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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . .4 Casey O’Lear . . . . . . . . . .6 Sean Cary . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .16 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .18

Art of the State . . . . . . .19 Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .25 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . .30 Free Will Astrology . . . .34 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . .35 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .35

MORE LIKE

A PARFAIT See News, page 8.

THE ANSWER, MY FRIEND, IS BLOWING IN THE WIND See Green, page 11.

GRIMM PICKS

THE OSCARS See Arts&Culture, page 16.

Environmental changes since the declaration of war on cancer have made us all test subjects

LIVING

IN AMERICA See Art of the State, page 19.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 18, ISSUE 1

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FEBRUARY 23–29, 2012


2012 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

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2  V1_69093.1_10x11.5_4c_Ad.indd  |   RN&R   |   FEBRUARY 23, 2012 1

2/21/12 4:32 PM


LETTERS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com To argue the lack of merits of this ruling would take pages of analysis. The flawed application and unenforceability of its regulations is enough comic fodder for Stephen Colbert. Even if the general principle of Citizens United was deemed correct, one of the most important safeguards is unenforceable. According to the ruling, candidates cannot coordinate with Super PACS. Stephen Colbert and John Stewart proceeded to mock this regulation, coordinating multiple sketches, including the signing of official FEC documents transferring control of Stephen Colbert Super PAC to John Stewart, Colbert’s business partner and friend. Being business partners does not count as coordination, nor does being former aides (Romney and Gingrich), advisor (Santorum), or co-owning an island with a candidate’s chief-ofstaff (Perry). Citizens United stands as a loophole to bypass restriction on direct corporate campaign contributions. Due to the difficulty of proving coordination and number of obvious loopholes, Super PACS are able to overtake advertising for campaigns in an effective matter, while providing candidates the appearance of distance from negative ads. Stephen Colbert took money, or speech, from thousands of Americans and warped their free speech into support for his self-satisfying agenda, whether or not it represented the interests of his donors. This misallocation of Americans’ political speech stands as a funny, albeit serious example of what the future holds This law will gradually diminish the influence that average Americans have on the political process. The contributions of millions of dollars by a minute percentage of individuals and corporations threaten to steer future legislation and political discourse towards the whims of an upper class micro-minority and away from the needs of the majorities.

Here come da judge Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Every year, I take on a little journalism chore: judging other states’ press association awards. It usually just takes one weekend day, or two at most, but I really get more than I give. That’s how I spent my Sunday. For me, it’s an opportunity to put my hands on what distant local newspapers consider good journalism. I always sign up for the weeklies, as they’re sort of my niche. They’re often not my cup of tea, however. For example, some of those little newspapers are actually community public relations sheets, papers whose owners believe booster stories are good journalism and will enhance advertising revenues. Some, like some tribal papers, have no pretension to be anything but family newsletters. But it becomes obvious, and I mean like a sore thumb, that the newspapers that are doing real, balanced, watchdog journalism are vastly more successful from both a community service and a financial standpoint. I mean, they’re thick with ads and content, and the staff boxes are big and dense. But—particularly this year when I’m reading newspapers from a Midwest state—these are daily newspapers that come out once a week. They don’t have the edge of alt-weeklies. They have far more in common with the Reno Gazette-Journal than with us. Many of these publications serve a much smaller readership than our own metropolitan daily, and yet, they have triple and quadruple the percentage of locally produced articles that would appear in any single issue of the GazetteJournal. In fact, it’s very difficult to find a wire story, and many of them actually rewrite the press releases that are published as “staff reports.” I watch our community newspaper struggle, and I listen intently to the silence when more buyouts are announced by Gannett. My heart goes out to those experienced journalists, and I know they aren’t the insulated ones who can’t see what works in other parts of the country. I don’t know why corporate can’t see this, too.

Save our rights Re “Welcome to the machine” (Feature story, Jan. 19): Please email Sens. Harry Reid and Dean Heller and ask them to support Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s “Due Process Guarantee Act of 2011.” You can contact them or any senator through www.senate.gov. Erik Holland Reno

The nuts are in charge Re “Fiscal gee-wizards” (Letters to the Editor, Feb. 16): Wow! Have Republicans gone crazy? I am a lifelong Democrat, but I am a citizen of the United States first. As a Native American, I distrust both parties. As I watch the Republican primary process and listen to what the candidates say, it makes me wonder what it is they’re trying to do. I recall an English sociologist named Herbert Spencer. He argued that the state was not an “essential” institution and that it would “decay” as voluntary market organization would replace the coercive aspects of the state. He also argued that the individual had a “right to ignore the state.” The world soundly rejected his philosophy back in the late 1800s. Are the Republicans in lockstep with Spencer? Do they really want to neuter all forms of government? I find it difficult to believe that a majority of citizens who call themselves Republicans

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

actually believe that government has no function save national defense and enforcement of contracts. Never in history has a society existed along those lines: It is fictional, yet Republicans seem to be advocating for Herbert Spencer’s model of society. My only conclusion is that a wing of the Republican Party has gone crazy. More realistic Republicans had better speak up. Even if your party fails in November, your crazy uncle has taken over. Wake up before it’s too late. Anthony Matulich Reno

Citizens undermined Re “The new state of campaign finance” (Right to Your Head, Feb. 16): Sean Cary has missed the not-sosubtle point in Stephen Colbert’s satirical performance. Colbert’s central message is not “money equals speech,” as Cary naively says. His central message is “Citizens United is profoundly misguided.”

Editor D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Photographer Amy Beck Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Sharon Black, Sean Cary, Carol Cizauskas, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Audrey Love, Casey O’Lear, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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Daniel Sotelo Reno

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

Re “Valentine’s Day Tech Support” (Arts & Culture, Feb. 9): I enjoyed Matthew Craggs’ article on the latest in sex toy technology, but thought it might be good to point out one of the biggest American manufacturers of adult toys is located right here in town. Tantus, Inc. moved from Chula Vista, Calif., a year ago and is operating at full production at our facility in Sparks. Jenna Clark via email

Many parents Re “Organically grown” (Feature story, Feb. 9): I feel fortunate to have been a part of the Great Basin Food Co-op since its inception. In the Sallaberry sisters’ backyard, early meetings consisted of defining how the co-op would operate, make decisions, and start out filling its britches without overextending its limited means. There were attendees that had survived the fallout of the old Washoe Zephyr Co-op offering words of wisdom and a younger generation brimming with rogue idealism and confidence. From its early home at Sound and Fury Records to the location near the Reno Bead Shop, the co-op has ridden the laurels of good fortune, elbow grease, and an incredible enclave of dedicated denizens. And now the co-op is truly on the map, in a great location and a stellar structure that will truly benefit the community of Reno. Now, the co-op can take care of the village that worked so hard to create it. Taylor Donovan Reno

Justin credible Re “Justin McMahon” (In the mix, Feb. 16): I’m so glad that not all artists have Brad Bynum’s musical taste and the need for “edge” all the time. When I want that, I know where to find it, too. Good job, Justin! It was worth the wait. Please keep up the good work, even though not everyone appreciates it. Jim Mueller Reno

Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Daniel Golightly General Manager John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Senior Accountant Kevin Driskill Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Brennan Collins, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Kelly Funderburk, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke

FOODFINDS

Hometown toys

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Hayley Doshay Feature story design: India Curry

FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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RN&R

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3


by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

Will ‘they’ cure cancer? Asked at Michael’s Deli, 628 S. Virginia St. Bob Howell Retiree

Not in my lifetime. I hope they do. With the exception of breast cancer, there’s too much money in trying to cure it. You give people medicine. If they cured it, where’s all the bucks going to go?

Melanie Lubbe Student

Yes. I think I recently saw a new article on [progress]. I think there’s a good chance that they could.

