice from a former RA

BY

Ashley Hennefer

ashleyh@newsreview.com

I spent two years as a resident assistant in Canada Hall, and each year I had around 40 students on my floor who needed my mentoring and support at all hours of the day. It was a role I took on for several reasons—to get free room and board was a huge perk, but I also wanted to help my peers have positive experiences in school and life. After getting to know eighty very different students in those two years, many of the issues new students face are common— stress, loneliness, uncertainty. Here are some tips I used to share with my residents on a regular basis.

ASK FOR HELP UNR has many resources available to help students, including tutoring services, counselors, career advisors, and more. So I was always surprised when a student came to me upset about his or her grades or choice of major. Talk to your professors often to let them know where you are with the course material. Stop by the counseling center every now and then to vent if you’re worried about the future. Find a writing consultant to help you get through that paper you’ve been dreading. College is hard and often stressful, but if you don’t ask for help, you’re left to deal with things on your own, which can quickly get overwhelming.

never made before if you stick to only hanging out with the same crew you’ve known since high school.

LEARN HOW TO BALANCE YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CHECKBOOK I was an RA in the upper class hall, and most of my residents had been in college for a couple of years and knew most of the ropes. But even seniors seemed to have a hard time sticking to their responsibilities, like paying bills or going to class on time. If you’re one of the lucky ones whose parents help foot the bill for school, consider getting a part-time campus job to help out with your tuition or living expenses. If you’re already financially independent, make sure that working doesn’t take too much of your time away from school. Working and going to school is hard, but it’s doable, and you’ll learn a lot about balancing responsibilities.

e!

m That’s

PARTICIPATE IN YOUR HALL Much of an RA’s job includes planning programs and events in the dorms, and in my hall, an event was considered successful if there was a turnout of ten students. Which is pretty sad, because it takes hours to plan programs. RAs put on programs with their residents’ needs in mind—we know who our students are, what their majors are, what they like and don’t like. Take advantage of these programs hosted in your building. They’re for you. Sometimes they’re educational or career-oriented; other times, they’re a way to blow off some steam during a stressful semester. These events are always free, and there’s likely to be food or other goodies. And you’re welcome to come in your pajamas.

BRANCH OUTSIDE OF YOUR SOCIAL CIRCLE UNR draws students from all over the world, and resident halls house a diverse group of people from different backgrounds. It’s daunting to find yourself living in a place with complete strangers, but you learn a lot about yourself and how you deal with uncertain situations when you’re forced to experience confrontation, cultural differences and often unpredictable personalities. But you might make some friends you would have

FOCUS ON SCHOOL Going to college is not just about what you learn in a classroom, but at the end of the day, you’re there to become a smarter person and work toward your career plans. Extracurricular activities are valuable learning experiences, but they shouldn’t take presidence over studying. The same goes for friendships and relationships. Speaking from my own experience, if a friend encourages you to ditch class often, they probably aren’t a very good friend.

KEEP THINGS IN PERSPECTIVE I can’t count the number of times I had a resident come to my door at 3 a.m. crying about a failed test or a bad date. Sometimes school, and life, just sucks. But college is part of a big picture. Otherwise you wouldn’t be here. Remember that you’re lucky to be able to go to college, and that you’re working hard toward building a life for yourself. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | AUGUST 23, 2012 |

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entertAinMent (Main Stage, Free)

Jelly Bread

Wednesday, August 29th, 7pm

A mix of funk, soul and roots rock, this band from the Reno/ Tahoe area will wow audiences on the first night of the Rib Cook-Off. Jelly Bread’s calling card is high-energy, funky music, balanced with exceptional songwriting and storytelling.

