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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . .4 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .16 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .18 Art of the State . . . . . . .19

Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .27 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .29 This Week . . . . . . . . . . .33 Free Will Astrology . . . .42 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .43 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . .43

DEPUTY

DOLLARS See News, page 6.

TEACH YOUR CHILDREN WELL See Green, page 9.

k kisses

SUMMER FLING

NADA ’NOTHER

DADA DING See Arts&Culture, page 16.

A-Z OF SUMMER

MOUNTAIN

OR MANHOLE? See Art of the State, page 19.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 17

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JUNE 14–20, 2012


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EDITOR’S NOTE

Wet and wild Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. How did everyone do with that weird freeze last week? I noticed something a little odd, but I don’t know for sure whether it’s something to implement for late-in-theseason freezes. It’s something to keep in mind, anyway. My vegetable garden sits on one edge of my yard. Wednesday is one of my watering days, so right in the middle of the freeze, my sprinklers went off. If you’ll picture a square with the sprinkler in one corner and a fan shape emanating from it, you’re picturing the frostdamage to my vegetables. The closer to the sprinkler head, the less damage. The only plant that actually died was a cucumber on the opposite corner of the box (and it was sick to begin with). The next plants closer to the sprinkler were eggplants, they took the most survivable damage. But the peppers and tomatoes that got the most water were barely damaged at all. All right, so here’s my theory. Water, when fluid, is above freezing temperature. That means, by necessity, it’s warmer than the air when the air temperature is 32 degrees Fahrenheit. That suggests two possibilities to me. First, water takes longer to reach freezing than air; maybe by slowing down the freezing process, less damage is done to the cell walls. Second, maybe ice, as opposed to frost, has some insulating properties. So anyway, in a bass-ackwards kind of Friday logic, I turned to the internet. There are lots of different theories as to why irrigating works to prevent frost damage, but most appear to deal with the slight raise in temperature or the ability of the plants to uptake moisture as quickly as the cold dry air pulls it out of them. Good to know. The world is a wondrous place. It doesn’t hurt any to try to figure out how things really work.

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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LETTERS

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

What? Another?

Gone to the dogs

Water, oh well

Re “It’s complicated” (Arts & Culture, May 24): I am writing about the RAW: Natural Born Artist movement. When not one person I asked could tell me the actual, tangible benefit of participating, why they had to pay, or where the money goes, in anything other than canned press points, I decided to investigate. What I found seems disturbing, and I’d love your newspaper to investigate more for a follow-up article, as this has all the makings of a con job. By all accounts, this event will raise almost $5,000 (17-20 artists at $200 each, plus whatever comes in through the door). It would be great to know where that money goes, how much of it stays local, or goes to actually support the participating artists. I fear that these funds, raised on the backs of our local artists and their fans, goes directly to support the salaries of a bunch of folks in Los Angeles. I shot an email to founder Heidi Luerra, telling her I was asked to write about RAW for a local blog—which at the time, I was—and received no real answers to any of my questions. In fact, when I asked again, very politely, to have some sort of percentage breakdown of where the ticket sales go—how much money stays local; how much supports the local director; and what the rest goes to fund—I received a curt email back saying RAW does not disclose financial information, followed by another email asking for my “press credentials and the name of my supervisor.” Looks like I hit a nerve. People have learned (most recently from KONY 2012 and Susan B. Komen Foundation) to ask where the money goes. If an organization has a hard time telling you where, there’s probably a reason they want that hidden. RAW: Natural Born Artists is not for artists, it’s for a few folks in bigger cities making money on the backs of hundreds of artists in smaller towns participating in their showcases. It certainly is complicated. Our artists deserve more and deserve better.

Re “The secret life of Google” (Feature story, May 24): Dogs at Google? What for? Are they going for the Third World Chic look?

Re “Dry spell” (Green, May 31): “Dry Spell” by Ashley Hennefer is a great little article. Oddly and paradoxically, given White Pine County, Clark County, et al, per the author, are in a Stage 2 “severe” drought alert, someone should have advised Nevada State Engineer Jason King before he recently ruled to allow Las Vegas to abscond with nearly 84,000 acre-feet from various above- and below-ground water sources in White Pine County! I guess Las Vegas, in light of this recent ruling, will no longer be drought stricken. Politics at its finest.

Lea Miller Reno

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Don Manning Reno

Support neighbors Re “No one’s home” (Election, June 7): Is is strange to you that the offender always has the best defense? Half a block from an elementary school, two doors down from a bus stop? What about the kids who already live in this neighborhood? Why add to the multitude of trials and tribulations that youth already have to deal with? 60 kids rotating through this house every year! Good luck selling your home! I am no expert, but I’m pretty sure that facilites like this seek solitude for a reason. Maybe for a real chance at success? Bill Winks Reno

Support children Re “No one’s home” (Election, June 7): Of course, we all recognize addiction is an illness and not a moral judgment. When doing so, we as well recognize the community supports are necessary to the health and welfare of the individuals recovering with addictions. This would be ever more prevalent for kids with dual-diagnosis. That the community can readily adapt to children and teens with dual-diagnostic needs and offer the variety of supports is fantastic! What a wonderful and knowledgeable community to be able to do what is needed for kids. It is very unfortunate when the educational level of a community is that which cannot adapt to the needs of its children, forever setting children up for failure and a lifetime of self-fulfilling prophecy in telling kids, “That is what you are, it is, and that is all you (it) will ever be!” Or, similar excuses to denying the necessary community support. Recall, “It takes a village.” Lori Santos Reno

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Photographer Amy Beck Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Brennan Collins, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

Dan Streight Reno

Missed opportunity Re “The Money Pit” (Feature story, May 31): First of all, don’t we have enough people in this highly creative town who have the ability to just make what is already there work? A massive revamp seems hardly necessary other than possibly sound and lighting, but that does not need to be state of the art for the size of that theater. It does not need to be the latest and greatest. It just needs to be a beautiful, inspiring old building with its own character and genuine talent to play in it. Secondly, I worry that the Lear will become insular and riddled with red tape and as such will be moved out of reach for people who want to create there, but are not affiliated with an established (read: exclusive) organization and face difficulties because of cost, bureaucracy or politics. What we need is a venue where local producers can create freely without the burden of thousands of dollars in venue fees. Maybe a set portion of ticket sales and bar/concessions in addition to the foundation, grants or any combination of the above to which the production has access, could pay for the venue and the production could be the focus of the organization creating it. Companies could bring their own technicians or pay for a house tech depending on what the company can afford. Some of their costs could be defrayed by service provided to the

Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Russell Moore General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Cassy Valoleti-Matu

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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theater such as light maintenance cleaning, office work, etc. throughout their rehearsal/performance schedule. That is what this community theater/nonprofit should be. It should not ever become dominated by one or another group of particular artists, and it should not cost what venues such as Wingfield Park cost to put on a show there. Especially if it is something being offered free to the public and has been sanctioned by the venue or directors of whatever event it serves (i.e. Artown). I wonder if too much money is wasted on redundancies in administration such that possibly inflated costs must be assumed by the artist or the price of ticketing. I think there are enough committed, creative people here to make the theater run very well on very little money by artists themselves with minimal oversight. Look at what a camp at Burning Man can do. Look at what community looks like in maker circles where greatness is produced on minimal budgets with nothing more than intelligence, ingenuity, commitment, willingness and minimal bureaucracy. If all the money up until now had been used with integrity, by people who did not adhere to an old and inefficient “business” model of non-profits requiring redundant and resource-sucking fulltime “directors” but instead chose people who used their positions to maximize volunteer input and minimize bureaucracy, it would be so much more alive. There would be enough to get something very cool going and sustaining that could offer a springboard to local performing art rather than the anchors we are often handed by venues through fees, undue red tape and other prohibitive obstructions to access. It almost makes me think that a self-capitalized artist co-op model might work better. That way, there is less of a chance of a drain being made by people who talk much and look good on paper, but really just create problems so they can ensure their future as “problem solvers.” We don’t need overseers, we need community theater. I believe that is what the Lears would have loved to see. Jill Marlene Reno

Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Hayley Doshay Feature story design: India Curry

JUNE 14, 2012

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RN&R

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BIG HE A SMALL H

by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25kSummer plans? Yellow SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OFSubmarine BIG HE AD)Deli, 920 Holman Way, Sparks Rafael Castellos Postal worker

Work, work, work. I don’t really have many other plans. I have a vacation coming. I have a wedding to attend.

Trevor Wolfe Diesel mechanic

Just working. I don’t have a vacation that I know of yet. I work too much. I may go to Lake Tahoe, swimming on weekends.

Pull the plug Here it is. Tuesday. We’re able to get the primary end of your life. Rather, it’s often time lost at the results in the paper (see page 7), but there won’t be height of the fun. time to analyze them before we go to press. We’d like And, dang it, it’s not easy. It seems irresponsible to to congratulate all the people who made it through the leave the smart phone at home. What if something bad primary, and offer our sympathies to the rest— happens, how do you call for help? Or how can you although a “win” in this election is like winning a race remain at the front of the pack if you don’t have that to become sacrificial lamb. So where do we turn for a laptop next to your bed wirelessly connected to the meaningful editorial? World Wide Web? And what if one of your friends Ahh, summer. The first day of the season is the spots a celebrity and posts a picture to Facebook, how last day this paper will be on the stands. We didn’t can you respond? talk about it much in our summer guide, but we have But it can be done. People did it for centuries. You an idea for how to make your summer better. In fact, can reengage with terra firma. You can still make a it may be a difficult ideal to live up new friend in a bar or at a festival. to, but following this one simple It’s like Billy Joel sang once, “I piece of advice will improve your know it’s awful hard to try and make You can reengage life this summer and for all sumlove long distance (pant, pant, mers in the future: Unplug. At least, with terra firma. pant).” You may even have some unplug a little. family members or loved ones who We’re not kidding. Try as we could use a bit of that analog world’s might, we just can’t believe 10 years connection. down the road, you’ll recall a caustic Facebook postOur arts editor compares a digital sabbatical to a ing as your best memory of Summer 2012. Do you religious Sabbath. The idea is for one day a week to imagine that creating an image with a snarky statebreak the rhythms of work life, maybe to slow down ment and a retro graphic for Pinterest is going to be or to speed up. So, that’s where you start. Take a better than taking a photo of a friend on a camping Sunday. Turn off the cell phone. Turn off the comtrip? Or an actual memory of the one that got away? puter. In fact, you can turn off any electronic tool with Our work and our digital lives frequently intrude a screen. into our real-world lives because we allow those Go outside. Preferably go somewhere with pretty things to intrude. Life is short, and every moment people in skimpy swimwear or a panoramic view. spent obsessively checking statuses, posting images, Take baby steps. or tagging yourself—often in the middle of the event If you’re careful, and you take it one step at a time, you’re there to enjoy—is like a moment stolen. And by Labor Day, you may be able to disconnect for an it’s not like cigarettes chopping a few years off the entire three-day weekend. Ω 4

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RN&R

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JUNE

14, 2012

Corey Wood Service technician

Skydiving. I’ve done it once this year. Got to do it again. You’re jumping from 14,000 feet out of a plane. It’s a huge rush.

Nicholas Good Diesel mechanic

I’m going to Hawaii. Otherwise, probably just swimming and working on my boat on weekends. I like to fish, so I have a little fishing boat.

Devon Velasquez Deli server

I plan to go camping out at Pyramid and just walking the marina with my dog. No vacation this year. Can’t afford it this year. A stay vacation this year.


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OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

For more information and online tickets visit

www.TahoeCityWineWalk.com Produced by SDBX Studio & Wild West Communications Group for the Tahoe City Downtown Association

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 14, 2012

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Small businesses pleased Owners of small businesses often feel that they are overlooked in public policy debates, that their concerns and those of large businesses are not necessarily the same and that organizations like chambers of commerce do not speak for them. Thumbtack.com, a service that helps businesses find local help, commissioned a survey from the Kauffman Foundation of small business owners around the nation. The results on feelings toward government seem to be very different from large businesses. In Nevada, responses suggest that business owners are not as worked up about regulation or taxes as some groups that say they speak for business. In area after area—the ease of starting a business, regulations, health and safety, employment and hiring, tax codes, licensing, environment, zoning and networking programs—Nevada received A or B grades. It received no C grades. Only in two areas was the state found lacking—hiring costs (other than pay) and the availability of state and local government training programs for aspiring business owners.

Whittemore indictment Once-powerful lobbyist and real estate developer Harvey Whittemore has been indicted on federal campaign finance charges and for supposedly lying to federal officials. Whittemore surrendered and pleaded not guilty before a U.S. magistrate. When the indictment came down Wednesday, a warrant was issued for Whittemore’s arrest. This may have been an effort by Looking for tips? At Sundance prosecutors to portray Books, Harvey Whittemore Whittemore negatively in the purchased a John Grisham legal public eye, because a summons is novel. the normal procedure in these kinds of cases. Whittemore declined comment but Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer issued a statement claiming that the longtime lobbyist used family members and associates “as conduits to make illegal contributions to the campaign committee of an elected member of Congress”—presumably U.S. Sen. Harry Reid. (Breuer is under fire himself for allegedly misleading Congress about wiretaps in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms scandal that may have resulted in guns reaching Mexican drug cartels. Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa said last week that Breuer should resign.) Whittemore has suffered major financial reverses in recent years as a result of the housing collapse and the recession. His lobbying activities have been limited at recent state legislative sessions, even before hard times, because he was concentrating more on his career as a developer. At last year’s Legislature, in contrast with his usual long list of lobbying clients, he registered only to represent his own law practice. This appears to be the first indictment of a Nevada lobbyist since former Boston Celtics and Ebbets Field owner Marvin Kratter was arrested for allegedly trying to bribe Assemblymember Lloyd Mann at the 1979 Nevada Legislature. Also arrested was Kratter associate Gerry Zobrist. Kratter, who successfully lobbied the Legislature to make the alleged youth drug procaine hydrochloride (AKA Gerovital) legal, was acquitted at trial. Though the Legislature approved legalization of the substance, it remains illegal under federal law. This criminal indictment against Whittemore is one of a half dozen legal actions against him. The others are civil suits.

—Dennis Myers

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JUNE 14, 2012

Public safety, private anxiety Sheriff’s deputies deal with hard times For members of the public, the thought when they hear about fewer police on the by street is likely for the safety of themDennis Myers selves and family members. But it also means that the jobs of those officers who remain after budget cuts become more dangerous. “I think what happens a lot in policing is … as calls for service come out—and depending on the number of bodies there are to handle those, depending on the priority of call— they’ll either wait longer in the hopper, if you will, and receive no response until such time that we have someone available,” said Washoe sheriff’s Sgt. Don Gil, a leader in the Washoe County Sheriff Deputies Association. “Or if it’s a higher priority call, and there’s a lot of those stacked up, usually what you’ll see is sometimes officers will maybe put themselves out there in situations that they should avoid. Obviously, we don’t encourage that. We want, you know, a minimum of two officers to our highest priority calls. But sometimes they’re waiting for some time for that second officer to get there.” Among Washoe sheriff’s deputies, there is a morale problem as a result of more of those kinds of calls. Last month, when the Washoe County Commission was about to adopt its new budget, Deputies

Association president Tim Ross issued a statement saying that “deep cuts to the Sheriff’s Office budget and other law enforcement programs have significantly reduced personnel and resources devoted to public safety. Among other things, Washoe County employs less than one patrol officer for every 1,000 residents. The Western regional average is nearly double that figure.”

“Given any comparison of agencies of like size, the pay of our deputies is last in line.” Mike Haley Washoe County sheriff Figures released by the county at the Feb. 14 Washoe County Commission show that in the 20052006 budget, 30.5 percent of county spending went to public safety. In 2011-2012 that figure was up to 37.8 percent, according to that staff report, which has aroused disbelief among the deputies.

At a banquet in a downtown hotel, Washoe County Sheriff Mike Haley stepped out to take a call.

“And then, here in 2011 they show 1,079 employees,” Gil said. “I can certainly tell you from my vantage point at the sheriff’s office, none of those employees came there. And we’ve actually [gone] down. I believe we lost 23 positions over the course of the last year or year and a half of attrition, people who retired and have not been replaced. We haven’t hired a new deputy sheriff in probably a couple of years.” The pressure of policing in a recession has made the workforce at the Washoe County Sheriff’s Department feel aggrieved and receptive to suspicion. Many of them are convinced that the county has redefined what constitutes “public safety” in order to keep the numbers up. For instance, rumors have circulated that five positions in flood control and additional spending at the Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center have been brought under the public safety label. However, the Washoe County Sheriff Deputies Association has not been able to firmly nail down whether this has, in fact, happened. “I guess if there’s a flood it would be a danger to the public, but I think it skews the public’s opinion of, are they really safer?” Gil said. “Like I said, when I hear public safety and when others hear public safety, they assume boots on the ground, police officers in the field. I don’t know how accurate, and I’m not sure how many people the county has moved in to that bigger umbrella of public safety.” When informed of the deputies’ skepticism, County Commissioner Kitty Jung said that early in the recession, to deal with agencies trying to get themselves under the public safety rubric, the Commission made a policy decision on how “public safety” would be defined, and she has assumed it was followed by the county staff. “I do remember when I first got to the commission, the one thing that we had made a policy decision was that public safety would be cut the least,” Jung said. “And then, everybody’s suddenly public safety, right? Parks and recreation could make an argument that if you don’t have clean parks, then the public isn’t safe. So we operationally defined it as, when you call 911, who shows up?” Sheriff Mike Haley was cautious about claiming the numbers have been juggled. “I don’t have any evidence that loosely described public safety projects are being pushed into our budget, like flood control,” he said. “I don’t have personal evidence, and quite frankly, it’s a very complicated envi-


Primary results percent in 11/12 you had from previous reports.” (The 37.8 percent figure, again, originated with a county staff report provided to the county commissioners.) Haley said he knows people in his department feel ground down, and he worries about the effect. “I just had a retreat today, starting with the captains and lieutenants and then we’ll move to the sergeants and then to the deputies,” he said. “The morale is high, but the frustration with pay and benefits is weighing on them and distracting them from their jobs. ... They are tired and overworked and lots of times doing multiple jobs. … The deputies’ pay is not adequate. Given any comparison of agencies of like size, the pay of our deputies is last in line. It’s a complex subject. They ought to be frustrated and they have a right to be frustrated.” Sheriff’s deputies are feeling a good deal of unease, and so are their families. One spouse said, “I keep reading that our population is going down. That’s the best news I’ve heard, because it means less crime and fewer situations … that deputies get into.” Ω

All’s well that ends well (or begins well) There is at least one benefit to having the lowest election turnout numbers in decades—19.96 percent—on by D. Brian Burghart Tuesday: The counting goes really and Dennis Myers smoothly. In fact, workers in Registrar of Voters Dan Burk’s office were practically giddy with the ease of the process: A car would arrive and pass a sealed envelope with PCMCIA cards to one of the four workers or their backup at the front table. Other critical supplies went against the back wall, then the cards went on to another room have their contents tabulated.