A newborn pariah Nevada politicians are in high dudgeon as they frantically formerly rich and powerful) people are not exceptions to shed the financial contributions from Harvey Whittemore the Bill of Rights. The politicians who are now treating that they once accepted with alacrity. Whittemore like a pariah are figures we expect to uphold Whittemore, a long-time lobbyist who moved into the rule of law in the public performance of their duties. real estate development just in time to be clobbered by Harvey Whittemore, like each of us, is entitled to be the foreclosure collapse that helped cause the recession, regarded as innocent under the law until the law proves has given campaign money to U.S. Sens. Harry Reid and otherwise. How protective can we expect our leaders to Dean Heller and innumerable other politicians. be of our civil liberties if they are busily pre-judging Whittemore as a lobbyist always played hardball, someone they once embraced so enthusiastically? often leaving bruised feelings. The way the scientific In disputes like this, politicians often suddenly start institute he and his wife founded went after a departed acting like innocent, virginal blushing brides when bad scientist with criminal charges publicity puts them into awkward instead of a civil lawsuit had his positions. They start cherry-pickIf they don’t protect fingerprints all over it. ing who they want to be But Reid, Heller and company Harvey Whittemore’s associated with in the public knew he was a tough guy when mind. In her first U.S. Senate rights, what chance is campaign, Hillary Clinton they took his campaign contributions. It’s not an indictable offense accepted contributions from there that they will to play rough. Israeli supporters and returned Whittemore is now being sued protect ours? money from Arab supporters. by some associates from his Reid, Heller and company are second career as a developer. responding to news stories that But Reid, Heller and company take money from have accusatory tones and few facts, but they knew businesspeople involved in lawsuits all the time. It’s not Whittemore’s methods of operation when they took his an indictable offense to be sued. contributions. It would be nice if they responded with Whittemore is also being investigated by the U.S. greater force to the rights of citizens not to be judged on Justice Department, but he has not been indicted or the basis of rumor and untried lawsuits. If they treat a pal convicted of anything—or, indeed, accused of anything like Harvey Whittemore this way, what chance is there except by some unhappy litigants on the other end of that they will oppose measures like the National Defense the lawsuits and journalists too free with loaded language. Authorization Act and the PATRIOT Act that endanger Harvey Whittemore can take care of himself, but the civil liberties of all of us? Unfortunately, we already there is a principle at stake here. Rich and powerful (or know the answer to that question. Ω 4

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RN&R

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Brian Smith Retiree

I think there’s cures out there right now that the medical establishment is just trying to protect itself by not revealing what the cures really are.

Aaron Neilson Bartender

I think there’s already a cure. The government’s hiding it from us.

Colleen Laidlaw Retiree

I hope so, so that so many people won’t die. I think everybody wants them to cure cancer.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Itʼs happen ing in

SPRING KICKBALL LEAGUE

The City of Sparks brings a fresh new twist to the adult recreational sports scene by offering kickball. The popular program is geared for adults who want to socialize and be active without the competition required of a sport like softball or basketball. Teams of 10 players open to men and women ages 18+. 10 games, with doubleheaders, 6:30-9:30PM Mondays, 3/5 - 4/2, at the Golden Eagle Regional Park Sports Complex. $350/team. Register through 3/1, Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385 or sportsinfo@cityofsparks.us.

YOGA CLASSES

Six-week sessions taught by instructors from Yoga Loka studio. Yoga Basics: Introductory course covering principles, philosophy, movements, breathing and relaxation techniques of yoga. Tuesdays, 2/21- 3/27,5:30-6:45PM. Yoga Flow: All levels. Includes a flowing sequence of postures and detailed instruction. Thursdays, 2/23 – 3/29, 5:30-6:45PM. Yoga mat, block and strap are required. $97/session for adults; $81/Sparks residents. Larry D. Johnson Community Center, 1200 12th Street (across from Sparks Library) (775) 353-7857 or e-mail recinfo@cityofsparks.us.

ERIC ANDERSEN

WEEKEND JUMP-OFF PARTY

TYLER STAFFORD

With First Take, featuring Rick Metz. Th, F, Sa 6PM. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 With DJ BG. F, Sa, 10PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

CELTIC HERITAGE EXHIBIT

The Sparks Heritage Museum has created a Celtic exhibit in their 900-square foot changing gallery displaying loaned items from the Northern Nevada Celtic community. M-Su through 4/30, $5 donation for reception. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-1144

FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Featuring work by members of the Portrait Society of Reno. M-Su, 6AM-5PM through 3/27. Free. Jolt-N-Java Cafe & Coffee House, 5295 Vista Blvd. (775) 354-2121

THE VOICE VIEWING PARTY FOR WHITNEY MYER Come cheer on local talent Whitney Myer on this season of NBC’s “The Voice”. Monday nights at 8PM, 8-9PM through 5/14.Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

Hosted by DJ BG. Th, 6-11PM, Trader Dick’s Lounge. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

DUST ON THE BOTTLE

Th, 2/23, 5:30PM, F, 2/24, 6PM and Sa, 2/25, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

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Live Local Music. Th, 2/23, 6PM, no cover. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-6262 Th, 2/23, 8PM, F, 2/24, 9PM, Sa, 2/25, 9PM and Su, 2/26, 8PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

SHAKA

F, 2/24, 5:30PM, Sa, 2/25, 5:30PM, Su, 2/26, 5:30PM no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

FILM

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MUSICBEAT

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY!

Experience a workshop by Eliot Coleman, bestselling author, researcher and farmer. Learn about moveable greenhouses and using fabric covers, soil health, vegetable varieties that survive. Su, 2/12, 10:30AM-noon & 1:30-3PM, $50/session. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way, (775) 355-1551

CITY OF SPARKS Geno Martini - Mayor, Julia Ratti - Ward 1, Ed Lawson - Ward 2, Ron Smith - Ward 3, Mike Carrigan - Ward 4, Ron Schmitt - Ward 5, Shaun Carey - City Manager, Tracy Domingues - Parks & Recreation Director.

OTHER ELECTED OFFICIALS Judge Barbara S. McCarthy - Dept. 1, Judge Jim Spoo - Dept. 2, Chet Adams - City Attorney. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 353-2311

SPARKS CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 745 Fourth St., Sparks CITY OF SPARKS WEBSITES: www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com www.sparksitshappeninghere.com CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1420 Scheels Drive, Ste. 108

KARAOKE

SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861

Presented by Gourd Guru Jack Fulton. Learn techniques for building gourd birdhouses and making them look fabulous for your feathered friends. Sa, 2/25, 1PM, $15 per gourd, includes all supplies. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

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E-mail to: Sparks@newsreview.com

Zumba is a way to burn calories that’s more like a dance party than an exercise routine. Tuesdays &Thursdays, 6:15-7:15PM. Designed for all levels, beginner to high fitness. Bring workout shoes and water. $42 or $35/month for Sparks residents. Drop-in option, $6/class. Sparks Recreation Gym, 98 Richards Way.

Presented by Master Composter Ron Shulman. Learn how to set-up easy compost systems in your home. Regular and vermaculture (worm farms) will be covered. Sa, 2/25, 10AM. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

FOODFINDS

DEE LUCAS

ZUMBA FITNESS

COMPOSTING AT HOME

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SEND US YOUR SPARKS EVENTS!

GARDENING WORKSHOP

JO MAMA

ART OF THE STATE

Sa, 2/25, 8:30PM, no cover.Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711 W, 2/29, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

BUILD AND BLING GOURD BIRDHOUSES

Enjoy a great evening of wine and great food featuring Husch Winery from the Anderson Valley CA. 2/23, 6PM. $17/ person. Limited Space. RSVP (775) 359-7547. O’Skis Pub & Grille, 840 Victorian Ave.

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happening now!

JAZZ

WINE & FOOD PAIRING

LADIES 80’S NIGHT

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

(next to Forever 21, Legends at Sparks Marina)

OPEN MIC

775-358-1976 www.thechambernv.org

GREAT BASIN BREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

THIS SECTION AND ITS CONTENTS ARE NOT FUNDED BY OR CREATED BY THE CITY OF SPARKS

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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RN&R

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5


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6

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RN&R

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Photo by David Calvert

saturday, March 3rd

Last week, Democratic state Sen. Sheila Leslie unexpectedly delivered a resignation letter to Gov. Brian Sandoval. The goal of Leslie’s resignation is to assist Democrats in holding onto the majority in the state Senate—she plans to move into a new home in a new district and subsequently run against Republican Greg Brower for the by seat in the competitive new district. Where Leslie previously repreCasey O’Lear sented a staunchly Democratic caseyo@ newsreview.com district that is generally regarded as Northern Nevada’s safest Democratic seat, she will now be moving into a district where voter registration is split relatively evenly between Democrats and Republicans. It is an entertaining political move that is almost too exciting to be true. A year ago before the current legislative districts were created, Leslie purchased a house in Senate District 15 against the day when her daughter became self-sufficient and left home, which she has now done. As a result of subsequent redistricting, the house happened to land in Senate District 15. Currently, the district is being served by Brower, who was appointed last year after Sen. Bill Raggio resigned. Democrats currently have an 11-10 advantage in the Senate, which may be threatened as Sens. Shirley Breeden and Allison Copening will not be running for reelection next term, leaving their seats up for grabs and very tempting to Republican candidates. Leslie has served in the Nevada Sheila Leslie’s Senate campaign website Assembly and Senate since 1998. can be found at Her move is risky. But there is no www.sheilaleslie.org/ better state to take a gamble in, about-sheila-leslie. and I believe Leslie has the upper hand in this situation. Sometimes, you just have to go for it. In the same way it is dissatisfying to argue with someone who agrees with you, politics are no fun if you just stay in your “safe” district year after year. Leslie’s willingness to take a chance on this election and step into an unfamiliar arena full of new voters who have been newly redistricted is pretty inspiring. It is refreshing to see politicians take risks like this with the goal in mind of bettering the state. Leslie has long been an active and effective representative of her

constituents, and it is clear that she is motivated and enthused to win the election in her new, more competitive district. Though many Democrats— and Republicans, naturally—are skeptical about this announcement, I can’t help but be caught up in some sort of optimism about it all. Leslie’s confidence combined with the incredulous and bemused reactions from Brower and other Republicans instills some confidence in me and hopefully empowers other Democrats as well.

