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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . .4 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .14 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .16 Art of the State . . . . . . .17

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .25 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Free Will Astrology . . . .38 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .39 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .39

OUT OF THE FRYING PAN See News, page 6.

AQUAMAN AT UNR See Green, page 9.

ABE LINCOLN

CUTS UP See Film, page 20.

L on gt i m e a th e i s t a n d UN R p r o fe s s o r Ja k e H i gh t on ta k e s on th e c on c e p t o f a s upreme being

A MONTH

OF ART

See Artown/Rollin’ on the River, inside.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 19

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JUNE 28–JULY 4, 2012


2   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 28, 2012


EDITOR’S NOTE

Play mythy for me

Food for thought Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Had a food weekend. Loved it. I have to admit, I was a little slow to get on the local food bandwagon, but now that I’m here, I feel like I fit right in, an innovator. I mean, I’ve been growing food at my home for a long time, and I’ve never used engineered pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers, so I guess I was vanguard, but this week, I took the concept a slimy step or two further. It all started Friday when Hunter and I went down to the Food Truck event at Idlewild Park. The weekly traffic obstacle was going on down on Virginia Street, so I was grateful that the Reno Street Food moved a bit out of the melee. Lots of families, lots of selection, lots of food that I shouldn’t be eating, a puppeteer with lots of puppets, it had a wholly different vibe than the downtown event (even though I also enjoyed my time there, just not the long waits). I don’t believe I waited more than 20 minutes in line at the most popular truck on Friday. But none of that stuff is particularly innovative. Sunday is where I took it up a notch. My girlfriend, Kelly, lives in the socalled banana belt of Reno. It’s a microclimate in town that’s a little warmer than the rest of town so things grow there that don’t grow anywhere else in town. Anyway, her garden is beset by these giant snails— they look just like the snails you eat when you order escargot. Well, thanks to the wonders of the internet, I discovered they’re the same type of snail. I’ll tell you all about the process at a later date, but I can tell you—with a little garlic and butter—they taste exactly like the snails you’d get in the poshest French restaurant. • Did you vote in our Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada popularity contest yet? Somehow, I screwed up the URL, in my Editor’s Note last week. Just go to www.newsreview.com/reno/ ballot/BestOfReno12 and get ready to spend some time.

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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LETTERS Re “Tales out of School” (Feature story, June 21): In “Tales out of School,” Dennis Myers cites the negatives printed about our schools by journalists; saying they perpetuate “myths.” But is this negative coverage entirely a “myth?” There have been serious problems in some schools that the journalists are bringing to our attention. In the academics area, it’s no secret the schools are behind. According to recent statistics how explain that over a third of the kids entering college need remedial help? This is especially bad news since we have a plethora of foreign students clamoring to get in. More parents are dissatisfied with public schools, but they either don’t have the resources to move their kids to a better school or are not capable to home school which is on the rise and one solution to the crisis. Charter-style schools coming online and possible use of vouchers can contribute to better education. Underlying all the problems with the schools is the bedrock from which all this arises: a serious culture crisis stemming from a lack of ordinary discipline that ought to begin in the homes. Not to beat the religion drum but society really could use a step back to some of those values that uster wuz. The 10 Big Ones anyone?

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Idlewild will get my business. Downtown’s too much of a hassle by comparison. Steve Lambert Spanish Springs

Mythed the truth Re “Tales out of School” (Feature story, June 21): As per Dennis Myers’ piece and also our current political discourse, it’s hard to get rid of myths once they sink into the public’s psyche. One illustration: several years ago, our Reno branch of American Association of University Women undertook a study of violence in our community’s middle schools at the request of a group of parents. At the end of our study, our conclusion was that violence was almost non-existent. The parents all rejected our results since they didn’t conform to their perception! Go figure! They would rather believe the myth than accept the reality. Another illustration is the political myths surrounding the Obama administration’s success with the stimulus, and many other activities of the presidency. Many voters would rather cherish the fiction of failure than the facts of success. What are you going to do when the myths are reinforced by entertainment outlets masquerading as news organizations?

Reta Tallman Reno

Keep on truckin’ Re “Totally trucked” (Feature story, June 7): I attended the Reno Street Food event last night at Idlewild Park, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. There was lots of room to move around, I parked for free a short distance away, and all the kids had safe places to play. I’ve heard about the controversy between Food Truck Friday and Reno Street Food, so here’s a way to settle it: The event that takes place at

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Janice Flanagan Reno

Minus some exclamation points Re “Rock of ages” (Film, June 14): I have a bone to pick with your movie critic, Bob Grimm. His review last week for the “Rock of Ages” sent me over the edge! First, he takes jabs at the songs in the movie—which are totally awesome! They are the exact reflection of the eighties era! Then he completely loses his mind and personally attacks the rock icon of the ’80s, Jon Bon Jovi, by calling him a “loser!” “That’s a bunch of horseshit Clark” Who does that? Don’t get me

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Photographer Amy Beck Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Brennan Collins, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

wrong, I am all for freedom of the press, but nowadays any moron with an outlet can spew venomous lies and slander anyone’s character with no regard for the truth! Then he goes on to have the nerve to say that Tom Cruise did it better! Are you kidding me? Get real! Not to say that I wasn’t pleased as punch to see Cruise in rocker form, getting down to my man’s song, was the best part of the movie in my opinion, but my man does it like no other! Talk about the ugly green-eyed monster coming out! If he doesn’t like his music, then say just that! To be hateful and call him out as a “loser” screams that he, Bob. Grimm, is the real loser! Jon Bon Jovi is a successful musician, actor, song writer who was inducted into the Writers’ Hall of Fame! He is an entrepreneur and founded the JBJ Soul Foundation to build home and communities for inner cities—they work hand in hand with Habitat for Humanity—he started a food kitchen that is designed to feed everyone who comes, and they pay what they can or they can come in and volunteer and help in the kitchen. He is a loving husband—married his high school sweetheart, he has four children with her. He has never been in the tabloids or aired his dirty laundry in public. He is a respectable entertainer with a heart of gold, who has stood the test of time because of his talent, and should be referred to as such! So, if Mr. Grimm considers him to be a “loser,” I question his intelligence! That’s all! Daniele Alicea Reno

Right on Re “Elect Diane Nicolet” (Editorial, June 21): This is superb. And Diane [as stated in the editorial] has a Ph.D. in education, not just a Master’s. She is a bright and clear candidate, and I applaud your editorial: It is right on!

The Gubernator “Taxes? We don’t need no taxes. We don’t have to pay no stinkin’ taxes! Gubmint don’t need taxes to run, nohow. Gubmint? We don’t need no Gubmint. Big Friendly Corporations will do the job just fine, thank you, and we won’t even have’ta vote no more. Social Programs? We don’t need no Social Programs. If they can’t cut it, they deserve to live on the streets. This is ’Merica, you know, and if you’re too lazy to get rich, then get your lame ass on outa here. Firefighters? We don’t need no—. Oh, wait. Never mind. (Backs away slowly from keyboard.) Craig Bergland Reno

Corrections Re “Elect Diane Nicolet” (Editorial, June 21): In our editorial endorsing Diane Nicolet for School Board Trustee District E, we stated that had one of candidates received more than 50 percent of the votes, he would have advanced alone to the general election. Although this information was confirmed by the registrar of voters’ office on primary night, it was incorrect. The web version of the editorial has been edited to reflect the accurate information. We regret our error and apologize for any confusion we may have caused. Re “ ‘Their’votes” (News, June 21): The wording of our story suggested that the campaign of Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dean Heller was supporting the lawsuit to get rid of Nevada’s “none of these candidates” ballot option. A campaign spokesperson said this is not so. We regret the error. For more on this issue, see Upfront, page 6.

Dr. Mel Minarik Reno

Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Russell Moore General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Cassy Valoleti-Matu

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Hayley Doshay Feature story design: Hayley Doshay

JUNE 28, 2012

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RN&R

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3


BIG HE A SMALL H

by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25kWhat if God was oneHE AD) of us? SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG Asked at the University of Nevada, Reno Kody Marques Student

I would want to be his best friend.

Chris Woolsey Student

If God was one of us, he would be a criminal justice major. … I’m a criminal justice major. I’m not sure if it’s the right way to do it, but it’s a step in the right direction, trying to research everything and figure out what ways work and don’t work instead of just throwing everybody in jail.

We know nothing. Nothing! It’s so tempting to predict what the United States Supreme Court is going to rule on the Affordable Care Act. Today is Tuesday, June 26, and most knowledgeable sources guess that the Supreme Court will rule by Thursday because it closes its session on Friday. And in the World Headquarters of the Reno News & Review, we’re journalists, you know. We can’t help ourselves but to use the knowledge we have garnered from past but similar incidents to predict the future. Hell, we’ve done it more times than we can count. For example, it’s tempting to think that the Court’s divided ruling on Arizona’s crazy immigration law gives us some semblance of foresight. Maybe, since the Court was willing to keep part of the law while declaring the rest unconstitutional, it suggests that the Court will keep part of Obamacare. Wouldn’t be prudent for us to declare it, though. Some of the most predicted outcomes—the individual mandate to own insurance will be found unconstitutional, for example—seem to have possible nuanced treatments at the hand of the Court. After all, it’s the most pro-business (insurance companies) section of the whole law. This desire to prognosticate is a failing of journalism. It’s easy to understand. Fortunately, it is also easy to spot. Take this health-care thing. Only a handful of people in this country know today which way it is going to go: The justices and their clerks. They probably made their decision within weeks of the law’s day in court, but then the opinions, both affirming and dissenting, had to be written. The U.S. Supreme Court historically has been extraordinarily good at keeping its decisions quiet until rendered. We said probably here because in some cases of great moment, such as Roe v. Wade, the court decided not to decide and 4

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28, 2012

had the case re-argued the next year. So that’s another option. According to Kaiser Health News, most of the lowercourt rulings upheld the health care program. There’s another straw in the wind. Anyway, everybody’s talking about it. Politicians, from the president on down, are discussing it. You’ve probably talked about it with your neighbor or your spouse or your parent. In fact, you’ve probably taken note of the fact that you may be negatively impacted by the decision no matter what it is—for example, you or your parent may have a pre-existing condition that insurance companies may not have to cover if that part of the law is stricken down. But it’s the fact that everyone is talking about it that makes news organizations want to be part of the dialog. It makes us appear relevant to the conversation. So readers end up with politicians making their unfounded and conflicted assertions on the front pages of newspapers across the country. For example, Nevada’s lead counsel in its lawsuit against the law, Mark Hutchinson, a GOP candidate for state Senate, got to trumpet his conflicted expectations of the court’s decision on the front page of today’s Reno Gazette-Journal. But he doesn’t know jack shit about what the Supreme Court will do. Honestly. And even if by some circumstance his opinion is correct—and it very well may be—it’s only because he had a lucky guess. Whenever newspapers predict the future, they’re succumbing to the desire to want to be part of the discussion, to take a lead role in the dialog. The problem is, they’re often wrong, which results in a misinformed public. And when “it’s in the newspaper so it must be true” gets trumped by “it happened so it’s true,” readers get angry and begin to doubt the credibility of newspapers. Ω

Gabe Cedillo Teaching assistant

Who says he’s not? Or she. Or it? Or whatever it might be? I think a good portion of the people already believe that and try to live that in their lives. … I think it’s a good ideal, if anything.

Chuck Cowgill Food director

He’d be kind of disappointed. We’re not getting along. If God was one of us, I guess we’d all be in his image, huh?

Darrell Blumkin Groundskeeper

Well, we’d have to find out who he was and see what his idea would be. If he was one of us, hopefully he would help us out with something, I guess, but I’m agnostic so it doesn’t really help.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

!

Itʼs happen ing in

JOEL EDWARDS

LADIES 80'S NIGHT

JASON KING BAND

JAZZ

Th, 6/28, 5:30PM, F, 6/29, 6PM and Sa, 6/30, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 Live on the outdoor stage during the Whole Foods Hometowne Farmers’ Market. Half-priced margaritas! Th, 6/28, 6PM, no cover. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-6262

ESCALADE

Th, 6/28, 7PM, F, 6/29, 8PM, Sa, 6/30, 8PM and Su, 7/1, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

THE OTHER BAND

Th, 6/28, 7PM, no cover.Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave.(775) 355-7711

WHOLE FOODS SPARKS FARMERS' MARKET

Presented by Shirley’s Farmers’ Markets, the 20th annual farmers’ market returns with a family-friendly atmosphere and farmerfocused event. This year’s event has been extended to 11 weeks. Thursdays, 3-8PM through 8/2, Th, 8/16, 3-8PM and Th, 8/23, 3-8PM. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Ave.

CAR CRUISE NIGHTS

Every Thursday, bring your classic cars to show. Great food and a DJ for music. Summer fun and prizes. Thursdays, 5PM, Free. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316

SCHEELS BIKING CLUB

Hosted by DJ BG. Th, 6-11PM, Trader Dick’s Lounge. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

SHAKA

F, 6/29, 5:30PM, Sa, 6/30, 5:30PM and Su, 7/1, 5:30PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

LOS ROLANDS Y MARITO RIVERA

Battle of the Central American bands, cumbia from El Salvador and punta music from Honduras. F, 6/29, 9PM, $20. New Oasis, 2100 Victorian Ave. (775) 359-4020

SPARKS XTREME BEACH SPORTS FESTIVAL The EVP Volleyball Tour and UWP-IJSBA Watercross Tour will combine for the first time on the West Coast. Both events are the largest of their kind in the country, featuring hundreds of All-American athletes going head-to-head in pro volley ball action on the beach and high-speed race action on the water. Sa, 6/30 and Su, 7/1. All ages. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Dr. www.uwpinc.com/ site_information_SPARKS.htm or (775) 353-2376

MUSIC AT THE MARINA

LIGHTNING & LACE

Sing for fun or compete for prizes,depending on the number of contestants, with DJ John Graham. Th, 9PM and F, 9PM. No cover. Anchors Bar & Grill, 325 Harbour Cove Dr. (775) 356-6888

booths. The annual Fourth of July celebration continues with live entertainment for the whole family, a kids’ area, food vendors, an Air National Guard C-130 flyover and the area’s largest fireworks display set off from the rooftop of John Ascuaga’s Nugget at dusk. Free. W, 7/4. Daytime activities: 6AM3PM Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Dr. Evening activities: 4-11PM, Victorian Square, Victorian Ave. For info on activities at the Marina: http://www.northernnevadachamber. org or (775) 636-9550. For info on activities at Victorian Square: www.janugget.com or (775) 356-3300

The popular water play park will be open W-Su, 10AM-5PM through 8/26. $3; free for seniors (61 and older) and children under 3. Melio Gaspari Water Play Park at Lazy 5 Regional Park, 7100 Pyramid Lake Hwy. (775) 424-1801

WEEKEND JUMP-OFF PARTY

With DJ BG. F, Sa, 10PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

SUMMER SWIM SEASON!

The City of Sparks summer swim season is underway, with designated swim areas open at the Sparks Marina Park and the outdoor pool at Deer Park (Oppio Park pool is closed). The 2012 outdoor swim schedule is: Sparks Marina Park: Recreational swimming in designated swim area/north beach only (weather permitting), 12PM-4PM, 6/9 - 8/19, 8/25-26, 11AM-6PM 7/4 and 9/1-3. Free. Deer Park Pool (1700 Prater Way): Recreational swimming in the heated, zero-entry pool from 12PM-4PM through 8/19, 8/25-26 and 9/1-3. Under 18/$3.50,18-54 yrs./$6, 55+/$4, Family (up to 6 members)/$15. An “Almost Free Friday™“promotion takes place throughout the summer offering all ages a reduced rate of $1 per person to swim on Fridays. Swim lessons will be conducted at Deer Park pool, pre-registration required. Call 353-2385 or go to www.sparksrec.com

KARAOKE

STEVE STARR KARAOKE M, 8PM. No cover. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316 SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 3566000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861

OPEN MIC

GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

BEADS AND BOOKS!

Learn basic beading techniques with volunteer beading expert, Jamie, and work on projects with other beaders. First Su of every month, 1-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

Sa, 6/30, 8PM, no cover.Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave.(775) 355-7711

BANDA LA AUSENTE

happening now!

WATER PARK

CON BRIO

Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Rides will vary from 20-30 miles. Participants will need to sign a liability form when they attend. Th, 5:45PM through 9/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

SPECIAL EVENTS COMING UP IN SPARKS: ARTS IN BLOOM (July 21st)

BLACK AND BLUES JAM

Live bands from Mexico (zapateado, banda music) Dj DASS Sa, 6/30, 9PM, no cover. New Oasis, 2100 Victorian Ave. (775) 359-4020 Sa, 6/30, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

Tu, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

SCHEELS KIDS’ TRIATHALON (July 28th)

The city of Sparks celebrates the Fourth of July with a full day of activities starting at Sparks Marina Park. Festivities include the Sparks Got Talent competition, Model Dairy Milk Carton Boat Regatta, free tethered hot air balloon rides, North Valleys Kiwanis Club Pancake Feed, a fun run/walk, bounce house and games for kids, as well as music, food and vendor

E-mail to: Sparks@newsreview.com

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY!

CITY OF SPARKS Geno Martini - Mayor, Julia Ratti Ward 1, Ed Lawson - Ward 2, Ron Smith - Ward 3, Mike Carrigan - Ward 4, Ron Schmitt - Ward 5, Shaun Carey - City Manager, Tracy Domingues - Parks & Recreation Director. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 353-2311 or Sparks City Council Chambers, 745 Fourth St.

WEB RESOURCES: www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com www.thechambernv.org www.sparksitshappeninghere.com

REGIONAL CHILI COOK-OFF (July 23rd)

STAR SPANGLED SPARKS

SEND US YOUR SPARKS EVENTS!

THIS SECTION AND ITS CONTENTS ARE NOT FUNDED BY OR CREATED BY THE CITY OF SPARKS

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY!

It’s the biggest blast in town and it’s only at the Nugget! Featuring a multiple choice of different Bonus Rounds that pack a big bang!

Big Buck Hunter® Pro © 2006 Play Mechanix, Inc. All Rights Reserved. OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 28, 2012

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RN&R

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5


PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

On his way to City Hall one day last week, Reno Mayor Bob Cashell stopped for coffee and chatted with citizens.

Heller: I’m for NOTC Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dean Heller’s campaign said last week that if some of his supporters are backing the lawsuit that seeks to overturn Nevada’s “none of these candidates” (NOTC) ballot option, they’re not speaking for him. The lawsuit filing invokes Heller’s name, but his campaign spokesperson said, “Neither Senator Heller or his campaign is involved with this suit. In fact, as [Nevada] secretary of state, Senator Heller defended NOTC.” In related news, Las Vegas Sun columnist Jon Ralston wrote last week that a Republican National HELLER Committee told him the RNC “is financially supporting an effort to bring clarity to the Nevada presidential election ballot”—an RNC way of describing the effort to torpedo NOTC. Among the plaintiffs are an official of the Nevada Republican Party and one of the GOP candidates for Nevada presidential elector.

Lee defeat eases northern woes The defeat of conservative Clark County Sen. John Lee in the Democratic primary will remove a thorn from the sides of Northern Nevada legislators. Lee, of North Las Vegas, has been a chronic presence in bills affecting the north. At last year’s Legislature, Lee successfully sponsored legislation to pull Nevada out of the bi-state Tahoe Regional Planning Agency unless the state gets its way on some key policy points, including change in the TRPA board voting system. At another Legislature, Lee used his prerogative as committee chair to kill a measure that would have changed Reno City Council elections so that councilmembers were elected by voters in their wards. Currently, the candidates must be elected city-wide, making running for the Council very expensive.

Pension abuse A Chicago organization called Taxpayers United of America has issued a report titled “Nevada’s Staggering Government Pension System Revealed!” The group’s numbers are staggering, all right. That’s probably because its people made them up. And they also failed to do basic research. The numbers needed to make actual calculations were unavailable from the Nevada Public Employees Retirement System because of privacy rules, so Taxpayers United “estimated” pension costs. Nevertheless, many media outlets reported the findings straight, as though they had validity. In one case the report—actually more of a news release— showcased Washoe County School Superintendent Heath Morrison as a particularly notable case of pension abuse: “Heath Morrison, a Washoe County government school district superintendent, has an estimated annual pension of $199,548, based on his actual annual gross of $259,153, with an estimated lifetime payout of $9,494,494.” Except that Morrison, who is soon leaving to take another job, doesn’t get a pension. He didn’t work in Reno long enough to qualify for one. “Dr. Morrison is not vested in the Nevada Public Employees Retirement System and he will not be when he leaves … at the end of next week,” according to school district chief accountant Thomas Ciesynski. Taxpayers United also estimated former UNLV basketball coach Lon Kruger annual pension payments at $466,000, which the Las Vegas Sun reported is four times the accurate figure.