“It’s like gears in a machine,” said Brian Takemoto, senior technology systems developer for Washoe County. “This goes here, hits that. This goes here, hits that. This goes here, hits that. Lots of checks and balances; they’re all checking and they’re all balancing.” Even the registrar himself seemed relatively at ease. Early in the evening, he was called away from the office to help out at polling place—a worker at the Silverado poll had never broken down the station by herself, and she was nervous. Assuaging workers’ worried minds is something that only happens when the system is running flawlessly. Things were operating smoothly enough that Burk felt free to go to the field. A second benefit of the dismal turnout is it is likely to provide support for efforts by Assemblymember Pat Hickey and others to push the primary election back to autumn. What follows are figures for the top two finishers in each race. Uncontested races are not listed. Turnout figures are at the bottom.

Registrar of Voters workers, from left, geographic information systems administrator Kobe Harkins, senior deputy Cate Sali, senor deputy Heather Carmen, office temp Shari Havelka, and election certification board chairman Greg Neuweiler, accept the final envelope from Spanish Springs at 9:01 p.m. on June 12.

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

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GREEN

Nevada Assembly district 30/Republican Ken Lightfoot 1,299 / 65.08 percent Lauren Scott 427 / 21.39 percent Nevada Assembly district 40/Republican Phillip Davies 1,434 / 27.83 percent Pete Livermore 3,718 / 72.17 percent Reno Councilmember/ward 1 Jenny Brekhus 1,318 / 21.65 percent Bernie Carter 933 / 15.33 percent

RENO Councilmember at large Hillary Schieve 4,978 / 25.36 percent David Ward 3,953 / 20.14 percent

Sparks police escorted Ryan Misner into a vehicle after a four-hour standoff on Ninth Street. Misner was hiding in an attic during most of that time. Police arrived at about 6 a.m. as a result of a tip and cleared the block while they tried to talk Misner out of the building. This standoff followed an earlier one on I Street a few days earlier when police failed to locate Misner, who was wanted on a stolen vehicle charge.

NEWS

U.S. House/Democratic Samuel Koepnick 8,860 / 40.53 percent Xiomara Rodriguez 7,399 / 33.85 percent

Reno Councilmember/ward 5 Neoma Jardon 2,151 / 46.00 percent Kitty Jung 1,879 / 40.18 percent

For more detail, see statewide figures at www.silverstateelection.com and Washoeonly figures at www.co.washoe.nv.us/ voters/enresults.html

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U.S. Senate/Republican Sherry Brooks 5,353 / 5.19 percent Dean Heller 88,926 / 86.28 percent

Reno Councilmember/ward 3 Oscar Delgado 908 / 35.57 percent Cliff Young 556 / 21.78 percent

Capture

OPINION

U.S. Senate/Democratic Shelley Berkley 62,055 / 9.46 percent Nancy Price 4,208 / 5.39 percent

PHOTO/D. BRIAN BURGHART

ronment. … To me it’s [public safety] police and firefighters on the street.” He said the new budget is not to his liking, but county officials have a difficult task in a time of anemic revenues. “I think in any budget challenge that we have, everything has to do with compromise. The county has particular policies and budget approaches they’ve taken and that’s their prerogative. … The county has a right to make the decision. I don’t have to agree with that decision, and I don’t agree with it this time.” At our request, County Manager Katy Simon reviewed the 2006-2012 budgets to see if the definition of public safety spending had changed during that time. In an email message, she said it has not: “We reviewed all the adopted and final amended budgets, and there are no significant changes that would materially change the numbers from 05/06 to 11/12, except that when the final amended budget for 11/12 was filed, the change for Public Safety was from 30.5 percent of the General Fund in 2005/6 to 36.8 percent in 2011/12, vs. the 37.8

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Washoe Commission/district 1 (D) Andrew Diss 2,373 / 62.68 percent Skyler Kachurak 1,413 / 37.32 percent Washoe Commission/district 4 (R) Vaughn Hartung 2,860 / 56.87 percent Jesse Gutierrez 1,473 / 29.29 percent University regent Ron Knecht 953 / 55.28 percent Michon Mackedon 525 / 30.45 percent State school board/district 2 Donna Clontz 16,845 / 25.36 percent Dave Cook 20,255 / 30.50 percent Washoe School Board district E David Aiazzi 3,030 / 43.62 percent Diane Nicolet 2,335 / 33.61 percent Washoe school board/district A Lisa Ruggerio 5,061 / 53.19 percent Dale Richardsone 3,079 / 32.36 percent Nevada voter registration 1,058,808 Ballots cast 199,797 / 18.87 percent Washoe voter registration 217,905 Ballots cast 43,497 / 19.96 percent

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FREE WORKSHOP GREENSPACE

Got Belly Fat? Hoping you’ll someday lose weight?

Learn HOW to burn stomach fat not merely a few temporary water weight pounds Learn WHY many people EXERCISE with ZERO results Learn WHAT is really behind a resistant metabolism ONLY 2% of overweight people are successful FIND OUT WHY!

Dr. Layne Linebaugh, D.C./Alpine Wellness Center www.alpinewellnesscenter.net There will be a demonstration of the treatment and patient testimonials at the end of the workshop.

The secret to losing weight in the belly, hips and thighs begins with knowing your BODY TYPE.

Farm bill freed The Agriculture Reform, Food, and Jobs Act of 2012 had bipartisan sponsorship in the U.S. Senate, but it nearly ran afoul of an imaginary filibuster and too many amendments. The bill would cut subsidies to farmers. Only a handful of senators opposed it, including Sen. Dean Heller, most of them from the south. It was sponsored by Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow and Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts, both of whom are members of the Agriculture Committee. The act is intended to reauthorize farm programs and cut subsidies given to farmers who no longer grow crops, and according to a statement released by Sen. Harry Reid, would save “$23 billion, which will be used to reduce the deficit. ... This measure will create jobs and cut subsidies. … It includes important reforms that make farm and food stamp programs more accountable and more defensible.” The act would also cut $4.5 billion from food stamps. New York Sen. Kristen Gillibrand proposed an amendment to keep the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), as the food stamp program is now known, from being cut. In the end, the Senate voted to invoke cloture—that is, end debate and vote—and passed the bill 9-8. As expected, Reid voted yes, and Heller voted no.

Community service In late spring, Friends of Nevada Wildnerness led several volunteer groups to clean up and maintain rural areas of the state, including the Desert National Wildlife Refuge and Tom Basin. Volunteers pruned the Desert Refuge to ensure that native Nevada flowers would be able to bloom this season by removing sweet clover, an invasive species, from the Corn Creek area. Invasive species can take water and nutrients away from other plants. The refuge is located north of Las Vegas. Restoration began in Tom Basin, part of the Santa Rosa Range and located north of Winnemucca, below the Oregon border. In 2011, a fire destroyed much of the ecosystem. Volunteers planted more than a thousand plants, including Great Basin Sage, Wyoming Big Sage and bitterbrush plants. Mule deer depend on bitterbrush for sustenance during the winter, and the area is also a habitat for sage grouse.

—Ashley Hennefer

You will learn: •The basic BODY SHAPES and how hormones can distort the body-blocking weight loss even when Diet & Exercise don’t work •How the body’s FAT BURNING hormones get triggered. Find out the biggest mistake people make with exercising •Learn the 4 different causes of belly fat •How hormones affect what you crave. How Chronic Pain and SLEEPING PROBLEMS relate to your body type

6:30 – 8pm, June 21st Call (775) 657–9026 to sign up today! Limited seating • only R.S.V.P. admitted 8

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ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT Learn now to build your own passive solar cold frame at a workshop hosted by Hungry Mother Organics. A GE engineer will lead the workshop on how to easily build a passive solar cold frame. Simple design ensures maximum exposure to the sun, with exterior insulation and infared thermal film maintaining warmth throughout the cold winter nights. Workshop will be held at the HMO farmstand, 3190 Hwy 395, Minden. $10, June 16, 10 a.m. RSVP required. stacey@hungrymother.cc

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit www.facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.


PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREEN

Whether it’s raining in June or dry in December, Truckee Meadows Water Authority always values responsible water use. That’s why we encourage

Weather-Wise Watering. Lauren Gonce, right, and Urban Roots volunteer coordinator Susan Juetten stand in front of the garden’s geodesic dome.

Ecoliteracy Proper tree care begins with proper drip irrigation and Weather-Wise Watering to build a deep, strong root system.

Garden Habitat Program If summer school meant being outside, playing with bunnies and chickens, planting seeds and cooking, perhaps it wouldn’t have such a bad reputation. This week, this kind of summer school starts at Urban Roots Garden by Ashley Classrooms. Hennefer Urban Roots has had a busy year setting up its farm and class space on West Fourth Street and launching its Garden Habitat Program, a collaboraashleyh@ newsreview.com tion with schools in the Washoe County School District in which students and parents will help to establish a school garden, and teachers will use the garden to teach. The program will start officially in the fall, but Urban Roots has been planning the curriculum and logistics for more than two years, according to development coordinator Lauren Gonce. “A lot of teachers are excited at the idea of having a garden at their schools, but they are just so busy that it can become an overwhelming project,” she says. “We’ve been putting together a program that lets them use the garden with their students without having to worry about maintaining it too.” Currently, 10 schools have applied to the program, but Gonce says that they plan to accommodate more next year if the program is successful. Four schools—High Desert Montessori, Hug High, Mount Rose Elementary and Heart to Hand—are the first to be accepted. Once a school is accepted into the program, Urban Roots will survey For more the school’s site to plan for the garden, which will be led by two school information about the Garden Habitat garden coordinators—parent volunteers. Teachers will then work with Program, visit Urban Roots’ education specialists on curriculum integration. www.urgc.org/home “Teachers used to say to us, ‘It sounds great, but I just can’t take this /for-schools . on,’ but now we provide them with every resource,” says Gonce. Gonce also says much of the appeal is the link between gardening and different content areas, including science, math, social studies, physical education and culinary arts. Teachers will also have access to a blog to document their students’ progress. “A few schools have had pilot programs, and it has gone really well,” Gonce says. “Now that we have a space to test out ideas, we can better help teachers.” The Fourth Street farm space is fairly new to Urban Roots. Since March, much of the farm has been planted, including an herb spiral garden, apple trees—whose branches will eventually grow together to create a place for kids to sit underneath—and a mini-berry forest, where all berries will be edible to let kids “forage.” There’s also a bunny, two chickens and many lizards and other critters that scamper around the plants. A cooking station will be available next to a vegetable patch, and a hoop house will keep plants growing year-round. A geodesic dome and a few solar-powered offices provide covered space, and the solar panels will keep the entire operation off the grid, according to Gonce. She says that most of the structures will be plant-based, including the apple grove and an in-progress green fence made out of vines. Composting and beekeeping sections are also in the works. “It’s just a great place for kids to come and explore,” she says. “It’s really nice for anyone to be here, including adults.” Ω

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The Truckee Meadows Community Forestry Coalition provides you with resources to properly care for your trees, using the weather as your guide. For a wealth of Weather-Wise tree care tips and a list of trees for our high-desert climate visit

www.communityforestry.org

This message is brought to you by the water lovers at |

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SUMMER FLING

AH, SUMMER

A-Z OF SUMMER

kisses

ASTRONOMY , the universe above. The Fleishmann Planetarium has a full menu for any A summer, including feature movies and star pro-

BY D. BRIAN BURGHART, BRAD BYNUM, ASHLEY HENNEFER AND DENNIS MYERS

k

IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER, BUT WE HERE AT THE RN&R OFFICES STILL HAVE TO COME IN TO WORK AND PRODUCE THIS FINE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER, SO IT’S NOT ALL 24/7 FUN IN THE SUN FOR US. BUT YOU CAN BET THAT WE’LL BE OUT AND ABOUT ON THE WEEKENDS, DRINKING AND ADVENTURING AND TAKING IN THE LOCAL ART AND ENTERTAINMENT SCENE. WE’VE COMPILED AN A-Z LIST OF SUMMER ACTIVITIES FOR YOU TO REFERENCE THROUGHOUT THE NEXT FEW MONTHS. SO KICK UP YOUR FEET, STRAP ON A HARNESS OR OPEN UP ANOTHER BEER— SUMMER’S HERE.

IS FOR ASTRONOMY

grams. Just this month, dome showings began of Coral Reef Adventure and Tales of the Maya Skies. Added to those are the long running Pink Floyd’s The Wall (weekly showings) and Attack of the Space Pirates (daily). For more information, go to http://planetarium.unr.nevada.edu/ Now_Showing.html#Light .

BOWERS MANSION B , a historical place. The Bowers Mansion county park is located on Old 395 19 B miles south of Reno. (Some websites say it’s on IS FOR

OWERS

Franktown Road, but if you see the turnoff to Franktown, you’ve gone too far.) The 1860s mansion itself was built by wealthy Comstockers Lemuel and Eilley Bowers. It is surrounded by a spring-fed swimming pool, picnic areas, a playground, and the graves of the Bowers can be reached with a small hike up the hill. Some of the most interesting features were stripped from the property in an early 1970s renovation, but it remains a charming, easygoing park. More information is at www.co.washoe.nv.us/parks/parkdetails~pkid=1

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“SUMMER FLING” CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

traits of all the governors in the building and a frieze runs near the ceiling around the entire first floor. On the mall there is statuary of significant figures in state history and a memorial to fallen police.

day’s picnicking and swimming, the West End Beach is more easygoing. Donner Lake is immediately adjacent to the equally interesting pioneer lumber town of Truckee, also filled with good restaurants.

CAPITOL C , where business gets done. At one time this buildC ELEVATION ing contained offices for the executive, DONNER LAKE legislative and judicial branches. It D , that infamous , so look to the should be noted that technically, this is name. But Donner Lake’s reputa- E sky. There are peaks all around D no longer Nevada’s capitol, though tion is significantly more positive than us—Peavine, Mt. Rose, Sun Mountain, IS FOR

APITOL

IS FOR

everyone calls it that. By definition, the capitol is the structure containing the representative assemblies, and the Nevada Senate and Assembly in 1971 moved into a new structure a few hundred feet south, across the Capitol Mall. Now, one of the old legislative halls upstairs is used for large meetings and the other is a museum, and the former Supreme Court room is also a meeting room. There are por-

ONNER

IS FOR ELEVATION

that of the Donner Trail. An easier reach than most of Lake Tahoe, Donner has boating, fishing, hiking trails, public docks and a number of inns and restaurants. The original twolane U.S. 40 follows the north shore, then rises to the architecturally striking Donner Pass Bridge. The elaborate Donner Memorial State Park is on the east end of the lake, but for just a

Crystal Peak, Pond Peak. Climb some of them. Or if you are even more ambitious, climb Boundary Peak—the highest mountain in the state. Or there’s Wheeler Peak, one of the most picturesque—and it comes with the bonuses of the Lehman cavern and a grove of bristlecone pines, the second oldest living things on Earth. Mountaineering has it all over climbing a wall that was designed to be climbed.

FOUNTAINS , creating a splash. In Carson City when you F visit the capitol, walk directly across IS FOR FOUNTAINS

EVENTS

Carson Street and see the large animal fountain. In the early 20th century, a group called the National Humane Alliance donated fountains to dozens of towns around the nation for cattle, horses, dogs, cats and people. The Carson City fountain was installed in 1909. There is a large circular trough above for the largest animals, and smaller fountains closer to ground level for smaller animals. Emblems marking the location on the Lincoln Highway through Carson, but those were removed in the 1990s. In Sparks, take your children to the fountain in the plaza on C Street in front of the downtown theaters. A couple of dozen nozzles shoot streams of water up out of the sidewalk. The happy cries of children ring out all summer long. Even if you don’t have children, it’s a delight to watch.

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2012 LAKE TAHOE CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE: Lake

22ND ANNUAL HIGH SIERRA MUSIC FESTIVAL: The

Tahoe Concours d’Elegance celebrates its 40th anniversary with the Riva Aquarama as the Marque Class. A collection of 100 antique wooden boats will gather at Lake Tahoe to compete for top honors in multiple categories. In addition to the two-day show, there will be a variety of social gatherings both before and after the main event. F, 8/10, 10am-4:30pm; Sa, 8/11, 9am-4:30pm. $25$40; free for children under age 12. Sierra Boat Company, 5146 N. Lake Blvd., Carnelian Bay, (775) 851-4444, www.laketahoeconcours.com.

four-day camping and music event features performances by STS9, Railroad Earth, Galactic, Ben Harper, Built to Spill, Toots and the Maytals and others. Th-Su through 7/8. Opens 7/5. $40-$199 for weekend passes through June 28. Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds, 204 Fairground Road. Quincy, (530) 283-6272, www.highsierramusic.com.

5TH ANNUAL BEERFEST & BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL:

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The festival features live music from the nations top bluegrass bands, more than 30 local and regional breweries on tap, special children’s treats and activities and more. Sa, 7/14, 3-7pm. $30, $38. Northstar California Resort, 3001 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784, www.northstarcalifornia.com.

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AMERICAN CENTURY CHAMPIONSHIP: Charles Barkley will join Michael Jordan, Tony Romo, Aaron Rodgers, John Elway, Ray Romano and Jerry Rice and other sports and entertainment figures at the 23rd annual celebrity golf tournament. The 54-hole event includes a purse of $600,000. Proceeds will be donated to LIVESTRONG. Tu-Sa, 9am through 7/22. Opens 7/17. $15-$60; free for children age 10 and younger. Edgewood-Tahoe Golf Course, 180 Lake Parkway, Stateline, (530) 544-5050 ext. 224, www.tahoecelebritygolf.com.

ARTOWN: The annual arts celebration offers nearly 500 events, more than 100 workshops and more than 30 ongoing programs. Festival highlights include the opening night concert with the Mickey Hart Band, closing night performance by Maceo Parker, performances by Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Michael Feinstein, Chanticleer and Missoula Children’s Theatre, as well as returning festival favorites such as the World Music Series, Monday Night Music Series and Movies in the Park. M-Su through 7/31. Opens 7/1. Free for most events. Call (775) 322-1538 or visit website for details. www.renoisartown.com.

ARTS IN BLOOM FESTIVAL: The city of Sparks’ 10th annual event features a fun day of art, entertainment, food and beverages and activities for children. About 40 artist booths offer a variety of fine art, including oil paintings, watercolors, jewelry, ceramic pieces, woodwork and

GEOLOGY , that rocky subject. At the Mackay School of G Mines on the University of Nevada, IS FOR GEOLOGY

Reno campus, there is a small mining museum that is little-known even to residents. Not just a collection of rocks—though those are certainly there—it includes mining machinery, historic photographs, maps and a mock-up mine superintendent’s office. For more information, surf to www.mines.unr.edu/museum .

HOT DOGS , all you can eat. Some foods just taste better in the H summer—like the humble hot dog. The IS FOR HOT DOGS

dogs at Aces Ballpark are pretty good, though they’ll cost you an arm. And if you decide to get a beer, about all they’ve got is banana-flavored Coors Light, which will cost you a leg. (Seriously? You’ve never noticed that Coors Light tastes like banana?) If you’re of a more vegetarian persuasion, they offer tasty veggie and even vegan dogs, along with beef, turkey and pork, over at Freeman’s Natural Hotdogs, 106 California Ave., 322-3434.

