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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . .4 Casey O’Lear . . . . . . . . . .6 Sean Cary . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .16 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .18

Art of the State . . . . . . .19 Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .27 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .29 This Week . . . . . . . . . . .34 Free Will Astrology . . . .38 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .39 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .39

CUTTING AGE TECHNOLOGY See News, page 8.

FIELD LAB OF DREAMS

FOR THE FARM TEAM See Green, page 11.

COMMON

SUTRA

See Arts&Culture, page 16.

B R E A K I N G T H E G E N E R AT I O N A L C YC L E O F WA R

PEPPER CHASE see Foodfinds, page 22.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 4

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MARCH 15–21, 2012


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EDITOR’S NOTE

LETTERS Sign post

Hat-shaped box Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. At the risk of writing another health-related column this week, let me tell you about my new hat. It occurs to me that those who don’t already get it, won’t understand it. Some hats are symbols for how others want us to be perceived by still others. For example, all the members of the congregation, the fast-food squad or the sports team have identical brims. Sometimes, we’ll choose to identify with a team we don’t belong to— we’re fans. Some hats are symbols for how we want others to see us. They’re a combination of utility and fashion statement. I’m a hat-wearer of such a stripe. I basically own three hats, a wool stocking cap, a wide-brimmed, gardening hat and an Irish flat cap. I have a few other headcoverings in my closets, but these are generic, and if a stranger in a bar took one off my head, the bartender might not have to call 9-1-1. I’ll never be one of those guys who shields his eyes from the sun with his hand because his baseball hat is on backward. So, anyway, I’m retiring my old houndstooth flat cap. I got it from my Grampa George’s estate when he died 30 years ago. It had to be 30 years old then. The lining is worn through. I’m afraid to have it cleaned for fear of it crumbling to dust— things fall apart, as you know. I’ve been looking for a new hat with half an eye for a year or so. I looked online, I’ve looked in malls and haberdasheries. Every time I saw a hat like the one I was looking for, I’d ask, “Where’d you get that hat?” Finally, I landed at that Celtic store on Center Street, The Isles. They had one that was so close, so close—but not it. But they did have a new shipment coming in from Ireland. A few weeks later, they called. I recognized my hat as the shopowner came around the corner with it. It’s new. I can feel the new of it as it drops over my bald skull. I hope when the next owner puts it on, he or she is contemplating its antiquity.

I don’t know how to differentiate between “good” conservatives and “bad” conservatives. Tonight, someone set our OBAMA/BIDEN sign on fire. I know the “bad” conservatives (Republicans) are nuts. For all of you Republicans, would you do such a thing? If not, then you must admit that there is a wing of your party that has gone completely crazy with their bigotry and lack of civility. If you don’t think the vulgar and inappropriate language spewed out by leaders in the Party as well as “entertainers” has an effect, then think again. I tried to catch the perpetrator, but was unable to find him. Now I know it was a good thing I didn’t. I don’t want to hear that this was the work of a single individual and not that of a “communal belief of radical conservatives.” The sign will go back up in the morning with all of its scars. Perhaps I will catch up with the Limbaugh-loving assholes next time! A police report was filed. Anthony Matulich Reno

Disordered court Re “Top 10 worst Supreme Court decisions” (Feature story, March 8): Thank you for exposing the “Supreme Court.” “Court of what, exactly?” is my question. Kudos to author Jake Highton for an extremely enlightening and wellwritten article that clearly reveals the anti-progressive bias of these ossified legal lizards. It’s nice that we’re beginning to strip away the robes of judicial malfeasance to reveal the soft white underbelly of corporate corrosion that has turned the Supreme Court into another flabby tentacle in the plutocratic stranglehold that has been foisted on an unknowing public by devious means since 2000. What’s sad is that there doesn’t seem to be a whole lot that we the people can do about it. As a retired postal carrier and 30-year union member, I have seen first-hand the disastrous results of decisions that place corporate interests above human concerns. The

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OPINION

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NEWS

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

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I’m a guy, with a daughter and a wife, and I feel passionately about women’s rights and am willing to say so. I encourage every person to contact their GOP leaders and let them know how you feel about women losing their rights if more Republicans are elected in Nevada. Remember, we will be waiting for you when you return to Nevada this spring, so you had better start supporting women’s right to health care or rethink your visit. Nevadan’s Republican voting support is in shambles in this state. Republican state chair Amy Tarkanian is leaving, and it will take years to put together even something that resembles the Democrats’ efforts under Sen. Harry Reid. So expect a war this year at the voting booth.

Gary Ross Reno

Different story Re “Dirty books” (News, March 3): Andrea Juillerat-Olivera complains of censorship by PayPal. The problem centers around her novel, Demon’s Grace, published in Smashwords. I publish in Smashwords, among five publishers that I use.\ I have had a couple of my stories unpublishe—that is, effectively removed—in Smashwords because of difficulties with PayPal. The problem is really not censorship by PayPal. Smashwords is built around payment processing by PayPal. PayPal depends upon payment processing by major credit cards. The credit card companies are seeing a great deal of backcharging (removal of charges for things purchased), especially with ebook stories involving bestiality, rape and/or incest. Thus, the credit card companies are charging PayPal very high fees for publishers who publish e-books featuring these themes. Apparently, for economic reasons, PayPal is telling publishers such as Smashwords to remove any and all ebook stories with these themes. I have 33 novels and perhaps 150 shorter stories currently published. Most of my stories are science fiction, adventure or erotica. My stories are plot heavy, with several themes. A few of my better selling stories do have incest themes, along with other themes. I am being damaged financially by PayPal’s decision. However, it’s not an attempt at censorship, as such, by PayPal. It’s a business decision, based upon the need to make a profit.

ART OF THE STATE

Franklin Miller Reno

No transfers Re “The wheels on the bus” (Arts & Culture, March 1): I get it, you bought an all-day pass and felt it was a waste to use it and lose it. So you gave it to someone who could get more from your random act of kindness. I like the motivation, but I think they’re nontransferable, meaning that you giving your pass to someone else is someone else not giving the city money to keep the buses going. If everyone shared their all-day passes around like mp3s, the city would make even less money for public transportation. It’s probably also illegal. We’re just lucky that Lars Ulrich doesn’t run the buses here, or you’d be in a heap of trouble. Felix Polanski Reno

Raw Re “True blood” (Editor’s Note, March 8): Thank you for sharing your personal dietary choices. I also enjoy a diet that is built upon heaping amounts of animal foods with some variety of seasonal plant foods— however, I enjoy everything raw,

R. Richard Reno

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Photographer Amy Beck Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Sharon Black, Sean Cary, Carol Cizauskas, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Audrey Love, Casey O’Lear, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

IN ROTATION

Women vote

dubious decisions of the Roberts Court seem to promise more of the same, at increasingly greater cost to the general welfare. Is this really the best we can do? “Progressive” is not a dirty word, Nevada! Millions of progressive Americans are finally and completely fed up with the entrenched special interests of the plutocracy. Where is our damned voice on the “Supreme Court?”

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Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Brennan Collins, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Kelly Funderburk, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke

FOODFINDS

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Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Daniel Golightly General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Senior Accountant Kevin Driskill

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unpasteurized and uncooked with the occasional exception. I’m glad to learn of others who are experimenting with animal foods. Please feel welcome to contact me. I’d love to learn more about your diet and health and source for foods. Cheers and good luck with your probe! Justin Zabriskie via email

Snookered Re “The wheels on the bus” (Arts & Culture, March 1): How ironic. My first letter to the Reno Gazette-Journal editor regarding RAPID/CONNECT was exactly two years ago. Since then I have written a half-dozen more—the last winning the Silver Pen award. I spoke to Reno City Councilmember Dave Aiazzi and emailed back and forth. He terms my opinions “asinine.” You, sir, were suckered. Reno is a potemkin city run by blithering idiots. John Sparnicht Reno

Yen for Yen Ching Re “Dated night” (Foodfinds, March 8): I’m surprised at K.J. Sullivan’s Yen Ching restaurant review. Countless Fulkerson family members and friends have had dinner at Yen Ching restaurant over the years. We’ve had wedding and graduation celebrations and large and small gatherings there. Never has anyone complained about food or service. The servers are kind and always remember us. The egg rolls are divine, and you’ll find the best pot stickers in Reno at Yen Ching. Never have I seen a speck of foreign matter on any dish or utensil, never. Yes, the furnishings are original, but outdated? I’d call them comfortable—like I’m going home to a place of nurture and generosity. I would urge anyone to give Yen Ching a try. You are going to leave happy and full of delicious food. Mary Lee Fulkerson Reno

Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Hayley Doshay Feature story design: Hayley Doshay

MARCH 15, 2012

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by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

Do you expect another war soon? Asked at UNR student union Alexander Vierra Student

I would say yes, it’s a possibility that there would be one in the future, especially with what’s going on there now. … If the people over there feel like they need to go in and invade a country because that other country may possess nuclear arms, and if the war’s necessary, then I think that’s a good thing.

Laura Makoba Speech therapist

I think that it’s possible, but I hope not. With the conflict in Iran and that difficulty, I think it’s possible, but I would hope not.

Anna Wall

Be a hero Here it is, only mid-March, and already the battle lines are being drawn in the Reno City Council races. Come on, all you warriors, you bleeding hearts, you corporate lackeys, it’s time to get your palms limbered up to run for the pleasure of four years of public crucifixion. If you think your reputation and future business opportunities will grow with what happens in the next term, we’ve got news for you: The next seated City Council will be paying for the sins of the last administrations, dating back to at least 1995. Purely for informational purposes, here are the people who’ve signed up for the privilege thus far: Reno City Council, Ward 1: Wendy Alderman, Jenny Brekhus, Bernie Carter, Paul M. Gordon, Troy E. Harsh, Carola Nan Roach, and Allyson Denby Wong. Reno City Council, Ward 3: Chad Dehne, Oscar DelGado, Nick Phillips, Dennis A. Romeo, and Michael “Mike” Trudell. Reno City Council, Ward 5: Neoma Jardon and Kitty K. Jung. Reno City Council, At-Large: Edward Hawkins, Scott Kelley, and David Ward. Let’s admit it, we already know many of these names. We know whether they are earnest do-gooders or re-runs who finally see their chance at the trough. We’ve heard many of the “new” ideas they propose, and—even though the ideas have been publicly dismissed or failed before—they appear to feel a sense of entitlement to an elected seat. There are a few that even from this distance appear to have puppeteer developers’ hands stuck firmly up their … pantlegs. And, by jiminy,

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Student

there are some people on this list we would love to see on the Reno City Council. Unfortunately, there are a few names that should be on this list that have yet to declare. Sam Dehne, for example. Who can say it better than Sam said it on his Facebook page? “Somebody said, ‘Look at the train trench, ballpark, bowling stadium, events center, ballroom, bus station, City Hall itself.’ Who is the one voice who has warned everybody about these impending disasters ... and many, many more … over and over at every public comment he could find? Yup, it’s been that Sam character who’s always sticking his ‘knows’ in government business.” Sam, you can’t deprive this city of all your knowledge and ardor now, when you actually stand an honest chance of winning. And Erik Holland, Congressional District 2? We sympathize, and we hate the new fascism, too, but man, this is the one Reno election in recent memory where regular people have a good chance of winning, and if enough regular people run, the very complexion of the Council will change, and the question of whether this city bends over for business or supports the regular people’s interest will be decided—maybe for decades. Really. So all you masochists, you Dudley Do-Rights, you earnest, principled heroes, you’ve got until Friday, tomorrow, March 16 at 5 p.m. to go down to the Reno City Clerk’s office to pay your filing fee. We’ve got the firing squad waiting out back. Ω

I’m hoping no, but you never really know with the government. You never really understand what they’re going to do. But as far as right now, I don’t think there should be one coming up.

Zac Mooney Student

I could very well see it happening, especially if North Korea and Iran continue to build their power and oppose the U.N. There’s also problems in Africa that we keep hearing about, so I think it’s very possible. With America being along the lines of a world police, we will most likely get into some kind of conflict in the near future.

Daniel Cain Student

Yes, probably. We’ll probably get involved with Israel and Iran, I imagine, in some form. … I think Iran’s president’s kind of crazy, a little dangerous. And I think that if Israel gets involved, then to stop nuclear weapon activity, that it’d be important for us to back them up—a long-time ally. And someone like that probably shouldn’t have nuclear weapon capability, anyway.


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OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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One night last week, we all went to sleep, and when we awoke, our Facebook newsfeeds were covered with unmistakable “Kony 2012” slogans, a dozen or so repostings of a 30minute video campaign put together by the Invisible Children organization and invitations to an April 20 event called “Cover the Night.” Joseph Kony is one of the by world’s 10 most wanted fugitives. He is the leader of the Lord’s Casey O’Lear Resistance Army, a militant group caseyo@ newsreview.com that operates primarily in Uganda, Sudan and other areas in Africa. Kony and the LRA are known for committing crimes against civilians including rape, murder and sexual enslavement, and for forcing children into warfare. Some U.S. action has been taken to stop Kony. Last October, President Obama authorized the deployment of about 100 U.S. troops to central Africa to assist local forces fighting against Kony and the LRA.

Using local protests to throw a spotlight on an international problem

To see the video that launched a thousand Facebook posts, check out www.kony2012.com.

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For years, I have heard murmurings about Invisible Children, an organization dedicated primarily to raising awareness of the LRA’s crimes against children. I have met people who were incredibly passionate about the cause. But I’ve met far more people who’d never heard of it. Now, it appears Invisible Children is well on its way to achieving its goal of making Kony infamous around the world. The seemingly overnight increase in awareness of Uganda’s problems is pretty impressive, but the mission is not accomplished yet. Katie Caffery is one volunteer who has been working to organize the Cover the Night event in Reno. The night will include a rally downtown, a barbecue, the hanging of some posters, and the pressuring of local and national lawmakers to support the United States’ assistance to

African forces in removing Kony from power. Caffery’s Facebook event already has more than 1,400 confirmed attendees. “I was actually one of the ones who had no idea about the entire thing until that video went viral,” Caffery said. “I sat down and watched that, and I was really inspired by it, so I decided to get a group of friends together to do the Cover the Night event and go around and post posters up for awareness, and it actually turned into a really big group, so it’s great.” Social networking has enabled us to share important information to hundreds of people within seconds. The internet has enabled us to discover and research any subject imaginable. It’s good that we are trying to use these tools to help people around the world solve their problems, but it’s important to do so wisely. It is always worthwhile to spend some additional time reading the plethora of available information and thinking critically about the organizations and causes you’re being compelled to support. Invisible Children has a history of problematic practices that make many wary of the Kony 2012 campaign. Invisible Children’s finances and staff have both been called into question. A llegations include the organization refusing to cooperate with the Better Business Bureau and using large amounts of money raised to pay staff exorbitant salaries. “From my point of view, I understand the criticism, but I think the cause is bigger than that,” Caffery said. “I think we’re getting a lot of support. I expect the criticism, but I’m just happy with the way Reno’s responding as a group.” This issue is bigger than something that can be solved with Facebook posts, donations to questionable charities or rich white kids traveling to Africa. To take down Kony as a leader, disassemble the Ugandan dictatorship and LRA, and free the child soldiers will take dedication beyond purchasing a bracelet, but it is most certainly a cause worthy of our attention. Attend Cover the Night if you desire. Donate money to Invisible Children if your heart tells you to. Petition the U.S. government to take action toward Kony’s arrest. But ensure that you do so because you are well informed about the issues, and not because you want to be smug about it on Facebook. Ω


RIGHT TO YOUR HEAD

Downtown, midtown, all around the town Reno is a city with a bit of an image problem. For too many years we have suffered from poor marketing, bad communication and too much of a focus on trying to be something we are not. When the economic crisis hit, Reno was devastated. Parts of our community quickly fell into disrepair and neglect, and as businesses shuttered their doors and left town, we saw our economy, our by morale and our once proud city Sean Cary sink into the doldrums. seanc@ During better times when Reno newsreview.com saw explosive growth, our downtown core withered. The suburbs exploded with new development as luxurious community after luxurious community sprang forth from the sagebrush bearing cutesy Italian-inspired names and stucco in every shade of beige imaginable. Suburban Reno was trying to become suburban Las Vegas, and little thought was given to the future, as realtors became ordertakers and developers scrambled to erect houses and strip malls as fast as humanly possible. Downtown redevelopment, however, hasn’t been nearly as robust. The city has been active in trying to stem the decay, evidenced by investments in projects like Aces Ballpark, the Reno Events Center, our spectacular whitewater park, and turning the decrepit, derelict Riverside hotel into a cool landmark filled with retail space, artists living in the converted hotel rooms, and a trendy restaurant, but work still needs to be done. Some of these projects have been successful, some have not, but it’s important to Read more about remain vigilant in this endeavor. downtown Reno at Downtown can be beautiful again, www.downtown and it’s going to happen with permakeover.com. sistence, hard work and innovation. Oft-maligned as nothing more than seedy bars and tattoo parlors, I invite the naysayers to dig a bit deeper. The Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, for example, turned an empty jewelry store into a fun little theater where one can go for some local culture. Now if only the ribald leadership over at the Pioneer Center would recognize that although big name musicals are fun on occasion, that beautiful venue can be used for so much more than it is. It’s a community

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treasure and it saddens me that the irritating, obnoxious team that purports to run the place greedily hoard it, rather than make it available and accessible to everyone in the community. I only hope that as the RSCVA continues to evolve to meet Reno’s ever-changing demands, they keep this in mind. Too many nights that venue sits empty and dark, and it’s a shame. It’s time for a new direction there, and I can only hope it happens sooner rather than later. Until that time, my donation check will be going elsewhere.