John Ascuaga’s nugget

t

he biggest and the best BBQ festival is

proud to announce a brand new rib cooker for 2012. Chicago-area BBQ experts, Sweet Baby Ray’s, will join the line-up of champion rib cookers at the Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off. Sweet Baby Ray’s is well-known for delicious, award-winning barbecue sauce. The 24th annual best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-off will run Wednesday, August 29, through Monday, September 3, 2012. This must-attend culinary, music and craft festival is open 11am to 9pm Wednesday through Sunday, and 11pm to 5pm on Monday. Admission is free! More than 500,000 visitors attended and 100 tons of ribs were served in 2011. The wide variety of activities within the event, including world-championship rib eating contest, the 2012 Presidential Pig Race, and top-notch entertainment - not to mention the best BBQ in the country - all come together to draw massive amounts of people to Victorian Square every Labor Day weekend. Similar large crowds are expected for 2012. Twenty-four of the country’s most celebrated and talented rib cookers will feed event goers, while competing for a total cash purse of $14,500 and the title of “Best in the West” - a designation many cookers consider to be the ultimate prize in highvolume competitive BBQ. Last year, Back Forty Texas BBQ was the top winner. Another top honor - the 2011 People’s Choice Award was given to Bone Daddy’s BBQ for the second year in a row.

2 | best in the west rib cookoff ProGrAM |

2012 JUDGes Alan Zeman

Rational USA

Larry Forgione

Culinary Institute of America

Jules Forgione

Goddess of American Cuisine

Sean Forgione

Wynn Las Vegas

Ken Wayne

KTVU

Matt Russell

On the Menu Live

Ron James

Wild 102.9 Reno

Beryl Love

Reno Gazette Journal

Spud Hilton

San Francisco Chronicle

Pat Hambright

KOLO 8 News Now

Tad Dunbar

Charter Judge

Albert Hall

Acacia

The Wood Brothers

Thursday, August 30th, 7pm

Two brothers comprise this blues and folk band. The Wood Brothers create their own evocative sound to make a high-lonesome harmony blend of music influenced by their childhood, and of course, their family.

D. Brian Burghart Reno News & Review

entertAinMent John Ascuaga’s Nugget is announcing an all-star line-up for The Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off, including country favorite, Gloriana, and 90’s hit band, the Spin Doctors. More than 40 bands will play on multiple stages during the sixday Victorian Square event. The bands will take the main stage during the event, which runs from Wednesday, August 29th, through Monday, September 3, 2012. No tickets are required, and people can enjoy the bands free of charge!

aug ust 2 9-se pte mbe r 3, 20 12

Spin Doctors

Friday, August 31st, 7pm

This Grammy-nominated group won the American Music Award for Best New Song Act in 1994. They’re best known for hits like “Two Princes,” and “Little Miss Can’t Be Wrong.” Sure to be a crowd favorite!


west end stAGe entertAinMent wednesdAY, AuG 29

nal o i t i Add inment! rta ente

Time 11am-2pm 2:30-5:30pm 6-8:30pm

Band

Slide Mountain Band John Dawson Band Dead Winter Carpenters

thurdAY, AuG 30 11am-2pm Rigorous Proof 2:30-5:30pm Schall Adams Band 6-8:30pm Buster Blue

Gloriana

Saturday, September 1st, 7pm

fridAY, AuG 31 11am-2pm Hired Gunzz 2:30-5:30pm Jake’s Garage 6-8:30pm Buddy Emmer Band

Country favorite Gloriana propelled into the spotlight with their 2009 hit “Wild at Heart.” They’ve been honored with an American Music Award for Breakthrough Artist and an ACM Award for Top New Vocal Group. You’ll be able to hear them perform their hit song “(Kissed You) Good Night.”

sAturdAY. sePt 1 11am-2pm The Novelists 2:30-5:30pm Greg Golden Band 6-8:30pm Buddy Emmer Band sundAY, sePt 2 11am-2pm Max Volume Band 2:30-5:30pm West Bay Rhythm 6-8:30pm Mark Sexton Band MondAY. sePt 3 11am-2pm Delta Cat 2pm Rib Cook-Off Awards Ceremony 2:30-5:30pm Jo Mama

Molly Hatchet

Sunday, September 2nd, 7pm

This southern rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1975. They are best known for their hit songs "Flirtin' with Disaster,” “Dreams I’ll Never See,” and “One Last Ride.”