ICKYI , our favorite to drink, I After a pitcher, you’ll stop and IS FOR CKY

you’ll think, This beer is the best, a great IPA, But my bladder is full, so now I pee, eh? But then I’ll want more, so please go pour us Another pitcher of Ichthyosaurus.

JAIL , where we’d not like to stay. We drink, and we drive, but Jnever the same day. Nobody likes to IS FOR JAIL

photography. Sa, 7/21. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Avenue across from John Ascuaga’s Nugget and in front of the Century Theaters, Sparks, www.cityofsparks.us.

BEST IN THE WEST NUGGET RIB COOK-OFF: Cookers from across the country compete for prizes and bragging rights to the best ribs in the West at the 24th annual rib festival. The six-day event features the Nugget World Rib Eating Championships, live entertainment on several stages, a kids’ area, arts and crafts vendors and lots of ribs with all the fixins. W, 8/29, 11am-9pm; Th, 8/30,

11am-9pm; F, 8/31, 11am-9pm; Sa, 9/1, 11am-9pm; Su, 9/2, 11am-9pm; M, 9/3, 11am-5pm. Free admission. Victorian

Square, Victorian Avenue, 14th Street to Pyramid Way, Sparks, (775) 356-3300, www.nuggetribcookoff.com.

EXPEDITION MAN: Northern Nevada’s first Ultra Distance Triathlon traverses a 194.2-mile course from South Lake

Tahoe to the Legends at Sparks Marina. Participants begin with a swim at Zephyr Cove, Lake Tahoe, followed by a challenging bike course through Carson City into Reno, culminating with three fast out-and-backs around the Sparks Marina. Sa, 8/25, 6am-noon. Visit website for details, www.expeditionman.com.

FIREWORKS 500: The off-road racing event features qualifying races, performances by the Monster Freestyle MX Team featuring X-Game and Ninja Stunt Team riders, race car displays, autograph signing and live entertainment at several locations in Reno and Sparks. On July 7, racers take to the desert at the Reno Tahoe Motorplex, off Interstate-80 Exit 32, for a 500-mile race—the longest off-road race in the United States. M-Su through 7/9. Opens 7/1. Call (702) 407-3059 or visit website for details. http://hdrarace.com.


party more than your friends here at the RN&R. If you’re out and about at an event in downtown Reno, particularly one with alcohol, you’re as like to bump into a RN&R staffer as not. So by all means, party it up this summer. But be smart and be careful. If you’re going to partake of illicit substances, know your sources and take it easy. Remember this rule: Never break more than one law at a time. Oh, and this rhyme: When you’re out drinking, remember this, please, To call up a cab, just dial seven threes.

KISSES , all hot and wet. According to some sages, lips K taste best when they’re drenched in IS FOR KISSES

sweat. Summer’s the right time for making out … on the beach, in the car, on your roof, at the park, or anywhere else—especially in public places where it will be sure to disgust, embarrass and irritate passersby. You’re already all hot and bothered. The more lascivious letters—Q, for example—might encourage a full bodice-ripping intercourse, but there’s something to be said for the small, innocent pleasure of a big, wet kiss on a hot summer day.

LAKE TAHOE L T , you’d be a fool not to go. Kind of a noL brainer. It’s summer, and one of the IS FOR

AKE

AHOE

most beautiful bodies of water on the planet is less than an hour away. Sure, you might want to uncover some hidden cultural gems, but sometimes the cliché attractions are the cliché attractions because they’re awesome. It’s deep and it’s blue, surrounded by crisp mountain air, beautiful beaches, and aromatic pine trees. For grub, we recommend T’s Mesquite Rotisserie, 901 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, 831-

2832. Those burritos would almost be worth the drive even without the gorgeous lake.

MUSIC , the Bard’s “food of love.” Locals love to comM plain about the music scene here in IS FOR MUSIC

Reno. And sure, we’re not Portland or Seattle or Austin, Tex. (Reno does however have a better music scene than Austin, Nev.) But often the people who complain the loudest are the ones who spend their Saturday nights at home playing Xbox or knitting scarves or whatever. You’ve gotten halfway through this alphabet guide now, so that probably means you’re willing to read our paper, so you probably know that the best place to find out about the musical happenings in this town every week is right here in the RN&R. Check out our weekly concert grid. Whether you’re into rock or jazz, dubstep or lieder, grindcore or easy listening, there’s something going on every week. So get off your ass.

NEIGHBORS , the people next door. Sure, you’ve had N naked dance parties on Friday nights, IS FOR NEIGHBORS

realizing a moment too late that your neighbor can see in your dining room window. And has. It’s their precious look of abject terror and embarrassment that will linger in your memory when you try to invite them over for a beer or a cognac and a Cuban. But invite them, you should. You never know when somebody’s going to have to accept delivery of that package from erowid.com.

OPEN , and maybe a case. What letter better symbolizes O summer better than the letter O? As in

GREAT ELDORADO BBQ, BREWS AND BLUES FESTIVAL: The 17th annual festival is equal

EVENTS

parts barbecue block party, microbrew-tasting event featuring more than 40 microbreweries from around the world and music festival with two stages featuring rock and blues acts such as The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Canned Heat, the U.S. Air Force Band “Mobility” Charlie Musselwhite, Edwin McCain, Shane Dwight, the Blues Monsters and the Jason King Band, Maxx Cabello Jr. and Rockin’ Down the Highway. F, 6/22, 12-8pm; Sa, 6/23, 11am8pm. Free admission. Eldorado Hotel Casino, 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700, www.eldoradoreno.com.

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GREAT INTERNATIONAL CHICKEN WING SOCIETY COOK-OFF: The 11th annual cook-off features a variety of bars and restaurants offering their version of chicken wings for “tasters” (Chicken Hawks) to taste for the awards contest. Visitors can also purchase sampler plates from each

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participating restaurant booth. The festival includes live entertainment and arts and crafts booths. F, 7/6, 10am-8pm;

Sa, 7/7, 10am-8pm; Su, 7/8, 10am-8pm.

HOT AUGUST NIGHTS: The 26th annual celebration of classic cars and rock ’n’ roll features show-n-shines, cruising, drag racing, Classic Car Auction, the Hot August Nights Swap Meet and live music and entertainment at venues across Reno, Sparks and neighboring areas. The event concludes on Aug. 12 with the parade of cars through downtown Reno. Tu-Su through 8/12. Opens 8/7. Free for most events. Call or visit website for details, (775) 356-1956, www.hotaugustnights.net.

JAZZ AND BEYOND CARSON CITY MUSIC FESTIVAL: Mile High Jazz Band Assoc. presents its annual jazz festival featuring more than 100 musicians performing at venues across Carson City. M-Su

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PYRAMID P , no finer lake. Pick your summer activity: Lizard huntP ing, check. Wakeboarding, check. IS FOR

YRAMID

Stargazing, check. Beer drinking, check. Rattlesnake hunting, scorpion searching, rock skipping, check,

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check, check. Tahoe fans aside, there is not better body of water in the region for doing all those things that fall under the heading, “Fun in the sun.” Just remember, this is tribal land, so show respect and pay your fees for day use or for camping. After all, P also stands for pokey, and that’s where you don’t want to end up.

QUICKIE , with someone you like. C’mon, what newspaper Q do you think you’re reading? People IS FOR QUICKIE

you love definitely get the longies. Here’s our idea. Grab a blanket, one of those ready to eat, complete, deepfried chicken dinners at the deli at any

“SUMMER FLING” CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

through 8/19. Opens 8/4. Free. Call or visit

7/13. $20-$85. Sand Harbor State

website for details, (775) 883-4154, www.jazzcarsoncity.com.

Park, 2005 Highway 28, Incline Village, (775) 832-1616, http://laketahoeshakespeare.com.

LAKE TAHOE REGGAE FESTIVAL: The all-day

Free. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (775) 233-4757, www.gicws.com.

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open a beer, open-air sex, or open your heart. There are many art openings this summer that will demand your presence. Open-air markets and yard sales are great summertime activities. In fact, O brings many wonderful things to mind—as long as it’s not Oprah, who may distract from the Big O we’re really thinking of—but as long as you keep an open mind, you’re going to have a great summer.

festival will feature reggae/dub/rock band Pepper, along with New Zealand’s Katchafire, Hawaiian reggae band J Boog, Hot Rain, Keyser Soze, Mark Sexton Band and Squarefield Massive. Sa, 6/30, 1:30pm. $39. MontBleu Resort, 55 Highway 50, Stateline, (775) 337-8344 ext. 200, www.ticketmaster.com.

LAKE TAHOE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL: The 40th anniversary season commences with its production of William Shakespeare’s The Two Gentlemen of Verona with shows on Tuesday-Sunday evenings. On Monday evenings, the outdoor stage features music or performing arts. Performances include Broadway on the Beach on July 16, Giselle on July 30, Chautauqua: Marie Curie & Mother Jones on Aug. 13 and TOCCATA’s Requiem for John Lennon on Aug. 20. M-Su, 7:30pm through 8/26. Opens

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NEVADA HUMANITIES CHAUTAUQUA 2012: SAINTS AND SINNERS: Nevada Humanities celebrates the 21st anniversary of the Nevada Humanities Chautauqua festival. Explore the lives of legendary characters such as Robert E. Lee, Benedict Arnold, Mary Harris “Mother” Jones, Eleanor Roosevelt, Malcolm X and George Wallace. Evening events begin with a musical performance followed by two theatrical Chautauqua presentations. Music starts at 6pm and Chautauqua presentations begin at 7pm. Admission to the Young Chautauqua evening program on Monday, June 25, is free to all. M, 6/25, 6pm; Tu, 6/26, 6pm; W, 6/27, 6pm; Th, 6/28, 6pm. $10-$60; free for children age 12 and younger. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 784-6587, www.nevadahumanities.org.

LAKE TAHOE SUMMERFEST: The inaugural festival features a series of classical concerts and performances, fine arts and cultural events at several locations in Lake Tahoe during the first three weekends of August. F-Su through 8/19. Opens 8/3. $25-$85. Call or visit website for details, (775) 298-0245, http://tahoesummerfest.org.

MIDTOWN ART WALK: Local businesses in Reno’s Midtown participate and host one or more local artist. Artists and merchants will have the opportunity to market their products during the event. Start the walk at either Junkee Clothing or Living Stones Church. Th, 7/26, 5-9pm. Free. Living Stones Church, 445 S. Virginia St., (775) 622-9772, www.midtownartsproject.com.

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local grocery store, a bottle of red, a corkscrew and a couple hard plastic glasses, and go someplace remote but scenic (and not too remote, there’s a certain button that gets pushed at the prospect of getting caught), drink the wine and then do it like your ancestors did—at home, in the dark and ashamed.

ROCKS , when learning to R climb. You know you’ve had the exact same thought: I’d sure like to IS FOR ROCKS

climb to the top of that thing at CommRow. You held off all winter, but now the kid is out of school, and you’re again eyeing that top set of handholds. Isn’t this the kind of training you’d need before you tackle Half-Dome in August? Doesn’t this seem like more fun than looking at the fat rump in the front row of the cardio section at the gym? The prices are pretty reasonable, and this might be the sort of thing your children can do while you have a quick cocktail, or whatever. (See the letter Q.) Check out http://commrow.com/BaseCamp.asp for more information.

SIESTA UNDERWATER X-TREME SPORTS , the best kind of , the murky , though it’s a bit S nap. Is it just us, or does siesta U lake depths. Explore the ecosys- X of a stretch. We live in a natural have connotations of outdoor tem below Lake Tahoe by scuba playground, so challenge yourself to IS FOR SIESTA

diving. Altitude diving is a bit different from snorkeling, so take a training course and use professionalgrade gear. Take some pictures while you’re at it—rent or buy an inexpensive underwater camera and capture the fish, plants and who knows what else. And heck, if you really want to dive deep, we’re only about three hours away from the Pacific Ocean. For Tahoe scuba equipment or lessons, check out www.sierradive.com or www.laketahoequest.com/scubaDive .htm .

TRUCKEE T , the river T downtown. Be prepared to purchase new inner tubes after your

VACATION , that elusive V treat. Summer is the time to take that vacation you’ve been putting off

IS FOR

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for months. Depending on your destination, take a few days—or weeks, if you’re lucky—and go adventuring. Or take a mental vacation instead, and hang out at home. Catch up on some reading while basking in the sun. And turn your phone off while you’re at it. Don’t worry, those missed calls and emails will still be waiting for you when you get back.

ride down the Truckee River because it’s going to be a rocky ride unless you go this week. But there’s always the kayak course at Wingfield Park. And if you’re really, really lucky, while you’re enjoying a cold, frosty beverage at the Sierra Tap House, you’ll see a beautiful creature swept off his or her feet and thrust downriver. Acting with unusual speed and stamina—almost like a superhero—you race down to the steps, where you thrust out your hand, grasping, grasping, and pull the beautiful one to shore. In gratitude, your quarry buys you another drink. That happened to us last summer.

ROLLIN’ ON THE RIVER: RN&R’s 17th annual summer concert series kicks off with Big Sandy and His Fly Rite Boys on July 6. The series continues with The Gospel Hummingbirds on July 13, Igor and Red Elvises on July 20 and Truth & Salvage Co. on July 27. F, 7/6-7/27, 5:30-8pm. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., 324-4440, www.newsreview.com/reno.

Cal Neva, 38 E. Second St., (775) 337-8344, www.renegadeshows.com.

RENO GAY PRIDE FESTIVAL: The 16th annual gay pride celebration and gathering of the area’s gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community features live performances and entertainment, vendor booths, beer garden and a variety of foods. Sa, 8/18, 11am-6pm. $5. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (877) 344-7366, http://renogaypride.com.

SPARKS XTREME BEACH SPORTS FESTIVAL: The EVP Volleyball Tour and UWP Watercross Tour will combine for the first time on the West Coast. Both events are the largest of their kind in the country, featuring hundreds of All-American athletes going head-to-head in pro volley ball action on the beach and high-speed race action on the water. Sa, 6/30; Su, 7/1. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, Sparks, (775) 3532376, www.uwpinc.com.

RENO-TAHOE OPEN: See professional golfers compete for a $3 million prize purse during the 14th annual tournament, one of 47 stops on the PGA Tour and the only summer event on the West Coast. The tournament is also part of the race for the FedExCup. M-Su through 8/5. Opens 7/30. $20-$195. Montreux Golf & Country Club, 16475 Bordeaux Drive, (775) 322-3900,www.renotahoeopen.com.

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sleeping? It’s the hottest part of the afternoon. You haven’t been day drinking—yet—but an afterlunch lethargy has descended upon you. You bought that hand-woven hammock during your last trip to Tijuana to buy over-the-counter pain medicine and antibiotics. It’s been gathering dust in the front closet since the day you got back. Well, you can’t wait for the cherry trees to grow large enough to support it. Why don’t you just lay a nice big towel down in the shade and have a snooze?

REGGAE AT THE LAKE: Tosh Meets Marley, Nkulee Dube and DJ Treez perform. F, 7/13, 9pm. $20 advance; $25 day of show. Club

OPINION  |  |   RN&R NEWS | GREEN FEATURE 14    |  |  JUNE 14,STORY 2012

IS FOR UNDERWATER

ARTS&CULTURE

SPEAK YOUR MIND HIP HOP ART FESTIVAL NO. 4: The fourth annual festival features performances by Mic Rob, Jelly Bread,

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YOGA , so prepare your Y limbs. What’s great about yoga is that you can do it anywhere—at a IS FOR YOGA

festival, on the beach, in the desert, in your house. It’s free, if you watch some tutorials on YouTube, or you can rally your friends together and take a class. If you’re feeling really adventurous, try acroyoga, which is a combination of yoga, acrobatics and spirituality. Yoga is especially fun when you can jump into a pool or lake afterward to cool off. Be careful trying the tree pose or downward facing dog while intoxicated—unless, you know, you’re into that sort of thing.

WANDERLUST ZIPLINING , a longing W to explore. If you decide to Z tight. Despite a ,recent so hold on episode of take a vacation, might as well cross South Park lamenting over the boresome bucket list locations off your IS FOR WANDERLUST

IS FOR ZIPLINING

list and go big. Take a road trip or cash in those frequent flier miles. Or, if you’d rather stay close to home, check out the Wanderlust Tahoe festival at Squaw Valley from July 26-July 29. Watch performances by Ziggy Marley and Beats Antique, do some yoga, and get inspired by motivational speakers. www.squaw.com .

Black Rock City Allstars, Dialect HD and others. Su, 6/24, 1-10pm. Free. Wingfield Park, 2 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 626-0814, www.775hiphop.com.

STAR SPANGLED SPARKS: The city of Sparks celebrates the Fourth of July with a full day of activities starting at Sparks Marina Park. Festivities include the Sparks Got Talent competition, Model Dairy Milk Carton Boat Regatta, free tethered hot air balloon rides, North Valleys Kiwanis Club Pancake Feed, a fun run/walk, bounce house and games for kids, as well as music, food and vendor booths. The fun continues later that evening at Victorian Square in downtown Sparks with live music and the Star Spangled Sparks fireworks show starting at dusk. W, 7/4, 6am-11pm. Free. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive; Victorian Square, Victorian Ave. 14th Street to Pyramid Way, Sparks, (775) 636-9550 or (775) 356-3300, www.northernnevadachamber.org, www.janugget.com.

FOODFINDS

break out of your comfort zone. Try the rock climbing wall at CommRow (see “Rocks”), or hike up the mountain to Job’s Peak in Alpine County—a difficult hike, but worth it to see the great view of the Carson Valley. If you’re really a thrill seeker, try hang gliding, white water rafting or sky diving. Local Company Thermal Sky Sports offers lessons and equipment. www.thermalskysports.com .

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dom of ziplining, few things are cooler than gliding through the forest hooked only to a harness. Ziplining is an easy day trip and it might satiate the adrenaline junkie in you without breaking the bank. Ω www.ziptahoe.com.

TOUR DE NEZ: The 20th annual celebration of cycling features professional men, women and hand-cyclists competing in a downtown criterion, a road race and street sprints. There will also be kids’ races, a bicycle scavenger hunt, art bikes, clunker races and booth exhibits. F-Su through 7/29. Opens 7/27. Call or visit website for details, (775) 348-6673, www.tourdenez.com.

Center, a Washoe County School District Signature Academy. Sa, 6/23, 3pm. $25, $35. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 334-7208, www.windyhillmusicfestival.com.

WATER & RAILS POND AND GARDEN RAILROAD TOUR: The seventh annual event presents self-guided tours of serene gardens, koi-filled ponds and model trains that travel more than 1,000 feet of track, under tunnels and through miniature towns. Proceeds from the event benefit ALS of Nevada. Sa, 6/30; Su, 7/1. $25 for two people; free for children age 12 and younger. Call or visit website for details, (775) 329-3041 ext. 125, www.waterandrails.org.

VALHALLA ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL: The 32nd annual celebration of the arts includes musical and theatrical performances, visual art exhibits, fairs, cultural festivals and art workshops. M-Su through 9/2. Prices vary. Tallac Historic Site, Highway 89, 2.5 miles north of Highway 50, in South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4975, http://valhallatahoe.com.