Downtown— cleaner, nicer, residents and tourists stroll its streets

Now it’s midtown’s turn. A dilapidated wedding chapel has been transmogrified into the Old Granite Street Eatery. Our ugly, sad excuse for a former City Hall is now the Terry Lee Wells Discovery Museum, the single greatest thing to happen to Reno in the past 10 years. What was once a fortune teller’s house is now Süp Restaurant. Things are cleaner, nicer, and residents and visitors regularly walk the streets. The area’s distinct seediness is much less pronounced, and it’s so tremendously awesome to see the leaders in this area stepping up to the plate to turn this neighborhood into the fun cool place they know it can be. Due to term limits, we will be seeing a major overhaul of the Reno City Council this election cycle. A wide variety of candidates have popped up for these seats, and I look forward to having the redevelopment discussion with them. We are starting to see some shoots of green here in Reno, and our new City Council must do everything possible to keep this momentum going. We simply must take pride in our city again, and the time for leadership is now. Ω

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Obama sign burned A sign supporting the Obama/Biden ticket was burned at someone’s home by an unknown arsonist. A reader comment posted on the RN&R website (see Letters, page 3) reads in part, “Tonight, March 10, at 10:10 pm someone set our ‘OBAMA/BIDEN’ sign on fire. ... I tried to catch the perpetrator, but was unable to find him. ... The sign will go back up in the morning with all of its scars. Perhaps I will catch up with the Limbaugh loving axxholes next time!!!! The sign will be up in the morning and will stay up. Police report filed.” A Reno Police Department spokesperson confirmed the incident occurred: “We do have a report on file. Essentially, our reporting party saw flames out his front window, went out and discovered the sign had been lit on fire. He saw an unknown male riding away on a bicycle in the area. It is unknown if this individual had anything to do with the sign being lit. There is no additional information available on any possible suspects.” The victim is Anthony Matulich, who lives on Grandview Avenue. Fire has been a favored form of protest by some of Obama’s critics. Over the years, Obama signs have been burned in Altadena, Ca., Boca Raton, Fl., St. Peters, Mo. An effigy of the president was burned in West Allis, Wis. In Springfield, Mass., a black church under construction was torched the day after Obama’s election.

Holland announces Former Reno mayoral candidate Erik Holland announced in a March 12 Facebook post that he will seek election to the U.S. House of Representatives. “I’m running because I’m concerned about recent erosions of civil liberties, and want to see a return to fiscal sanity—as in paying our bills,” Democrat Holland wrote. “How odd—conservative reasons!!!” He has been outspoken in his opposition to provisions of the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that critics say allows detention of U.S. citizens who the executive branch considers terror suspects, sections that have drawn wide attention because they give wide latitude to presidential powers. Holland was Mayor Robert Cashell’s opponent in the 2006 campaign, expressing his opposition to sprawl, particularly the Winnemucca Ranch development 30 miles from Reno proper. The U.S. House seat is currently held by Republican Mark Amodei, who won a special election last fall for a partial term. Told that Holland would be running on NDAA and the deficit, Amodei said, “Great. He’s on the right track.” Amodei also said there is considerable misinformation about NDAA spread by the blogosphere on what the law contains. He said there are three different provisions in the language that make clear it does not apply to U.S. citizens.

IAP nominates Nevada’s Independent American Party nominated its 2012 candidates for public office at a convention on March 3. David VanderBeek of Pahrump, a life skills consultant, is the U.S. Senate nominee. He ran unsuccessfully in 2010 for the Nevada Assembly. In the northern U.S. House district, Russell Best of Stagecoach was nominated. He unsuccessfully sought election to the Stagecoach General Improvement District board in 2008. It’s his second run for the House seat. He pulled 4.05 percent of the vote in 2010 against Republican Dean Heller and Democrat Nancy Price. The IAP was started in Nevada as the state arm of the American Independent Party, the vehicle for George Wallace’s 1968 presidential candidacy. It was kept together in most elections after that. Smaller parties do not have primary elections to nominate their candidates in Nevada, instead holding nominating conventions.

—Dennis Myers

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MARCH 15, 2012

Assemblymember Debbie Smith of Washoe County, who oversaw construction of the state budget in the Nevada Assembly, listened to an audience member last week at a Nevada Women’s Lobby meeting.

Grinding to a halt After four rounds of budget cuts, some services face dim future Some Nevada programs, including aging services, are at risk of slowing down by radically or even shutting down Dennis Myers because they are being kept afloat by federal funding, and state government may not be able to pay its small share. Some of the programs involved, such as police staffing levels, cut close to the daily lives of citizens. “I will tell you that I had our staff do a matrix for me of how much [state] general fund was in every budget across the state, and there’s so little general fund money left in most places that you can’t really cut,” Assembly budget chief Debbie Smith told a Nevada Women’s Lobby luncheon last week. “Aging and Disability Services is another example. There really isn’t much general fund [money] there.” With the state providing so little money to its own programs, federal moneys or grants are keeping them going. But to qualify for those federal dollars, the state must provide matching funds. That match is normally only a fraction of the federal grants but even those small amounts are becoming more difficult to come by. “We have a great deal of federal money that funds a lot of the programs,” Smith said. “Aging is a perfect example. ... With the federal deficit reduction, all that going on, the grants to the states will probably be cut by about 30 percent. And so a lot of these justice grants, for example, that fund cops on the streets, that schools use ... foster care ... that kind of stuff is just going to be gone. Thirty percent of that money will just be gone.” She said legislators are in conversations with the Washoe County School District, which is on precarious financial footing. “They have virtually no funding— no funding—once they use up the money that we were able to free up in this [2011] legislative session. Once that’s gone, they aren’t going to have any bonding capacity ’til 2017. 2017. And that means roofs, asphalt—if anything big happens, they have to go to their [school district] general fund. ... That’s a really scary situation, but it really tells you that with our property

values declining and therefore property tax revenue [also declining], that’s the ramification of that, is that the programs that we fund like that are in serious jeopardy. And there’s no ability, then, to do the repairs needed for schools other than going into general fund, which would hit the classroom. So that’s one example of the still-precarious position we find ourselves in.” A couple of her listeners asked Smith about cultural programs such as libraries, and she had to tell them that with budget levels now so low, choices have become much more painful (“Artburn,” RN&R, Dec. 30, 2010). “When you’re talking about human life versus anything else, it’s always hard to preserve,” she said. “It’s hard to preserve culture and parks and that type of budget item because you’re looking at taking older people off of day care. ... There were hearings that I personally as the chairman had a hard time getting through because I knew what we were facing. You know, cutting the senior property tax assistances program, cutting veteran’s services officers.”

She said legislators had made some progress in rebuilding mental health programs after previous economic downturns and now find themselves returning those programs to reduced levels again. With four waves of budget cutting behind the state, the easy cuts were already made two or three rounds ago. One of those is state workers and their benefits, which have been slashed more than once, to the point that some state workers are now eligible for public assistance and workers are departing state service. That kind of turnover causes expensive and perpetual training costs. Moreover, the desirability of state employment is not what it once was. “The state employees have continually taken cuts in the form of furloughs,” Smith said. “The last session we did a combination of furloughs and pay cuts. They had their benefits cut and their costs increased. Because they are such a large part of the budget they are a natural target, if you will, for cuts. But it’s hard. Doing it once is one thing, but over and over is very difficult. We have state employees who qualify for state aid”—a murmur ran through the audience—“and that’s very, very difficult for us to know.” State workers leaving for the private sector or leaving the state now number in the thousands, she said. “It has really changed the whole climate of the situation for state employees. ... And we have double digit numbers of agency heads leaving.”

Harder to ignore

State legislators and executive officials have worked hard to insulate the public from the effects of budget cuts, but that is becoming more difficult to do. “This is where the rubber meets the road, that the cuts


that we’ve made are starting to take effect, and people are starting to notice,” Smith said. Smith said that as chair of the committee that builds the state budget, she was often exasperated by the shortsightedness of some decisions she had to preside over. “I said a couple of times during budget hearings it was reminding me of my mother’s old saying about tripping over a dollar to pick up a dime, that at so many budget hearings that’s what it felt like, that we were cuttings something that we knew, down the road, was going to cost us more.” (Italics reflect the emphasis in Smith’s voice.) She also noted that at meetings of the Interim Finance Committee— a panel that handles legislative money matters when the full legislature is out of session—some lawmakers who, at the 2011 Nevada Legislature, opposed restoring any programs, are now taken aback by the dwindling services. “And I’ll tell you that every single Interim Finance Committee meeting, there’s tons of discussion of ‘Oh, my gosh.’ And I think, ‘Well, people, what did you think was going to happen?’ When you cut millions of dollars out of the child care subsidy program ... people are going to lose their child care subsidies and then they are not going be able to go to work.” Smith described a couple of bright spots, if they can be called that. In answer to a question about state parks, she said because Nevada has never created much of a state park system, it was relatively easy to protect it from funding cuts.

“Remember that we’ve cut the budget four times.” Assemblymember Debbie Smith Assembly budget chief “Because there’s so little there, really, we managed to keep things together.” And she said lawmakers in 2011 made things a little easier for themselves at the 2013 Legislature by reducing some of the bookkeeping tricks they had used since the beginning of the recession to patch budgets together. “Fortunately, we did solve the budget problems with fewer of the sort of smoke-and-mirror things that had happened in the past, where all were doing was moving money from one place to another, but we would have to deal with it down the road,” Smith said. “We eliminated a lot of those in the budget that we finally passed. So at least we don’t have those things to deal with going into the next session.” One of those arrangements was stopped only by a timely Nevada Supreme Court ruling. On May 26, 2011, Smith was presiding over a hearing on Gov. Brian Sandoval’s proposal to take school district construction bond money for state use when an aide handed her a note saying the court had just handed down a decision curbing the Legislature’s ability to take money away from local governments in order to fund state programs. Ω

Virginia reel PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

A Sierra Spirit bus navigated North Virginia Street behind a line of cars. Road construction has created havoc for cars and other vehicles. Some streets are closed. There is construction—or the trappings of it—between Fourth and Fifth streets, between Fifth and Sixth, between Sixth and Seventh, and between Maple and Artemesia. Several bus stops are shut down, and one is open but blocked by construction signs and plastic pylons.

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Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

GREENSPACE Greenest little city Students at the Davidson Academy are taking their recycling efforts (“Go-getter,” Jan. 26) to the next level with a petition started on Change.org to “Require Recycling in Reno Apartments.” The petition states, “We are dumping all our recyclable materials into a landfill that supports the waste of [more than] 200,000 residents [residing in apartments]! With required recycling written into the Reno Franchise Agreement for single family homes, apartment residents all across our city should have the same access to recycling bins with no impact on their lease. “Both Carson City and Las Vegas have at least minimal access to recycling for apartments. Why doesn’t Reno? We need to start caring about recycling in our community. This is only the first step to making Reno the Greenest Little City in the World!” View the petition at http://tinyurl.com/7fhv2nj. —Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

Low battery The Volt electric car is showing signs of faltering. General Motors will halt the manufacture of Volts from March 19 until April 23 after sales goals were not met. Sales of the Volt have grown steadily, but never to the level GM wanted. Last year 7,671 Volts were sold, short of the corporation’s 10,000 target. Sales in January and February are lower than needed to meet the 2012 target of 45,000 and the company is building an unsold inventory. After a federal rebate, the Volt sells for $33,500. The GM announcement of the temporary halt to manufacture of the car came just three days after President Obama told a United Auto Workers conference, “And five years from now, when I’m not president any more, I’ll buy one and drive it myself.” The audience cheered wildly, and it’s uncertain whether the cheers were for Obama’s support for their car or for the implication that he will be in office for another term. Washington Post editorial writer Charles Lane wrote of the GM announcement that “progressives’ fascination with electric cars and other alternative-energy schemes reflects their own refusal to face the practical limitations of alternative energy—limitations that themselves reflect stubborn scientific facts.” —Dennis Myers

ECO-EVENT Rail City Garden Center and News Talk 780 KKOH will host the volunteer Spring Cleanup Day at Washoe County’s Wilbur D. May Arboretum. Workshops on rose care and tree pruning start at 9 a.m. Bring hand pruners, loppers and a small folding hand saw. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. March 31, 9 a.m.-noon. To volunteer, call Denise Evans at 823-6525.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Visit facebook.com/RNRGreen for more.

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PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREEN

Mark O’Farrell, owner of Hungry Mother Organics, shows off lettuce grown in a hoop house.

Planting the seed High Desert Farming Initiative The announcement of the University of Nevada, Reno’s High Desert Farming Initiative came soon after the proposed annexation of the Main Station Farm Land was postponed—and for agriculture students and supporters, the initiative is by a promising step in the right direction. Ashley The High Desert Farming Initiative is a joint effort between the univerHennefer sity, the Nevada Small Business Development Center (NSBDC) and local ashleyh@ farmers, including Mark O’Farrell of Hungry Mother Organics and Rick newsreview.com Lattin of Lattin Farms. It will transform the Valley Road Field Lab into what the university calls a “collaborative agribusiness demonstration project and farm.” The initiative is threefold: provide learning opportunities for students and community members, develop research on organic farming in high desert climates, and use agriculture as economic development for small businesses. It is funded with $500,000 provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Lattin and O’Farrell will serve as community representatives to the university and will handle much of the day-to-day operation. “As a society, we’ve gotten to the point where everything we eat is processed,” said O’Farrell. “Forty years later, we’re seeing a reaction to that. There’s a consumer preference for local and organic food.” He also mentioned that the initiative has “a special focus on small farms,” and cited his educational background at Virginia Tech, where Future Farmers of America was founded. The food grown at the facility will be used toward food services on the UNR campus and will be available for local stores and businesses. Waste generated by the facility will be used as compost material. Students will have opportunities to be involved in all aspects of the operation, and some have been a part of the initiative’s inception—graduate student Jennifer Ott wrote the initiative’s business plan. “Students will participate in business and agriculture right here rather than going to some outlying place,” said NSBDC director Sam Males. “Construction, research and outreach is the 21st century model for agribusiness.” Through the initiative, six hoop houses, a new greenhouse, new produce packing facility and an area for composting will be built. Officials estimate the construction of the new buildings will be completed this summer. O’Farrell emphasized the use of hoop houses to grow produce as a way of “enhancing our natural environment.” He argued that greenhouses are often fossil fuel intensive, whereas hoop houses allow for more adaptability and experimentation. “Hoop houses create their own ecosystems,” he said. “We want farmers to introduce more risk to their operation.” He cited the use of durable materials, such as twin wall polycarbonate panels, that will be used in the hoop houses so farmers can “alter our environment” and maintain a steady stream of food production. Research on economical and sustainable farming practices will be a vital part of the initiative, and officials say the university has already collected some funding to be delegated toward studies which will investigate how farmers can plant durable, healthy crops organically in Northern Nevada. “The amount of food we produce will be minimal, initially,” O’Farrell said. “But [this project] has potential for rural development and urban food production.” Ω OPINION

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It

was April 30, 1975. Saigon, the only territory United States and Saigon regime forces ever held with certainty, had fallen to the Vietnamese. The U.S.-invented “nation” of South Vietnam was gone. Vietnam was reunif ied.

In the United States, which manufactured the war, both fatigue and relief were nearly palpable. And as the years passed, those feelings did not die out. Public repugnance toward military adventures was so pronounced that it imposed an unaccustomed military restraint on U.S. officials. Opinion surveys indicated the public wanted arms control negotiations and trade employed instead of war. The feeling became known as the Vietnam syndrome. Who in 1976 would even have imagined that, just 28 years after Vietnam, the United States would plunge into another tar pit of a war in dubious circumstances with uncertain public support? And who would have imagined that the U.S. Congress, press and public would again be taken in by another pack of lies issued by officials once again ignorant of the situation and society into which they wanted to intrude?

RESISTING RESTRAINT Presidents chafed under the restriction of the Vietnam syndrome. In one of the most belligerent speeches ever made by a U.S. presidential candidate, Ronald Reagan in 1980 attacked the Nixon, Ford and Carter administrations for yielding to the public abhorrence of further foolish wars—and attributed that repugnance to manipulation of the U.S. public by the Vietnamese, who Reagan still described as “North” Vietnamese: “For too long, we have lived with the ‘Vietnam syndrome.’ Much of that syndrome has been 12

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created by the North Vietnamese aggressors who now threaten the peaceful people of Thailand. Over and over they told us for nearly 10 years that we were the aggressors bent on imperialistic conquests.” Presidents kept trying to whittle away at the public’s reluctance, using short wars of overwhelming force against weak opponents like Panama and Grenada. After the Kuwait war, the first President Bush exulted, “By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all.”