Doug Kershaw monday, September 3rd, 3pm

Louisiana-native Doug Kershaw’s Cajun folk music will entertain rib-eaters on the last day of the Cook-off. Kershaw has recorded 15 albums during his career, and is well-known for his fiddle playing skills, and hit song “Louisiana Man.”

kids’ AreA

Children will delight in an array of rides and activities. The kids’ area will be located on the west side of Victorian Plaza, near the West End Stage, and will include an obstacle course, a bounce house, a slide, and a mechanical swing. Ride tickets will be available for purchase just outside the kids’ area.

website/sociAl MediA

You’ll find all the details you need about the Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off at www.nuggetribcookoff.com or use our social media channels to find out about things as they happen! Like us on Facebook at facebook.com/nuggetribs to post rib cook- off photos and share your experience or follow us on twitter @nuggetribs.

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Name: Armadillo Willy’s Location: Los Altos, CA About Us: It all began in 1983 with a simple goal: Serve the best BBQ this side of Texas in a fun, inviting atmosphere at affordable prices. We take pride in offering a family-friendly experience and we’re proud of the look and feel of each of our restaurants. Yet, we never forget that Armadillo Willy’s is all about barbecue. Real barbecue. Cooked over an oak-wood fire. No gas. No electricity. Just serious barbecue. Whether you’re dining in our home or yours, know that, when it comes to barbecue, this is as good as it gets. www.armadillowillys.com

Name: Aussom Aussie Location: Pittsburgh, PA About Us: Aussom Aussie is Australia’s most accomplished BBQ chef with more than 150 awards for best BBQ in the USA and Canada. A 24 year veteran of the International BBQ Circuit, Paul “Aussom Aussie” MacKay started competing in BBQ contests in 1988 and after several years he and his father developed their very own traditional Australian fruit based barbecue sauce. Taking on the best Barbeque chefs, he came to North America to prove he had a winning formula. Paul’s sauces, seasonings and supplies are simply the best you can buy, if you take the art of Barbie (BBQ) seriously. History: 3rd 2004, 2nd 2002, 1st 2001, 5th 2000 www.aussomaussie.com

Name: BJ’s Barbeque Location: Sparks, NV About Us: Established nearly 20 years ago, BJ’s Nevada Barbecue Company is family owned and operated and a local favorite. We serve up delicious Pork Ribs, Beef Brisket, chicken, shredded pork, Louisiana Hot Links, salads, wings and more! How good are our ribs? BJ’s is very proud to be a six time “Best of the West” rib cook-off winner! This is why we are Sparks, Reno, and Carson City’s favorite place for real Nevada Barbeque. History: 4th 2010, 2nd 2006, 5th 2005, 4th 2000, 1st 1998 www.bjsbbq.com

Name: Back Forty Texas Barbecue Location: Pleasant Hill, CA About Us: Jeff and his team compete regularly in contests against the nation’s finest barbeque operations. As one of the nation’s Top 24 Barbeque Teams, Back Forty Texas Barbecue has been invited to compete in the National Rib Cook-Off every year since 1991. The judges regularly vote Back Forty the #1 Barbeque In California and twice voted Back Forty’s barbeque sauce as Best in the Nation. In 1993, Back Forty opened a restaurant in Shingle Springs, CA and, in 1995, Back Forty served travelers at the Roseville, CA location. In 2007, Back Forty Pleasant Hill opened the Roadhouse & Saloon 20 miles up Interstate 680 from San Ramon. History: 1st 2011, People’s Choice 1997, 5th 1996, Best Sauce 1996 www.backforty.us

4 | best in the west rib cookoff ProGrAM |

aug us t 2 9-se pte mbe r 3, 20 12


Name: Bone Daddy’s BBQ Location: Midland, MI About Us: Bill Wall married his wife, Kim, while here for the competition one year. Their beautiful daughter Jessica has been attending shows with them since she was little and still helps out today. In 2005, Bone Daddy’s opened a restaurant in Midland, Michigan. Today Bill and Kim continue to offer award-winning food through their catering and restaurant business and they are still winning competitions throughout Michigan and the USA. The best of all of these competitions is The Best In the West Nugget Cook-Off, in which Bone Daddy’s has been invited to compete since 1990. History: 1st 2011, 2010, Peoples Choice 2010, 2nd 2009, 3rd 2011 Peoples Choice 2009, 1st 2008 www.bonedaddysbarbeque.com