WINDY HILL MUSIC FESTIVAL: Buster Blue, Jelly Bread and The Whitney Myer Band perform at this benefit concert, the official kick off to the Damonte Ranch High School Performing Arts

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In Rotation 18 | Art of the State 19 | Foodfinds 20 | Fi¬m 24

HAS NADA DADA, AN INFAMOUS, MESSY, CHAOTIC ANNUAL ART FESTIVAL, ACTUALLY GOTTEN RESPECTABLE? If a person’s tone of voice had a shape, the sound of Rex Norman talking would by be the shape of a storybook prince Kris Vagner waving a bubble wand off the back of a Harley. With a top hat often fixed atop his shoulder-length gray hair and Mad-Max-meets-MadHatter coattails trailing his springy gait, the graphic designer and costume designer, known among artists as Killbuck, speaks with such glee you can hear him smiling. Even over the phone. Which is why, after I say, “Gosh, Nada Dada has almost turned into an organized entity,” I’m a little surprised when he For more information and a map, visit abruptly shouts, “No!” nadadadamotel. It’s a good-natured tease. But I weebly.com. (Heads get it. Although the annual, resup: there are several olutely anarchist, DIY art show now websites for past boasts an artwalk-style map, a webNada Dada events. Nadadademotel.com site, and a spokesperson (that’d be will get you to the 2011 Killbuck) do not insult its 65-ish site.) chaos-loving artists (or possibly 350 artists, depending on who you talk to) by calling them “organized.” And for God’s sake do not utter icky epithets like “established.” For even though that term might aptly celebrate the six-year-old event’s longevity, it’s too close for comfort 16

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to, you know, the “establishment,” that very entity this shindig was invented to contradict. Just call it the exuberant display of absurdity, personality, free-speech and merriment that it is, OK? One that’s never been tethered to grant money or fallen into the clutches of corporate sponsorship, but which has become, well, a Reno institution.

MOTEL LIFE Nada Dada began in 2006, when Jeff Johnson circulated a series of long, manifesto-like emails urging artists to unite but not exactly organize. “The whole point was so I didn’t have to bitch about Artown any more,” says Johnson. He and others opposed that month-long, city-run arts festival for being too controlled and too corporate. Artown imported too much talent, they said, and ignored too many locals. Artist Chad Sorg recalls, “We would meet for six months before the first show.” The outcome of those meetings, says Sorg, was the adoption of two

defining factors: “The date would always be the third weekend of June. The name stays.” Or, the way Johnson recalls it, “There are three things that define Nada Dada. It always occurs on the third weekend of June. We’re celebrating Reno’s unlimited potential for absurdity. And arguing about the name.” Everything else—finding an exhibit space (in most cases a downtown motel room), funding a show, installing the artwork, marketing, throwing receptions—would be handled by individual artists however they saw fit. The tagline became, “Get a room. Make a show.” During the 2007 event, originally called Dada Motel, artists filled the rooms of the El Cortez, as well as the bar, the roof, and the balconies. Lines of giddy visitors snaked up tightly packed stairways. Among the artists’ offerings were paintings hung above bathtubs, a room decorated as black-light lounge, and impromptu musical performances on the sidewalk. Over the next five years, the event’s name changed a couple times. It’s now called Nada Dada.

The El Cortez went back to letting its full-time residents sleep peacefully and declined to host the event. It now takes place at a handful of motels, Strega Bar, the new Reno Art Works facility and Wildflower Village. There is still no party line, still no curator, no leader, no funding, and no real organizational force. There is still raging against the machine aplenty. But, you might have expected one of the usual cyclical cultural forces to have exerted itself upon Nada Dada by now. The age-old phenomenon of underground creative efforts getting accidentally assimilated into the mainstream could have crushed the event’s do-or-die soul. It didn’t. A swift entropic demise could have gone down after too much infighting or too much apathy. It didn’t. Instead, Nada Dada has settled into a comfortable state of libertarian balance. You know how sometimes a philosophy or a movement goes so far to one extreme it seems to circle around the whole globe and arrive, still kicking, right back at the point it departed from?

Jeff Carver in Mickie Lambert’s room, and an alien at Wildflower Village, during last year’s Nada Dada. PHOTOS/AMY BECK


UNUSUAL SUSPECTS Johnson, long known as a neon artist, plans to show—drum roll please—his recent watercolor paintings, which range from cheekily foreboding to just plain darling. He’s also hoping to have a neighborhood-advisory-board-sponsored public neon sculpture installed by curtain time. Erik Holland, long known as an environmental activist, will show his mild-mannered paintings of Nevada landscapes. He’s also the selfappointed Mayor of Nada Dada. Holland says excitedly, “I will have an un-civil liberties room at Strega Bar, featuring mixed-media stuff, like a toilet labeled NDAA with the Constitution and the Magna Carta in it!” Chad Sorg, long known for running the old Blue Lyon gallery and for holing up in a plexiglass box for days on end so people can watch him make paintings, plans to show realist oil paintings of The International Car Forest of the Last Church, an art installation in Goldfield that involves defunct vehicles sticking vertically up from the ground.

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Paris Almond, who makes hats out of LPs and last turned a motel room into an interactive exhibit called, “The Game of Frickin’ Life,” plans to call her room at Wildflower Village, “Art Theraplay.” “I’m not a therapist,” she says. “I’m offering therapy as art.” Visitors can calm their anxieties by making Froot Loop necklaces, and Almond, who teaches art at Truckee Meadows Community College, says she also plans to offer drop-in drawing instruction. “I could teach you a lot about drawing in a short amount of time,” she says. Bernie Beauchamp, who does set construction and backstage lighting for casinos, is also a marionettist. During Nada Dada, he’ll host puppet slams, essentially puppet open-mic performances, in the courtyard of the Townhouse Motel. Theater director Laurence Yarborough, in between staging scenes from Langford Wilson’s play “Home Free!” will run a “Kids Korner” at Wildflower Village, where children are invited to make artwork. As for Killbuck, he’ll follow up his 2011 motel room installation, “Alice in Nadaland,” wherein Alice had tattoos and a tequila bottle, with “The Room of Costume” at Wildflower Village, along with collaborators Mary Crawley, Carolyn Runnels, Megan J. Jewett and Geoffrey Nelson. Killbuck explains, “It’s looking at art as costume, costume as art. It’s looking at how we use costume as a rite of passage. We’re turning the room into the interior of a circus tent.” The installation will involve thematic paintings, photo, and 3-D artwork. All right, Nada Dada, no more accusations from me about having become organized. I hereby recognize your official lack of officialdom. And I believe your ever-diplomatic spokesman Killbuck when he says, “It’s not the safe stuff. It might be edgy. We celebrate the seedy lost paradise of the city, and we find that charming.” But you’re a pillar of the community now. So long live your chaotic, free-speech-defending ways. Ω

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So here’s what happens when artists call the shots and no one tells them to play nice. They’d be free to devolve into nihilistic ranting if they wanted to, but generally they don’t. This is where it can get really interesting: most of Nada Dada’s major players live on both sides of the tracks, with one foot in the art establishment and the other foot wherever they want it. I’m not saying Nada Dada is all bark and no bite. Artist Manbabe, often seen sporting a leather harness, is still making sculptures out of sex toys. And Rich Van Gogh told me last week, 100 percent deadpan, that he intends to hand out drugs in his Nada Dada motel room in an effort to fight the war on drugs. I’m saying that maybe a nice, long stay in a series of trashy rooms on the artworld fringes could have paved the way for pure, petty, self-indulgent alienation, but in many cases it’s actually laid the tracks for some interesting connections, for entire types of interactions we weren’t going to get elsewhere in town.

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Summer reading Unterzakhn Leela Corman Schocken Books

by

Kel Munger kelm@ newsreview.com and

Rachel Leibrock rachell@ newsreview.com

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Leela Corman’s debut graphic novel, Unterzakhn ($24.95)—Yiddish for “underwear”—tells the story of two sisters in early 20th-century New York. The children of immigrants from the Russian shtetl, twins Esther and Fanya observe their community on the Lower East Side as children, grow into it as young women, and find disparate—if equally subversive—paths as adults. Subtly feminist and thoroughly fascinating, Corman’s story is captured in her detailed black-and-white drawings, revealing the complexity of life among working-class women and the harsh realities of attempting to make it in the “land of opportunity.” — K.M.

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movement. With protests and actions bound to resume as the weather improves, the publication of this well-written little book is a great place to bone up on the basics in time for some serious occupation. All proceeds are donated to Occupy Wall Street. www.orbooks.com/ catalog/ows. — K.M.

Louise: Amended Louise Krug Black Balloon Publishing Louise Krug thought she’d have the perfect life. Krug, a pretty 22-year-old Kansas journalist prepping for a move to California with her handsome French boyfriend, found her world imploding after a ruptured cavernous angioma—a brain bleed, in layman’s terms—forces her to undergo an emergency craniotomy. What followed, as chronicled in Krug’s compelling memoir Louise: Amended ($14), is the story of a woman who—even as she endured extensive rehabilitation for among other afflictions, double vision and facial paralysis—also faced an existence in which her usual crutch, physical beauty, had suddenly disappeared. Krug’s book is at once darkly funny and touching as she details what it was like to rely on others for what once seemed the simplest of tasks, all while trying to figure out the future. — R.L.

The Glass Collector Anna Perera Puffin Books

Occupying Wall Street Various authors OR Books It’s rare for nearly 50 writers to collaborate on a project, let alone a book that reads so smoothly, but the contributors to Occupying Wall Street: The Inside Story of the Action That Changed America ($15) are the real thing; present as the movement we now know as Occupy Wall Street began to coalesce at Zuccotti Park in New York City. They took notes and conducted interviews, creating this clear narrative of how the general assembly formed and the occupation grew, as well as detailing the discussions within the

In Anna Perera’s new young adult novel, The Glass Collector, 15-year-old Aaron’s life is, literally, down in the dumps. Living in Cairo, his job is to rummage through trash piles in search of broken glass suitable for resale. That grim existence turns even more nightmarish when the teenager’s family kicks him out of the house, forcing Aaron to find a new way to get by. His alternatives aren’t very promising: steal, beg—or worse. Here, Perera sketches out a world that, while perhaps unfamiliar to Western teens, should still resonate with its universal themes of self-identity, perseverance, pride and how a complex labyrinth of circumstance and choice can shape one’s future. — R.L.


PHOTO/AMY BECK

Oil spell

Edward Burtynsky in a gallery featuring his work at the NMA.

Edward Burtynsky Questions about oil are inseparable from contemporary society. Its residue is ubiquitous; its by hold inescapable. “Drill, baby, drill,” is a Stephen mantra for some, and for others merely a Cummings fact. Ours is a civilization built on oil— means of acquiring it, consuming it and disposing of it. We build with it, and we burn with it. We forget its ills quickly because of its convenience, and it continues to drive us in our complacency. It was to this subject that, over a decade ago, photographer Edward Burtynsky turned Edward Burtynsky’s Oil his lens, and the presentation of Oil now is on display at the comes to the Nevada Museum of Art. Nevada Museum of Art. Burtynsky is a Romantic. Asked which 60 W. Liberty St., 329artists have influenced his work, the 3333, through Sept. 23. For more information, German painter Caspar David Friedrich is visit www.nevadaart.org. first out of the gate, followed closely by the Hudson River School painters of the American 19th century. These artists celebrated the landscape as an awesome and humbling force. Humanity’s influence was but little in the face of overwhelming nature. More recent shapers of Burtynsky’s outlook, including Robert Adams and the New Topographic photographers, pushed

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against the veneration of landscape in favor of a directness about man’s transformative impact. Burtynsky, perhaps unsurprisingly, operates at the intersection. So thoroughly have we overwhelmed the Earth that sublimity can no longer be reserved for nature alone. What’s more frightening and inconceivable: a mountain of ice, or a mountain of discarded auto parts? We could easily see Friedrich’s wellknown “Wanderer” standing above a tangle of pipes, vents and valves. In Burtynsky’s hands, the arc of Thomas Cole’s painting “Oxbow” has become that of a twisting suburban street enclosing an oddly geometric “lake”-front neighborhood in fabulous Las Vegas. The treatment of these subjects might not be considered a critique, partially because of the great detachment that defines the artist’s perspective. Burtynsky gives us a view from where no one is supposed to be, most often setting himself up high to mitigate the hierarchy that inevitably accompanies a foreground, and thereby

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emphasizing the feeling of vastness that accompanies his compositions. “It’s the middle ground that really reveals the scale,” he says. In this way, Burtynsky presents remote pipelines angling through the wilderness, dense clusters of refineries competing for air space, and retired drilling equipment huddled out at sea. Ribbons of color flatten weirdly in the rectangular pools of “Alberta Oil Sands #6,” and at “Talladega Speedway #1,” a truck cab thunders around the raceway like an ogre billowing the flag for a crowd of tens of thousands. Up close, a pile of engines might well be the plastic bits stuffed into one of Chris Jordan’s ill-fated seabirds, one of which can be seen on the museum’s second floor, and a thicket of

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jagged machine parts becomes a carpet of oxidation. “Highway #5, Los Angeles” is reminiscent of the artist’s own “Nickel Tailings,” which museum goers may recall from last fall’s Altered Landscape exhibition. Less colorful, the liquid in this case is a stream of concrete cutting through an unending array of stucco. In Bangladesh, Burtynsky captured dreamscapes of rusting towers of ships impossibly large yet strewn about haphazardly—carelessly cast off remnants from the culture at the top of the beanstalk. The series is not about oil per se, but about us. Our appetite is insatiable, our capacity unrestrained. We are the gods who’ve overthrown the Titans, and our bickering among ourselves does little to check our expansion. It may be possible to gain some small amount of humility by the confrontation of a photograph. What will it show us about our habit of excess or necessity or addiction? Ω

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Food with a view The Lodge at Galena 17025 Mount Rose Highway, 849-2100

I live pretty far from Galena so I tend not to get up to the area much. However, I’ve wanted to try the Lodge at by K.J. Sullivan Galena for quite some time. My friend Brett and I decided to head ksullivan@ up there on a recent Saturday, newsreview.com hoping to sit outside on the spacious deck at the Lodge. When we pulled up and saw the “Congratulations Grad!” sign, I knew my deck dreams were proba-

PHOTO/AMY BECK

menu, which offered a lot of greatlooking burgers and sandwiches. Brett and I decided to start with the Polynesian poke ($8), which is an ahi salad with soy sauce, tomatoes and green onions. There was a side of wonton crisps to load the salad on. The ahi was flavorful, and I was impressed by the amount of tuna served. The soy sauce was slightly spicy, and the tomatoes absorbed it well. I really liked this dish, but I wish the wontons had some sort of sweet glaze to balance out the saltiness of the salad. After polishing off the appetizer, Brett and I decided it was time to switch from wine to beer, so I went with the Deschutes Twilight ($6.75 for the large), and Brett got the Eel River organic blend ($6.75 for the large). Since the appetizer was larger and more filling than expected, we decided to just split the Kobe-style meatloaf sandwich with a side salad ($10) and a cup of French onion soup ($5). The soup and salad arrived first, and while the salad was basic, it was fresh and decent-sized. The soup was packed with cheese, and the broth had a nice flavor. When the sandwich arrived, I was excited to see that the meatloaf was wrapped in a piece of bacon, because who doesn’t love beef and bacon? The sandwich was served open-faced on a piece of rosemary garlic bread, but unfortunately, I didn’t taste any rosemary or, really, any garlic. The meatloaf made up for it, though. It was tender, flavorful and covered in a thick demi-glace that had a rich mushroom flavor. I wish there had been more, as it was just on the top of the meatloaf. Overall, I enjoyed my lunch at the Lodge, and I think if I had been able to sit outside, I would have been more excited about it, so I will probably have to come back to enjoy that deck out among the trees. Ω

The “tender, flavorful” meatloaf sandwich at The Lodge at Galena.

The Lodge at Galena is open Tuesday through Thursday, 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

20

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JUNE 14, 2012

bly dashed, but we went in anyway where we were apologetically informed that the deck was indeed reserved for a graduate. Well, if the kid can make it through school, then I suppose I can sit inside for one meal. The Lodge is split into two sections, with a large bar in front and a more formal dining area toward the back. The décor was casual and comfortable, leaving the scenic views as the main decoration. We stayed in the bar, which has large windows, so I could look outside at the pine trees. This also gave me a prime view of the graduate’s dad shamelessly flirting with the friendly, young bartender, which she handled like a seasoned champ. The same bartender came over right away to take our drink orders. She’s either really good at her job or wanted to run away from the guy hitting on her, maybe both. I wanted some wine and she helped steer me to the Charles Krug chardonnay ($10), which was crisp and not overly sweet. We spent some time perusing the lunch


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

!

Itʼs happen ing in

SUMMER SWIM SEASON!

SMOKIN’ BULLDOGS

The City of Sparks summer swim season is underway, with designated swim areas open at the Sparks Marina Park and the outdoor pool at Deer Park (Oppio Park pool is closed). The 2012 outdoor swim schedule is: Sparks Marina Park: Recreational swimming in designated swim area/north beach only (weather permitting), 12PM-4PM, 6/9 - 8/19, 8/25-26, 11AM-6PM 7/4 and 9/1-3. Free. Deer Park Pool (1700 Prater Way): Recreational swimming in the heated, zero-entry pool from 12PM-4PM 6/98/19, 8/25-26 and 9/1-3. Under 18/$3.50,18-54 yrs./$6, 55+/$4, Family (up to 6 members)/$15. An “Almost Free Friday™“promotion takes place throughout the summer offering all ages a reduced rate of $1 per person to swim on Fridays. Swim lessons will be conducted at Deer Park pool, preregistration required. Call 353-2385 or go to www.sparksrec.com

Th, 6/14, 7PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

CAR CRUISE NIGHTS

Every Thursday, bring your classic cars to show. Great food and a DJ for music. Summer fun and prizes. Thursdays, 5PM, Free. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316

SCHEELS BIKING CLUB

Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Rides will vary from 20-30 miles. Participants will need to sign a liability form when they attend. Th, 5:45PM through 9/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

IF PARKS COULD TALK

Washoe County’s “If Parks Could Talk” series continues at 7PM on Th, 6/14, with the story behind Lazy 5 Regional Park in Spanish Springs. Free. Lazy 5 Regional Park, 7100 Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs. (775) 424-1801

WHOLE FOODS SPARKS FARMERS’ MARKET

MUSIC AT THE MARINA

Presented by Shirley’s Farmers’ Markets, the 20th annual farmers’ market returns with a family-friendly atmosphere and farmer-focused event. This year’s event has been extended to 11 weeks. Thursdays, 3-8PM through 8/2, Th, 8/16, 3-8PM and Th, 8/23, 3-8PM. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Ave.

ROSENDO & CECELIA

Tuesday: Summit Reno Farmers’ Market 9am to 2pm June 5 to October 9

Thursday: Whole Foods Sparks Farmers’ Market 3pm to 8pm

Th, 6/14, 5:30PM, F, 6/15, 6PM and Sa, 6/16, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

DAVE FRITZ

Sing for fun or compete for prizes,depending on the number of contestants, with DJ John Graham. Th, 9PM and F, 9PM. No cover. Anchors Bar & Grill, 325 Harbour Cove Dr. (775) 356-6888

JUST RIGHT

F, 6/15, 5:30PM, Sa, 6/16, 5:30PM and Su, 6/17, 5:30PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. ( 775) 356-3300

MARK CASTRO DUO

F, 6/15, 6PM, no cover. David’s Grill, 6590 N. Wingfield Pkwy. (775) 626-1000

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now!