“I tell you the Vietnam syndrome is alive and well on the home front.” Jerry Brown 1992

In California, then former governor Jerry Brown responded that Bush was reading too much into an easy victory: “It may be, as some say, that victory in the Gulf War has put the ghost of Vietnam to rest in the area of military affairs. But I tell you the Vietnam syndrome is alive and well on the home front.” Some officials interpreted the syndrome to fit an administration’s objectives, as when Carter assistant secretary of state Hodding Carter III said in April 1978, “I don’t think they [the public] have written off our international obligations, but they have written off believing there is some simple code they are supposed to adopt.” Some officials seized on every foreign policy crisis—even those caused by the U.S.—to declare the syndrome dead. In June 1980, Philip Geyelin wrote in the Washington Post that officialdom, “heartened by the public response to the hostage crisis in Iran and the Soviet plunge into Afghanistan,” believed the syndrome “has been laid to rest.” Apparently not, because five years later rightist U.S. Rep. Robert Dornan complained about the “near fatal fever of the Vietnam syndrome which has plagued us for 10 years …” In April 1978, United Press International ran an interpretive article that began, “It’s called ‘Vietnam syndrome’ and it has left a mark on the attitudes of Americans toward their nation’s foreign policy.” In an article by what conservatives call the liberal press, UPI characterized the syndrome as a problem needing solving, rather than as the solution its supporters considered it.

BIPARTISAN RECKLESSNESS Military adventurism is hardly a partisan matter. The generational cycle of preventable and unnecessary wars is fostered by both parties. It’s instructive to recall that in 1998, President Clinton— seeking public support for his proposed war against Iraq—sent teams of high officials around the nation to sell the public on Clinton’s claims that Saddam Hussein’s government was seeking “weapons of mass destruction.” On Feb. 18, 1998, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Defense Secretary William Cohen and National Security Adviser Sandy Berger conducted a 6,000-person “town meeting” in an Ohio sports arena live on CNN. The officials encountered public hostility and anger toward another war on Iraq, prompting the administration to screen out critics from crowds at succeeding stops but also forcing Clinton to retreat from his plans for war. September 11, of course, changed everything. Officials of the second Bush administration believed the syndrome was gone for good. Chickenhawk officials believed they could extend the post-September 11 mandate beyond the Afghan war to Iraq. (The term chickenhawk was coined by U.S. Rep. and Korean war veteran Andrew Jacobs to describe officials who avoided war themselves but try to send others to war.) Early in the Iraq war there were a lot of folks who drew parallels between Iraq and Vietnam. In the trappings of war, the geography and culture, the parallels really didn’t work. But in the policymaking that led to war, they did. There were leaders who, in order to get the United States into a war, misled both themselves and the nation. There was ignorance of the society and terrain the U.S. invaded. There was an acquiescent press that took its cues from the administration. There were members of Congress who failed to do their duty. And most of all, there was a gullible and passive public that was too unwilling to listen to voices of reason and restraint and too willing to be stirred up and maneuvered by leaders skilled in emotional and chauvinistic manipulation of tragedy. Now again, in the wake of the second Iraq war, there is a revival of public resistance to doing it again. Will we do it again? In a few years, will we forget the Vietnam and Iraq lies and misery and again place U.S. servicepeople in harm’s way on the

same kind of suspicious rationale? Must we keep perpetually re-learning the same lessons? When the Iraq war entered its fourth year in March 2007, this newspaper published the names of every servicemember the nation had lost to that date. In March of most years thereafter, we published an anniversary report of some kind. Now, th Iraq war is supposedly over, and March is here again, so we asked authors, activist, veterans of both war and antiwar: Will we do it again?

MICHAEL ARCHER is author of A Patch of Ground, an account of the siege of Khe Sanh, which he experienced as a Marine Corps radio operator. He is now writing the biography of a childhood friend who fell at Khe Sanh.

by DENNIS MYERS

B R E A K I N G T H E G E N E R AT


The good news is that American military leaders seem to have taken to heart some valuable lessons from Vietnam and will likely take even more away from the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. During the decision-making process leading up to the major U.S.

troop deployment in Vietnam, President Johnson and Secretary of Defense McNamara were enthralled by the promises of Generals Westmoreland, Wheeler and Curtis (“Bomb them back into the Stone Age”) LeMay, that a quick and decisive victory could be won against the Viet Cong and North Vietnam by the use of big-ticket armaments, such as B-52 bombers. These officers had no respect for the military capability of our adversary, which was substantial, or the religious, cultural and nationalist sensibilities of the population of South Vietnam. As World War II-trained officers, they disregarded the lessons learned by the French in Vietnam, or during their stalemate in the Korean conflict a decade before, and were still flush with overconfidence from victories over Japan and Germany.

Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Raytheon, Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics will once again pour into the pockets of our candidates, guaranteeing that when the time comes to decide, our elected representatives will vote in their favor for war— regardless of negative public sentiment. Without campaign finance reform, the will of the people pales in comparison to the size of the wallet, and future wars, with the huge profits they engender, are a given.

Only a few high ranking officers, like Marine Corps General Victor Krulak, stood against such a strategy in Vietnam. Krulak particularly objected to the forced relocation of much of the rural population from their ancestral lands, thus alienating them and helping Viet Cong recruiting efforts. So convinced was he that the plan would result in quagmire and eventual defeat for the U.S., Krulak chose to commit career suicide by going over the heads of his superiors directly to the Oval Office, where his arguments failed to move the President. The 2003 invasion of Iraq was personally directed by Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld and Vice President Cheney, civilians who had virtually no practical military experience and little regard for input by military experts. These two men were guided by the neo-con historical view that Vietnam had been a winnable war, lost by a radical-left antiwar movement and a “liberal media”— rather than a misguided strategic plan. Consequently, they resurrected that same old swagger, the same disrespect for the ability of insurgency forces, and a blind faith that expensive military hardware would “shock and awe” the enemy. A “Generals Revolt,” publicly denouncing Rumsfeld for his “abysmal” military planning and lack of strategic competence, forced his resignation in 2006. I am encouraged that this more cautious, unpretentious generation of military commanders, unafraid to learn from past mistakes, and more willing to speak out against incompetent leadership, will make better decisions about when, where and how to fight again. Future budgetary restraints will also force them to be more selective. And, electing national leaders whose worldview is less delusional, and whose public personas are less condescending toward other cultures, wouldn’t hurt either.

CORY FARLEY served as a Special Forces medic in Vietnam, spending most of his tour at Pleiku and Plei Me. What we do militarily depends a lot on who’s elected in 2012, I think. In the absence of a military draft, public sympathy is an unreliable tool. I know a lot of conservatives who claim to support our actions in Iraq and Afghanistan, for instance— but only one I can think of who actually has a family member who’s served there. It’s a necessary war as long as their housekeepers’ kids are fighting it. If their own kids were subject to being called up, their attitudes might change.

PHOTO/DEBRALEE P. CRANKSHAW

Zone is broadcast on the Progressive Radio Network.

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Having said that, though, I don’t see any reason to doubt that we’ll do it again, and in a shorter time than [a] “couple of decades” if conservatives remain influential. Increasingly, they have little to offer ordinary people. Cuts in social programs that help the poor, sick and elderly, tax hikes for the average family, and tax breaks for the wealthy aren’t going to attract many middle-class voters. The GOP’s best hope is to keep us all scared and position themselves as our protectors. That, plus their obeisance to big business, pretty much guarantees a succession of small and probably fruitless wars. Which is not to say some of their fears aren’t justified, but you can count on them to magnify them for political leverage.

In a heartbeat. The defense industry is one of the most powerful forces in American politics. No-bid defense contracting in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya and Israel is the goose that laid the golden egg for the militaryindustrial complex. With more than 1,000 U.S. military bases throughout the world, perpetual war—regardless of the tar pit it pulls the US into—is a guaranteed way for these multinational defense companies to insure that the goose continues producing. In the 2008 election cycle, $24 million was spent by the militaryindustrial complex to fund politicians, split equally between Democrats and Republicans. As we enter another election year, massive campaign contributions from

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There is political viability to short wars—Grenada, Panama, Gulf War I. But the September 11 attacks removed restraints. Still, I daresay few who supported the attack on Afghanistan shortly thereafter had any idea that American troops would be in action there more than a decade later. Bush, with his go-forbroke attitude, promised a short war—claimed one, in fact (“Mission Accomplished”)—and left a bad feeling about long wars. It must be recognized, too, that the Iraq war was a catastrophe—not least for the hundred thousand or more Iraqi dead and their survivors. If I read the situation correctly, the Pentagon has given up the idea that it can fight and win two wars simultaneously. For a long time, very probably decades, as after

MARCH 2006: GOV. KENNY GUINN VISITED NEVADA TROOPS IN THE IRAQ WAR.

CHRISTIANE BROWN’s Solutions

TIONAL CYCLE OF WAR

Columbia University sociologist TODD GITLIN headed Students for a Democratic Society in 1963-64 and helped organize the first national protest against the Vietnam War, held on April 17, 1965. He is author of 15 books, including The Sixties (1987) and Occupy Nation (2012).

1975, they will be reluctant to commit Iraq- or Afghanistan-sized expeditionary forces. “Exit strategies” will be scrutinized much more tightly. The emphasis now, and for the foreseeable future, seems to be on high-tech, specialized warfare deploying elite units, like Seals, with drones and other low-manpower equipment. This is cheaper than troops, less visible, and less politically risky. It seems apparent, though, that if another president chooses to send large detachments of professional soldiers into a big war on the scale of Afghanistan or Iraq, he or she will be able to count on the isolation of the troops from the population at large, which means

“WILL WE DO IT AGAIN?” continued on page 14

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that opposition to the war will not be boosted by draftees at risk.

the benefit of the few, the frequency and duration of wars will increase because that’s the only solution we’re geared for. Unless we organize.

MARK RUDD was a leader of the

REBECCA THOMAS, former director

Weatherman faction of Students for a Democratic Society and is now a New Mexico college mathematics professor.

of the Washoe Temporary Protection Order Office, is a graduate student at the University of Nevada, Reno. Her son is a U.S. Army infantry soldier who spent 18 months in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, known as the “valley of death.”

continued from page 13

What I’ve learned over the last 40 years is that the powers that want and need war are so great that it can only take an enormous public outcry, such as during the Vietnam era, to stop a war. And that is rare. There is no peace party. There are many war parties—the military, the defense contractors, the construction and oil interests, the shallow patriots.

“By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all.” George H.W. Bush 1992

So until we develop a peace party—people who understand and reject the militarist nature of our society—we’ll have many more wars. As the national economic and moral decline continues, and by this I mean the improvement of the society for

Yes, I think it is a possibility that is more likely than not. In the run-up to the Iraq war, the Bush administration fell victim to what social psychologists call confirmation bias. Once a person has a belief, they will look for and interpret information that confirms the belief, and reject information that disconfirms the belief. The Bush administration already had a belief that Iraq had continued its weapons program in defiance of UN restrictions. When information about aluminum tubes being sought by Iraq surfaced, the administration filtered that through their belief that Iraq was attempting to develop nuclear weapons and voila!—justification for invasion. There was no need to investigate more thoroughly because another confirmation bias, that Saddam was deceitful and uncooperative with the UN, made any attempts

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

“WILL WE DO IT AGAIN?”

tory for someone to be against a war but support the troops fighting it. The U.S. has seen lots of military actions since Vietnam … we will continue to have them. The most that we can hope for is a leader who is aware enough of his or her own beliefs to check and double check their decisions for bias. I suppose theoretically this is supposed to happen when Congress considers the question of invasion, but representatives have confirmation bias, too.

JULES WITCOVER is a

syndicated columnist, author of nine books and coauthor, with Jack Germond, of four books.

JANUARY 2003: NEVADANS PROTESTED AGAINST GOING TO WAR AGAINST IRAQ.

at diplomacy and non-military intervention seem naive. I recall the Bush rhetoric of “you are either with us or against us,” which created a bias that forced the public to take sides. It included the idea that being against the war in Iraq meant that you were against the U.S. (recall that polls showed a large portion of the public believed that Iraq was behind the terrorist attacks in the U.S., another example of confirmation bias). No matter how deep the Vietnam syndrome, we wanted our country to be safe from another attack. I heard many people state they were “against the war but for the troops.” This could be interpreted as a response to the Vietnam syndrome,

where individuals were having cognitive dissonance because their confirmation bias was created by Vietnam. We wanted to guard against further attack, very clearly did not want a repeat of Vietnam, and also did not want a repeat of the damage done to veterans—both physical and psychological—in that war. The public reaction to the Iraq and Afghanistan wars may be to shake their heads and call it another Vietnam, but we certainly have demonstrated much clearer separation of enlisted men and women from the politics. It no longer seems contradic-

BEN’S!”

The notion dies hard that after one calamitous war, as in Vietnam and even more notably in Iraq, a public “syndrome” sets in assuring that never again will an American administration commit lives and treasure to an overseas military adventure of dubious purpose or prospect of success. But never is a long time, and the ability of elected leaders to fire up an aura of patriotic duty and allure, as achieved by Lyndon Johnson in Vietnam and George W. Bush in his war of choice in Iraq, should never be underestimated, and demands public vigilance. Ω

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MASTER THE ART In Rotation 18 | Art of the State 19 | Foodfinds 22 | Fi¬m 24

A CURRENT ART EXHIBITION EXPLORES THE DIVERSITY OF WORK CREATED BY GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA RENO’S MFA PROGRAM

PHOTOS/AMY BECK

Peter Whittenberger and Kim Musser stand before their work (his video is on the left, her paintings on the right) in the Common Ground art exhibit.

BY Brad Bynum bradb@newsreview.com

For a show called

Common Fate, the current exhibition in the Truckee Meadows Community College Main Art Gallery is surprisingly diverse. The artworks seem to have more in contrast than in common with one another. There’s a rugged, outdoorsy assemblage sculpture; a collection of unusual, elegant book designs; and a big, bright, colorful video loaded with pop culture images. There are two painters in the show, but one paints small, carefully rendered oil portraits and the other paints large, colorful acrylic abstractions— one of which is based on a video game character. What the six contrasting artists in the exhibition have in common is that they’re all graduates of the University 16

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of Nevada, Reno’s Master of Fine Arts program. It’s a small, young program, first launched in 2006. The participating artists in the exhibition constitute six of its seven graduates. “We all are very diverse,” says Peter Whittenberger, the artist responsible for the colorful video. “We come from different places artistically and around the states.” “I think it’s refreshing to see the variety of work in a show like this,” says Jeff Erickson, the outdoorsy sculptor. In addition to the works by Erickson and Whittenberger, there are a pair of travelogue-like videos by Jeremy Stern, paintings by Ahren Hertel (the oil portraitist) and Kim Musser (the acrylic abstractionist), and book arts by Katy Govan. The TMCC gallery is large enough that most of the pieces seem to exist in their own individual spaces. “I like that it’s a sparse show,” says Tamara Scronce, who curated the show. She’s a sculpture professor at UNR and chair of the MFA program. “That allows the work to have

its own autonomy and let that diversity play off each other.” The possible exception to this principle of autonomy is Whittenberger’s video, “Simple #1,5,6,8,” which, by virtue of being large, colorful and constantly changing, tends to attract the eye before the rest of the work. It’s a video of a fluttering hand which appears to pet, as one would a dog, a variety of animals, political figures, athletes, musicians, objects, advertising mascots, cartoon characters, and just about any other conceivable category of thing. It’s bizarre, hypnotic and funny. “Originally my idea was a piece about how we interact with the world physically with our hands,” says Whittenberger. “Originally, it was going to be a video of me petting different things, and I decided that of course I didn’t need to be in the video. That’s why I went the animation route. As I started to gather more and more subject matters, I decided that they needed to be random. It was either going to be from one genre or one specific aspect of the world, you know,

sports or politics, or it needed to be a little bit of everything. So I went with the little bit of everything route. I think there’s around 172 different subjects.” Erickson’s piece, “Exalted in Might Most Merciful,” is a material-oriented assemblage that brings together stones, cast aluminum, mirrors, and, almost hidden in the piece, a rabbit tail, something delicate hidden in the sturdy materials. Erickson describes it as an artifact of some chance encounter, possibly with a coyote. “Coyotes leave the tail, just the tail, cottontail rabbit tails just kind of blowing in the wind,” says Erickson. “I find them perfectly nipped off. And I think about what occurs—obviously something happened—and it’s the fact of that encounter that I’m interested in.” Kim Musser has two paintings in the exhibition. One is a non-representational exploration of color. The second is an abstracted representation of the character Master Chief from the Halo video game series. “I wanted to do something representational that was still along my interests and still in my style—my

abstract-y, graphic, bold colors-andlines style,” says Musser. “I love playing video games, and Halo is one of my very favorite video games.” Interestingly, though Master Chief is usually depicted with the more detailed, realistic graphics of contemporary video games, Musser’s approach transformed him to flat blocks of colors almost reminiscent of the 8-bit era. “I wanted to abstract him,” says Musser. “I wanted it to be that when people saw it, they’d go, oh that’s a Kim painting—but wait, that’s Master Chief! You know, kind of see him as the second thought. Like, that’s a colorful painting, but wait, there’s a figure in there. I wanted him to be sort of hidden.”