Name: Butch’s Smack Your Lips BBQ Location: Mt. Laurel, NJ About Us: Butch’s Smack Your Lips BBQ ribs and sauce have won prizes all across America. Now, whenever we get a craving for some of Butch’s ribs, we just fire up the grill and follow Butch’s time-tested rib cooking recipe while using some of his amazing smack-your-lips barbecue sauces and seasoning rubs. We like our sauce sweet, but you can get yours whatever way you like it best: Mild, sweet, pyrogenic – and if you’re real brave – super pyrogenic! History: People’s Choice 2008, People’s Choice 2006, 1st 2005 www.smackyourlipsbbq.com

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Name: Carson City BBQ Location: Carson City, NV About Us: We’re Nevada’s most award winning barbeque company. Our first contest was the Arizona Rib Round Up. We tried our luck again at The Best on the Mountain Horizon Rib Cook Off and won Best Sauce. Following this we won 1st or 2nd place for sauce and 1st place for ribs for the next five years. In 1998 we entered the “John Ascuaga’s Best in the West Rib Cook off” for the first time and took 4th place with ribs; we’ve since won five more trophies. In the preceding years we started catering more and more and now cater anywhere from 250 to 300 catering jobs a year with clients reaching us from as far as 500 miles away. History: Best Sauce 2004, People’s Choice 2003 www.carsoncitybbq.com

Name: Checkered Pig BBQ Location: Martinsville, VA About Us: Checkered Pig™BBQ has two restaurant locations in Martinsville and Danville, VA. Our national competition cooking team is based out of Martinsville, Virginia. We travel all over the nation serving award-winning ribs and our Southern style menu, including America’s leanest pork BBQ. We’re a fairly new team on the circuit but we’re already bringing home the big trophies. Our biggest accomplishment was winning the 2004 Best in the West Rib Cook-Off. Our ribs have been featured on the Food Network and we’re members of the Kansas City Barbeque Society and National Barbecue Association. History: 4th 2007, 1st 2004 www.checkeredpig.com

Name: Chicago BBQ Company Location: Burr Ridge, IL About Us: Owner and barbeque expert Tom Ferguson opened Chicago BBQ Company in 1985, with a vision of creating Chicago’s ultimate barbeque experience. Trained in the fine art of low and slow smoking at the age of ten, Tom has spent his life creating the world’s best barbeque. Tom started traveling around the country doing ribfests in 1988. Critics have been raving ever since. Rib eaters agree...Chicago BBQ is the best barbeque in the country. Please join us in making everyday an outdoor barbecue. History: 2nd 2011, 5th 2010, 2nd 2008, 2nd 2005, 3rd 1999, 4th 1996 www.chicagobbq4u.com

Name: Desperado’s BBQ & Rib Co. Location: Hinckley, OH About Us: Desperado’s BBQ & Rib Company was started by a personal ad, sort of. Co-owner Lee Rice was looking through newspaper ads for a car when he found himself looking through the personal ads, one of which caught his eye - about a sassy redhead who soon became his wife and partner, Donna Rice. Donna’s home economics background and Lee’s food service background led to opening a restaurant. In 1989, the Rices started participating in BBQ competitions. Instant success led to more cook-offs every year since. Today, Desperado’s participates in 30 cookoff contests annually, and boasts 19 first place awards in 1997 alone. History: 2nd 2007, 3rd 2005, People’s Choice 2004 www.lickmyribs.com

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Name: Famous Dave’s BBQ Location: Plymouth, MN About Us: Dave started with a hankerin’ for fine barbeque and a desire to make the finest slow-smoked barbeque folks had ever tasted. He visited rib shacks, roadside joints, every hole-in-the-wall or fancy pants supper club he could, in search of the most BBQ succulent meats, savory seasonings and lip-smackin’ sauces around. After 25 years of tastin’ and cookin’, Dave decided he had to share. He’s received more awards than he has walls to hang ‘em on. Over three hundred, in all. Famous Dave’s offers great barbeque and fun. But that’s for you to judge, ‘cause after all, you’re our best critics. Come on in, we’ll treat y’all right. History: 4th 2008, 1st 2007, People’s Choice 2007, 1st 2006, People’s Choice 2005 www.famousdaves.com