[Leslie’s plan] is an entertaining political move that is almost too exciting to be true. Leslie’s move not only provides an opportunity for a capable candidate such as Assemblyman David Bobzien or Assemblywoman Debbie Smith—both of whom have expressed some interest in running for Leslie’s now-vacant Senate seat—it provides an opportunity for Democrats to reach even further and connect with even more Nevadans. Of course, there is always the terrible prospect of loss. We cannot forget that a portion of this new district was responsible for electing Sharron Angle as its representative (over Brower). And, losing Leslie as a representative would be unfortunate—she is an influential Nevada legislator who believes in the importance of education and the necessity of jobs in renewable energy, in addition to many other issues that have affected Nevadans. But, it is good to see a capable candidate such as Leslie vacate a “safe” seat in favor of some good, old-fashioned competition, which is something of a rarity in many Nevada elections. Each move a candidate makes leading up to an election must be carefully planned and mindful of the overall goal. I believe that Leslie has a valuable goal in mind, and an achievable one at that. Ω


RIGHT TO YOUR HEAD

:H[\YKH`Z HYLH/VV[ VU2<59

Sheila Leslie: carpetbagger If partisan politics has taught me anything, it’s that not-good things happen when it becomes an obsession. Take state Sen. Sheila Leslie, D-Reno, for example. In a move that puts pure partisan politics ahead of everything else, including her constituents, Leslie has decided to add ‘carpetbagger’ to her resume. Leslie recently announced that she is resigning her seat repreby senting Senate District 1 to Sean Cary challenge state Sen. Greg Brower, seanc@ R-Reno, in Senate District 15. newsreview.com Yes. A sitting state senator has resigned her seat in a heavily Democratic district to move across town so she can run against one of her current Senate colleagues who represents a district that maintains only a slight Republican advantage.

These aren’t the actions of a public servant, they are the actions of a perennial office shopper.

Greg Brower’s campaign website can be found at www.gregbrower.org.

OPINION

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NEWS

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The sprawling, heavily populated district 15 stretches from Bordertown to Cold Springs over to Sun Valley, both old and new areas of the northwest, through Caughlin Ranch and then down to the Mt. Rose Highway. You mean to tell me, that in a senate district encompassing almost 27,000 Democrats and some of the most affluent neighborhoods in Reno, there isn’t a single one willing to stand up and run against Brower? Where the hell do the trial lawyers live in this town? College professors? Anyone? C’mon Democrats, are you that afraid of the big, bad Brower? This is a bold, classless political move for Leslie. First elected to the Senate in 2010 after a lengthy period in the state Assembly, Leslie has now made it very clear that she’s not in Carson City to serve her constituents, she’s there to drive a partisan agenda, one that obviously she feels is so rigid that it can only get passed if the Democrats maintain a chokehold on Carson City. GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Plus, this political power grab by Leslie and her cronies flies in the face of not only the people, but our laws. Nevada recently went through the redistricting process, a process that was cast aside by our dysfunctional, obnoxious legislators and placed in the hands of the courts to determine how our maps would look. The non-partisan special masters that conducted this process went to great care to draw the maps to accommodate the existing legislators to avoid this very instance—two sitting legislators running against each other and one legislative district sitting empty. Well, this simply wasn’t good enough for Leslie. Who cares what the courts decided? Who cares what’s best for the constituents who put their faith and trust in her to go to our state’s capitol and fight for the issues she ran on in 2010? Who cares that she’s not resigning to take up shipbuilding or to spend more time with her pet iguana. She isn’t even trying to spin this one away—the Nevada Democrats couldn’t find a credible candidate to run against Greg Brower, so they had to import one. These aren’t the actions of a public servant, they are the actions of a perennial office shopper who cares little about the good of the people and cares only about the partisans who helped to get her elected, and their agenda they want passed. Here’s an idea: Rather than saying ‘Fuck you!’ to our system to get your agenda passed, why don’t you let the voters make their own decisions about who should represent them and then finish the job you took an oath to do? I hope someone over in the Brower camp decides to have fun with this. Don’t hold fundraisers, hold housewarming parties! Hang up ‘Welcome Sheila’ banners at your campaign events. Wait, those last two paragraphs sounded a little mean. I was raised better than that. Lemme try that again. Ahem. Senator Leslie, as a resident of this part of Reno for decades, allow me to be the first to warmly extend my hand and say welcome to the neighborhood! Would you like me to show you around? Ω

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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Though there has been talk of reactivating the old Anaconda open pit mine in Lyon County, so far it has come to nothing.

Tahoe agency held hostage? A California Senate delegation has been named to negotiate with Nevadans about Tahoe issues, but the Golden State also provided an earful for Silver Staters. The delegation of three California state senators and staffers was named in response to the enactment by Nevada of Senate Bill 271, which threatened Nevada withdrawal from the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) unless Nevada gets its way on some policy issues involving development at Lake Tahoe. The bi-state TRPA was created after negotiations between California Gov. Ronald Reagan and Nevada Gov. Paul Laxalt in response to degradation of the Lake Tahoe basin, but TRPA failed to solve the problem. In 1980, voting reforms to made the agency more effective. Pro-growth advocates have chafed under TRPA’s activities ever since. All anti-TRPA bills failed until last year when S.B. 271 was approved mostly by Southern Nevada legislators at the behest of the casino lobby. In a letter to Sen. John Lee of Nevada, who sponsored 271, California Sen. Darrell Steinberg appointed Sens. Alan Lowenthal, Fran Pavley and Ted Gaines to negotiate with Nevada. Steinberg, president pro tem of the California Senate, then wrote: “In addition to responding to your request [for designation of negotiators], I want to share with you and your colleagues the displeasure many in California ... have with the recent unfortunate and rather provocative actions taken by the state of Nevada following years decades of cooperation over matters relating to our mutual interests in the environmental and economic sell being of the Tahoe basin. [Nevada’s S.B. 271] is both unnecessarily inflammatory and deeply counterproductive to the collegial relationship our two states have had on these matters. One can only imagine how leaders in Nevada would react if California were to take similar action. It is both surprising and disappointing to see a national treasure as important as Lake Tahoe become a political hostage to the agenda of special interest groups who have little interest in the many values the region provides. Despite the verbiage in the Nevada legislation, dissolution of the Tahoe Compact would require an Act of Congress and would have deeply disruptive effects on Lake Tahoe’s economy and environment.” One former TRPA member attributes the success of S.B. 271 to casino lobbyist William “Billy” Vassiliadis. A surprising number of Democrats cast what are considered anti-environment votes on the issue. Not one Republican in either house of the legislature opposed 271. But nine Democrats in the 42-member Assembly voted for the bill, giving it a majority. They were Elliot Anderson, Kelvin Atkinson, Irene Bustamante, Marcus Conklin, Marilyn Dondero Loop, Jason Frierson, William Horne, Steven Horsford, Marilyn Kirkpatrick, Harvey Munford, Dina Neal, and John Oceguera. All are from Southern Nevada and Oceguera is speaker of the Assembly. In the 21-member Senate another nine Democrats joined with Republicans. They were Shirley Breeden, Allison Copening, Ruben Kihuen, John Lee, Mark Manendo, David Parks, Michael Schneider and Valerie Weiner. Again, all are from Southern Nevada. Democrat Lee was the bill’s sponsor. Horsford is the Democratic floor leader in the Senate. The only Senate Democrats to oppose the bill were Sheila Leslie and Mo Denis.

Urban Nevada The 2012 Republican caucuses may have helped correct views of Nevada. As we have reported several times in recent years, Nevada is one of the nation’s five most urban states. The state got so much depth coverage in advance of the caucuses that some national reporters expressed surprise that it is not the rural enclave they had assumed. Some Nevadans might also be surprised. “But do not be fooled by the scenery,” wrote Micah Cohen in the New York Times. “Where elections are concerned, Nevada is an urbanized state. Most Nevadans live in cities, and that holds true for Republicans and for Republican caucusgoers.” His piece was accompanied by a map that showed where the state’s Republicans live—82 percent of them in Clark and Washoe counties. Elko County, which often sets the tone for the state party, has just two percent of the state’s GOP voters.

—Dennis Myers 8

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The onion field Critics say federal testing is less than meets the nose “The scent of onions often perfumes the air,” wrote someone on an online message by board in response to someone who Dennis Myers had asked for information on Yerington, where she had been offered a job. On the other hand, the minutes of a Lyon County Commissioners meeting in 2010 reported that during the public comment period a local resident “spoke about the odor and fly issue in south Mason Valley due to rotting onions.”

