Page 1

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . .4 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .14 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .16 Art of the State . . . . . . .17

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .23 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Free Will Astrology . . . .34 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .35 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .35

SECOND TO NONE See News, page 6.

BIKE CURIOUS See Green, page 8.

SCHOOL OF

HARD BLOCKS

See Arts&Culture, page 14.

IRISH SING See Musicbeat, page 23.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

|

VOLUME 18, ISSUE 18

|

JUNE 21–27, 2012


GARY VALENCIANO JUNE 23 TAHOE REGGAE FESTIVAL JUNE 30 ft. Pepper, Katchafire and more COMEDIANS OF CHELSEA LATELY JULY 7 TRACY MORGAN JULY 14 SUBLIME WITH ROME & CYPRESS HILL JULY 26 ALL AMERICAN REJECTS AUGUST 14 ft. Shiny Toy Guns & Eve 6 JIMMY CLIFF AUGUST 25 MATISYAHU & DIRTY HEADS SEPTEMBER 27

FOR TICKETS AND ROOM INFORMATION CLICK OR CALL MONTBLEURESORT.COM 888.829.7630 | FOLLOW US A T R O P I C A N A E N T E R TA I N M E N T C A S I N O 2   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 21, 2012

|

TROPICANACASINOS.COM


EDITOR’S NOTE

LETTERS Hmm

We’re live. You’re the Best. Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Guess what! The Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada went live on Monday. It was a soft launch, first announced on our Facebook site www.facebook.com/RenoNewsReview, for reasons that may or may not eventually become clear. We’ll have many up-to-the-moment announcements on our Facebook page, so you probably want to befriend us now. For the last few years, I’ve looked at the community and decided on an area that I thought deserved a certain amount of extra attention, a little highlighting in our annual popular search for community. For example, last year, it was the Latino part of our community and readership. This year, though, I want to focus on the Midtown District, which includes businesses in the area bordered by Liberty Street, Plumb Lane, Holcomb Avenue and Plumas Street. I mean, to be honest, if there is one section of town that is flourishing when many sections of town are struggling with “closed” signs, it’s Midtown—block by block, storefront by storefront, building by building. I think it’s Midtown’s “do or die” sentiment that is moving that area of town forward. And it’s that very same philosophy that has moved many of our past winners into the rarified atmosphere of “Reno’s Best.” It’s a beautiful thing, really. In that section of town, friendly competition and cooperation has improved the bottom line for many businesses and individuals. The usual rules will apply. We want everyone to campaign for the top spot, but we’ve gotten pretty sophisticated with catching cheaters. For example, last year, we had a botnet attack from India, which resulted in some 4,000 votes getting disqualified. So if you’re human, vote. If you’re not human, don’t vote. For non-Facebookers, check www.newsreview.com/reno/ ballot/bestofreno2012 . And with no further adieu, let the bloodbath begin. Our readers’ poll will be conducted through Aug. 3. We’ll publish our results on Aug. 9.

Re “Wet and wild” (Editor’s note, June 14): The reason some of your garden plants didn’t suffer damage due to the freeze is “latent heat of condensation.” When liquid water vapor changes into ice (a solid) the water moves to a lower energy state. Thus, the energy is released as heat, either into the air or onto a surface where the freezing is taking place (your plants). The heat release is about 80 calories per gram of water. The plant receives water, the heat and also an insulating coat of ice. This heat transfer and the insulation effect are well known in agriculture. By the way, the effect works only in a limited range and time of freezing. For a limited time, the temperature of the ice doesn’t drop below 32 degrees F, even if the air temperature goes lower. R. Richard Reno

Off truck Re “Totally trucked” (Feature story, June 7): I’ve always been in admiration of my fellow Renoites who strive to make our community a more diverse and well-rounded city against all odds. These are the pioneers of Reno who have the heart and ambition to make this city an exceptional place to live. The women who run Gourmelt are two of these pioneers. They had the drive to create an event for the purpose of uniting their colleagues and boosting Reno’s food scene. Unfortunately, another group’s sense of entitlement and greed has caused this unnecessary feud. Of course the Reno Food Truck Friday is not an original idea. Many cities worldwide hold similar events. However, I would like to validate RFTF’s disappointment by saying

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

that Reno Street Food has acted inappropriately by creating the same event with the same concept, time and place. Sure, business is business, but this city is far too small and connected to be stepping on the backs of others. Treating your fellow community members with disrespect because you think you can and because you believe you are more important than them will not get you very far in this tight-knit community. There are good people here trying to do good things. This kind of behavior will catch up to them some day. Marie McElroy Reno

Cock crows Which major country is out-smarting America? Here we are trillions in debt. We’re like that car rocking on the edge of the cliff and just a feather would send us over the edge. Whats going to happen is not a feather, but a boulder is coming, and that boulder is Europe. Greece falls, then maybe Italy. They owe us money, we owe China money—a ripple effect. China calls our notes. The U.S. dollar is worth nothing at that point. We keep producing less, exporting less, importing more and continue to offer entitlements and going further in debt. China sells us widgets we don’t need and loans us the money to buy them. Wake up, America! Michael David Arp Reno

Running dialog Who is this Lori Santos? Why does her letter get in RN&R and not mine? She says that addiction is an illness and not a moral judgment. Who is she trying to fool? Of course it’s a moral issue. You have to have respect for yourself not to take drugs. Poeple who take drugs have no respect for themselves. Of course it’s a moral thing. [Perhaps] she’s trying to divert attention

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Photographer Amy Beck Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Brennan Collins, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

because she has a member or members of her family who are into drugs. This is typical of irresponsible people. They want the community to clean up what their own lazy asses start. This is where our money goes, listening to these deadheads. And then she tries to compliment the community by saying that they are wonderful and knowledgeable to further candycoat her argument and get what she wants. This is how socialism starts. I was in jail and this fellow down at the end was complaining that he needed a program to get off drugs. You know what the guard told him? You’re getting that now, shut up.

Rodeo clowns If rodeo cowboys could be rodeo animals for only one day and be broken and bridled, saddled and spurred, caged and corralled, gelded and branded, scared, frightened to bolt and run, chased, lassoed and stretched, hog-tied and wrestled to the ground, and made to jump, buck, turn and kick, only to be slaughtered someday, charbroiled and eaten as a steak, why sonny, I’ll bet ya two bits, the rodeo would be no more. Then, rather than a wave of a cowboy hat, and a “yee ha, yippity yi yeah” there would only be a quiet whinny, the soft cry of moo hoo hoo, and a wag of many tails. Michael Ahles Reno

René D. Bravo Reno

Feed me, take my money

Swing low Re “Dada rock” (Arts & Culture, June 14): The hoopla for the Nada Dada motel art show is forthcoming; I’m commenting not about the art or the project, but on the ironic unawareness that emits from the local “scene.” I was at the Nevada Museum of Art First Thursday last week. A tall dude was wearing an even Taller Top Hat with an Art Dada promo sign on it. There were Dada handouts, kilts, the works. Yet the kitschy and unique “Caution: Low Motel Sign” street sign, not far from Dadaville on West Second Street, has gone unnoticed, and it is in deteriorating condition. I wrote in about this once after the Olympic (5 rings) Motel sign piece in the RN&R—yet the “low” sign just withers away. Maybe the art/burner crowd could get their own council member elected, and save this icon. I mean, if Toni Harsh once put up silly “feel good” signs around California Avenue, why isn’t this one-of-a-kind caution sign worthy of posterity? Or are we all just “Too Tall?” Steve Klutter Sun Valley

Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Russell Moore General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Cassy Valoleti-Matu

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

Re “Totally trucked” (Feature story, June 7): I recently moved back to Reno and was excited to hear about Food Truck Friday as part of First Fridays. I went down to the first one and found the two-to-three hour lines. I’m never going to wait that long to buy food from a food truck, no matter how good the food is reported to be. I was very happy when I heard the food trucks would be downtown every Friday instead of just the first Friday. This would allow more people to partake and would alleviate the crowds that caused such long waits. It wasn’t until I saw the article in RN&R that I realized these events were being put on by different groups. As a consumer, I really don’t give a rat’s ass who puts the event on, and I really don’t understand the childish behavior and finger pointing. If you didn’t think of putting on the event every Friday and someone else did, then boo hoo. Let us consumers enjoy the event without the political crap behind the scenes spoiling it. Keith Deutscher Reno

Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Hayley Doshay Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

3


by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

How was your school experience? Asked at Java Jungle, 246 W. First St. George Kepner Food server

I went to school in Southern California back in the late ’80s, early ’90s. Graduated in ’91. … On the whole it was a good experience. When I grew up, public education was a little bit more in the forefront of government funding and whatnot, so we had a lot better studentsper-teacher ratio.

Lisamarie Wand Real estate agent

I loved high school. I was friends with lots of different groups of people, and I was active in sports and activities in school, and I did great. I had good grades. Most of [the teachers] were really good. There’s always that one or two that you can leave behind.

Elect Diane Nicolet You know why newspapers wait until close to the This is not personal. Aiazzi has often done a very election to endorse candidates? One reason is that the good job at the Reno City Council and on many boards candidate who is not endorsed generally will not adverand commissions. He’s a great guy—huge for the arts tise with the newspaper. It’s money. Another is that after over the years—but he’s not the right guy for this job. the endorsement, the unendorsed candidate assumes all Washoe County has a great opportunity with coverage will be biased against him or her, and so he or Nicolet. In fact, the idea that Aiazzi saw her infinitely she often refuses to discuss unrelated issues. superior qualifications and didn’t step out of the Screw that. The race for School Board Trustee race—for a job where other people’s children will be District E is a great example of why newspapers should affected by his lack of knowledge—suggests he’s not occasionally have the guts to eschew advertising dollars. in it to improve Washoe County schools for us citiHere’s why: The candidate who is eminently qualified zens, but to keep his name in the public ear for a for the position appears clueless as future elected position. to how to get her message out. She’s People in Washoe County often This has got to be lament never been a politician. The career the poor graduation rates politician who isn’t even qualified to an election about and lack of quality in our educabe a substitute teacher in Washoe tional system. We’ve gotten this qualifications County Schools took 3,030 votes in way by not demanding that the the primary.If he had gotten 444 people who make choices for our and experience. more votes out of the 6,947 cast (50 school system be qualified to make percent plus 1), he would have won informed choices. the election without a runoff—based only on his name Not every elected position requires a certain backrecognition. It was an injury narrowly averted. ground experience—for example, Reno City Council We’re going to help her get her message out. This can be run quite efficiently by people with non-politihas got to be an election about qualifications and expe- cal life experience—but few thoughtful people would rience. Diane Nicolet has a doctorate in educational vote for a high school dropout for the Nevada Supreme leadership. She has a master’s degree in education. She Court. We want people who are experienced and even has 17 years teaching children. Currently, she’s the accomplished with the law. director of the E.L. Cord Child Care Center. She’s We believe the person who has enough respect for raised her own children and is a grandmother. education to bother to get one is the person who should Dave Aiazzi has a two-year degree from Truckee be sitting on the school board. Meadows Community College. He has raised children In November, elect Diane Nicolet to the position of and is a grandfather. He’s an expert in bureaucracy, School Board Trustee for District E. Ω not education. 4

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

Cassidy Brown Sales associate

Went to high school and honestly thought it was joke. … Teachers really don’t care about the students. I think it’s because they get paid way too little. So their lack of ambition is affecting the students.

Aimee Giller Community relations manager

My school experience was amazing. Very fortunate. I grew up in Las Vegas. I went to a school my mother taught at. It was in my neighborhood. We could walk to and from school. I had great teachers, very involved, cared about what I did. High school, I went to another local school and just—played volleyball, softball, student council. I really enjoyed my teenage years.

Gabrielle Myers Teacher

Middle school was difficult. I was made fun of [laughs], but high school was great. I enjoyed it. I went to an all-girls school in Washington, D.C. The teachers were great. I loved my English teacher in particular. She sparked a lifelong passion for writing and reading that I still [have] today. I teach English part time at the college level because of that experience.


BEN’S!” LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

“The BEST BUYS are at

TAKE

10% OFF

ANY NON-SALE WINE OR LIQUOR WITH PURCHASE OF 6 BOTTLES

6 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS FEATURING WINE, SPIRITS, AND BEER SMIRNOFF ...................... 11.2oz ... $6.99 CORONA ........................... 12oz.... $12.99 SESSION .......................... 11oz..... $9.99

BASS OR BECKS............... 12oz.... $11.99

DESCHUTES ...................... 12oz..... $6.99 FULL SAIL ......................... 12oz..... $5.99

LEINENKUGELS ................. 12oz..... $6.99

KONA OR WIDMER ............ 12oz.... $12.99

SAM ADAMS ..................... 12oz.... $13.99 GREAT BASIN–ICKY IPA ..... 12oz..... $6.99

DOS EQUIS ....................... 12oz.... $11.99 REDHOOK ......................... 12oz.... $12.99

Asst 6 Packs

12 Packs

Asst 6 Packs

12 Packs

6 Packs

Asst 12 Packs

Asst 6 Packs

6 Packs

12 Packs

12 Packs 12 Packs 12 Packs

ANCHOR ........................... 12oz..... $7.99 NEWCASTLE ...................... 12oz.... $11.99 BLUE MOON ..................... 12oz.... $11.99 Asst 6 Packs

12 Packs

12 Packs

PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU 6/30/12

RENO 3480 Lakeside - 825.0244 | Fourth & Keystone - 323.6277 | 4700 N. Virginia - 322.0588 | 10870 S. Virginia - 853-2367 SPARKS 2990 Sullivan - 337.2367 | CARSON CITY 444 E. Williams - 885.9463 | www.bensfinewineandspirits.com

PLEASE USE OUR PRODUCTS IN MODERATION

LAKE TAHOE OUTDOOR ARENA AT HARVEYS 2012 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY, JUNE 22 AT 10AM! Ticketmaster.com or ApeConcerts.com

TotalRewardsTahoe.com

NEIL YOUNG & CRAZY HORSE #TahoeConcerts

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2012

Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

T1600-12-114

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

5


PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

The new St. Mary’s owner When Dignity Health announced in March that it was selling Reno’s St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center to Prime Healthcare of Ontario, Calif., the news release announcing the sale read in part, “Since 2008, Dignity Health has invested $67 million in Saint Mary’s, which has significantly strengthened the facility’s ability to sustain its mission. However, the hospital continues to experience significant challenges brought on by an ailing local economy and insufficient reimbursements. In 2011, the hospital posted a net loss of $43.5 million.” It was not surprising that Prime, which has 14 California hospitals, would want to take over a hospital that was faltering. The corporation was founded by cardiologist Prem Reddy, who has been quoted saying, “Every hospital I acquire, I acquire in bankruptcy.” It has regularly picked up financially troubled properties, often assuring that local opposition or regulation will be less rigorous. But that has not kept the corporation free from bad publicity or strong regulation outside those areas. In September last year, California Attorney General Kamala Harris refused to allow Prime to take over a hospital in Victor Valley: “We have concluded that this proposed sale is not in the public interest and will likely create a significant effect on the availability or accessibility of health care services to the affected community.” Although there were other buyers available, the hospital continued negotiating with Prime and won a court ruling that allowed the sale to go forward. In recent years at least three different U.S. House members have called for Medicare investigations of Prime billing practices. In February, at a time when former Prime employees were being questioned by the FBI, Prime president and chief executive officer Lex Reddy—brother of the founder—resigned. What prompted the calls for Medicare probes was principally charges that Prime was using Medicare number codes for maladies to upgrade to more expensive treatments. Specifically, malnutrition was designated as kwashiorkor, a rare form of malnutrition found mainly in Africa. The investigative organization California Watch reported, “Reports of kwashiorkor at Shasta Regional Medical Center exploded after Prime acquired the hospital in November 2008. That year, the hospital reported only eight cases of kwashiorkor. But in the two years that followed, 1,030 cases were billed to Medicare, more than 70 times the statewide rate for general hospitals. In [patient Darlene] Courtois’ case, the hospital’s reimbursement from Medicare increased by more than $6,700— from $4,708 to $11,463 – by noting kwashiorkor on the bill, according to a California Watch analysis of billing information obtained under the federal Freedom of Information Act.” In a letter, Prime responded, “California Watch is once again trying to misinterpret a patient’s medical records to suit its malnutrition story angle. Prime Healthcare has sent California Watch hundreds of pages of literature documenting the issues, but still it persists in promoting a misleading and unfair narrative. In the latest query, the patient, who has chronic problems, was referred by her primary care physician from his clinic to Shasta Regional Medical Center emergency department. Essentially, the attending physician documented protein malnutrition based on very low blood albumin levels and sub-optimal nutritional status. … The physicians did an excellent and comprehensive job of identifying, addressing and documenting her significant health issues including her malnutrition.” The entire Prime response can be read at http://tinyurl.com/bvr7jvg . Prime has also been accused of violating patient confidentiality. Los Angeles Times writer Michael Hiltzik wrote a piece titled “Her case shows why healthcare privacy laws exist” after Prime showed the medical records of Darlene Courtois to her hometown newspaper. Prime argued that it was no longer bound by confidentiality after she showed some of her records to California Watch. In 2009, Prime was the only for-profit company to be listed on Thomson Reuters list of the 10 best health care systems in the United States. Prime has said that many of its problems are caused by a labor union, the Service Employees International Union/United Healthcare Workers West, and that it would look outside the union’s territory for new hospitals. Besides St. Mary’s, it has also taken over two hospitals in Texas.