Name: Joey’s Texas Thunder Location: Euless, TX About Us: We’ve operated Sutphen’s Family Style Restaurants since 1950. We are the barbecue that all others are measured by in the Texas Panhandle for over 40 years. Visiting 11 states and 15 cities annually we’ve served wood-cooked and wood-smoked BBQ to the Texas delegation of the U.S. Congress, the Governor and distinguished guests plus approximately 2600 crew members at the christening of the USS Texas, factory workers in Oregon and Tennessee, Phillips oil men working in the North Sea, celebrity fox hunts in Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut and celebrity tennis tournaments at LaCosta Resort in Carlsbad. History: Best Sauce 2002, 1st 1997 www.texasthunderbbq.com

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wed., Aug. 29- Mon. sept. 3, 2012 Victorian square, sparks nV

on Victorian Ave., between 14th Street & Pyramid Way. PARKING: Surrounding areas of Victorian Square, Sparks, Nevada. SHUTTLES: For quick, convenient access, park at Legends at Sparks Marina, and ride the free shuttle. Shuttles run Wednesday through Friday from 5pm to 10pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 10pm. The pick-up/drop-off point

at Legends is the Dirt Lot next to Sparks Blvd., between Fuddruckers and Popeye’s. Shuttles will take event goers to the RTC CENTENNIAL PLAZA, near Victorian and 14th, just steps away from all the action!

nuggetribcookoff.com or (800) 648-1177 or (775) 356-3300 MORE INFO:

The Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-off could not be possible without the support of our generous sponsors year after year.

free ADMission

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840 Victorian Ave • Sparks, NV 775-359 SKIS (7547)

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Name: Johnson’s Bar-B-Que Location: Chesapeake, VA About Us: In operation since 1984, Johnson’s is now one of the most respected indoor and outdoor caterers in the Southeast. We serve award-winning baby back ribs, pit BBQ hams, shoulders, loins and whole hog roast. History: Best Sauce 2010, 5th 2004, Best Sauce 2000, Best Sauce 1999

Name: Kentucky Bourbon Q Location: Westport, KY About Us: One of Shane and Tracy Best’s first competitions was the World Invitational Rib Championship in Richmond, Virginia, against 20 of the best rib cooking teams from around the world, They returned home as World Invitational Rib Champions. Since then, Shane and Tracy have received many awards for their products, including two Scovie Awards in 2001 and 2004 and an award for packaging from the national Barbecue Association. Shane is extremely proud of his 1st and 2nd Place People’s Choice Awards for Best Barbecue Sauce at the 2004 International Zesty Food Show in Fort Worth, TX. History: 5th 2008 www.bourbonq.com

Name: Kinder’s Custom Meats Inc. Location: Concord, CA About Us: Three generations of hard work and family pride began in 1946 when John Kinder opened his first meat market in San Pablo, CA. In 1985, Kinder’s relocated to Concord, CA and the business became a popular neighborhood meat market, deli and catering company. Kinder’s now boasts 15 franchise and corporate locations throughout Northern CA and NV. Over the years, Kinder’s has developed their own collection of award-winning BBQ sauces, marinades, rubs and spices. The combination of Kinder’s products with a passion to make every customer feel at home has made each location a thriving success. History: 4th 2011, 2nd 2010, 5th 2007, Best Sauce 2007, 4th 2005, 2nd 2003 Best Sauce 2003, People’s Choice 2002, People’s Choice 2000 www.kindersbbq.com

Name: Memphis Championship Barbecue Location: Las Vegas, NV About Us: Memphis Championship Barbecue is a product of the heritage of slow cooking, my family’s passion and my deep desire to take it one step further. It’s not just the Applewood we use for sweet and smoky flavor, or our sauce my mother was still making when she was 95. It’s not my unique blend of spices – our “Magic Dust” - that makes our barbecue special. It’s my family’s belief in the power of great barbecue that brings people to Memphis Championship Barbecue again and again. Accolades and awards from barbecuing competitions across the country don’t hurt either. www.memphis-bbq.com