JAZZ

With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

WATER PARK OPENS

The popular water play park will be open weekends only for the three-day Memorial Day weekend and the first week of June. Sa/Su, 10AM-5PM through 6/2. Opens 5/26 and W-Su, 10AM-5PM through 8/26. Opens 6/9, $3; free for seniors (61 and older) and children under 3. Melio Gaspari Water Play Park at Lazy 5 Regional Park, 7100 Pyramid Lake Hwy. (775) 424-1801

WEEKEND JUMP-OFF PARTY

With DJ BG. F, Sa, 10PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

NATIONAL CONCRETE CANOE COMPETION

The 25th Annual ASCE National Concrete Canoe Competition consists of college engineering students designing and constructing a canoe entirely of concrete and competing against other universities in four separate categories: paddling, final product, design paper, and oral presentation. Winners from each of the 18 regional competitions across the United States are invited to the National Concrete Canoe Competition (NCCC) each year. The Sparks Marina will be the site of the 25th annual event. Sa, 6/16, 10AM-5PM. Free. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Dr. (775) 353-2376

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE

A high-spirited musical romp that has all of New York dancing the Charleston. It’s the zany new 1920s musical that has taken Broadway by storm. Sa, 6/16, 2 & 8PM and Su, 6/17, 2 & 7PM, $25. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Come check out our outdoor stage after visiting the Whole Foods Sparks Farmers’ Market. Half-priced margaritas! Th, 6/14, 6PM, no cover. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-6262

JEFF ROWAN

MOON GRAVY

DASH FOR DADS

STEW STEWART

LADIES 80’S NIGHT

Hosted by DJ BG. Th, 6-11PM, Trader Dick’s Lounge. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Th, 6/14, 7PM, F, 6/15, 8PM, Sa, 6/16, 8PM, Su, 6/17, 7PM, M, 6/18, 7PM and Tu, 6/19, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

F, 6/15, 8PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

Sa, 6/16, 8PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711 Hosted by the Builders Association Charity, this Father’s Day 5K walk/run and kids’ fun run includes. face painting, a bounce house and free tattoos for kids. Proceeds go toward life-saving PSA testing and financial assistance during

treatment. Su, 6/17, 8AM-12PM. $10-$30 entry fee. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Dr., Sparks 89431 (775) 353-2376 or go to www.dashfordads.com

SEND US YOUR SPARKS EVENTS!

SUMMER ART CAMPS

Ignite imaginations! An hour of art, theater, movement/music each day. 9AM-12PM, Mo-Th 6/18-21. $75 for four half days. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385

E-mail to: Sparks@newsreview.com

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY!

SUMMER SOIREE AT THE ARBORS

Enjoy the delightful sounds of the Maytan Band and the art of Moments of Memory. M, 6/18, 6-8PM. Free. Arbors Memory Care, 2121 E. Prater Way. (775) 331-2229

0

CITY OF SPARKS Geno Martini - Mayor, Julia Ratti - Ward 1, Ed Lawson - Ward 2, Ron Smith - Ward 3, Mike Carrigan - Ward 4, Ron Schmitt - Ward 5, Shaun Carey - City Manager, Tracy Domingues - Parks & Recreation Director.

JOHN DAWSON BAND

W, 6/20, 7PM, Th, 6/21, 7PM, F, 6/22, 8PM, Sa, 6/23, 8PM and Su, 6/24, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300

KARAOKE

OTHER ELECTED OFFICIALS

STEVE STARR KARAOKE M, 8PM. No cover. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316

Judge Barbara S. McCarthy - Dept. 1, Judge Jim Spoo - Dept. 2, Chet Adams - City Attorney. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 353-2311

SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861

SPARKS CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 745 Fourth St., Sparks CITY OF SPARKS WEBSITES: www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com www.sparksitshappeninghere.com CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1420 Scheels Drive, Ste. 108

OPEN MIC

GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

SPECIAL EVENTS COMING UP IN SPARKS

MUSICIAN FAIRE AND FANFEST presented by Musician Rehearsal Center and sponsored by the RN&R and Rock 104.5 (June 23). For info, call (775) 355-9494. SPARKS XTREME BEACH SPORTS FESTIVAL (June 30th – July 1st) STAR SPANGLED SPARKS (July 4th) ARTS IN BLOOM (July 21st) REGIONAL CHILI COOK-OFF (July 23rd) SCHEELS KIDS’ TRIATHALON (July 28th

(next to Forever 21, Legends at Sparks Marina)

775-358-1976 www.thechambernv.org THIS SECTION AND ITS CONTENTS ARE NOT FUNDED BY OR CREATED BY THE CITY OF SPARKS

June 7 to August 23 (Dark August 9 for HAN)

Friday: Tamarack Junction Reno Farmers’ Market 8am to 1pm June 8 to October 12

Saturday: Village Reno Farmers’ Market 8am to 1pm June 2 to October 6 (Tentative)

A benefit for

Saturday: Summit Reno Farmers’ Market 9am to 2pm June 2 to September 29

MUSIC EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

SATURDAY, JUNE 23 11AM-4PM turner Crossing business Park, Sparks

Contact:

Shirley at 775.746.5024 PO Box 2898 Sparks NV 89432

if you love music and want to show support for local musicians and music in schools, please join us for a fun day!

PRESENTED BY

For information, go to: musicianrc.com kdot.com or call (775) 355-9494

SPONSORED BY

DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION IS 5PM ON JUNE 18th!

www.ShirleysFarmersMarkets.com 22   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 14, 2012

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 14, 2012

|

RN&R

|

23


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

!

Itʼs happen ing in

SUMMER SWIM SEASON!

SMOKIN’ BULLDOGS

The City of Sparks summer swim season is underway, with designated swim areas open at the Sparks Marina Park and the outdoor pool at Deer Park (Oppio Park pool is closed). The 2012 outdoor swim schedule is: Sparks Marina Park: Recreational swimming in designated swim area/north beach only (weather permitting), 12PM-4PM, 6/9 - 8/19, 8/25-26, 11AM-6PM 7/4 and 9/1-3. Free. Deer Park Pool (1700 Prater Way): Recreational swimming in the heated, zero-entry pool from 12PM-4PM 6/98/19, 8/25-26 and 9/1-3. Under 18/$3.50,18-54 yrs./$6, 55+/$4, Family (up to 6 members)/$15. An “Almost Free Friday™“promotion takes place throughout the summer offering all ages a reduced rate of $1 per person to swim on Fridays. Swim lessons will be conducted at Deer Park pool, preregistration required. Call 353-2385 or go to www.sparksrec.com

Th, 6/14, 7PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

CAR CRUISE NIGHTS

Every Thursday, bring your classic cars to show. Great food and a DJ for music. Summer fun and prizes. Thursdays, 5PM, Free. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316

SCHEELS BIKING CLUB

Moderate to strong riders are encouraged to participate. Rides will vary from 20-30 miles. Participants will need to sign a liability form when they attend. Th, 5:45PM through 9/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

IF PARKS COULD TALK

Washoe County’s “If Parks Could Talk” series continues at 7PM on Th, 6/14, with the story behind Lazy 5 Regional Park in Spanish Springs. Free. Lazy 5 Regional Park, 7100 Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs. (775) 424-1801

WHOLE FOODS SPARKS FARMERS’ MARKET

MUSIC AT THE MARINA

Presented by Shirley’s Farmers’ Markets, the 20th annual farmers’ market returns with a family-friendly atmosphere and farmer-focused event. This year’s event has been extended to 11 weeks. Thursdays, 3-8PM through 8/2, Th, 8/16, 3-8PM and Th, 8/23, 3-8PM. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Ave.

ROSENDO & CECELIA

Tuesday: Summit Reno Farmers’ Market 9am to 2pm June 5 to October 9

Thursday: Whole Foods Sparks Farmers’ Market 3pm to 8pm

Th, 6/14, 5:30PM, F, 6/15, 6PM and Sa, 6/16, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

DAVE FRITZ

Sing for fun or compete for prizes,depending on the number of contestants, with DJ John Graham. Th, 9PM and F, 9PM. No cover. Anchors Bar & Grill, 325 Harbour Cove Dr. (775) 356-6888

JUST RIGHT

F, 6/15, 5:30PM, Sa, 6/16, 5:30PM and Su, 6/17, 5:30PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. ( 775) 356-3300

MARK CASTRO DUO

F, 6/15, 6PM, no cover. David’s Grill, 6590 N. Wingfield Pkwy. (775) 626-1000

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now!

JAZZ

With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

WATER PARK OPENS

The popular water play park will be open weekends only for the three-day Memorial Day weekend and the first week of June. Sa/Su, 10AM-5PM through 6/2. Opens 5/26 and W-Su, 10AM-5PM through 8/26. Opens 6/9, $3; free for seniors (61 and older) and children under 3. Melio Gaspari Water Play Park at Lazy 5 Regional Park, 7100 Pyramid Lake Hwy. (775) 424-1801

WEEKEND JUMP-OFF PARTY

With DJ BG. F, Sa, 10PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

NATIONAL CONCRETE CANOE COMPETION

The 25th Annual ASCE National Concrete Canoe Competition consists of college engineering students designing and constructing a canoe entirely of concrete and competing against other universities in four separate categories: paddling, final product, design paper, and oral presentation. Winners from each of the 18 regional competitions across the United States are invited to the National Concrete Canoe Competition (NCCC) each year. The Sparks Marina will be the site of the 25th annual event. Sa, 6/16, 10AM-5PM. Free. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Dr. (775) 353-2376

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE

A high-spirited musical romp that has all of New York dancing the Charleston. It’s the zany new 1920s musical that has taken Broadway by storm. Sa, 6/16, 2 & 8PM and Su, 6/17, 2 & 7PM, $25. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Come check out our outdoor stage after visiting the Whole Foods Sparks Farmers’ Market. Half-priced margaritas! Th, 6/14, 6PM, no cover. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-6262

JEFF ROWAN

MOON GRAVY

DASH FOR DADS

STEW STEWART

LADIES 80’S NIGHT

Hosted by DJ BG. Th, 6-11PM, Trader Dick’s Lounge. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Th, 6/14, 7PM, F, 6/15, 8PM, Sa, 6/16, 8PM, Su, 6/17, 7PM, M, 6/18, 7PM and Tu, 6/19, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

F, 6/15, 8PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

Sa, 6/16, 8PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711 Hosted by the Builders Association Charity, this Father’s Day 5K walk/run and kids’ fun run includes. face painting, a bounce house and free tattoos for kids. Proceeds go toward life-saving PSA testing and financial assistance during

treatment. Su, 6/17, 8AM-12PM. $10-$30 entry fee. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Dr., Sparks 89431 (775) 353-2376 or go to www.dashfordads.com

SEND US YOUR SPARKS EVENTS!

SUMMER ART CAMPS

Ignite imaginations! An hour of art, theater, movement/music each day. 9AM-12PM, Mo-Th 6/18-21. $75 for four half days. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385

E-mail to: Sparks@newsreview.com

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY!

SUMMER SOIREE AT THE ARBORS

Enjoy the delightful sounds of the Maytan Band and the art of Moments of Memory. M, 6/18, 6-8PM. Free. Arbors Memory Care, 2121 E. Prater Way. (775) 331-2229

0

CITY OF SPARKS Geno Martini - Mayor, Julia Ratti - Ward 1, Ed Lawson - Ward 2, Ron Smith - Ward 3, Mike Carrigan - Ward 4, Ron Schmitt - Ward 5, Shaun Carey - City Manager, Tracy Domingues - Parks & Recreation Director.

JOHN DAWSON BAND

W, 6/20, 7PM, Th, 6/21, 7PM, F, 6/22, 8PM, Sa, 6/23, 8PM and Su, 6/24, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300

KARAOKE

OTHER ELECTED OFFICIALS

STEVE STARR KARAOKE M, 8PM. No cover. Grumpy’s Sports Bar & Grill, 2240 Oddie Blvd. (775) 358-2316

Judge Barbara S. McCarthy - Dept. 1, Judge Jim Spoo - Dept. 2, Chet Adams - City Attorney. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 353-2311

SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861

SPARKS CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 745 Fourth St., Sparks CITY OF SPARKS WEBSITES: www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com www.sparksitshappeninghere.com CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1420 Scheels Drive, Ste. 108

OPEN MIC

GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

SPECIAL EVENTS COMING UP IN SPARKS

MUSICIAN FAIRE AND FANFEST presented by Musician Rehearsal Center and sponsored by the RN&R and Rock 104.5 (June 23). For info, call (775) 355-9494. SPARKS XTREME BEACH SPORTS FESTIVAL (June 30th – July 1st) STAR SPANGLED SPARKS (July 4th) ARTS IN BLOOM (July 21st) REGIONAL CHILI COOK-OFF (July 23rd) SCHEELS KIDS’ TRIATHALON (July 28th

(next to Forever 21, Legends at Sparks Marina)

775-358-1976 www.thechambernv.org THIS SECTION AND ITS CONTENTS ARE NOT FUNDED BY OR CREATED BY THE CITY OF SPARKS

June 7 to August 23 (Dark August 9 for HAN)

Friday: Tamarack Junction Reno Farmers’ Market 8am to 1pm June 8 to October 12

Saturday: Village Reno Farmers’ Market 8am to 1pm June 2 to October 6 (Tentative)

A benefit for

Saturday: Summit Reno Farmers’ Market 9am to 2pm June 2 to September 29

MUSIC EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

SATURDAY, JUNE 23 11AM-4PM turner Crossing business Park, Sparks

Contact:

Shirley at 775.746.5024 PO Box 2898 Sparks NV 89432

if you love music and want to show support for local musicians and music in schools, please join us for a fun day!

PRESENTED BY

For information, go to: musicianrc.com kdot.com or call (775) 355-9494

SPONSORED BY

DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION IS 5PM ON JUNE 18th!

www.ShirleysFarmersMarkets.com 22   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 14, 2012

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

JUNE 14, 2012

|

RN&R

|

23


Pleasure Cruise Rock of Ages With his scaling of the tallest building in the world for last year’s Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, and now his crazily good turn as singer Stacee Jaxx in the musical movie Rock of Ages, Tom Cruise has now transformed himself into Hollywood’s greatest stuntman. It took some big nuts to propel himself off of the Burj Khalifa tower in that harrowing, all-time classic sequence, and now he has learned to sing and play some guitar for his by latest flick. It’s like he’s going down a list of Bob Grimm bug nut crazy stuff to do in a movie, and he’s bgrimm@newsreview.c just picking them off one by one. om And he’s not just crooning soft ballads. He’s belting out some of the biggest crap rock of the ’80s with a voice that’s some sort of blessed convergence of Axl Rose and Vince Neil. CRUISE CAN SING! His magnificent rock act is surrounded by a movie that’s fun, but not nearly as good as him. Adapted from the Broadway play and directed by Adam Shankman (Hairspray), the plot is your typical “girl comes from a small town to make it in Hollywood” story that has been told a thousand times before. It’s just never featured Tom Cruise in a fur coat accompanied by a rambunctious, well-dressed baboon.

3

That Something About Mary hair product never goes out of style.

24

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Sherrie Christian (a likeable Julianne Hough), wannabe singer, starts the film out on a bus, getting fellow travelers and even the driver to join her for a rousing rendition of “Sister Christian,” a goofy yet infectious scene that sets the tone for the movie. All of the action winds up at The Bourbon Room where owner Dennis Dupree (a shaggy Alec Baldwin) is trying to avert financial disaster. His last big hope is the final

1

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POOR

FAIR

GOOD

4 VERY GOOD

5 EXCELLENT

performance of huge metal band Arsenal before their singer, Stacee Jaxx, goes solo. Sherrie gets a job at the Bourbon thanks to a chance meeting with Drew Boley (Diego Boneta), another up-and-coming singer trying to make it in the big city. The paint-by-numbers plot assembled by a team of screenwriters including Justin Theroux (Iron Man 2, Tropic Thunder) is just a place setter for musical numbers featuring tunes by Def Leppard, Pat Benatar, Foreigner, Bon Jovi, etc. There’s an occasional good joke about drinking or puking, but this is mostly a reason for big stars to lip synch admirably to their own vocal tracks. And let it be said that I detest hair rock— deplore it. When characters in this movie talk about the power of rock ’n’ roll, I couldn’t help but think, “Where’s Led Zeppelin or The Who?” This plastic music was all the wow during my teen and college years, a fact that still frightens and disturbs me. Oh sure, the occasional Guns N’ Roses or Leppard song was OK, but holy hell, Poison and Mötley Crüe almost killed me. And Starship? This is the umpteenth movie to use what is easily the worst song ever recorded by anybody, “We Built This City.” Hell, the Muppets had it in their movie last year! The fact that I still enjoyed a movie where this music is prominently featured says a lot for the cast of singers including Cruise, Russell Brand, and Malin Akerman as a Rolling Stone reporter who shares a funny sex scene with Cruise that includes him using her ass as a microphone. A song that has always pissed me off is “Wanted Dead or Alive,” with loser Jon Bon Jovi likening himself to a gunfighter with his “oh so burdensome” rock career. Yet, when Cruise sings it in this movie, it takes on awesome life. He, quite frankly, puts Mr. Bon Jovi to shame. I can honestly say this is the first time I’ve enjoyed listening to that particular track. If you go to this movie, go knowing that you will see and hear some amazing stuff from Mr. Cruise. Otherwise, Rock of Ages is just a mildly enjoyable musical goof, sort of like The Beatles Across the Universe movie, but with far crappier songs. Ω


The Avengers

5

Everything good about the last bunch of Marvel superhero movies comes together for one massive, excessively entertaining party. Director Joss Whedon hits all the right notes as Captain America (Chris Evans), Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and the Hulk (newbie Mark Ruffalo) all get equal time in this well balanced, often funny, and completely satisfying cinematic experience. I wasn’t sure if they would pull this off, but they did, with Loki (Tom Hiddleston) once again bringing the fun as the villain. Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) contribute mightily to the process, as does Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). Good luck to all the rest of the summer movies in trying to top this one’s fun factor. And let it be said that this contains the best Hulk action put to film ever! Joss Whedon is a god.

Bernie

4

Jack Black gets back together with his The School of Rock director Richard Linklater, and casting Black in this film was a masterstroke. As Bernie Tiede, the real-life convicted killer of Marjorie Nugent in Carthage, Texas, Black delivers a performance to be remembered. For an actor who has a tendency to overdo it, it’s good to see him rein it in and do something with depth and nuance. Linklater comes at the story from a risky angle. It’s no secret that much of the town loved Bernie Tiede, and some even believed he didn’t commit a murder that he confessed to. The movie almost comes off as an argument that this fellow wasn’t such a bad guy after all, even if he did shoot an old woman (played awesomely by Shirley MacLaine) in the back four times and stuff her in a garage freezer. This is a triumph for Black and Linklater, proof that these guys should just keep making movies together. Both men have done their best work when they team up, and I certainly hope this isn’t the last time they share a set. Also stars Matthew McConaughey as District Attorney Danny Buck, the man who would put Tiede behind bars.