— Dennis Myers 6

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

‘Their’ votes Romney and Heller campaigns seek victory by limiting voter choices Mitt Romney and Dean Heller backers are trying to reduce ballot options in order to force all voters seeking by alternatives into major party choices. Dennis Myers In Nevada, they are suing jointly to overturn the state’s “None of these candidates” (NOTC) ballot line to keep it from draining away votes from them. And in Michigan, Romney is suing to keep Libertarian Party presidential nominee Gary Johnson off the ballot to keep him from drawing votes that might otherwise go Republican. The NOTC option in Nevada has been in place since 1976, but only in statewide races. State legislators in the 1975 Nevada Legislature did not want it applied to themselves. And they made it non-functional. Although voters would get to express their unhappiness, it could not prevail in an election. The election results would be certified as though NOTC were not on the ballot—the human who came in first still won. Romney and Heller are arguing that by creating the NOTC ballot option and inviting voters to use it while making it ineffective, Nevada is invalidating their votes without due process. Their complaint says state officials “ignore it [NOTC] in determining and certifying the winners of elections”—which is what the law requires election officials to do.

Among the plaintiffs are two state Republican leaders, including one of Romney’s presidential elector candidates, plus several unknown voters. NOTC is generally regarded as draining votes away from challengers, so incumbent Heller could be adversely affected by the lawsuit. In the past, NOTC victories— which came in pluralities, not majorities—have occurred mainly in non-competitive races where one party or the other fails to field a serious candidate. And so far they have always come in primary elections, which political analysts believe are regarded by voters as “free” votes whose effect can always be remedied in the subsequent general election.

‘None’ has actually won in some primary elections. In 1976 NOTC won its first victory in the GOP primary election for what then was the state’s only U.S. House seat. Nevada Republicans were unable to get a strong candidate against incumbent Democrat James Santini, with the result that unknowns Walden Earhart and Dart Anthony both trailed

A Reno resident voted at the University of Nevada, Reno student union during early voting this month.

NOTC. But because “None of these candidates” is non-binding, Earhart won the nomination anyway. NOTC did have one effect, though—whatever small chance Earhart had was snuffed by the indignity of losing to “None of these candidates.” Earhart went on to achieve the uncertain distinction of being a double-NOTC victim, when he came in second in the GOP primary for secretary of state in 1978. In their complaint, the Romney/Heller group said there were at least two ways the Nevada Legislature in 1975 could—and should—have made NOTC effective. It could, they said, have required that when NOTC won an election, “the office at issue must be deemed vacant at the commencement of its term,” upon which the normal procedure for filling vacancies would kick in. That’s the way Nevada law works when a person who has died after getting on the ballot is elected. Or the legislators could have required that if NOTC won, a runoff would be held for that office. “States that require candidates to win elections by a majority (rather than plurality) of votes often hold run-off elections after Election Day for races in which none of the candidates received more than 50 percent of the vote,” the complaint reads. It fails to note that runoffs are held mostly in Southern states and were devised as a way to keep black candidates from winning the plurality elections that prevail in most other states. It is also used in what the Atlanta Journal-Constitution calls “some politically charged cities north of the Mason-Dixon line.” Runoffs have been the target of attacks under the U.S. Voting Rights Act. Moreover, in Nevada they could require an additional statewide election, which brings an expense factor into play. Obama and Romney have been in near-ties in several surveys since Romney emerged as the clear frontrunner for the Republican nomination, and those same surveys have shown unusually small segments of undecided voters for so early in the campaign year. That makes the few votes that might be drawn by other ballot options precious. Both major parties have a history in tight races of attacking independent or third party candidates for taking “their” votes and being “spoilers,” as when such charges were thrown at Ralph Nader on Al Gore’s behalf in 2000. In a 2010 New York Times story about the impact of NOTC on that year’s U.S. Senate race, a Republican manager said, “Any vote not for Sharron Angle is a vote for Harry


Turnover

can switch parties and then run for office. The Johnson campaign was informed of the decision in a letter written by state Attorney General William Schuette, Romney’s state campaign chair. The secretary of state also said candidate Johnson’s ballot application arrived in her office three minutes past the deadline. However, in 1980 when Republican presidential candidate John Anderson ran in the general election as an independent using a newly created Michigan party— the Anderson Coalition Party—as a vehicle, that state’s officials did not interfere with his ballot listing. In addition, it is uncertain whether states can impose additional qualifications on candidates for the presidency that do not appear in the U.S. Constitution. Elections deputy Scott Gillis in the Nevada secretary of state’s office said the Libertarian Party already has ballot status in the state and all it has to do to list Gary Johnson as its presidential nominee is file the paperwork. Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller is a Democrat. He does not have a position, honorary or otherwise, with the Obama campaign. He said he would decline such an invitation: “I am very cautious about political activity because I count the votes.” He’s speaking figuratively— county officials do the actual counting—but he writes the election rules the counties must follow. Ω

In 19 weeks, Reno voters will have a duty that does not often present itself. In a single election, they will elect a new by Dennis Myers majority of the Reno City Council. As a result of term limits taking hold, four of the seven seats on the Council will turn over. The importance of this election is certainly apparent to power players in the valley. Developers in particular are believed to be pushing hard for a Council they find congenial. Some PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Reid.” In that race, it turned out not to be true—if Republican Angle had received every vote cast for NOTC, she still would have lost heavily to Democrat Reid. But in 1998, NOTC saved Reid—he defeated John Ensign by just 428 votes as NOTC took nearly 8,000 votes. NOTC rarely breaks the 5 percent mark, but even a smaller number comes dearly in a close election. Although the Romney/Heller complaint says NOTC nullifies votes, it also says that the option does have some impact—the Legislature, the complaint says, gave the public “a way of expressing ‘nonconfidence’ in their candidates for elected office and telling the prevailing candidate to ‘clean up your act.’” Though Nevada’s unusual ballot option has become known outside the state, there is little indication that other states are anxious to imitate it. In California, voters rejected, by a 2 to 1 margin, a 2000 ballot measure that would have created a “none” option in that state. The Romney effort to keep Libertarian Gary Johnson, a former New Mexico governor, off the ballot is more complicated. Johnson began the year running for the Republican presidential nomination and appeared on the Michigan GOP primary ballot. He later dropped out of that race and won the Libertarian Party nod at its national convention in Las Vegas. Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson, a Republican, says state law puts a time limit on when candidates

activists who were appalled by the sprawl allowed by the current council—particularly approval of a housing development 30 miles north that is detached from the city proper—are also hoping for a better deal from the next Council. Growth and environmental degradation have been issues before the Council since 1978, when six casinos opened in the valley. People poured in looking for jobs, which were very available, but there was no place to live, and the sewer plant ran out of capacity about when available housing nearly vanished. People lived in cars or in tents at a highway rest stop. Traffic problems increased. Overnight a controlled growth movement was legitimized in a city that had always given developers a long leash. Controlled growth advocates Barbara Bennett and Peter Sferrazza were elected mayors into the mid1990s but control of the Council was a more expensive proposition and the controlled growth faction never quite managed a majority of the Council. Reno attorney Bill Bilyeu has some experience with the dynamics involved in a sudden sweeping change in membership of a public body. In 1984, a Republican surge gave the GOP the only majority in the Nevada Assembly it had in 40 years. Bilyeu said the result of the sudden new majority tended to show itself more in procedures than in

This year, 27 Renoites—some of them shown here at a public forum—ran for Reno City Council. In the primary election this week, they were winnowed down to eight.

Bucket list PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Passers-by read some of the entries written in chalk on the “Before I Die” blackboard on East Fourth Street, one of two in the downtown Reno area on which people can write their “Before I die I want to ...” wishes. A nearby sign put up by the Black Rock Art Foundation describes the blackboards as “a snapshot of the values our neighbors hold dear.” OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

policy. For instance, it had been, and still is, the practice to shut the public out of the legislative process by “suspending the rules” in the closing days of the legislative session. Bilyeu did it, too, but he waited longer than usual. “I didn’t suspend my rules over on the Assembly side until—what?— it was at least two weeks after the Senate has suspended theirs.” He said turnovers also costs the public something, and pulls in people who aren’t necessarily suited to the job: “If you get a sudden influx of new people, anyway, because of term limits, there is not institutional memory and you really don’t know what kind of wild cards you’re drawing these days.” Truckee Meadows College political scientist Fred Lokken agreed the changeover will cost the voters. He said the current council has not been appreciated for its ability to govern. “The consequences can be very dramatic,” he said. “Frankly, it puts at risk what has been a very productive working culture, largely because of Mayor Cashell, but it has taken time.” Cashell will likely continue as mayor for two years after November. His first years were very difficult because of infighting on the Council. “The city is coming through this period of remarkable accomplishment, and of holding it together during hard times,” Lokken said. “It takes time to train new faces and unless they’ve served on a neighborhood board, it can take a year or more to get them familiar with the budget process and working routines.” He said that “some candidates who are seen as more insider than others” would likely adapt more quickly, but that doesn’t necessarily help them win. Moreover, some newly elected officials have been known to arrive in office with fire in their eyes, determined to follow their own priorities. “Often when someone does come on board with their own agenda, that can be even more destabilizing than the other factors,” Lokken said. “Getting something done isn’t always the first thing they think about. In Reno particularly we have dealt with very difficult elected officials, who forget that they were elected to be part of a team and pursue their own agenda.” He said getting things together fast is especially important, because in two years the rest of the Council will also be term limited out. Ω

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

7


Primary choice Senate candidate Patricia Spearman defeated fellow Democratic candidate John Lee in last week’s Democratic primary. Despite Sen. Harry Reid’s endorsement of Lee, Spearman has gathered support for her stances on environmental issues, including the endorsement of the Nevada Conservation League. Spearman is also backed by other interest groups for her advocacy of reproductive health and gay rights. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, she is expected to lead in Democraticdominated districts. All of the candidates endorsed by NCL defeated their opponents in the primary, including Peggy Pierce, assembly district 3; Heidi Swank, assembly district 15; Justin Jones, senate district 6; Elliot Anderson, assembly district 15; and several others. For a full list, visit www.nvgreenvote.org.

“It’s good progress for bikers,” said Reno Bike Project cofounder Noah Silverman.

Lovebirds Scientists from the University of Nevada, Reno published a study in a recent issue of Behavioral Ecology about the relationships of black brant, also known as Pacific Brent Geese. The study, led by researchers Jim Sedinger and Chris Nicolai, found that the lifespan of female brants was significantly reduced after the loss of a mate. The team studied more than 2,000 birds, and is part of a longitudinal study on brant. “Mate loss increases the vulnerability of females to harvest and natural mortality because females need protection by males during feeding, nesting, and migration,” said Nicolai in a statement. “It may take an especially fit female to survive mate loss, re-pair with a new mate, and continue reproducing in the future.” The findings may help scientists evaluate other bird species for similar patterns. According to the university, “The study is the first to characterize health effects of mate loss to female geese, and its conclusions have implications for wildlife population management.”

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT Rail City Garden Center and MacLean Financial Group will host the Water & Rails Pond & Garden Railroad Tour. The tour will lead visitors to more than 30 ponds and garden railroads—miniature model railroads that run throughout gardens—in Northern Nevada. Participants will also learn how to create their own pond or garden railroad. June 30-July 1. $15 per person or $25 per couple for a self-guided tour. Visit www.railcitygardencenter.com for more information.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.

8

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREEN

Column note

GREENSPACE

Changing lanes Fourth Street Corridor More than 30 cyclists and bicycle lane advocates turned out for an RTC meeting on by

Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@ newsreview.com

June 14, which determined the future of bike lanes in the Fourth Street thoroughfare (“Positively Fourth Street,” May 10). “A lot of people showed up and talked to the RTC,” said Noah Silverman, co-founder and director of the Reno Bike Project. “This caused the RTC to reevaluate and make a new plan based on suggestions from the public.” “All of the cyclists who came to the meeting gave public comment during the public comment time,” said RBP program manager Jeff Mitchell. “It was cool because there wasn’t a single person there who was against bike lanes. We spoke with a really unified voice.” RTC director of planning Amy McAbee Cummings agreed. “There was a lot of great public comment. The input was helpful in determining these lanes.” And it worked. According to Mitchell, bike lanes will be installed “from Keystone, all the way to Vista Boulevard in Sparks, with the exception of a small downtown strip of the corridor.” “The plan is to install 6.7 miles of new bike lane from Keystone to the east end of Sparks,” said Cummings. “The segment between Evans and Sutro Street is being looked at for other options like a road diet, which reduces four lanes to two.” Other plans include marking it as a green, shared road lane to allow for cyclists to have the right of way. A portion of the road diet is in a school zone. Currently, RTC is waiting to hear back about the Transportation Investment Grant for Economic Recovery (TIGER). The grant would provide $60 million to adding bike lanes to the corridor, and construction would begin in fall of 2013, according to Mitchell. The lane decisions were made based off of the results of the Fourth Street/Prater Way Corridor Study conducted by RTC and Wood Rogers, which was released to the public on June 14. Besides breaking the corridor down by district, the study also highlights goals, including “Create safer streets that are more inviting for families, pedestrians, and bicycles … slow traffic down to encourage people to spend time at businesses, events, and restaurants in the corridor … increase and improve street lighting … coordinate on and off-street parking … increase connectivity between Sparks, Reno and the Truckee River … improve bicycle facilities, including bicycle storage … where possible, provide wider sidewalks … create an identity for the entire corridor with coordinated individual themes for Reno and Sparks … incorporate the corridor’s historical significance and the arts in theming and streetscape elements … [and] all travel modes moving smoothly and safely; good lighting, amenities, and cultural and historical landmarks that have been preserved.” View the entire report at http://bit.ly/KN2IjA. Mitchell, Silverman and other local bike enthusiasts are looking forward to the increase of lanes on Fourth Street. “It worked out pretty well for us,” said Silverman. “It’s good progress for bikers.” Ω


OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

9


Bus it to the Beach

Announcing the East Shore Express

s Free entry into Sand Harbor with $3 round-trip bus fare. $1.50 round-trip bus fare for children 12 and under, seniors and disabled passengers. Must be cash only and exact change. s Runs every 20 minutes from 9 am-6 pm s Runs all summer: June 15-September 3 s Park at 771 Southwood Blvd. in Incline Village (Old elementary school at Southwood Blvd. and SR 28) s Smart, convenient and better for our lake

www.eastshoreexpress.com

Funding from US Forest Service, NV Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration 10   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 21, 2012


BY

How journalism damages education with bad information

DENNIS MYERS

S

teve Mulvenon retired from the Washoe County School District two years ago. While he worked there he was communications director—that is, he was the chief spokesperson for the district and handholder for reporters.

For more ee s reading, thstein’s Ro Richard report at n educatio url.com/ ny http://ti r2 j5 4 9 c

From 1995 to 2000, there was a spate of school shootings around the nation, and each time one happened, local reporters would flood Mulvenon’s operation to “localize” the story. Then there were the times when a Washoe student would take a weapon to school, and it would be covered by local reporters like a presidential assassination. Little of this news coverage put school violence in context by reporting the rarity of school shootings and other violence on school grounds. News outlets were unnecessarily raising the anxiety level of parents, students and teachers. “I guess I was resentful that people were trying to tie the local school district to an event that happened hundreds or thousands of miles away,” Mulvenon told me recently. He became so exasperated by the bad news coverage that he considered ending his cooperation with those kinds of stories. And that was just one myth about schools. Mulvenon and his colleagues in similar positions at thousands of school districts around the nation had to deal with one myth after another. Public policy myths do a lot of damage in areas from agriculture to zoology, but no field is more victimized by them than education.

The students

In the years leading up to the cluster of school shootings, journalists had been busy characterizing the young as monsters. In its Winter 1998 edition, Nieman Reports—a publication of a journalism foundation at Harvard—devoted considerable space to the invention of the “superpredator” young: “The latest ‘theme’ was prompted by Northeastern University criminologist James Fox in 1995. Noting a rise in arrests of juveniles for violent crimes in the late 1980s, Fox combined this observation with the expectation of a substantial growth in the teenaged population during the next 15 years. Unless things changed, so the thesis went, an influx of violent and predatory youth would plague the country shortly after the turn of the century.” Conservative writer John DiIulio also pushed the notion, characterizing the young as essentially soulless: “It’s as though our society had bred a new genetic strain, the child murderer who feels no remorse.” There are always psychopaths of all ages to plague society, of course, but these critics were predicting something massive—270,000 “superpredators” were in the pipeline. Soon others, including liberals like Susan Estrich, were jumping on the bandwagon. And so were journalists.