“Capping the mine [is] the only appropriate measure.” Paiute Yerington Tribe On a third hand, Peri and Sons Farms, an operation with an ambitious organic program, has an interest in having its onions thought of positively: “Our onions are ethicallygrown using certified, clean, safe and traceable practices,” reads its website. Now, those heavily debated onions, a mainstay of Lyon County, have become a player in new debates over an earlier mainstay of the county—the now-abandoned Anaconda mine pit. For the better part of a century, regulation of Nevada mines was minimal, with the result that when a mine closed, the owners could more or less walk away. They didn’t have to replace their divots or clean up after themselves. As a result, there are

nasty environmental hazards all over the state. In Lyon County, Anaconda shut down its 3,400-plus acre copper mining operation near Yerington in 1982 after 64 years. It had opened during World War I as the Empire Nevada Mine. When operations ceased, so did groundwater pumping, with the result that the open pit filled, and a huge lake is now in the pit. Atlantic Richfield (ARCO) acquired the Anaconda Copper Mining Company in 1977 for $700 million, a fateful purchase. Copper prices soon tumbled and Anaconda operations in Nevada and elsewhere were closed. What ARCO mostly got from the purchase was a lot of environmental disaster sites. Pit operations in Montana and Nevada are now on Superfund application lists, but the likelihood of the Nevada site getting much Superfund money anytime soon is unlikely because “it is not on the National Priority List (NPL) of sites,” according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Nevada has sought Superfund money for more than 200 sites, most of them former mines, and only one—the bed of the Carson River, contaminated by Comstock-era mining wastes—has been designated a Superfund site. Part of that lack of urgency about Yerington stems from testing done by the EPA. Testing in 2004 suggested levels of uranium were higher than the EPA standard (“Environment,” RN&R, April 15, 2004), but in 2007 it conducted additional tests.

A March 2011 EPA bulletin on the Lyon County site read in part, “In 2007, EPA conducted tests of onions grown adjacent to the Anaconda site and irrigated from a supply well located just north of the site boundary. The onions were selected from random areas of the field and were not washed or trimmed prior to analysis. The onions were analyzed for uranium, a primary site contaminant. The results showed that uranium levels in the onions were low, and below levels typically found naturally in onions from other areas of the United States. Accordingly, EPA concluded that the test results showed that the Anaconda mine did not elevate uranium levels in local onions.” EPA liked that verbiage so much that it repeated it word for word in a subsequent bulletin issued in August. But last week Associated Press reporter Scott Sonner reported that newly available documents indicate that what the EPA called “tests of onions” was insufficiently specific. They were actually tests of four onions. That’s four individual onions, not four cartons of onions. Sonner reports that the Colorado contractor who obtained the four onions warned the EPA that they constituted an inadequate sample for final conclusions. The AP revelation incensed some residents of the area, including the Yerington Paiute Tribe. In November the tribe issued a prepared statement that called for “capping the site—a method that covers a mine site to substantially eliminate movement of contaminants from the site—[as] the only appropriate measure due to the threat from contaminated soil and water. The estimated cost of this option is $60,000,000 but would qualify for the federal Superfund program. … Capping this part of the Anaconda mine site not only helps address the threat to community health and natural resources but it also presents a substantial economic development opportunity for Lyon County through job creation associated with the project.” The EPA has gathered pledges for about $6 million from various past operators of the mine, including $2.7 million from short-term owner ARCO. With Superfund money unlikely and EPA action uncertain, that left the issue to the courts, and many residents are suing ARCO. U.S. District Judge Robert Jones last week set a trial date in June 2013, saying that it will take at least that long for discovery proceedings in such a monster case.


Some remediation, such as the removal of tons of contaminated soil, has been done at the site, but it remains an ecological disaster area. Besides soil contamination, water is also an issue. EPA tests in 2010 found uranium and arsenic levels in most drinking water to be far above what the agency considers safe. For eight years BP, the corporate parent of ARCO, has provided bottled water to residents whose wells have heavy concentrations of uranium. In April last year, Singatse Peak Services of Vancouver became the latest owner of the land. At the time, Singatse CEO Thomas Patton said he hoped to reopen the mine in view of rising copper prices and because “one of the quickest, most efficient methods of correcting issues at former mine sites is to put those sites back into production.” That has not happened. Peri and Sons Farms, once described by a farming trade journal as “Crusaders for Onions Born in the U.S.A.,” has a stake in the purity of the soil, which would seemingly make Peri and the tribe natural allies. But Peri attorney Brad Johnson said he is satisfied with the EPA’s assessments, and he was harshly critical of the tribe for faulting the small onion sample. “The EPA is not basing its statements and conclusions just on the [onions] sample,” he said. “The tribe ignored all the other evidence,” including additional agriculture studies.

“There is a [tribal] effort to promote a litigation strategy.” Brad Johnson Peri and Sons Farms lawyer Johnson claimed the tribe has made allegations that are “demonstrably false,” including that the test onions were already packed for distribution when obtained and that a Peri well is contaminated when in fact that well no longer actually exists. He said further, “There is an effort by them to promote a litigation strategy for the benefit of the tribe.” Peri had offered to meet with the tribe without success, he said. Johnson was also critical of the AP for not including more of a written statement he gave Sonner in its story. Tribal environmental consultant Dietrick McGinnis said of Johnson’s statements, “We’ve met with them before. Their reaction is a bit of a surprise.” He said there are more than 40 substances that are suspect besides uranium and he is not satisfied with the EPA work. “There’s many issues associated with that site,” he said. “Uranium is just one of them.” In a letter to the tribe last week, the EPA’s San Francisco office said the agency “considered many lines of evidence” in making its determination of safety in farm products. Ω

G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25

GEORGE THOROGOOD PAUL REVERE AND AND THE DESTROYERS THE RAIDERS SATURDAY, MARCH 10

SATURDAY, MARCH 3

DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS ROCK SUGAR SATURDAY, MARCH 17

Mazel tov!

SATURDAY, MARCH 31

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Tickets available at the Box Office, by calling 1-800-786-8208 or online at SouthShoreRoom.com.

John Farahi (left) and Debbie Pomeranz greeted John Marshall enthusiastically at a gathering at the Nevada Museum of Art. Marshall wrote the book Jews in Nevada, which became the basis for a public broadcasting program of the same name that debuted this month on stations in Reno and Las Vegas.

OPINION

BLUE ÖYSTER CULT

SATURDAY, MARCH 24

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See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC. RNR-022312

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GREENSPACE Piped up The Keystone XL pipeline is starting to seem like a never ending story, and it may not be one with a happy ending. Despite dozens of activist organizations including OccupyKXL and the National Resources Defense Council rallying in opposition, plans to once again move forward with the pipeline—which will transport oil from Alberta, Canada, to the southeastern coast of Texas—were approved with a 237-187 vote in the House of Representatives on Feb. 16. TransCanada, the Canadian company behind the project, announced that the pipeline would be operable by 2015. Business Insider reported that the project is estimated to cost $7 billion. The bill passed as part of a larger one that lumps together two other issues: earmarks for oil companies to drill in the Arctic Wildlife Refuge and the go-ahead to open up the coasts of Florida for off-shore drilling. But those who oppose the pipeline aren’t going down without a fight. A judge in Lamar County, Texas, issued a restraining order to prevent construction of the pipe on a farm near Paris. However, the company has previously taken other farmland by eminent domain. At a climate change summit in Washington on Feb. 17, Canadian environmental minister Peter Kent encouraged support for the pipeline. At the same summit, he also announced a new plan, in partnership with U.S. Secretary Of State Hillary Clinton, to reduce carbon emissions.

Sunny days ahead Two more local schools have implemented renewable energy resources to help power facilities. Last month, Reed High School and North Valleys High School installed 1.5-megawatt solar power systems. According to the Washoe County School District, the project was funded entirely by rebates from NV Energy, and the solar panels are estimated to save the district $270,000 annually from energy costs. A press release from the district states, “The savings will be realized within the operating general fund and purposed for classroom essentials, educator salaries, and student textbooks and materials.” Carson High School added solar panels last October, and two schools in Lander County recently installed wind turbines (“Cool schools,” Feb. 2).

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT Hungry Mother Farm and Full Circle Compost will host the third annual seed swap on March 3. Bring your own seeds to swap or get rare, locally grown heirloom varieties. Seeds are available for flowers, vegetables, trees, shrubs and more. If you do not have seeds to swap, a small donation is requested. Workshops and demonstrations will also be available on soil fertility, raised bed gardening, seed germination, vegetable gardening and healthy lawns. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Full Circle Compost and Hungry Mother Farm Stand, 3190 Hwy 395, Minden. www.hungrymother.cc.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Find more at facebook.com/rnrgreen.

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PHOTO/ASHLEY HENNEFER

GREEN

A group of student members from Nevada Fair Share discuss ideas for contacting representatives.