—Dennis Myers 6

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Labor intensive With just hours to go, Cashell still tries to stop fire deconsolidation Consolidation of fire services in the Truckee Meadows lasted just 12 years. by The combined services began Dennis Myers operating in 2000 and it will come to an end on July 1, unless the county has a dramatic change of heart. Reno Mayor Bob Cashell was still trying to keep consolidation together as this was written, but even he seemed to be losing heart toward the end. “Well, I was, but—some of the stuff they want to do caused me problems,” he said. The Washoe County Commission voted 4 to 1 on June 28, 2011, to break away from con-

“I want nothing to do with your labor agreement.” David Humke Washoe County Commissioner

solidated fire services. In the year since then, city officials have tried to get the county to reconsider that decision, with little effect. Cashell said the city worked with unions—he praises them for being flexible and working out differences among themselves—and came up with a plan for keeping all stations open with four-person crews, and it was rejected by the county. Washoe County

Commission chair John Breternitz said that solution would have lasted for only a year and then taken the county into the red. Cashell responded that it would have given the two entities a year to work on the problem. Cashell: “If we went to a joint powers agreement negotiation, they would all sit down at the table with us, and we would negotiate every contract we have with the fire union. And we’d have county commissioners on it, City Council on it, staffs, legal—everybody would have set down and negotiated with the union. … Then every station in Washoe County except for Sparks would have been open with fourman crews, with it set up the way it was. There would have been no tax increase, none. And then they [county officials] had a meeting, a closed door meeting, and agreed they weren’t going to do it and so they never discussed it—to the best of my knowledge—publicly or anything. They just decided no.” Breternitz: “That’s true, because it would have worked for less than a year and then we would have gone in the red. You know, our goal is sustainability, and we can’t maintain a long-term fire service under the terms of the Reno fire contract. There was not a deal. It was one commissioner had had discussions and brought it to the county commission in a closed labor session, and we decided that we couldn’t afford that contract

with that union. And therefore, there was never a deal.” Cashell said that under the agreement, “Their [county] reserves would have actually gone up … by $1.7 million. … [I]f we’d stayed in negotiations, we could have negotiated those contracts.” There was wide confusion, even in county ranks, at the Washoe County Commission’s determination to deconsolidate, and some officials in the end believed that it came down to ideology—the four Republicans on the commission taking advantage of hard times to inflict as much damage as possible on labor unions. That would indicate that the kind of dogmatic polarization that exists in Congress and has afflicted the Nevada Legislature is now a factor in county government, as well. “Government consolidation is a conservative article of faith, and here we had the four Republicans opposing it,” said one county agency official. When it became clear that the county was immovable on deconsolidation, Cashell hastened to Washington, D.C., where he met with U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, who set him up a meeting at the White House with the presidential liaison with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. When Cashell returned to Reno he had what he needed to make sure the city was not injured, financially at least, by deconsolidation—a $14 million grant that would take care of all of Reno’s needs in the transition from consolidated services. “Every station in Reno will be open with four man crews,” Cashell said. That also complicated prevention of deconsolidation, though. The grant is written for a city fire system and would have to be retooled to accommodate a consolidated system. Cashell is willing to go back and get that done, but it further complicates his hope of stopping deconsolidation. Cashell pointed out that the county is having to raise taxes in the unincorporated areas, something he said would have been averted by retaining consolidation and continuing to negotiate. Cashell: “And they’re going to raise the taxes now. They’re going to raise the taxes in their unincorporated area to make theirs work. … And they didn’t have to before.” Breternitz: “Well, that is true and the reason for that is because


Cashell: “Caughlin Ranch will be covered by Verdi. … That’s quite a distance, and in traffic it’ll be 10, 12 minutes for them to get there. … We got one [a fire station] on Skyline, and we got one down on Mayberry, and I’m hoping they’ll come through with a mutual aid agreement.” Breternitz said that 98 percent of the Hidden Valley calls are nonfire calls.

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

County Commission chair John Breternitz is not running for reelection, but wants fire deconsolidation as part of his legacy.

Reno has been unwilling to work with us to provide the automatic aid in certain areas—Caughlin Ranch and Hidden Valley—and in turn, we would provide the beneficial automatic aid that they can’t provide to their own people in the north valleys.” The two sides seem not to agree on the most basic things. Cashell said the city is ready to assist the county with mutual aid agreements, but so far no one has asked. Breternitz said the county has said often that it wants such agreements. The County Commission told the sheriff to set up a fire dispatch system. It turned out that, with the sheriff’s limited resources, the county needed the city of Reno to provide county fire dispatch until the Washoe County sheriff can put together a system in a few months.

Unless Cashell somehow rolls events back, the county next week will have all stations open with three person crews and the city will have all stations open with four person crews. Breternitz: “All of our stations will be open at—I believe it’s 24 stations … 13 volunteer and 11 permanent, 11 of the career stations. That’s all of our stations and we have flexible staffing, so most of those stations will be three-person crews. … That’s a fact of life. When you can’t afford to have four people, you do the best you can and have three people.” The number of people on fire crews—firefighters are barred by law from entering a home unless four crew members are on the scene—is at the heart of the dispute, but whether it is a matter of money

Living history PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

At a gathering at Cliff Young’s home, Young chatted with Harold Jacobsen, left, his college roommate. After college, Jacobsen served as a state legislator from Humboldt County, a Nevada regent, and mayor of Carson City. Young went on to serve as Nevada’s only U.S. House member in the 1950s, as a state legislator and Nevada Supreme Court justice. OPINION

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or of anti-union sentiment is a judgment call. It sometimes appeared that the city’s good working relationship with the unions was a handicap in the eyes of county commissioners— and one of the reasons the county wanted deconsolidation. At one joint meeting of the county commission and the city council, County Commissioner David Humke said, “With all due respect, I want nothing to do with your labor agreement.” Later in the same meeting, he said, “When will the city be free of their agreement?” Cashell: “You could tell the way Humke acted that day there was no room for negotiations.” Unionism comes up again and again. Cashell: “No, they thought that a lot of these [Reno] guys would quit and come to work for them or we would cut back so far that they would be able to pick them up and use them. And they are getting a few Reno guys going over. But they all got promotions, they went over as captains or they went over whatever.” Breternitz: “Well, sure. We’re not able to pay as much as the city of Reno is paying them because of their union contract and that’s the main reason why we had to discontinue our relationship with the Reno Fire Department is because we couldn’t afford to pay the wages that they were paying their firefighters. I think many of the Reno firefighters chose not to come over to ours because they would take a decrease in pay.” Cashell said the county is going to be stretched in serious fire fighting. He said, and Breternitz confirmed, that Caughlin Ranch will be served from Verdi and Hidden Valley—except for a twoperson crew on the scene—will be served from Sun Valley. A lot of damage can be done during those travel times, and Cashell argues that it’s not the first truck on the scene that is key to firefighting.

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Will it stick?

Still to be determined is the effect of the November election on deconsolidation. The county commission has two seats up for election and both will see replacement of incumbents. Breternitz and Larkin will both be leaving the commission. One commissioner, Kitty Jung is running for the Reno City Council in a fiercely fought race. If she is not elected to the Council, she will still have two years to run on her commission term—and she was the one vote against deconsolidation. It is conceivable that the commission will have a pro-consolidation majority after the election. In the District One race for county commission, candidates are in agreement that deconsolidation was a mistake.

“Two or three of them just have their heels dug in.” Bob Cashell Reno mayor “I believe that splitting up our fire resources is dangerous and shortsighted,” said Democrat Andrew Diss. “I think the fire deconsolidation is unfortunate and wish the city and county had worked out a way to resolve their differences prior to getting this far down the road,” said Republican Marsha Berkbigler. So would they revisit the issue if elected, even though the county would be six months into the new operation? Berkbigler: “Yes, I would. I believe consolidation of fire services is the best option.”

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Diss: “Oh, absolutely. I’d try to get the ball rolling as soon as possible.” Candidates in the District Four race did not respond. Cashell would certainly want to reopen the topic: “Well, I’m going to have four more councilmen, four new councilmen, and they’ll have two or three county commissioners. And I think that we should sit down, because really the thing for this region is to have it consolidated, especially with Reno and Washoe County for the unincorporated area, and if we set it up right I’m pretty sure Sparks would come. But right now, I don’t blame Sparks. I’d stay 10 miles away from all this B.S.” He is still working on trying to avert deconsolidation, though he is becoming more dispirited. He expects to make an approach to Breternitz. “I haven’t met with John, and I owe it to him. I went out of town for a couple of days. I owe John a call, and I’ll give him a call, but from another city councilman I got word that John was still holding course on some of his stuff. And I don’t want to blow these grants. I don’t want to burn any bridges with Washington.” Cashell said it is more difficult all the time to stop deconsolidation because the county has become more invested in it. His continued hope for keeping the consolidated system may strike some as unrealistic. “We’ll sit down and meet with anybody and talk about seeing if we can [stop it], but once they went out and hired a fire chief, and they done these other things, promoted all these guys to captains and whatever else, I don’t know how you unwind some of it unless we all sit down and gulp it,” he said. “If they would have agreed to do what we talked about back in January or February, whenever it was, we could have solved all of it. … I wish them the best at what they’re doing. I personally don’t think that they’re doing what they should have, but they must think they do, so we can agree to disagree on that, you know what I mean? But we need to have a single fire chief. We don’t need two fire chiefs. We don’t need two of everything, and that’s what we’re going to have.” Ω

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GREENSPACE Whether it’s raining in June or dry in December, Truckee Meadows Water Authority always values responsible water use. That’s why we encourage

Weather-Wise Watering.

Polluted air Nevada representatives voted no on two legislative actions and are now facing the disappointment and anger of the state’s environmental advocates. Last week, Sen. Dean Heller voted against updates proposed by Environmental Protection Agency to the Clean Air Act, a measure that ensures air quality regulation. The Senate disagreed and voted to update the act and will now require power plants to make changes throughout the next three years to reduce toxic emissions. A bill to rewrite smog standards will be voted on this week. But it’s not all good news for clean air—the Domestic Energy and Jobs Act was passed in the House of Representatives, which promotes the expansion of oil and coal-centric projects, such as the Keystone XL pipeline, in the name of job creation. Heller and Sen. Harry Reid both voted no on an amendment of the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act that would require that all consumable items be labeled if the “product contains a genetically engineered ingredient,” according to Senate.gov. With a 73-to-26 vote, the bill did not pass. In response, several petitions have been started online, as well as letter writing campaigns to Heller and Reid.

Controlled burn Assigned-Day Watering only applies to your sprinklers. Run your spinklers when it’s cool and not windy, usually early in the morning. Turn them off when it’s raining. Water Weather-Wisely on your assigned days.

Nevada is no stranger to wildfires, and the Active Fire Mapping Program by the U.S Department of Agriculture may help states better track and prepare for the influx of fires during the summer season. Fire detection maps are available for each state, as well as other resources like fire data web services, satellite images and last detected fire activity. As of June 25, Nevada, along with Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and several others, is classified as a “red flag warning” zone. No surprise there, so take extra caution while camping or using flammable items outside. Visit http://activefiremaps.fs.fed.us/ to check out the resources.

Arrays of light The Yerington Paiute Tribe installed four new solar arrays to help power tribal facilities. A ceremony on June 21 also featured the dedication of a commemorative sundial by artist Louise Mackie. According to Black Rock Solar, which designed and build the arrays for the tribe, the “sundial has been placed in the center of a 43.5 kW solar photovoltaic array that was designed in the shape of the geometric sun.” Three of the arrays were created in a pictograph style, symbolizing the sun, the gavel—the tribe’s official symbol—and the basket weave. The tribe received rebates for all four arrays through NV Energy’s rebate program, and is expected to save an estimated $21,500 each year. The money will go toward “education, health and elder services in the community,” according to a statement released by Black Rock Solar.

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

Also, give your sprinklers a rest on Mondays, as it is TMWA’s day to replenish and maintain our water system.

ECO-EVENT For more on your assigned days and other conservation tools, visit

www.tmwa.com

Learn about which flowers to eat at the “Food of fairies” workshop hosted by Hungry Mother Organics. Last year, recipes included salad with pansies, nasturtium butter and lavender mint lemonade. Participants will sample various dishes and learn new recipes. $20. RSVP required. Email nanci@hungrymother.cc.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/ RNRGreen for more.

This message is brought to you by the water lovers at 8

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2.5x12 PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

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Big fish Zeb Hogan Zeb Hogan and the Megafishes Project could easily be the name of a band. But fame isn’t really Hogan’s thing, even though he was recently selected as one of the 50 sexiest environmentalists in the world, according to green living by Ashley publication Rodale. He comes right before Justin Timberlake on the list, Hennefer which also features Brad Pitt and Julia Roberts, and is one of only three actual scientists on the list—the rest are actors, socialites and athletes. ashleyh@ newsreview.com Hogan, a National Geographic Explorer and researcher at the University of Nevada, Reno, is more concerned with conservation than celebrity. He heads the Megafishes Project, a research endeavor that takes him all over the world studying the populations of very large, and often somewhat unnerving, fish. The project also works with the World Wildlife Fund, and seeks to “document and protect the planet’s freshwater giants.” Currently, Hogan is filming a television series with NatGeo called “Monster Fishes.” No release date has been set. Hogan holds a doctorate in ecology from UC Davis. His love for marine biology began as a child, and academia eventually led him to focus on fish. “What I focus on is anything related to freshwater fish ecology and conservation,” he says. “So I do a lot of assessment on the world’s largest fish Learn more about to determine endangered status.” Hogan’s research at Hogan spends time studying fish abroad, including southeast Asia, http://www.national- where he spent a few years as a Fulbright Scholar. So how does a scientist, geographic.com/ explorers/bios/ whose research is primarily focused on large fish in substantial bodies of zeb-hogan/. water, end up in the high desert ecosystem of Northern Nevada? “The university was very supportive of the overall project,” he says. It also helps fund his research. Last semester, he taught a class at the university about Nevada’s fish species, and he also studies the Lahontan trout population. Part of Hogan’s research requires him to be an activist about topics like water conservation and endangered species, he says. But many of the issues Hogan aims to address are complicated, such as shark finning, overfishing, and Nevada’s droughts and water usage. “With shark finning, the problem is pretty clear, and there’s a relatively straightforward way to solve it,” he says. “But it’s still difficult to enforce rules so that sharks are harvested sustainably. The same goes for other issues. It’s really hard to get the message about water conservation when people are sort of living in a bubble.” Besides research, Hogan is a photographer and hopes to use photography as a way to raise awareness about the many fish species that go unnoticed. This is especially useful, he says, to document rare fish. “I’ve dedicated my life to these fish, and I’m lucky if even I get to see them,” he says. “If we can capture them with photographs, we can show people what’s out there, and perhaps they’ll take a more active approach to protecting them.” Hogan acknowledges that there are many problems affecting the world’s bodies of water, but any progress humans can make toward conservation is good progress, “Freshwater is so scarce,” he says. “There’s a competition between the way we use freshwater and the wildlife that needs it. So it’s a step by step issue. Right now we’re just hoping for small victories.” Ω OPINION

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by Jake Highton

L O N G T I M E AT H E I ST A N D U N R P R O F E S S O R JA K E H I G H TO N TA K E S O N T H E C O N C E PT OF A SUPREME BEING My own mind is my own church. —Thomas Paine

But that the dread of something after death …/ The undiscover’d country from whose bourn / No traveler returns.” People who believe in God believe in a lie. Or, perhaps they have a failure of nerve and intellect. German-born Frenchman Baron d’Holbach, with a deeper insight than Paine, published the atheist’s bible, The System of Nature, in 1770. To escape persecution in France, he published the work anonymously in Amsterdam. The baron’s book was heretical, flying in the face of almost universal belief in God. But they solidified his place as one of the luminaries of the Age of Enlightenment. D’Holbach called religion “a mere castle in the air,” a phantom. Theology is “a tissue of fallacies and contradictions,” he pointed out. “Fanatics have cut each other’s throats, publicly burnt each other, committed, without a scruple and even as a duty, the greatest crimes and shed torrents of blood.” These barbarities were committed in the name of God, a figment, a creation of the imagination. D’Holbach noted that mankind is bound “in the chains of religious fiction, improbable tales, ridiculous fables, impenetrable mysteries and puerile ceremonies” … “Liberty of thinking alone can give men humanity and greatness of soul.” All religions are inventions of mankind. Belief in God is an absurdity. Nature has wonders but a so-called God had nothing to do with them. Yet belief is comforting and consoling. Most people need those chimeras and miracles. As Vonnegut says in Cat’s Cradle: Live by untruth and be happy. As d’Holbach wrote, “Every revealed religion is filled with mysterious dogmas, unintelligible principles, incredible wonders and astonishing recitals.” Academia extols critical thinking. But if the professoriate, maybe the most intelligent group in society, really believed in critical thinking all professors would be atheists. A survey in Nature magazine reported that 40 percent of biologists, physicists and mathematicians believed in God, a God they could pray to “in expectation of an answer.” So it is not surprising that 99 percent of Americans believe in God or some “higher power.” Nor is it surprising that 100 million Americans identify themselves as evangelicals, the least educated and most rural-dwelling. D’Holbach said, “The more men are deficient in knowledge and reason, the more zealous they are in religion.”

WHEN I WAS A BOY growing up in a Lutheran home I was a fervent believer. I prayed on my knees at bedtime and went to sleep with a small silver cross dangling from my neck. My dad was a soldier in England and North Africa during World War II so I followed the battles intently every day in the Philadelphia Bulletin. The war ended in triumph for the Allies in 1945. Although I had no idea then how horrible war was, I was certain the monumental struggle had been “a war to end all wars.” Imagine my disillusionment then when the Cold War soon set in. I was seized by a sudden truth: God doesn’t exist. At college I read The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine, one of the most important intellectual books ever written. It confirmed my atheism, an atheism that only deepened over the next 60 years. No reasoning person can believe in God although fine minds did, like writer Bill Buckley in America, Cardinal Newman in England and philosopher Pascal in France. Nor can it be argued “nearly everybody believes in God so you should too.” As the French philosopher Bayle has observed, “the unanimous consent of mankind is no criterion of truth.” Even the great deists of the 18th century dared not disbelieve, arguing for a rational God rather than accepting the deity on blind faith. They believed in Christ’s message but not in his divinity. Deists are like Hamlet in his suicide soliloquy: “Who would fardels bear / To grunt and sweat under a weary life /

Four in 10 Americans believe in creationism, most of them evangelicals. Four in 10 evangelicals believe Jesus will return in 2050. It is impossible to give credence to such primitive thinking. The majority of scientists say that science is compatible with religion. Untrue. Science and religion are incompatible. Science is rational, religion is mere faith. Example: The great scientist Galileo was hauled before the Inquisition for “irreconcilable difference with sacred texts” because he espoused the Copernican truth that the sun is the center of the solar system. Pastors, priests, rabbis and imams and their flocks live an untruth. But it is amazing the number of people who suspend reason when it comes to religion in this Goddrenched nation. Epicurus, third century B.C. Greek philosopher, insisted rightly that nothing should be believed except that which was tested through observation and logical deduction. Quod erat demonstrandum. The intellectual struggle over God has preoccupied people over the ages: reason vs. faith, science vs. religion, rationalism vs. superstition, evolution vs. creationism, enlightenment vs. the supernatural, truth vs. delusion, the mind vs. fantasy, intelligence vs. the preposterous, reality vs. ignorance, wisdom vs. dogma.

WHERE WAS GOD?

Six million Jews were exterminated in the Holocaust. “Where was God?” broadcaster Edward R. Murrow asked on seeing the horror of Buchenwald. Murrow did not answer his anguished question. But the truth is God does not exist. Despite the Holocaust, too many Jews—maybe the most intelligent people on earth—cling to God and religion. Slavery in America? Where was God? Apartheid in South Africa? Where was God? Apartheid in America? Where was God? Millions died in the orgy of religious killing that attended the partitioning of India and Pakistan in 1947. Where was God? The Inquisition? The crusades, an effort to wrest the Holy Land from Muslims? The Albigensian crusade against good Christians with doctrinal differences? The killing of socalled heretics?

“ARE YOU THERE GOD?” continued on page 12

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“ARE YOU THERE GOD?” continued from page 11

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Calvin’s order to burn Servetus for his denial of the trinity, an unbelievable doctrine? Selling of indulgences? Joshua’s call for God to destroy Jericho? The Borgia popes with mistresses, illegitimate children, piles of money and private armies? Women degraded today under Sharia, strict Islamic law? Wars, wars, wars, endless, senseless U.S. wars? Where was God when Southern Baptists adopted two heavens, one for whites and one for blacks? As Faulkner wrote: “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” The recent volleying against God has been withering. Two books are provocative and intellectually challenging, The End of Faith by Sam Harris, and The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. Dawkins calls God “the most unpleasant character in fiction.” And you can almost hear Dawkins laugh when he notes that the Catholic Church divides angels into nine categories: seraphim, cherubim, thrones, dominions, virtues, powers, principalities, archangels and common angel. Most Catholics, more sophisticated than evangelicals, refuse to accept such balderdash. But even the 99.44 percent pure atheist Dawkins had a failure of intellect. Dawkins, dubbed “Darwin’s Rottweiler,” admitted: “I cannot know for certain but I think God is very improbable.” Paine rightly assaulted organized religion and the Bible in The Age of Reason. But he refused to go beyond the deism that most Enlightenment notables and the U.S. founders espoused. Paine had a failure of intellect. Paine believed in “a God of moral truth and not a God of mystery or obscurity.” But atheists need no God to be moral. They don’t need a biblical Sixth Commandment to tell them that murder is wrong. Atheists just believe with the protagonist of the Camus novel, The Stranger, who angrily tells a shriving priest that “none of his certainties was worth one hair of a woman’s head.” Atheists are not the devil incarnate. Indeed, atheists are more Christian than Christians in their behavior. The so-called Christians often do not practice what the synoptic gospels preach. Atheists do. “God’s quarterback,” Tim Tebow, former star of the Denver Broncos, used to kneel by the playing field to pray before games. He wore patches under the eyes citing biblical verses like Ephesians 4:8 (“by grace are ye saved through faith”) or Philippians 4:7 (“the peace of God which passeth all understanding”). (All Bible quotations are from the King James Version.)

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Tebow’s display of faith was offensive ostentation. He ignored the injunction of Matthew 6:5-6: “When thou prayest thou shalt not be as hypocrites are. For they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets that they may be seen of men. … But thou when thou prayest enter into thy closet and when thou has shut thy door pray in secret.” A story in the New York Times recently revealed that a Russian Orthodox Church leader wore a $30,000 watch. Perhaps he did nor read nor heed Mark 10:21: “Sell whatsoever thou hast and give to the poor and thou shalt have treasure in heaven.”

LIVE BY UNTRUTH AND BE HAPPY. Kurt Vonnegut in Cat’s Cradle Dawkins remarks that the nastiest letters he got were from readers who call themselves Christian. Justice Harry Blackmun can attest to that. After writing the decision for the Supreme Court in 1973 legalizing abortion, he was inundated with letters invoking “God’s wrath” against him and denouncing him as a baby killer. “I do not understand the vilification and personal abuse that has come to me,” Blackmun said. “It is hard to believe that some clergymen and sisters can indulge in such abuse and still profess to be workers in the vineyard.” And then there are Christian zealots who blow up abortion clinics, Episcopalians outraged by gay bishops, the United Methodist Church defrocking lesbian ministers, crucifixion of Matthew Shepard on a fence in Wyoming “to save the soul” of a homosexual and Vatican rejection of woman priests and denunciation of gays and lesbians. Pope Benedict endorsed an Austrian priest who believed that Hurricane Katrina was God’s revenge for America having gays and allowing abortions. And surely not even honest Mormons can accept the mumbo-jumbo propounded about founder Joseph Smith: an angel led him to buried golden plates “revealing” that Native Americans are of Jewish origin, was visited by Jesus after his

resurrection, that the plates were written in an unknown language, “reformed Egyptian,” and translated into the Book of Mormon using supernatural seer stones. It is also impossible to believe Mormon doctrine about the resurrection of the body and immortality through Christ’s atonement. Similarly, no one can believe in Muslims “living this life” to prepare for “the next realm of existence” in heaven. And it is certainly excessive when Muslims must pray five times a day while bowing in the direction of Mecca. The true followers of Christ have compassion, understanding and love. Yet fundamentalists are against gay marriage, abortion and homosexuality. (See Leviticus 20:13: “If a man lie with mankind as he lieth with a woman both of them have committed an abomination. They shall surely be put to death.”) Perhaps the finest “sermon” in the Bible concerns “a woman taken in adultery.” Jesus declares in John 8:7: “He that is without sin among you let him first cast a stone at her.” Nor is this a Christian nation as so many insist. It is deeply multi-religious—Christianity, Judaism and Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Sikhism, Quakerism, Baha’i, Wicca, Jehovah’s Witnesses et al. Katha Pollitt, Nation columnist, speaks of the unbounded credulity people have of historic religious figures: “I don’t accept the idea that a man was born of a virgin, walked on water and rose from the dead. I don’t accept the idea that we should follow the Muslim ‘prophet’ who at the age of 53 had sex with a 9-year-old girl and ordered the murder of whole villages of Jews because they wouldn’t follow him.”