“TALES OUT OF SCHOOL” continued on page 12 OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

11


continued from page 11

The mother of a Pine Middle School student comforts her daughter as they leave the school grounds during a March 14, 2006, shooting incident. News coverage of the incident largely ignored the freakishness of such events.

“They are called superpredators,” according to the Tampa Tribune in May 1996. “They are not here yet, but they are predicted to be a plague upon the United States in the next decade.” The notion crossed the Atlantic. “Remorseless brutality” would characterize the “invasion of the superpredators,” according to the London Times. “As University of California criminologist Franklin Zimring commented at the time, DiIulio didn’t address the implication of 6 percent of all juveniles being superpredators, nor did he help to unravel the mystery of what it meant to already have almost 2 million of them among us,” Nieman’s report observed. “This, after all, is twice as many kids as are referred annually to all the juvenile courts in the country.” Actually, as Nieman reported, “arrests of juveniles for violent crime began falling shortly after [Fox’s] dire predictions,” but journalists never checked actual figures. So when the first school shooting of the late 1990s cluster happened in Seattle in 1995, both reporters and public were primed to think in a particular way.

The violence

In a numbing series, the school shootings came one after the other in places like Pearl, Miss.; West Paducah, Ky.; Jonesboro, Alaska; Edinboro, Penn.; and Springfield, Ore. Each time the satellite trucks rolled in, the wall-to-wall coverage began, and a light of white hot intensity was thrown on each shooting. In living rooms, misinformation flowed over viewers. Rarely if ever did the journalists on the scene report how atypical these incidents were. And rarely if ever did they explore the idea that overheated news coverage caused copycats, to explain the sudden cluster. Then came Columbine. To all the false data that had been produced by the earlier shootings, Columbine news coverage added a jackpot of misinformation. Nearly every major piece of information we “know” about Columbine is wrong, even including its location. It didn’t happen in Littleton, Colo. During the long hours when the school was closed off, journalists put any and all information on the air unscreened and uncooked. It is now known that the two perpetrators were not loners who targeted jocks. There was a “trench coat” group at the school, but it was made up of good kids, and the two shooters weren’t among them. Those killed were not the targets—the entire school was, because it was 12

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

RN&R FILE PHOTO

“TALES OUT OF SCHOOL”

about half the number of Americans killed annually by lightning strikes.” (There were 88 lightning deaths in 1997, 40 deaths on school grounds in school year 1997-98.) As soon as the story hit the air, I received an irate phone call from a Reno High School teacher who berated me for making such a comparison. Later another teacher told me the reaction was easily explainable—teachers have become committed to getting greater security in their workplaces, and my report could undercut them. Teachers, it seemed, had a stake in fostering the notion of violent schools in order to get more security around themselves and students. I later checked and found that Reno High, too, is a school where violence in rare. But there was no un-ringing the bell that created the myth. With students effectively demonized and their schoolhouses regarded as unsafe, opponents of public education were able to go after the system itself.

The schools

planned not as a school shooting but as a bombJoe Nathan /CatholicEducation.org: ing. The shooting began when the bombs failed. Thousands of parents and educators are voting Diane Sawyer reported without any evidence that with their feet. “some of these Goths may have killed before.” New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg: Charlton Heston said the tragedy could have And school choice is an important way to hold been prevented if there had been a guard with a schools accountable for success because when gun. There was. people vote with their feet you know that it’s It took years for the truth to come out about real, and it’s pretty obvious which direction what actually happened at Columbine, and there they are going. was a costly consequence. Legislatures started passing punitive new laws and school districts For years we’ve heard that there is an exodus of started diverting money to security before getting students from public to private schools. It helped good information. establish the talking point of our “failing When it was over, the school system was left schools.” All over the U.S. politicians have prowith a reputation for violence, which is nonsense. moted this myth. Violence on school grounds has been declining In fact, no such migration ever happened. In for decades, to a point that it barely registers in 2000, when that perception was being pushed by traditional measures anymore. But the critics of public education in the presipolicy myth was so powerful that dential campaign and journalism even those who created it started was swallowing it whole, New to believe it. In addition, once York Times columnist Richard we all “know” something, it In 1995, Rothstein checked the actual develops a constituency. figures (something other 270,000 People become committed to journalists should have its “solution.” One reason ‘superpredator’ done) and found the oppowhy dispelling policy myths site—parents and students children were can be difficult to do is that were actually leaving pritheir preservation often serves vate schools for public predicted. someone’s agenda. schools. He reported that “the At the time of Columbine, I proportion of students in private was reporting for KOLO News in schools has been falling nationReno. I pitched a story about how wide.” The decline was uniform, with school shootings and other kinds of serious the numbers down in upper, middle, and lower school violence were very rare. The idea went so income groups. sharply against the grain of conventional wisdom That journalists, by playing games with the that our assignment editor wouldn’t let me do it facts, were actually affecting public policies and unless I proved it to him. I had to go home and influencing lawmaking and thus hurting good pick up a file I had been keeping on school people who depend on us for good information, safety during the spate of earlier school shootings seemed never to occur to us. in order to make my case before I was permitted The migration trend is still holding. U.S. to do the piece. Department of Education figures show that In my report, I noted that of all the places between 2006 to 2010 private school enrollments children frequent, school is by far the safest— dropped by about 174,000. Public school enrollcertainly safer than the home. As many children ments increased by 718,000. are killed at home by parents or guardians or Private schools have never been very popular. whomever about every three days, I said, as were At its height in the mid-1980s, private school killed at Columbine. Each day students leave enrollment was less than 13 percent. violent homes for the safety of schools. Except for a slight spike of less than a perI also quoted a report from the Justice Policy centage point in 2001-2002, private school Institute (which had compared school violence enrollment has been declining steadily since the statistics with figures from the National Climatic 21st century got underway in January 2001. Data Center): “To give the reader a sense of the Private school enrollment from pre-kindergarten idiosyncratic nature of these events, the number through 12th grade dropped 12.7 percent from of children killed by gun violence in schools is 2001-02 to 2009-10 according to Condition of

Education, a report ordered by Congress. In the fall of 2001, 6.3 million students were enrolled in private schools. By the fall of 2009, that figure was down to 5.5 million, even as the population grows. Nevertheless, the migration from public to private schools is something we all “know” to be true, so it has impact on public policy. Together with the demonization of students and the portrayal of schools as dangerous, the flight from public education makes schools a problem to be solved. Education analyst Richard Rothstein says former vice president Richard Cheney’s idea that there was once a “former glory” of schools is part of the problem, reflecting “an American myth, repeated in every decade since the beginning of the 20th century—public schools were always better in the past than they were today. Around 1920, a professor got tired of hearing this nonsense, so he dug up the test that [19th century education reform leader] Horace Mann had administered in the 1840s and administered it to students nationwide. Of course, students in the 1920s outperformed those in the 1840s, to the pundits’ great surprise.” (Rothstein’s book The Way We Were? documents the non-existence of that golden age.) Local reporters are sometimes assigned to the schools beat, but they are rarely given the time and resources to do the job well. Cranking it out has become SOP in newsrooms. And they are always expected to sidetrack themselves to cover the latest education policy fads, including viewing with alarm our failing schools. “Only 20 years ago, the phrase was hardly uttered: ‘Failing schools’ appeared just 13 times in mainstream news accounts in January 1992, according to Nexis,” Washington Post reporter Paul Farhi recently wrote. The schools have only gotten better since then, by every reliable measure.

Garbage in,garbage out

When bad information guides governance, bad policies result. “Falsely to diagnose the trouble is to move toward the wrong remedies, and the wrong remedies will worsen the disease,” wrote journalist I.F. Stone in 1970. With journalism portraying parents pulling their children out of dangerous schools filled with psychopaths, the resulting policies are going to be flawed. During the cluster of school shootings, school systems and law enforcement around the nation bought new high tech security gear, provided for training, set up procedures for dangerous situations. Much of it was designed with information gleaned from media coverage in mind. But over time, educators and police learned that many of the premises on which they created their policies and procedures were faulty. The U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education produced a May 2002 report that discredited much of what school officials thought they “knew” about those dangerous situations. (It may have been the first time that a Secret Service investigation was needed to find out the truth about a major public policy issue that journalism bungled.) A reporter named Dave Cullen who stayed with the Columbine story for nine years— long after others had dropped it—published an influential book that found nearly every conclusion reached by journalism at the time of the tragedy was wrong. As better information emerged after the school shootings subsided, school systems redesigned the training, changed the procedures, and rewrote the plans they had


Television is a special problem. It rarely even attempts to address the nuances of education. While broadcast entities engage in hand-wringing about 24-hour news—usually after some spectacular blunder is exposed—they never change the practices that lead it into errors when the alternative is inconvenience or difficult decisions that might create competitive disadvantages. The Nieman conclusion in 1998 still applies: “There is little doubt that television coverage contributes to the public hysteria about youth crime.” Television spokespeople never use their high-publicity forums to call for ways to “solve the problems” of television. The 270,000 “superpredators” have never appeared, only the usual freakish exceptions. Nor has the exodus from public schools materialized, or the wave of violence. But they all appeared real enough in journalism, and they continue to plague education to this day. Steve Mulvenon decided not to stop cooperating with reporters on “gun in backpack disease” stories (as cartoonist Tom Toles describes them). He went on helping, giving facts and figures, providing people for reporters to interview and doing interviews himself. Sometimes, Mulvenon said, he was successful in getting some context into stories. On March 16, 2006, at Pine Middle School, a local school shooting happened. The systems that had been put in place after the late 1990s cluster worked well. Few news stories provided broader context than the day’s event. Nine years earlier, a plane had crashed on the playground at Pine Middle School. The crash did not mean that schools were now at wider risk of plane crashes. Ω

Glendale School, above, in Sparks and Huffaker School in Reno have been preserved as relics of our educational past, but yearning for a mythical golden age of schools is a mistake, experts say.

PHOTO/AMY BECK

Dungeons & Dragons could get kids in trouble with parents or schools. In Clark County, girls in two schools were arrested for writing lists of people they disliked. It should be noted that at the time these education policy myths were being formed, the correct information was available to reporters. Indeed, many of them wrote it. But it was usually in sidebar form, tucked inside newspapers or deep in newscasts that led with the most provocative information. Or it was delayed. Time magazine ran a piece (“The Perception Gap”) a year after Columbine. The freakish rarity of school violence needed to be a repeated theme in main stories. Instead, journalism converted the exceptions into the norms. Parents are fleeing from dangerous schools filled with psychopaths. Far more saleable in the journalism marketplace were stories like an inflammatory Las Vegas Review-Journal story (“Anniversary of Columbine shooting raises fears”) published as the one-year anniversary of Columbine neared. It contained plenty of emotionally loaded terms (“massacre,” “unease,” “rampage,” “amok”) suggesting that nothing about restraint had been learned in that year. The story linked minor incidents at local and outof-state schools with school shootings. “Unfortunately, the massacre mania is happening across the county,” it reported as the cluster died out. Or to bring it directly home in words parents and students must have loved, “Rumors this week had Greenspun Junior High and Green Valley High as targets of violence.” Nowhere in the 842-word story was room found for actual statistics on school violence either in Las Vegas or nationally. It was all anecdotal.

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

devised to deal with school shootings and other violence. Legislatures have been less willing to correct their mistakes—it’s a brave lawmaker who tries to repeal anti-crime laws. So students must continue living with laws based on bad information. The same kind of thing happened outside law enforcement and education circles. Community activists, acting on the scapegoats journalism provided, went after “causes” that didn’t exist. New York journalist Will Leitch wrote in refreshing fashion, “Everybody had something to say, even though none of them had the slightest idea what they were talking about. I was one of them. I suspect you were, too.” One of them was Jody Ruggiero, a Reno parent and school board member. She had already been proselytizing the notion of some kinds of music as moral evils before Columbine. After that tragedy, she quickly hopped on the bandwagon of folks who blamed the influence of Marilyn Manson music on the young killers for the massacre. She led an effort to cancel a Reno Manson concert. “I don’t care what your religion is,” she said. “This is not about censorship. This is about public safety.” Even Gov. Kenny Guinn, who in other disaster situations resisted panicky actions, reluctantly joined the effort to stop the concert. In the end, the concert was cancelled. There was one problem with all this. The two Columbine killers disliked Marilyn Manson music. The linkage between Marilyn Manson and Columbine was all in the heads of Ruggiero and her allies. That linkage of pop culture with the school shootings along with pop psychology proved to be an unending source of what had become harassment of students for their habits. Playing

p To u s e T a ic if T r e gifT c o T f l e s r u o y TreaT

% 5 7 ! F F O

Visit www.newsreview.com gifT cerTifica cerTificaTes froM resTauraNTs, Bars, cluBs, TaTToo, reTail, THeaTer, saloNs, spas, golf, VacaTioNs & More OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

13


In Rotation 16 | Art of the State 17 | Foodfinds 18 | Fi¬m 20

The crowd gathers at the 2011 Reno Block Party at Wingfield Park.

School of

BLOCK I n i t s s e c o n d ye a r, R e n o B l o c k P a r t y makes a bid to become par t of Reno’s busy summer schedule of community events BY MARVIN GONZALEZ Reno Block Party, which takes place downtown at Wingfield Park, 300 W. First St., on Saturday, June 30, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, visit www.renoblockparty.com.

14

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

There’s something Party people it’s only natural that new events about summertime So, should pop up to meet that demand, in Reno. A light shines on the which is precisely what Reno Block city that tears away the rough edges of this normally gritty municipality. Everything is crisp and vibrant. The air is clean; the waters purifying. During the winter, we’re shut in while deathly soot rains down and cloaks this city with a sticky residue. The trees disrobe and malnourish. The skies tear up. The vivacity of the city dwindles. But, every summer the spirit of this city is reborn. This city becomes restitute, and the public convenes along the banks of the Reno Ganges to mutually wash away the darkness of winter in its baptismal waters. Let New York have its solemn autumns. Summer belongs to us. During no other season is the sense of community in Reno more evident. It usually begins around Earth Day. Suddenly, humanity abounds. People take out their bikes. They hang out by the river. Music fills the air. Part of it is the natural beauty of this city, which inspires us to get out of our caves and face the elements. But part of it is also all the cool shit going on. From Riverfest to Artown to the Tour De Nez, it seems there’s always something to do in the summer months that involves us congregating en masse downtown, sitting over blankets, and sipping on refreshing libations. And, most people can agree that we live in a city where any excuse to celebrate is more than welcome.

Party, which takes place downtown at Wingfield Park on Saturday, June 30, has done. This event, though still nascent, is already growing in its second year. As Anastacia Sullivan, the spokesperson for Reno Block Party, says, the event is “growing and spreading.” In its first year, billed mainly as a musical event, Reno Block Party attracted, according to Sullivan, somewhere in the neighborhood of 5,000 people, but the organizers hope that this year that number will exponentially expand. According to Sullivan, because of a focus not only on music but also on art, they hope to attract more people. “Last year it was testing the waters, and there was a lot of music and it was a lot of fun,” she says. “And it was a surprise of how big a success it was. So this year so much has been added. I think the huge art component is really what’s different about this year. The creator and main producer of Reno Block Party, Charles Doyle of Glitter Dome, is heavily involved in Burning Man, and just as that event mixes celebration with arts and music, the idea is to do much the same with this event. “Charles [Doyle] says that Reno is a gateway to Burning Man,” says Sullivan. And, though the Reno Block Party is an event that stands on its own, its producers hope to keep much of the spirit of Burning Man, especially its


|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

RENO EVENTS CENTER 8:00PM Tickets are available at all locations, online at downtownreno.com or call 1-888-288-1833

$45 day of the event, cash only

FEATURE STORY

JUNE 28

Tickets $35 in advance

|

Saturday, June 23rd • Noon - 4pm

GREEN

Discover Wines with a View

|

Last year’s event organizers include Kahele Dunn, Kristine Boyer, Michael La Prairie, Jess Blaze Smith and Charles Doyle.

THURSDA Y

www.TahoeCityWineWalk.com

NEWS

Like any good all-day event, Reno Block Party will have two official after-parties starting at 9 p.m., one at Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, and one at the Knitting Factory, where DJs from the Osiris stage will be spinning. The organizers hope that Reno Block Party will become a regular annual event here—one of those summertime fixtures that remind us how truly wonderful life can get here in our strange little city at the feet of the Sierra. And, it seems perfectly fitting, though perhaps coincidental, that the god Osiris should play so prominently in the visual aesthetic of the event. For he is not only lord of the underworld, but the representation of rebirth—a perfect idol to watch over the renaissance of not only the season, but of our community’s cultural offerings. Ω

Buy tickets NOW & Save!

|

The goal of any block party is to bring the community together.