Dark Shadows

2

After the boring tragedy that was Alice in Wonderland, the normally reliable Tim Burton and Johnny Depp team up once again to induce nap time with this plodding adaptation of the cult fave vampire soap opera from the ’60s. Depp plays Barnabas Collins, cursed by an evil witch (Eva Green) two centuries ago and buried in the Earth. Somebody digs up his coffin to make way for a McDonald’s and, boom, Barnabas is strutting around in the ’70s. Or at least he should be. As it turns out, he just spends most of his time moping around his mansion droning his lines. This had the looks of something potentially funny and weird, but Burton actually goes for the soap opera feel, a move that doesn’t work on the big screen. I would really like to see Depp do another real drama or smart comedy without burying himself under makeup and wigs. Having seen what he looks like in The Lone Ranger, I know I won’t be getting my wish soon.

Hysteria

2

This film tells the story of Mortimer Granville (Hugh Dancy) and his participation in the invention of the first vibrator as a means of curing female “hysteria” in the late 1800s. Fed up with working for doctors who still peddle leeches and don’t believe in germs, Granville goes to work for Dr. Robert Dalrymple (Jonathan Pryce), who basically runs a clinic that gets women off using his hands. When Granville no longer can cure his patients because of hand cramps, he’s dismissed, only to return when his friend Edmund St. JohnSmythe (Rupert Everett) converts his electric feather duster into, essentially, a sex toy. Maggie Gyllenhaal stars as Charlotte Dalrymple, the doctor’s daughter and rebel working to help the poor and occasionally punch cops in the face. The film has an uninteresting romance between her and Granville. Things get off to a funny and spirited start, but it peters out in the end, culminating with a courtroom drama that feels stale.

Reno Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

3

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted

The third in this franchise winds up being the best, and a decent comeback after a bland second installment. The zoo animals, still kicking it in Africa, wind up on a European tour with a circus, which gives writers Eric Darnell and Noah Baumbach the opportunity to introduce some fun new characters. These include a hoop-jumping tiger (voiced by Bryan Cranston), an evil animal control officer (Frances McDormand) and, most winningly, a dopey seal named Stefano voiced wonderfully by Martin Short. This one is a bit touched in the head, as evidenced by the “Circus Afro” sequence featured in the advertising campaign. Darnell and Baumbach write good jokes that will keep both the adults and children laughing. Stars the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, David Schwimmer and Jada Pinkett Smith.

3

Men in Black III

It’s been nearly a decade since the last chapter in the Men in Black series, something I find a little shocking. The franchise has been a cash cow, and I expected to see one every four or five years. We should be up to Men in Black V or VI by now. MIB III is a return to form in some ways. The effects are much better than they were in MIB II. Tommy Lee Jones, as Agent K, mentally checked out of this series after the first one, and he has a reduced role in this chapter. Most of the heavy lifting in this installment is handled by the capable, talented egomaniac Will Smith. His Agent J is still wisecracking with the best of them, and must travel back in time to stop a hideous alien monster (Jemaine Clement) from killing K and erasing him from history. The younger K is played hilariously by a deadpan Josh Brolin, who totally captures the essence of Tommy Lee Jones. Goes a little crazy toward the end, but overall it’s a good time.

3

Snow White and the Huntsman

4

Prometheus

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In this prequel to his own Alien, director Ridley Scott explores all new angles in his monster universe via eye-popping 3-D visuals and intense storytelling. When scientists discover cave drawings that appear to be superior alien intelligence inviting us for a visit, an exploratory space mission travels to a distant galaxy in search of our origins. What they find involves tentacles, slime, gnarly selfadministered operations and general despair. Noomi Rapace takes on the female heroine role, with Charlize Theron along for the ride as a mysterious mission commander. Best of all is Michael Fassbender as David, a strange android who models himself after Peter O’Toole. With this, Scott proves that he is still a master of the sci-fi genre, a genre he hasn’t visited since his 1982 Blade Runner —he’s rumored to be working on a sequel to that classic, as well. The ending of this one, hopefully, paves the way for another chapter—a chapter I sincerely hope Scott is involved in.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

FEATURE STORY

Who:

The 347th Snow White movie this year is actually a fairly decent one, with Kristen Stewart doing a fine job as the title character and Chris Hemsworth contributing nicely as the ax-wielding Hunstman. Best of all the cast is Charlize Theron as Ravenna, a loony queen hell-bent on staying young and eating Snow’s heart. Director Rupert Sanders puts together a swell visual movie, especially in the way he creates dwarves out of actors like Nick Frost, Ian McShane, Bob Hoskins and Toby Jones. The movie is quite good when it features Snow White running around in various enchanted forests, though not so much in the final act, where it becomes a weird Joan of Arc movie. The last act feels tacked on, like it belongs on another film. Still, Stewart is quite winning here and Theron is a bona fide scene-stealer.

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

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Brüka Theater Summer Performing Arts Camp July 9 – July 22, 2012

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SATURDAY, JUNE 23 11AM-4PM turner Crossing business Park, Sparks

if you love music and want to show support for local musicians and music in schools, please join us for a fun day!

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Instrumental case Prescription “I Don’t Wanna Come Down,” a song by Reno band Prescription, has a rare kind of swagger. It sounds sort of leatherby Brad Bynum jacket tough, but with a bouncy groove, youthful confidence and bradb@ restrained aggression, like a sophonewsreview.com more so badass that all the seniors step out of his way, and all the girls sway and swoon.

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Reno rock ’n’ roll version of Booker T and the MGs. “We want to be the kind of band that can jump on almost any kind of bill,” says Coxson. He mentions that the band recently played a straightedge punk basement show, and they have an upcoming gig with the very un-straight-edge ska-jazz group Keyser Soze. The band members have the eclectic taste and depth of knowledge of avid record collectors, and put that knowledge to work in their music, which draws from punk, prog, psych, soul, and, more than anything else, straight-up rock ’n’ roll. Prescription’s music stands up well without a vocalist. Some of the band’s faster, more aggressive songs, like “Cracked Actress,” are both menacing and upbeat. (When asked if the song title is a reference to David Bowie’s song “Cracked Actor,” which it clearly is, Oakley is cagey, admitting only that it’s about a girl.) “It’s sonic guitar rock,” says Oakley. “I personally feel like bringing back really awesome sounding guitars … with great tones and melody, but also danceable. We want girls to like it, too. We don’t just want to play just so a bunch of dudes can mosh.” Though the group has the sound of punk band backing a psychedelic guitar-player, sort of reminiscent of Neil Young’s early work with Crazy Horse, the songwriting is surprisingly complex. Many of the songs are mini-epics, complete with key changes and rhythmic shifts, and the band is skinny-jeans tight, particularly the bass-and-drums team of Williams and Coxson. (The two have been playing music together since fifth grade.) The overall effect of the combination of punk rock momentum, danceable swagger and brainswirling guitars is very ’69, meaning both the musical year, with its associate long-form psychedelic garage rock freak-outs, and of course, the sexual position. Ω

Shane Oakley, Justin Craperi, Dan Damone, Jaron Coxson and Donovan Williams kick it between kicking out the jams.

Prescription plays at The Stage in Harrah’s Reno, 219 N. Center St., 788-2908, on June 22, and with Keyser Soze at Shea’s Tavern, 715 S. Virginia St., 786-4774, on July 14.

OPINION

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NEWS

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Drummer Donovan Williams, bassist Jaron Coxson and rhythm guitarist Dan Damone lay down the tight grooves, while lead guitarist Shane Oakley reels out fuzzy, squealing guitar lines that never stray too far from hummable melodies. New recruit Justin Craperi adds some atmospheric organ sounds to the mix. The bands conveys a definite rock ’n’ roll attitude—a ride-withthe-devil nonchalance—without the help of vocalist. “That wasn’t the intention, but we couldn’t imagine anyone we know singing on these songs,” says Oakley. “And these songs are cool without a singer.” In fact, Oakley’s bright, evocative guitar lines often take the place of traditional vocal melody. He cites psychedelic-era guitarists like Roky Erickson and Jimi Hendrix among his inspirations. The members of the group see other advantages to being an instrumental combo. Coxson mentions the potential to collaborate with other musicians, like jazz players or solo singer-songwriters, on one-off shows or recording projects. Not having a singer means the group can adapt to different situations, almost like a GREEN

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3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

THURSDAY 6/14

FRIDAY 6/15

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

SATURDAY 6/16

Jam Stain, 9:30pm, no cover

SUNDAY 6/17 Moon Gravy, 8:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

The Saddle Tramps, Hellbound Eddie The Kennedy Veil, Dissonance in Design, Wilson, The Rhythm Tailors, 8pm, $8, $10 Nevermute, others, 9pm, $5, $7 after 9pm

BAR-M-BAR

Fire spinning performance, 8pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-0806

THE BLACK TANGERINE

Bike Night Blues Jam, 7pm, no cover

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Strangeworld, 9:30pm, $5

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

Slide Mountain Band, 9pm, no cover

Ladies Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 for women

COMMA COFFEE

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662 255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 1) Cargo 2) Centric 3) Main Floor

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Sunday be fore publication .

1) Forbidden Fridays, 8pm, $10, $12 JT Chevalier, 6pm, no cover

Larry Johnson, 6pm, no cover

Larry Johnson, 6pm, no cover

DAVID’S GRILL

Mark Castro Duo, 6pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Twitch Angry, Mad Side, 9:30pm, no cover

The Xchangerz, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Phil, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Phil, 9pm, no cover

1) XM Fredie, 9pm, no cover 3) Casual Dogs, 9pm, no cover

3) Livitz Livitz, 9pm, $5 men, no cover charge for women

3) Party Jams w/Cliff Notes, 7pm, $5 men, no cover charge for women

3) Mark Castro Band, 3pm, no cover

6590 N. Wingfield Pkwy., Sparks; (775) 626-1000 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

FREIGHT HOUSE DISTRICT 250 Evans Ave., (775) 334-7041 1) 250 Lounge 2) Duffy’s Ale House 3) Heineken Stage

June 15, 8 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

College Night w/DJs (dubstep, electro, house), 10pm, $5 with college ID

COMMROW

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

The Saddle Tramps

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

535 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-1774

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Sunday Night Acoustics/Open Mic, 8pm, no cover

DJ/dancing, 9pm, no cover

CLUB BASS

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/18-6/20

GENOA BAR & SALOON

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover

2) Jason King Band, 7pm, W, no cover

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, no cover Karaoke w/Nick, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Smokin’ Bulldogs, 7pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Jeff Rowan, 8pm, no cover

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Utility Players, Th, 7:30pm, $11, $16; Hynopt!c with Dan Kimm, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Will C, Tony D, F, 9:30pm, Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $13, $16

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

City Lights, Carousel Kings, Rust Belt Lights, Our Devices, 7pm, Tu, $TBA

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

JAVA JUNGLE

Sunday Music Showcase, 6pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Helen Hong, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Thomas Dale, Michael Blaustein, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Todd Glass, Daniel Kinno, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Bob Zany, Larry “Bubbles” Brown, W, 9pm, $25

Mark Castro Band, 8pm, no cover

2282 Main St., Genoa; (775) 782-3870

Comedy

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover

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THU dj dance party 8pm

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FRI songwriters in the round 8pm

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SUN karaoke 8pm–12Am mON karaoke 8pm–12Am

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Best rs Burge o in Ren OPINION

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RYAN’S SALOON

& BROILER GREEN

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OTIS

TUE steve starr karaoke 8pm–12Am

Think you know your limits? Think again.

WED open mic with cliffnotes 8pm–12Am

If you drink, don’t drive. PerIod.

ALL SHO WS NO COV ER

O p E N 7 DAY S 3 p m – ?

924 S. Wells Ave. Reno 323-4142 ARTS&CULTURE

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THURSDAY 6/14 JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

FRIDAY 6/15

SATURDAY 6/16

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Vague Choir, Big Remote, Kadence, 10pm, $3

Bobby Joe Ebola & the Children MacNuggits, 10pm, $5

Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Serpent and Seraph, Hellpig, Dennis is Dead, Sound the Sirens, 8pm, $6

Bring Back The ’80s Dance Party w/DJ Kos, 8pm, $5

Seether, 8pm, Tu, $35

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Apostles of Badness, Canyon White, Hellbilly Bandits, 9pm, $5

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

Open Mic Night/College Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover

MO’S PLACE

Gift of Gab, Equipto, Z-Man, Enzyme Dynamite, DJ True Justice, 9pm, $10, $15

3600 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 542-1095

NEW OASIS

Los Inquietos del Norte, 9pm, $35

2100 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 359-4020

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Dale Poune, 7pm, no cover

The Northstar Session, 8pm, no cover

Scot Marshall, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

PONDEROSA SALOON

Karaoke w/Steel & the Gang, 7:30pm, no cover

The Bootleggers, 8pm, no cover

318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED ROCK BAR

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

Open Blues Jam with Schall Adams, 7pm, no cover

Spencer & Morgan’s Funk Jam, 9:30pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Live metal bands, 8pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

NMA film after party, 9pm, no cover

Live music, 9pm, no cover

Nada Dada Closing Party “Identity Crisis,” 2pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

DJ Dance Party, 8pm, no cover

Songwriters in the Round, 8pm, $12

It’s Party Time Variety Show, 7pm, $10

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

June 17, 9 p.m. Mo’s Place 3600 Lake Tahoe Blvd. South Lake Tahoe (530) 542-1095

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-6460

THE UNDERGROUND

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Naomi Grady, Wayne Carlson, Kurt Harrigan, 7pm, no cover

AND MANY MORE! Receive 10% off

ON ANY PURchASE OVER $100 MENTiON ThiS AD fOR AN ADDiTiONAl 5%

825-0195

5445 Meadowood Mall cir. RN&R

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JUNE 14, 2012

Karaoke w/Steve Starr, 8pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Steve Starr, 8pm, M, Tu, Open Mic w/Cliff Notes, 8pm, W, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

SAVE UP TO 25% On Select Styles

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Local Band Listening Party, 9pm, M, Dark Tuesdays, 9pm, Tu, DJ Ahn, 9pm, W, no cover

1) Forrest Day, Naked for Safety, John Frederick, 8pm, $8, $10

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993 1) Showroom 2) Tree House Lounge

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

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Live jazz, 7:30pm, M, W, Taxi Cab Tuesdays (blues jam), 8pm, Tu, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Gift of Gab

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Think Free

June 16, 10 p.m. Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor 71 S. Wells Ave. 384-1652

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/18-6/20

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

Bobby Joe Ebola & the Children MacNuggits

SUNDAY 6/17

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

THURSDAY 6/14

FRIDAY 6/15

SATURDAY 6/16

SUNDAY 6/17

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/18-6/20

2) Steppenstonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppenstonz, 4pm, Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Steppenstonz, 4pm, Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 8pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Vegas Road Show, 6pm, no cover

2) Vegas Road Show, 6pm, no cover

1) Collin Raye, 8pm, $25 2) Vegas Road Show, 6pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, M, Tu, no cover Vinny Messina, 6pm, W, no cover

Atomic Rodeo, 10pm, no cover

Atomic Rodeo, 10pm, no cover

Atomic Rodeo, 10pm, no cover

Atomic Rodeo, 10pm M, no cover Desert Thunder, 10pm Tu, W, no cover

2) The Brothers Comatose, 10pm, no cover

1) David Allan Coe, 9pm, $25, $27

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, $19.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 8pm, $19.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, 9:30pm, $19.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturday, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, $19.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Man in the Mirror, 7pm, Tu, W, $19.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Steele Breeze, 10pm, W, no cover

4) Seven Days Gone, 9pm, no cover

1) Wanda Jackson, 9pm, $20, $35 4) Seven Days Gone, 9pm, no cover

1) Zeke, The Chop Tops, 9pm, $17.50, $24 4) Seven Days Gone, 9pm, no cover 7) Pinoy Champs w/Angeline Quinto, Yeng Constantino, Marcelito Pomoy, Jovit Baldovino, 8pm, $38-$88

2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Edgar Winter Band, 7:30pm, $27.50 2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 2) Quinn Dahle, 8pm, $15, The Gunner’s Daughter, 10pm, no cover 3) KaraokeTrivia, 6pm, DJ/dancing, 9pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 2) Quinn Dahle, 8pm, $15, Thee Indoors, 10pm, no cover 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, DJ/dancing, 9pm, no cover

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) WET Ultra Lounge 3) Xtreme Sports Bar 4) Mustangs 5) 2500 East 6) The Beach 7) Summit Pavilion

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 2) Quinn Dahle, 8pm, $15 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, no cover 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

Wanda Jackson June 15, 9 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. 789-2000

1) Viva Le Cirque, 9pm, Tu, W, $10

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover

1) Persuasion, 9pm, $25, $30 3) Karaoke-Trivia, 6pm, no cover

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, no cover 2) Stew Stewart, 7pm, no cover 3) Rosendo & Cecelia, 6pm, no cover 3) Rosendo & Cecelia, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ BG, 6pm, no cover Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

1) Thoroughly Modern Millie, 2pm, 8pm, $25 1) Thoroughly Modern Millie, 2pm, 7pm, 2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, no cover 3) Rosendo $25 2) Stew Stewart, 7pm, no cover & Cecelia, 6pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 5) Just Right, 5:30pm, no cover 5:30pm, DJ BG, 10pm, no cover

2) Stew Stewart, 7pm, M, Tu, John Dawson Band, 7pm, W, no cover

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

2) Ricky & The Red Streaks, 7pm, no cover 3) Jackie Landrum, 7pm, no cover 4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

2) Ricky & The Red Streaks, 8pm, no cover 3) Gary Douglas, 9pm, no cover 4) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Ricky & The Red Streaks, 8pm, 2) Ricky & The Red Streaks, 7pm, no cover 3) Gary Douglas, 9pm, no cover no cover 4) Dukes & Boots Rodeo Party, 3) Wesley Orsolic, 7pm, no cover 10pm, $20

2) Ricky & The Red Streaks, 7pm, M, no cover 3) Wesley Orsolic, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

1) Collective Soul, 8pm, $35, $45 2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover

2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ Tom, 9pm, M, DJ I, 10pm Tu, W, no cover 3) Dudes Day, 7pm Tu, Mix it Up!, 10pm, W, no cover

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover

TAHOE BILTMORE

5 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 831-0660 1) Breeze Nightclub 2) Casino Floor 3) Conrad’s

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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2) Patrick Major, 9pm, no cover

FEATURE STORY

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THIS WEEK

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Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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17th annual

RN&R 17 y e a rs of free communit y concer t s. be the re e very friday in july at 5:3 0pm

wingfield park amphitheater on the truckee river – downtown reno

FRIDAY, JULY 6

big sandy & his fly rite boys

opening: keyser soze – presented by:

FRIDAY, JULY 13

the gospel hummingbirds

opening: rick metz jazz trio

FRIDAY, JULY 20

igor & red elvises FRIDAY, JULY 27

truth & salvage co. produced by: thank you to our sustaining sponsors:

32   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 14, 2012

opening: the mark sexton band


For Thursday, June 7 to Wednesday, June 13 To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

DASH FOR DADS CHEETAH CHASE: Watch Animal Ark’s cheetahs run, off-leash, on the hillside of the wildlife sanctuary. The big cats will go from zero to 45 mph in three seconds with 220-foot strides they accelerate to 60 mph. Children must be age 10 or older to attend. RSVP required. Su, 6/17, 6pm. $40 adults; $35 seniors; $30 children ages 10-16. Animal Ark Wildlife Sanctuary and Nature Center, 1265 Deerlodge Road, off Red Rock Road, (775) 970-3431, www.animalark.org.