MAKING THE GRAD “What I got excited about is that they are all still making artwork,” says Scronce, of the program’s graduates, and the impetus of the exhibition. “They are all still pursuing their careers as practicing artists and most


Emily Rogers, a photographer and second year grad student, originally from the Detroit area. “I think whatever your medium is you should research the faculty and chose a school that has someone there that you could potentially use as a mentor. And UNR definitely has it. … I’ve met so many people and collaborated with so many artists here in the program. There’s just a great group of diverse students working in different mediums, painters, sculptors, photographers, so it’s been really fantastic working with other artists as well as the faculty.” “Since I graduated, my teaching experience there has helped me get jobs,” says Whittenberger, who now teaches at TMCC, UNR and Sierra College in Truckee, Calif. “This past year, I’ve had shows in Berlin. I have a show in Milan coming up in April, England, all over the country. I think really what helpful was a having a diverse amount of faculty members and visiting artists come in, and I learned what the art world really was. … Meeting real artists from all over who are doing different things made me realize the variety in the art world, and how you can navigate it in different ways, and that’s been extremely beneficial to me.” Whittenberger was born in St. Louis, attended the University of Montana, and was living in Oregon when he applied to the program. “One of the things that attracted me was the interdisciplinary nature of the program. One of the things they emphasized was, ‘We don’t care what you do as long as what you decide to do, you have to do it very well.’ There wasn’t any restrictions on your medium or your direction, they just wanted to make sure you were doing it well.” Ω Common Fate is on display in the Main Art Gallery of the V. James Eardley Student Center at Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini Blvd., through March 29. For more information, visit www.unr.edu/art.

Ahren Hertel’s “Winter Series #6’ is one of the paintings in the Common Ground art exhibit at Truckee Meadows Community College.

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ConstruCtion set to Begin on Digital 395 BroaDBanD network

We are pleased to announce that the Digital 395 broadband network project is beginning construction in Washoe County. Excavation to install underground fiber optic cable will commence along sections of U.S. Highway 395 and on certain Washoe County roads on or about April 1, 2012. The work consists of placing the cable in a 4-inch duct that is connected by a series of 36-inch diameter utility vaults. This work is the first part of the construction of a communications network that will bring high-speed, high-capacity Internet, telecommunications, data and video services to the communities of the Eastern Sierra. The project is funded by grants from the United States Department of Commerce and the California Public Utilities Commission. During work hours of 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, residents in the area can expect construction-related traffic and noise as workers access the construction sites, deliver equipment and materials, and complete the installation. Public courtesy notices that detail the specific locations of the work and the anticipated traffic controls and impacts will be mailed out to residents and businesses. They will also be posted at public venues and be available on our website, Digital395.com. California Broadband Cooperative thanks you in advance for your patience and cooperation as the Digital 395 project is implemented. More information is available on the project, the nature and location of the construction, and the services it will provide by visiting our website (Digital395.com), calling our toll-free number 855-DGTL395 (855-348-5395) or by visiting one of our project offices in Reno, Bishop, Big Pine, or Ridgecrest. Addresses of our offices are listed on the website.

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of them are pursuing very connected professional activities that are about them being artists. I consider that, first and foremost, a pretty significant marker because … it is very easy for life to pull you away from art practice.” For Scronce the success of the program is determined less by the academic accomplishments of the graduates—getting tenure-track jobs—than their artistic accomplishments. “Students aren’t necessarily pursuing an MFA degree solely to earn the credentials to teach at the college level,” she says. “Part of the point of graduate school is to facilitate ourselves as artists. … It’s this intense period of time that you are just expected to eat, breathe, sleep, be and become the best professional practicing contemporary artist that you can be.” The program is still developing. The university recently provided the department with studio spaces for the grad students in the Jot Travis Building, the former student union. “We’re still a relatively young program,” says Scronce. “We’re gaining more and more attention and levels of success on campus. The new graduate student spaces in Jot Travis are an example. That’s being financially supported at the university level because they have a belief in our program that’s due to the level of success that we’ve accomplished.” The program has attracted students from throughout the country and even internationally. According to Scronce, none of the current grad students are originally from Reno. “As professional practicing artists, I do think that people who are coming here to study, while they’re here studying, are having an impact. Our students are doing volunteerism, they’re creating projects, they’re doing stuff that is additive to our community. … So that’s bringing artists into our community who weren’t here, and they really are folding in and taking ownership of this place.” Current and former graduate students cite the interdisciplinary nature of the program and the innovative faculty as primary draws to the program. “The faculty members here are fantastic,” says

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Next Door Ninja Automatic

In the Mix is a monthly column of reviews of albums by local musical artists. To submit an album for review consideration, send a physical copy to Brad Bynum, Reno News & Review, 708 N. Center St., Reno NV 89501 or a digital link to bradb@news review.com.

Most people can put some music on in the background and then tune it out. But for music nerds, people who listen to even the most mundane and routine pieces of music with the rapt, wide-eyed attention, this is a serious challenge—a division of attention. For obsessive music fans, it can be difficult to listen to music while performing other tasks, ELECTRONICA like driving a car or eating a burrito or even having sex. It can be too distracting for the feeble mind to focus on two things at once. And during complex tasks that require a high degree of mental engagement—like writing, for example— listening to music is impossible. Usually ... there are exceptions, pieces of music that, rather than competing for attention, manage to somehow engage alongside intellectual and creative processes, soundtracking them. Music that makes the mind, while writing or painting or cooking or doing a crossword puzzle, feel a steady progression toward some goal, as though in a movie montage depicting some rapid improvement. Rather than distracting you, it actually seems to make you better at whatever you’re doing. To be effective in this regard, the music is almost always wholly instrumental, with a high degree of rhythmic repetition and literal harmonic progressions. The music of minimalist composers like Philip Glass and

Drag Me Under The Great Devour

Steve Reich is great in this way. Brian Eno has explored this idea off and on throughout his career. And certain electronic artists, like, say, Autechre, pull it off nicely. And on the album Automatic, Next Door Ninja, the nom de Pro Tools of Hector Urtubia, also a member of the Schizopolitans, gets it right. It’s electronic music that moves in an introspective, meditative direction, along steady but interesting rhythms, building big movements with small melodic pieces. Some songs are better than others, of course, but with the best tracks, like “Cell Theory,” a track that evokes the Chicago post-rockers Tortoise, listening to it activates some brain center that, however briefly, makes you feel smarter.

Scholars for generations to come will argue the differences between metal and hardcore, and the various cross-pollinations between them. Drag Me Under takes the moods and heavy HARDCORE riffs of metal, and the no-holdsbarred energy of hardcore, but without the meathead attitude that mars much of so-called “metalcore.” Nor is it a speed-mongering thrash band. Some of the band’s most effective stuff is in the slower, swampier riffs, as in “Shameful and the Shameless,” a song with a tense build-up to the chorus and then, more uniquely, a tense build-out to the end. Lead vocalist Maurice Harold has an effective, tell-it-like-it-is shout, but the group wisely mixes it up with occasional vocals from other members and, perhaps most effectively, mob chants.

—Brad Bynum bradb@newsreview.com

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PHOTO/AMY BECK

Family jewels

Cold lampin’ with the Guns and Glass exhibition at the Nevada Museum of Art.

Guns and Glass The legendary blue box with the white ribbon beloved by grateful women the world over celeby brates its 175th birthday this year. It’s Jessica Santina that iconic box for which the name Tiffany is mostly known. Tiffany & Co., purveyor of the fine jewelry and luxury goods found inside that box, was established by Charles Lewis Tiffany in 1837. His son, Louis Comfort Tiffany, an artist and glassmaker, eventually went on to found Tiffany Studios, producer of the Guns and Glass renowned Tiffany mosaic lamp and other is on display at the remarkable decorative glass pieces and Nevada Museum of Art, “fancy goods.” 160 West Liberty St., Perhaps far lesser known is that through May 20. For more information, visit Charles Tiffany, in addition to creating www.nevadaart.org. the jewelry we’re familiar with, put some of those signature designs on weapons. The Nevada Museum of Art celebrates the Tiffany family’s legacy of design through three exhibits which, together, are titled Guns and Glass. The exhibits include a collection of 20 stained glass lamps manufactured in the early 20th century by Tiffany Studios

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and other companies, seven rediscovered Tiffany Studios windows that incorporate innovative glass-working techniques, and nine pieces of decorative firearms that span more than a century of design by Tiffany & Co. The mosaic lamp exhibit, “Out of the Forest,” features work from Tiffany Studios, as well as several other manufacturers. Charles Tiffany, being the first to acquire the Bray Patent on joining glass mosaics using the copper foil method, is usually believed to be the only maker of such lamps. However, as Rachel Milon, NMA’s director of communications and marketing, explains, when the patent expired in 1903, a host of other manufacturers jumped on the bandwagon, contributing their own designs to the mix. “Somebody asked me whether those lamps were ‘knock-offs,’ and no, actually, these other companies”—those featured here are Duffner & Kimberly Co., The Handel Company, R. Williamson & Co., The Unique Art Glass

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& Metal Co., and The Wilkinson Company—“eventually became just as well-known and respected, and their lamps were just as high in quality.” Close study of the lamps reveals not only the turn of the century’s Art Nouveau inclusion of organic shapes and forms, but also individual design choices. Duffner & Kimberly, for example, tended toward larger, more evenly distributed floral patterns, while others used more streamlined or geometric patterns. “In Company with Angels” showcases Louis Tiffany’s impressively distinctive glassworking talents. Unlike most stained glass, in which panes are painted to produce color, depth and texture, Tiffany used a technique of repeatedly folding and compressing the glass, with the folds creating much richer results. This can be seen especially in the robes worn by the seven angels in the collection of

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windows, as well as in their wings, which have a distinctly feathery texture that appears etched. Additionally, the windows contain varying thicknesses of glass, making some features appear to be spotlighted depending on the cut. The windows, unearthed from a church barn after more than a decade of storage, are also remarkable in that about 50 percent of Tiffany’s church windows have been destroyed or lost, making this collection quite precious. The Tiffany & Co. firearms collection demonstrate many of the Art Nouveau traits used in the glasswork—vines filigreed into gun handles, for instance— along with the etched gold and silver embellishments seen in the jewelry. The collection shown here, most of which were never intended for use, includes a presentation sword given to U.S.S. Iowa Commander Admiral Robley D. Evans, and a case containing two storied, embellished Colt pistols presented as a gift to Buffalo Bill; they’re reputed to have been opened by him in private, so overwhelmed was he with their beauty. Ω

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Celebrate

GREE

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Corn Beef & Cabbage Irish Shots & Beer

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Festivities start at Noon

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t. 4th S

We’ll light your fire for St . Paddy’s Day 2: green coors light N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY DESIGNER

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MUSIC INDOORS & OUT FEATURING:

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from the RN&R!

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1. Abby’s Highway 40

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180 E. 1st St., Reno

6. Ryan’s Saloon

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7. Studio on 4th

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N E W S & RTraditional. E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E Never O N LY Always Trendy

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RIDE free after 4 pm and enjoy a safe celebration. Saturday schedules in effect for: - RTC RIDE, RTC RAPID and RTC CONNECT - RTC SIERRA SPIRIT will be extended until midnight 20   |   RN&R   |   MARCH 15, 2012

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21


Celebrate

GREE

J

Corn Beef & Cabbage Irish Shots & Beer

S k N I h dR ge

IRIS

eef & b d e n

m p 2 m 1a h

cor

Home of the Giant Sandwiches & Irish Coffee.

cabba

1

LuNc Coney Island Bar

March 17th 7pm

Festivities start at Noon

Irish Drink Specials Free Corn Beef & Cabbage

Green Beer

Car Bombs Guiness & Jameson shot specials

St. patrick’s

622 -3208

775-322-9422

424 E. 4TH ST • RENO

ay2012

2x3 (1/10 H)

The Celebration of Celebrations! Saturday March 17th 11am till-? Music, Beverages, Food & Fun For All.

St. Patrick’s Day Party! Saturday, March 17th 11-5pm Irish Trivia • Irish Music • Irish Beer Smithwick’s on tap Irish Boiling Bacon & Colcannon Served with homemade Soda or Brown Bread Jewelry Books CDs

t. 4th S

We’ll light your fire for St . Paddy’s Day 2: green coors light N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY DESIGNER

ISSUE DATE

ACCT. EXEC.

RYANSSALOON031209R2

DATE

03.6.08

USP (BOLD SELECTION) PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE

PLEASE NOTE FOR e River ckeCORRECTIONS TruANY YOUR AD, SIGN AND FAX BACK TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW BY ________ TODAY, OTHERWISE THE AD WILL RUN AS SHOWN.

3

1

7

5

8

❑ ❑

APPROVED “AS-IS”, NO CORRECTIONS

APPROVED WITH CORRECTIONS AS NOTED

MUSIC INDOORS & OUT FEATURING:

Happy St. Patrick’sDay

The Blarney Band The Clarke Brothers The Mark Sexton Band Neil O’Kane

from the RN&R!

4th St.

1. Abby’s Highway 40

I-395

424 E. 4th St., Reno

2. Ceol Irish Pub

538 S. Virginia St., Reno

3. Coney Island Bar

2644 Prater Wy., Sparks

4.Filthy McNasty’s

1718 Holcomb Ave., Reno

5. Men Wielding Fire

6

4

nue Ave

FILE NAME REV. patio open...weather permitting

2

ton

3: 22oz guinness - jameson shots - any 16oz draft beer $ 4: irish carMB/SW bombs - any3.12.09 22oz draft beer BLS

ing

$

Arl

$

St. 2nd t. 1st S

Center St.

www.theislesonline.com

t Stree inia Virg

809 south center st, reno

I-80

Wells A ve.

Candy Food Apparel

L

St Patrick’s Day Celebration

IRISH FAVORITES

Paisley Brain Cells

1718 Holcomb Ave Reno, NV 89502

2644 prater Way • Sparks, NV 89431 • 775 358-6485

924 S. WELLS AVE, RENO 323-4142

b Abby’s Hwy 40!

l o b a l D ri n k

Th i

A St. Paddy’s Tradition – Stop By!

JOIN US for our

G nk

al

R E E B N

R

S FO OIN u

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

oc

Ryan’s Saloon & Broiler

FOOD AND IRISH FARE BY The Land & Sea Specialty Meat Co.

COME HELP BEAT THE “EMPTY KEG RECORD” OF 51 FROM LAST YEAR

180 E. 1st St., Reno

6. Ryan’s Saloon

924 S. Wells Ave., Reno

7. Studio on 4th

432 E. 4th St., Reno

8. The Isles

809 S. Center St., Reno

N E W S & RTraditional. E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E Never O N LY Always Trendy

Please don’t drink & drive!

DESIGNER SS ISSUE DATE 03.10.11 FILE NAME FILTHYMCNASTYS031011R2

ACCT EXEC GDO

538 S VIRGINIA ST. AT CALIFORNIA AVE ~ (775)329-5558 REV DATE NEW

SIGNATURE

ceolirishpub.com

PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING:

SIGNATURE

AD SIZE (COLUMN X INCHES) SPELLING NUMBERS & DATES CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESS, ETC) AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED APPROVED BY:

Free St. Patrick’s Day Safe RIDE Program is fully sponsored by...

PLEASE SIGN & FAX BY __________ TODAY TO: 775.324.4572

Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW!

RIDE free after 4 pm and enjoy a safe celebration. Saturday schedules in effect for: - RTC RIDE, RTC RAPID and RTC CONNECT - RTC SIERRA SPIRIT will be extended until midnight 20   |   RN&R   |   MARCH 15, 2012

348-RIDE rtcwashoe.com OPINION

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301 Kietzke Lane, 786-6359

People who read this column suggest places for me to check out, and La Parada was suggested by someone who happens by Dave Preston to be a restaurateur. It was a good suggestion. Marco Cabrera is the davep@ self-trained chef, who put in his time newsreview.com at the Peppermill and Circus Circus, and his wife, Martha, runs the frontof-the-house. In its fifth year, this el comedor is simple and serves breakfast, lunch and dinner ($2.99-$10.95), and has Mexican and American dishes throughout the extensive menu.

PHOTO/AMY BECK

Marco Cabrera shows off a tampiqueña steak at La Parada.

La Parada Restaurant is open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., on Tuesday to Saturday, and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sunday and Monday.