Stroll Downtown Tahoe City to 30+ Lakefront Tasting Locations Live Music Complimentary Wine Glass

OPINION

“The community is starting to realize that you’re more successful as an artist if you’re reaching out,” she says. “And now Reno is more integrated, symbiotic—an everyone helping each other out sort of place.” Though there is a new focus on art, the event still showcases a wide variety of local and out of town musical talent. There will be two stages: the main pavilion at Wingfield, which will have 17 acts from local fixtures like the Deadly Gallows to Los Pistoleros from London, England, as well as a stage built by Osiris Burners, an Egyptianthemed stage making its debut here before going to Burning Man, that will host 11 DJs.

and All the Charms of Downtown Tahoe City

emphasis on art and community, alive in Reno Block Party. A part of the new emphasis for this year’s event is that artists of all stripes, and not just musicians, will have an opportunity to showcase their work. Apart from the vendors that normally accompany these outdoor events, they are planning on creating a whole section devoted solely to giving local artists an opportunity to reach a diverse audience that might not normally have the opportunity to experience their creative endeavors. “One whole side of the island [at Wingfield Park] is going to be an artist village,” says Sullivan “It will feature all kinds of artists from painters to sculptors to performance artists.” The organizers of the event have invited local businesses, nonprofits and crafts dealers to set up booths to show members of the community some interesting and diverse things going on within the community. But, the organizers also hope that they can educate the community on the fact that there are exciting things taking place within the art scene here in Reno that are contributing to the growing culture that exists outside of the gambling, touristy idea that many outsiders have about Reno. “What this event, and a lot of new events going on here, are trying to get rid of the idea that Reno is all about gambling, and the little guy next to Vegas, and that we have some of the biggest arts festivals coming out of here,” says Sullivan. “You know, Reno has some of the most interesting artists and musicians, and we want to be seen as a cultural center. And, one of the things that we want is for people outside of Reno to see that.” But the goal of any block party is to bring the community together, and Sullivan feels that’s precisely what’s going on at Reno Block Party—not simply represented by the constituents that it hopes to bring together, but also with the organizers of different events that have become regular staples to life in Reno. Sullivan, who also helps organize the Earth Day event, also sees this as a sort of prelude to the monthlong Artown celebration. “It’s a good pick-up for Artown,” she says. “I don’t think that everyone thought of that when they were planning the date. But, this year Artown starts the day after, and they will be there with a booth.” She sees this as positive and encouraging trend in Reno.

TCWW_RNR62112_Layout 1 6/7/12 8:13 AM Page 1

NEXT THURSDAY!

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

15


Like a virgin The Mexican responds to a long letter about the stereotypical complexities of romancing Mexican women Dear Mexican: In anticipation of the upcoming Reconquista, I’ve decided that I need a Mexican girlfriend. I feel this will help me fit in better with our new Mexican overlords. However, Mexican ladies must be approached with particular regard to culture and customs, and that raises many questions. A well-known example of Mexican womanhood is Consuelo by Gustavo Arellano Velázquez, who wrote “Besame Mucho” when she was 16, but never gustavoa@ actually got kissed until she was 25. newsreview.com Clearly the Mexican girl is a shy, delicate, retiring flower who must be approached with restraint and tenderness. Also, there is the tradition of the dueña or chaperon, the female relative or friend who accompanies the girl during her encounters with her boyfriend. As I understand it, the dueña joins the girl in her room at her father’s hacienda as the girl talks to her mounted caballero amoroso

through the bars that cover her window. Surely, this is an accurate description of modern Mexican courtship. On the other hand, Mexican girls are spicy señoritas who dance for coins on the tables of cantinas and tempt men into sin with low-cut peasant blouses worn off the shoulder. Furthermore, when I was growing up I heard rumors of something called a Mexican Donkey Show, which somehow combined Mexicans and donkeys in ways that were never clearly explained, but which seemed ripe with possibility to my eagerly inquiring adolescent mind. In addition, it is well known that all Mexican girls carry razor blades for the purpose of defending their honor. Whether they are defending their honor against males of the hot-blooded Mexican type or of the coldly calculating Anglo type

depends on who’s telling the story and isn’t important. What matters are la mexicana’s warrior traditions and her choice of weapon. So, my intended is a young woman of virginal sluttiness, a murderously helpless naïf of worldly experience who must be treated with respect and discretion to avoid bruising her tender sensibilities, and also to prevent her from cutting off my balls.

I’ve decided that I need a Mexican girlfriend. My plan is to lull her into lowering her guard by inviting her to the local symphony when they’ve scheduled an all-Manuel Ponce night, take her out afterward and get her drunk on tequila, steal her razor blade, and declare my undying love.

This will work because it is every girl’s dream of romance to be drunk, defenseless, and at the mercy of an amorous foreigner who doesn’t speak her language. Unfortunately, even the best-laid plans may be undone by insufficient attention to detail, and in inter-cultural relationships such as this one, it is especially important not to violate the norms of Mexican courtship. My question therefore is this: Will the girl’s family supply the chaperon, or do I need to rent one for the occasion? Dear Limey: Your summation of the stereotypes surrounding Mexican mujeres? To quote your people, effen’ bloody brilliant, luv! Wish that the dueña system was still around, though—nowadays, all you need is Juanes on your iTunes, and a Mexican woman’s chonis melt off faster than ice cream on asphalt. Ω

Now HiriNg

Advertising ConsultAnt Do you know all the best places to eat or have a cocktail in Reno and Tahoe? Do you love to network and meet new people? Do you want to be on the inside of Reno’s most rockin’ paper? RN&R is now hiring a talented, experienced, selfmotivated, ambitious, and independent person for an advertising sales position. The ideal candidate must possess superior sales skills, a proven track record, and be a self-starter with the discipline to work in the field and in the office. You must have experience

with prospecting/lead generation, business-tobusiness cold calling, and superb closing skills. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business. Media sales experience in the Reno/Tahoe market as well as business relationships in the local hospitality/nightlife/restaurant industry preferred.

To read the full announcement and apply online, go to www.newsreview.com/jobs 16

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

equal oppoRTuNiTY eMploYeR

Gustavo Arellano’s column “¡Ask a Mexican!” runs every week on our website at www.newsreview.com/ reno/All?oid=310599


PHOTO/AMY BECK

Family show

From left, artists Michelle and Peter Laxalt, Kelly Peyton and Rachael Scala at the Holland Gallery.

Michelle and Peter Laxalt, Kelly Peyton, and Rachael Scala Michelle Laxalt’s sculptural installations have the stark sweetness of an artfully spilled cupby cake. Glossy ceramic flowers that almost Kris Vagner look like cracked-open hearts hang from ribbons. Cartoon-like flying fish dangle in the air between them. Her work is a little nostalgic, a little realistic and a little fantastical. It would look equally at home in a Holland Project Gallery, kid’s room as in a Tim Burton movie. Her brother Peter’s drawings have a 140 Vesta St., hosts three mini-exhibits by dash of bubbly lightheartedness, too. The young, emerging artists: attitude of his drawings is quirky macabre. In the Making; Something Honest, Anthropomorphized black-and-white critNothing Profound; and ters intertwine with household objects that Hither & Thither: A might just be alive, with a wisp of zombie Celebration of the aesthetics and a tattoo artist’s reserved dab Temporal. The shows of shading. run June 18 through July Michelle is an art student at the 6, with an artists’ reception Friday, June University of Nevada, Reno. Peter gradu22, from 7 to 9 p.m. ated this year from Reno High School. Gallery hours are Tues.They’re among the four featured artists in Fri. from 3 to 6 p.m. or by appointment. the Holland Project Gallery’s current show, which is actually three mini exhibitions, all shown together.

Since its inception in 2007, Holland Project has been championing, enabling and entertaining younger Reno artists and artgoers with exhibits, filmmaking programs, all-ages dance nights, indie craft fairs and art exhibits. In October 2011, Holland Gallery on Vesta Street became its first dedicated gallery space. “Our statement is, ‘for young people by young people,’” says Sarah Lillegard, 27, Holland Project’s arts and programming director. From the get-go, the aim of the new gallery has been to provide highschool, college-age, and 20-something artists with as professional an exhibition experience as possible. “The gallery’s just coming out of its infancy,” says Lillegard. “This is the first time the gallery’s had its own space, and that has propelled us onto another level of curating art.” Since October, she and the nine-member board have worked out a museum-like submission process, whereby they accept proposals, the committee

reviews them, and they organize exhibits based on the trends they notice. Lillegard says there’s been a lot of discussion since the gallery opened about how to offer opportunities to beginning artists while maintaining a high quality standard and keeping older artists in the fold as they pass into the “mid-career” stage. “We discussed how to balance that, so experienced artists feel it’s worthwhile and younger artists feel its accessible,” she says. She’s been an advocate for teen artists in particular. “It’s just as relevant to be showcasing high-school artists,” she says. “We always give professional consideration, no matter what age,” she adds. Like a commercial gallerist, she conducts studio visits to see how her artists’ work is pro-

gressing, produces nicelooking labels for exhibits, and sends out articulate press releases. “Regardless of who the artist is they always get the same finished treatment,” she says. “The walls are always clean. The floors are always mopped and swept. There’s always a reception.” The Laxalts’ portion of the show is called In the Making. Toward the back of the gallery, which is separated for the event into distinct spaces with modular walls, is an exhibit by recent UNR graduate Kelly Peyton, Something Honest, Nothing Profound. Her pen-and-ink drawings in thrift-store frames take on intentional incongruities—mixing cuteness with entropy, for example—with charm and precision. Back in the hallway, which serve as a gallery annex, first-time exhibitor Rachael Scala will hang her altar-like assemblages, made of rusty objects found in the desert, natural materials that reference traditional crafts such as basket making, and freshlooking dabs pf bright-colored paint. Her part of the show is titled Hither & Thither: Ω A Celebration of the Temporal.

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to

75% OFF!

Visit www.newsreview.com GIFT CERTIFICATES FROM RESTAURANTS, BARS, CLUBS, TATTOO, RETAIL, THEATER, SALONS, SPAS, GOLF, VACATIONS & MORE OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

17


A simple plan The Gas Lamp

101 E. Pueblo St., 329-5267

Tuesday: through October 9

Summit Reno Farmers’ Market 9am to 2pm

Thursday: through August 23 (Dark August 9 for HAN) Whole Foods Sparks Farmers’ Market 3pm to 8pm

Friday: through October 12

The first thing I noticed was the murals on the walls of the little building at the corner of Pueblo and Holcomb. by Dave Preston They’re colorful and look a bit like graffiti but are recognizable scenes. davep@ The wall paintings were done by Joe newsreview.com C. Rock, a local spray-can artist. Chef/owner Danny Augello commissioned the work, and Augello knows art.

PHOTO/AMY BECK

Tamarack Junction Reno Farmers’ Market 8am to 1pm

Saturday: through October 6 (Tentative) Village Reno Farmers’ Market 8am to 1pm

Saturday: through September 29

Summit Reno Farmers’ Market 9am to 2pm

Contact: Shirley at 775.746.5024 PO Box 2898 • Sparks NV

www.ShirleysFarmersMarkets.com

Gas Lamp owner and chef Danny Augello is a veteran of the kitchen.

The Gas Lamp is open Wednesday through Sunday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.

18

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

He dribbles it with a sauce of red pepper oil, black and white sesame seeds and a touch of Hoi Son. Just enough spice in the sauce to congeal the creamy avocado with the subtle, fresh fish and create a flavor profile satisfying with every bite. And delivered on the crisp, it adds another texture and a bit of salt to this perfect marriage of land and sea. Now comes the 14-ounce, grilled, center-cut pork chop ($19). Easily three inches thick and grilled to a moist, it’s a succulent, savory piece of the “other white meat” etched with grill marks and topped with a honey dijon. The skill it takes to keep a thick piece of meat moist and lined with that sweet-tart nuisance mustard atop the cooked-to-perfection loin from a smoky grill is Augello’s art. This simple cut of meat with a simple preparation delivers amazing flavor and is a commentary on the elegance of simplicity. The chef allows the food to be the focus. Gelato, sorbet and granite ($3/scoop), all house-made, are part of the sublime experience you can expect. I went for the mocha toffee, and it was rich and creamy with a nice balance of coffee and chocolate. The wine list is, again, simple. And there’s a fair assortment of microbrews, imported and domestic beers ($3.50-$4.50). The restaurant has a small by-the-glass wine offering, but it’s in keeping with the simple approach Augello takes. I went with the Running with Scissors Cabernet Sauvignon from the Central Coast ($7). The wine is a deep garnet in color with a nose of anise and currant, full-bodied with medium tannins, a black cherry and currant flavor and a smooth long finish. In cooking, simplicity is just about elements treated with the utmost care and the least amount of grandiose concoction. It’s about letting the food speak for itself and it takes a masterful hand to create simplicity. At The Gas Lamp, you’ll find a master in residence. Ω

His true art is inside the building. When you walk in, to the left is a full-service bar that seats 40, and the dinner room is to the right. An eclectic collection of tables, chairs and hutches that look like they came out of your grandmother’s house gives the room some character. It’s cozy, holds 50, and the polite wait staff makes you feel welcome. Augello is a veteran in the kitchen. He opened a little more than three and a half years ago. He’s a graduate of the renowned California Culinary Institute in San Francisco and before moving to Reno, spent the better part of a decade at Sam’s, a legendary burger and seafood establishment on the Tiburon waterfront. His sister Debbie is at his side, and she’s a great pastry chef in her own right. It’s not a big menu, and Augello changes it to highlight seasonal foods. It lists First, Second and Third to separate appetizers ($5$9.50) from soup and salads ($5-$16), and entrées ($10-$23). The offerings are a la carte. To start, I went with the ahi tuna tartare served over a molded, chopped avocados with wonton crisps ($9.50).


$5 GYRrOi Mon-F

GRAND OPENING

w it ho ut fr ie s

pe r pe rs on on e co up on EX P: 7/ 6/ 12

TIGHT WAD TUESDAYS

th A I sP I c E E xP REss

10

10

11

formEr ownErS of Thai SpicE kiTchEn in carSon ciTy arE now in rEno aT Thai SpicE ExprESS!

10

11

11

11

Beer at a bargain.

10 10

W ES

T STREET MARKET

10

thAI sPIcE

10

10

10

148 West Street 775-284-3678

10

nikosgreekkitchen.com

3004 kietzke lane (775) 825–8399 Mon – Sat 11aM–9pM • Sun 11:30aM–8pM www.ThaiSpiceExpress.com

10

ExPREss

10

10

10

10

All pints priced for the penny-pincher. ĸĸĸĸ0RVWSLQWVDUHDPHDVO\$ĸĸĸĸ

WIN FREE PREMIUM BASEBALL TICKETS! Drop a card in our raffle to catch

every week while stillWE in season EVERY TUESDAY UNTIL GO BROKE {Ladies, don’t come here looking for a sugar daddy.}

our home plate seats!

FOOD SPECIALS • DRINK SPECIALS

Reno

Sparks

180 East 1st St. • Reno 89501

5525 S. Virginia St. 775.284.7711

846 Victorian Ave. 775.355.7711

(on the corner of Lake and 1st St.)

(775) 324-3473 www.menwieldingfire.com

Dining out week? this

Come to JB’s A Casual Experience with a fine dining flair

Dining out week? this

Check out these local favorites!

greatbasinbrewingco.com

Dining out week? this

INTRODUCING LUNCHES Thur–Sat · 11–2

DINNER SERVED TUE–SAT 5pm–close

Experience our $35 Prix Fixe menu which includes a starter, entree + dessert

Check out these local favorites!

Check out these local favorites!

Outside Seating Available Jazz Pianist Fri + Sat Try our new dessert truffle “The Nipples of Venice” with a glass of Port

50 N. Sierra St., Reno • 323-1944 • Tues-Sat 4pm-10pm Banner Award for Best Designed Restaurant in a Commercial Building 2011 OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

19


WIN TICKETS, DINNER AND A MEET & GREET WITH THE

MESS FEST AT THE KNITTING FACTORY, RENO ON JULY 9TH!

FEATURING PRIMA DONNA, ADAM BONES, WARNER DRIVE & ACIDIC

Wes side story Moonrise Kingdom Hey, all of you critics calling for director Wes Anderson to change his style and make movies differently, I am at this moment asking you to shut the hell up. He has a signature style all his own, and I couldn’t love it more. All you haters can go watch some Michael Bay films. As for Moonrise Kingdom, Anderson’s return to live action after the wonderful Fantastic Mr. Fox, we get the most “Wes Anderson” of all the Wes Anderson movies. by It’s also one of the year’s best films. Bob Grimm Every shot in this film is seen through Anderson’s abstract, surreal, just plain odd bgrimm@ newsreview.com eye, and the way he views the world remains highly entertaining. Co-written with Roman Coppola, it contains all of the Anderson signatures: Odd musical choices, tableau shot setups, and the trademark slowmotion cast walk. Funny, I just want to jump into the screen when Michael Bay does his slow motion cast walks. I want to jump into the screen and trip all of the cast members being bathed in the obnoxious entity that is the Bay camera.

5

WIN S T E K C TI

“This new RN&R cover story is fantastic!”