GOD IN AMERICA

America is a secular nation although many fundamentalists would have it otherwise. The Constitution makes no mention of God, has no religious test for office. Yet America still offers stunning examples of undermining the inviolable wall of separation between church and state. A brave student in a Rhode Island high school was called “an evil little thing” because as an atheist she objected to a school prayer hanging on the wall of her school auditorium. For 30 years, Alaska Airlines distributed prayer cards to passengers. The U.S. Forest Service renewed a permit to maintain a statue of Jesus in Flathead National Forest in Montana. Players and coaches bowed their heads and kneeled in prayer before football games at Bowie High School in El Paso, Texas. Two of America’s greatest heroes, Eugene Debs and Emma Goldman, were political prisoners. Debs, lion of socialism, and Goldman, lioness of anarchism, were atheists who proved that you don’t have to believe in God to be a magnificent human being. Their lives rebuke the eminent theologians who argue that the only basis for morality is religion. Debs and Goldman lived the Golden Rule: “Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them” (Matthew 7:12). Kant’s categorical imperative says the same thing although put in more philosophical terms: “Act only according to that maxim whereby you can … will that it should become a universal law.” Goldman was beloved by inmates in New York and Missouri prisons. Debs was so highly esteemed by federal prisoners in Atlanta that he was called “little Jesus.” A woman once asked me why I could not tell a harmless lie. “You’re an atheist,” she said. “Why do you care?” The question showed a vast misunderstanding of atheists. They do not need a “higher authority” to be ethical, moral, decent and honest. They do not need a God to tell them that child abuse is wrong, although some Catholic priests believe it is all right. Theists struggle to prove the existence of God but they cannot do so. That’s why their arguments are jesuitical and casuistical: prime mover, first cause, a priori, a posterioi, the celestial watchmaker, intelligent design, Pascal’s wager,


scripture, teleological, ontological, cosmological and eschatological. Theologians are masters of such solemn hocus-pocus. Their thinking is theological prestidigitation. No critical thinker can believe in miracles, resurrection and original sin. No critical thinker can believe in the trinity, the incarnation, transubstantiation, the divinity of Jesus, immortality, reincarnation, sacraments and an embryo “ensouled by God.” Nor is it possible to believe in heaven and hell, the devil and an afterlife. No one can give credence to the sun standing still for Joshua. No critical thinker can believe in 72 virgins waiting in paradise for Muslim martyrs. No critical thinker can believe in the efficacy of prayer. No one can take seriously “God the Father, God the son and God the holy spirit.” Yet religion seems immune from rational attack. The Establishment press refuses to run articles exposing religious delusion. As author Harris writes, religion “is still sheltered from criticism in every corner of our culture.” This article would never appear in the New York Times or any other Establishment newspaper. It is “not suitable discourse,” “too personal” for debate and it is wrong “to destroy people’s faith.” Nation columnist Pollitt asks unarguable questions: “What’s so special about religion that it should be uniquely cocooned? Women, gays, leftists and atheists are constant targets of the faithful. “How can it be logical that women can’t point out sexism in the Bible or the Koran but clerics can use those texts to declare women inferior, unclean and in need of male control?” Pope Benedict, appearing recently in a Mexico wracked by drug wars, spoke soothing words at an outdoor mass to half a million believers: “seek a humble and pure heart and trust in God in the face of evil and sin.”

That’s “theology speak” doled out to the masses. The Old Testament sows seeds of atheism. It is full of godhurled death and destruction, violence and slaughter. Typical is Exodus 11:5: “All the first-born in the land of Egypt shall die.” Or Exodus 15:3: “The Lord is a man of war.” Wildest fabrications abound in the Bible. For instance: Genesis: 19:26: Lot’s wife “looked back” so she was turned into “a pillar of salt.” And how about Pentecostals in Tennessee who celebrate Easter with “shouting, dancing, speaking in tongues and snakeand fire-handling”? These are “gifts of the Holy Spirit”? Yet the movement has 15 million adherents in America. Tennessee! Eighty-seven years after its embarrassing trial of biology teacher Scopes because he taught evolution, Tennessee has just enacted a law protecting teachers who invite challenges to evolution and global warming. The press sometimes supports “God’s presence.” Columnist David Brooks of the New York Times says great

presidents have felt “the presence of God’s hand on their every move.” Presumably presidents Franklin Roosevelt and Kennedy were guided to adultery by the hand of God. Some bankers argue that they are doing “God’s work” by sustaining the free-market system. Yet Matthew 6:24 is anticapitalist to the core: “Ye cannot serve God and mammon.” In sharp contrast to American religiosity and piety, Denmark and Sweden are extremely secular. Author Phil Zuckerman notes that in those countries “the belief in God is muted, minimal and marginal.” Yet as he points out, most Danes and Swedes live decent lives without God and without religion. Nevertheless, most of the world’s people look at God and religion from the point of view of Hebrews 11:1: “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” Precisely. The hoping begs the question. Reason should always trump faith. Ω

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In Rotation 16 | Art of the State 17 | Foodfinds 18 | Fi¬m 20 Left: Channing Tatum earns some cool points for this funny remake of 21 Jump Street with Jonah Hill.

Right: Awestruck, as you’ll be when you see Moonrise Kingdom. Middle: Liam Neeson is just a badass in The Grey. I mean, look at him. Below: The Pirates! A Band of Misfits, and no Johnny Depp in sight. Right: Project X. One of the worst.

Half FAST This movie year is not plodding along as slowly as last year. Here are the 10 best and worst. by Bob Grimm |

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B G R I M M @ N E W SR E V I E W . C O M

hile this hasn’t been an overly exciting movie year so far, it’s shaping up to be a better one than last year. At the midyear point of 2011, I was already calling it one of the worst movie years imaginable, a fact that stuck when the year changed over. Here’s this year’s midyear report card. I was able to find 10 films I liked, so that’s an improvement. The “found footage” phenomenon continues, though, so that’s a blight on any year.

The Best So Far 1. Moonrise Kingdom: Wes Anderson returns to live action after Fantastic Mr. Fox with a very Wes Anderson movie. Great cast, awesome cinematography, and shot-for-shot genius. Any year where Anderson makes a movie is a happier movie year for me. 2. The Grey: Liam Neeson should be an Oscar contender for his work as a man battling harsh snowy wilderness and wolves after a plane crash. Joe Carnahan’s movie is a great survival flick, and an excellent monster movie to boot. There are a lot of people out there whining about the ending. To these people I say: “AAAAHHHH SHUDDUPPP!!! 3. The Avengers: A rousing, funny, overall exciting meeting of the Marvel superheroes that has made a huge impact on the box office but, most importantly, depicts the Incredible Hulk in a

way that most everybody seems to be happy with. Well, perhaps Edward Norton isn’t a fan. And maybe Eric Bana, but everybody else is stoked. 4. Prometheus: Ridley Scott’s return to the Alien universe is a mind bending and somewhat perplexing movie that qualifies as one of the year’s most beautifully shot films. Scott has used 3-D technology much to his advantage. Oh, sure, the film’s logic is all over the place, but I don’t really care. Bring on more Prometheus movies, please. 5. Bernie: Jack Black gives one of the year’s best performances thus far as Bernie, the real life murderer of an elderly widow (played by Shirley MacLaine) in Carthage, Texas. Richard Linklater, reteaming with his The School of Rock star, knows how to handle Black better than anybody.

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6. The Pirates! Band of Misfits: There’s an oddball sense of humor at the heart of this stop-motion gem from the creators of Wallace & Gromit. It’s extremely entertaining, and should stand as one of the year’s best animated efforts. 7. Last Days Here: This documentary catches up with Bobby Liebling, lead singer of heavy metal group Pentagram, living in his mom’s house and whacked out on drugs. A fan finds him, and works hard to get his frazzled ass back on stage. It’s highly absorbing stuff. 8. 21 Jump Street: Channing Tatum is, surprisingly, a laugh riot in this R-rated comedy very loosely based on the Johnny Depp TV show. Features what will surely stand as the year’s best cameos and Ice Cube doing what may be his best screen work to date. Jonah Hill helped come up with the idea for this reboot, and he fashioned quite the funny vehicle for himself and Tatum.


Independence Week at Aces Ballpark Join us for a week-long celebration, concluding with the biggest fireworks show in Aces Ballpark history on July 3!

The Worst So Far 1. The Devil Insid`e: The year’s worst movie so far is a found footage movie. Can you believe it? I’m seriously hoping that crap like this has rung the death bell for found-footage films. If I have to sit through another found footage exorcism, I’m going to enter a convenience store, gather up all of the flu medicine, and put it in the ice cream freezer where people won’t find it. I know that this particular act isn’t all that awful or impactful, but it’s all I can come up with right now. 2. Battleship: Oh yeah … let’s make a boring movie based on a boring board game. Let us tap that untapped mine of gorgeous cinematic ideas that is the American board game. I want a Chutes & Ladders movie now! 3. Act of Valor: Please, members of the military, don’t beat my ass for hating this movie. While it was cool to cast real soldiers in this thing, it wasn’t cool to give them a script that makes the Chuck Norris film Missing in Action look like Rambo: First Blood Part II (Let me make this perfectly clear … Rambo ruled!)

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4. Contraband: Mark Wahlberg action films have a tendency to suck, as does this one. I still love him, and can’t wait for the talking teddy bear movie. As for this, he should be ashamed of himself. 5. Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance: I’m so lame that I actually went into this hoping it would be good. I usually like when Nicolas Cage gets all weird. Not this time. While the skull looks better in this movie, everything else looks like it was produced by 10-year-olds during a massive papier-mâché arts and crafts session. 6. One For the Money: Katherine Heigl’s film career continues its downward spiral. She’s on her way to movie Hell waving at others as they plummet with her. Look Katherine … there’s Keanu Reeves! Wave to him Katherine … wave! There goes Adam Sandler … tip your fine hat to his sorry ass. Hey … there it’s Nicolas Cage, and he’s pulling Amanda Seyfried along with him! Wave! Oh … wait … what is Cage doing to Seyfried on the way to Hell? Oh … that’s disgusting … look away Katherine … look away. 7. Darling Companion: This is actually a movie about Diane Keaton and Kevin Kline looking for a lost dog. It’s them walking around on paths calling out the damned dog’s name and getting lost and shit. Curse ye who put Annie Hall in a lost dog movie! May thee go to cinematic Hell with Katherine Heigl! 8. Chernobyl Diaries: Some kids go to the Chernobyl site and get attacked by mutants. This movie actually got produced. 9. That’s My Boy: Dammit Adam Sandler, you used to be so cool! Adam Samberg…get your ass back to Saturday Night Live fast! 10. Project X: Todd Phillips and friends make a party movie for a roll of quarters and some Kool Aid. Looks and plays like cinematic dookie. Ω

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9. The Cabin In the Woods: This one sat on the shelf for quite some time. So glad somebody picked it up, blew the dust off, and released it. One of the more innovative horror films of the last 10 years, and co-written by Joss Whedon, director of The Avengers, which starred Chris Hemsworth, who also stars in this movie. Can you see the connections? This means something! 10. Delicacy: I’m a sucker for Audrey Tautou romances, because there’s always something a little different going on under the surface. This time out, she stars as a widow who falls for an average Joe (Francois Damiens), and it’s just so darned cute!

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Celebrate America at the ballpark this week! Coors Light Thirsty Thursday™ pres by ESPN Radio 94.5 and the Reno News & Review Thu, June 28, 7:05 vs. Fresno Grizzlies

Enjoy $2 Coors beer specials until the middle of the 5th! Freight House: $2 Coors all night, XM Freddy in 250 Lounge

Saint Mary’s Fireworks Friday presented by KRNV News 4 Fri, June 29, 7:05 vs. Fresno Grizzlies

We’re lighting up the skies above Reno to start the holiday weekend! Freight House: Con Brio on the Heineken Stage; DJ Montague in 250 Lounge Garden Gnome Giveaway presented by KOLO 8 News Now Sat, June 30, 7:05 vs. Fresno Grizzlies

2,000 lucky fans will receive one of the hottest giveaways in baseball! Freight House: Party Jams with Cliff Notes on the Heineken Stage Dillard’s Youth Jersey Giveaway Sun, July 1, 1:05 vs. Las Vegas 51s

Get your tickets and get here early, as 1,000 lucky fans 12 and under will receive a replica of our road gray uniform! Renown Children’s Hospital Family Funday Sun, July 1, 1:05 vs. Las Vegas 51s ®

Play Renown Baseball Bingo and pay attention to the on-field action for a chance to win tickets to an upcoming Aces game! Om-Nom-Nomday: $1 Ribs, presented by KTVN Channel 2 News Mon, July 2, 7:05 vs. Las Vegas 51s

Bring your appetite for Om-Nom-Nomday, every Monday night at Aces Ballpark! This Monday’s deal: $1 ribs, while supplies last!

Independence Day, pres by K-BULL 98.1 and KTVN Channel 2 News Tue, July 3, 6:35 vs. Las Vegas 51s

Join us for the biggest fireworks show in Aces Ballpark history, and a special post-game performance by eNVision!

FOR TICKETS, CALL (775) 334-7000 OR VISIT RENOACES.COM HAPPY HOUR 4-6 BEFORE EVERY ACES HOME GAME LIVE ENTERTAINMENT EVERY THU, FRI AND SAT NIGHT FULL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS AT FREIGHTHOUSE.COM |

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Furry fun Sphero

Thundershirt

Pet Water Bottle

After a long day at work, we often want to crash on the sofa for a night of television. Our butt hitting the cushion is the universal signal for the household cat(s) to become hyperactive. We love our pets, but it’s tough being a purrfect parent. Entertain your cat with Sphero. Sphero is a robotic, glowing ball—slightly larger than a tennis ball—with sensors, a gyro, and an accelerometer, all controlled by your iPhone or Android smartphone so you can send it whirling down the hall or around corners. While not the toy’s primary function, it is perfect for playing a game of cat and mouse. The tough little ball can take a beating—running into walls, for example—but it shouldn’t be dropped or thrown so keep this away from dogs or stairs. At $130, this is probably the most expensive cat toy you’ll ever purchase, but the hours of creative uses derived from the apps justifies the price for geeks and robot aficionados. $130.

When people leave the house, pets get sad but, unfortunately, some pets get depressed, anxious, and extremely distressed. Meant to run free outside, it’s never fun to have to leave a dog indoors while you go to work, but it could break your heart if doing so left them emotionally distraught. So, while the Thundershirt is meant to be worn by the dog, its calming effect will benefit both pet and owner. The Thundershirt wraps around the neck and front legs and pulls snug to create constant pressure. The idea is that this hugging force calms the animal and helps alleviate separation anxiety. Tested on my incredibly anxious dog, there were noticeable improvements, but the Thundershirt doesn’t work magic. Still, for $40, it’s worth the peace of mind to know that you’re doing what you can without having to resort to puppy pills and doggy downers. Also available for cats, I’ve always found cats don’t get depressed, they just get bitchy. $40.

Summer is the time to hydrate and not just with Margaritas and beer by the pool. Water keeps us fueled through the hot days, and our pets are no different. Walking around the neighborhood or hiking in the hills, ThinkGeek’s Pet Water Bottle with Rolling Ball is an excellent way to keep Fido watered. When dogs drink from most water bottles, 90 percent of the water ends on the ground. This stainless steel, BPA-free bottle has a metal ball in the opening, just like you’d find on a hamster or rabbit water feeder. When the dog licks at the mouth of the bottle, he gets all the water he wants with minimal spill. The 24-ounce bottle fits in bike cup holders or backpacks so it’s portable, and with the amount of water you rescue from spilling, it will be enough for almost any walk in the park. ThinkGeek.com. $18.

In this edition of our monthly Gadget column, we examine gadgets for pets.

www.thinkgeek.com

www.Thundershirt.com

www.gosphero.com

—Matthew Craggs

OK – HB

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Nate Clark and his dog, Hannah, are visiting Olympia, Wash. He values repetition for what it can do for art. Hannah values Nate.

Retracing steps

Clark’s mom. He remembers watching her as a kid while she was on the phone. She would take notes while talking and when she was finished writing down information, she would continue to trace over the lines of her writing again and again. Whether revisiting it to make it better or a way of remembering information, it again relates to the idea of practice. That process of retracing literally shows up in a few of his paintings. “When we see information like this, it’s so perfect now because you print it off or it’s made by a computer,” says Clark, talking about the way we generally see complex systems and visual data represented. “We’ve become so good at accepting perfect images that it’s almost like you have to make things that are a little bit off now. Or, it gives you an opportunity to make those things more interesting.” As he writes in his artist statement: “[These paintings] are visual reminders of what working with the hands can do, and how imperfections make things beautiful.” Ω

Nate Clark’s LINE [repeat] Repetition and obsession are a couple of words that come to mind in describing the Nate by Clark’s latest work, on display in the Megan Berner Sheppard Fine Art Gallery at the University of Nevada, Reno. The show, titled LINE [repeat], consists of a series of large-scale paintings that appear to be monochromatic at first glance and a sculpture that occupies the space at the center of the room. The paintings (some would probably more appropriately be called drawings) are abstract in nature, made up Nate Clark’s exhibition, of basic marks, mostly lines. “They are more about really recognizaLINE [repeat], runs from June 19-July 13. ble handmade marks,” says Clark. “I like Exhibition hours are that the drawings are also kind of Tuesday and Thursday 2 p.m.-6 p.m. and involved. I feel like people really connect Saturday noon-3 p.m. with drawings.” There is a closing recepBecause of their large size, the painttion on Friday July 13 ings demand attention. Most of the pieces from 6-8 p.m. are around 4 feet by 6 feet. Their surfaces are layered and, as you get closer, they reveal their most interesting features— showing the subtle differences between each mark made on the canvas either in the thick brushstrokes or the imperfect lines in

pencil and marker. Take, for example, a black canvas with black vertical lines painted on top of it, almost like tally marks, each approximately one inch long and ordered in more or less regular rows across the entire surface. The piece was made for his sister, who has been living in Africa. “She has this extreme interest in people who have become a statistic and are somehow unrepresented in reality. I thought this was an interesting way to push that idea,” Clark explains. “Each of these marks is so unique, but they’ll always be seen as kind of one just big ridiculous kind of complete thing. Like, no one will really pick out one, but instead it’s more like the whole complete picture.” There is a quality to the piece that can be overwhelming. The sheer number of marks and the nature of Clark’s approach— not making the marks perfect but revealing his process and the imperfection inherent in the human hand—create a visceral connection in the viewer making them relatable. There is an organic feeling to the work that contrasts the cool, sterile, minimalist

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approach, making the paintings friendly and almost playful despite the obsessive quality that is present in all of the work. “It’s kind of impossible not to think, ‘Wow, this person is either really wacky or just really patient,’” Clark says. Clark talks about the idea of practice in relation to this work, which is deeply integrated in his process. You practice something to get better at it or to perfect it. In these paintings, Clark talks about making a mark over and over until reaching “this one spot.” “After that you keep practicing. Sometimes you don’t know when that one time is, or that spot,” Clark explains. “They are all very systematic.” The title for the exhibition came from

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Bigfoot ball Sasquatch Tavern and Grill 775 Highway 40, Verdi, 657-9207

July 6-8

DOWNTOWN RENO

I’ve never seen a sasquatch, but I don’t discount the fact they could exist. If so, it seems a lot more likely that the by K.J. Sullivan sasquatch would hang out in Verdi rather than Reno. Bigfoot just strikes ksullivan@ me as more of a small town creature newsreview.com who wouldn’t get into the gambling and nightlife that Reno has to offer, so it makes sense that Verdi would offer up a tavern and grill named for the illustrious creature.

PHOTO/AMY BECK

It’s a Three Day Street Festival Bustin’ with BBQ, Rockin’ Live Music & Baja’s Baddest Buggies! Friday, July 6 • Noon-8pm Saturday, July 7 • 10am-8pm Sunday, July 8 • 10am-4pm All-American BBQ Food Booths Two Stages featuring Rockin’ Tribute Bands Street Faire with lots of Arts & Crafts and Memorabilia Booths Monster Energy Freestyle Motocross Presentation Special Monster Energy Girls and DJ Appearances Join us in a Special Tribute to the Men and Women of the Armed Forces

The black and bleu burger at Sasquatch Tavern in Verdi.

Baja Desert Race Car Show • Friday, July 6

Check out over 150 of the Baja Desert Race Cars that will be competing in the High Desert Race Association & Eldorado Fireworks 500 off-road race on July 7 & 8! Sponsored by Downtown Reno and Fueled by Monster Energy!

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Sasquatch Tavern and Grill is open Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to midnight; Saturday and Sunday, 8 a.m. to midnight.