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Cabrera boasts he loves to come to work every day, and that passion is found in his food, a gift of flavors. It was evident in the tampiqueña steak ($10.95). He uses a seven-ounce, thin rib-eye that has been marinated in teriyaki, orange juice and lemon, then grilled to medium rare and served with sautéed and roasted pablano peppers, onions, queso fresco, guacamole, and a dab of sour cream. The moist meat had a hint of sweet citrus countered by the tang of the grilled peppers and a savory note from the grilled onions. It was a flavor fiesta. Wine is not their thing at La Parada, but there’s a couple of simple house wines by-theglass ($3.50). There’s a fair offering of domestic ($2.75) and Mexican cerveza ($3.50). Beer is best with this food, and I was feeling a little frisky and went for a Michelada ($4.99), a cerveza preparada made with beer, lime juice and tomato juice, and served in a chilled, salt-rimmed glass and a large shrimp hanging on the rim—again, Cabrera’s special touch. There’s a new menu coming in April, and Cabrera will add salads, soups and sandwiches to his already extensive offerings. His chips, salsas, rice and beans are all made from scratch. His red sauce is a blend of habaneras and puya peppers, and the green is made with habanera, serrano and jalapeño peppers. The salsa have exceptional flavors with the right degree of bite for the blends. On Saturday and Sunday, they serve menudos ($6.45) and birria de chivo, (goat soup, $9.99) with tortillas, all homemade. Mexican cuisine is known for its varied flavors, colorful decoration and variety of spices and ingredients, most of which are native to the country. This cuisine has evolved through thousands of years of blending indigenous cultures. In November 2010, Mexican cuisine was added by UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) to its lists of the world’s “intangible cultural heritage.” Marco and Martha Cabrera continue that heritage everyday at La Ω Parada, con mucho gusto.

Cabrera wanted me to try the huevos rancheros ($7.99) because he does it his way. That meant two cheese enchiladas, homemade chorizo, eggs, rice, beans, a dab of sour cream, queso, onions, tomato and cilantro. The chorizo in the enchiladas was ground and had a savory flavor with a hint of cinnamon. And the sauce on top included tomatillos—a green fruit with a husk skin grown by the Aztecs—as well as yellow and jalapeño peppers, garlic, onion, black pepper, and bay leaf. The sauce married to the chorizo made the eggs regal. The unique savory, robust tastes of roasted peppers with a slight lift and the cinnamon in the chorizo gave this rancheros an aromatic finish defining this dish and giving it an original culinary signature.


25% O Off

With coupon, not valid with other offers, cannot be used with take out orders. Valid with a minimum purchase of $25 and a maximum of $200. Offer expires 03/31/12. 09

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Perfectly placed scones, muffins and brownies greeted me one fine Sunday morning at the West St. Farmer’s Market. This is where I met 5th Street Bakehouse and fell in love. The words “All-natural, no preservatives, freshly baked bread” caught my attention. As I bit into a hand-made chocolate croissant, I knew this was a serious romance. We were going steady.

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55 Arroyo St 775.327.4422 www.ElAdobeCafe.com

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ASIAN NOODLES HOT POT FONDUE

ASIAN NOODLES

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EVERY THUR-SAT BRING YOUR FRIENDS AFTER 9PM

y a D s ’ k c i r t a S quare St. P on the 17th Saturday, PaMrtay rc• hDrink Specials

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Based on all their delicious treats, I imagined a huge bakery pumping out mass qualities of pastries with someone screaming, ‘We’re almost out of flour!’ I decided to do some investigating and visit the mother ship of my new love. I was surprised when I entered the humble store on 5th and Keystone. Where was the panicked bread maker? Maybe I was in the wrong place? Then, I recognized the croissants and I knew I was in the right place!

NEW TO RENO!

Eat where the Asians Eat!

A Chinese & Vietnamese Restaurant

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s e is lv E d e R e h T featuring urgeois Gypsies

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GRAND OPENING

There’s a little something for everyone who visits 5th Street Bakehouse, from their all-natural ice cream and sorbets to their soups, salads and sandwiches. Try a cup of their freshly ground organic freetrade coffee, roasted locally.

th A I sP I c E E xP REss authentic thai cuiSine

For breakfast, start the day off right with their “Morning Cuban”: Roasted, pulled pork, Swiss cheese, ham, fried eggs with green salsa on a toasted bun. It fills you up and gives you a kick in the pants - a sure cure for any groggy morning blues.

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For lunch, try their Chipotle Chicken Sandwich (marinated chicken breast, Chipotle aioli, Anaheim pepper relish, Monterey Jack cheese, Romaine lettuce, red onions, on a Focaccia Bun).

3004 kietzke lane (775) 825–8399 Mon – Sat 11aM–9pM • Sun 11:30aM–8pM www.ThaiSpiceExpress.com

We’ll light your fire for St . Paddy’s Day

For dessert, dabble in a little of this and that until you find your perfect match. It’s okay to be promiscuous when it comes to desserts. Enjoy!

$ $

5th Street Bakehouse 953 5th St., reno 775-323-1885

2: green coors light

3: 22oz guinness - jameson shots - any 16oz draft beer $ 4: irish car bombs - any 22oz draft beer patio open...weather permitting

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I scream Silent House While it’s a bit of a relief to see a horror film not using the “found footage” gimmick, Silent House is ruined by a couple of lousy supporting performances and a stupid payoff after a decent start. There’s a pretty good idea at play here: Keep a camera on a girl who is being stalked by “something” in a remote house that is difficult to escape. Directors Chris Kentis and Laura Lau, who gave us the effective by shark thriller Open Water, do a nice job of Bob Grimm making the movie look like one long, continuous shot. It isn’t, but there are some bgrimm@ newsreview.com impressive long stretches and clever edits to make it appear as such. Silent House is definitely an impressive technical achievement in shooting for that “real time” feel. It just needed a better script and a couple of men who can act. Elizabeth Olsen, so good in last year’s Martha Marcy May Marlene, is a real talent. As Sarah, the young woman who just can’t seem to escape her damned house, she does a supreme job at playing scared out of her mind.

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Two dudes and an Olsen sister go in search of ... a better ending!

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One gets the sense that this particular gig must’ve been quite taxing on her psyche. Kentis and Lau probably did a good job of actually scaring her senseless while filming. Olsen has an arsenal of sounds that contribute well to the film’s claustrophobic feel. When she tries to harness and muffle her screams, it really is quite unsettling. She also lets out some pretty decent full-throated ones. Based on this, I would give her the distinction of Muffled and Suffocated Scream Queen.

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5 EXCELLENT

The film has a few other players. Adam Trese is a real stiff as John, Sarah’s peculiar and particular dad. His line readings are flat, making it hard to invest in his character. Eric Sheffer Stevens is a little better as Sarah’s Uncle Peter, but he’s ultimately dead weight as well. Julia Taylor Ross is just a little too obvious as Sophia, a child friend of Sarah’s who mysteriously drops by to hang out. The film starts with an impressive overhead shot of Sarah as she sits by a lake. The shot comes down to meet Sarah as she walks up and into the house, and it’s a nice sequence. Cinematographer Igor Martinovic, whose resume includes a lot of documentaries, works overtime to make the real-time gimmick work. It must be said that he is unable to keep his subjects in focus all of the time when they are in motion. It’s understandable given the task at hand, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy on the eyes. This film is a remake of Uruguay’s The Silent House, a movie allegedly shot in one take for an estimated $6,000. I’ve seen portions of the original, and there’s no argument that Kentis and Lau have made a betterlooking film, and probably made a wise choice to make the film appear like one take rather than actually shooting it in one take. A 90-minute continuous shot, while possible, would be a total bitch to shoot. As I said before, the film is undone by a payoff that tries too hard to be “deep” and provide a big twist. Given the technical work at play, and the effective Olsen performance, the cinematographer and actress were deserving of something a little more distinct and honest. The payoff throws everything askew, makes little to no sense, and is easily guessed. By the time credits rolled at the screening I attended, people yelled at the screen, using many expletives and variations on “That sucked!” While I don’t think Silent House sucks, I felt their frustration. Had the movie come up with a better final 15, it could’ve been something to remember. As it is, it’s just a semi-impressive stunt that ultimately wastes a solid central performance. Ω

Act of Valor

Even if the real members of the military cast in this film could act—and believe me, they can’t—the story here is a sputtering dud and ineptly directed. Navy SEALS go on a couple of missions involving kidnap victims, drug lords and terrorists, and the film lacks a sense of adventure or purpose. The film’s big draw is that real military types are cast in major roles. Many of them look the part, but they have flat line deliveries. Still, that would be forgivable had directors Mike McCoy and Scott Waugh possessed the abilities to put together a decent action scene and gotten themselves a decent plot. This is a mess of a movie, and it made a ton of money in its first weekend. Shows you what I know.

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The Artist

An homage to silent films that’s actually a silent film, this is a funny, touching and innovative piece of work with a fun performance from Jean Dujardin. He plays a silent movie star at the dawning of the sound age, much like Charlie Chaplin, who either must make the leap to sound or slip away. Berenice Bejo plays Peppy Miller, a star on the rise. After sharing a scene in a film, their two careers go in separate directions. They’re wonderfully expressive performers, which suits Michel Hazanavicius’s film perfectly. One of last year’s biggest surprises, and they’ll be watching this one a hundred years from now.

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Friends with Kids

A large swath of the cast of Bridesmaids shows up for this romantic comedy that seems to be going an unconventional route for most of its running time. Too bad it falls apart in the last reel, cops out, and wraps up with some sort of weird Eyes Wide Shut ending. Written and directed by Jennifer Westfeldt, who also stars, the cast is great and the movie works on a moderate level until the implosion. Adam Scott and Westfeldt star as two best friends living in Manhattan who decide to have a kid together while still dating other people. They are a likeable pair of actors, as are costars Kristen Wiig, Jon Hamm, Maya Rudolph, Chris O’Dowd, Edward Burns and Megan Fox. Westfeldt writes good dialogue and, let’s face it, Adam Scott is The Man, especially when he’s allowed to be a little mean. It’s a shame they couldn’t come up with something better than the torpedo ending.

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John Carter

Every piece of marketing for this movie made it look like total garbage. While it’s no amazing cinematic feat, it does manage to be enjoyable. Taylor Kitsch plays the title character, and he’s taking a critical shellacking for his central performance. I happen to think his performance is the best thing in the film. Based on novels written by Edgar Rice Burroughs way back when, this science fiction fantasy on Mars is a bit overblown in spots, and totally fun in others. I loved when John Carter, a Civil War soldier teleported to Mars, first discovered his ability to jump on the planet. And Willem Dafoe provides his voice to the animated, four-armed Tars, a decent special effect. Casting around Kitsch is awful (Mark Strong and Dominic West as villains … AGAIN), and it feels a bit long. But, like Waterworld before it, it’s much better than some critics will lead you to believe.

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Project X

The found-footage gimmick is applied to teen party comedies with mixed but mostly lousy results. The script for this movie is no better than one of the American Pie direct-to-video sequels. While a bunch of teens getting together and throwing a wild party has been funny in the past, and will most assuredly be funny in the future, it’s not funny here thanks to a mostly unmemorable cast. I was a little less annoyed by a person continuing to film while

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supposedly funny things are happening as opposed to holding onto the camera while being attacked by monsters and maniacs as in past “found footage” films. But very few of the gags work, and this is all stuff we’ve seen done better before. It’s making a ton of money, and a sequel is already in the works. The found-footage thing is here to stay. Damn it.

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Safe House

Ryan Reynolds plays Matt Weston, a CIA operative who has spent a year sitting in a safe house bouncing a ball against a wall and listening to tunes. He longs for the big assignment in the field, but the organization seems content to keep him out of the way and performing menial tasks. Things change mightily when Tobin Frost (Denzel Washington) is brought to his house for some questioning and good old healthy waterboarding. Frost is a former agent gone rogue, selling secrets to enemy countries and making a decent living off of it. He’s also a dangerous, murderous son of a bitch. Throw into the mix that he’s also virtuous, and you have your typically complicated Washington character. Reynolds and Washington complement each other well in this action thriller that constitutes the rare Reynolds film that is good.

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A Separation

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This Means War

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Wanderlust

An Iranian couple is forced to separate when the wife, Simin (Leila Hatami), wants to live abroad, while the husband, Nader (Peyman Moadi), needs to stay home and take care of his ailing father. The situation causes many difficulties, especially when a hired housekeeper (Sareh Bayat) asked to care for the father starts behaving strangely. Writer-director Asghar Farhadi’s film, which recently won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, is a strong portrayal of family strife and illness. Moadi is especially good as a man who finds himself in all sorts of trouble for one short instance of overreaction, which also gives us an interesting look at the Iranian criminal justice system. It’s an absorbing movie, and it deserved its Oscar. Likeable performers can’t save this silly film from running out of steam by the time credits roll. Reese Witherspoon plays Lauren, a woman with a job I can’t really explain—she’s some kind of product quality tester—who winds up dating not one but two CIA operatives (Chris Pine and Tom Hardy), who are also best friends. The two men find themselves in competition for Lauren’s hand, and they do all sorts of unethical things to win it. All three are good and funny here, but director McG can’t make the premise work for the entire running time, and the film just runs out of energy. McG, who made the weak Terminator Salvation, is quite the messy director. Full blame goes to him for this film’s failures, because the actors almost pull it off. Paul Rudd plays George, a politely frustrated Wall Street worker living in a microscopic Manhattan apartment with his bad documentarian wife, Linda (a funny Jennifer Aniston, Rudd’s costar in The Object of My Affection and Friends). When George loses his job and Linda’s penguin cancer documentary is passed over by HBO, they wind up at a free sex commune presided over by a strange Christ-like figure (Justin Theroux). It’s directed and cowritten by David Wain (Wet Hot American Summer, Role Models), and that’s a good thing, because Rudd has had some of his best screen moments under Wain’s direction. There are a few scenes here that are among Rudd’s best, including a mirror moment when he practices sex talk that’s an instant classic. Not Wain’s best, but Rudd and company, including many members of The State, make it memorably funny.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe


The Reno Film Festival presents

The 2012 Oscar winning & nominated

AnimAted And Live Action short fiLms.

Two Screenings: fri & sAt, mArch 30 & 31, 7Pm Joe Crowley Student Union, UNR

ticKets General: $10 students: $5

Available in advance at renofilmfestival.com or at the door; cash or check only at the door no credit cards Presented in partnership with Shorts International and Magnolia Pictures. With special thanks to the Joe Crowley Student Union.

www.RenoFilmFestival.com 775-334-6707

SPONSORS KTVN-Channel 2, Reno Media Group, Bea-Design for Marketing, KUNR Public Radio– FM 88.7, Red Machine Multimedia and the Reno News & Review. Grant support has been received from the City of Reno Arts & Culture Commission, DP/Dermody Properties Foundation and the E.L. Cord Foundation. All eight City of Reno Advisory Boards also support the festival: Ward 1, Southwest Reno. Wards 2, Central and South Reno; Ward 3, East Reno; Wards 4, Northeast and North Valleys; Wards 5, Old Northwest and Northwest.

Get back in the swing of things.

Opening Day is April 5! Order your tickets now by phone at (775) 334-7000, online at RenoAces.com or at the Aces Ballpark Ticket Office OPINION

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Itʼs happen ing in

YOGA CLASSES

Six-week sessions taught by instructors from Yoga Loka studio. Yoga Basics: Introductory course covering principles, philosophy, movements, breathing and relaxation techniques of yoga. Tuesdays, 2/21- 3/27,5:30-6:45PM. Yoga Flow: All levels. Includes a flowing sequence of postures and detailed instruction. Thursdays, through 3/29, 5:30-6:45PM. Yoga mat, block and strap are required. $97/session for adults; $81/Sparks residents. Larry D. Johnson Community Center, 1200 12th Street (across from Sparks Library) (775) 353-7857 or e-mail recinfo@cityofsparks.us.

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With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659

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With DJ BG. F, Sa, 10PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 3563300

SCHEELS SPORTS BRA FITTING PARTY

ST. PATRICK’S DAY ON THE SQUARE

Let’s celebrate Moving Comfort’s 35th Birthday, and make sure you’re in the right sports bra! Th, 3/15, 6-8PM. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

SOUL SERENE

Live local music. Th, 3/15, 7PM, no cover. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-6262

BUDDY EMMER BAND

Th, 3/15, 8PM, F, 3/16, 9PM, Sa, 3/17, 9PM and Su, 3/18, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

LADIES 80’S NIGHT

Hosted by DJ BG. Th, 6-11PM, Trader Dick’s Lounge. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

26   |   RN&R   |   MARCH 15, 2012

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Enjoy live music and great beer! St. Patrick’s Day revelry on Victorian Square in Sparks featuring The Red Elvises, Jason King Band and the Bourgeois Gypsies Sa, 3/17. Free. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave.