TO ENTER:

• Send an e-mail with “MESS FEST” in the subject line to contest@newsreview.com. • Include your full name, birth date and day phone. All entries must be received by Sunday, July 1st. Winner will be notified by phone and e-mail on Monday, July 2nd. 20

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

Yet, whenever Anderson does the same thing, I can’t get enough of it. I love watching his casts walk in slow motion! The story here is set in 1965, where Sam the Khaki Scout (newcomer Jared Gilman) has flown the coop during a camping expedition, much to the worry of Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton, in his funniest performance yet). Sam runs away with Suzy (Kara Hayward, also a newcomer), and they have themselves a romantic couple of days while parents and authority figures frantically search for them.

1

2

3

POOR

FAIR

GOOD

4 VERY GOOD

5 EXCELLENT

The adolescent puppy love story is treated with the sort of storybook grace one might expect from Anderson. Sam and Suzy’s dance in their underwear on the beach is a thing to behold, as is their courageous stand against a pack of Khaki Scouts looking to capture the missing duo and return them to Scout Master Ward. The aftermath of the Khaki Scout attack is classic Anderson. Among the authority figures are Walt and Laura Bishop (Bill Murray and Frances McDormand), Suzy’s messed-up parents. Murray is always at his best in the land of Anderson, and this film is no exception. Nobody plays comically cranky and confused like Murray. McDormand has a bathroom scene with Hayward that might be her best piece of acting since Fargo. There’s also Bruce Willis as a sympathetic and sad police officer heading up the search for the children. Willis, an Anderson firsttimer, has a nice return to grace after a bad streak that included Cop Out and some straight-to-video fare. Norton kills it as the bythe-numbers scoutmaster who, despite all of his efforts to earnestly take care of his kids and look out for their best interests, often has a lit cigarette hanging out of his mouth while just a few feet away from them. There are many moments in this movie that will survive as my favorites of 2012. Chief among them would be when one of the Khaki Scouts has a change of heart while hanging in their tree house, delivering a rousing speech to his fellow scouts despite the fact that a big chunk of their shelter disengages and collapses during his delivery. It’s just one of those great moments that only Anderson could come up with. And let it be said that no movie since Caddyshack has used the dreaded lightning strike with such comedic success. If you aren’t an Anderson fan, this isn’t the movie that will put you over the top with his stuff. If you are an Anderson fan, prepare to fall madly in love with a movie. So, please Mr. Anderson, ignore all the dummies asking you to make a Wes Anderson movie that isn’t a Wes Anderson movie. Your style is yours all alone, and if you were to diverge from it, I just might cry for all the wrong reasons at the movie theater. Ω


The Avengers

5

Everything good about the last bunch of Marvel superhero movies comes together for one massive, excessively entertaining party. Director Joss Whedon hits all the right notes as Captain America (Chris Evans), Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and the Hulk (newbie Mark Ruffalo) all get equal time in this well balanced, often funny, and completely satisfying cinematic experience. I wasn’t sure if they would pull this off, but they did, with Loki (Tom Hiddleston) once again bringing the fun as the villain. Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) contribute mightily to the process, as does Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). Good luck to all the rest of the summer movies in trying to top this one’s fun factor. And let it be said that this contains the best Hulk action put to film ever! Joss Whedon is a god.

Hysteria

2

This film tells the story of Mortimer Granville (Hugh Dancy) and his participation in the invention of the first vibrator as a means of curing female “hysteria” in the late 1800s. Fed up with working for doctors who still peddle leeches and don’t believe in germs, Granville goes to work for Dr. Robert Dalrymple (Jonathan Pryce), who basically runs a clinic that gets women off using his hands. When Granville no longer can cure his patients because of hand cramps, he’s dismissed, only to return when his friend Edmund St. JohnSmythe (Rupert Everett) converts his electric feather duster into, essentially, a sex toy. Maggie Gyllenhaal stars as Charlotte Dalrymple, the doctor’s daughter and rebel working to help the poor and occasionally punch cops in the face. The film has an uninteresting romance between her and Granville. Things get off to a funny and spirited start, but it peters out in the end, culminating with a courtroom drama that feels stale.

3

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted

The third in this franchise winds up being the best, and a decent comeback after a bland second installment. The zoo animals, still kicking it in Africa, wind up on a European tour with a circus, which gives writers Eric Darnell and Noah Baumbach the opportunity to introduce some fun new characters. These include a hoop-jumping tiger (voiced by Bryan Cranston), an evil animal control officer (Frances McDormand) and, most winningly, a dopey seal named Stefano voiced wonderfully by Martin Short. This one is a bit touched in the head, as evidenced by the “Circus Afro” sequence featured in the advertising campaign. Darnell and Baumbach write good jokes that will keep both the adults and children laughing. Stars the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, David Schwimmer and Jada Pinkett Smith.

3

Men in Black III

It’s been nearly a decade since the last chapter in the Men in Black series, something I find a little shocking. The franchise has been a cash cow, and I expected to see one every four or five years. We should be up to Men in Black V or VI by now. MIB III is a return to form in some ways. The effects are much better than they were in MIB II. Tommy Lee Jones, as Agent K, mentally checked out of this series after the first one, and he has a reduced role in this chapter. Most of the heavy lifting in this installment is handled by the capable, talented egomaniac Will Smith. His Agent J is still wisecracking with the best of them, and must travel back in time to stop a hideous alien monster (Jemaine Clement) from killing K and erasing him from history. The younger K is played hilariously by a deadpan Josh Brolin, who totally captures the essence of Tommy Lee Jones. Goes a little crazy toward the end, but overall it’s a good time.

Reno Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

4

Prometheus

3

Rock of Ages

3

Snow White and the Huntsman

2

That’s My Boy

In this prequel to his own Alien, director Ridley Scott explores all new angles in his monster universe via eye-popping 3-D visuals and intense storytelling. When scientists discover cave drawings that appear to be superior alien intelligence inviting us for a visit, an exploratory space mission travels to a distant galaxy in search of our origins. What they find involves tentacles, slime, gnarly selfadministered operations and general despair. Noomi Rapace takes on the female heroine role, with Charlize Theron along for the ride as a mysterious mission commander. Best of all is Michael Fassbender as David, a strange android who models himself after Peter O’Toole. With this, Scott proves that he is still a master of the sci-fi genre, a genre he hasn’t visited since his 1982 Blade Runner —he’s rumored to be working on a sequel to that classic, as well. The ending of this one, hopefully, paves the way for another chapter—a chapter I sincerely hope Scott is involved in. The hit Broadway play featuring ’80s hair rock comes to the big screen courtesy of director Adam Shankman (Hairspray) and the results are a mixed bag. But one of the things in that bag would be Tom Cruise as jaded rock star Stacee Jaxx, a role that affords Mr. Cruise the opportunity to sing, and sing well. He belts out songs like “Pour Some Sugar on Me” and “Wanted Dead or Alive” with such authority, it’s a wonder we haven’t heard this guy singing sooner. Julianne Hough is so-so in your typical “girl moves to the big city to make it big” role. Other members of the cast, including Alec Baldwin, Russell Brand and Catherine ZetaJones all have some fun singing crap songs. The movie is overlong, and not too bright, yet enjoyable whenever Cruise takes over. It’s sort of worth seeing for him. The 347th Snow White movie this year is actually a fairly decent one, with Kristen Stewart doing a fine job as the title character and Chris Hemsworth contributing nicely as the ax-wielding Hunstman. Best of all the cast is Charlize Theron as Ravenna, a loony queen hell-bent on staying young and eating Snow’s heart. Director Rupert Sanders puts together a swell visual movie, especially in the way he creates dwarves out of actors like Nick Frost, Ian McShane, Bob Hoskins and Toby Jones. The movie is quite good when it features Snow White running around in various enchanted forests, though not so much in the final act, where it becomes a weird Joan of Arc movie. The last act feels tacked on, like it belongs on another film. Still, Stewart is quite winning here and Theron is a bona fide scene-stealer. I’ve been hating—vehemently hating— Adam Sandler’s broad comedies of late. Jack and Jill, Grown Ups, Just Go with It and Bedtime Stories all blew. Funny People was great, but that wasn’t a Sandler vehicle. It worked because Judd Apatow was at the helm. Watching Sandler’s latest, in which he plays a former child star who got his teacher pregnant, I found myself almost liking it. It’s bad, but it’s almost good-bad in a Billy Madison sort of way. I’ve really been longing for the days when I could go to a Sandler film, shut my brain off, and revel in how creatively and comically stupid it could be. Andy Samberg stars as Sandler’s son, and jokes about whacking off to grandmas, pants shitting and incest ensue. There are some solid laughs, but a lot of duds. Will Sandler ever get his dumb comedy mojo back? He’s currently working on Grown Ups 2, so the future is bleak.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

|

FEATURE STORY

|

Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

21


ine u n e G

Northern Nevada Special wedding gifts Home Accessories Unique Card Collection European Soap Collection

Reno HydRo in-stoRe lowpRiCe guaRantee! Huge seleCtion HelpFul & FRiendly staFF

50% off many Home Accessories all summer 46 W. First St. Reno 324 –1936 Tues thru Sat 11 – 6

hands down reno’s best tattoo shop

We have unbelievable light package specials & sales all day, everyday!

775.284.8700 www.RenoHydro.com

• PRIVATE ROOMS • CUSTOMER FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE • WALK-INS ALWAYS WELCOME

5635 Riggins Ct., #21

{742 MILL ST. / 775.324.2223 } MENTION THIS AD FOR A 10% DISCOUNT

East on Neil Rd. exit from 395. 1/2 mi. R on Meadow Wood Ln, 1st R on Riggins Ct.

Project1

5/11/10

3:02 PM

Page 1

WE ARE MOVING TO MIDTOWN! New store opens June 1! Kietzke store open through end of November.

Buy, Sell or Trade! CD's, DVD's, LP's + VHS

822 S. Virginia (opens 6/1)

9fY:Xiifccfe//%.=DBLEI Big Bands, Blues, Ballads & Broadway

Tune in two nights a week ... for music like it used to be. The Music of America — Wednesdays 7:00 - 9:00 pm Club 88 — Sundays 6:00 - 8:00 pm KUNR is your longtime, local public radio station, broadcasting from the University of Nevada, Reno since 1963 22   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 21, 2012


Irish eyes Cíana Cíana is an Irish word meaning roughly “distance and space,” particularly the distance and space encountered on a long, by Brad Bynum and perhaps lonely, journey, like driving Nevada’s famed stretch of bradb@ Highway 50. newsreview.com “It’s a name that seemed to fit in Nevada,” says Tina Carlsen, the fiddle player for the musical group Cíana, a band specializing in traditional Irish music. PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

The Carson Valley-based trio consists of Carlsen and husband and wife Joe and Kathy Bly. Joe plays whistles and flutes, and Kathy plays guitar and octave mandolin—a larger version of the familiar instrument that’s pitched an octave lower. Carlsen and Joe both sing, though the groups’ repertoire is split between instrumental tunes and vocal-led songs. “One of the biggest things about Irish traditional music is that we’ve been carrying some of these tunes since the 1600s,” says Joe. Not all of the group’s tunes are 400 years old—or Irish. Some are Scottish or French-Canadian, and some are fairly contemporary, though all the tunes are in traditional Celtic styles. “We do all traditional tunes, though some were only written 30 years ago,” says Joe, with a laugh. The group’s instrumental tunes Cíana’s record release party, with the Blarney move with toe-tapping bounce. Band, is Friday, June 22, Kathy’s guitar and mandolin playing at Ceol Irish Pub, 539 S. provides a rhythmic center, and the Virginia St., at 9 p.m. fiddle, whistle and flute lines provide catchy, intertwining melodies. The vocal songs, in contrast, tend toward melancholy. Joe sings “May Morning Dew,” for example, in the traditional, unaccompanied sean-nós style. He credits the melancholic Kathy Bly, Joe Bly and Tina Carlsen are the traditional Irish trio Ciana.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

underpinnings to the music to some of the social context of the music. “Irish history is one misery after another,” he says. The group’s new self-titled debut album features one original song, “Back Home to Athenry,” a response to traditional song “Fields of Athenry” co-written by Joe and Patrick Moriarty, and sung by Carlsen. The Blys connected with Carlsen two years ago, during Irish music sessions throughout the region. These sessions are informal gatherings of musicians, picking and playing traditional tunes. “The difference between a bluegrass jam session and an Irish session is that, at the Irish session, you have to know the tune,” says Joe. Bluegrass jams can be competitive, with each musician trying to outperform the others with better, faster solos. Irish sessions are more ensemble-oriented. Ceol Irish Pub hosts a session every Tuesday night from 7 to 10 p.m. “Ceol’s been really great about supporting Irish traditional music,” says Joe. The pub hosts Cíana’s record release party for the new album on June 22. In contrast to the Tuesday night sessions, the group will be presenting carefully rehearsed sets of music. “The sessions are for the musicians; the band performances are for the audience,” says Kathy. She says some traditionalists object to the use of guitar in traditional Irish music because the instrument didn’t exist when many of the tunes were written, but it’s an accessible and practical instrument. She uses an open tuning and a capo to create some of the harmonic drones of the traditional music. Each of the musicians came to Irish traditional music in different ways. “My family came over during the famine in the horrible coffin ships,” says Joe. He grew up with the music, sung in the house by his mother and on records by groups like the Clancy Brothers and the Dubliners. Carlsen and Kathy both connected with the music later in life. Kathy, a classically trained musician, didn’t appreciate the music until after she and Joe were married. “I thought it was godawful,” she says. “It made no sense to me whatsoever.” Then, one day, she found herself humming the tunes, and it clicked. Ω

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

23


3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

THURSDAY 6/21

FRIDAY 6/22

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Jason King Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Matty T. Blues Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Seedless 10DenC, Days 11, Johnny McLaughlin, Bill Hill, 8:30pm, no cover

Nuke Vegas, Strangeworld, ViennA, 7pm, $10, $12

THE ALLEY

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

SATURDAY 6/23

BAR-M-BAR

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

Bike Night Blues Jam, 7pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

Jason King Band

COMMROW

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Comedy

Deja Vu, 9:30pm, $5

Ciana, Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

Brendan Desmond, 9pm, no cover

1) Lil’ Rob, Mr. Knightowl, Ms. Krazie, Brownboy, Proper Dos, 8pm, $23-$40 2) Blues Callin’ Band, 6:30pm, no cover

J.J. von Briesen, 6pm, no cover

George Souza, 6pm, no cover

George Souza, 6pm, no cover

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Dust on the Bottle, 9:30pm, no cover

Flesh Hammers, The Wisenheimers, Up Against It, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Phil, 9pm, no cover

1) XM Fredie, 9pm, no cover

3) Rick Hammond Blues Band, 9pm, $5, no cover charge for women

3) Jason King Band, 7pm, Down Beat Funk, 10pm, $5 men, no cover charge for women

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

FREIGHT HOUSE DISTRICT

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Bob Zany, Larry “Bubbles” Brown, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Tommy Savitt, Chuck Martin, W, 9pm, $25

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Dad’s LPs, 7pm, no cover

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., Modern Pets, Thee Indoors, Failing Plan B, 8pm, $5

250 Evans Ave., (775) 334-7041 1) 250 Lounge 2) Duffy’s Ale House 3) Heineken Stage

FUEGO

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Barbara Baxter, 8pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke with Phil, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, no cover Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

LovePoP!, 8pm, no cover Hammerfist, 7pm, Tu, $TBA Sunday Music Showcase, 6pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

2) Jason King Band, 7pm, W, no cover

Underten, 7:30pm, $TBA

JAVA JUNGLE

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Loud as Folk hosted by Spike McGuire, 8:30pm, W, no cover

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover

THE DAILY GRIND

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

1) Midnight Minx Summer Solstice Cabaret, 8pm, $10, $12 2) Blues Callin’ Band, 6:30pm, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Thomas Dale, Michael Blaustein, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Dave Mencarelli, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Hynopt!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16

Deja Vu, 9:30pm, $5

2) Cheap Lick, The Smokin’ Bulldogs, 8:30pm, $5

1805 W. Williams Ave., Fallon; (775) 428-5800

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8:30pm, no cover

Celtic/American Tune Session, 7pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

June 22, 9:30 p.m. 3rd Street 125 W. Third St. 323-5005

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/25-6/27

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-0806

THE BLACK TANGERINE

SUNDAY 6/24

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Custom Tattooing :: Body Piercing Clothing walk-ins welcome 11am-10pm 7 days a week

(775)786-3865

www.evolutiontattooreno.com

THESE DON’T MIX Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

24

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

Think Free


THURSDAY 6/21

FRIDAY 6/22

SATURDAY 6/23

SUNDAY 6/24

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Merkin, Middle Finger Mob, 9pm, $3

Block Party Fashion Show w/Enslave the Creation, Stabby Unicorns, 7pm, $10 donation

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Eclipse, The Novelists, 8pm, $10-$17

Barry Weaver, DJ Sean Murray, Erik Lobe, Serg Rockwell, 9pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Seks, The Crunchees, Get Shot!, Failing Plan B, 9pm, $5

NEW OASIS

Tierra Cali, Horoscopos de Durango, 9pm, $25

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

2100 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 359-4020

Sonido La Conga, 9pm, $20

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Dale Poune, 7pm, no cover

Buddy Emmer, 8pm, no cover

Tony Cataldo, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Karaoke w/Steel & the Gang, 7:30pm, no cover

Blue Haven, 8pm, no cover

318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED DOG SALOON

Open Blues Jam with Schall Adams, 7pm, no cover

Otis, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

Jay Goldfarb, 7pm, W, no cover Hillbilly Band, 8pm, M, no cover Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SAWTOOTH RIDGE CAFE

877 N. Lake Blvd., Tahoe City; (530) 583-2880

’80s Dance Party w/DJs Nasty Nate, Chuck Money, 9:30pm, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Renegade, 9:30pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Pretty Things Peep Show June 23, 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Sunday be fore publication .