Winds of change Nevada Fair Share For environmental engineering and renewable energy major Kaitlin Kimbrough, bringing wind energy to Nevada makes sense during rough economic times. “A wind industry will bring growth to Reno,” she says. “We already by have the landscape for it. And there are so many parts that go with it—the Ashley engineering, maintenance, manufacturing. Plus, it’s so much better for Hennefer the environment.” ashleyh@ Kimbrough is a member of University of Nevada, Reno’s Nevada Fair newsreview.com Share, a student-run organization which is part of a larger network called the Fair Share Alliance. Fair Share Alliance works toward the development of employment opportunities for communities, and while their mission is focused on job growth and worker’s rights in all sectors, the members of NFS are focused specifically on green employment. By the end of this year, a Nevada tax incentive for businesses to adopt wind energy will expire. Kimbrough and her peers hope to ensure that it will stay on the table as a resource for Nevada business owners. “We want more businesses using wind turbines to provide their power,” she says. “Some local businesses are already doing it. But we know that people just need to be more informed.” The students are stationed in three groups—grassroots campaigns, outreach, and a coalition to target the political side of the cause, which entails making phone calls and writing letters to representatives. NFS has only been Check out Nevada in operation for a few weeks, but members have been busy recruiting volunFair Share’s teers on campus and are making plans for larger community events, such as Facebook page film nights, lecture series and festivals. at https://www. “This [organization] offers so many different opportunities,” says Bonnie facebook.com/ NVFairShare. Makara, an economics major interested in political science. “It’s an issue that has more than one side, so we need people interested in different subjects. I’m interested in the economic benefits of renewable energy, especially saving jobs and making new ones. We had a big turnout at the first meeting. The feedback has all been positive.” Currently, they have been handing out postcards for students to pledge their time and energy to the cause, and want to send the postcards to state representatives. Kimbrough says that they have also discussed creating an art installation, such as a giant turbine made of PVC pipes. “We want to have events and activities that are creative, but can still inform people about the issues,” she says. “We don’t want to be an aggressive campaign. But everything we do has implications. We have to acknowledge that our way of life is not sustainable. It’s about changing our thought process.” NFS is the first Fair Share branch in Nevada, but environmental science major Jacob Sax envisions their efforts expanding throughout the state, with headquarters stationed in Reno. “I think it’d be great if we could get started here, and then get more of the community involved,” he says. Makara says that no matter what happens with the tax incentive, NSF will continue to push for a Nevada wind industry and encourage other green energy markets. “It would be awesome for the economy,” she says. “It would help our state so much to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels.” Ω

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Supported by the Nevada State Health Division (NSHD) through grant numbers 3U58DP002003-01S2 and 5U58DP002003-03 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NSHD or the CDC.

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HUMAN TRIALS

Environmental changes since the declaration of war on cancer have made us all test subjects In June 2010, a dermatologist cut a weird growth from my by Bill O’Driscoll left wrist. The growth was wart-sized, grape-purple and stippled black. It was sensitive to the touch and bled when scratched. Two weeks later, the doctor told me the tumor was malignant—melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The doctor also told me this: “You’re part of an experimental generation.” She meant that in the past 30 years, she’d seen an alarming rise in skin cancer, and not just among older people. (I was 45.) Despite the advent of sunscreen and the fact that people don’t go outside as much as they used to, she’d even been seeing more moles—possible precursors to melanoma—on children. One or more risk factors for melanoma, she reasoned, must have changed. My doctor’s guess: the human-caused depletion of atmospheric ozone, which allows more ultraviolet light—a leading melanoma risk factor—to reach our skins. But other variables have also changed in recent decades, including the chemicals we’re exposed to through air, water and food. How much might such exposures be increasing the risk for melanoma and other forms of cancer? Mostly, the answer is: We really don’t know. And that’s the experiment, in which we’ve become the test subjects—without our knowledge or consent.

LESS DEATH, MORE CANCER

A longer, four-part version of this story originally appeared in Pittsburgh City Paper. For the complete series, see http://tinyurl.com/ Pittsburghcancer.

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My doctor’s language, inevitably, recalled Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. Writing in the years when America first went whole-hog for synthetic chemicals, Carson warned that we were subjecting humanity and nature to a vast, uncontrolled experiment. In 1964, Carson herself died of cancer. And in a decade that saw rising cancer rates and death tolls, fear of the malady metastasized. On Dec. 23, 1971, President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act, pledging to make the “conquest of cancer a national crusade.” This epic initiative, inevitably dubbed the “war on cancer,” is now 40 years old. Most still gauge progress

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by how long we keep cancer patients alive, or by whether we’re approaching the “cancer cure” that Nixon sought. And there’s still disappointment that cancer remains uncured, countered with hopeful tidings of new gene-based therapies. But here’s a fact you probably won’t hear much: You’re actually more likely to get cancer than when the war on cancer began. In announcing his “conquest,” Nixon noted that cancer struck one in four Americans. Four decades later—and after hundreds of billions of dollars in research, radiation and chemotherapy—the figure has risen to about two in five. Nearly half of all men, and more than a third of all women, will get cancer. That’s about 1.6 million new diagnoses each year. And for most major types of cancer, according to National Cancer Institute statistics, incidence remains higher than it was in the early ’70s. While record keeping in the early 1900s was less authoritative, cancer registries suggest incidence also rose steeply for most of the past century; by one estimate, it rose 85 percent between 1950 and 2001 alone. Meanwhile, between 2003 and 2007, the incidence of liver cancer rose for men, along with thyroid cancer among women. Melanoma climbed for both genders; so did non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia and cancers of the kidney and pancreas. The news isn’t all bad: Incidence of two major types of cancer, colorectal and cervical, have dropped steeply in recent decades, largely because of improved screening. And cancer now kills less surely. Death rates for the most common forms—lung, breast, colorectal, prostate—have fallen in the past 20 years. Even so, 570,000 Americans die of cancer annually—and the overall cancer death rate is only about 6 percent lower than it was in 1950. Our boat is still leaking; we’re just bailing faster. This trend of “less death” and “more cancer” is starkest among children. Forty years ago, a child with cancer faced a virtual death sentence. (I had a sister who died of neuroblastoma in 1972 at age 5.) Today, most child cancer victims survive, and death rates keep dropping. But incidence keeps rising—by about 0.6 percent annually over the past 20 years, mostly driven by leukemia. An estimated 7 million American kids under age 10 are now living with cancer. Nor is there any easy explanation for dramatic rises in cancers that primarily strike young adults, like testicular cancer. While cancer incidence is dropping in people over age 65, probably because of smoking’s long decline, it’s rising in people under 50 … despite smoking’s long decline.

“HUMAN EXPERIMENT” continued on page 14

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“HUMAN EXPERIMENT” continued from page 13

OUR CHEMICAL ROMANCE

Cancer itself is complicated. It’s really more than 100 diseases, affecting numerous parts of the body and presenting a wide range of medical challenges. But broadly, cancer happens when cells in our body grow out of control.

role, though likely much less than most people think. Meanwhile, ever since surgeon Percival Pott observed in 18th-century London that chimney sweeps were prone to cancers of the scrotum, we’ve also known that many environmental pollutants are carcinogens. Asbestos, still used in automobile brake pads, is one. So is benzene, a common At age 45, Bill O’Driscoll learned he had cancer, pollutant in autoa malignant melanoma. mobile and factory The alarming news set exhaust. Likewise, him on an unexpected formaldehyde, path of discovery about found in consumer cancer and its causes. products including some wooden furHuman bodies make cancer cells niture, was recently designated a constantly, and as far as we know, they “known human carcinogen” by the always have. (Clinical descriptions of National Toxicology Program. cancer seemingly date to ancient Industrial workers still often bear Egypt.) Usually, our bodies kill them the brunt of the most severe expooff. When such cells do thrive, the sures. The threat is also elevated for causes of the disease are sometimes inhabitants of areas like Louisiana’s readily identifiable: Lung cancer is “Cancer Alley,” a stretch of the largely attributable to smoking; a small Mississippi River known for massive number of cancers are caused by toxic releases from the petrochemical viruses (with liver cancer, for instance, industry, and for exceptionally high linked to Hepatitis B and C). Diet and cancer rates among its mostly poor, sedentary lifestyles have been implimostly black residents. cated in some cancer. Genetics play a Yet the increase in cancer rates

isn’t confined to specific regions or occupations. Increasingly, researchers are interrogating the environment as a cause of cancer—and suggesting that cleaning up the environment may help prevent it. After all, the past century’s rise in cancer has been paralleled by the rise in synthetic chemicals and other pollutants in everyday life. In the years following World War II, plastics took over for wood, metal and glass. And from 1950 through 1975, pesticide production—Carson’s key concern in Silent Spring—grew sevenfold, to 1.4 billion pounds a year.