Listings are free, but not guaranteed. Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

IF PARKS COULD TALK SERIES: Washoe County’s lecture series continues with the story behind Lazy 5 Regional Park in Spanish Springs. Join Washoe County Park Ranger Marie Fong for an hourlong walk around the park and a talk about the history of the park and the area around it. Th, 6/14, 7pm. Free. Lazy 5 Regional Park, 7100 Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs, (775) 8236500, www.washoecountyparks.com.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., June 28, is Thursday, June 21.

Events ART BITE SERIES: Learn from biologist Guy Hoelzer about the slime molds featured in Gail Wight’s exhibition Hydraphilia. F, 6/15, 12-1pm. $10; free for NMA members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

NADA DADA MOTEL: Reno-based artists will rent motel rooms in downtown Reno and transform them into individual galleries, performance spaces and surrealistic art installations during the annual art event. Locations include the Townhouse Motor Lodge on Second Street and Arlington Avenue, the El Ray and Lido Motels on North Arlington, the Rancho Sierra and In-Town Motels on Fourth Street, Wildflower Village at West Fourth Street near McCarran Boulevard, Strega Art Bar at 310 S. Arlington St., and the new Reno Art Works Studios and Gallery at 1995 Dickerson Road. Th, 6/14, 7-10pm; F, 6/15,

DANCERS EXTREME CHALLENGE: Pro, intermediate and beginner dancers from across the nation come together on the southwest shores of Pyramid Lake for Dancers Extreme Challenge. Featuring a 5,000 square foot dance floor on the lake front, this event includes a Survivor-style team competition, water volleyball, bonfires and all-you-can eat breakfast, lunch and dinner. Th-Su through 6/24. Opens 6/21. $240. Pyramid Lake, Nevada State Route 445, 40 miles northeast of Reno, http://latindancemag.com.

DASH FOR DADS: Builders Association Charity hosts this Father’s Day 5K walk/run and kids’ fun run. There will be face painting, a bounce house and free tattoos for kids. Proceeds from the event go toward programs offering assistance to families affected by prostate cancer, as well as awareness and testing programs. Su, 6/17, 8am-noon. $10-$30 entry fee. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, Sparks, (775) 329-2424, www.dashfordads.com.

Concrete Canoe Competition (NCCC) each year. Sa, 6/16, 10am-5pm. Free. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, Sparks, (775) 353-2376.

PRCA XTREME BULLS: The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association-sanctioned bull riding tour kicks off the 93rd annual Reno Rodeo. The PRCA Xtreme Bulls Tour showcases pro rodeo’s top bull riders and some of the toughest bulls the world has to offer. The bull riders includes the top 40 cowboys from the PRCA World standings, as well as contestants who advance through Xtreme Bulls qualifying events. Th, 6/14, 7pm. $17 general; $22 reserved; $27 box seats. Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, 1350 N. Wells Ave., (775) 329-3877, www.prorodeo.com.

RENO ROCKABILLY RIOT: The second annual celebration of rockabilly music and culture features drag racing, burnouts, a pin-up girl contest, a tattoo show and live music including headliners Wanda Jackson, Zeke and The Chop Tops. F-Su through 6/17. Opens 6/15. $10-$50. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (775) 291-5008, www.renorockabillyriot.com.

RENO RODEO: The 93rd annual rodeo is a Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association-sanctioned sporting event and draws more than 750 professional athletics competing for $500,000 in prize money. Highlights include two world class team roping events, professional bull riding, team roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing and bronco riding, as well as a cattle drive, parade,

10am-10pm; Sa, 6/16, 10am-10pm; Su, 6/17, 10am-6pm. Free. Visit website for details, http://nadadadamotel.weebly.com.

kids’ activities, food, shopping and a carnival. M-Su through 6/23. Opens 6/14. $5-$25. Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, 1350 N. Wells Ave., (775) 329-3877, www.renorodeo.com.

the Sierra Nevada College campus. Nohost bar at 5:30pm; presentation begins 6pm. $5 donation suggested. There will be a bird watching walk on June 16 starting at the UC Davis Tahoe City Field Station. Th, 6/14, 5:30pm. $5 donation suggested. Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences, Sierra Nevada College Campus, 291 Country Club Drive, Incline Village, (775) 881-7566, http://terc.ucdavis.edu.

RIVERWALK DISTRICT WINE WALK: Visit any Riverwalk District Merchant on Wine Walk day to get a map of participating Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, with a valid photo ID, you’ll receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Every month offers a different theme and part of all proceeds are donated to a local charity. Third Sa of every month, 2-5pm. $20. The Riverwalk District, downtown Reno along the Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

UPPER RALSTON/NORTHERN LITTLE ITALY WALK: Enjoy a walk in a residential neighborhood with a mix of architectural styles. Reservations required. Tu, 6/19, 6-8pm. $10; free for HRPS members. Intersection of Washington Street, The Strand and College Avenue, (775) 7474478, www.historicreno.org.

VALHALLA ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL: The 32nd annual celebration of the arts includes musical and theatrical performances, visual art exhibits, fairs, cultural festivals and art workshops. M-Su through 9/2. Prices vary. Tallac Historic Site, Highway 89, 2.5 miles north of Highway 50, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4975, http://valhallatahoe.com.

SMALL WONDER WEDNESDAY: Families with children 5 years old and younger are invited to play, explore and listen to stories read by the museum’s educators. Only children age 5 and younger are admitted to Small Wonder Wednesdays, which start at 9am, an hour before the museum opens. Older siblings may join at 10am. Third W of every month, 9am. $8 per person; free for members and babies under age 1. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

WESTERN ADDITION: Visit vestiges of one of Reno’s earliest residential neighborhoods, dating from the mid-1870s. Hear the stories of its early “movers and shakers,” such as Fire Chief George Twaddle, businessman Frank Humphrey and banker Charles Bender. View the varying architectural styles from the Carpenter Gothic Clifford House to the modest brick bungalows of the Smith-

TAHOE’S AVIAN SUMMER VISITORS: Kirk Hardie, co-executive director of the Tahoe Institute for Natural Science, presents two events introducing the migratory birds of the Lake Tahoe region. Hardie will present a talk on these avian visitors to the area on June 14 at the Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences on

THIS WEEK

continued on page 35

NATIONAL CONCRETE CANOE COMPETITION: The 25th annual competition consists of college engineering students designing and constructing a canoe entirely of concrete and competing against other universities in four separate categories: paddling, final product, design paper, and oral presentation. Winners from each of the 18 regional competitions across the United States are invited to the National

s r e t a W Wild Water sports athletes and enthusiasts will gather in downtown Reno for the ninth annual Reno River Festival this weekend. Originally held in May, the whitewater event has been moved to June to take advantage of the (hopefully) warmer temperatures and avoid the inclement weather that can sometimes hit the region in mid-spring. Whitewater athletes will compete for $12,000 in prizes in various kayaking and stand-up paddleboard events throughout the weekend. The festival will also feature the fifth annual Run Amuck Competition (pictured) and the Charity Raft Race, as well as new events Splash Dogs and the Biggest Little Dog Jog. Spectators can watch the action at the Truckee River Whitewater Park, as well as visit food and vendor booths, shop at the outdoor gear expo and listen to live music at Wingfield Park, located between First Street and Arlington Avenue. Headliners include San Diego reggae band Tribal Seeds on June 15, local rock/funk group Jelly Bread on June 16 and San Francisco soul/funk outfit Monophonics on June 17. Festival hours are 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on June 15-16 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on June 17. Park admission is free. For details, visit www.renoriverfestival.com. —Kelley Lang

OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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Online Public School for K-12

We prepare Washoe County’s online students for a bright future.

WINDY HILL

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Enroll now and be ready for the first day of school! 888-322-9353 www.wolflearning.com

Hawkins Amphitheatre FAMILY FUN INCLUDES: • Juggler • Card Magician • Banjo Phenom Ken Jones

WITH GUEST MC Washoe Online Learning for the Future An E-Learning Academy of Washoe Innovations High School

Alan Gratzer, Founder & Former Drummer of REO Speedwagon

TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE AT: • Absolute Music SM

• Greg Golden's Bizarre Guitar

June 23, 2012 Starts at 3pm $35 General seating $25 Lawn seating Buy tickets at GSR www.grandsierraresort.com

www.windyhillmusicfestival.com

All proceeds from the event will benefit Washoe

School starts August 27th! 34   |   RN&R   |   JUNE 14, 2012

County School District and the Performing Arts Center Signature Academy at Damonte Ranch.


continued from page 33

75% TreaT yourself To gifT cerTificaTes up To

OFF! Petersen subdivision. Reservations required. Sa, 6/16, 10am. $10 non-members; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. Meet at the northeast corner of Fifth and Bell streets by JJ’s Pie Co., 555 W. Fifth St., (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

Art ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Peaked Again. Artists Co-op of Reno features Erik Holland’s plein air paintings of Nevada mountaintops, as well as work by guest artist Patricia Sherer. Through 6/30, 11am4pm. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

WHOLE FOODS SPARKS FARMERS’ MARKET: The 20th annual farmers’ market returns with a familyfriendly atmosphere and farmer-focused event. New highlights include a gourmet food truck court and expanded food area. Th, 3-8pm through 8/2; Th, 8/16, 3-8pm; Th, 8/23, 3-8pm. Free. Victorian Square Plaza, Victorian Avenue, across from John Ascuaga’s Nugget and in front of Century Theaters, Sparks, (775) 7465024, www.shirleysfarmersmarkets.com.

CCAI COURTHOUSE GALLERY: New Crop. Capital City Arts Initiative presents its summer exhibition featuring work by Northern Nevada artists Amy Aramanda, Kaitlin Bryson, Logan Lape, Kath McGaughey, Emily Rogers and Karl Schwiesow. M-F through 9/4. Free. Inside the Carson City Courthouse, 885 E. Musser St., Carson City, www.arts-initiative.org.

of time through Nevada’s seasons. With each of her four altars, Scala isolates the seasons while connecting them to the greater ebb and flow of life cycles. The opening reception is June 22, 7-9pm. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 7/6. Opens 6/18. In the Making. Using her personal history as inspiration, University of Nevada, Reno sculptural ceramics student Michelle Laxalt creates pieces that evoke a whimsical world of interactions and child-like wonder. In almost direct contrast, Peter Laxalt’s drawing and paintings merge design and graffiti aesthetic into exaggerated figures and forms. Combined the siblings’ work shares the thread of moving the viewer from the common world into a more fantastical one. The opening reception is June 22, 7-9pm. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 7/6. Opens 6/18; Something

Visit www.newsreview.com

THE HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Hither & Thither, In her first exhibition, Rachael Scala draws from her experiences as a native Nevadan to create an installation exploring the passing

THIS WEEK

continued on page 38

Motherly shove

when was your last massage & facial?

I’m in my 20s and, for eight months, have been seeing a girl who might very well be “the one.” The problem is she wants to meet my mother, who is beyond control. She plays a game with girls I date, which I call “the 20 questions of doom.” Her questions start out normal, but by question 10, she’ll ask stuff like, “Have you ever seen my son in the nude, and if not, do you have plans to?” She’ll also say very negative things about me. Also, I’m a dark-skinned black person, and my girlfriend is biracial, and my mother doesn’t want me dating a lightskinned girl because she wants grandkids who resemble her. I want to keep this girl, but she is growing impatient with my not letting her meet my mom, and she’s beginning to think I’m ashamed of her. Any girl meeting her boyfriend’s mother for the first time expects a few uncomfortable questions—but on her politics and reproductive plans, not whether she’s had the chance to probe that mole under Sonnyboy’s scrotum. People who don’t have saboteurs for parents can find it hard to understand that somebody’s mother could be their relationship’s worst enemy. You, on the other hand, are already dreading your mother’s hospitality: “Son, shall we have dessert now and push your little friend into the woodchipper later?” Talk to your girlfriend, but not about meeting the middle-aged mean girl also known as your mother. Open up to her about the painful relationship you have with your mother and how hurtful it’s been that she has tried to drive away every woman in your OPINION

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make it today with our introductory signature massages & facials

life. (Some animals eat their young. Some eat their young’s girlfriends.) Evoking your girlfriend’s sympathy is the first step in shrinking her hurt feelings. For best results, avoid mentioning that Mom’ll think she’s from the wrong side of the Crayola box. You can’t control your mother’s behavior, but you can control who she gets to meet. This would be a good time to reconsider the definition of family. Maybe family means people who act like family whether they’re blood relatives or not, and maybe you should bring your girlfriend around to meet those people—your dearest friends and maybe an aunt and uncle who are fond of you. Chances are, what ultimately matters to her is not meeting your mother but believing you think she’s important enough to introduce. Show her you’re proud of her and that she’s loved and appreciated, and she should stop sulking. In fact, she might even start joking about what it would be like, being invited over for a nice quiet dinner of sacrificial lamb—or, as your mother might put it to her: “Let me just show my son to his chair, dear, and then I’ll show you to your spit.” Ω

introductory signature massge or facial: { for first time customers only }

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

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Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Honest. Nothing Profound, Kelly Peyton’s newest body of work centers on the personal impact of everyday concepts, quotes and statements. Utilizing thrift store frames, pen, ink and transferred images, Peyton creates pieces that explore and share how the seemingly cliche can become intimate. The opening reception is Friday, June 22, 7-9pm. Tu-F, 36pm through 7/6. Opens 6/18. Free. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: North Tahoe Arts June Art Exhibits. North Tahoe Arts presents Fired Up, featuring clay art by a group of five women ceramic sculptors from Auburn, in the Main Gallery. In the Corison Loft Gallery is Art & Solstice, a summerinspired and themed exhibit featuring 2D and 3D artwork. Tu-Su, 11am-5pm through 6/25. Free. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

SHEPPARD FINE ARTS GALLERY, CHURCH FINE ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Nate Clare: LINE [repeat]. Nate Clark’s paintings examine order, structure and time as they relate to mark making. The closing reception is July 13, 6-8pm. Tu, Th, 2-6pm through 7/12. Opens

6/19; Sa, 12-3pm through 7/7. Opens 6/23; F, 7/13, 6-8pm. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6658,

www.unr.edu/art .

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Nudes and Neon: Stephanie Hogen, Elaine Jason, & Candace Nicol. This three-person exhibition investigates the connection between body, light and reflections. This show combines a sense of art history with a reference to Reno’s history. M-F, 10am-5pm through 6/28. Free. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

ST. MARY’S ART CENTER: STAND. Capital City Arts

www.newsreview.com

Initiative and St. Mary’s Art Center present the exhibition STAND, a salute to Nevada’s Basque arborglyphs by fiber artist Lexi Boeger. The installation is the culmination of Boeger’s two-week residency at St. Mary’s and will be in the center’s fourth floor gallery. F-Su, 11am-4pm through 7/8. Free. 55 N. R St., Virginia City, (775) 847-7774, www.arts-initiative.org.

STREMMEL GALLERY: Open Space, Stremmel Gallery presents an exhibition of new work by contemporary landscape painters Dale Livezey, Craig Mitchell, James Shay, Valerie Shesko and Alan Sonneman. M-Sa through 6/16. Free. 1400 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-0558, www.stremmelgallery.com.

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Studios. The TMCC Main Art Gallery will feature a variety of different art media hosted by Reno Open Studios. Reno Open Studios is composed of 42 visual artists living and creating art within the Reno/Sparks area. The exhibit includes oils, acrylics, watercolor, decorative gourds, jewelry, textiles, bronze, photography, woodturning, metal sculpture, glass and glass blowing, clay, printmaking and ceramics. Closing reception and artist talks will be held on Wednesday, June 20, 58pm. Featured speakers include Tom Beebe, Tia Flores, Brett Moten and Ray Valdez. M-F,

9am-9pm through 6/25; Sa, 9am-5pm through

6/23. Free. Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini Blvd., (775) 674-7698, www.tmcc.edu/vparts/artgalleries. THE VISION PLACE GALLERY, UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP OF NORTHERN NEVADA: Eureka! Last year a group of artists and photographers spent a weekend in the historic mining town of Eureka, Nev. Works inspired by that tour will be on display through June 17. M-Su through 6/17. 780 Del Monte Lane, (775) 240-7998.

THE WEDGE CERAMICS STUDIO: Dane Austin Meier Pottery Exhibit. Meier uses the ceramic forms of antiquity as his inspiration when spinning his ceramic art into something new, altered and modern. Through 6/26, 10am-5pm. Free. 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

Museums NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Gregory Euclide: Nature Out There, W-Su through 9/2; The Canary Project: Landscapes of Climate Change, W-Su through 6/17; Edward Burtynsky: Oil, W-Su through 9/23; Anne Lindberg: Modal Lines, W-Su through 7/15; Tim Hawkinson: Totem, W-Su through 10/7; Andrew Rogers: Contemporary Geoglyphs, W-Su through 8/26; Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-Su through 1/1; Southwest Pottery From Anasazi to Zuni Selections from the Brenda and John Blom Collection, W-Su through 9/9; Art, Science, and the Arc of Inquiry: The Evolution of the Nevada Museum of Art, W-Su through 7/1; Gail Wight: Hydraphilia, W-Su through 8/26; Arthur and Lucia Mathews: Highlights of the California Decorative Style, Tu-Su through 10/14. Opens 6/16. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

Film CHINESE DRAMA: TUYA’S MARRIAGE: Artemisia Moviehouse presents a screening of this romance drama about a Mongolian sheepherder’s search for a new husband to help her take care of her family. Tu, 6/19, 7-10pm. $7 general; $5 members, bicyclists, students. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

CORAL REEF ADVENTURE: The SkyDome 8/70 largeformat film presents the real-life expedition of ocean explorers and underwater filmmakers Howard and Michele Hall as they guide viewers to the islands and waters of the South Pacific. M-Su, 1, 3, 5 & 7pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 children ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812.

DARK SIDE OF THE MOON: Pink Floyd’s legendary rock ‘n’ roll masterpiece, is recreated in fullcolor HD animation with surround sound and new footage and effects. F, Sa, 8pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 kids ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center; 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

EVENT HORIZON: This documentary film tells the story of what it means when, once a year, more than 50,000 people gather from all corners of the globe to build Black Rock City. The film explores Burning Man’s history, some of the myths and misunderstandings that surround and sensationalize Burning Man’s culture, and how the event has come to survive, grow and evolve by working closely with its neighbors. Th, 6/14, 6pm. $8 for NMA members; $10 for non-members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

TALES OF THE MAYA SKIES: The full-dome digital planetarium show travels to the ancient jungles of Mexico and features the ancient complex of Chichén Itzá, the “seventh wonder of the modern world,” in a rich combination of science, culture and legend. Spanish language showing at 6pm on Wednesdays. M-Su, 12, 2, 4 & 6pm through 9/3. $7 adults; $5 seniors age 60 and older, children ages 3-12. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

Poetry/Literature DAVID C. ANTONUCCI BOOK READING: The author gives an illustrated talk based on his latest book Fairest Picture: Mark Twain at Lake Tahoe. The program will be followed by a Q&A session and book signing. Sa, 6/16, 12:30pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188.