VooDooDogz, 8pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RYAN’S SALOON

Tycho, Onuinu, 8pm, M, $8-$25 Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

PIZZA BARON

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/25-6/27 Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover, Thom Crowder & Friends, Modrag, 9pm, Tu, $3

Open Mic Night, 9pm, Tu, no cover Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Feather Merchants, 9pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

Dance Floor Junkies, 8pm, no cover

Transcendant, 8pm, $3

1) The Strange, Merkin, The Kanes, 8pm, no cover

1) Saving Alleya, The Reagan Years, 1) Fortunate Youth, Tatanka, The Jet Stole Home, Come Home Geoffrey, Trench War Audio, 8pm, $8, $10 6:30pm, $5-$8; no cover age 21+

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-6460

THE UNDERGROUND

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993 1) Showroom 2) Tree House Lounge

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Colin Ross, 7pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

The Kanes, Scarlet Presence, Rigorous Proof, Merkin, 9pm, no cover

Mel Wade, Liam Kyle Cahill, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Erin and The Project, 7pm, no cover

Erin and The Project, 7pm, no cover

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

Local Band Listening Party, 9pm, M, Dark Tuesdays, 9pm, Tu, DJ Ahn, 9pm, W, no cover

Groove Centric w/Cliff Notes, 8pm, no cover

Karaoke, 8pm, M, karaoke w/Steve Starr, 8pm, Tu, open mic, 8pm, W, no cover

Colin Ross, 2pm, Erika Paul Carlson, 7pm, no cover

Milton Merlos, 7pm, M, JK Trio, 7pm, Tu, Tyler Stafford, 7pm, W, no cover

Tycho June 25, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

HAPPY HOUR

OPEN 3PM DAILY

3-7pm $3 Pints, Well, Wine & Irish Coffees

WE ❤ LS!!

LOCA

2 foErTS!1! T ICK

HIS PRESENT T AL OC AD WITH L OX B E ID AT TH OFFICE

LIVE MUSIC NEVER A COVER! Friday 6/22 9PM

CIANA CD RELEASE PARTYcianamusic.com - with the -

THOMAS DALE & MICHAEL BLAUSTEIN Through June 24th

BLARNEY BAND

DAVE MENCARELLI - June 26-July 1

Saturday 6/23 9PM

BRENDAN DESMOND

SPECIAL APPEARANCE - June 29-30 ONLY from “Chelsea Lately” ALI WONG

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

TRAD TUESDAYS

Live Traditional Irish Music Sessions 7PM-10PM $3 Pints till the music stops

LEGENDARY COMEDY SINCE 1972

TUESDAY THRU SUNDAY ALL SHOWS ARE 21+ SHOWS AT 7:30PM LATE SHOWS AT 9:30PM FRIDAYS and SATURDAYS

Brought to you by:

Reno’s only connection for all things Celtic! TheIslesOnline.com

407 NORTH VIRGINIA RENO, NV 89501 www.catcharisingstar.com ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

blarneyband.com

FOODFINDS

& CeolIrishPub.com · 538 S. Virginia St, Reno · 329.5558 |

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

25


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

THURSDAY 6/21

FRIDAY 6/22

SATURDAY 6/23

SUNDAY 6/24

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/25-6/27

2) American Made Band, 8pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 4pm, Hindsight, 10pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 4pm, Hindsight, 10pm, no cover

2) Hindsight, 8pm, no cover

2) Rebekah Chase Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Escalade, 7pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, M, Tu, Vinny Messina, 6pm, W, no cover

Desert Thunder, 10pm, no cover

Desert Thunder, 10pm, no cover

Desert Thunder, 10pm, no cover

1) Albino!, 10pm, no cover 2) Andrew the Pirate, Gurbtron, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Pretty Things Peep Show, 10pm, no cover 2) Flook, Micah J, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, $19.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 8pm, $19.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, 9:30pm, $19.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, $19.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, Tu, W, $19.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Garage Boys, 10pm, W, no cover

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, $10 4) Whiskey Dawn, 9pm, no cover

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, $10 4) Whiskey Dawn, 9pm, no cover 6) Shine 2012, 6pm, $45, $55

1) Yolanda del Río, Graciela Beltran, Beatriz Adriana, B.A. Soli, 8pm, $39-$100 4) Whiskey Dawn, 9pm, no cover

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, $10

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, Tu, W, $10

2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Starship starring Mickey Thomas, 7:30pm, $34.10 2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 ; 2) Sam Fedele, 8pm, $15, live local bands, 10pm, no cover 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, DJ/dancing, 9pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 2) Sam Fedele, 8pm, $15, live local bands, 10pm, no cover 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, DJ/dancing, 9pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, no cover

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

War

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

June 23, 9 p.m. John Ascuaga’s Nugget 1100 Nugget Ave. Sparks 356-3300

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

Karaoke

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

26

|

RN&R

|

HARRAH’S RENO

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 2) Sam Fedele, 8pm, $15 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, no cover 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

2) John Dawson Band, 7pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ BG, 6pm, no cover

2) John Dawson Band, 8pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover 5) Steve Bradford, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

1) War, 9pm, $39 2) John Dawson Band, 8pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover 5) Steve Bradford, 5:30pm, DJ BG, 10pm, no cover

2) John Dawson Band, 7pm, no cover 5) Steve Bradford, 5:30pm, no cover

3) Rick Parma, 6pm, W, no cover

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

2) Doo Wah Riders, 7pm, no cover 3) Wesley Orsolic, 7pm, no cover 4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

2) Doo Wah Riders, 8pm, no cover 3) The Act, 9pm, no cover 4) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, Boombastic Beats, 10pm, $20

2) Doo Wah Riders, 8pm, no cover 3) The Act, 9pm, no cover 4) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

2) Doo Wah Riders, 7pm, no cover 3) Carolyn Dolan Duo, , no cover

2) Doo Wah Riders, 7pm, M, no cover 3) Carolyn Dolan Duo, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

2) Superlicious, 9pm, no cover

2) Superlicious, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover

2) DJ Tom, 9pm, M, DJ I, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover 3) Dudes Day, 7pm, Tu, Mix it Up!, 10pm, W, no cover

2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

JUNE 21, 2012


A benefit for

MUSIC EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

SATURDAY, JUNE 23 11AM-4PM

turner Crossing business Park, Sparks (587 Dunn Circle). if you love music and want to show support for local musicians and music in schools, please join us for a fun day!

fEATURED MUSiciANS*

Authmentis • Cold Steel band • Demention 13 • envirusment • Hollywood trashed • John frederick Machine Gun • Vendetta • Miakoda • our Devices • Pinky Polanski • Alisha Sadler Schall Adams band • Seasons of insanity • Seedless 10denc • the Porch Side Seats the Video Game Symphony • todd South and the reno Music Project • Uprising • Vienna

OTHER PARTiciPANTS:

505 Studio • Aerionx • Commrow • St. Lawrence Pizza • front row Photography • Maytan Music • Mercury Promotions Midnite rekords • Moedecker and his Cigar box Guitars • reno news & review • rock 104.5 • Shanda’s Golden ticket Sidelines Sierra Sonics • Sinful Salon • Sundance Guitar repair • the Alley • tom Gordon - imirage recording Studio • Village with Heart *there will be no live performances

For info, call : (775) 355-9494 or go to: kdot.com

FREE TO THE PUBLIC

PRESENTED BY

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

SPONSORED BY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

27


0

$2 Coors until the middle of the 5th! presented by New West Distributing, ESPN Radio 94.5 FM and Reno News & Review

THU, JUNE 28, 7:05 PM

For tickets, call 334-7000 or visit RenoAces.com 28   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 21, 2012


For Thursday, June 21 to Wednesday, June 27 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review. Listings are free, but not guaranteed. Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

GALENA VOLUNTEERS & MIXER ON THE PORCH:

4TH ANNUAL TRUCKEE CHILI COOKOFF:

its annual artisan market. Art and craft vendors will be located inside and outside of The Holland Project all day Sunday. There will be a raffle to benefit The Holland Project. Su, 6/24, 10am-5pm. Free admission. The Holland Project, 140 Vesta St., Suite 330, (775) 742-1858, www.indiereno.org.

KIDS’ DISCOVERY ROOM: Discovery Room Volunteers will open the Discovery Room three days a week during the summer months. Each week, activities will focus around a different theme, ranging from

annual outdoor sports event offers a series of mountain biking events in addition to other outdoor sporting competitions, clinics, live musical concerts and family-friendly activities. Th-Su through 6/24. Call or visit website for details, (530) 546-1019, www.adventuresportsweek.com.

DOG MOB & FAIR: In support of national Take Your Dog To Work Day, The Glenn Group will host its annual event in the company’s parking lot. Pet owners and pet lovers to help are invited to bring their dogs to this event, which includes a doggy parade, contests such as owner and dog look-a-like and best dressed dog, educational materials and representatives from Beyond Obedience and Pyramid Veterinary Hospital who will answer questions about dog care and training. F, 6/22, 11am-2pm. Free. The Glenn Group, 50 Washington St., (775) 686-7794, www.facebook.com/theglenngroupdogs.

FIELD DAY 2012: Meet and talk with members of the Sierra Nevada Amateur Radio Society. Check out their radio equipment and see what amateur radio is all about. A special “Get-On-The-Air” station will be set up so you can try ham radio yourself. Sa, 6/23, 11am-6pm. Free. Sky Tavern Ski Area Lodge, 21130 Mount Rose Highway, (775) 741-6937.

GALENA TODDLERS: MEET A RANGER: Bring your junior rangers ages 2-5 to learn all about the important role of park rangers. There will be a storytime and a visit with Galena Creek Park Ranger John Keesee. Advance registration required. Th, 6/21, 10am. $5 suggested donation per person. Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, (775) 849-4948.

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

MANSIONS ON THE BLUFF: This history walk looks at some of the most notable homes in Reno: Court, Ridge and upper California streets, home to three senators and the merchants that made early Reno “The Biggest Little City.” Reservations required. Sa, 6/23, 10amnoon. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. McCarran House, 401 Court St., (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

sporting event and draws more than 750 professional athletics competing for $500,000 in prize money. Highlights include team roping events, professional bull riding, team roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing and bronco riding, as well as kids’ activities, food, shopping and a carnival. M-Su through 6/23. $5-$25. Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, 1350 N. Wells Ave., (775) 329-3877, www.renorodeo.com.

Charles Everett Pace presents “Malcolm X: Bridge to the Islamic World.” Su, 6/24, 2pm. Free. Bethel AME Church, 2655 Rock Blvd., Sparks; Doug A. Mishler presents “A Saint and Sinner and His Times: The Chaotic 1960s and George Wallace.” M, 6/25, 1pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs; A. Theodore Kachel presents “Military Tactics and Strategies of General Robert E. Lee: The Views from Both Sides Now.” W, 6/27, 1pm; Frank X. Mullen presents “Benedict Arnold: The Making of an American Judas.” W, 6/27, 2pm. Free. Incline Village Library, 845 Alder Ave., Building A, Incline Village, (775) 784-6587, www.nevadahumanities.org.

SHINE 2012: This white dress event and benefit for the Nevada Humane Society features specialty cocktails created by Armando Rosario, food from Charlie Palmer Steak and a fashion show featuring the Humane Society’s adoptable pets. F, 6/22, 6pm. $45, $55. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (775) 8562000, www.grandsierraresort.com.

POWNING ADDITION AND LITTLE ITALY: Discover one of Reno’s earliest vernacular neighborhoods, predominantly settled by Northern Italian immigrants. Reservations required. Tu, 6/26, 6-8pm. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 925 Riverside Drive, (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

TAHOE STAR TOURS: MARS RULES THE SKY: Join star guide and poet Tony Berendsen for a unique and educational night under the stars. F, 6/22, 8pm; Sa, 6/23, 8pm; F, 6/29, 8pm. $30 adults; $15 children age 12 and younger. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784.

SUMMER SOLFEST SPIRITUAL FAMILY FESTIVAL: This campout based on The Circle Sanctuary's Pagan Spirit Gathering features classes, games and music during the day. On Friday morning there will be an opening ritual at noon and a solstice ritual in the

RENO RODEO: The 93rd annual rodeo is a Professional Rodeo Cowboys Associationsanctioned

THIS WEEK

continued on page 30

Meet some historical figures and learn a little about their lives at the 21st annual Nevada Humanities Chautauqua. The theme of this year’s event is “Saints and Sinners,” which focuses on controversial characters from America’s past. During a Chautauqua performance, a scholar in the guise of a historical figure he or she is portraying tells the audience “first-hand” accounts of incidents that occurred in that person’s life. After the monologue, the character will take questions from the audience regarding key moments in his or her life. After the question and answer session, the scholar will break character and answer questions about a subject that he or she couldn’t answer while in character. The festival kicks off with a free show on June 25 with “An Evening of Young Chautauqua: Heroes and Villains” featuring performances by members of the Great Basin Young Chautauqua program. The series continues on June 26 with A. Theodore Kachel as Robert E. Lee (pictured) and Frank X. Mullen as Benedict Arnold, on June 27 with Karen Vuranch as Mary Harris “Mother” Jones and Susan Marie Frontczak as Eleanor Roosevelt, and on June 28 with Doug A. Mishler as George Wallace and Charles Everett Pace as Malcolm X. Local musical groups perform before each show at 6 p.m., followed by the Chautauqua performance at 7 p.m., at the Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater at Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road. Tickets are $10$60. Admission is free for children age 12 and younger. Call 784-6587 or visit www.nevadahumanities.org.

Humanities and Sundance Books and Music present the annual series. Each morning during Nevada Humanities Chautauqua week, join the previous evening’s performers for a discussion of history and scholarship behind the characters. Coffee and treats available. 6/26-6/29, 7:30-9am. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

|

solstice celebration of human powered watercraft featuring “Ancient Art to State of the Art” boats, boards and paddles. Interpretive exhibits will highlight sustainable recreation, healthy foods, yoga, healing arts and environmental awareness. There will also be workshops, clinics and family entertainment. Sa, 6/23; Su, 6/24. El Dorado Beach Park, Highway 50 at Lakeview Avenue, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 318-2704, www.laketahoepaddlefestival.com.

NEVADA HUMANITIES CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS:

History comes alive

COFFEE WITH THE CHAUTAUQUANS: Nevada

NEWS

LAKE TAHOE PADDLE FESTIVAL: The festival is a

INDIE RENO ARTISAN MARKET: Indie Reno holds

ADVENTURE SPORTS WEEK TAHOE: The second

|

This walk commemorates the 15th annual United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture. Su, 6/24, 5:30pm. Free. Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 425-1171.

features barbecue, more than 40 microbreweries from around the world and two stages featuring rock and blues acts such as The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Canned Heat, the US Air Force Band “Mobility” Charlie Musselwhite, Edwin McCain, Shane Dwight, the Blues Monsters and the Jason King Band, Maxx Cabello Jr. and Rockin’ Down the Highway. F, 6/22, 128pm; Sa, 6/23, 11am-8pm. Free. Eldorado Hotel Casino, 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700, www.eldoradoreno.com.

Events

OPINION

LABYRINTH WALK & CANDLELIGHT VIGIL:

GREAT ELDORADO BBQ, BREWS AND BLUES FESTIVAL: The 17th annual street party

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., July 5, is Thursday, June 28.

The Truckee Sunrise Rotary Club’s community fundraiser includes chili tasting, entertainment, food and beverages and activities for adults and children. The area’s best chili cooks will compete for top honors in various categories. All proceeds benefit Truckee-North Tahoe programs addressing the needs of youth, economically disadvantaged and elderly. Su, 6/24, 11am-5pm. $ 10 adults; free for kids 12 and younger. Truckee River Regional Park, 10500 Brockway Road, Truckee, (530) 587-8131, www.truckeechilicookoff.org.

dinosaurs to pioneers. Regular activities include “Crafts on the Porch” on Wednesdays and story time at 11am on Fridays. W-F, 10am-1pm through 8/24. Free. Great Basin Adventure, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

The event starts with an introduction to Galena Creek Park’s volunteer program at 5pm. The mixer follows at 6pm with socializing over hors d’oeuvres and refreshments. Th, 6/21, 5pm. Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, (775) 849-4948, www.thegreatbasininstitute.org.