diesel, soot and they’re in shampoo. They reach us through the packaging that contains our food, the pesticides on apples and the flame-retardant fabric woven into children’s car seats. Some of these chemicals accumulate in our bodies. Others are shed into the environment, where they may persist for decades. For examples, a growing array of studies link cancers, including breast, prostate, leukemia and multiple myeloma, to pesticide exposure. I was personally intrigued that a 2007 study from Italy tied melanoma to household pesticide use. Perhaps the most surprising survey was “Reducing What I want to know is, why are we Environmental getting sick? Why has melanoma Cancer Risk: What incidence tripled since the 1970s? Why is We Can Do Now.” The April 2010 report thyroid cancer rising even faster? Why was issued by the are men younger than me increasingly President’s Cancer Panel, chaired by two getting tumors in their testes? Why are appointees of babies getting more cancer? President George W. Bush. The widely publicized report In 2008, according to a U.S. cited “a growing body of evidence Environmental Protection Agency linking environmental exposures inventory, there were some 84,000 to cancer.” synthetic chemicals on the market. (There are surely more today.) Most TINY EXPOSURES, are made from coal, oil or natural gas. But only a handful of these substances MYSTERIOUS EFFECTS have ever been tested for health The scope of the synthetic-chemical effects. We’re in contact with many of problem is huge. The 1976 Toxic them on a daily basis. They’re in Substances Control Act requires the

84 0 0 0

40

number of synthetic chemicals on the market

years since we started the “war on cancer”

570,000

Americans die every year of cancer

7

years the Safe Chemicals Act has failed to win approval from Congress

6%

the cancer death rate has lowered this much since 1950

American kids under the age of 10 now living with cancer 14

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2 IN 5

1 IN 4 Americans struck Americans struck with cancer in 2011 with cancer in 1971

$50 MILLION

amount the chemical industry spends annually lobbying in Washington, D.C.


testing of potentially toxic substances. But while there are tens of thousands of synthetic chemicals in circulation, the vast majority haven’t been fully tested for health risks, and only a handful have been banned. There’s not even a complete ban on known carcinogens like asbestos. Yet it’s not up to industry to prove its chemicals are safe—it’s effectively up to everyone else to prove they’re dangerous. And with everyone exposed to hundreds of chemicals daily, that’s a much tougher proposition. Indeed, the more researchers learn, the thornier their questions become. One problem is that big doses of a chemical aren’t always necessary to create big problems. Even tiny exposures can have huge effects, depending on when the exposure happens. Take breast cancer. A 2011 University of Buffalo study found that women’s DNA can be altered by exposure to air pollution when they’re young and when they give birth to their first children. That alteration increases the mother’s risk of premenopausal breast cancer. And while the pesticide DDT doesn’t appear to be a factor in breast cancer among adult women, a 2007 study found increased risk of breast cancer in women who were under age 14 when DDT usage peaked. Special risks may apply to fetuses and children, who break down and purge chemical invaders more slowly than adults.

One example involves a chemical known as diethylstilbestrol, a synthetic estrogen widely prescribed to ease pregnancy discomforts from the 1940s through the ’60s. According to a new National Cancer Institute study, the women who took DES didn’t necessarily get sick. But their daughters did: Years later, they proved 40 times more prone to a rare form of vaginal cancer. They also had increased risk of breast cancer and reproductive problems. Are there others out there? “Hormone mimics,” as ingredients of pesticides, plastics and personal-care products, are today a part of daily life—a part too little researched, say critics. The chemicals of concern aren’t just mutagens—substances that damage the structure of genes. Researchers are also exploring the behavior of genes, or whether they are activated or deactivated. An “oncogene,” switched on, can lead to cancer; a cancer-fighting gene, meanwhile, can be shut off, allowing cancer to develop. Many hormone-mimics, researchers say, can throw that off-switch, leaving people vulnerable to cancer and other threats. And such hormone-mimics are found in everything from laundry soap and shampoo to weed killers and prescription drugs.

THE RIGHT CHEMISTRY

Some researchers have gone so far as to suggest that nearly all cancers have an environmental component. Still, protecting us from this complex chemical soup would be daunting. As famed medical researcher John Bailar once wrote, “Cancer prevention on a large scale is likely to require substantial changes in our personal habits,” as well as “very expensive measures to clean up the environment and the workplace” and other changes, too.

Here’s a fact you probably won’t hear much: You’re actually more likely to get cancer than when the war on cancer began. Yet public-health campaigns work. Removing lead from gasoline, for instance, has meant less of it in children’s blood … and higher IQs and fewer developmental problems. There is the promise of “green chemistry,” the movement to reduce unnecessary usage of petrochemicals and create nontoxic alternatives. But significant progress on that front will likely require government incentives, or mandates requiring industry to change its ways.

One hope is U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg’s Safe Chemicals Act. The bill would require chemical makers to prove their products are safe for humans and the environment before selling them, rather than pulling them from the market after they’ve been proved harmful. But Lautenberg (DN.J.) has introduced the act seven years running, and gotten little traction, no doubt thanks partly to a chemical industry that spends $50 million annually lobbying in Washington. Rather than continuing to spin our wheels, Devra Davis offers a novel solution. Epidemiologist Davis, also author of such books as The Secret History of the War on Cancer, notes that the parties best able to judge the threat posed by these chemicals are the companies who make them. But she writes that corporations, fearing lawsuits and diminished profits, have either avoided doing the research or suppressed it. Meanwhile, people fall ill and die from lack of information. So Davis, who now runs the Washington, D.C.-based Environmental Health Trust—proposes a “truth and reconciliation” commission on man-made toxins: “If we gave [industry] a free pass to come forward … [citizens] would then be informed,” she says. While this would mean granting amnesty for past chemical releases, instead, “We’d do medical monitoring and surveillance. We’d all be better off. …

“No matter how much money we spend on finding and treating cancer, no matter how good we get at treating it … if we don’t reduce the demand, we’ll never win.”

WRONG WAR, WRONG RACE

Cancer patients, understandably, care less about why there’s cancer than how to treat theirs. And as cancer victims go, I’m lucky. I quickly learned that mine hadn’t spread. My only keepsakes so far are a couple of scars (including one for the lymphectomy). I’m glad for that, and glad that there are ways to help people sicker than me. But I’m less interested in the war on cancer everyone will be talking about. It feels like the “war on terror” or the “war on drugs”: a hugely expensive effort to fix a problem whose causes we’re ignoring. What I want to know is, why are we getting sick? Why has melanoma incidence tripled since the 1970s? Why is thyroid cancer rising even faster? Why are men younger than me increasingly getting tumors in their testes? Why are babies getting more cancer? And in a country where you can’t swing a surgically excised lymph node without hitting someone’s Race for the Cure, why does no one ever hold a Race for the Cause?

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In Rotation 18 | Art of the State 19 | Foodfinds 20 | Fi¬m 22

Awards

with

friends

The RN&R film critic weighs in with his Academy Award predictions

Best Picture

by

Bob Grimm bgrimm@ newsreview.com

The Academy Awards air on ABC at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26.

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

While I might have the Oscars on in the other room while I write or play Words with Friends, I don’t intend to watch the ceremony from start to finish. This is because I hate Billy Crystal as a host. I hate him so very, very much. My favorite host of the show, ever, is Steve Martin, followed by Jon Stewart and Johnny Carson. Hell, I liked David Letterman more as a host than Crystal. And knowing that Eddie Murphy had the gig this year and quit just makes me angry. I think that show would’ve been something to see. As it is, we’re going to get the stupid Crystal song and dance to start things off, then smarmy one-liners all night that fall flatter

than Pepsi Throwback left in the fridge, the can opened and fermenting next to the green bread and perky mouse that just seems to love it in there. Man, I really have to clean. So, I will catch glimpses. I will walk by the TV and witness parts of the car crash, but I will monitor the winners on that little thing called the internet rather than enduring Crystal’s jokes about his wacky uncle’s car. As for the nominees this year, there were some epic snubs along with some nice surprises, and one nomination that I still can’t believe happened. It actually scares me that it is in consideration. I might need some help.

The Artist The Descendants Hugo The Tree of Life Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close War Horse Midnight in Paris Moneyball The Help

I think The Artist is one of those movies that people will like voting for so they can feel all cool and arty and different, so I’m betting it will take the big prize. The Tree of Life would get my vote because it is easily the best film of the year. Also, voting for it makes me feel cool and arty and different. The worst nomination of the year, and possibly ever, is Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. How this absolutely awful film got in there is beyond me. Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock have a lot of friends with votes, and those two stars must give kick-ass oral pleasure. In the no-chance-whatsoever department, we have the enjoyable Moneyball, the overrated Midnight in Paris and the so-so War Horse. The

Descendants had some momentum, but it’s fading faster than a racehorse fed tranquilizers and beer before the gate opened and then shot in the face during the second turn by a shady guy wearing a fedora and smoking Camel Menthols. If The Artist fails to win, I suspect this would go to Hugo, but don’t count out The Help, this year’s “Movie That Has Won a Lot of Awards and Doesn’t Deserve a Single Damned One of Them.” Should Win: The Tree of Life Will Win: The Artist

Best Actor George Clooney, The Descendants Brad Pitt, Moneyball Demian Bichir, A Better Life Jean Dujardin, The Artist Gary Oldman, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

It’s a tough call in this category, although, for starters, I would eliminate Oldman’s rather bland performance. Pitt was terrific, but not showy enough to take home the Oscar. Bichir was OK, but I feel snubbed nominees such as Michael Shannon (Take Shelter) and Ryan Gosling (Drive) were more deserving of his slot. I’m pretty undecided with this one. I think Clooney did the best of the nominated lot, but Dujardin had one of the more unique roles to come along in a century, and he pulled it off. I’m going with Dujardin. If I change my mind, I will post my thoughts on a bulleting board in some coffeehouse somewhere.