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the Black and Blue Burger ($9.50) while Tim went with the Mushroom Burger ($9.50). When the burgers arrived, I was astounded by the size of the plates that were filled with a giant burger and a giant serving of french fries. I had actually ordered onion rings, but when I saw how good the fries looked, nice and crispy, I didn’t bother to say anything. My burger was large and cooked perfectly, still pink inside just the way I requested it. The meat had a nice fresh flavor, and I liked the blue cheese on top. The menu indicated that the burger was pan fried in Cajun spices, but I didn’t taste any heat. The bun was soft, and the lettuce and tomatoes on the side were crisp. Tim’s burger was frigging amazing. Not just a typical mushroom burger, this was a mushroom Swiss teriyaki burger with sautéed mushrooms and onions that brought out the flavor of the meat so well, I knew right then and there that I would drive back out to Verdi for this hamburger anytime. This is a messy burger, but Lauren quickly returned with more napkins and even some wet naps. During the meal, we decided to order a Tanqueray and tonic ($4.25) for me and Maker’s and Coke ($4.50) for Tim. Holy Moses, do they pour a strong drink there! I was practically breathing fire after one delicious sip. Thank goodness we had the giant burgers to balance out the strong drinks or it would have been a dangerous ride out of town. We had arrived right before lunchtime, and the place started to quickly fill up with what appeared to be a lot of locals. The overall vibe was relaxing and comfortable and if I lived in the area, I would be there all the time. Do yourself a favor and head up to Verdi and check this place out. Even if you never get to see a real sasquatch, at least you can eat at the tavern and grill. Ω

My friend Tim and I headed up there on a weekday for lunch. The Sasquatch Tavern and Grill is a small setup with a large bar on one side and a smaller dining area on the other. While it’s dark inside, it’s not scary dark. A large stone fireplace sits in the corner with a sasquatch statue on the mantel. There’s also a mural of a sasquatch hitchhiking. The place appears to have been recently updated as the floors and booths all looked new. The bar is still old-school style, but welcoming none the less. Tim and I sat down and were promptly greeted by the smiling, attractive bartender, Lauren. We decided to start with some beers, a Newcastle and Icky, both on draft ($4.50), while we looked over the menu. The menu was so varied that I was kind of shocked. Choices ranged from a brie plate covered in apricots to prime rib to stir fry. The call of the Yeti must have awakened the carnivores inside us, because both Tim and I opted for a burger. I got


Dining out this week?

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/foodtruck Trucks listed are a sampling and are subject to change.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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GourMelt - @GourMelt Dish Truck - @Dishtruck Sauce Wagon - @saucewagon St. Lawrence Pizza - @StLawrencePizzas Slap Yo Mama - @slapyomama Breezy Freeze - @BreezyFreezeLA Chi-Town Hustler - @chitownhustler2 Traffic Jam Yum Truck Pearson’s Cajun Truck

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 28, 2012

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67,5

The boring dead

/6<9:

GD\VDZHHN

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

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Somewhere in the development of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, somebody made the call to play it completely straight, as though Honest Abe was a serious enemy to the undead during his young adulthood and presidency, and there was nothing funny about it. Big mistake. This film has no sense of humor. None. It wants to be taken seriously, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simply impossible. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a movie about Abraham by Lincoln killing vampires. It needs to be stupid Bob Grimm and campy, and it plays like a really bad Civil War movie with the occasional bloodsucker bgrimm@ newsreview.com thrown in for spice. I suppose this would be forgivable if director Timur Bekmambetovâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;director of the interesting vampire flick Nightwatch and the entertaining Wantedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;had assembled some decent action scenes. The film is surprisingly lacking when it comes to the action sequences. Abraham Lincoln (played by Benjamin Walker) looks cool the first couple of times he swings away with his axe, but it gets old fast. The fight scenes are edited so quickly and sloppily itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to follow any of the action.

2

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going after every review of this movie!â&#x20AC;?

20

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JUNE 28, 2012

As for the vampires, they are just cartoons. CGI can be a great thing, but its over-use here takes you right out of the film, and the battles lose any sense of tension. CGI also mars the big action scenes, like the final battle aboard a train on a fiery bridge. You feel the protagonists are more in danger of death via an invasive computer virus than a rabid vampire.

1

2

3

POOR

FAIR

GOOD

4 VERY GOOD

5 EXCELLENT

Walker makes a decent enough Lincoln as far as appearances go. He sort of has a young Liam Neeson vibe going for him. Yet, he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t given much to do other than look the part. Timothy Olyphant, Eric Bana and Adrien Brody were all considered for the role, and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but think any of those actors wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve brought a little more pizzazz to the film. Rufus Sewell and Marton Csokas play Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main vampire adversaries, and they are dull, dull, dull. You know you are in bad shape if Rufus Sewell is playing your main bad guy. He is an actor with zero charisma. This is a film that actually manages to make Mary Elizabeth Winstead completely uninteresting (as opposed to The Thing, where she was only mildly uninteresting). As Mary Todd Lincoln, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forced to stand around in period hairdo and dress. When I read that Winstead was in this, I thought for sure she would swing into action along with Lincoln. How fun would it have been if they were a husband/wife vampire killing crew? Nope, Winstead, who has action movie chops, just stands around moping because Abe tells fibs about what he does with his nights. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wasted opportunity. Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the title alone suggest campy, goofy fun? Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you expect to laugh a few times at the sight of the iconic stovepipe hatwearing Lincoln blasting bloodsuckers? You are more likely to yawn than even chortle. The movie desperately needs a solid star. They shouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve paid somebody like Civil War movie vet Kevin Costner to play the head vampire, what with his Dances With Wolves pedigree. That wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been good weird fun. As for the tone, I was expecting something more like Evil Dead 2 than the stupid Underworld movies. The film does suggest that the Confederacy consisted of many vampires, and the tide of the war didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t turn until Lincoln realized he had to use silver on them. (I thought that was for werewolves.) Again, the Confederacy being a bunch of vampires could be funny, but nothing is done with the premise other than the occasional confederate soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face sprouting fangs via shite special effects. And if you are going to see this despite my warning, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shell out the extra for 3-D. This is some of worst 3-D since the 2010 Clash of the Titans. How can you make a movie called Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter boring? Bekmambetov has most certainly found a way. â&#x201E;Ś


Hysteria

2

This film tells the story of Mortimer Granville (Hugh Dancy) and his participation in the invention of the first vibrator as a means of curing female “hysteria” in the late 1800s. Fed up with working for doctors who still peddle leeches and don’t believe in germs, Granville goes to work for Dr. Robert Dalrymple (Jonathan Pryce), who basically runs a clinic that gets women off using his hands. When Granville no longer can cure his patients because of hand cramps, he’s dismissed, only to return when his friend Edmund St. JohnSmythe (Rupert Everett) converts his electric feather duster into, essentially, a sex toy. Maggie Gyllenhaal stars as Charlotte Dalrymple, the doctor’s daughter and rebel working to help the poor and occasionally punch cops in the face. The film has an uninteresting romance between her and Granville. Things get off to a funny and spirited start, but it peters out in the end, culminating with a courtroom drama that feels stale.

3

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted

4

Prometheus

In this prequel to his own Alien, director Ridley Scott explores all new angles in his monster universe via eye-popping 3-D visuals and intense storytelling. When scientists discover cave drawings that appear to be superior alien intelligence inviting us for a visit, an exploratory space mission travels to a distant galaxy in search of our origins. What they find involves tentacles, slime, gnarly self-administered operations and general despair. Noomi Rapace takes on the female heroine role, with Charlize Theron along for the ride as a mysterious mission commander. Best of all is Michael Fassbender as David, a strange android who models himself after Peter O’Toole. With this, Scott proves that he is still a master of the sci-fi genre, a genre he hasn’t visited since his 1982 Blade Runner —he’s rumored to be working on a sequel to that classic, as well. The ending of this one, hopefully, paves the way for another chapter—a chapter I sincerely hope Scott is involved in.

3

Rock of Ages

The hit Broadway play featuring ’80s hair rock comes to the big screen courtesy of director Adam Shankman (Hairspray) and the results are a mixed bag. But one of the things in that bag would be Tom Cruise as jaded rock star Stacee Jaxx, a role that affords Mr. Cruise the opportunity to sing, and sing well. He belts out songs like “Pour Some Sugar on Me” and “Wanted Dead or Alive” with such authority, it’s a wonder we haven’t heard this guy singing sooner. Julianne Hough is so-so in your typical “girl moves to the big city to make it big” role. Other members of the cast, including Alec Baldwin, Russell Brand and Catherine ZetaJones all have some fun singing crap songs. The movie is overlong, and not too bright, yet enjoyable whenever Cruise takes over. It’s sort of worth seeing for him.

Reno Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

2

That’s My Boy

4

Brave

5

Moonrise Kingdom

The 347th Snow White movie this year is actually a fairly decent one, with Kristen Stewart doing a fine job as the title character and Chris Hemsworth contributing nicely as the ax-wielding Hunstman. Best of all the cast is Charlize Theron as Ravenna, a loony queen hell-bent on staying young and eating Snow’s heart. Director Rupert Sanders puts together a swell visual movie, especially in the way he creates dwarves out of actors like Nick Frost, Ian McShane, Bob Hoskins and Toby Jones. The movie is quite good when it features Snow White running around in various enchanted forests, though not so much in the final act, where it becomes a weird Joan of Arc movie. The last act feels tacked on, like it belongs on another film. Still, Stewart is quite winning here and Theron is a bona fide scene-stealer. I’ve been hating—vehemently hating— Adam Sandler’s broad comedies of late. Jack and Jill, Grown Ups, Just Go with It and Bedtime Stories all blew. Funny People was great, but that wasn’t a Sandler vehicle. It worked because Judd Apatow was at the helm. Watching Sandler’s latest, in which he plays a former child star who got his teacher pregnant, I found myself almost liking it. It’s bad, but it’s almost good-bad in a Billy Madison sort of way. I’ve really been longing for the days when I could go to a Sandler film, shut my brain off, and revel in how creatively and comically stupid it could be. Andy Samberg stars as Sandler’s son, and jokes about whacking off to grandmas, pants shitting and incest ensue. There are some solid laughs, but a lot of duds. Will Sandler ever get his dumb comedy mojo back? He’s currently working on Grown Ups 2, so the future is bleak. After the severe misstep that was Cars 2, Pixar gets back to goodness with this, the tale of Merida (voice of Kelly Macdonald). Merida is a princess who doesn’t want to conform to tradition, shooting arrows better than any of the boys in or around her kingdom, and not really too keen about marrying any of them under arranged circumstances. When a spell is cast on family members, she must search for a way to restore normalcy, while convincing her mom (Emma Thompson) that she has the right to choose her own destiny. Merida is a fun character, and Macdonald is the perfect voice for her. As for the look of this movie, it is beautiful for its entire running time. While I’ve liked many Pixar films more than this one, that is not a dig on this movie. It might not be one of the best the studio has offered, but it is still a highly entertaining piece of work. Writer-director Wes Anderson’s return to live action after his animated gem Fantastic Mr. Fox is probably the most “Wes Anderson” Wes Anderson movie yet, and that’s a good thing if you love the guy (I do!). The story here is set in 1965, where Sam the Khaki Scout (newcomer Jared Gilman) has flown the coop during a camping expedition, much to the worry of Scout Master Ward, (Edward Norton, in his funniest performance yet). Sam runs away with Suzy (Kara Hayward, also a newcomer), and they have themselves a romantic couple of days while parents and authority figures frantically search for them. The adolescent puppy love story is treated with the sort of storybook grace one would expect from Anderson. Every shot is a thing of beauty. Bruce Willis, Bill Murray, Frances McDormand and Jason Schwartzman all contribute wonderfully in what stands, and will stand, as one of the year’s best films.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

|

FEATURE STORY

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Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Gift certificates make great gifts! Visit www.newsreview.com

The third in this franchise winds up being the best, and a decent comeback after a bland second installment. The zoo animals, still kicking it in Africa, wind up on a European tour with a circus, which gives writers Eric Darnell and Noah Baumbach the opportunity to introduce some fun new characters. These include a hoop-jumping tiger (voiced by Bryan Cranston), an evil animal control officer (Frances McDormand) and, most winningly, a dopey seal named Stefano voiced wonderfully by Martin Short. This one is a bit touched in the head, as evidenced by the “Circus Afro” sequence featured in the advertising campaign. Darnell and Baumbach write good jokes that will keep both the adults and children laughing. Stars the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, David Schwimmer and Jada Pinkett Smith.

3

Snow White and the Huntsman

Tahoe

ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 28, 2012

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RN&R

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NATHAN OWENS MOTOWN LEGENDS JUNE 29 – JULY 2 JULY 5 – JULY 8 JULY 13 – JULY 16 JULY 27 – JULY 30

THE B-52s

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

PENN & TELLER

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

Tickets available at Ticketmaster.com or SouthShoreRoom.com

See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC. RNR-062812

OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

V1_76132.1_4.93x11.5_4c_Ad.indd 1

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FOODFINDS

6/25/12 9:35 AM

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FILM

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3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

THURSDAY 6/28

FRIDAY 6/29

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

DSTL’D w/DJs Dennis, Sparkinzi, Sulli, 5657, Michael Rivera, 10pm, $5

SATURDAY 6/30 Boogie Daddies, 9:30pm, no cover

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

THE ALLEY

Beastie Boys tribute, 9pm, $5 suggested donation

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

SUNDAY 7/1

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/2-7/4

Casual Dogs, 8pm, no cover

Gabardine Sisters, 7pm, no cover

Jazz Night, 7:30pm, Tu, no cover

Fang, Neutral Boy, Machine Gun Vendetta, Let It Burn, 9pm, $8

Valient Thorr, Royal Thunder, 7:30pm, M, $10 Nekromantix, The Casualties, 6:30pm, Tu, $17

BAR-M-BAR

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB

Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-0806 188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

CEOL IRISH PUB

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Ladies Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 for women

College Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 with college ID

1) The Flesh Hammers, The Letdowns, 8:30pm, $5

1) Forbidden Fridays, 11:30pm, $10, $12 2) DJ Double B, DJ Luciano, 11pm, no cover

1) DJ Fredy G, DJ A-Kran, DJ Hektor S, 10pm, $10, $12 after 11pm

Bennett Jackson, 6pm, no cover

Wagon, 6pm, no cover

535 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-1774

COMMROW

The Grups, 9pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

CLUB BASS

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Vokab Kompany

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Sunday be fore publication .

June 29, 9 p.m. Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor 71 S. Wells Ave. 384-1652

Comedy

Drop Top Lincoln, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Phil, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, no cover Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

250 Evans Ave., (775) 334-7041 1) XM Fredie, 9pm, no cover 1) 250 Lounge 2) Duffy’s Ale House 3) Heineken Stage

3) Con Brio, 9pm, no cover charge

3) Party Jams w/Cliff Notes, 7pm, no cover charge

FRESH KETCH

New World Jazz Project, 7pm, no cover

Drop Top Lincoln, 9:30pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

FREIGHT HOUSE DISTRICT

2435 Venice Dr., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 541-5683

Karaoke with Phil, 9pm, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Dave Mencarelli, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; Ali Wong, F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; TBA, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Jesse Kalin, 6:30pm, Tu, no cover

GENOA BAR & SALOON

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Tommy Savitt, Chuck Martin, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Kivi Rogers, Frances DiLorinzo, W, 9pm, $25

Mark Castro Duo, 1pm, no cover

2282 Main St., Genoa; (775) 782-3870

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

The Other Band, 7pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Con Brio, 8pm, no cover

JAVA JUNGLE

Sunday Music Showcase, 6pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Ladies of Laughter with Susan Jones, F, 9:30pm; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16; Hynopt!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Beer at a bargain.

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Reno

Sparks

5525 S. Virginia St. 775.284.7711

846 Victorian Ave. 775.355.7711

Recycle this paper

TIGHT WAD TUESDAYS

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

greatbasinbrewingco.com OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

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JUNE 28, 2012

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RN&R

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25


THURSDAY 6/28

FRIDAY 6/29 Vokab Kompany, 9pm, $12

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Loverance, Tha Jacka, Keak Da Sneak, Yukmouth, 7pm, $30, $35

Official Reno Block Party After Party w/Alvin Risk, SuperVision, 9pm, $12-$125

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL NEW OASIS

Los Rolands y Marito Rivera, 9pm, $20

2100 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 359-4020

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Banda La Ausente, 9pm, no cover

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Dale Poune, 7pm, no cover

Drinking with Clowns, 8pm, no cover

Carson City Rascals, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

Lady and the Tramps, 8pm, no cover

Lady and the Tramps, 8pm, W, no cover

Cyanate, 8pm, no cover

Live jazz, 7:30pm, M, W, no cover Blues jam, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Lightning & Lace, 9:30pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RED ROCK BAR

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

Open Blues Jam with Schall Adams, 7pm, no cover

Enslave the Creation, Psychosomatic, Clot, Hellpig, 8pm, $2

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm Tu, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Local Band All Stars, 9pm, no cover

Reno Block Party After Party, 9pm, no cover

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

THE UNDERGROUND

1) Fender Music Foundation Benefit Concert, 8pm, donations 2) Hot TreeHouse Nights, 9pm, $5

1) Reno CORE Project Fundraiser, 9pm, $12-$20

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Blair O’Gorman, Smiley Mikey, Craig Prather, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Verbal Kint, 7pm, no cover

Sample of Soul, 7pm, no cover

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993 1) Showroom 2) Tree House Lounge 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Judgement Day, 9pm, Tu, no cover Ladies Night w/DJ Ahn, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Steve Starr, 8pm, Tu, no cover Open Mic w/Cliff Notes, 8pm, W, no cover

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-6460

July 3, 9 p.m. Strega Bar 310 S. Arlington Ave. 348-9911

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Spencer & Morgan’s Funk Jam, 9:30pm, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Judgement Day

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/2-7/4

Wild Ride, Willy Cavins, Cold Steel Band, 9pm, $5

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

July 2, 7:30 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

SUNDAY 7/1

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

Valient Thorr

SATURDAY 6/30 Bourgeois Gypsies, Nevada Backwards, The Burrowing Owls, 9pm, $TBA

Colin Ross, 7pm, no cover

1) Coke La Rock, Busy Bee, Percee P, DJ Grand Wizard Theodore, Jendor, 7pm, M, $10

Sunday jazz, 2pm, no cover

ARTOWN

Charity of the Month

SUMMER MUSIC SERIES

Thursday, June 28

W/ Sil Shoda, Na Na Nonchalant, Crush, Stewart In The Basement, Joandy 775 Hiphop / Reno Tahoe Tonight Present:

Friday, June 29

A Tribute To The Beastie Boys. Over 20 Acts Performing The Best Beaties Songs!

FANG

Saturday, June 30 W/ Neutralboy, Old Glory, Machine Gun Vendetta

VALIENT THORR

Monday, July 2

W/ Royal Thunder. The Kickass, Elephant Rifle, Nevermute

NEKROMANTIX

Tuesday, July 3

W/ Casualties, Down By Law, Lower Class Brats, Flatfoot 56, The Sheds

4TH OF JULY & FIREWORKS

Wednesday, July 4 FREE BBQ + DJ PLAN C

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: Valient Thorr — July 2 Nekromantix, Casualties, Down By Law, Lower Class Brats — July 3 The Dwarves — July 6 Dizzy Wright W/Dj Hoppa — July 12 Bouncing Souls — July 20 Strung Out — August 18

TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

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Dine with us during the month of July, mention ARTOWN and we will donate 20% of the food portion of your bill to

ARTOWN

RAPSCALLION 35 YEARS & WE

THANK YOU!

Every month a different Charity will be participating. Dine with us often & support your favorite Charity.

A RENO RAdItION t fOR 40

YEARS!

friday, JUly 6TH 9PM

meTal sHow oTis

saTUrday, JUly 7TH 9PM

1555 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV

www.Rapscallion.com

775-323-1211 • 1-877-932-3700 Open Monday - Friday at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm Sunday Brunch from 10am to 2pm

los pisToleTos

Best rs Burge o in Ren

RYAN’S SALOON

& BROILER

all sHo ws No CoV er

924 S. Wells Ave. Reno 323-4142


OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 28, 2012

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 6/28

FRIDAY 6/29

SATURDAY 6/30

SUNDAY 7/1

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/2-7/4

2) Rebekah Chase Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Rebekah Chase Band, 4pm, Chili Sauce, 10pm, no cover

2) Rebekah Chase Band, 4pm, Chili Sauce, 10pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Dick Dale, 9pm, $25 2) Professor Stone, DJ Paul, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Leftover Salmon, 9pm, $30 2) The Real Nasty, 12:30am, no cover

2) The Real Nasty, 12:30am, no cover

2) Noah D, The SubDocta, 11pm, Tu, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 8pm, $19.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, 9:30pm, $19.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, $19.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, Tu, W, $19.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Capital Down, 10pm, W, no cover

1) Ultimate Reno Combat 34, 8pm, $25-$100 4) Aces Up, 9pm, no cover

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, $10 4) Aces Up, 9pm, no cover

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, $10

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, Tu, W, $10

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm, $22 2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm, $22 2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm, $22

1) Nathan Owens Motown Legends, 7:30pm, M, $22

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 2) Joe Fontenot, 8pm, $15 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 2) Joe Fontenot, 8pm, $15, live local bands, 10pm, no cover 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, DJ/dancing, 9pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 2) Joe Fontenot, 8pm, $15, live local 1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 bands, 10pm, no cover 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, no cover 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, DJ/dancing, 9pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 7pm, no cover 3) Joel Edwards, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ BG, 6pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover 3) Joel Edwards, 6pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover 3) Joel Edwards, 6pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, $19.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

Dick Dale

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, $10 4) Aces Up, 9pm, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

MONTBLEU RESORT

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 7pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 5:30pm, no cover

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

6) Lake Tahoe Reggae Festival w/Pepper, Katchafire, J Boog, 1:30pm, $39

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

2) In A Fect, 7pm, no cover

3) Carolyn Dolan Duo, 9pm, no cover 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

2) In A Fect, 9pm, no cover 3) Chocolate Martini, 9pm, no cover 4) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) In A Fect, 9pm, no cover 3) Chocolate Martini, 9pm, no cover 4) Anchorman Party w/DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) In A Fect, 7pm, no cover

2) In A Fect, 7pm, M, no cover

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover

1) MC Hammer, 8pm, $45, $59.50 2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover

2) DJ Tom, 9pm, M, DJ I, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover 3) Dudes Day, 7pm, Tu, Mix it Up!, 10pm, W, no cover

Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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June 29, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

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FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

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JUNE 28, 2012

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29


VICTORY OVER YOUR HAIR LOSS No Plugs • Rugs • Drugs

F

ollicular Micrograft Surgery is the Gold Standard in Hair Restoration for both MEN & WOMEN. Dr. Wesley W. Hall, a leader in our region in General & Vascular Surgery for over 35 years, has helped countless WOMEN AND MEN with their hair loss. Read his free report Candid Answers About Hair Restoration and be informed before you let anyone touch your hair.