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ew Brand n 2 1 0 2 in

Name: Sweet Baby Ray’s Location: Chicago, IL About Us: Sweet Baby Ray’s is well known for their delicious BBQ sauce! Chef Larry says he perfected his family’s sauce recipe back in 1985, creating a sweet and tangy BBQ sauce that beat out more than 700 other sauces at a national cook-off. After their success, they started selling the sauce door-to-door, at small mom-andpop shops, eventually growing their business across the country. Now, they sell about 500,000 bottles a year! The name, Sweet Baby Ray’s, comes from the nickname of Chef Larry’s younger brother, David, who got the nickname shooting hoops on Chicago’s West Side. www.sweetbabyrays.com

Name: Porky ‘N Beans BBQ Location: Port Saint Lucie, FL About Us: Porky ‘N Beans has been a proud member of the National Award Winning Rib Cookers of America since 1983. We are national rib cook-off contenders and travel between 10,000 and 15,000 miles a year competing in cities from St. Paul, MN to Fort Lauderdale, FL. We have won numerous rib cook off titles such as the prestigious Golden Rib Award and Best Ribs in America. We make our presence felt from the moment we enter a city with a $30,000 custom built Dooley which transports a 20’ specially equipped, self-contained trailer. History: Best Sauce 2006, 5th 2011 www.porkynbeans.com

Presidential Pig race 2012

to Predict America’s next President WHEN: 11am Thursday, August 30th, 2012, during The Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off WHERE: The corner of 11th & Victorian in Sparks, just outside of John Ascuaga’s Nugget We’re putting the “pork” in politics at this year’s Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off at John Ascuaga’s Nugget! In a completely unscientific method of predicting America’s next Commander in Chief, pigs dressed to represent “Obama” and “Romney” will race down Victorian Avenue, oinking for your vote. Just like the real 2012 Presidential candidates, these little piggies will be pounding the pavement! See which pig “squeals” the top spot, and wins by a snout! If your prediction falls short, you can always join the half-a-million people chowing down on more than 100 tons of ribs at one of the largest BBQ festivals in the country.

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Name: Rasta Joe’s BBQ Inc. Location: Plymouth, IN About Us: In 1993, “Rasta Joe” Alexander turned his passion for barbequing into a national award-winning business. The accolades and prize money started rolling in when Rasta Joe perfected his “Jamaican Style” sauce recipe after five trips to the Caribbean, where Joe discovered that blending local spices and flavorings - including Jamaican Rum - livened up his barbeque sauce even more. Considered by many to be one of the country’s top BBQ chefs, Rasta Joe continues to win national rib cook-off competitions from coast to coast. Joe takes his Southern Pride 700 Cooker on the traditional summer festival and fund-raising circuit. History: 3rd 2010, 2nd 2004, 5th 2002, 3rd 2000, 2nd 1998, 5th 1997, Best Sauce 1997 www.rastajoe.com/moses

Name: Smokehouse Specialties Location: Dos Palos, CA About Us: Carolyn admits this was all her husband’s idea long before their 20 plus year marriage - he had a family catering business for almost 10 years. Enjoying the fun of bringing their BBQ on the road is what it is all about. “We participate for the FUN” says Carolyn “and we have met a lot of people at the various events who have turned into life-long friends.” Smokehouse Specialties has been a part of the Nugget Rib Cook-Off for many years. They love coming to Sparks. In addition to ribs they also bring their award-winning BBQ Turkey Drums.

Name: Texas Outlaw Barbecue Location: Elizabethtown, KY About Us: Jim IS Texas Outlaw Barbecue. For 16 years, Jim has kept the BBQ on the road and it’s paid off as Texas Outlaw Barbecue is the only three-time 1st place winner at the Nugget Rib Cook-Off. Jim has won five awards in Sparks and is looking forward to this year’s competition. Restaurant manager Paul keeps the doors open back home at Texas Outlaw Barbecue Restaurant. Everything is made from scratch. The meat is hand-cut and smoked all day long. Jim keeps his recipes to himself but feel free stop by and talk to him at the Nugget Cook-Off. History: 3rd 2008, 1st 2003, 1st 2002, 1st 2000, 2nd 1999