—Kelley Lang

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

29


continued from page 29

evening. On Saturday there will be a gratitude web ritual in the afternoon and Norse feast pig roast in the evening. On Sunday, there will be a closing ritual and re-visioning for next year. F, 6/22, 12-11:30pm; Sa, 6/23, 8am-11:30pm; Su, 6/24, 8am-4pm. $5 per night per car for locals. Washoe Lake State Park, 4855 East Lake Blvd., Carson City, (775) 722-6317, http://renomagick.com.

TAHOE CITY SOLSTICE FESTIVAL: Tahoe City Downtown Association presents its festival of summer fun featuring outdoor concerts, Tahoe City Wine Walk, Classic Car Stroll, Adventure sports competitions, clinics and more. M-Su through 6/24. Call or visit website for details, (530) 583-3348, www.visittahoecity.org.

TOUR OF THE CARSON VALLEY—BARBECUE & ICE CREAM SOCIAL: Pedal back in time on optional mileage routes taking recreational bicyclists along the eastern foot of the Sierra Nevada Mountains on former Pioneer, Pony Express,

Stagecoach and Emigrant Wagon roadways. The rides end with a barbecue and ice cream social. Su, 6/24, 8:30am. $30-$45 entry fees; $20 for barbecue and ice cream social. Mormon Station State Park, 2303 Main St., Genoa, (800) 565-2704, www.bikethewest.com.

VALHALLA ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL: The 32nd annual celebration of the arts includes musical and theatrical performances, visual art exhibits, fairs, cultural festivals and art workshops. M-Su through 9/2. Prices vary. Tallac Historic Site, Highway 89, 2.5 miles north of Highway 50, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4975, http://valhallatahoe.com.

WHOLE FOODS SPARKS FARMERS’ MARKET: The 20th annual farmers’ market returns with a family-friendly atmosphere and farmerfocused event. Th, 3-8pm through 8/2; Th, 8/16, 3-8pm; Th, 8/23, 3-8pm. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Avenue,, Sparks, (775) 7465024, www.shirleysfarmersmarkets.com.

Art ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Peaked Again. Artists Co-op of Reno features Erik Holland’s plein air paintings of Nevada mountaintops, as well as work by guest artist Patricia Sherer. Through 6/30, 11am4pm. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

CCAI COURTHOUSE GALLERY: New Crop. Capital City Arts Initiative presents its summer exhibition featuring work by Northern Nevada artists Amy Aramanda, Kaitlin Bryson, Logan Lape, Kath McGaughey, Emily Rogers and Karl Schwiesow. M-F through 9/4. Free. Inside the Carson City Courthouse, 885 E. Musser St.,Carson City, www.arts-initiative.org.

THIS WEEK

continued on page 32

Thrilla in vanilla My best friend is a guy. We have tons in common and have conversations that are lively, honest and deep. He’s basically everything I’ve ever wanted in my future husband, but he has an infatuation with Filipina women half his age. I’m 37, his age, and Caucasian. His plan is to find and marry a girl from the Philippines. In fact, he is so stuck on marrying a Filipina that he’s learning to speak Tagalog and travels to the Philippines twice a year but has yet to have anything work out. I maintain hope that he’ll eventually develop the attraction to me that I have for him and that compatibility will trump looks, because he often tells me how much he appreciates me. Am I fooling myself, or could he outgrow his Filipina fetish? If people could override their physical attractions, strip clubs could hire homely but very kind women to bare only their souls. For the price of a lap dance, they’d tell a man all about their work easing the suffering of cancer patients or nursing stray dogs back to health. Afterward, he’d go home to his hot but mean wife and do his marital duty—while fantasizing about Martha getting little Buster to a really good home. Whenever you start looking at your friend through future-husband-colored glasses, remind yourself that the guy’s learning Tagalog, and not because he calls the cable company and they say, “Press one for Tagalog.” Lust is a powerful and automatic biochemical reaction driven by sex hormones in the brain. One study by Dr. Ingrid R. Olson suggests that we appraise whom we find hot 30

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

in 13 milliseconds or less— approximately 25 to 30 times faster than an eye blink. And unfortunately, we can’t rejigger whom we lust after—any more than we can convince ourselves that something that smells like ass really smells like lily of the valley. You need to stop focusing on how you click with this guy. I also really click with my friend Debbie, but when I look at her and feel longing, it’s to ask her where she got her barrette. This means we’re well-matched as friends and hair accessory shoppers but nothing more. What you need is a guy with a you fetish—one who thinks you’re the hottest thing since he leaned back, trying to look cool for you, and burned his hand on the party host’s stove. To find that man, banish your Filipina-phile from your mind as anything more than a friend with a thing for women who aren’t you. If that’s hard to do, stop hanging out with him so much until it stops being hard. Save for meeting a fairy godmother in the supermarket and having her transform you into a 4foot-11, 18-year-old hottie from Manila, there’s only one way you’ll ever make this guy fall for you, and that’s by installing a tripwire. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

FREE!

*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

PHONE ENTERTAINMENT MEN SEEKING MEN 1-877-409-8884 Gay hot phone chat, 24/7! Talk to or meet sexy guys in your area anytime you need it. Fulfill your wildest fantasies. Private & confidential. Guys always available. 1-877-409-8884 Free to try. 18+

ADULT WEBSITES EroticEncounters.com Where Hot Girls Share their private fantasies! Instant Connections. Fast & Easy. Mutual Satisfaction Guaranteed. Exchange messages, Talk live 24/7, Private 1-on-1. Give in to Temptation, call now 1-888-700-8511.

$495, 1br, 1 BA upstairs unit in Old SW Reno residential area, 1060 Haskell Street #5 and #7, 89502 Washer/dryer in unit, gas heat, walk-in closet, dishwasher, new appliances. Large trees, close to local restaurants, shopping and bus stop. 2nd month 1/2 off with lease. Call Mike at Reno Property Management 329-7070

more rentals online

www.newsreview.com

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

ine more mind body & spirit onl

www.newsreview.com

Treat Yourself To A Massage 24hrs, 7days, outcall only. Hotels/Motels. Serving Reno, Sparks Ann: 775-329-0606

SEEKING MUSICIANS Wanted Singer / Musician for country band. 566-1000 x 117

Train for an Exciting Career in Beauty! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute of Cosmetology Reno Campus Call Now 1-877-205-4113

more items for sale online

www.newsreview.com

Music Instrument Repair Specialist in String Instrument Serivce & Repair for over 30 years. 775-225-8297

MEET LOCAL

Give in to your wildest fantasies!

SINGLES

Reno

775.323.7575

GENERAL Career Training: AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214 Help Wanted!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN)

|

Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

Attn Musicians move in specials on rehersal studios. Gate hrs 24hrs 7 days a week, Call Bergin Way Self Storage 775-322-8024

Train for a New Career in Massage or Healthcare! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute Sparks Campus 1-866-467-0094

NEWS

BULLETIN BOARD

HEALTH/PERSONALS/ MISCELLANEOUS: WERE YOU IMPLANTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEBIBRALLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? Have you had this lead replaced, capped or did you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

MUSICIAN SERVICES

SCHOOLS AND TRAINING

|

ATTORNEYS

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Think Free

Program Director KUNR 88.7 FM / Reno Public Radio, Reno, NV Open recruitment for a full-time, degreed program director (and broadcaster) with KUNR at the University of Nevada, Reno. An NPR-member station with a growing presence in the market with top-quality local news. Enjoy Lake-Tahoe’s world-class skiing and limitless year-round recreation, with Sacramento and San Francisco just a few hours away. For more details visit www.kunr.org Applications are accepted ONLY online at https://www.unrsearch.com/ postings/10936. Equal Opportunity Employer

HOT Guys! HOT Chat! HOT Fun! Try FREE! Call 888-779-2789 (AAN CAN)

OPINION

WANTED TO BUY

Feel The Sensation & Relaxation Of Massage Swedish, Deep Tissue Call David 762-7796 Office $50 Outcall $75

GREEN

Reno 775.334.6666 77 75.3 75. 5.3 .334 334 34. 4.66 4.6 666 666 66 Carson City 77 7 5.88 888 88.99 999 995 9 775.888.9995

Carson City

APARTMENT RENTALS

775.888.9100

$665-$835 mo. or pay wkly frm $185, furn/un-furn, 1&2 bdrm full apts, NO CRDT CK, pet?, pvt decks/ views 775-287-0633

FREE

For other local numbers:

1-888MegaMates

MegaMates.com TM

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

.700.6666 m mbers: 1.800 More Local Nu 18+ ww w.redhotdateline.co

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2012 PC LLC 2352

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2012 PC LLC 1944

|

775.325.3994

FREE CODE: Reno News

FREE CODE: Reno News

1-888-MegaMates FEATURE STORY

FREE

FREE to listen & reply to ads!

To Listen and Reply to Ads!

For other local numbers call

|

TRY FOR

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

31


continued from page 30

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Hither & Thither. In her first exhibition, Rachael Scala draws from her experiences as a native Nevadan to create an installation exploring the passing of time through Nevada’s seasons. With each of her four altars, Scala isolates the seasons while connecting them to the greater ebb and flow of life cycles. The opening reception is June 22, 7-9pm. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 7/6; F, 6/22, 7-9pm; Something Honest, Nothing Profound. Kelly Peyton’s newest body of work centers on the personal impact of everyday concepts, quotes and statements. Utilizing thrift store frames, pen, ink and transferred images, Peyton creates pieces that explore and share how the seemingly cliche can become intimate. The opening reception is Friday, June 22, 7-9pm. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 7/6; F, 6/22, 79pm; In the Making. Using her personal history as inspiration, University of Nevada, Reno sculptural ceramics student Michelle Laxalt creates pieces that evoke a whimsical world of interactions and child-like wonder. In almost direct contrast, Peter Laxalt’s drawing and paintings merge design and graffiti aesthetic into exaggerated figures and forms. Combined the siblings’ work shares the thread of moving the viewer from the common world into a more fantastical one. The opening reception is June 22, 7-9pm. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 7/6; F, 6/22, 7-9pm. Free. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY: End TimesPhotography Exhibit Reception. Nevada Historical Society’s curator of photography presents work that foreshadows the end of the world. Altered landscapes emphasize metaphor over reality using digital software in End Times: A Photography Exhibition by Dr. Lee P. Brumbaugh. F, 6/22, 5-7:30pm. Free. 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 688-1190.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: North Tahoe Arts June Art Exhibits. North Tahoe Arts presents Fired Up, featuring clay art by a group of five women ceramic sculptors from Auburn, Calif., in the Main Gallery. In the Corison Loft Gallery is Art & Solstice, a summer-inspired and themed exhibit featuring 2D and 3D artwork. Tu-Su, 11am-5pm through 6/25. Free. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

SHEPPARD FINE ARTS GALLERY, CHURCH FINE ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Nate Clark: LINE [repeat]. Nate Clark’s paintings examine order, structure and time as they relate to mark making. The closing reception is July 13, 6-8pm. Tu, Th, 2-6pm through 7/12;

Sa, 12-3pm through 7/7. Opens 6/23; F, 7/13, 68pm. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6658,

www.unr.edu/art.

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Nudes and Neon: Stephanie Hogen, Elaine Jason, & Candace Nicol. This three-person exhibition investigates the connection between body, light and reflections. This show combines a sense of art history with a reference to Reno’s history. M-F, 10am-5pm through 6/28. Free. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

32

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

ST. MARY’S ART CENTER: STAND. Capital City Arts Initiative and St. Mary’s Art Center present the exhibition Stand, a salute to Nevada’s Basque arborglyphs by fiber artist Lexi Boeger. The installation is the culmination of Boeger’s twoweek residency at St. Mary’s and will be in the center’s fourth floor gallery. F-Su, 11am-4pm through 7/8. Free; Historical and Art Gallery Tours, View art on display and tour this historic building, formerly known as the St. Mary Louise Hospital. F-Su, 11am-4pm through 10/28. Opens 6/24. $5 per adult; $3 per child. 55 N. “R” St., Virginia City, (775) 847-7142.

STREMMEL GALLERY: In Urban Light. Stremmel Gallery presents work by renowned watercolor artist John Saliman. Saliman’s exhibition, In Urban Light, depicts the abstract possibilities of photographic references and the atmospheric qualities resulting from the dramatic lighting found within vibrant cityscapes. There will be an opening reception on June 28, 5:30-7:30pm. M-Sa through 7/31. Opens 6/28. Free. 1400 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-0558, www.stremmelgallery.com.

TMCC MAIN ART GALLERY: Preview: Reno Open Studios. The TMCC Main Art Gallery will feature a variety of different art media hosted by Reno Open Studios. The exhibit includes oils, acrylics, watercolor, decorative gourds, jewelry, textiles, bronze, photography, woodturning, metal sculpture, glass and glass blowing, clay, printmaking and ceramics. M-F,

9am-9pm through 6/25; Sa, 9am-5pm through 6/23. Free. Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini Blvd., (775) 674-7698, www.tmcc.edu/vparts/artgalleries.

THE WEDGE CERAMICS STUDIO: Dane Austin Meier Pottery Exhibit. Meier uses the ceramic forms of antiquity as his inspiration when spinning his ceramic art into something new, altered and modern. Through 6/26, 10am-5pm. Free. 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Southwest Pottery::

From Anasazi to Zuni Selections from the Brenda and John Blom Collection, W-Su through 9/9; Arthur and Lucia Mathews: Highlights of the California Decorative Style, Tu-Su through 10/14; Gregory Euclide: Nature Out There, W-Su through 9/2; Gail Wight: Hydraphilia, W-Su through 8/26; Tim Hawkinson: Totem, W-Su through 10/7; Edward Burtynsky: Oil, W-Su through 9/23; Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-Su through 1/1; Anne Lindberg: Modal Lines, W-Su through 7/15; Andrew Rogers: Contemporary Geoglyphs, W-Su through 8/26; Art, Science, and the Arc of Inquiry: The Evolution of the Nevada Museum of Art, W-Su through 7/1. $1-$10; free for NMA members. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

Film CORAL REEF ADVENTURE: The SkyDome 8/70 largeformat film presents the real-life expedition of ocean explorers and underwater filmmakers Howard and Michele Hall as they guide viewers to the islands and waters of the South Pacific. M-Su, 1, 3, 5 & 7pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 children ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

DARK SIDE OF THE MOON: Pink Floyd’s legendary rock ’n’ roll masterpiece, is recreated in full-color HD animation with surround sound and new footage and effects. F, Sa, 8pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 kids ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812.

GAINSBOURG: A HEROIC LIFE: Artemisia Moviehouse presents a screening of Joann Sfar’s biographical film of French singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg. Tu, 6/26, 7-10pm. $7 general; $5 members, bicyclists, students. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 3379111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

STEAMPUNK MOVIE NIGHT: High Desert Steam presents a screening of the 1995 French fantasy/drama City of Lost Children, directed by Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet and starring Ron Perlman. The film follows a scientist in a surrealist society who kidnaps children to steal their dreams, hoping that they slow his aging process. This movie is rated R. Th, 6/21, 7pm. $5 donation. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 848-5550.

TALES OF THE MAYA SKIES: The full-dome digital planetarium show travels to the ancient jungles of Mexico and features the ancient complex of Chichén Itzá, the “seventh wonder of the modern world,” in a rich combination of science, culture and legend. Spanish language showing at 6pm on Wednesdays. M-Su, 12, 2, 4 & 6pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 seniors age 60 and older, children ages 3-12. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812.

Music A TASTE OF TOCCATA: TOCCATA-Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus will begin their 21-concert summer season with A Taste of TOCCATA SummerFest Kickoff. The program features returning guest artist, flutist Josue Casillas and includes works by Vivaldi, Bach and Handel. Ticket includes wine and cheese prior to concert and four-course dinner complete with champagne and wine following the concert. Th, 6/21, 5pm. $130. West Shore Cafe, 5180 W Lake Blvd., Homewood. (775) 313-9697, www.toccatatahoe.com.

A TASTE OF TOCCATA: TOCCATA-Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus’ concert features works by Vivaldi, Bach and Handel. Sa, 6/23, 7pm. $5-$35; free for youth under age 19. St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, 341 Village Blvd., Incline Village; Su, 6/24, 5pm. $5-$35; free for youth under age 19. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 313-9697.


SPEAK YOUR MIND HIP HOP ART FESTIVAL NO. 4: The fourth annual festival features performances by Mic Rob, Jelly Bread, Black Rock City Allstars, Dialect HD and others. Su, 6/24, 1-10pm. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 626-0814, www.775hiphop.com.

and the kitsch of 1950s pin-ups. F, 6/22, 9:30pm; Sa, 6/23, 9:30pm. $20 in advance, $22 day of the show. Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 762-9870, www.renotahoecomedy.com.