Actually, nope, I’ve changed my mind before turning this thing in. Going with Clooney. Probably wrong, but, to quote Mickey Rourke, “Sometimes you just have to roll the potato!” I don’t know what that means. Should Win: George Clooney Will Win: George Clooney

Best Actress Glenn Close, Albert Nobbs Viola Davis, The Help Meryl Streep, The Iron Lady Rooney Mara, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Michelle Williams, My Week with Marilyn

Until a few weeks ago, I thought Streep was a lock here, and I feel she deserves the award. Close worked hard in a movie that sucked, as did Mara. I loved Williams in Marilyn, but feel Streep just smoked everybody here, not to mention all the other movies that hit screens in 2011. Her performance was one of her very best, and that’s saying a lot. That said, Viola Davis is going to win because she was in The Help, and people LOVE The Help. Not enough to make it Best Picture, but enough to throw a lot of performance awards at it. Should Win: Meryl Streep Will Win: Viola Davis

Actor in a Supporting Role Jonah Hill, Moneyball Kenneth Branagh, My Week with Marilyn Nick Nolte, Warrior Christopher Plummer, Beginners Max von Sydow, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Worst snub of the year goes to Albert Brooks with the Academy ignoring him for his amazing turn in Drive. Truly something the Academy should be ashamed of. Von Sydow basically stole the nomination for a film that should be competing for the Razzies rather than Oscars. Everybody else in this category did good work. Of those contending, my pick would be Nolte for his grizzled—of course—father in Warrior. However, I have no doubt that Plummer will be victorious. On a side note, it would be so badass if he whipped out an acoustic guitar for a live rendition of “Edelweiss” for his acceptance speech. No words, no thank yous, just “Edelweiss.” I would seriously cry. Should Win: Nick Nolte Will Win: Christopher Plummer

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

Actress in a Supporting Role Bérénice Bejo, The Artist Jessica Chastain, The Help Melissa McCarthy, Bridesmaids Janet McTeer, Albert Nobbs Octavia Spencer, The Help

While she was very good in The Help, Jessica Chastain should’ve been nominated for Take Shelter or The Tree of Life in this category. Excluding McTeer, I like all of the performances in this category, especially Bejo and McCarthy. I would love to see McCarthy win here, but my gut and a little bit of my pancreas tell me Spencer. While I did like most of the performers in this category, I would happily swap one of them (McTeer!) out to see Keira Knightley nominated for A Dangerous Method. Should Win: Melissa McCarthy Will Win: Octavia Spencer

Best Director Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist Alexander Payne, The Descendants Martin Scorsese, Hugo Woody Allen, Midnight In Paris Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life

So glad to see Malick get a nomination here after the Directors Guild of America inexplicably ignored him. He won’t win, for sure, but good to see him in the bunch. Hazanavicius won with the DGA, and I think he’ll take this award. His silent film feat was impressive. Should Win: Terrence Malick Will Win: Michel Hazanavicius

Other Predictions: Best Animated Film: Rango Cinematography: Hugo Art Direction: Hugo Costume Design: The Artist Documentary Feature: Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory Documentary Short: The Barber of Birmingham Film Editing: Hugo Foreign Language: A Separation Makeup: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Music (Original Score): Hugo Music (Original Song): “Man or Muppet” from The Muppets Short Film (Animated): La Luna Short Film (Live Action): Pentecost Sound Editing: Hugo Sound Mixing: Hugo Visual Effects: Rise of the Planet of the Apes Screenplay (Adapted): The Descendants Screenplay (Original): Midnight in Paris Ω

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Life stories LIFE as I Saw It John Frook Kindle There are two men on this planet to which I owe my debasement from earnest bartender to cynical journalist: Mike Norris and John Frook. by Norris was the guy who on Friday D. Brian Burghart nights would drink glass after glass of Harveys Bristol Cream on my bar at brianb@ Eddie’s Fabulous ’50s. He convinced me newsreview.com there was no hope for a writer of fiction to make a living, and I should change majors at the University of Nevada, Reno from English to journalism. He later helped found the newspaper that became this one and gave me a job. Frook was my magazine writing professor, who—when my wife chose her moment of faithlessness for the week before my final paper was due—gave me eight paragraphs of encouragement and a lapel pin when I turned the assignment in on deadline. It was a story that began with a full-moon night spent in a ghost town graveyard. You’ll note, he did not grant me a deadline extension, although he offered me an “incomplete.” Peppermill_10x2.75_Locals_RNR_Ad.pdf

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Now, a guy who can motivate a life with a few paragraphs must be a pretty powerful writer. He’s got to have a style that can adeptly cut through the bullshit. John Frook has written an e-book, LIFE as I Saw It. He was the Midwest bureau chief and then West Coast Regional Editor for Life magazine, back in the ’60s during the premier picture magazine’s heyday. His name appeared on a lot of other national mastheads, and he even won a couple of Emmy Awards, but all 52 stories in this book are from his time with Life. I remember him telling some of these stories in class. His face would get so red that I was afraid for his heart. I’m not kidding; I’d go through the CPR steps in my head. He had creased earlobes and these yellow patches around his eyes that I always took as signs of a drinker. I have no idea if he was. But you get the idea, he was able to infect students with his passion for storytelling—even students who barely 11:03 AM knew what Life magazine was.

But we knew who Charles Manson and the Beach Boys were. I remember him telling the class the story of how he found a Beach Boys gold record buried in the dirt floor in an outbuilding on the Manson family ranch. That was the first story I looked for when I cracked open the book that Frook had left at the front desk. And there it was! “Charlie Manson Running Wild.” Oh man, and here’s that story about his pursuit of Howard Hughes. I have to admit that story was a bit of my inspiration when Don Dondero and I were pursuing a local

newspaper publisher to ask her about her connections to Harrah’s casino. The big stories are here. And then some. During his time at Life, Frook was hip deep in reporting—from the Civil Rights battles to the time he poisoned Johnny Cash with bug spray to Charles Whitman’s attack at the University of Texas at Austin to roller skating with Raquel Welch. It’s the events, the photographers, the stories and the story telling. It’s all here—except the photos, for the most part. This is like a shot of adrenaline with a coke back to a reporter who’s been sitting at a desk for too long. But I don’t believe that this is a book meant for journalists. The stories are elegantly written with humor and compassion. I often laughed aloud. I know a lot of the readers of this newspaper are old school, and possibly not owners of an Amazon.com Kindle e-reader. I will note that there are hard copies available—the one he gave me was printed through blurb.com—but I’m not quite sure how to get one. I’ll bet interested people can get hold of him through his blog, oldprowriterforhire.com. But, they’d better be careful. There’s no telling what roads this guy might send you down. Ω

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University Theatre’s Nevada Repertory Company presents

Nevada Rep’s next world premier following OP Hamlet March 2 – 11, 2012

A p o s t m o d e r n r e t e l l i n g o f t h e D o n J u a n s t o r y. Produced by special arrangement with The Susan Gurman Agency, LLC

by Anne Garcia-Romero

Nevada Repertory Company productions are supported or funded in part by the University of Nevada, Reno, ASUN, GSA and the City of Reno Arts and Culture Commission.

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Redfield Studio Theatre, Church Fine Arts Building, University of Nevada, Reno

For Performance & Ticket Information:

Anne Garcia-Romero

Visit www.unr.edu/arts or call 775-784-4278


PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

Made in America

“A painting with good light will be a good painting,” says Rafael Lopez.

Blanco de San Roman

“My parents asked me, ‘How can you criticize a country that has given you so many by things?’” says Rafael Lopez. Brad Bynum “My point is not to criticize the U.S. These things are also going on in bradb@ newsreview.com Spain. But I’m here now. I think artists should be involved in things going on where they are. And because I speak Spanish, I have access to so many stories. … I’m working with a subject that is very fragile— illegal immigration.” Lopez’s exhibition Living in “El Living in “El Norte” is Norte” is on display at the Truckee on display in the Main Meadows Community College’s Main Art Gallery of the V. Art Gallery and credited to Lopez’s James Eardley Student artistic nom de plume Blanco de San Center at Truckee Roman. The show consists of nine Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini large oil painting portraits of Alma Blvd., through Feb. 25. and Ramiro, two young people who first came to this country as illegal immigrants when they were young children. For the purposes of the exhibition, they’re referred to by only their first names. This is partly because, though Ramiro is now a U.S. citizen, Alma is not.