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FREE CONSULTATION AKROS- THE INTELLIGENT CHOICE IN HAIR RESTORATION

WESLEY W. HALL MD FACS DIPLOMATE AMERICAN BOARD OF SURGERY MEMBER INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY HAIR RESTORATION SURGERY

AKROS HAIR RESTORATION 635 Sierra Rose Dr. Ste A • Reno

775.284.3331 • 866.424.7548 www.welcometoakros.com

Bus it to the Beach

Announcing the East Shore Express

s Free entry into Sand Harbor with $3 round-trip bus fare. $1.50 round-trip bus fare for children 12 and under, seniors and disabled passengers. Must be cash only and exact change. s Runs every 20 minutes from 9 am-6 pm s Runs all summer: June 15-September 3 s Park at 771 Southwood Blvd. in Incline Village (Old elementary school at Southwood Blvd. and SR 28) s Smart, convenient and better for our lake

www.eastshoreexpress.com

Funding from US Forest Service, NV Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration

30   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 28, 2012


For Thursday, June 28 to Wednesday, July 4 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

DOLLAR EXCHANGE AT NEVADA STATE MUSEUM:

Listings are free, but not guaranteed. Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., July 12, is Thursday, July 5.

DOWNTOWN RIVERWALK WALKING TOUR: This summer walk along the Truckee River will kick off HRPS July Walks in Reno for Artown. Learn about Reno’s relationship with the Truckee River and observe how the HRPS Walks in July relate to the Truckee and the history of Reno. Reservations must be made one day in advance of the tour. Tu, 7/3, 6-8pm. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. Wild River Grille, 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 180, (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

Events ANGELS IN THE COMMUNITY CHARITY AUCTION: This evening of food and fun to help feed the hungry in the community features music by jazz singer Bunnie Robbins. Sa, 6/30, 6:30-9pm. $25. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (775) 690-9555, www.angelsinthecommunityinc.com.

ARTOWN: The annual arts celebration

activities before the Family Series show. M, 5-7pm through 7/30. Opens 7/2. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 322-1538, www.renoisartown.com. event is a leisurely ride through the most historic parts of Reno. Helmets required. Reservations required. Su, 7/1, 9-11am. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. My Favorite Muffin, 340 California Ave., (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

mobile restaurants from Reno, San Francisco, Sacramento and Los Angeles will roll in to Carson City serving up a variety of authentic, exotic cuisines. The culinary event includes musical performances throughout the day from the Red Hot Smokin’ Aces. Sa, 6/30, 12-5pm. Free admission. Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 885-7000.

Humanities and Sundance Books and Music present the annual series. Join Nevada Humanities Chautauqua performers for a lively discussion of history and scholarship behind the characters. Through 6/29, 7:30-9am. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188.

Volunteers will open the Discovery Room three days a week during the summer months. Activities will focus around a different theme for week. Regular activities include “Crafts on the Porch” on Wednesdays and story time at 11am on Fridays. W-F, 10am-1pm through 8/24. Free. Great Basin Adventure, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961, www.washoecountyparks.com.

LEGENDS GRILL GOLF TOURNAMENT: This benefit for CARE Chest features tee prizes, contests, a raffle and a post-play barbecue with live music. Sa, 6/30, 1pm. $100 entry fee. Washoe Golf Course, 2601 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 853-5550, www.legendsgrill-reno.com.

NEVADA HUMANITIES CHAUTAUQUA 2012: SAINTS AND SINNERS: Explore the lives of

FANDANGO GOURMET FOOD TRUCK FEST: The

COFFEE WITH THE CHAUTAUQUANS: Nevada

KIDS DISCOVERY ROOM: Discovery Room

its Fourth of July fireworks event. Edgewood, Lakeside Beach, El Dorado Beach, Nevada Beach and Regan Beach are considered some of the best locations to see the fireworks show. W, 7/4, 9:45pm. Free. Call for details, (530) 5415255, http://tahoesouth.com.

Racing Association’s off-road event features qualifying races, performances by the Monster Freestyle MX Team featuring X-Games and Ninja Stunt Team riders, race car displays, autograph signing and live entertainment at several locations in Reno and Sparks. On July 7, racers take to the desert at the Reno Tahoe Motorplex, off Interstate-80 Exit 32, for a 500-mile race. M-Su through 7/9. Opens 7/1. Call or visit website for details, (702) 407-3059, http://hdrarace.com.

ARTOWN FAMILY FESTIVAL: Enjoy children’s

Truckee-Donner Recreation & Park District presents an old-fashioned Fourth of July celebration with games, live music, food and fireworks show at 9:30pm. W, 7/4, 9am-10pm. $6 in advance. West End Beach, Donner Lake, 15963 Southshore Drive, Truckee, (530) 5827720, www.tdrpd.com.

LIGHTS ON THE LAKE: South Lake Tahoe holds

ELDORADO FIREWORKS 500: High Desert

offers nearly 500 events, more than 100 workshops and more than 30 ongoing programs. M-Su through 7/31. Opens 7/1. Free for most events. Call or visit website for details, (775) 322-1538, www.renoisartown.com.

BIKE TOUR THROUGH OLD RENO: This Artown

FOURTH OF JULY AT WEST END BEACH: The

Reno Coin Club & The Nevada State Museum present “Coin Exchange and Minting on Old Coin Press No. 1.” The museum will fire up the press and offer the new National Park quarters and Native American and presidential dollars at face or cost. There will be Chester Arthur and Grover Cleveland dollars, as well as the 2012 Native American Dollars for $1.25 and a display of ancient and obsolete U.S. coins. F, 6/29, 10am-3pm. $8 adults; free for children under age 18. Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 815-8625, www.renocoinclub.org.

legendary characters such as Robert E. Lee, Benedict Arnold, Mary Harris Mother Jones, Eleanor Roosevelt, Malcolm X and George Wallace. Audiences are also invited to share in performances by Young Chautauquans. Evening events begin with a musical performance followed by two theatrical Chautauqua presentations. Gates open at 5pm, music starts at 6pm and Chautauqua presentations begin at 7pm. Th, 6/28, 6pm. $10-$60; free for children age 12 and younger. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 784-6587, www.nevadahumanities.org.

NEVADA HUMANITIES CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Frank X. Mullen presents “Benedict Arnold: The Making of an American Judas.” Th, 6/28, 2pm. Free. Northwest Reno Library, 2325 Robb Drive; Karen Vuranch presents “Coal Camp

Memories.” Th, 6/28, 2pm. Free. Downtown Reno Library, 301 S. Center St.; Susan Marie Frontczak presents “Dear Mr. President: A Look at Letters and Packages Sent to the Roosevelts.” Th, 6/28, 4pm. Free. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 784-6587, www.nevadahumanities.org.

Beach. M-W, Sa, Su through 7/4. Opens 6/30. Free for most events. Call or visit website for details, (775) 298-1010, www.redwhiteandtahoeblue.com.

RENO/SPARKS RELAY FOR LIFE: More than 1,000 walkers will participate in the 18th annual American Cancer Society's Reno/Sparks Relay for Life with a goal of celebrating survivors, raising monies for research and remembering loved ones that have been lost to cancer. The 24-hour event includes lunch, live bands and performers, a midnight 5K run, the Mr. Relay Contest and a wing-eating contest. Register in advance. Sa, 6/30, 11am. $10 donation. Reno High School, 395 Booth St., (775) 750-5295, www.renorelay.com.

NEVADA STATE RAILROAD MUSEUMS INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION: Ride the historic V&T steam locomotive and McKeen motor car during the Nevada State Railroad Museums five-day Independence Day celebration. Train rides are from 10am to 4pm. The museum will be open from 8am to 6pm. The annex and outdoor exhibits will be open from 8:30am to 4:30pm. Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday feature rides on the No. 25 Steam Locomotive and photos of the McKeen in static display. Wednesday features rides on the McKeen motor car. Inyo, the 1875 woodburning steam locomotive, will be out for photos (no rides) on Monday Tuesday and Wednesday. M-W, Sa, Su, through 7/4. Opens Sa, 6/30. $3-$16; free for children age 3 and younger. Nevada State Railroad Museum, 2180 S. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 687-6953, http://museums.nevadaculture.org.

RSVP 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION: The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program presents its annual Independence Day fair featuring carnival rides, crafters and food vendors. The carnival is open noon until 10pm. The event culminates with a fireworks show starting about 9:15pm on July 4. M-W, Sa, Su, 12-10pm through 7/4. Opens 6/30. Mills Park, 1111 E. William St., Carson City, 775687468 ext. 4, www.nevadaruralrsvp.org.

SPARKS XTREME BEACH SPORTS FESTIVAL: The EVP Volleyball Tour and UWP-IJSBA Watercross Tour will combine for the first time on the West Coast. Both events are the largest of their kind in the country, featuring hundreds of AllAmerican athletes going head-to-head in pro volley ball action on the beach and high-speed race action on the water. Sa, 6/30; Su, 7/1. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, Sparks, (775) 353-2376, www.uwpinc.com/site_information_SPARKS.htm.

OVER THE EDGE: This fund-raising event provides participants the chance to rappel 30 stories down the Grand Sierra in a safe environment. The event is a benefit for Special Olympics Nevada. F, 6/29; Sa, 6/30. Free for spectators. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (702) 4653797, www.overtheedgereno.com.

PARSONS/MILLS ARCHITECTURE: Stroll through one of Reno’s most unique neighborhoods to view some designs of Reno architects Edward Parsons and Russell Mills, who sometimes collaborated on designs. Hear about the families who first lived in these homes. Reservations required. Sa, 6/30, 10am-noon. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. Corner of Marsh and LaRue avenues, (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

TAHOE STAR TOURS—MARS RULES THE SKY: Join star guide and poet Tony Berendsen for a unique and educational night under the stars. F, 6/29, 8pm. $30 adults; $15 children age 12 and younger. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784.

TAHOE STAR TOURS WITH ACCENT STRING QUARTET: Tahoe Star Tours offers an evening of

RED, WHITE AND TAHOE BLUE: The annual cel-

science, poetry, star gazing and music. Accent Nevada, a Reno-based string quartet featuring cellist Eileen Brownell, will perform while Tony Berendsen takes you on a tour of the skies. Sa, 6/30, 8pm. $65 adults; $30 children age 18 and younger. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 4666784, www.northstarcalifornia.com.

ebration features 28 events in Incline Village and Crystal Bay, including the USAF Air National Guard Training Mission, a parade, concerts, veterans tribute, Rubber Ducky Races, a community fair, ice cream social and chalk drawing for kids. The four-day event culminates with a fireworks display on July 4 starting at 9:30pm at Incline

VALHALLA ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL: The 32nd

Fantastic Fourth

annual celebration of the arts includes musical and theatrical performances, visual art exhibits, fairs, cultural festivals and art workshops. M-Su through 9/2. Prices vary. Tallac Historic Site, Highway 89, 2.5 miles north of Highway 50, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4975, http://valhallatahoe.com.

Barbecues, picnics at the park, parades and fireworks—what better way to celebrate the nation’s 236th birthday? There’s plenty to do on the Fourth of July. Here’s a brief list: Star Spangled Sparks continues to be one of the most popular Independence Day events year after year. The family-friendly affair kicks off early in the morning with tethered hot air balloon rides, the Model Dairy Milk Carton Boat Regatta, Sparks Got Talent show and more at Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, Sparks. The free event runs from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m., and moves to Victorian Square in downtown Sparks at 4 p.m., with live entertainment throughout the evening and a fireworks display launched from the rooftop of John Ascuaga’s Nugget after 9:30 p.m. Call 636-9550 or 3563300. If you’re looking for an evening of toe-tapping tunes, the 1st Division Marine Band will perform American and patriotic music as part of Artown’s World Music Series at Wingfield Park, First Street and Arlington Avenue. The free concert starts at 7:30 p.m. Call 322-1538. Finally, pianists Christian McLeer, Jonathan Levin and Azamat Sydykov and Donna Axton will present an evening of “pianistic fireworks” in celebration of the Fourth of July at Steinway Piano Gallery, 500 E. Moana Lane. The free show starts at 6 p.m. Call 829-0600.

VIRGINIA CITY FOURTH OF JULY: The annual Fourth of July parade starts at noon and runs down C Street. The celebration continues throughout the afternoon with Wild West entertainment including gunfights, stage coach rides, the V&T Railroad train rides, museum and mine tours and music on the street. Just before the fireworks, David John & The Comstock Cowboys will hold their free annual 2nd Amendment Concert in the Delta Saloon parking lot. The fireworks display begins after dusk. W, 7/4, 12-10pm. Free; donations welcome. Downtown Virginia City, C Street, Virginia City, (775) 8461130, www.nvshows.com.

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—Kelley Lang

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WATER & RAILS POND AND GARDEN RAILROAD TOUR: The seventh annual event presents self-guided tours of serene gardens, koi-filled ponds and model trains that travel more than 1,000 feet of track, under tunnels and through miniature towns. Proceeds from the event benefit ALS of Nevada. Sa, 6/30; Su, 7/1. $25 for two people; free for children age 12 and younger. Call or visit website for details, (775) 329-3041 ext. 125, www.waterandrails.org.

WHOLE FOODS SPARKS FARMERS’ MARKET: The 20th annual farmers’ market returns with a family-friendly atmosphere and farmerfocused event. Th, 3-8pm through 8/2; Th, 8/16, 3-8pm; Th, 8/23, 3-8pm. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Avenue, Sparks, (775) 7465024, www.shirleysfarmersmarkets.com.

Art ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Peaked Again. Artists Co-op of Reno features Erik Holland’s plein air paintings of Nevada mountaintops, as well as work by guest artist Patricia Sherer. Through 6/30, 11am4pm; Rockin’ Out, Artists Co-op hosts a month-long art show and sale to benefit the Nevada Rock Art Foundation. The exhibit features a variety of petroglyph and pictograph art, crafts and photography, produced by Nevada artists, co-op members and guests. M-Su, 11am-4pm through 7/31. Opens 7/1. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 3228896, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

CCAI COURTHOUSE GALLERY: New Crop. Capital City Arts Initiative presents its summer exhibition featuring work by Northern Nevada artists Amy Aramanda, Kaitlin Bryson, Logan Lape, Kath McGaughey, Emily

Rogers and Karl Schwiesow. M-F through 9/4. Free. 885 E. Musser St., Carson City, http://arts-initiative.org.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: Hats Off to Artown. The Portrait Society of Reno presents an art exhibit in the church’s parlor titled Hats Off to Artown, featuring portraits of models wearing a variety of hats and headgear from weekly live portrait sessions. Members of the Portrait Society will be on hand for the Tuesday evening performances, some office hours or by appointment. M-F, 9am-4pm through 7/30.

Opens 7/2; Tu, 6:30-8:30pm through 7/24. Opens 7/3; Sa, 7/14, 11am-4pm; Tu, 7/31, 9am-noon. 209

W. First St., (775) 322-4564.

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interest like you’re experiencing. But because you’d rather have this guy’s sex scraps than nothing, you’re all “Yeah, cool, no strings” while chasing him with a lasso and trying to forget that his favorite thing to do after sex is to sneak out of your house. Even if you typically have the ability to keep things casual, it’s likely to be impaired if you choose poorly—if the man you’re having sex with is more Mr. Awesome than just Mr. Awesome in Bed. The clue that you can’t put this current thing into perspective is your inability to tell him, “Hey, text me back, because it bugs me when you don’t.” That’s surely what you’d do, no problem, if a friend had you on ignore. If you can’t accept what he’s not willing to give, you need to get out—and approach casual sex a little more realistically in the future. While being successful in love is about finding the right person, being successful in casual sex is usually about finding the somewhat wrong person—one who’s decent in bed but inspires you to think postcoital flowery thoughts like “Umm … don’t you have somewhere to be?”

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GALLERY 3: Dan Ericson: The Signtologist.

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Nudes and Neon: Stephanie Hogen, Elaine Jason, & Candace Nicol. This three-person exhibition investigates the connection between body, light and reflections. This show combines a sense of art history with a reference to Reno’s history. M-F, 10am-5pm through 6/28; Revolución: Celebrating a Rich Artistic Society, Art Slaves’ art show and sale features the work of communications professionals in Northern Nevada. M-Su through 7/31. Opens 7/1; M, 7/2, 5-9pm. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

Denver-based artist Dan Ericson, aka The Signtologist, recycles hundreds of street signs into unique homages to musicians, actors, public figures and athletes that inspire him. W-F, Su through 8/8. 3 N. Virginia St., (775) 230-7333, www.gallery3art.com.

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Something Honest, Nothing Profound, Kelly Peyton’s newest body of work centers on the personal impact of everyday concepts, quotes and statements. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 7/6; In the Making, Using her personal history as inspiration, University of Nevada, Reno sculptural ceramics student Michelle Laxalt creates pieces that evoke a whimsical world of interactions and child-like wonder. In almost direct contrast, Peter Laxalt’s drawing and paintings merge design and graffiti aesthetic into exaggerated figures and forms. Combined the siblings’ work shares the thread of moving the viewer from the common world into a more fantastical one. TuF, 3-6pm through 7/6; Hither & Thither, In her first exhibition, Rachael Scala draws from her experiences as a native Nevadan to create an installation exploring the passing of time through Nevada’s seasons. With each of her four altars, Scala isolates the seasons while connecting them to the greater ebb and flow of life cycles. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 7/6. Free. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

ST. MARY’S ART CENTER: STAND, Capital City Arts Initiative and St. Mary’s Art Center present the exhibition STAND, a salute to Nevada’s Basque arborglyphs by fiber artist Lexi Boeger. The installation is the culmination of Boeger’s two-week residency at St. Mary’s and will be in the center’s fourth floor gallery. F-Su, 11am-4pm through 7/8. Free. 55 N. R St., Virginia City, (775) 847-7774, http://arts-initiative.org.

STREMMEL GALLERY: In Urban Light. Stremmel Gallery presents work by renowned watercolor artist John Saliman. Saliman’s exhibition depicts the abstract possibilities of photographic references and the atmospheric qualities resulting from the dramatic lighting found within vibrant cityscapes. There will be an opening reception on June 28, 5:30-7:30pm. M-Sa through 7/31. Opens 6/28. Free. 1400 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-0558, www.stremmelgallery.com.

MATHEWSON-IGT KNOWLEDGE CENTER: Far Out: The University Art Scene from 1960-1975, This summer, the Special Collections department at the University of Nevada, Reno presents this sequel to the acclaimed 2011 summer exhibit Post-War Bohemians in Northern Nevada. Far Out will highlight the next generation of leading edge visual artists at the university during the ’60s and ’70s. M-Sa, 9am5pm through 9/9. Opens 7/2. Free. University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 6825665, http://knowledgecenter.unr.edu.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP OF NORTHERN NEVADA: Reception-Jim McCormick. The Vision Place welcomes Jim McCormick’s Life Stories: Three Slices, from the Woman, Comstock, and Tragedy Down Deep series of print and drawn works. A conversation with the artist will begin at 11:45am after the reception. Su, 7/1, 11am-1pm. Free. Contact Julie Sulahria ksrasra@peoplepc.com for details on this exhibit. 780 Del Monte Lane, (775) 851-7100.

NORTHWEST RENO LIBRARY: A Very Special Art Exhibit. Work by young artists created in VSA Nevada workshops during the 2011-12 school year is on display in the gallery at Northwest Reno Library. Tu-Sa through 8/24. Opens 7/5. Free. 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 8266100 ext. 3, www.vsanevada.org.

Richard Jackson Ceramic Art. Fred Reid and Richard Jackson will show their ceramic sculptures. 7/1-7/31, 10am-5pm. Free. 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

Museums NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM (THE HARRAH COLLECTION): Mutant Rides: Origin of a Species, M-Su through 7/25. $10 adults; $8 seniors; $4 kids ages 6-18; free for children 5 and younger. 10 S. Lake St., (775) 333-9300.

RENOWN SOUTH MEADOWS MEDICAL CENTER: Art For Healing. Sierra Watercolor Society members present their latest work. M-Su, 9am-6pm through 7/31. Opens 7/1. Free. 10101 Double R Blvd., (775) 742-6339.

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Gregory Euclide: Nature Out There, W-Su through 9/2; Tim Hawkinson: Totem, W-Su through 10/7; Arthur and Lucia Mathews: Highlights of the California Decorative Style, Tu-Su through 10/14; Edward Burtynsky: Oil, W-Su through 9/23; Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-Su through 1/1; Anne Lindberg: Modal Lines, W-Su through 7/15; Andrew Rogers: Contemporary Geoglyphs, W-Su through 8/26; Gail Wight: Hydraphilia, W-

SHEPPARD FINE ARTS GALLERY, CHURCH FINE ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Nate Clark: LINE [repeat]. Nate Clark’s paintings examine order, structure and time as they relate to mark making. Tu, Th, 2-6pm through 7/12; Sa, 123pm through 7/7; F, 7/13, 6-8pm. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6658, www.unr.edu/art.

OPINION

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Film CORAL REEF ADVENTURE: The SkyDome 8/70 largeformat film presents the real-life expedition of ocean explorers and underwater filmmakers Howard and Michele Hall as they guide viewers to the islands and waters of the South Pacific. M-Su, 1, 3, 5 & 7pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 children ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

DARK SIDE OF THE MOON: Pink Floyd’s legendary rock ’n’ roll masterpiece, is recreated in fullcolor HD animation with surround sound and new footage and effects. F, Sa, 8pm through 9/3. $5-$7. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812.

WIN S T E K C TI

FRIDAY FILM SERIES: The Brewery Arts Center and ACCtv, with the help of Occupy Carson City, kicks off its film series with Nourish: Food + Community. There will be a discussion time after the film. F, 6/29, 6:30-8:30pm. Free. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976, www.breweryarts.org.

TALES OF THE MAYA SKIES: The full-dome digital planetarium show travels to the ancient jungles of Mexico and features the ancient complex of Chichén Itzá, the “seventh wonder of the modern world,” in a rich combination of science, culture and legend. Spanish language showing at 6pm on Wednesdays. M-Su, 12, 2, 4 & 6pm through 9/3. $5-$7. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812.

THE WEDGE CERAMICS STUDIO: Fred Reid &

RENO ART CENTER: Latimer Art Club: Celebrating 91 Years of Art Excellence. Latimer Art Club’s art show features the work of current club members. This show is a fundraiser for LAC Scholarship Fund, which gives scholarships each year to Reno-area high school students who will be studying art in college. W-F, 9am3pm through 6/29; Su, 7/1, 10am-4pm. Free. 449 Marsh Ave, (775) 240-3349.