Name: The Barbecue Company Inc. Location: Phoenix, AZ About Us: In business since 1987, The Barbecue Company has been recognized with several national awards for our ribs, including Michigan’s Bay City Pig Gig, the Naperville Ribfest in Illinois and Iowa’s World Pork Expo and the “National Championship” Trophy from the Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off. Our FreeRange Red and Sweet Sonoran Heat barbecue sauces have also won awards, including 1st Place in the Best in the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off and the Arizona Fiesta Bowl BBQ Classic. Chili Pepper Magazine has repeatedly recognized us for our outstanding barbecue sauces throughout the years. Most recently we were awarded the “Best of Phoenix” in the Phoenix New Times for our Sweet Sonoran Heat sauce. History: Best Sauce 2008, 5th 1998, Best Sauce 1998 www.thebbqco.com

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Name: Uncle Bub’s Location: Westmont, IL About Us: Uncle Bub’s BBQ puts a “best of BBQ regions” spin on their own unique award-winning recipes. Given their many competition awards, celebrity chef admirers and fiercely loyal fan base, it’s no wonder that WGN-TV in Chicago has declared Uncle Bub’s as one of Chicago’s Best BBQ Joints. Whether you like the BBQ styles of Carolina, Texas, Kansas City or anywhere in between, you’ll be in hog heaven with your first taste of “BUB LOVE”!!! History: Best Sauce 2011 www.unclebubs.com

Name: Willingham’s World Champion BBQ Location: Memphis, TN About Us: This 2010 National BBQ Hall of Fame inductee has been cookin’ and servin’ up his dry-rubbed ribs in Memphis since 1981. Winner of back to back World Championships and 100’s of competitions all across the country, John’s best known for his dry rub, known everywhere as “W’ham Seasoning”. “W’ham” is what sets Willingham’s apart from ALL the rest. Sauces are served on the side; so you can choose the flavor you prefer, if any. Sauce definitely not required. www.Willinghams.com

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Visit www.newsreview.com gifT cerTifica cerTificaTes froM resTauraNTs, Bars, cluBs, TaTToo, reTail, THeaTer, saloNs, spas, golf, VacaTioNs & More au gu st 29-se pt e m b e r 3 , 2 012 | best in the west rib cookoff ProGrAM |

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Presents the 3rd Annual

A

MUSIC HEALING ADDICTIONS

Music Festival

September 8, 2012 Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater at Bartley Ranch Gates Open at 3 p.m. Concert from 4-10 p.m. Over 20 of your favorite local acts will be performing

Tickets are $12.00 - Kids 6 and under are free.

Silent Auction Raffle Prizes Activities for the kids Food and drinks available onsite Purchase tickets by calling 775-324-7557, Purchace online at www.mu-ha.org or visit Recycled Records at 3344 Kietzke Lane, Reno September is National Recovery Month Ticket price is tax deductible. All proceeds will be used for public awareness about drugs of abuse and to assist family members of addicts.

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2012 Annual

PeoPLe’s choice AwArD sample ballot (select one only)

FREE WORKSHOP

Got Belly Fat? HopinG you’ll someday lose weiGHt?

This sample ballot is NOT for actual voting. Please stop by Voting Booth to complete official ballot.

Learn HOW to burn stomach fat not merely a few temporary water weight pounds Learn WHY many people EXERCISE with ZERO results Learn WHAT is really behind a resistant metabolism ONLY 2% of overweight people are successful FIND OUT WHY!

dr. layne linebaugh, d.C. alpine wellness Center www.alpinewellnesscenter.net There will be a demonstration of the treatment and patient testimonials at the end of the workshop.

The secret to losing weight in the belly, hips and thighs begins with knowing your BODY TYPE.

You will learn: Baby Ray’s (Chicago, IL)

•The basic BODY SHAPES and how hormones can distort the body-blocking weight loss even when Diet & Exercise don’t work •How the body’s FAT BURNING hormones get triggered. Find out the biggest mistake people make with exercising •Learn the 4 different causes of belly fat •How hormones affect what you crave. How Chronic Pain and SLEEPING PROBLEMS relate to your body type

6:30 – 8pm, Thursday, August 30th Call (775) 657–9026 to sign up today! Limited seating • only R.S.V.P. admitted au gu st 29-se pte m b e r 3 , 2 012 | best in the west rib cookoff ProGrAM |

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