TAHOE BLUES READING AND SIGNING: Authors Joan Atkinson, Alison O. Bender, Margaret Elysia Garcia and Mark Maynard read from and sign Tahoe Blues: Short Lit on Life at the Lake, a new collection of flash fiction and microessays by 56 writers from Tahoe, Reno and beyond. W, 6/20, 6:30-8pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

Music ANTSY MCCLAIN & THE TRAILER PARK TROUBADOURS: Singer, songwriter, humorist and storyteller Antsy McClain and his band celebrates 20 years in music and the release of their new CD Living the Dream. Th, 6/14, 7:30pm. $23 general; $19 students, seniors, BAC members. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976 ext. 116, http://breweryarts.org.

CARPENTERS MUSIC WORLD MONTHLY MUSIC PROGRAM: This music program is open to all ages, styles and skill levels. Performers must call in advance with their name or name of group, song title, instrumentation and length of performance. Performances must fit the theme of the month. June’s theme is “Television and Movie Theme Songs.” Second Th of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Carpenters Music World, 2700 S. Virginia St., (775) 391-7757, www.carpentersmusic.com.

THIS WEEK

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KUNR JAZZ BRUNCH: Judith Ames and Rocky Tatarelli perform at the monthly event presented by KUNR Radio and Nevada Museum of Art. Su, 6/17, 11am-1pm. Free admission fees apply to art galleries. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

6/14, 7:30-9:30pm; F, 6/15, 7:30-9:30pm; Sa, 6/16, 7:30-9:30pm; F, 6/22, 7:30-9:30pm; Sa, 6/23, 7:309:30pm; Su, 6/24, 3-5pm. $14-$20. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 3223716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE: Tahoe Players present its production of the Tony Award-winning musical. Taking place in New York City in 1922, Thoroughly Modern Millie tells the story of young Millie Dillmount, who has just moved to city in search of a new life for herself. Based on the popular movie, the stage version includes a full score of new songs and dance numbers. Sa, 6/16, 2 & 8pm; Su, 6/17, 2 & 7pm. $25. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks, (775) 356-3300, www.janugget.com.

SUMMER SOIREE AT THE ARBORS: Hear sounds of the Maytan Band while enjoying the art of Moments of Memory, a local non-profit bringing art projects to people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Light refreshments will be provided. M, 6/18, 68pm. Free. Arbors Memory Care Community, 2121 E. Prater Way, Sparks, (775) 331-2229, www.arborsmemorycare.com.

Sports & Fitness

Classes

BIRD WATCHING: Kirk Hardie, co-executive direc-

BUILD YOUR OWN PASSIVE SOLAR COLD FRAME:

tor of the Tahoe Institute for Natural Science will lead a bird-watching walk. After the walk, the UC Davis Tahoe City Field Station will be open from 10am to 2pm with a volunteer docent available for tours of the wetlands, stream restoration and native plant demonstration gardens as well as opportunities to participate in citizen science projects for water quality monitoring, phenology monitoring and bird watching. Sa, 6/16, 8-10am. $5 donation suggested. UC Davis Tahoe City Field Station, 2400 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City, (775) 881-7566, http://terc.ucdavis.edu.

This project yields a long-lasting, solid garden space, which not only protects the garden from the cold weather and high winds, but also rabbits and other pests. Simple design ensures maximum exposure to the sun, with exterior insulation and infrared thermal film holding the warmth throughout the cold winter nights. RSVP to Stacey. Sa, 6/16, 10am-noon. $10. Hungry Mother Organics Roadside Stand, 3190 Highway 395, Carson City, (775) 267-3084, http://hungrymother.cc.

LAVENDER PRODUCTION & SALES WORKSHOP: The WNC Specialty Crop Institute offers this workshop that includes a lavender farm tour and classroom lecture. The workshop will begin at Campies Lavender Patch in Stagecoach where students will learn about harvesting, soils and site selection, the extraction process for essential oils and best varieties for Nevada. Following the farm tour, a classroom lecture at the WNC Carson Campus will focus on sales and marketing, product development and online strategies to expand markets. M, 6/18, 9am-4pm. $35-$45. Western Nevada College, 2201 W. College Parkway, Carson City, (775) 351-2551, www.wnc.edu/sci.

RENO ACES: The minor league baseball team plays Tucson Padres. Th, 6/14, 7:05pm; F, 6/15, 7:05pm; Sa, 6/16, 7:05pm; Su, 6/17, 1:05pm. $6$24. Reno Aces Ballpark, 250 Evans Ave., (775) 334-4700, www.renoaces.com.

Onstage HOW I LEARNED TO DRIVE: Brüka Theatre presents Paula Vogel’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama that follows the strained, sexual relationship between a young girl and her aunt’s husband, from her adolescence through her years into college and beyond. Strong language. Suggested for mature audience members age 18 and older. Th, 6/14, 8pm; F, 6/15, 8pm; Sa,

YOGA BASICS: A six-week introduction to the principles, philosophy, postures and breathing of yoga. Pre-registration requested. M, 7:15-8:30pm through 7/9. $81. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

6/16, 8pm; W, 6/20, 8pm; Th, 6/21, 8pm; F, 6/22, 8pm; Sa, 6/23, 8pm. $18 general; $16 seniors,

students, military; $20 at the door. Brüka Theatre; 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org.

ORDINARY PEOPLE: Good Luck Macbeth Theater presents this drama based on Robert Redford’s 1980 movie directorial debut. The story follows the accidental death of the older son of an affluent family and the relationships among the bitter mother, the good-natured father and the guilt-ridden younger son. Th,

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

Community BRIDGEWIRE—MAKERSPACE OPEN SPACE NIGHT: Learn about this member-funded, non-profit makerspace, hackerspace workshop. Th, 6-9pm through 12/27. 1055 Industrial Way, Ste. 20, Sparks, (775) 219-7987.

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WIN TICKETS, DINNER AND A MEET & GREET WITH THE

MESS FEST AT THE KNITTING FACTORY, RENO ON JULY 9TH!

FEATURING PRIMA DONNA, ADAM BONES, WARNER DRIVE & ACIDIC

BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s time for

your right hand to find out what your left hand has been doing lately, and vice versa. They’ve been attending to their separate agendas for a while, and now it would be wise to have them work together more closely. As they get reacquainted, a bit of friction would be understandable. You may have to serve as a mediator. Try to get them to play nicely with each other for a while before jumping in to the negotiations about how best they can cooperate in the future. And be very firm with them: no slapping or fighting allowed.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Some rela-

tionships that you call “friendships” may be little more than useful connections or status boosters or affiliations that enhance your power and influence. There’s no shame in that. But it’s also a smart idea to make sure that at least some of your alliances are rooted primarily in pure affection. You need to exchange energy with people who don’t serve your ambitions so much as they feed your soul. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to cultivate friendships like that. Take good care of those you have, and be alert for the possibility of starting a new one.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Do you

remember what you were doing between July 2000 and June 2001? Think back. Did anything happen then that felt like a wild jumpstart, or a series of epiphanies, or a benevolent form of shock therapy? Were you forcibly dislodged from a rut by an adversary who eventually became an ally? Did you wake up from a sleepy trance you didn’t even know you had been in? I’m guessing that at least some of those experiences will be returning in the coming months, but on a higher octave this time.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Author Steven Covey describes your “circle of concern” as everything you’re concerned with or worried about. Your “circle of influence,” on the other hand, is anything that’s within your ability to change right now. For example, you may have general long-term questions or anxieties about the future of your health. That’s your circle of concern. But your circle of influence contains specific actions you can take to affect your health today, like eating good food, getting enough sleep, and doing exercise. What I’m seeing for you, Cancerian, is that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to spend less time in your circle of concern and more in your circle of influence. Stop fantasizing about what may or may not happen, and simply take charge of the details that will make a difference.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There’s a wild zoo

S T E K C I T WIN TO ENTER:

• Send an e-mail with “MESS FEST” in the subject line to contest@newsreview.com. • Include your full name, birth date and day phone. All entries must be received by Sunday, July 1st. Winner will be notified by phone and e-mail on Monday, July 2nd. 42

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about two hours northwest of Seattle. After paying your fee, you can drive your car through acres of land where large animals are allowed to roam free. When I took the tour, I stopped my rented Dodge Stratus by the side of the road to get a better look at a humongous buffalo with a humped back and a long woolly beard. It lumbered over to where I was parked and for the next five minutes thoroughly licked my windshield with its enormous purple tongue. My head was just inches away from its primal power, and yet I was safe and relaxed and perfectly amused. I wouldn’t be surprised if you had a comparable experience sometime soon, Leo.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the Biblical

book of Genesis, Jacob had a dream of angels ascending and descending a ladder that went up to heaven. I recommend that you try to incubate a similar dream, or else do some meditations in which you visualize that scene. It would help prime your psyche for one of this week’s top assignments, which is to be adaptable as you go back and forth between very high places and very low places. Heaven and earth need to be better connected. So do the faraway and the close-at-hand, as well as the ideal and the practical. And you’re the right person for the job.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Thomas Edison said something to the effect that a person who is thoroughly satisfied is probably a failure. I guess he meant that if you’re not always pushing to make your life better, you must not have very high standards or passionate goals. While I can see the large grains of truth in that theory, I don’t think

it applies in all cases—like for you right now, for instance. During the upcoming grace period, it will make sense for you to be perfectly content with the state of your life just as it is. To do so won’t make you lazy and complacent. Just the opposite, in fact: It will charge your psychic batteries and create a reservoir of motivational energy for the second half of 2012.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Twenty-

four-year-old actress Annalynne McCord has risen up in rebellion against what she calls “Hollywood’s perfection requirement.” Lately she has been brazenly appearing in public without any make-up on. She has even encouraged paparazzi to snap photos of her in her natural state. “I’m not perfect,” she says, “and that’s okay with me.” I nominate her to be your role model in the coming weeks, Scorpio. You will be able to stir up useful blessings for yourself by being loyal to the raw truth. You can gain power by not hiding anything. (And yes, I realize that last statement is in conflict with the core Scorpionic philosophy.) Here’s my guarantee: It’ll be fun to be free of unrealistic images and showy deceptions.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Nineteenth-century Russian novelist Ivan Turgenev once called his fellow novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky a “pimple on the face of literature.” But more than a hundred years after that crude dismissal, Dostoyevsky is a much more highly regarded and influential writer than Turgenev. Use this as inspiration, Sagittarius, if you have to deal with anyone’s judgmental appraisals of you in the coming days. Their opinions will say more about them than about you. Refresh your understanding of the phenomenon of “projection,” in which people superimpose their fantasies and delusions on realities they don’t see clearly.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take a

few deep breaths. It’s important not to get overly worked up about your recent diversion from the Truth and the Way. I mean it’s not like you sold heroin to high school students or dumped toxic waste into a mountain stream, right? It’s true that you’ve incurred a minor karmic debt that will ultimately have to be repaid. And yes, you’ve been reminded that you can’t allow yourself to lower your standards even slightly. But I doubt any of it will matter in five years—especially if you atone now. So please go ahead and give yourself a spanking, make a definitive plan to correct your error, and start cruising in the direction of the next chapter of your life story.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Have you

ever tried to drink from a fire hose? The sheer amount and force of the water shooting out the end makes it hard to actually get any moisture in your mouth, let alone enjoy the process. On the other hand, it is kind of entertaining, and it does provide a lot of material to tell funny stories about later on. But are those good enough reasons to go ahead and do it? I say no. That’s why I advise you, metaphorically speaking, to draw your sustenance from a more contained flow in the coming week. Cultivate a relationship with a resource that gives you what you really need.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The coming

week will be an excellent time to declare your independence from anything that depresses you, obsesses you, or oppresses you. You will attract help from unexpected sources if you take that brave action. At the same time, it’ll be a perfect moment to declare your interdependence with anything that fires up your imagination, stirs up smart hope, or fills you with a desire to create masterpieces. Be adventurous as you dream about blending your energies with the very best influences.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Brad Bynum PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

Cabaret John Ludwick

Twenty years ago, it would have been inconceivable to imagine local punk bands playing gigs in Reno casinos. But times change, and now there’s a summer concert series of local underground rock bands playing The Stage in Harrah’s Reno. The Gunner’s Daughter and Mary Jane Rocket play on June 15. Thee Indoors plays on June 16. Prescription plays on June 22. The shows are booked by John Ludwick, a local musician better known as the guitarist and vocalist for the garage rock band Cathedral Ghost. For more information, visit http://blvproductionsnv.com/

How’d this get started? I got connected through the entertainment director over there, a guy named Tom Crist. My wife, Britney [Irwin], is working with the entertainment director over there, and she just put in her show [Persuasion] in Sammy’s Showroom with Tyzen, a hypnotist. [Crist] had some different ideas about what he wanted to do with the casino. He was trying to take the Zone 21 part of it, in the east tower, and make it more oriented towards a younger demographic. And he wanted to do live music, so she put us in contact, and I talked to the guy and got a feel for what he wanted to do. I told him that, as far as the music scene in town, I guess I get pigeonholed in the underground or the punk circle or whatever you want to call it, so I asked him if he was open to doing local bands of all

types and he said, yeah. My one main stipulation for it was that I wanted to get local bands paid. ... The ultimate goal is that bands will have more money to put out records and do those kinds of things. … [My wife’s] company is BLV Productions. That’s what the whole thing is contracted under, and just having me do the music. ... The venue is called The Stage at Harrah’s, it’s an old cabaret room. The space by itself is pretty cool. It’s just kind of strange that obviously it’s attached to a casino, and I’m doing bands that I guess normally wouldn’t play in the casinos. We’re over there Friday and Saturday.

Tell me about some of the shows. I did a show on Friday with The Shames and Los Pistoleros. The Shames are kind of like poppy punk rock ’n’ roll stuff, and Los Pistoleros is like psychobilly. And on Saturday I did the abomination known as the Pelvis Wrestlies, which is Clark [Demeritt] and John Lee’s band, which is kind of like Spitsy, Ramones-style rock. ... Coming up, Thee

OPINION

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

When I first got approached about this whole thing, I really didn’t know how to feel about it. I liked the idea that bands would get paid, but I was thinking that people would be resistant to the idea, because it’s in a casino, and it’s really weird. But when I talked to bands, 99percent of the time people were into it because it’s weird and obviously they could get some money out of it. So that’s what prompted me to take it on. The first night, it was little bit weird for the casino. I probably should have tried to ease into it a little bit. ... It was a little bit wild, because some of the security wasa little bit weirded out by the mohawks and, as they called it, “the moshing pit.” [Laughs.] But, at the end of the day, as long as there are people coming in, the casino will be pretty open to it. … And the bands have been pretty into it. The Shames were psyched. I’m not a sleazy promoter guy. I’m just a guy who plays in bands. … So overall the response has been pretty good. People are excited to have a new spot to play and just do something a little different, so you’re not just playing Holland [Project] or a basement or the same three or four venues that people generally play in town. Ω

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brucev@newsreview.com

A recent Newsweek cover story reports on a new idea in astronomy, one that puts forth the possibility there is more than one universe, that there are, perhaps, billions of universes, comprising a truly incomprehensible Multiverse. It s a skullcramping concept, involving string theory, quantum physics, black holes, dark matter, etc. You know, the typical stuff you hear folks gabbing about after a UFC pay-per-view bash. The reason I bring it up is to point out that there’s something about this idea (and nobody at this time is daring to suggest it’s true or there’s any evidence at all that it’s true) that fits in with the grand progression of man’s grasp of cosmic reality. As in, we used to think there was just one planet, a few hundred years ago. We then found out there was more than one. We used to think there was just one sun. We then discovered there were lots. And just a hundred years ago, we didn’t know if there was more than one galaxy in the universe. Then, the great

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∫y Bruce Van Dye

I recently drove past the Black Rock Desert, and the playa is already dry. Real dry. What’s it all mean, as far as this year’s Labor Day Weenie Roast is concerned? Haven’t the foggiest. In the meantime, the following appeared in the current issue of Rolling Stone (Charlie Sheen cover), in an article highlighting the summer’s four hottest dance parties: Burning Man, Black Rock City, Nevada. Aug. 27-Sept. 3. Top D.J.s rock mega sound systems all day and all night at camps like the Opulent Temple during the superpsychedelic desert experience. OK, fine. Accurate enough. But I bring it up because of RS’s listing of prices for tickets. $240-$420. Yeah, right. That brings me to StubHub, one of many ticket dealers online now selling tickets to the The Man for a thousand bucks. This reality inspires me to inquire as to what exactly is the difference between StubHub and crackhead ticket scalpers. Answer— StubHub takes Visa. ••• NEWS

Indoors are playing. They’re doing one set of Thee Indoors and one set of Nirvana covers. I’ve got Prescription coming up. … I also have some things that are a lot different. I’m trying to keep it varied. I have Milton Merlos, he’s the dude who used to do Sol Jibe. He’s going to be playing Spanish acoustic guitar. I’ve got some singer-songwriters in there and some more mainstream alt-rock. … Seas & Centuries is going to be playing there towards the end of the month, and Lucas Young & The Wilderness.

What’s the reaction been?

It’s all stars

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Edwin Hubble blew everybody’s pudding out their earholes, and proved that all those little smudges in space between the stars were actually galaxies. That led to us now knowing there are billions of galaxies, each with billions of stars. So in the last millennium, cosmic reality has gone from one planet/one sun to billions of galaxies/a googol of stars. Mercy. And now, there are guys who are stretched out, warped out, and far out enough to suggest there may be more than one universe. If this is true, it wouldn’t be that weird, in that it falls right in line with our growth pattern, if you will. Then again, if it is true, it will undoubtedly be the weirdest thing ever. Weird enough, probably, to make you explode into 74 octillion quarks on the spot. OK, that’s it for today’s consciousness stretch. Now get back to that busted lawn mower ... Ω

BIG HE ADERS GIZA 25pt 25k SMALL HEADERS GIZA 15pt 55k (60% OF BIG HE AD)

ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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JUNE 14, 2012

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IT’S ONE BREWSKI-FLOWING, MUD-FLINGING, TAIL-WAGGING

GOOD TIME. Only dogs that are registered participants are allowed in the park. All dogs must be kept on leash when not competing. Reno River Festival reserves the right to search and seize contraband items.

NEWEST ADDITIONS:

SPLASH DOGS COMPETITION &

BIGGEST LITTLE DOG JOG

FREE CONCERTS IN THE PARK ALL WEEKEND!

RUN AMUCK,

FREESTYLE, BOATERCROSS,

SLALOM & STAND UP PADDLEBOARD

Visit renoriverfestival.com for full schedule.


R-2012-06-14