Su through 8/26; Art, Science, and the Arc of Inquiry: The Evolution of the Nevada Museum of Art, W-Su through 7/1; Southwest Pottery From Anasazi to Zuni: Selections from the Brenda and John Blom Collection, W-Su through 9/9; Ice Music, W-Su through 10/28. Opens 6/30. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

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Poetry/Literature UNEARTHING NEVADA’S PAST: MICHON MACKEDON: Black Rock Institutes Michon Mackedon presents Bombast: Spinning Atoms in the Desert, a look at Nevada’s relationship with the nuclear industry, the military and scientists, mixed with images from atomic pop culture. Afterwards, she will sign copies of her book. Free, temporary parking permits are available in the admissions office. Sa, 6/30, 2-3:30pm. Free. Nevada Historical Society, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 688-1190 ext. 0, http://museums.nevadaculture.org.

TO ENTER:

• Send an e-mail with “MESS FEST” in the subject line to contest@newsreview.com. • Include your full name, birth date and day phone.

Music ARTOWN OPENING NIGHT: AN EVENING WITH THE MICKEY HART BAND: The percussionist for the Grateful

All entries must be received by Sunday, July 1st. Winner will be notified by phone and e-mail on Monday, July 2nd.

Dead headlines Artown’s opening night with a

ART OF THE STATE

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mix of new material, as well as selections from his greatest hits and Grateful Dead songs. Su, 7/1, 7:30-9pm. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 322-1538, www.renoisartown.com.

BAROQUE TO BROADWAY: TOCCATA-Tahoe Symphony

Mack McGranahan, the volunteer band present lunchtime concerts featuring songs from all eras. M, W F, 12-1pm through 7/27. Opens 7/2. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 334-2414, www.renoisartown.com.

THE RHYTHM EXPERIENCE: DRUM CIRCLE WITH MICKEY HART: Participate in a drum circle and experience the essence of rhythm with percussionist Mickey Hart. Su, 7/1, 3-6pm. Free. Idlewild Park, 1900 Idlewild Drive, (775) 3221538, www.renoisartown.com.

SWEET VIBRATIONS SERIES: Squeek Steele performs ragtime piano tunes with special guest Gary Greenlund on the banjo. Tu, 7/3, 7-8pm. Free. First United Methodist Church, 209 W. First St., (775) 322-4564, www.renoisartown.com.

A CAPPELLA SUMMER SHOW: Nevada Vocal Arts presents this a cappella concert featuring ensembles The Champagne Singers, Ravens and Roses and Vocal Art Works, as well as DIVA, The Andrew Sisters Act and other guest musicians. Su, 7/1, 4-5:30pm; M, 7/2, 7:30-9pm. $10 suggested donation. Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd, 501 California Ave., (775) 852-2429, www.renoisartown.com.

Sports & fitness RENO ACES: The minor league baseball team plays Fresno Grizzlies. Th, 6/28, 7:05pm; F, 6/29, 7:05pm; Sa, 6/30, 7:05pm; the team plays New Orleans Zephyrs. Su, 7/1, 1:05pm; M, 7/2, 7:05pm; Tu, 7/3, 6:35pm. $6-$24. Reno Aces Ballpark, 250 Evans Ave., (775) 334-4700, www.renoaces.com.

COLIN ROSS BAND: Composer and multi-instrumentalist Colin Ross and his band will play from their repertoire of original and traditional jazz, boogie-woogie, blues, swing, rockabilly and Americana. Sa, 6/30, 4pm. $10 adults; free for youth age 18 and younger. Carson City Library, 900 N. Roop St., Carson City, (775) 883-4154, http://milehighjazz.com.

DON HENLEY: The singer-songwriter and founding member of The Eagles performs. Th, 6/28, 8pm. $55-$95. Reno Events Center, 400 N. Center St., (775) 335-8800.

AN EVENING WITH PIPES ON THE RIVER: Organist and

SCHEELS 3D ARCHERY SHOOT: Scheels and Silver Arrow Bowmen host the second annual archery shoot. Su, 7/1, 9am. $15 adults; $10 teens ages 12-17; free for children age 11 and younger. Silver Arrow Bowmen Archery Range, 1255 Matterhorn Drive, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

Onstage CURIOSITY CAT: TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada presents this play by Chris Grabenstein that tells the engaging story of displaced children and homeless cats. The SPCA and Nevada Humane Society will offer cats for adoption during this Artown performance. M, 7/2, 7-8:30pm. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 284-0789, www.twnn.org.

composer Angela Kraft Cross presents a concert of works by the masters and her own compositions. Tu, 7/3, 7-8:30pm. $10 suggested donation. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

MONDAY NIGHT MUSIC SERIES: RENO PHILHARMONIC: The Reno Philharmonic kicks off the summer season with its free community concert “Pops at the Ranch” featuring the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus. M, 7/2, 7:30-10pm. Free. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 322-1538, www.renoisartown.com.

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Orchestra and Chorus continue their summer season with a program that features guest artist Josue Casillas performing Mozart’s Concerto for Flute and Orchestra in D major and Vivaldi’s Concerto for Piccolo in C major Rv. 443. The TOCCATA chorus will perform Barber’s Agnus Dei and Chorus and soloists will also perform spirituals and Broadway show tunes. Su, 7/1, 3:30pm. $5-$35; free for youth age 19 and younger. St. Theresa Catholic Church, 1041 Lyons Ave. South Lake Tahoe; TOCCATA will repeat this concert as part of Artown. Tu, 7/3, 7pm. $5-$35; free for youth age 19 and younger. Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd, 501 California Ave., (775) 313-9697, www.toccatatahoe.com.

multiple live performance stages. Sa, 6/30, 10am-9pm. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., www.renoblockparty.com.

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evening of spontaneous, improvised comedy. Tu, 7/3, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Valhalla Grand Hall/Grand Lawn, Tallac Historic Site, 1 Valhalla Road, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4975.

There will be a demonstration of the treatment and patient testimonials at the end of the workshop.

YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU: Ageless Repertory Theatre presents the classic play by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Tu, 7/3, 1-3pm; Th, 7/5, 1-3pm; F, 7/6, 7-9pm. Free. Circle’s Edge Center For Spiritual Living, 1117 California Ave., (775) 345-7323, www.renoisartown.com.

RENO BLOCK PARTY 2: OUR CITY. YOUR PARTY: The second annual Reno Block Party is a music and arts festival that draws upon and showcases local and regional artists and musicians. The all-ages event will have live bands, DJs and

The secret to losing weight in the belly, hips and thighs begins with knowing your BODY TYPE.

You will learn: •The basic BODY SHAPES and how hormones can distort the body-blocking weight loss even when Diet & Exercise don’t work •How the body’s FAT BURNING hormones get triggered. Find out the biggest mistake people make with exercising •Learn the 4 different causes of belly fat •How hormones affect what you crave. How Chronic Pain and SLEEPING PROBLEMS relate to your body type

6:30 – 8pm, July 12th Call (775) 657–9026 to sign up today! Limited seating • only R.S.V.P. admitted OPINION

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BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you play soli-

taire, your luck will be crazy strong in the coming weeks. If you have candid, wideranging talks with yourself in the mirror, the revelations are likely to be as interesting as if you had spoken directly with the river god or the angel of the sunrise. Taking long walks alone could lead to useful surprises, and so would crafting a new declaration of independence for yourself. It’ll also be an excellent time to expand your skills at giving yourself pleasure. Please understand that I’m not advising you to be isolated and lonely. I merely want to emphasize the point that you’re due for some breakthroughs in your relationship with yourself.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Are you in

possession of a talent or interest or inclination or desire that no one else has? Is there some unique way you express what it means to be human? According to my understanding of the long-term astrological omens, the coming months will be your time to cultivate this specialty with unprecedented intensity; it’ll be a window of opportunity to be more practical than ever before in making your signature mark on the world. Between now and your next birthday, I urge you to be persistent in celebrating the one-of-a-kind truth that is your individuality.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Message in a

bottle” is not just a pirate movie cliche. It’s a form of communication that has been used throughout history for serious purposes. England’s Queen Elizabeth I even appointed an official “Uncorker of Ocean Bottles.” And as recently as 2005, a message in a bottle saved the lives of 88 refugees adrift in the Caribbean Sea on a damaged boat. Glass, it turns out, is an excellent container for carrying sea-born dispatches. It lasts a long time and can even survive hurricanes. In accordance with the astrological omens, I nominate “message in a bottle” to be your metaphor for the rest of 2012. Here’s one way to apply this theme: Create a message you’d like to send to the person you will be in five years, perhaps a declaration of what your highest aspirations will be between now and then. Write it on paper and stash it in a bottle. Store this time capsule in a place you won’t forget, and open it in 2017.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Every 10,000

years or so, reports the Weekly World News, hell actually does freeze over. A rare storm brings a massive amount of snow and ice to the infernal regions, and even the Lake of Fire looks like a glacier. “Satan himself was seen wearing earmuffs and making a snowman,” the story says about the last time it happened. I foresee a hell-freezesover type of event happening for you in the coming months, Cancerian—and I mean that in a good way. The seemingly impossible will become possible; what’s lost will be found and what’s bent will be made straight; the lion will lie down not only with the lamb but also with the sasquatch. For best results, be ready to shed your expectations at a moment’s notice.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “In purely spiritual

ordinary leap of faith might not be ambitious enough for you in the coming months, Virgo. I suspect your potential is more robust than that, more primed for audacity. How would you feel about attempting a quantum leap of faith? Here’s what I mean by that: a soaring pirouette that sends you flying over the nagging obstacle and up onto higher ground, where the views are breathtakingly vast instead of gruntingly half-vast.

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which is not fed with dream disappears,” said writer Antonio Porchia. Ain’t that the truth! Especially for you right now. These last few months, you’ve been pretty good at attending to the details of your big dreams. You’ve taken the practical approach and done the hard work. But beginning any moment, it will be time for you to refresh your big dreams with an infusion of fantasies and brainstorms. You need to return to the source of your excitement and feed it and feed it and feed it.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A Chinese

businessman named Hu Xilin is the champion fly-killer of the world. Ever since one of the buzzing pests offended him at the dinner table back in 1997, he has made it his mission to fight back. He says he has exterminated more than ten million of the enemy with his patented “Fly Slayer” machine. And oh by the way, his obsession has made him a millionaire. It’s possible, Scorpio, that your story during the second half of 2012 will have elements in common with Hu Xilin’s. Is there any bad influence you could work to minimize or undo in such a way that it might ultimately earn you perks and prizes—or at least deep satisfaction?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

From the 14th through the 18th centuries, many towns in England observed a curious custom. If a couple could prove that they had gone a year and a day without ever once being sorry they got married, the two of them would receive an award: a side of cured pork, known as a flitch of bacon. Alas, the prize was rarely claimed. If this practice were still in effect, you Sagittarians would have an elevated chance of bringing home the bacon in the coming months. Your ability to create harmony and mutual respect in an intimate relationship will be much higher than usual.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “If I

had my life to live over,” said Nadine Stair at age 85, “I would perhaps have more actual problems, but I’d have fewer imaginary ones.” I suggest you write out that quote, Capricorn, and keep it close to you for the next six months. Your task, as I see it, will be to train yourself so you can expertly distinguish actual problems from imaginary ones. Part of your work, of course, will be to get in the habit of immediately ejecting any of the imaginary kind the moment you notice them creeping up on you.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Astronomer Percival Lowell (1855-1916) was instrumental in laying the groundwork that led to the discovery of Pluto. He was a visionary pioneer who helped change our conception of the solar system. But he also put forth a wacky notion or two. Among the most notable: He declared, against a great deal of contrary evidence, that the planet Mars was laced with canals. You have the potential be a bit like him in the coming months, Aquarius: mostly a wellspring of innovation but sometimes a source of errant theories. What can you do to ensure that the errant theories have minimal effect? Be humble and ask for feedback.

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD) matters, God grants all desires,” said philosopher and activist Simone Weil. “Those who have less have asked for less.” I think this is a worthy hypothesis for you to try out in the next nine months, Leo. To be clear: It doesn’t necessarily mean you will get a dream job and perfect lover and ten million dollars. (Although I’m not ruling that out.) What it does suggest is this: You can have any relationship with the Divine Wow that you dare to imagine; you can get all the grace you need to understand why your life is the way it is; you can make tremendous progress as you do the life-long work of liberating yourself from your suffering.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A plain old

38

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The dream

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Throughout

the 16th century and even beyond, European explorers trekked through the New World hunting for the mythical land of El Dorado: the Lost City of Gold. The precious metal was supposedly so abundant there that it was even used to make children’s toys. The quest was ultimately futile, although it led the explorers to stumble upon lesser treasures of practical value— the potato, for example. After being brought over to Europe from South America, it became a staple food. I’m foreseeing a comparable progression in your own world during the coming months: You may not locate the gold, but you’ll find the equivalent of the potato.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Ashley Hennefer PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

Straight shot Lystra Pitts

Lystra Pitts and his wife, Deana, own Wasting Arrows, a sporting arrow company based in Sparks. Sporting arrow is the archery equivalent of skeet shooting, so instead of shooting at a stationary target, arrows are shot at foam targets that are tossed into the air. Wasting Arrows has been in business since March and provides sporting arrow equipment and lessons for kids and adults. Learn more at www.wastingarrows.com.

So how did you get into sporting arrows? My son is in Boy Scouts, and we were looking at the activities for the jamboree next year [in West Virginia], and the activities on the website had all of these great things like rock climbing, rafting, archery and sporting arrows. And I’d never heard of sporting arrows before so I got online and started checking out all of the YouTube videos. And we thought it looked super fun. So we wanted to try it and tried searching locally and there’s no place around here that has it. We found out there’s a place in Phoenix, Arizona, that had it and thought that would be a really fun business to open here in Reno to bring it to Reno. I went out to Phoenix to try it out. One thing we wanted to make sure was you could actually do it. It looks really hard. … I’ve done archery before.

With all of these movies that feature archery, like The Hunger Games and Brave, has that impacted your business at all? Yeah, we’re trying to tie into that. We’ve already had a lot of teenage girls come out and they’re like, “I’m channeling Katniss [protagonist of The Hunger Games]!” It’s awesome.

Yeah, I saw your table at the Sparks movie theater last weekend when Brave came out. Were people excited to have a chance to try out archery? Yes, that’s what we’re going for. We’re hoping to get a bunch of little people who are trying to channel Merida [main character of Brave] now. It works out pretty good. It’s a really easy thing for people to pick up. We can teach people how to shoot. We have all of the equipment. Parents will go out and spend hundreds of dollars on a bow. We talked to so many people this weekend who were like, “Yeah, we bought a bow, and we don’t know where to shoot it.” Or no one’s

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Is there a competitive edge to this? Can you participate in competitions? Yes. They’re forming the National Sporting Arrows Association. There’s going to be competitive shoots, kind of like skeet and those shotgun shooting sports.

What do you have to do to establish this in Nevada? We’re starting a chapter. We’re going to host competitions.

Right now, your website says you’re a traveling company. So if a family wants to try this out, where do they go? If you have over an acre of your own land, we can set up at your property. But we do have a location on USA Parkway off of Reno industrial park so they can come out and shoot with us there. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

Imitation Elvis and real cash Man, I had a basketball jones for the last month. Too bad the Thunder couldn’t beat the Heat. For a podunk cowtown like OKC to win an NBA championship would’ve been a nice feelgood. Also, I have to admit, and this is coming from an old baseball guy—it’s more fun and more exciting to watch the NBA Finals than it is to watch one of those glacial World Series. Goddangit, nine foul balls in a row is NOT a great at-bat. It’s a masterful method of brain-glazing. ••• Probably the big thing to happen this year at the Coachella Music Festival in Palm Springs was the resurrection of the late Tupac Shakur as an amazing light projection (inaccurately but conveniently called a hologram) which could literally perform with his old pal Snoop Dogg for a couple of songs. The effect was stunningly cool—if you haven’t seen it, it’s on You Tube—and it doesn’t take a genius to guess where this new technology might go. I mean, in a world filled with tribute bands (Iron Maiden? Bryan

ever been taught how to shoot it. Archery is a 20,000-year-old sport. Everybody knows how to shoot a bow. It’s instinctive, you know, it’s engrained in our DNA. But to get out there and actually do it, you know, there’s a right way and a wrong way. And we’re both USDA-certified archery instructors. And we can get out there and teach someone how to shoot a bow who has never done it before, and we’ve had lots of people who have never done it before and the first time they try it, they hit a target. They’re like, “Wow!”

brucev@newsreview.com

Adams? Jamiraquoi? Yep.) the hologram factor will undoubtedly be mega-huge. It’s just a case of how fast it will become mega-huge. Digital Domain is the company that blew everybody’s minds with their Tupac, and it now reports work is underway on the Jimi, Jim and Elvis holograms. Totally predictable, and why not? I’d guess you’ll see a serious Vegas Holo-Show sometime in 2013, maybe late 2012. You know the order has been made and the race is on. $150 tickets, and you see Elvis do three songs, then hand it off to John Lennon, who does a couple of numbers and then introduces Michael Jackson, who sings a few and then— you get the idea. Mega mega mega. And if you’re saying “Jim who?”, well, you need to break on through and light the fire of an L.A. woman, a stone cold 20th century fox, who will love you two times. And quite madly. ••• Our national election this year is going to drown in an obscene tsumani of cash. It will be horrible, hideous, and

disheartening. The election is not only up for grabs, it’s up for sale. I say this after seeing what happened recently in Wisconsin and the election to recall Governor Tooltime, aka Scott Walker. The first election Walker won by a margin of 5346 percent. In the recall, Walker won by 53-46 percent. How did this happen? Simple. Massive injections of Koch Kash that funded an advertising blitz that got the job done and made the whole enterprise look silly. The same will happen on a national scale. Citizens United has basically made a mockery of campaign finance laws. And thanks to Citizens United, all the wealthy folks who want those Bush tax cuts to remain on the books can literally spend as much as they want to gunk up the minds of millions and get their guy in the White House. And their guy ain’t the current occupant. Ω

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

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July 6-8

DOWNTOWN RENO

It’s a Three Day Street Festival Bustin’ with BBQ, Rockin’ Live Music & Baja’s Baddest Buggies! Friday, July 6 • Noon-8pm Saturday, July 7 • 10am-8pm Sunday, July 8 • 10am-4pm

All-American BBQ Food Booths Two Stages featuring Rockin’ Tribute Bands Street Faire with lots of Arts & Crafts and Memorabilia Booths Monster Energy Freestyle Motocross Presentation Special Monster Energy Girls and DJ Appearances Join us in a Special Tribute to the Men and Women of the Armed Forces Baja Desert Race Car Show • Friday, July 6

Check out over 150 of the Baja Desert Race Cars that will be competing in the High Desert Race Association & Eldorado Fireworks 500 off-road race on July 7 & 8!

Sponsored by Downtown Reno and Fueled by Monster Energy!


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J U NE 2 8 , 2 0 12 | a s p Ec ial s U p p l EmE N t to th E rEN o NEws & r E vi Ew


ART BEATS

THE 2012 ARTOWN GUIDE

I WAS IN WASHINGTON, D.C., a few weeks ago, and of course, the people I

was traveling with were interested in what there was to do in Reno besides hitting the casinos. “Artown!” I exclaimed enthusiastically, as I explained our yearly tradition of celebrating art, music, theatre and more throughout the city for a whole month. They were impressed, with good reason. Even the art lovers from cities in Texas and Wisconsin were envious of our dedication to encouraging creativity in our community. Take that, Austin! Artown is an impressive endeavor, with hundreds of events happening nearly around the clock for the 31 days of July, as well as the Encore events that take place throughout the year. So, to help make it a little easier to figure out what to do first, we compiled our yearly Artown guide. This guide is packed full of all the information you need to plan out your Artown activities, from daily event highlights to family-friendly fun to incorporating a bit of technology into your socializing. There are also some interviews with the bands performing on Rollin’ on the River, a guide to the Movies in the Park series, and a map of Artown events from around the world. Artown offers something for everybody, so there is no reason to sit around at home staring at a computer screen. Tuck this issue into your pocket, grab your friends and hit the streets. Artown’s adventure awaits.

DISCOVER AN ENDLESS SUMMER OF FAMILY FUN FIND THE CURE FOR ORDINARY AT

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Cheers,

WEEKLY EVENTS IN JULY & AUGUST

PET & FAMILY FRIENDLY FESTIVALS

Ashley Hennefer, RN&R special projects editor

Bluesdays - Every Tuesday - 6 to 8:30PM

Free, Live Blues Music! Plus Activities & Deals.

6/30 - 7/1 7/14 - 7/15 8/11 - 8/12 8/25 - 8/26 9/2

TA B L E of CONTENTS

Outdoor Movies - Every Thursday - 8:00PM

Free, Family Films, Outdoors Under The Peaks.

Squaw Valley Fine Arts & Crafts Art, Wine & Music Festival Brews, Jazz & Funk Fest Peaks & Paws Alpen Wine Festival

5-13 ROLLIN’ ON THE RIVER GUIDE 5 Rite by me: Big Sandy and His Fly Rite Boys 7 Hum along: The Gospel Hummingbirds 8 Red alert: Igor and Red Elvises 9 Nothin’ but the Truth: Truth and Salvage Co. 11 Act one: Opening acts of Rollin’ on the River 12 Around the world: The Biggest Little City goes global 15 Mixed media: Artown gets techie 17 Daily picks: A day-by-day event list 21 Family affairs: Kid-friendly Artown 22 Pass the popcorn: Artown’s film series 23 Community theatre: Theatrical events for all ages

Editor D. Brian Burghart Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Designer Hayley Doshay Contributors Laura Davis, Jessica Santina, Susan Winters Design Manager Kate Murphy Production Coordinator Sharon Wisecarver Advertising Sales Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Office/Distribution Manager Karen Brooke Exec. Assistant Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Theresa Ammerman, Sandra Chhina, John Miller, Jesse Pike, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Travis Wiltse General Manager John D. Murphy

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Director of Human Resources Deanna Frederickson Controller Kelly Schuhrke Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Jane Corbett, Kevin Driskill, Zahida Mehirdel Senior Systems Specialist Aaron McCormack Corporate Support Specialist Kelsey Falle Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek, Jonathan Schultz 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 3


Duck Race & Festival Nevada Humane Society

Adopt a Duck and Help Homeless Pets!