YOUNG CHAUTAUQUA UNDER THE TENT: Young Chautauquans perform on stage. There will be hands-on crafts activities for young people. Tu, 6/26, 9:30-11:30am; W, 6/27, 9:3011:30am. Free. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 823-6500.

WINDY HILL MUSIC FESTIVAL: Buster Blue, Jelly Bread and The Whitney Myer Band perform at this benefit concert, the official kick off to the Damonte Ranch High School Performing Arts Center. Sa, 6/23, 3pm. $25, $35. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 334-7208, www.windyhillmusicfestival.com.

Auditions HOT AUGUST NIGHTS SOCK HOP: Written and directed by Adam Whitney, this production is an original collection of songs from the ’50s and ’60s set in car culture, mid-century America. Be prepared to sing 16 bars of a song from the era. Bring sheet music in the proper key, headshot and resume. You will be asked to move and dance, so please dress appropriately. Open to men and women ages 18 an older of all ethnicities. Sa, 6/23, 1-3pm. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

Sports & fitness HERSHEY’S TRACK & FIELD GAMES: Kids ages 9 to 14 are invited to take part in the Hershey’s Track and Field Games state qualifying meet. The free program encourages physical fitness, participation and sportsmanship. First-place finishers in each age division are placed in a regional pool of finalists eligible for the North American Final to be held in Hershey, Penn. Pre-register by June 21. Sa, 6/23, 9am. Free. Northern Nevada Track Facility, Reed High School, 1350 Baring Blvd., Sparks, (775) 353-2376, www.cityofsparks.us.

RENO ACES: The minor league baseball team plays Fresno Grizzlies. W, 6/27, 7:05pm; Th, 6/28, 7:05pm; F, 6/29, 7:05pm; Sa, 6/30, 7:05pm.

      

Classes BANKRUPTCY EDUCATION CLINIC: Nevada Legal Services Inc. and Washoe Legal Services host this legal education clinic. Pre-registration requested to ensure the availability of materials. Third Th of every month, 1:303:30pm. Free. Nevada Legal Services, 654 Tahoe St., (775) 284-3491 ext. 214.

$6-$24. Reno Aces Ballpark, 250 Evans Ave., (775) 334-4700, www.renoaces.com.

Onstage HOW I LEARNED TO DRIVE: Brßka Theatre presents Paula Vogel’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama that follows the strained, sexual relationship between a young girl and her aunt’s husband, from her adolescence through her years into college and beyond. Strong language. Suggested for mature audience members age 18 and older. Th, 6/21, 8pm; F, 6/22, 8pm; Sa, 6/23, 8pm. $18 general; $16 seniors, students, military; $20 at the door. Brßka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org.

CONVERSATION CORNER: Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions ideal for non-native English speakers who want to improve their speaking skills. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that involve everyday activities. W, 4:30-6pm. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 829-7323.

FREE SELF-DEFENSE SEMINAR: Aikido of Reno hosts a self-defense seminar to help educate the community about how to stay safe. There will be a seminar for children ages 812 years old from 5pm to 5:45pm, and a seminar for teens and adults ages 13 years and up at 6pm. RSVP required. Th, 6/21, 55:45 & 6pm. Free. Aikido of Reno, 135 S. Wells Ave., (775) 337-8030, www.renoaikido.org.

ORDINARY PEOPLE: Good Luck Macbeth Theater presents this drama based on Robert Redford’s 1980 movie directorial debut. The story follows the accidental death of the older son of an affluent family and the relationships among the bitter mother, the good-natured father and the guilt-ridden younger son. F, 6/22, 7:30-9:30pm; Sa, 6/23, 7:30-9:30pm; Su, 6/24, 3-5pm. $14-$20. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.



        

SELF-HELP FORMS COMPLETION CLINIC: Nevada Legal Services offers general instructions and assistance on completing self-help forms. First Th of every month, 4:30-6:30pm;

Second W of every month, 11am-1pm; Third Th of every month, 4:30-6:30pm; Fourth W of every month, 11am-1pm. Free. Nevada Legal Services,

SUMMER SIZZLE: The Hootchy Kootchy Girls Vintage Cabaret presents its burlesque show combining the class and style of old Hollywood

      

654 Tahoe St., (775) 284-3491 ext. 214.

   

   

                                     !          "                       

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

33


+VUKVHTWT 1PTIVWT )S\LZWT 2<59`V\YSVUN[PTLSVJHSW\ISPJ YHKPVZ[H[PVUPZOVTL[V[OL/VV[HUK HSS`V\YSVUN[PTLMH]VYP[LZMYVT 579HUK9LUV7\ISPJ9HKPV :[HY[`V\Y:H[\YKH`^P[O579»Z>LLRLUK ,KP[PVUMYVT HT‹*HY;HSRH[  >HP[>HP[+VU»[;LSS4LH[ ;OL9PZR`)PZJ\P[/H`ZLLK/VV[ 1PTIV»Z1\RL1VPU[‹)S\LZ >LLRLUK(SS;OPUNZ*VUZPKLYLKH[ (7YHPYPL/VTL*VTWHUPVUWT (TLYPJHU9V\[LZH[‹1HaaWTHT

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

:H[\YKH`Z HYLH/VV[ VU2<59

BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Swans, geese

and ducks molt all of their flight feathers at once, which means they may be unable to fly for several weeks afterwards. We humans don’t do anything like that in a literal way, but we have a psychological analog: times when we shed outworn selfimages. I suspect you’re coming up on such a transition, Aries. While you’re going through it, you may want to lie low. Anything resembling flight—launching new ventures, making big decisions, embarking on great adventures—should probably be postponed until the metamorphosis is complete and your feathers grow back.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 2011 car

traffic began flowing across Jiaozhou Bay Bridge, a newly completed span that joins the city of Qingdao with the Huangdao District in China. This prodigious feat of engineering is 26.4 miles long. I nominate it to serve as your prime metaphor in the coming weeks. Picture it whenever you need a boost as you work to connect previously unlinked elements in your life. It may help inspire you to master the gritty details that’ll lead to your own monumental accomplishment.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An apple

starts growing on its tree in the spring. By early summer, it may be full size and as red as it will ever be. To the naked eye, it appears ready to eat. But it’s not. If you pluck it and bite into it, the taste probably won’t appeal to you. If you pluck it and hope it will be more delicious in a few weeks, you’ll be disappointed. So here’s the moral of the story, Gemini: For an apple to achieve its potential, it has to stay on the tree until nature has finished ripening it. Keep that lesson in mind as you deal with the urge to harvest something before it has reached its prime.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Dear Rob:

In one of your recent horoscopes, you implied that I should consider the possibility of asking for more than I’ve ever asked for before. You didn’t actually use those words, but I’m pretty sure that’s what you meant. Anyway, I want to thank you! It helped me start working up the courage to burst out of my protective and imprisoning little shell. Today I gave myself permission to learn the unknowable, figure out the inscrutable, and dream the inconceivable. — Crazy Crab.” Dear Crazy: You’re leading the way for your fellow Cancerians. The process you just described is exactly what I advise them to try in the coming weeks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Picture yourself

moving toward a building you haven’t seen before. Trust the initial image that leaps into your imagination. What type of path are you on? Concrete or dirt or brick or wood? Is it a long, winding way, or short and direct? Once you arrive at the front door, locate the key. Is it under a mat, or in your pocket or somewhere else? What does the key look like? Next, open the door and go inside to explore. Where have you arrived? See everything in detail. This is a test that has no right or wrong answers, Leo—similar to what your life is actually bringing you right now. The building you’ve envisioned represents the next phase of your destiny. The path symbolizes how you get here. The key is the capacity or knowledge you will need.

34

|

RN&R

|

JUNE 21, 2012

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the hands

of a skilled practitioner, astrology can help you determine the most favorable days to start a new project or heat up your romantic possibilities or get a tattoo of a ninja mermaid. Success is of course still quite feasible at other times, but you might find most grace and ease if you align yourself with the cosmic flow. Let’s consider, for example, the issue of you taking a vacation. According to my understanding, if you do it between now and July 23, the experiences you have will free your ass, and—hallelujah!—your mind will then gratefully follow. If you schedule your getaway for another time, you could still free your ass, but may have to toil more intensely to get your mind to join the fun.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

What is your most hateable and loveable obsession, Sagittarius? The compulsion that sometimes sabotages you and sometimes inspires you? The longing that can either fool you or make you smarter? Whatever it is, I suspect it’s beginning a transformation. Is there anything you can do to ensure that the changes it undergoes will lead you away from the hateable consequences and closer to the loveable stuff? I think there’s a lot you can do. For starters: Do a ritual—yes, an actual ceremony—in which you affirm your intention that your obsession will forever after serve your highest good and brightest integrity.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): As

someone who thrives on simple organic food and doesn’t enjoy shopping, I would not normally have lunch at a hot dog stand in a suburban mall. But that’s what I did today. Nor do I customarily read books by writers whose philosophy repels me, and yet recently I have found myself skimming through Ayn Rand’s The Virtue of Selfishness. I’ve been enjoying these acts of rebellion. They’re not directed at the targets that I usually revolt against, but rather at my own habits and comforts. I suggest you enjoy similar insurrections in the coming week, Capricorn. Rise up and overthrow your attachment to boring familiarity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

ancient Chinese book of divination known as the I Ching speaks of “catching things before they exit the gate of change.” That’s what happens when a martial artist anticipates an assailant’s movement before it happens, or when a healer corrects an imbalance in someone’s body before it becomes a full-blown symptom or illness. I see this as an important principle for you right now, Aquarius. It’s a favorable time to catch potential disturbances prior to the time they exit the gate of change. If you’re alert for pre-beginnings, you should be able to neutralize or transform brewing problems so they never become problems.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): My first poetry

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here’s my

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.

teacher suggested that it was my job as a poet to learn the names of things in the natural world. She said I should be able to identify at least 25 species of trees, 25 flowers, 25 herbs, 25 birds, and eight clouds. I have unfortunately fallen short in living up to that very modest goal, and I’ve always felt guilty about it. But it’s never too late to begin, right? In the coming weeks, I vow to correct for my dereliction of duty. I urge you to follow my lead, Virgo. Is there any soul work that you have been neglecting? Is there any part of your life’s mission that you have skipped over? Now would be an excellent time to catch up.

7YVNYHTKL[HPSZZJOLK\SLHUKZ[YLHTPUNH[R\UYVYN

testify that when a fearful image worms its way into the space behind my eyes, I sometimes let it stimulate a surge of negative emotions rather than just banish it or question whether it’s true. I’m calling this is to your attention, Libra, because in the weeks ahead you’ll have more power than usual to modulate your stream of consciousness. Have you ever seen the bumper sticker that says, “Don’t believe everything you think”? Make that your mantra.

nomination for one of the 10 Biggest Problems in the World: our refusal to control the pictures and thoughts that pop into our minds. For example, I can personally

Neurophysiologists say that singing really loudly can flush away metabolic waste from your cerebrum. I say that singing really loudly can help purge your soul of any tendency it might have to ignore its deepest promptings. I bring these ideas to your attention, Pisces, because I believe the current astrological omens are suggesting that you do some really loud singing. Washing the dirt and debris out of your brain will do wonders for your mental hygiene. And your soul could use a boost as it ramps up its wild power to pursue its most important dreams.


by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Adventurer Joe Chiappetto

The last time this fellow appeared in 15 Minutes (May 2, 2002) he was owner of the Book Gallery in Sparks. Now he runs Marina Boat Rental at the Sparks Marina (www.Sparks Marina.net, 379-4247, hours 10a.m. to 7 p.m., reservations available). We began the interview by asking about his transiency.

When I met you, you owned the Book Gallery. You went off to Asia for a year or so. You opened a comic book store in Sparks. You went off to Asia again. Now you have the boat rental. When will you decide what to do when you grow up? When I get a little older. I don’t know when it’s going to end, so I don’t have an estimate.

Do you expect to still be running the marina boats a year from now? Yes. It’s enjoyable. It’s outdoors. I mean, that’s a good enough reason right there. I always had a love of the outdoors, and I always liked boats and sunshine and exercise. I rent paddle boards as well as paddle boats.

How’s business? This is my second year, and it’s vastly improved because I went to Groupon as a promotion as well as Deal Chicken.

You used something different last year, didn’t you?

Is there an age limit?

I used Living Social last year. Unfortunately they wanted a 60/40 split instead of the typical 50/50 split. They [Groupon] advertise through email, and they offer everything at least half price. So the $30, twohour board rental turns out to be 15 and then Groupon and I split that.

So far this is a pretty windy summer. How’s it affecting you? Unfortunately, the wind has affected me, and I’ve had numerous cancellations and had to close a couple of days, especially Memorial Day. And free fishing day at the Marina was only a half day because of the wind. And yesterday and today [June 17-18] were also wind closings. With Groupon, they’re prepaid, so if they have reservations and it’s a wind day, then they just do it again in the future.

gates, what the hell is the point of having caucuses/primaries? In this same vein, there’s a new lawsuit in California that seeks to give all delegates permission to vote their conscience on the first ballot. If that suit goes anywhere, it’s basically a ticket to convention anarchy, so look for it to be quickly quashed. But it also shows the fervency factor of Ron’s supporters. If the New York Times’ latest delegate count is accurate, all this Paul talk is vapor. The Times has Romney’s delegates at 1480, with only 1144 needed to win the nomination. It lists Paul’s delegate count at 137. So it’s all over, right? The candidate himself seems to think so. In a recent e-mail to supporters, Paul wrote, “while this total is not enough to win the nomination, it puts us in a tremendous position to grow our movement and shape the future of the GOP!” But the diehards won’t die, and you gotta figure Ron loves it. Many of them are now pressing for delegates who aren’t devoted to Romney to abstain from the first

OPINION

|

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

ARTS&CULTURE

There’s a two-mile walk path around there, and somewhere along the path there’s a [marker] about how the marina was created. It tells about how deep it is and the history of it. The beach is open and people swim thereas well. They stock it with trout. There’s bass, trout and big catfish and carp there.

So what keeps you job-jumping? I’m just an adventurer. I’ve worked a lot of jobs I like, but the horizon just always seems brighter. Ω

brucev@newsreview.com

While Obama and Romney hack away at each other in an exercise that’s sure to get tedious by about tomorrow, some very earnest and committed folks are doing their best to bring protest, disruption, and maybe even full-on chaos to their party’s convention in August. Ladies and gentlemen, don’t forget about Good Ole Grampa Ron. In the latest move made by passionate Paul peeps, they just pulled the same maneuver in Iowa they recently pulled here in Nevada. That is, they showed up at the Iowa state convention this past weekend (Jun. 16) and hijacked delegates that everybody just sorta assumed would go to either Santorum, because he won the freakin’ caucus in January, or Romney, because Mitt’s now running for president. But after all the electioneering was over, it was none other then good ole Ron who copped 21 of the 25 Iowa delegates. This immediately brings to mind the question—if you can do stuff like that in terms of determining your deleNEWS

Do people know about this site once being a polluted construction pit?

∫y Bruce Van Dye

Zealotry in action

|

As long as they have a parent or guardian sign for them. You can be 14 for the paddle boats.

|

IN ROTATION

|

ballot at the convention, hoping that enough will heed that call to bring about a second ballot. If that were to happen, things could get interesting. Very interesting. Most delegates are only committed to a candidate for that first ballot. Once you go beyond Ballot Number One ... Ron Paul voted against the Iraq War, the Patriot Act and every congressional pay raise. There’s much to like about the man, certainly when compared to Romney, a poster boy for imperious and impervious plutocrats if there ever was one. There will be a three-day “Ron Fest” in Tampa right before the convention, and it’s now obvious most of those folks won’t be there hoping to just get some of Paul’s positions included in the party platform. They’ll be there with hopes of frying up some much bigger fish. I wish them the very best. Ω

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 21, 2012

|

RN&R

|

35


e h t t e g r o F ” l a e d y l i a “d Save up to 75%!

Sweetdeals is a gift certificate marketplace featuring some of the area’s sweetest businesses!

Check out some of our sweetest deals, available now! EmpirE ranch Golf coursE

ryan’s saloon & GrillE

it’s as easy as:

1

Visit the sweetdeals online marketplace at www.newsreview.com and choose from an assortment of the sweetest restaurants and goods and services businesses in the Reno/Sparks area. Forget the daily deal... we have a selection of sweet deals everyday!

2

Purchase your gift certificates at a discount! Most can be printed on-demand for use the same day using our print-at-home option.

Save up to 75% off on gift certificates at your favorite Sacramento businesses

www.newsreview.com Thank you for supporting local businesses and independent journalism

3

Redeem your gift certificates like cash at your favorite businesses. It’s that easy! These are gift certificates, not coupons, so most can be redeemed at any time. Some redemption restrictions may apply, see website for details.


R-2012-06-21  

VOLUME 18, ISSUE18 RENO’S NEWS &amp; ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY JUNE 21–27, 2012 See Musicbeat, page 23. See News, page 6. See Green, page 8. See...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you