BARE ROOT EZ RICK FRUIT TREES

Presented by James Shoa, expert fruit tree grower from L.E. Cooke Co. Learn how to plant fruit trees at your home. Sa, 3/17, 10AM & 1PM. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way. (775) 355-1551

IGOR & RED ELVISES

Celebrate St. Paddy’s Day with The Alley! Sa, 3/17, 8PM, no cover. The Alley, 906 Victorian Ave. (775) 358-8891

BOURGEOIS GYPSIES

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JASON KING BAND

St. Patrick’s Day celebration with drink specials and live local music! Sa, 3/17, 8PM, no cover. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-6262

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY WITH LAST STAND

Wear green! 9:30PM Sa, 3/17, 9:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

SCHEELS KIDS KLUB: GOLF 101

Learn some golf basics from the Scheels Golf Expert! Please meet at the Golf Simulator. All kids will receive a free ride on the Scheels Ferris Wheel. M, 3/19, 6PM. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

INTERMEDIATE BLACKSMITHING

Build upon your blacksmithing skills while exploring a variety of techniques like piercing, tooling, using a striker, upsetting, slitting and punching. Tu, 6:30-8:30PM through 5/15. Opens 3/20, $245. Sparks High School, 820 15th St. (775) 829-9010

CELTIC HERITAGE EXHIBIT

1he Sparks Heritage Museum has created a Celtic exhibit in their 900-square foot changing gallery displaying loaned items from the Northern Nevada Celtic community. M-Su through 4/30, $5 donation for reception. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-1144

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Featuring work by members of the Portrait Society of Reno. M-Su, 6AM-5PM through 3/27. Free. Jolt-N-Java Cafe & Coffee House, 5295 Vista Blvd. (775) 354-2121

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB

Looking for a group of people to run with on a weekly basis? Join the Scheels Running Club today! Tu, 6:30PM through 11/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

ZUMBA FITNESS

Zumba is a way to burn calories that’s more like a dance party than an exercise routine. Tuesdays &Thursdays, 6:15-7:15PM. Designed for all levels, beginner to high fitness. Bring workout shoes and water. $42 or $35/month for Sparks residents. Drop-in option, $6/class. Sparks Recreation Gym, 98 Richards Way.

KEITH ANDREW

W, 3/21, 6pm, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

KARAOKE

SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way

(775) 356-6000

THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country

music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861

OPEN MIC

GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy.

Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

SEND US YOUR SPARKS EVENTS! E-mail to: Sparks@newsreview.com

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY! CITY OF SPARKS Geno Martini - Mayor, Julia Ratti - Ward 1, Ed Lawson - Ward 2, Ron Smith - Ward 3, Mike Carrigan - Ward 4, Ron Schmitt - Ward 5, Shaun Carey - City Manager, Tracy Domingues - Parks & Recreation Director.

OTHER ELECTED OFFICIALS Judge Barbara S. McCarthy - Dept. 1, Judge Jim Spoo - Dept. 2, Chet Adams - City Attorney. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 353-2311

SPARKS CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 745 Fourth St., Sparks CITY OF SPARKS WEBSITES: www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com www.sparksitshappeninghere.com CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1420 Scheels Drive, Ste. 108 (next to Forever 21, Legends at Sparks Marina)

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Mountain duo Blunderbusst Why don’t more musicians get better as they get older? Why do most bands hit a plateau, and level off, or worse yet, by Brad Bynum fizzle out? Shouldn’t age, experience and practice make for an everbradb@ improving arc? newsreview.com “You have to want to get better,” says Jen Scaffidi, the guitarist and vocalist of Blunderbusst, an indie rock two-piece. “You have to want to practice, to work on getting better, because even if you become as technically proficient as possible, you can still be a better writer. … We like to write stuff we can’t play yet, so we have to learn how to do it. Like, we don’t know how to write a song with a long Krautrock breakdown? OK, let’s do it.”

PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

says Scaffidi, offering an accurate description. Scaffidi generally splits the difference between lead and rhythm playing, and employs just the right amount of effects, stomping a fuzz box or delay here and there, without needing to gaze too deeply at her shoes. Lyrically, Scaffidi says, “I take little pieces of things that are real, and stitch them together into a narrative that’s fictional. If anything, I’m too obtuse. … But, as a listener I like that.” The two-piece lineup has advantages and disadvantages (beyond the constant, inevitable comparisons to The White Stripes—though the less well known, but equally excellent, Baltimore duo Wye Oak is closer to the mark). “Our strengths are the same as our weaknesses,” says Scaffidi. “It allows for a certain economy of songwriting, because there’s just three elements— vocals, guitar, drums. Limitations are good in art.” “It does limit stuff, especially as far as what we’re able to cover,” says Gates. “All the songs I most want to cover have really awesome bass lines.” The duo have been together since 2006, and they’re a real exception to the rule about rock bands not aging well—if you go a year or two or five without seeing them, it’s impressive how much they will have evolved. Recently, they’ve invited guest musicians to play with them both in rehearsals and onstage. Keyboardist Carson Cessna is Scaffidi’s beau and bandmate in another project, Nancy Plays Nurse. And violinist and backing vocalist Samm Gates is Gates’ teenage daughter. When they join the core duo onstage, it makes for a fun, down-home family vibe. But Gates says that having the auxiliary band members around has some limitations as well. “There are some things we can’t talk about at band practice anymore,” she says. Ω

Jen Scaffidi and Carolyn Gates of Blunderbusst rock the house at Comma Coffee in Carson City.

Blunderbusst plays with Real Estate at The Holland Project, 140 Vest St., on April 25. For more information, including free downloads, visit www.blunderbusst.com.

OPINION

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NEWS

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The song in question is called “Aphasia,” and it does indeed have a long Krautrock breakdown. Scaffidi uses a looper pedal to create a repetitive bass pattern, then tastefully blends in guitar lines, while drummer Carolyn Gates plays a stuttering drum beat that challenges the brains of rhythmically challenged audience members who try to count time through it. Many of the beats and timings in Blunderbusst songs are unusual. “A lot of that comes from being a two-piece,” says Scaffidi. The smaller line-up allows for more idiosyncrasy and flexibility in the rhythm—having a lot of musicians play together tends to normalize the rhythms, but with just two people it can stay a little weird. And Gates has a distinctive, jazz-like fluidity to her drumming. “Somebody once referred to her playing as painting with drums,” GREEN

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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MARCH 15, 2012

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THURSDAY 3/15 3RD STREET

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

FRIDAY 3/16

SATURDAY 3/17

SUNDAY 3/18

Casual Dogs, 9pm, no cover

St. Patrick’s Day party w/Seasons of Insanity, 9pm, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8:30pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/19-3/21 DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm, Tu, no cover

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Jazz Night, 7:30pm, Tu, no cover

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

THE ALLEY

Street Dogs, Devil’s Brigade, Old Man Markley, Murder the Stout, 7:30pm, $13

Champagne Campaign, Infamous, DeSaint, 8:30pm, $4, $6

Igor & Red Elvises, 8pm, no cover

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB

DJs Greyson & John of Them Sonsofbitches, 9pm, no cover

The Brooklyn Fire, 9pm, $3

Shadow Arcade, 10pm, no cover

Seeing Eye Dogs, 9:30pm, no cover

Flashback, 9:30pm, no cover St. Patrick’s Day party w/Blarney Band, Clarke Brothers, Mark Sexton Band, 1pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

THE BLACK TANGERINE

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

James Wilsey Jr., 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

COMMA COFFEE

Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

COMMROW

Lee Burridge, Dave Staley, 9pm, $15, $18

Livitz Livitz, 11pm, $5

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Blarney Band, 7pm, no cover

Kai Clark Band, 7pm, no cover

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover Rock’n Clovers hosted by Crush, 7pm, $5

Girls, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, 9pm, $12, $15

THE DAILY GRIND

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Jeffrey James and the Wanted Gang, 9:30pm, no cover

VooDoo Dogz, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

1805 W. Williams Ave., Fallon; (775) 428-5800 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

John Digweed

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Cappadonna, Lord Mecca ICU, Venomous Ink, 8pm, Tu, $10, $15

FUEGO

Blues Jam Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

Comedy 3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Mitchell, 9pm, M, no cover Karaoke w/Nick, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Mitchell, 9pm, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Open Mic Comedy, 9pm, no cover

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Bourgeois Gypsies, 8pm, no cover

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Swahili, Schizopolitans, 7:30pm, W, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

JAVA JUNGLE

Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

John Digweed, Erik Lobe, 8:45pm, $25-$50

Sil Shoda, J French Project, Mnemonic, 8pm, $6

Bring Back the ’80s Dance Party w/DJ Kos, 8pm, $8, no cover w/green attire

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

March 15, 8:45 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover

Whitechapel, Miss May I, After the Burial, The Plot In You, 6:30pm, Tu, $17.50-$39

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Joe Moffa, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Turae Gordon, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Jackie Flynn, Kevin Flynn, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Neal Brennan, Shayla Rivera, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: DC Malone, Jay Stowe, Sean McBride, F, 7pm; Sa, 7pm, 9:30pm, $12, $16; Hynopt!c with Dan Kimm, F, 9:30pm, $16, $21

KING TUT

Now through May 23, 2012

(775)785-5961

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MARCH 15, 2012

|

RN&R

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THURSDAY 3/15

FRIDAY 3/16

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

SATURDAY 3/17 St. Patrick’s Day party w/Decoy, 9pm, $5

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

MO’S PLACE

3600 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 542-1095

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Michelle Pappas, 7pm, no cover

THE POINT

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Stevie D., 8pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

St. Patrick’s Day party w/Gemini, 9pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879

Igor & Red Elvises March 17, 8 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

PONDEROSA SALOON RED DOG SALOON

Others Brothers, 7:30pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474 241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Sunday be fore publication .

Spencer & Morgan Funk Jam, 9pm, no cover

Chord Soup, 8pm, no cover

Lady and the Tramps, 8pm, no cover

SIERRA GOLD

Apostles of Badness, Liquorville, 9pm, M, live jazz, 8pm, W, no cover St. Patrick’s Day Party w/Last Stand, 9:30pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

680 S. Meadows Pkwy., (775) 850-1112 Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Folk The System with Alan, 9pm, no cover

DJ Kiwi, 9pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

Christy Lynn, 5pm, no cover, Spoken Views Open Mic Poetry Slam, 8pm, $5

Christy Lynn, 5pm, no cover Midnight Minx Burlesque w/DJs Game Silky Soul Sundays w/Groove Centric, Songwriters in the Round, 7:30pm, $5-$7 Genie, Filthy One, Sophie Rae, 9pm, $TBA 6pm, no cover

THE UNDERGROUND

1) The Knux, The Vibrant Sound, Knowledge, 7pm, $5 for 21+, $8 for under 21

1) Flesh Hammers, DJ Razz, Mary Jane Rocket, 8:30pm, $10

1) As They Sleep, Nightshade, It Lies Within, Cranium, 8pm, $5, $8 2) Aversion Therapy, Pinky Polanski, 8pm, $3 after 9pm

Chuck McCumber, The McMullins, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 7pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

Cappadonna March 19, 9 p.m. Mo’s Place 3600 Lake Tahoe Blvd. South Lake Tahoe (530) 542-1095

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-6460 555 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-2582 1) Showroom 2) Tree House Lounge

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

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MARCH 15, 2012

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm W, no cover

Jay Goldfarb, 7pm, W, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover Little City, 9:30pm, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

9570 S. McCarran Blvd., (775) 787-9669

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

SPARKY’S

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

St. Patrick’s Day party w/The Big Bad Band, 9pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424 924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Cappadonna, King Magnetic, Block McCloud, Logic One, Lord Mecca ICU, 9pm, M, $15, $18

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA RYAN’S SALOON

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/19-3/21 Open Mic Night/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Ciana, noon, Blue Haven, 8pm, no cover

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED ROCK

SUNDAY 3/18

Merkin, Kimes, 9pm, no cover

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

Dark Tuesdays w/Stefani, 9pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Steve Starr, 8pm, Tu, no cover, Christy Lynn, 5pm, W, no cover 1) C-Money & the Players Inc, Inhale, Positive Rising, 7:30pm, W, $5, $10


THURSDAY 3/15

FRIDAY 3/16

SATURDAY 3/17

SUNDAY 3/18

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/19-3/21

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 4pm, Chili Sauce, 10pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 4pm, Chili Sauce, 10pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) Doctor Rockit, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Vegas Road Show, 7pm, no cover

2) Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

2) Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Melissa Dru, 10pm, no cover

Melissa Dru, 10pm, no cover

1) Afrofunk Experience, 10pm, no cover

1) Hot Buttered Rum, Cornmeal, 9pm, $22, $25

2) Mat the Alien, Trevor Kelly, 11pm Tu, no cover

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, 9:30pm, 1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, $19.95 + $19.95 + 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Alias, 10pm, no cover 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, DJ JC, 11pm, 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, no cover no cover 4) Guitar Stevie, 5pm, no cover

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, W, $19.95 + 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Capital Down, 10pm, W, no cover

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 8pm, $19.95 + 1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, $19.95 + 2) Alias, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live 2) Alias, 10pm, no cover piano, 4:30pm, DJ JC, 11pm, no cover 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Guitar Stevie, 5pm, no cover

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 4) Cin Cin Bar & Lounge

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Senses, 9pm, $15 1) Theater 2) 2500 East 3) The Beach 5) Country dance lessons w/DJ Jamie 4) Xtreme Sports Bar 5) Mustangs Dancehall & Saloon “G”, Cowboy Tom, 8pm, $5 6) Summit Pavilion 7) Grand Sierra Ballroom 8) Silver State Pavilion

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 427-7247 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Showroom 2) Sapphire Lounge 3) Plaza 4) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

1) Peter Frampton, 9pm, $45-$85

1) Mariachi Vargas De Tecalitlan, Mariachi Imperial de Mexico de Mario Rodriquez, Mariachi Garibaldi de Jaime Cuella, 8pm, $35-$100 4) Baila Latin Dance Party, 7:30pm, $5

2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Drive-By Truckers, 7:30pm, $29 2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Senses, 9pm, $15

March 16-17, 8 p.m. Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. 325-7401

1) Senses, 9pm, Tu, W, $15

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover

1) Kira Soltanovich, 8pm, $20, $25

1) Rhythm Riders, 8pm, $25, $30, Kira Soltanovich, 10:30pm, $20, $25 2) Karaoke, 6pm, Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

1) Rhythm Riders, 8pm, $25, $30, Kira Soltanovich, 10:30pm, $20, $25 2) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

1) Rhythm Riders, 8pm, $25, $30

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 8pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ BG, 6pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer Band, 8pm, no cover 5) Just Right, 5:30pm, no cover

3) Keith Andrew, 6pm, W, no cover

2) Mike Furlong, 5pm, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, no cover 4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

2) Mike Furlong, 8pm, no cover 3) Tony Vee, 9pm, no cover 4) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Mike Furlong, 8pm, no cover 3) Tony Vee, 9pm, no cover 4) Green Party, 10pm, $20

2) Mike Furlong, 6pm, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, no cover

2) Mike Furlong, 7pm, M, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, M, W, no cover

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover 3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

1) Willie Nelson, Pegi Young & The Survivors, 8pm, $65, $80 2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Tyler Stafford, 5pm, no cover

1) Willie Nelson, Pegi Young & The Survivors, 8pm, $65, $80 2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover

2) DJ Tom, 9pm M, DJ I, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover 3) Dudes Day, 7pm, Tu, Mix it Up!, 10pm, W, no cover

2) Baron von Remmel, 9pm, no cover

2) Baron von Remmel, 9pm, no cover

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

TAHOE BILTMORE

5 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 831-0660 1) Breeze Nightclub 2) Casino Floor 3) Conrad’s

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

Willie Nelson

|

Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MARCH 15, 2012

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31


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560 e. Plumb ln. 775-828-6000 www.massageessence.com

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N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY DESIGNER

MTH

ISSUE DATE

08.27.09

FILE NAME MOTORSHEEP082709R1

ACCT. EXEC.

CLB

REV. DATE

08.16.01

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For Thursday, March 15 to Wednesday, March 21 3/16,2-10pm; Sa, 3/17, noon-10pm; Su, 3/18, noon-7pm. $15 per day; free admission

To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

for children age 14 and younger. Circus Circus, 500 N. Sierra St., (412) 531-5319, http://tattoopgh.com/ladyluck.html.

MARK CAVAGNERO LECTURE: Black Rock Design Institute presents Mark Cavagnero of Mark Cavagnero Associates Architecture. Learn about the firm’s wide range of projects. Networking and beer at 5pm. Talk at 6pm. Th, 3/15, 6pm. $10 general; $8 NMA members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

Listings are free, but not guaranteed. Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., April 5, is Thursday, March 29. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

Events

preparing, first aid, common backcountry problems and treatment, vital signs and nutritional considerations. This presentation is part of the Tahoe Rim Trail Association and Cabela’s of Reno Spring Speaker Series. W, 3/21, 6-8pm. Free. Cabela’s, 8650 Boomtown Road, (775) 298-0238, www.tahoerimtrail.org.