August 26, 2012, Wingfield Park Free Festival • 11 am - 5 pm Duck Race • 4 pm

Live entertainment, pet adoptions, food, family fun. Cool prizes for the fastest ducks! Chance to win $400,000 prize. For duck adoptions and details, visit NevadaHumaneSociety.org or call 775-856-2000

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J U NE 2 8 , 2 0 12 | a s p E c ial s Up p l EmEN t to th E rENo NEws & r E vi Ew


by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

RITE BY ME BIG SANDY AND THE FLY-RITE BOYS

PERHAPS THE PHRASE

“rock and roll will never die” should be changed to say “rockabilly” instead—at least in the context of Big Sandy and the Fly-Rite Boys, who have been playing classic rockabilly tunes since the late 1980s. Even though Big Sandy and his crew have been navigating toward a different sound in the past few years— one that incorporates bluegrass, swing, Cajun and even Mariachi—rockabilly remains the basis, and the inspiration, for the band’s music.

The group started first as a solo act, headed by Big Sandy, whose real name is Robert Williams. Williams joined the California rockabilly revival scene in the early 1980s, playing solo for a few years before forming a trio. Now he plays with bassist Wally Hersom, steel guitarist Lee

Jeffriess, guitarist Ashley Kingman and drummer Bobby Trimble. Jeffriess and Kingman are from the United Kingdom. The band’s first album, Jumpin’ from 6 to 6, was released a few years after their inception. “I grew up in a house that was filled with music,” Big Sandy says. “There were lots of records around the house, lots of rockabilly. That’s the music my parents were into. I used to go out with my dad to see shows and listen to music. So when I was a teen and started to play music, it was natural that it was influenced by the music I listened to as a kid.” Big Sandy started taking guitar lessons and spending hours researching rockabilly music at his local library. “I started to wonder, ‘What is this rockabilly thing?’” he says. “I spent a lot of time at the library. I was lucky to have a library with such a great music collection.” He attributes Elvis as the inspiration that encouraged him to delve further into his own music. It wasn’t long before he was immersed in the rockabilly revival scene in southern California, where he then met two musicians who would eventually help him form Big Sandy and the Fly-Rite Trio. After a while, though, Big Sandy and his band-

“ BIG SANDY SAYS HE’S NEVER HAD TO GO VERY FAR TO FIND GOOD MUSICIANS WHO SHARE HIS VISION.” mates wanted to expand their sound and incorporated more musicians. Although the band lineup has changed a few times, Big Sandy says he’s never had to go very far to find good musicians who share his vision. “There’s a network of musicians interested in this kind of music,” he says. “It’s always worked out pretty well.” Big Sandy’s stage name was inspired by an old mechanic’s shirt given to him by his uncle. “Robert Williams didn’t sound too rock and roll,” says Big Sandy. “My uncle’s name was Santiago, and his nickname was Santi, but his boss had put ‘Sandy’ on the name tag. So I thought it would be cool to use that as a stage name.”

The ‘Fly-Rite Boys’ part of the band’s name was inspired by the Nat King Cole song “Straighten Up and Fly Right.” The songwriting process happens a bit differently for each band member, according to Big Sandy. “I usually start with a melody, which seems to come while I’m washing the car or doing laundry,” he says. “Then I’ll sit down with an acoustic guitar and figure out which chords go with the melody. I’ll form the basic structure and skeleton of the song, and I’ll bring it to the band.”

Other members of the band will bring in a completed song and sometimes even recordings ready for the band to practice, he says. The band will release a new album later this year, and a just-released 45 featuring the songs “Our Eyes are Open But There Ain’t Nobody Home” and “The Girl at the Bar.” Big Sandy says that the records sell more than the CDs. Big Sandy and the Fly-Rite Boys are inductees of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. See them live at Wingfield Park on July 6, 5:30-8 p.m., where they will have copies of their single available.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

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HUM ALONG

by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@ newsreview.com

THE GOSPEL HUMMINGBIRDS

THE GOSPEL HUMMINGBIRDS

do not perform your average gospel music. Not that gospel music can ever be classified as “average,” but The Gospel Hummingbirds have earned a reputation of turning the genre on its head by infusing the traditionally energetic, faithbased music with a bit of blues and jazz. Band manager and member James Gibson Jr. refers to it as “R&G.” “We call our music R and G—rhythm and gospel,” he says. “Our musical influences come from traditional and contemporary gospel music, as well as a strong blues and R&B.” The group was founded in the 1960s by Joe Thomas Sr. In 1993, their album Steppin’ Out was nominated for a Grammy in the “Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album” category. It also received honors worldwide. Based out of Oakland, Calif., the band has since traveled around the world and gained an international following. Like most gospel groups, the Hummingbirds started performing at their local church. In 1987, they began performing at jazz and blues nightclub Eli’s Mile High Club in Oakland. The lineup has changed over the years, but the current group features vocalists Gibson, Charles Holland and Gerald Dyce and Morris LeGrande on vocals and guitar. “Over the years, personnel changes have occurred, and the current guys are here as a result of these changes,” says Gibson. “Most of them have been in other music groups prior to coming to the ‘Birds.”

Gibson says that the song writing process is largely independent. Each member will write about his own life and experiences, and the rest of the group aids in turning an idea into a song. “Most of our songs come from members in the group individually,” Gibson says. “On occasion, we will collaborate on some songs.” Although their music is inspired by faith, Gibson says that it is able to reach people of all beliefs because of its unique sound and universal themes such as struggle, triumph, surrender and redemption. Some of the group’s songs are heavily influenced by the language and stories of the Bible, such as “Old Ship of Zion” and “Signs of the Judgment.” “I think our music appeals to people of all faiths because of the simple messages of hope and faith that our songs bring,” he says. “Most of them are written with real life experiences influencing the lyrics. In the past, the group has played with bands like The Five Blind Boys of Alabama, B.B. King, Etta James, Huey Lewis and The News, Otis Rush and the Dixie Hummingbirds, to name a few. They’ve also played in venues around the world, including Japan, Italy, France, Belgium and Australia. Gibson says that the economy has impacted the band’s tour schedule, but he’s optimistic about the future of the band. More albums are in the works. “Because of the economy, engagements have been slow in coming,” says Gibson. “But we plan to persevere and keep recording and performing long as we can.”

Whether or not you’re down with the Lord, that shouldn’t stop you from enjoying The Gospel Hummingbirds’ performance at Wingfield Park on July 13, 5:30-8 p.m..

“WE CALL OUR MUSIC R AND G— RHYTHM AND GOSPEL.”

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 7


RED ALERT by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

IGOR AND RED ELVISES IGOR AND RED ELVISES

—formerly known as just the Red Elvises—are somewhat of a music legend. They have a huge following in Europe, especially Ukraine, and a dedicated crew of fans here in the states. Although the band’s lineup has changed several times during the past two decades, the Red Elvises have toured the world almost non-stop for years. Known for their signature sound—a hybrid of rock, reggae, rockabilly and traditional Russian tunes— the band brings to mind other unique Slavic bands like Gogol Bordello. The website for Igor and Red Elvises is indicative of the band’s personality— it’s an alarming shade of red, and it shows up on Google as “YOUR FAVORITE BAND!” They sign off on their blog and Facebook posts with their Slavic-esque interpretation of “rock ’n’ roll”—“ROKENROL,” also the name of their ninth studio album. It’s all very classically, almost stereotypically, Russian, especially when they post pictures of Vodka on their Facebook page. The art style on the covers of their 16 albums is reminiscent of propaganda posters, with blocky typography and pin-up models, which make sense, given the band’s eclectic, multicultural background. The band’s lead vocalist and guitarist Igor Yuzov, born in Germany and raised in the Soviet Union, founded the band in the mid 1990s. Other members of the band come from all over the world, including Israel and Puerto Rico. According to Yuzov, Elvis Presley appeared to him in a dream, and bid him to make music. The band chooses to release their music independently, and it’s worked for them since the early ’90s. Most recently, they released a Live in Montana album in 2011. “We’ve never signed any deals and never wanted to,” Yuzov said in an interview with the Herald-Journal. “And I’m glad about that, because all these albums and all these songs belong to us. It makes things much, much easier, being independent. Their songs are energetic and over the top, and while the musicians have a serious amount of talent powering their 8 | ARTOWN 2012 | JUNE 28, 2012

| A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

music, the band doesn’t take itself too seriously. Some of their more famous songs include “I Want to See You Belly Dance,” “Twist Like Uma Thurman” and “Drinking with Jesus.” Yuzov’s stage presence is what has garnered the band it’s reputation for putting on memorable live performances—he shouts at the audience and demands almost constant involvement from them. If you attend a Red Elvises show, you’re expected to stand, jump and dance for the entire performance.

“THE BAND DOESN’T TAKE ITSELF TOO SERIOUSLY.” After attending a show, writer Ben Salmon from the Bend Bulletin in Oregon, said, “We could get caught up in assessing the artistic merits of Red Elvises or their technical abilities, and they’d come out looking OK in either case. But none of that matters much when folks are having that much fun.” Igor and Red Elvises have been touring in Russia for all of June, and will stop in California for a few days before venturing over to Nevada. After Reno, the band heads over to San Francisco and then up to tour throughout the Pacific Northwest, so it’s in your best interest to catch them while they’re in our town. They’re performing with LovePop! on July 20.


TRUTH AND SALVAGE CO.

NOTHIN’ BUT THE TRUTH

by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@ newsreview.com

TRUTH AND SALVAGE CO.

ARE YOU FROM CALIFORNIA?

HOW’D YOU ALL MEET? makes the kind of music that pairs well with a beer and a None of us are from there. All of us bonfire. It’s funky and catchy, are from the Midwest and the South— but well constructed, evoking like New Orleans and Indiana. We met images of lone desert highway in California. We came together or smokey bars. The six-mem- because there were two bands, Scrappy ber band—four of whom share Hamilton and the Tim Jones Band. I was drumming for both bands and the role of lead singer—was writing for both bands, and we started formed in Los Angeles, but get together [and] just made one their style harkens to their roots to of living in the south and mid- megaband. west. I caught up with singer WHAT’S THE STORY BEHIND and drummer Bill “Smitty” Smith as the band—which also YOUR BAND’S NAME? includes organ player Adam We used to be called the Denim Family Grace, singer/rhythm guitarist Band, but management said you should Tim Jones, singer/lead guitarist think about changing the name. A friend of ours at dinner once said to us, Scott Kinnebrew and singer/pianist Walker Young— “You’ve sacrificed everything. You’ve been playing your dream for the past six was headed to a show in years. You’ve salvaged a lot to make Louisville, Ky. music.” So it kind of came from that, YOU’VE BEEN PLAYING ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. HOW HAS YOUR TOUR BEEN GOING? It’s been going well. Nothing out of the ordinary. We’re used to this. We tour a lot. We were off the road in November, and we were in the studio until April. And then since April, we’ve been on the road since then, through all of May and June. So it’s going good. We moved from California to Tennessee. We’re based out of Nashville these days, so we’ll go out for a few days and tour, and then come back. It’s a lot easier than being out two to three months at a time.

and we added company to the end.

SO WHEN’S THE NEW ALBUM COMING OUT? That’s a good question. You never know in this business. We have a bit more to record, but you can say it’s slated for January 2013.

I READ THAT ONE OF YOUR SONGS WAS USED IN A GAP JEANS AD. HOW’D

“WE DON’T GET PAID TO WRITE SONGS. IT’S JUST OUR OUTLET.” THAT HAPPEN? Yeah, it’s called “Them Jeans.” It was actually when the iPad came out, and they used it on their iPad app. They shipped us out to the desert and shot a music video.

DID THAT IMPACT YOUR LISTENER BASE AT ALL? Not really. Most of our listeners come from touring. We were on the road with the Black Crowes and that helped us out a lot. Our first album was produced with [Black Crowes frontman] Chris Robinson and that helped us out better than anything. The bands we play with on the road and just the fact that we’ve opened up for everyone from the Avett Brothers to the Steve Miller Band to Lynyrd Skynyrd is really what helps get us out there.

HOW IS IT PLAYING ALONGSIDE BIG BANDS LIKE THAT? It’s surreal and very humbling. When you’ve been doing it for so long, you take every experience and moment and just hold onto it, so there’s a lot of living in the moment. This band consists of a lot of guys who have gone through a lot, a lot of ups and downs, and we haven’t given up. So when we do get to play with our heroes, you just gotta soak it all in.

WHAT’S THE SONGWRITING PROCESS LIKE FOR YOUR BAND? Everybody in the band writes songs. There are four lead singers in the band. So the process goes of individual songwriters bringing it to the group, and the rest will help it from there. Some songs develop from rehearsal and jamming. Most of our songs are just our life expe-

riences. We are living it and we really do experience what it’s like to enjoy life but also hard times. We don’t get paid to write songs. It’s just our outlet.

HOW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU BEEN TO RENO? We did the River Festival before, and we’ve opened for the Black Crowes in Reno. We also opened for the Avett Brothers in Reno. And we’ve done some private parties. … We’re going back to California after Rollin’ to record some more for our record as well. We have tour dates scattered all through July and August. But we’re excited to be back in Reno to rock out with you.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 9


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THE MARK SEXTON BAND

ACT ONE

1

ROLLIN’ ON THE RIVER’S OPENERS by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

A good concert is about more than just the headlining act—the opening band i s w h at s e t s t h e t o n e f o r t h e e n t i r e show. This year’s Rollin’ on the River opening acts showcase the talent and d i v e r s i t y of R e n o ’ s m u s i c s c e n e .

LOVEPOP!

JULY 6: KEYSER SOZE

JULY 20: LOVEPOP!

Keyser Soze’s chill but intricate ska music is sprinkled with elements of jazz and soul, bringing a new edge to the genre. The band, formed in Reno by Rodney Teague and Jammal Tarkington, features seven musicians— Tarkington on vocals and saxophone, Teague on vocals and trombone, Mike Mayhal on bass, John Hall on drums, Ryan Hall on guitar, Kevin Lum on keys and Ruben Garcia on trumpet. The ensemble released their first album in 1999 and most recently came out with “But Not For You” in 2011. The title song is a catchy, jazzy tune—perfect for a summer soundtrack to listen to on your front porch, around the bonfire, or, heck, to dance to with your friends at Wingfield Park. Keyser Soze has played alongside acts like The Wailers, Steel Pulse and Michael Franti. After touring the west coast this spring, the band will spend the summer playing locally before hitting the road again in August to play in southern California. Catch their performance on July 6, 5:30 p.m. at Wingfield Park. Visit www.keysersoze.com for music samples and information on upcoming shows.

After just releasing their new CD, the three-piece ensemble LovePop! is on a summer high. LovePop!, which consists of bassist/vocalist Clayton Stanfield, percussionist Kent Miura and vocalist/guitarist Monique Jade, is what the band members refer to as a “reincarnation” of their older project formerly known as All About Me. Each member has played in other Reno-based music projects. Living up to its name, the band plays pop and acoustic music aimed toward an adult crowds. In a recent Reno News & Review article, Megan Berner writes, “LovePop!’s sound is reminiscent of ’90s female pop artists like Michelle Branch and Vanessa Carlton. While many of the band’s songs seemingly would fit well on the soundtrack of a moody teen drama, not all of what LovePop! has to offer is bubblegum pop.” LovePop! Will perform on July 20, 5:30 p.m. at Wingfield Park before Igor and Red Elvises. Check out www.love-pop.com to learn more about the band.

Main act: BIG SANDY AND HIS FLY RITE BOYS

JULY 13: RICK METZ AND FIRST TAKE

KEYSER SOZE

Although Rick Metz was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., and raised in New Mexico, he’s found his calling performing throughout the West. Now stationed in Nevada, he’s played at a multitude of local venues, including the Carson City Jazz Festival and Jazz: A Louisiana Kitchen in Sparks. Although Metz considers himself “first and foremost a saxophonist,” he experiments with many instruments on stage. Metz has collaborated with artists and songwriters such as Bo Diddley, Otis Day & the Knights, Sha Na Na and Harvey Mandel. Watch Rick Metz and First Take—including Metz, Jimmy Vermilion on keys, bass and vocals, and Bill Heise on drums—perform on July 13, 5:30 p.m. at Wingfield Park. Visit www.rickmetz.com for more info—and to learn about Metz’s favorite things like cigars, bands and saxophones. Oh, and he’s also a Burner, and part of the U.S.S. Nevada Burning Man camp.

Main act: IGOR AND RED ELVISES

JULY 27: THE MARK SEXTON BAND Throughout the past couple years, The Mark Sexton Band has become a household name for Renoites, having performed at many local venues and festivals. You’ve probably seen their name in this paper quite a few times, too. Comprised of members Mark Sexton on vocals, guitar and keys, Alex Korostinsky on bass, and Dan Weiss on drums, the band achieves a unique sound of reggae, funk and soul. Most recently, the band released album Listen Out in 2010, featuring sophisticated, laid back tracks like “Don’t Tell Me” and “Hold On.” The Mark Sexton Band is on a summer-long tour throughout the west coast, making a brief stop in Reno in mid-July before playing back-toback shows in California for two weeks. But don’t worry, they’ll be back just in time to help conclude the Rollin’ on the River music series for 2012. Visit www.marksextonband.com for more. Main act : TRUTH AND SALVAGE CO.

Main act: THE GOSPEL HUMMINGBIRDS

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 11


The Biggest Little City goes global

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ARTOWN IS LARGELY ABOUT THE LOCALS. It’s a chance for the community to come out and see what kind of projects are growing within the area. But it’s also an opportunity to witness art, music and entertainment from around the world. So if you’re looking for a geography lesson, here’s a breakdown of acts and events that correspond with countries across the globe.

WORLD by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashley@newsreview.com

NORTH AMERICA 1. World Music Series, 1st Division Marine Band: Forty-five piece Marine Band from Pendleton, Calif., will perform patriotic American music. July 4, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Wingfield Park. 322-1538.

2. Americana Music Festival in Historic Virginia City: The fifth annual American Music Festival features roots music and dance. July 13, 7-10 p.m.; July 14, noon-10 p.m.; July 15, noon-7 p.m. $20 per venue. Virginia City. www.americanafest.org.

SOUTH AMERICA 3. Zumba by Z Body Fitness: Z Body Fitness will host a dance and fitness expo including a two-hour, non-stop Zumba dance class with international music, costumes, giveaways and more. July 14, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $20. Reno Ballroom. 657-9263, www.zbodyfitness.com. 4. World Music Series, Ana Tijoux: Chilean artist Ana Tijoux has received top honors in the music world, including a Grammy nomination, and will perform her jazzy, laid-back tunes. July 25, 7:309 p.m. Free. Wingfield Park. 322-1538.

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5. Celso Machado: Guitarist and composer Celso Machado will perform traditional Brazilian music with a twist. July 10, 7-8:30 p.m. Suggested donation $10-$20. Trinity Episcopal Church. 298-1686, www.sierraguitar.org.

CARIBBEAN 6. Reggae/Calypso Music Night: Calypso and reggae music will be performed by a group of musicians and students of Carpenter’s Music World. July 12, 6-8 p.m. Free. Carpenter’s Music World, 2700 S. Virginia St. 8527618, www.carpentersmusic.com.

EUROPE 7. World Music Series, Delhi 2 Dublin: Vancouver-based band Delhi 2 Dublin will play a mix of Bhangra, Celtic, reggae, dub and electronica. July 11, 7:30 p.m. Free. Wingfield Park. 322-1538. 8. Basque Festival: The festival will celebrate Nevada’s ties to Basque culture and will feature music, competitions, poetry, food and more. July 21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Wingfield Park. 722-4464.

9. A Celtic Summer’s Eve: The Reno Irish Dance Company will perform traditional Irish music. July 7, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Wingfield Park. 829-7878. 10. A Trip through Europe via Piano: Concert pianist Dr. Ron Williams will take listeners on a musical journey to Austria and Spain. July 7, 7-9 p.m. Free. Steinway Piano Gallery, 500 E. Moana Lane. 829-0600.

MIDDLE EAST 11. A Night of Egyptian Bellydancing Under the Stars: Troupe Jasmine will perform Middle Eastern bellydancing. July 27, 7-9 p.m. $5. River School Farm. 747-2222.

ASIA 12. An Evening of Chanting from Buddhist Traditions: Listen to chanters perform chants from different Buddhist traditions, including Japan, China, Tibet and India. July 13, 6-7 p.m. Free. Reno Buddhist Center. 348-6603.

13. Thakur Chakrapani Singh: Sierra Nevada Guitar Society presents Kachhapi Veena player and classical guitarist Thakur Chakrapani Singh. July 16, 7-8:30 p.m. Suggested donation $10$20. First United Methodist Church. 298-1686.

14. Origami at the Back Pond: Barbara Eisenhour will lead a class on how to fold paper cranes and other shapes. July 21, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $15. Sierra Water Gardens. 622-4090.

AFRICA 15. African drumming and dance: Mailly Tagba will teach African drumming and dance from the Ivory Coast. July 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. River School Farm. 747-2222.

16. World Music Series: Oliver Mtukudzi & the Black Spirits: This band hails from Zimbabwe and is known for being a musically political force in South Africa. July 18, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Wingfield Park. 322-1538. 17. Youth African Drumming Class: Kids ages 7-12 will learn how to drum using African Djembe drums, taught by drummer Dominique of Anouaze Beat. July 6, 13, 20, and 27, 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. $25 for four sessions or $8 for drop in. River School Farm. 747-2222.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 13


44th Annual Lovelock

Frontier Days Fri, Aug. 3 > Sun, Aug. 5

Enjoy a Weekend full of Family Fun!

Friday: Kids Games Magician Cribbage Bike Races Races Street Family- Train Dance

Saturday: Pancake Breakfast Parade Kids Games Tractor Pull Cribbage Poker Ride Pool Quarter Dive Magician Train Call Contest Talent Show Weight Carry BBQ Musical Buddies Races Magician Horseshoes

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TRAIN RIDES AROUND LOVELOCK ALL DAY, EACH DAY!

Sunday: Pancake Breakfast Cribbage Dog Show Bucket Brigade Scavenger Hunt Family Swim Arm Wrestling Horseshoes Visit www.zplace2b.com/FrontierD for a schedule of events 14 | artown 2012 |

J U NE 2 8 , 2 0 12 | a s p E c ial s Up p l EmEN t to th E rENo NEws & r E vi Ew


by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

MIXED MEDIA ARTOWN GETS TECHIE SOCIAL MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY

events easily available on your phone,” he says. “Not on a computer, not on a piece of paper, but ready for you to browse at any time on a device you carry on your pocket all the time. I was personally really excited when I was tasked with these apps, because I’m a big fan of Artown, and I knew how much easier it would make it for me to find the shows I wanted to see. “This year, we’ve added the ability to share events via Facebook and Twitter, which I think was a great move, since not only will I be finding good events to attend, but now I can have my friends find good events for me.” If you want to incorporate more tech into your Artown experience, check out these apps: Check in to venues, bars, restaurants, parks and more with Foursquare to help your friends meet up with you while you’re out and about. You can earn badges based on your check-in habits, like the “Local” badge—checking into the same place more than three times—or “Swarm”—checking into a place with more than 50 other people. Some businesses offer discounts or perks for people who check in on Foursquare while they are in their establishment. If you’re going on a wine walk or beer crawl, use an app like Path to document your, well, path. Check in at each location, write a quick description of what you’re up to, and snap a picture. Other Path users will be able to track your activities and can comment or join up with you around town. You can even select the music you’re listening to while you’re hanging out with your friends. Use a creative, unique hashtag—a word or phrase proceeded by a # symbol—to organize and tag photos taken on apps like Instagram. Photo apps will group together photos tagged with that particular hashtag, creating a sort of virtual album where you and your friends can look back on your snapshots. Try hashtag #mobileartown. And if you’re at Rollin’ on the River and really want to get into the rock and roll groove, download the Virtual Lighter app to wave around during a performance. But if that’s taking tech a little too far, you can always just use a real Zippo.

“EACH EVENT

CAN BE SHARED WITH FRIENDS ON SOCIAL MEDIA.”

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

get a bad rap for isolating people and changing the definition of friendship—but they don’t have to. Apps and websites can be used as tools to help coordinate and capture memories with your friends. And what better time to do this than during Artown? Artown has an official app made by local company Big Robot Studios and is the quintessential resource for active Artowners. It’s been downloaded by several thousand people, and has a bunch of useful features, including a full calendar of events, Twitter feeds, lodging and booking resources, photo albums and more. Each event can be shared with friends on social media, and can be located using Google maps. Hector Urtubia, who heads Big Robot Studios, says that he was approached by Artown planners after working on an app for Reno Passport. The Artown app was first released in July 2010. “Initially we had some brainstorming sessions to see what would make sense to put in the app,” says Urtubia. “We knew for sure that having the calendar of events in July was the first priority. Then some info about Artown itself, like how to contribute and their sponsors. They have always been big proponents of integrating social media into the app, which makes perfect sense since Artown is, in a sense, a Renowide social and cultural event that lasts an entire month.” The app is free and available for Android and Apple devices. Search for “Artown” in both app stores. “The response has been great,” Urtubia says. “Both apps have good reviews in their corresponding app stores. Everyone I talk to mentions that they like the convenience of browsing the Artown events on their phones. It also shows Artown as a forward thinking event that acknowledges technology and modern media.” According to Urtubia, social events can benefit from having a mobile component. “I think that there is a big advantage to having the calendar of Artown

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J U NE 2 8 , 2 0 12 | a s p Ec ial s U p p l EmE N t to th E rENo NEws & r E vi Ew


A DAY-BYDAY GUIDE TO ARTOWN HIGHLIGHTS

DAILY

PICKS JULY 1

by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

T H E R E ’ S N O S H O R TA G E

OPENING NIGHT Celebrate opening night by jamming in a drum circle with Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead. Idlewild Park. 3-6 p.m. Free. Call 322-1538 for more information.

JULY 6

of activities and entertainment during Artown, that’s for sure. Here’s a quick list of highlights for each of Artown’s action-packed days. JULY 2: MONDAY NIGHT

POETRY SLAMS take place once a week, the first for kids ages 9-12. Students will read Shel Silverstein’s poetry, and select one of his poems to memorize. They will also expand on the poem and prepare to perform it in front of a group. Sierra Arts Gallery. 5-7 p.m. Free. Visit www.sierra-arts.com for more information.

JULY 3: DOWNTOWN RIVER WALK will show you the sights and sounds of the Truckee River. Learn about the history of the river and Reno’s architecture. Starts at the Wild River Grille. 6-8 p.m. $10, or free to members of the Historic Reno Preservation Society. Reservations required. For more information, call 747-4478 or visit www.historicreno.org. JULY 4: THE 1ST DIVISION MARINE BAND, a 45 piece marine band from California, will lead the community in a Fourth of July celebration. 7:309 p.m. Wingfield Park. Free. Call 322-1538 for more information.

THE RENO VIDEOGAME SYMPHONY The Reno Videogame Symphony—formerly known as the Reno Videogame Orchestra—will perform famous music from beloved video games. 7-11 p.m. The Underground. $10. Call 410-5993 for more information.

JULY 5: THE RENO DANCE COMPANY will perform in the Dancing in the Park series at Wingfield Park. The company will incorporate music and dance from around the world into its performance. 8-10 p.m. Free. For more information, call 225-2194. JULY 7: KIDS WILL ENJOY MAKING THEIR OWN SHADOW PUPPETS and putting on performances with their friends. 4-5:30 p.m. Grassroots Books. Materials provided but space is limited. Reserve a spot by calling 828-2665.

JULY 8: AN ARTIST’S RECEPTION will be held to kick off the Rockin’ Art exhibit at the Artist Co-op Gallery. The exhibit will feature petroglyph and pictograph art, crafts and photography. 627 Mill St. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 322-8896 for more information JULY 9: THE MONDAY

NIGHT MUSIC SERIES will feature a night of youth—both the Reno Youth Philharmonic and the Reno Youth Jazz Orchestra will perform. 7:30-10 p.m. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater. Contact 322-1538.

JULY 10: CONCERT PIANIST DR. RON WILLIAMS will play music from Austria and Spain. 7-9 p.m. Steinway Piano Gallery, 500 E. Moana Lane. For more information, call 829-0600 or visit www.spgreno.com. JULY 11: BREATH OF HOPE is a collaboration of artists and non-profit art organizations, and will feature live music and art on display. 1-3 p.m. The Arbors, 2121 E. Prater Way, Sparks. Free. Contact 331-2229 for more information. JULY 12:

HOMEWARD BOUND EXPRESSIONS will feature art created at the Family Shelter during Very Special Arts Nevada, art works and poetry created by UNR professors who donated their time to teach poetry at the Family Shelter. 5-7 p.m. Church of Fine Arts, University of Nevada, Reno campus. Free. For more information, call 322-7143.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 17


p To u s e T a ic if T r e gifT c o T f l e s r u o y TreaT

% 5 7 ! F F O

Visit www.newsreview.com gifT cerTifica cerTificaTes froM resTauraNTs, Bars, cluBs, TaTToo, reTail, THeaTer, saloNs, spas, golf, VacaTioNs & More

18 | artown 2012 |

J U N E 2 8 , 2 0 12 | a s p E c ial s Up p l Em EN t to th E rENo NEws & r E vi Ew


JULY 13: BURNER MINGLE at Grassroots Books will give you a chance to ask questions about Burning Man, watch documentaries and more. 8-9:30 p.m. Grassroots Books. Free. For more information, visit www.grassrootsbooks.com or call 828-2665. JULY 14: THE ANNUAL YART SALE is hosted by CONNECTIONS, a local Reno alliance of artists selling various arts and crafts, including paintings, cards, jewelry, and more. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 1420 Mt. Rose St. Free. Call 8272516 for more information. JULY 15: NEVADA OPERA PRESENTS “DIE FLEDERMAUS PARTY” with an English translation. 7-9 p.m. Wingfield Park. Free. For more information, call 786-4046. JULY 16: THE BLUE

BARREL SHOW features powerful percussion and funny performances. 6-7 p.m. Wingfield Park. Free. Call 322-1538 for more information.

JULY 17: THE YOUTH SILVER STATE YOUNG CHAUTAUQUA FESTIVAL kicks off with historical performances, arts and crafts. 6-9 p.m. Visit www.facebook.com/silverstateyoungchautauqua for more. JULY 18: STAN THE

MAN is a one-man keyboard show. 2:30-3:30 p.m. The Arbors, 2121 E. Prater Way, Sparks. Free. For more information, call 331-2229.

JULY 19: A READING

WITH CLAIRE VAYE WATKINS, author of short story collection Battleborn, will take place at Sundance Books and Music. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. For more information, call 786-1188 or check out www.sundancebookstore.com.

JULY 20: LEARN HOW

TO MAKE 3D OBJECTS at Bridgewire Makerspace. 3-5 p.m. 1055 Industrial Way, Ste. 20. Suggested donation $6. Call 453-0196 or visit www.renobridgewire.org for more information.

JULY 22: COWBOY UP! opens the Phil Up! Pops Series. Don and Waddie make up Cowboy Up! and

performed at the Rhythm & Rawhide concerts in 2003 and 2004 and will play alongside the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra. Call 322-6393 or visit www.renophil.com for more information.

JULY 21

Arts in Bloom is a full day of art, entertainment, food and more. More than 40 artist booths will be on display. A wine tasting will also be available. 2-8 p.m. Victorian Square, Sparks. For more information, call 353-4098 or visit www.sparksrec.com.

JULY 24: DISCOVER THE ART OF DRAWING with artist Mallory Mishler. 9:3011:30 a.m. McKinley Arts and Culture Center. For more information, call 322-1538. JULY 25: WEDNESDAY COMMUNITY ART NIGHT is hosted at the Reno Art Works’ Hobson Gallery and will provide materials for participants to learn how to paint. 6-9 p.m. 1995 Dickerson Road. Free. Call 378-5559 for more information. JULY 26: THE ELECTRIC BURNER FASHION SHOW is inspired by Tron and will feature light up clothing made by PolyEsther and friends, as well as glow hoops, glow fire spinners, dancers and music by Mojo Green. 6-10 p.m. PolyEsther’s Costume Boutique, 655 S. Virginia St. Reno. Free.

JULY 23

JULY 27: A NIGHT OF

JULY 30: THE ARTOWN FAMILY FESTIVAL offers facepainting and other children’s activities. 5-7 p.m. For more information, call 322-1538.

JULY 31: ARTOWN

CLOSING NIGHT will feature live entertainment by Maceo Parker. 7:30-10 p.m. Wingfield Park. Free. Call 322-1538 for more information.

COLIN ROSS Composer and multi-instrumentalist Colin Ross will perform at Wingfield Park and kids will have an opportunity to join him on stage. 6-7 p.m. Call 322-1538 for more information.

EGYPTIAN BELLYDANCING UNDER THE STARS will present Troupe Jasmine. 7-9 p.m. River School Farm. $5. Call 747-2222 or visit www.riverschool.info for more information.

JULY 29: UPCYCLE PROJECTS will help you learn how to use everyday materials to create earthfriendly art projects. 1-2 p.m. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum. Members free, nonmembers $3. Call 786-1000 for more information.

ARTS IN BLOOM

JULY 28

COMPRESSION! Compression! Art and Fire features entertainment and vendors from local artists. 3-11 p.m. Reno City Plaza. Free, suggested donation $5 for premium seats. For more information, call 379-0186 or visit www.compression.controlledburnreno.com.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2012 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 19


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20 | artown 2012 |

J U N E 2 8 , 2 0 12 | a s p Ec ial s U p p l EmE N t to th E rENo NEws & r E vi Ew

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FAMILY AFFAIRS ARTOWN FOR KIDS AND PARENTS by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

SURE, Artown is largely

an adult-oriented event, with nighttime entertainment and plenty of booze to go around. But this year, there are more activities than ever intended for kids and families. Depending on your child’s interests, there’s something to suit any age. Best part? Most of the events are free.

PERFORMANCES TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada presents Curiosity Cat, a play by award-winning writer Chris Grabenstein. The play addresses homelessness, family illness and other difficult themes with a bit of humor to make it approachable for kids. Wingfield Park. July 2, 7-8 p.m. Free The Lake Mansion will teach acting, creative movement and music to kids of all ages. Call to 322-1538 to reserve a spot. July 3, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. If anything will help kids exert some energy, it’s banging on drums for an hour. Djembe drummer Dominique from Anouaze Beat will instruct kids ages 712 on basic African beats and playing in a drum circle. Instruments are provided, but families are invited to bring their own. July 6, 13, 20 and 27, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $25 for four sessions, or $8 to drop in. Call 747-2222 to RSVP. James Thurber’s play The Thirteen Clocks is an adventure story with quirky characters. Parents and kids will both enjoy this lighthearted performance hosted by the Reno Little Theater at the Laxalt Auditorium, 401 West Second St. The show will have four performances on July 7, 8, 14 and 15, from 2-3 p.m. And it’s free. It’s OK, parents—we know you still enjoy a good ghost story, even if you know they get harder to believe the older you get. Tag along with your kid to watch a free performance of The Great Gray Ghost of Old Spook Lane presented by the Nevada Opera. July 13, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Sarah Winnemucca Elementary School. Watching Young Chautauquans may spark a love of history in your child. Young Chautauquan’s will present themselves as historical figures, and will

answer questions from the crowd as their character. July 23, 9:30-11:30 a.m. McKinley Arts and Culture Center. Free.

ARTS AND CRAFTS Who says toys have to cost money? Kids ages 8 and up can make their own shadow puppets at a workshop hosted by Grassroots Books on July 7. Grassroots will provide all the materials. Reservations are required, so call 8286225. Artist Kathleen Durham will teach kids how to make tiny illustrated books with her Fred Mouse and Professor characters. Durham is a member of Wild Women Artists and makes small figurines which she refers to as “the Undersinkers” who live in “Underwood.” This is a free event at the McKinley Arts and Culture Center. July 2, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Grassroots Books will give kids ages 8 and up a chance to make their own decoupage boxes. Materials will be provided, and it’s all free. Can’t beat a free project and getting the kids out of the house for an hour and a half. Reserve a spot by calling 828-2665. handsON!, hosted by the Nevada Museum of Art, happens on the second Sunday of each month. On July 14, the theme is “Pottery and Patterns—pinch, pull, play!” Kids will learn about pottery to make their own creations. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free.

OUTSIDE FESTIVITIES The whole gang will enjoy the Artown Family Festival each Monday night throughout July. Facepainting, entertainment and other activities for kids will be available. Plus, it’s free—good news for families living on a budget. Wingfield Park. July 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30, 5-7 p.m. Erth’s Dinosaur Petting Zoo is not your average animal meet-and-greet. Kids will get to see models of dinosaurs up close, and will learn practical lessons about animal husbandry. July 9, 7-8 p.m. Wingfield Park. Free. To view all of Artown’s family events, visit http://bit.ly/ArtownFamily.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 2011 |

ARTOWN 2012 | 21


M OV I E S I N T H E PA R K S H OWC A S E CL ASSIC COMED I E S , ST E A M Y ROM ANCE AND A FA M I L I A R A L I E N

and relevance (Moonstruck was shown on a full moon night, and a scary movie double feature once paid tribute to Friday the 13th). Generally, the movies are appropriate for a family audience, staying in the G to PG-13 range. However, in the past 15 years, there have been a few R-rated exceptions, including Billy Elliot. This year’s lineup includes a family film, a comedy, a romance and a musical.

E.T. THE EXTRA TERRESTRIAL

PASS THE POPCORN by SAMI EDGE

IT’S TIME FOR THAT MONTH AGAIN. Sweltering temperatures,

scorching sun and blistered skin all mark the start of July. After a long, hot week on your feet—spent marveling at the sheer talent of the capable artists showcased in Artown, no doubt—Friday Movies in the Park offer the perfect opportunity to sit the kids down, cool off, kick back and relax. Movie screenings in Wingfield Park became a part of the Artown tradition in 1997, the second year of the festival, as a

22 | ARTOWN 2012 | JUNE 28, 2011

| A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

tribute to the art of cinematography. Originally, each flick was shown on 16mm film, but over the years the film and equipment have become more expensive and harder to find, forcing a transition from true film to DVD projectors. Though the grainy goodness that makes film so film-esque will have to be sacrificed, DVD projection is necessary to meet the demands of the Artown audience. According to Tim Jones, Artown cofounder and producer of Movies in the Park, movies are chosen based on variety

Spielberg hit starring a lonely boy and an alien that used to look real will screen this year in honor of its 30th anniversary. Although today we would probably expect E.T.’s spaceship to look more like something straight out of the Apple factory than a flying teardrop, the film remains a timeless classic about boyhood friendship. July 6, 9-11:15 p.m. (PG)

A NIGHT AT THE OPERA With the Marx brothers, everything is a joke. Zeppo Marx, however, must have grown bored with the humor. A Night at the Opera is the first Marx Brothers film starring only three of the infamous quartet—Zeppo left the crew to become a stage engineer and subsequently a multimillionaire. “We’re twice as funny without Zeppo,” Groucho Marx is reported to have said, and evidently he was right. A Night at the Opera is rated as the 12th funniest movie of all time by the American Film Institute. July 13, 9-11 p.m. (G)

STRICTLY BALLROOM The debut

film of the director who brought us the masterpiece of Moulin Rouge, and a tragically comedic rendition of Romeo and Juliet (yes, the one with Leonardo DiCaprio sporting Tommy Bahama), Strictly Ballroom is filled to the brim with hot moves and raging young romance. Though Strictly Ballroom is often compared to Dirty Dancing, its satirical nature makes the film more of a comedy than a dramatic romance. Don’t spin in your grave, Patrick Swayze— your spot in the heartthrob hall of fame is safe for now. July 20, 9-11 p.m. (PG)

GREASE What better way to round up Artown’s summer nights than with Grease, the hit movie-musical that has forever endeared the term “summer lovin’”? Throw on a poodle skirt and head down to Wingfield to sing along with a film that’s sure to get everyone revved up for August, a month of classic cars and even hotter summer nights. July 27, 9-11 p.m. (PG-13)


THERE’S NO SHORT AGE OF DRAMA during

this year’s Artown. Some of Reno’s major playhouses offer new interpretations on old classics, and bring some lesser known plays out of obscurity.

GOOD LUCK MACBETH Good Luck Macbeth will perform The Tempest, one of William Shakespeare’s most unique plays featuring adventure, betrayal, magic, romance and some odd creatures. According to producer and artistic director Chad Sweet, the Shakespearean play was chosen because of its accessibility to modern audiences. “Last year, our company did Twelfth Night, and it seemed to work out really well,” he says. “It’s Artown and summer, and Shakespeare is a really great, classic playwright. People really seem to like it.” Director Linda Noveroske is staying true to the original script, but the company got creative with the production design, using “very geometric and very abstract” visuals, according to Sweet. Last year’s production of Twelfth Night was performed with a steampunk aesthetic. “Kids will definitely enjoy it,” says Sweet of the The Tempest. “Most performances of The Tempest are not performed in a funny way, but we’re focusing on the comedic aspects of it. Kids will enjoy the gags and the jokes.” Performances are held on July 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 26 and 27 from 7:30-9:30 p.m.; on July 8, 15, 22 and 29 from 3-5 p.m.; July 21 from 7:45-9:30 p.m.; and July 28 from 7:30-9 p.m. Admission is $14-$20. 119 N. Virginia St.

GLM will also present Empire Improv’s Long Form Improv Show, in which two teams perform a 30 minute long play based on the suggestion of the audience. These productions are recommended for people 17 and older and will be held at GLM’s new location, 701 S. Virginia St. July 6, 13, 20 and 27 from 910:45 p.m. July 6 is free, and all other dates are $5. www.goodluckmacbeth.org

RENO LITTLE THEATER Noel Coward’s humorous plays about the difficulty—and reward—of maintaining relationships are timeless. This summer, Reno Little Theater presents Coward’s Private Lives, a comedy about divorced couple Amanda and Elyot unintentionally rekindling their romance while on honeymoons with their new partners. This production is directed by McKenzi L. Swinehart, and will run on July 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26-29 at 7:30-10 p.m. July 15, 22, and 29 from 2-4:30 p.m. $15 for general admission, $12 for students, seniors and military members. The New Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St. Meghan Kirwin and Helena Inskeep will perform as Prince Zorn of Zorna and Princess Saralinda in RLT’s production of The Thirteen Clocks, written by Frank Lowe and adapted by James Thurber. The Thirteen Clocks, directed by Kira Temple, is part poem, part fairy tale, and part fairytale. Attend one of four performances on July 7, 8, 14 and 15, 2-3 p.m. Free. Laxalt Auditorium, 401 West Second St. For more information, call www.renolittletheater.org or call 813-8900.

Think

AGELESS REPERTORY THEATER The three productions of the Ageless Repertory Theater are all comedies that address bigger issues like loss, family conflict, failure and mental illness, with a lighthearted approach. Shakespeare in Hollywood, written by Royal Shakespeare Company commissioned playwright Ken Ludwig and directed by Eileen Hacker, is the first performance on the roster. The play is set in 1934 and features Oberon and Puck—the famous fairies from A Midsummer Night’s Dream—getting into mischief on the set of a Hollywood film. Catch a performance of this show on July 10 and 13 from 1-3 p.m. and on July 12 from 7-9 p.m. On July 17, 19 and 20, Ageless Repertory will present Annoyance, a play by Sam Bobrick. In Annoyance, directed by Len Overholser, mental patient Ethan Steckler undergoes psychiatric treatment with the help of doctors Anita Wells and Sidney Gates. July 17 and 20, 1-3 p.m. July 19, 7-9 p.m. Director Ron Smith will present Broadway Bound, the third in Neil Simon’s Eugene trilogy. Broadway Bound is the story of two brothers—Eugene and Stanley—aspiring to become professional comedians while their family structure begins to crumble. July 24 and 27, 1-3 p.m., and July 26 from 7-9 p.m. All performances will be held at Circles Edge for Spiritual Living, 1117 California St. There is no admission cost, but donations are accepted. These plays are recommended for adults. For more information, contact 345-7323.

COMMUNITY THEATER by ASHLEY HENNEFER ashleyh@newsreview.com

ARTOWN THEATER PERFORMANCES

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10A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE10RENO NEWS & REVIEW | JUNE 28, 10 2012 | ARTOWN 201210| 23


 

     

    



  

   

             

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R-2012-06-28  

AQUAMAN AT UNR VOLUME 18, ISSUE19 RENO’S NEWS &amp; ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY JUNE 28–JULY 4, 2012 See News, page 6. See Green, page 9. See Film,...

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