BRINGING WIND ENERGY DOWN TO EARTH: Sunrise Sustainable Resources Group host a discussion on wind energy. Explore the pros and cons, successes and failures of wind energy installations for our region with a panel of specialists. Th, 3/15, 6:30-8:30pm. Free for members; $5 non-members. Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Parkway, (775) 673-7300, www.sunrisenevada.org.

FIRE SCIENCE THEATER: Ernie and Erica Wisner explore historic fire technology and options for heating, cooking, work and entertainment. Please RSVP. F, 3/16, 5:30-9pm. $25 per person. River School Farm, 7777 White Fir St., (775) 830-8822.

EDIBLE & ORNAMENTAL HERBS: Learn how to incorporate edibles and herbs into your garden or containers and how to cook with them. Sa, 3/17, 10am. Free. Moana Nursery Landscape & Design Center, 1190 W. Moana Lane, (775) 825-0600, www.moananursery.com.

GOLD HILL TUESDAY NIGHT LECTURE SERIES: Patty Cafferata presents “The History of Women’s Firsts in Nevada Politics.” Buffet dinner 5-7pm; lecture begins at 7:30pm. Reservations recommended but not required. Tu, 3/20, 5pm. $15 dinner and lecture; $5 lecture only. Gold Hill Hotel, 1540 Main St., Gold Hill, (775) 847-0111, www.goldhillhotel.net.

EQUESTRIAN FIRST AID AND NUTRITION TALK: Veterinarians Tanya Balaam-Morgan and Beth Messerlian of Large Animal Veterinary Services discuss information that all equestrians should consider when riding in the backcountry. Topics will include planning and

PUBLIC DOCUMENT SHREDDING DAY: The public

LADY LUCK TATTOO ARTS EXPO 2012: The 10th

is invited to bring all types of sensitive documents for immediate destruction in a mobile shred truck. Th, 3/15, 11am-1pm. Free. United Federal Credit Union, 10705 Double R Blvd., (775) 329-6673 ext. 5942.

RENO GEM FAIRE: The fair features jewelry, gems, beads, crystals, silver, rocks, minerals and more. Exhibitors from all over the world will be on site. F, 3/16, 12-6pm; Sa, 3/17, 10am-6pm; Su, 3/18, 10am-5pm. $7 weekend pass. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (503) 252-8300, www.gemfaire.com.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OYSTER FRY: Professional

RIPPEROO PARADE: The Ski & Snowboard

and amateur cooks and chefs from all over the region converge to compete for the most creative and unique dishes and recipes using beef “fries” (testicles). Sa, 3/17, 10am-3pm. Free admission. Parking lot of the Delta Saloon, 18 S. C Street, Virginia City, (775) 846-1130, www.nvshows.com.

School mascot will lead guests through the village during this parade featuring music, singing, dancing and fun. The parade leaves from the Adventure, Learning & Guiding Center, located next door to the Season Pass Office, on the corner opposite the 001 Oakley store. Sa,

3/17, 4:45pm; Sa, 3/24, 4:45pm; Sa, 3/31, 4:45pm. Free. Northstar-at-Tahoe Resort,

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE: Virginia City cele-

100 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 4666784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

brates Irish heritage with its annual parade. Sa, 3/17, 12-12:30pm. Free. Downtown Virginia City, C Street, Virginia City, (775) 847-4386, www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

SMALL WONDER WEDNESDAY: Families with children 5 years old and younger are invited to play, explore and listen to stories read by the museum’s educators. Only children age 5 years and younger are admitted to Small Wonder Wednesdays, which start at 9am, an hour before the museum opens. Older siblings may join at 10am. Third W of every month, 9am. $8 per person; free for members and babies under age 1. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, 490 S. Center St., (775) 786-1000, www.nvdm.org.

WOMEN’S SUCCESS SUMMIT DINNER: Sandra Yancey, founder and chief executive officer of eWomenNetwork, is the featured speaker at this dinner event hosted by the eWomenNetwork Reno/Carson/Tahoe Chapter. Participants will learn how to use and apply a dynamic PLANS model, ways to gain access to resources and how to increase a customer base. The evening also features networking and a business expo. W, 3/21, 5-9pm. $50-$70. Hidden Valley Country Club, 3575 E. Hidden Valley Drive, (775) 853-2120, www.ewomennetwork.com.

Art ARTINEERING: Ebullience. The exhibition features work by artists Lance Dehné, Larry Hunt and Tim Yardic. M-Su through 3/31. Free. 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 119, Building B, (775) 229-0634, www.artineering.com.

RIVERWALK DISTRICT WINE WALK: Visit any Riverwalk District Merchant on Wine Walk day to get a map of participating Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, with a valid photo ID, you’ll receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Every month offers a different theme and part of all proceeds are donated to a local charity. Third Sa of every month, 2-5pm. $20. The Riverwalk District, downtown Reno along The Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

All ages BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Photo Fandango VI. The sixth annual accomplished and upstart photographers invitational features the work of more than 20 local photographers. M-Su, 11am-4pm through 3/31. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

NEW MOTHERS SUPPORT GROUP: This group offers support to first-time mothers in dealing with the changes and issues that come with having a new baby. Th, 10-11:30am. Saint Mary’s Regional Medical Center, 235 W. Sixth St., (775) 770-3843, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

THIS WEEK

annual tattoo expo features exhibits, contests, vendors and a seminar. F,

continued on page 34

weekand enjoy a Hit the slopes ga at yo d an music end of skiing, ival. st Fe ow Fl the Freeride owskiers and sn Professional y tr un co ck ba d boarders an Rahlves, uding Daron experts, incl d Kent riga-alosa an Sage Cattab d workan s ic in cl offer Kreitler, will nd. ke ee hout the w hanie shops throug ep St as ch ors su ong Yogi instruct am , ia Pradeep Teot l Snyder and na io at ir sp fer in others, will of d and the body, min classes get DJs will n ow kn l. Wel spirit in sync use and ho in reggae, play the best y and da e th ut ugho dubstep thro ed to at sl night. DJs well into the ert en M l ha ic M ing and appear includ tin ar d Justin M (pictured) an lebrace y da ere e th LoBounce. Th -18 at ace March 16 tion takes pl , 1501 rt so Re n ai ount Kirkwood M e, iv eadows Dr Kirkwood M from $12 ckets range Ti d. oo Kirkw $349 for a to dual class for an indivi of the ckage. Part three-day pa ve Our Sa go to the proceeds will t si Vi n. tio Snow Founda details. flowfest for www.freeride

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—Kelley L

OPINION

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BACKSEAT GALLERY AT COMMA COFFEE: Reflections. The show features work by emerging local artists Jake Branco and Debbie Fontaine. There will be five large focal pieces, created exclusively for this show, including one collaborative piece. M-Su through 3/31. Free. 312 S. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 883-2662, www.commacoffee.com.

THE HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: The Scholastic Art Awards of 2012. The Nevada Museum of Art presents an exhibition of artwork created by Northern Nevada middle and high school students as part of The Scholastic Art Awards of 2012. Entries are evaluated on originality, technical skill and the emergence of a personal vision. Gold Key award-winning works are featured in this monthlong exhibition, which will be housed at the new Holland Project Gallery. M-Su through 4/1. $1$10. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

JOLT-N-JAVA CAFE & COFFEE HOUSE: Family and Friends. The show features work by members of the Portrait Society of Reno. M-Su, 6am-5pm through 3/27. Free. 5295 Vista Blvd., Sparks, (775) 354-2121.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Wildlife in Wild Places. North Tahoe Arts presents a collaborative wildlife exhibit from local artists Larry Hunt, Fred Boyce, Nina Porcelli-Fenn, Janet Martin, Alice Norton, Pat Edwards, Gretchen Davis, Mark Smith and Burton & Raschen. Tu-Su through 4/2. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Can You Imagine..., Pam Brekas presents a series of abstract photographs inspired by the colors, textures and details found in the rust of machinery and metal she has discovered abandoned in the landscape. Jack Taylor, a ceramicist and

sculptor, incorporates non-traditional materials into his ceramic works in order to “add a twist and an element of surprise to the traditional pot.” M-F, 10am-5pm through 3/16. Free. 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

SIERRA NEVADA COLLEGE: Geographical Divides: Finding Common Ground. Nevada Arts Council presents this exhibit in the Prim Library. M-F through 4/6. Free. 999 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, (775) 831-1314, www.sierranevada.edu.

STREMMEL GALLERY: Bearings Claimed. Brady’s exhibition of new work continues his line of inquiry into themes of abstraction and figuration led by familiar influences such as architecture and the human form. M-Sa

THIS WEEK

continued on page 36

Lard of the dance When I got married, I was slim, but I’ve gained a lot of weight. My wife gained about 20 pounds but recently lost that and more. I’ve been as high as 265, but I’m now at 238 and losing a pound a week, which isn’t fast enough for my wife. When I contemplate a stricter diet, what comes to mind is feeling angry, tired and hungry at my high-stress job. My wife said I obviously love food more than her, and if I won’t lose weight for her, maybe I’ll do it for our boys. She considers me self-centered and narcissistic because I’m not losing enough weight, and I consider her self-centered and narcissistic for framing every argument in terms of what she wants and isn’t getting. What do you think? Does being overweight mean you don’t love your significant other? There’s your wife, wagging a carrot stick at you, telling you that if you loved her you’d survive on lettuce sandwiches or go on the Drink Your Own Urine Diet— whatever it takes to drop flab fast. Probably because weight loss seems easier for her, she assumes you’re lazy and self-indulgent. She’s now trying to guilt-ivate you into losing weight, which is more helpful than voicing the other thing she’s probably thinking: “I don’t want to have sex with you; I want to harpoon you.” Chances are, the problem isn’t that your diet isn’t “strict enough,” but that you’ve been following the obesity-causing dietary “science” promoted by the government and much of the medical establishment. The “weight loss” diet they advise—high-carb, low-fat—is actually a weight-gain diet. 34

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Investigative science journalist Gary Taubes spent more than a decade digging through the body of research on diet. As he writes in Why We Get Fat, the evidence shows that it’s carbohydrates— from sugar, flour, starchy vegetables like potatoes, and juice and beer—that cause the insulin secretion that puts on fat. So, if you want to drop pounds—and not just one a week but like they’re stones falling off a truck—eat low-carb/high-fat foods like cheeseburgers. Just feed the bun to the pigeons. Unfortunately, it seems your love handles have become resentment handles. Some of the ill will between you may melt away as you lose the gut, but it points to a bad pattern. You don’t win marital arguments by clinging to how right you are and how wrong your spouse is; you win by working together to make things as right as you can for both of you (“us first” instead of “me first”). Some problems aren’t solvable, but you’ll be able to shrug off an impasse if you’re consistently putting yourselves in each other’s place. That’s the spirit that keeps you from striking out in revenge—for example, by insisting you’re on the Zone diet but not mentioning that it’s the zone from the outermost wall of Dunkin’ Donuts to the outermost wall of Cinnabon.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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through 4/7. Free. 1400 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-0558, www.stremmelgallery.com.

TMCC MAIN ART GALLERY: Common Fate. This exhibition features work by University of Nevada, Reno master of fine arts graduates Jeff Erickson, Ahren Hertel, Katy Govan, Peter Whittenberger, Kim Musser and Jeremy Stern. M-F through 3/29. Free. Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini Blvd., (775) 674-7698, www.tmcc.edu/vparts/artgalleries.

WHITTEMORE GALLERY: Always Lost. The Western Nevada College student and faculty exhibit honors and personalizes U.S. military personnel who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan since Sept. 11, 2001. M-Sa through 5/4. Free. First floor of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4636.

Call for Artists ARTISTS CALL FOR APRIL EXHIBIT: The exhibit A Child’s World targets the expressions of a child’s world through different mediums of art. This can include original artwork, wooden furniture and toys, sculpture, fabric art/clothing or story books. An application is available online. Email your application and three images of your artwork to info@northtahoearts.com. Deadline is March 20. North Tahoe Arts Center, 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop in Tahoe City, (530) 5812787, www.northtahoearts.com.

VSA ARTS OF NEVADA/LAKE MANSION: Rich in Art Exhibit, M-F, 10am-4pm through 4/30. Free. 250 Court St., (775) 826-6100.

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM, RANCHO SAN RAFAEL REGIONAL PARK: King Tut: Wonderful Things from the Pharaohs Tomb, W-Sa, 10am-4pm through 5/23; Su, 12-4pm through 5/20. $9 adults; $8 children age 17 and younger, seniors age 62 and older. 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

Film THE BAADER MEINHOF COMPLEX: Artemisia Moviehouse presents a screening of Uli Edel’s Academy Award- and Golden Globenominated film based on the true story of the Red Army Faction. Tu, 3/20, 7-10pm. $7 general; $5 members, bicyclists, students. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

BAD ASTRONOMY: MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS: The full-dome digital planetarium show is based on the popular book and website Bad Astronomy by author Phil Plait. Starlight Express, a short overview presentation of current space news that changes monthly, accompanies Bad Astronomy and is included in the ticket price.

M-Su, 2 & 4pm through 5/28; F, Sa, 6pm through 5/26. $7 adults; $5 children ages 3-12, seniors

age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., north of Lawlor Events Center, (775) 784-4812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

CORAL REEF ADVENTURE: The SkyDome 8/70 large-

Museums NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM (THE HARRAH COLLECTION): Mutant Rides: Origin of a Species, M-Su through 7/25. $10 adults; $8 seniors; $4 kids ages 6-18; free for children 5 and younger. 10 S. Lake St., (775) 333-9300.

NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY: Basque Aspen Tree Art Exhibition, W-Sa, 10am-5pm through 4/28; Reno: Biggest Little City in the World, W-Sa, 10am-5pm. $4 adults; free for members, children age 17 and younger. 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 688-1190.

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-Su through 7/1; In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows, W-Su through 5/20; Out of the Forest : Art Nouveau Lamps, W-Su through 5/20; The Canary Project: Landscapes of Climate Change, W-Su through 4/29; Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection, W-Su through 5/20; August Sander: Face of Our Time, W-Su through 4/22; Peter Liashkov: Paper Cowboy, W-Su through 4/15; Tim Hawkinson: Totem, W-Su through 10/7; Art, Science, and the Arc of Inquiry: The Evolution of the Nevada Museum of Art,W-Su through 7/1. $1-$10; free for NMA members. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM: Celtic Heritage Exhibit, M-Su through 4/30. $5 adults; free for children age 12 and younger. 814 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 355-1144, www.sparksmuseum.org.

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format film presents the real-life expedition of ocean explorers and underwater filmmakers Howard and Michele Hall as they guide viewers to the islands and waters of the South Pacific. M-Su, 1 & 3pm through 5/28; F, Sa, 5 & 7pm through 5/26. $7 adults; $5 children ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

DARK SIDE OF THE MOON: Pink Floyd’s legendary rock ’n’ roll masterpiece, is recreated in fullcolor HD animation with surround sound and new footage and effects. F, Sa, 8pm through 5/26. $7 adults; $5 kids ages 3-12, seniors age 60 and older. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 7844812, www.planetarium.unr.edu.

Poetry/Literature POETRY READING: Poets Genevieve Kaplan reads from In the Ice House and Jared Stanley reads from Book Made of Forest. F, 3/16, 6:30-8pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

younger. St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, 341 Village Blvd., Incline Village, (775) 313-9697, www.toccatatahoe.com.

JOPLINESQUE WITH SCHALL ADAMS: Reno Tahoe Comedy presents this portrayal of rock singer Janis Joplin as sung and performed by Schall Adams. Th, 3/15, 7:30-9pm. $15 advance; $20 the day of the show. Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 3225233, www.renotahoecomedy.com.

KUNR JAZZ BRUNCH: Niall McGuinness and the New World Jazz Project perform at the monthly event presented by KUNR Radio and Nevada Museum of Art. Su, 3/18, 11am-1pm. Free; admission fees apply to art galleries. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

L-CUBED: LOOK, LUNCH & LISTEN: Bring a lunch and check out this series of concerts that showcase University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Music students and faculty. W, noon through 5/2. Free. Randall Rotunda, Matthewson-IGT Knowledge Center, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

MEN OF WORTH: Scotsman Donnie Macdonald and Irishman James Keigher blend music and storytelling to take audiences on journey to their homelands. F, 3/16, 8pm. $20 general; $17 students, seniors; $16 BAC members. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976, www.breweryarts.org.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY ON THE SQUARE: Great Basin Brewing Company, Cantina Los Tres Hombres, Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, The Alley and O’Ski’s Pub & Grille celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with live music by The Red Elvises, Jason King Band and the Bourgeois Gypsies. Sa, 3/17. Free. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave. 14th Street to Pyramid Way, Sparks, www.greatbasinbrewingco.com.

UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE: The Wind Ensemble will perform as part of the Western/Northwestern Division Conference of the College Band Directors National Association where they will perform the world premier of a newly commissioned work by Julie Giroux as part of an concert called “The Wind Band Music of Julie Giroux.” F, 3/16, 4:15pm. Free. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

Sports & fitness Music BRRROQUE MASTERS: Tahoe Symphony Orchestra & Chorus (TOCCATA) presents this concert featuring guest cellist Jeffrey Lastrapes in a program that includes works by Bach, Couperin, Vivaldi, Scarlatti and Handel. F, 3/16, 7pm. $5-$35; free for youth ages 18 and

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT CLASSES: Guild certified Feldenkrais practitioner and teacher Carole Bucher teaches ongoing classes. Tu, 5:30-7pm. $12 drop-in fee. Center for Spiritual Living Carson City, 1927 N. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 2407882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.


FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT CLASSES: Guild certified Feldenkrais practitioner and teacher Carole Bucher teaches ongoing classes. Th, 5:30-6:45pm. $12 drop-in fee. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

9:30pm; Su, 3/25, 3-5pm. $17 general; $14 students, seniors; $20 at the door. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

PLIE’D THE FIFTH STUDENT DANCE CONCERT: The Department of Theatre and Dance at the University of Nevada, Reno, in conjunction with the UNR Dance Co-Op, present this student dance concert in which student choreographers create and set original choreographic works. Th, 3/15, 8pm; F, 3/16, 8pm. $5 at the door; cash only. Redfield Studio Theatre, Church Fine Arts Building, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

RENO BIGHORNS: The NBA D-league team plays Dakota Wizards. F, 3/16, 7pm; Sa, 3/17, 7pm. $8$125; the team plays Dakota Wizards. Tu, 3/20, 7pm. $8-$125. Reno Events Center, 400 N. Center St., (775) 284-2622, www.renobighorns.com.

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB: Runners and walkers are invited to join this Tuesday night group run. Water and snacks will be available after the runs. Meet in the men’s sport shoe shop. Tu, 6:30pm through 11/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

RAIN: A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES: Broadway Comes to Reno continues its 2011-2012 series with this tribute to the Fab Four. Rain performs the full range of The Beatles’ discography live onstage, including songs that The Beatles themselves recorded in the studio but never performed for an audience. F, 3/16, 8pm; Sa, 3/17, 2 & 8pm; Su, 3/18, 2 & 7pm. $40-$70. Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 686-6600, www.pioneercenter.com.

STAR GAZING SNOWSHOE TOUR: During the 2- to 2.5hour tour, a guide will lead participants through some snowshoe trails while chatting about the wonders of the sky. Participants will snowshoe back to the Cross-Country Ski, Telemark & Snowshoe Center for a laser tour, telescope viewing, wine and hot cider around the fire pits. The group will snowshoe down the last half mile to the Village at Northstar where the tour will end. Dogs on leashes are welcome. F, 3/16, 5pm. $50 adults; $25 children ages 10-12. Northstar-at-Tahoe Resort, 100 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784, www.northstarattahoe.com.

THE WILD PARTY: Brüka Theatre presents Andrew Lippa’s jazz-tinged musical based on Joseph Moncure March’s 1928 narrative poem about a 1920s party. Explicit theater. Ages 17 and older only. Th, 3/15, 8pm; F, 3/16,

8pm; Sa, 3/17, 8pm; Su, 3/18, 2pm; Th, 3/22, 8pm; F, 3/23, 8pm; Sa, 3/24, 8pm; Th, 3/29, 8pm; F, 3/30, 8pm; Sa, 3/31, 8pm; W, 4/4, 8pm; Th, 4/5, 8pm; F, 4/6, 8pm; Sa, 4/7, 8pm; Th, 4/12, 8pm; F, 4/13, 8pm; Sa, 4/14, 8pm. $20 general; $18 stu-

WOLF PACK BASEBALL: The University of Nevada, Reno plays University of California, Irvine. F, 3/16, 2pm; Sa, 3/17, 1pm; Su, 3/18, 1pm. $5-$11. Peccole Field, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-7225, www.nevadawolfpack.com.

dents, seniors; $25 at the door. Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org.

Classes ARGENTINE TANGO II: Increase your dance skill

Onstage

level in technique, style and complexity. Learn signature steps such as molinetes, ganchos and giros and practice them to different types of music. M, 7:30-8:45pm through 4/23. $69. Lets Dance Studio, 1151 N. Rock Blvd., Sparks, (775) 829-9010, www.washoecommunityed.org.

DEAD MAN’S CELL PHONE: TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada presents Sarah Ruhl’s award-winning comedy about a woman who answers a dead mans cell phone and finds her life turned upside down. F, 3/16, 8pm; Sa,

3/17, 8pm; Su, 3/18, 2pm; F, 3/23, 8pm; Sa, 3/24, 8pm; Su, 3/25, 2pm. $12 general; $10 students,

BANKRUPTCY EDUCATION CLINIC: Nevada Legal

seniors. Laxalt Auditorium, Warren Nelson Building, 401 W. Second St., (775) 284-0789, www.twnn.org.

Services Inc. and Washoe Legal Services host this legal education clinic. Pre-registration requested to ensure the availability of materials. First Tu of every month, 1:30-3:30pm; Third Th of every month, 1:30-3:30pm. Free. Nevada Legal Services, 654 Tahoe St., (775) 284-3491 ext. 214.

LOVE LETTERS: Good Luck Macbeth presents A. R. Gurney’s play about letters exchanged over a lifetime between two people who grew up together, went their separate ways, but continued to share confidences. F, 3/16, 7:30-

9:30pm; Sa, 3/17, 7:30-9:30pm; Th, 3/22, 7:30-9:30pm; F, 3/23, 7:30-9:30pm; Sa, 3/24, 7:30-

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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MISCELLANY

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MARCH 15, 2012

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RN&R

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MARCH 15, 2012

Save up to 75% on Gift Certificates! Visit www.newsreview.com

ONE STOP SHOP

BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): This week you

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): How did the

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Roots and

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): If you set up

may learn the real reason the tortoise beat the hare, why two of the three blind mice weren’t really blind, and the shocking truth about the relationship between Cinderella’s fairy godmother and the handsome prince. Myths will be mutating, Aries. Nursery rhymes will scramble and fairy tales will fracture. Thor, the god of thunder, may make a tempting offer to Snow White. The cow’s jump over the moon could turn out to have been faked by the CIA. An ugly duckling will lay an egg that Chicken Little claims is irrefutable proof the 2012 Mayan Apocalypse is imminent. Sounds like a rowdy good time for all!

wings. But let the wings grow roots and the roots fly.” That was written by Spanish poet Juan Ramon Jimenez, and now I’m passing it on to you. It will serve as a keynote for the turning point you’re about to navigate. In the coming weeks, you’ll generate good fortune by exposing your dark mysterious depths to the big bright sky; you’ll be wise to bring your soaring dreams down to earth for a pit stop. The highs need the influence of the lows, Taurus; the underneath will benefit from feeling the love of what’s up above. There’s one further nuance to be aware of, too: I think you will find it extra interesting to interweave your past with your future. Give your rich traditions a taste of the stories that are asyet unwritten.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Is it possible

you were a spider in a previous life? If so, please call on the abilities you developed back then. You need to create an extra big, superfine web, metaphorically speaking, so that you can capture all the raw materials you will be needing in the coming weeks and months. If you’re not sure whether you are the reincarnation of a spider, then simply imagine you were. Stimulate daydreams in which you visualize yourself as a mover and shaker who’s skilled at snagging the resources and help you require.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): British

writer Kenneth Tynan asked a movie director about how he’d film an advancing army. Did it matter whether the action went from right to left across the frame or left to right? “Of course!” said the director. “To the Western eye, easy or successful movement is left to right, difficult or failed movement is right to left.” The director showed Tynan an illustrated book as evidence. On one page, a canoe shooting the rapids was going from left to right, while a man climbing a mountain was headed from right to left. Use this information to your benefit, Cancerian. Every day for the next two weeks, visualize yourself moving from left to right as you fulfill a dream you want to accomplish.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Hanadi Zakaria al-

Hindi is the first Saudi Arabian woman to be licensed to fly a plane. But there’s an absurd law in her country that prohibits women from driving cars, so she needs a man to give her a lift to the airport. Is there any situation in your own life that resembles hers, Leo? Like maybe you’ve advanced to a higher level without getting certified on a lower level? Or maybe you’ve got permission and power to operate in a sphere that’s meaningful to you even though you skipped a step along the way? Now would be a good time to think about whether you should do anything about the discrepancy, and if so, how to do it.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Recent scientific

studies have confirmed what Native American folklore reports: Badgers and coyotes sometimes cooperate with each other as they search for food. The coyotes are better at stalking prey above ground, and the badgers take over if the hunted animal slips underground. They share the spoils. I suggest you draw inspiration from their example, Virgo. Is there a person you know who’s skilled at a task you have trouble with and who could benefit from something you’re good at? It’s prime time to consider forming symbiotic relationships or seeking out unusual partnerships that play to both parties’ strengths.

Vikings navigate their ships through rough northern seas on cloudy and foggy days? Medieval texts speak of the mysterious “sunstone,” a “Viking compass” used to detect the hidden sun. Modern theories suggest that this technology may have been Iceland spar, a mineral that polarizes light, making it useful in plotting a course under overcast skies. Do you have anything like that, Libra? A navigational aid that guides your decisions when the sun’s not out, metaphorically speaking? Now would be an excellent time to enhance your connection with whatever it is that can provide such power.

two mirrors in just the right way, you can get a clear look at the back of your head. You’re able to see what your body looks like from behind. I suggest you try that exercise sometime soon. It will encourage your subconscious mind to help you discover what has been missing from your self-knowledge. As a result, you may be drawn to experiences that reveal things about yourself you’ve been resistant to seeing. You could be shown secrets about buried feelings and wishes that you’ve been hiding from yourself. Best of all, you may get intuitions about your soul’s code that you haven’t been ready to understand until now.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

According to my Sagittarius friend Jonathan Zap, the Greek playwright Aristophanes had an ambivalent attitude about divine blessings. He said that no great gift enters the human sphere without a curse attached to it. I’m sure you know this lesson well. One of last year’s big gifts has revealed its downside in ways that may have been confusing or deflating. But now here comes an unexpected plot twist, allowing you to add a corollary to Aristophanes’ formulation. Soon you will find a second blessing that was hidden within the curse in embryonic form. You’ll be able to tease it out, ripen it, and add it to the bounty of the original gift.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Writing

in the science magazine Discover, Corey S. Powell says, “There’s an old joke: If you tell someone the universe is expanding, he’ll believe you. If you tell him there’s wet paint on the park bench, he’ll want to touch it to make sure.” In accordance with the astrological omens, Capricorn, I invite you to rebel against this theory. I think it’s quite important for you to demand as much proof for big, faraway claims as for those that are close at hand. Don’t trust anyone’s assertions just because they sound lofty or elegant. Put them to the test.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s an

excellent time to better appreciate your #@%(!)* vexations and botherations. In fact, let’s go ahead and make this Honor Your #@%(!)* Irritations and Annoyances Week. To properly observe this holiday, study the people and things that irk you so you can extract from them all the blessings and teachings they may provide. Are you too tolerant of an annoying situation that you need to pay closer attention to? Is it time to reclaim the power you’ve been losing because of an exasperating energy-drain? Does some jerk remind you of a quality you don’t like in yourself? Is there a valuable clue or two to be gleaned from a passive-aggressive provocateur?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Seahorses

have an unusual approach to reproduction. It’s the male of the species that cares for the eggs as they gestate. He carries them in a “brood pouch” on his front side. Of course it’s the female who creates the eggs in the first place. After analyzing the astrological factors coming to bear on your destiny, Pisces, I suspect you will benefit from having a seahorse-like quality in the coming weeks. Whatever gender you are, your archetypal masculine qualities should play an especially strong role as you nurture a project that’s in its early developmental phases.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart PHOTO/D. BRIAN BURGHART

Follow your dreams Who wouldn’t want their bottom line maximized? Teresa Martin says there’s nothing she’d rather do than increase the black ink in other people’s ledgers. To do this, she started a business called The Profitability Solution, in which she analyzes businesses, many of them already successful, and tells them how to streamline operations and create efficient sustainable structures. Sound like fun? More information can be had at 825-1568.

Where did you get your experience, what types of businesses?

the big money for other people. Does that seem fair? In making money for other people, I do make money for myself—as a consultant.

I do financial process improvements. What that means is I help businesses and medical practices increase their profits with financial, process and technology improvements.

Do you make more money as a consultant than you’d make if you started your own business along the lines that you consult in?

And what makes you particularly qualified to be consultant?

Well, actually, this is my passion. I actually love financial process improvement. I love helping businesses streamline their operations, implement operational efficiencies with technology in the workplace. ...

But it seems like if you have all this knowledge and ability that you would want to make money for yourself as opposed to making

What I like to do ... I’m not necessarily a business coach, I like to get in, identify unnecessary expenses, I like to streamline, I want

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FEATURE STORY

When did you officially start this business? I started in early November of 2011. It’s been about four-and-a-half months.

And do you have clients already? Yes I have. I have a couple clients. I have a manufacturing firm, I’ve had a PR firm and I’ve worked with a medical practice. Ω

brucev@newsreview.com

OPINION

GREEN

I just realized this is really my passion in life. I decided that now was the time to do it. I always wanted to be a consultant, and I felt that I had enough experience to make this change.

∫y Bruce Van Dye not walk for at least a couple of miles on the nice, gravel road on a clear, sunny day in Monument Valley in order to soak up the views and magnificence of the place is a lot like being on an Alaskan cruise ship and never leaving the bloody buffet. Every time I’ve been to MV, I’ve never seen anyone else besides my comrades actually get out of the car and walk for a ways. And we wonder why our national glutes are vanishing under globs of glucose. Since I was last in MV, there’s been a major development. Where there once was a very nice campground, there’s now a hotel. And you know what? Good for the tribe, (Monument Valley is on Navajo land.) Yes, it was a positively cool campground. But this new hotel absolutely rocks. It’s called The View for reasons that are quickly obvious. Of the 96 rooms, 90 look directly upon The Mittens, those buttes you’ve seen in John Ford movies, perhaps the most photographed natural feature in North

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www.evolutiontattooreno.com

All of it. The economy, my personal life, and the fact that at some point, you have to follow your dream.

Last week, you were informed that I didn’t have a new column because I was “communing with the universe.” Indeed. In fact, I was fortunate enough to be universing at a place that is still one of the most breathtaking spots in the known universe— Monument Valley, Arizona. I don’t have the space to blather as much as I’d like about what a truly awesome location this is. I’ll just try to sum up the MV experience by saying that the 17-mile drive through the valley floor is one of the best treats you will ever bestow upon your eyeballs. And easily nicer than that “other” 17-mile drive. Make sure you have a charger in your car for your camera, because you’ll wear the battery on that sucker out as you slowly proceed from wow point to wow point. And make sure you get your LUMPY ASS OUT OF THE BLEEPITY BLEEP CAR! Jesus, it’s unbelievable how many folks won’t/don’t do this. It’s simply incomprehensible. How can you not get out of the fucking car? To NEWS

(775)786-3865

You have 20 years doing that stuff. So for 20 years, and then you said, “I want to venture off on my own.” Is that how it came about? What were the steps?

What made now the time? Your personal life or the economy ...

So that’s creating structures. I guess what you get the thrill out of is creating the structure. Once it’s there, it’s time to move on and start over with chaos.

Mitten talk

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Custom Tattooing :: Body Piercing Clothing walk-ins welcome 11am-10pm 7 days a week

I was in medical, in insurance, and utility businesses.

Tell me what it is exactly that you do.

Well, I have 20-plus years of experience in financial and management experience. I have worked in a variety of industries. I have an accounting degree, and I have an MBA. I’m a certified internal auditor, and with all that experience and education, I can benefit my clients.

to help them reduce their financial risk, implement operational efficiency. I can do that, I can train their staff, put everything in place and then check back with them if they need to be helped ongoing, or I can pretty much move on to the next client.

ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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America (certainly top 10). Everything at the hotel—rooms, patio, restaurant, gift shop— is built for a full tilt whopper of those Mittens. Good move. Also a good move: no casino. At The View, it’s all about—the view! It’s well done, totally comfy, with a handsome lobby filled with stunning desert photos and lots of non-stop ambient Navajo flute music. And the off-season price we got was quite friendly—99 bucks. Safe to say, that won’t be the case in May or August. Speaking of this summer, you can expect non-stop sellouts at The View beginning in April. It’s not just us gringos who flock there. Monument Valley is on the radar big time for Germans, Brits and Japanese tourists, and they’re already total suckers for the joint. So if you want to hang there in the near future, you better get online. Or go in February. Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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MARCH 15, 2012

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RN&R

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         Prices good thru 3/24/2012.

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R-2012-03-15  

FIELD LAB OF DREAMS VOLUME 18, ISSUE4 RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY MARCH 15–21, 2012 See News, page 8. see Foodfinds, page 22. See...

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