Part of Lopez’s aim is to counteract the dehumanizing way illegal immigrants are often depicted—as statistics or worse, rather than people. Alma and Ramiro are Lopez’s friends, and his portraits depict them in a very sympathetic and even glamorous way. Lopez is an MFA student at the University of Nevada, Reno. He first came to the U.S. from his native Spain a decade ago to attend Florida Southern College on a tennis scholarship. (In Spain, he says, the options were to either go to college or play tennis— here, he could do both.) He transferred to Saint Mary’s College of California, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in fine arts. Because he’s a foreigner in this country legally, and a native speaker of Spanish, he has a unique perspective on U.S. immigration debates. “I stand as an outside viewer in the middle between illegal immigrants trying to find a better life for their family and the American citizens that want to protect their country from danger and criminality,” he writes in an artist’s statement accompanying Living in “El Norte.” Lopez’s painting style is close to realism—though he’s so focused on the people in

his paintings that he acknowledges the realism falters when he paints the landscapes or architecture in the background. And there are stylistic elements, particularly a dramatic high contrast between the light and shadows, an approach he says is inspired by the Italian technique of chiaroscuro. “A painting with good light will be a good painting,” he says. His method of painting is labor intensive, requiring layer after layer of paint, and he estimates he spends 250 to 300 hours on each canvas. He usually works on three at a time, alternating among them as layers dry. “I’m very stubborn,” he says. The paintings of Alma depict her laughing with her daughters, hiking through a distinctively Nevadan landscape, and, in a striking piece that borders on the melodramatic, holding two flags—one American and one Mexican.

“I love being Mexican, but I love being American also,” says Alma on a recording that accompanies the exhibition. Lengthy voice recordings of both principle subjects play in the gallery on directional speakers, carefully placed to avoid significant audio overlap. “From my perspective, there’s no us and them,” says Ramiro during his recording. He’s a veteran, and much of his audio recording is spent discussing his experiences in the military. He’s now a college student, and one large canvas depicts him standing in front of UNR’s Frandsen Humanities building, books in hand. Another canvas depicts a scene of Bohemian bonhomie: four young men smoking, drinking and engaged in what appears to be intellectual discussion. One of the young men is Ramiro, another is Lopez, sneaking in a self portrait. The exhibition is tied together with a quote from Northern Nevada literary luminary Robert Laxalt, which reads, in part, “And the irony of it was that our mothers and fathers were truer Americans than we, because they had forsaken home and family, and gone into the unknown of a new land with only courage and the hands that God gave them, and had given us in our turn the right to be born American.” Ω

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Sweet deals Carb your enthusiasm for the entire family! Petra’s Pretzels and More 2838 Vista Blvd., Sparks, 359-1919

Forget the daily deal, Sweetdeals is a gift certificate marketplace featuring some of the area’s sweetest businesses! Check out some of our sweetest deals, available now!

I always wonder about people who jump on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon. Why would anyone in their right mind by K.J Sullivan willingly stop eating the best part of the food pyramid? I mean sure, ksullivan@ who doesn’t like meat and cheese, newsreview.com but if I can’t put them between two delicious pieces of starch, then why bother? When I learned there was a place dedicated to the finest carbohydrate of all—the pretzel—I was ecstatic. My friend Tim and I headed out to Sparks and were surprised to see a “grand opening” sign outside Petra’s. For some reason, I thought this place had been around a while, but it turns out it just opened at the beginning of January.

PHOTO/AMY BECK

everything appeared written on the blackboard. While a friendly worker assisted the couple ahead of us, another worker came from the back and barked at me to place my order. As we told him what we wanted he began quickly pulling our choices from warming trays. I appreciated his efficiency, but he was pretty brusque and made us feel like we were bothering him. I was disappointed that so many of the items were pre-made, including everything Tim and I ordered, which was the pretzel dog ($2.75), a ham and cheese croissant ($3.75), and pretzel bites ($2.95 for a baker’s dozen). The ham and cheese croissant was filled with thick layers of ham coated with a nice layer of cheese. The croissant surrounding it was flakey and light and had a nice sweet flavor to it. Unfortunately, the entire thing was lukewarm at best. The flavor was really good though, so I imagine this would be fantastic hot. The pretzel dog had a thin pretzel casing surrounding a large hot dog. The dog had a rich flavor with a hint of spice to it. I wish the pretzel casing had been a bit thicker and doughier. The pretzel bites were light and airy and were delicious dipped in the little cups of warm nacho cheese, which was needed as the bites were not very warm. We decided we couldn’t leave without getting a cinnamon roll ($2.25), since the smell of cinnamon and dough filled the air. The cinnamon roll was large, with a light layer of white frosting coating the top. The middle was gooey layers of cinnamon, sugar, dough and butter. The cinnamon balanced out the sugar. I’m hoping with some more time under their belts, Petra’s can resolve some of the issues because the food tastes good. If I go in again, and who am I kidding, this place is carbohydrate heaven so I will be back, I would probably make the request that my items be made from scratch or heated up and would place my order to go. Ω

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The cinnamon rolls are a highlight at Petra's Pretzels and More.

RN&R

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Petra’s Pretzels and More is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Walking in, I was a little confused about the “grand opening” signs since the furnishings were pretty sparse. A row of white tables lines one wall, with the ordering counter and food preparation area on the other. When we visited, in early February, the walls were plain white with no decorations other than some Valentine’s Day signs made with window paint and a daisy in the middle of each table. The look was a little too institutional for me, but since they just opened, hopefully they’re still planning their decorating scheme. A small line had formed ahead of us, so we waited patiently while perusing the large blackboard that listed out the menu choices, including things like pretzels, croissants, turnovers and waffles. I couldn’t help but notice how hastily


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A new culinary experience for groups to enjoy together! Order as many items as your group wishes from a wide offering of meats, noodles, seafood, vegetables & broths. Ladle your own bowl to enjoy! All you can eat!

FULL SERVICE BAR

(Cobra drinks)

HAPPY HOUR

8PM-CLOSE

PLENTY OF PARKING

2 CAN EAT A NCH FOR COMPLETE LU $20! LESS THAN

www.asiannoodlesreno.com

1x6

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nhill w o d l l a s ’ it from here

Order Your Playoff Party Take-Out!

n e w s & r e v i e w b u s i n e s s u s e o n ly

Our Reno and Sparks breweries ACCTentry eXeC forgdo will give one every pint of ICKY purchased Wednesdays reV dATe on 06.17.11 until the drawing. Or drink ICKY any of the and receive one please carefully review your advertisement and day verify theweek following: entry per pint at participating Ad size (CoLUMn X inChes) locations, including:

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With coupon, not valid with other offers, cannot be used with take out orders. Valid with a minimum purchase of $25 and a maximum of $200. Offer expires 02/29/12. 09

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55 Arroyo St 775.327.4422 www.ElAdobeCafe.com |

NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

Reno

Sparks

5525 S. Virginia St. 775.284.7711

Drawings will be held and winners announced on Saturday, February 25, 2012. 6pm at Great Basin in Sparks, 12pm at Mt. Rose and 6pm at Ceol. Winners need not be present to win.

846 Victorian Ave. 775.355.7711

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Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe Ceol Irish Pub

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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SERVING NORTHERN MEXICO CUISINE IN THE RENO-SPARKS AREA FOR 27 YEARS

Motor psycho Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance

11AM – 9PM SUN – THUR 10AM – 10PM FRI & SAT

Reno’s Family Mexican Restaurant Live Music on Weekends, Catering Service Available, Take Out Orders, Full Bar, Gift Certificates Available Patio Dining - Weather Permitting Fresh Corn & Flour Tortillas Made Daily

BERTHA MIRANDA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Five years ago, when the original, milquetoast Ghost Rider came out, I issued a somewhat fair review, asking Marvel to “get sicker with the sequel.” Now we have the sequel and, not surprisingly, it doesn’t appear the folks at Marvel followed my “get sicker” suggestion. If the original was milquetoast, this one is more like Melba toast soaked in sour milk, tossed to the floor, and mushed by an angry little girl wearing Minnie Mouse shoes. by This is one wimpy, cheap looking, poor Bob Grimm excuse for a movie. Nicolas Cage returns as Johnny Blaze, a bgrimm@ newsreview.com comic book character having a very hard time translating to the big screen. The first film was an origin story establishing the fact that Blaze sold his soul to the Devil. This one picks up a few years down the road with Blaze not adjusting well to the life of a guy whose head occasionally explodes into flames. He’s hiding out in Eastern Europe, has let his hair grow out and, because he is played by Nicolas Cage, has crazy mood swings.

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336 Mill St. in Downtown Reno

(775) 786-9697

786-2525 fax

berthamirandas.com

At Plato’s Closet, we buy and sell brand name used clothing and accessories. And right now we’re stocking up on fall and winter apparel for guys and girls. So bring us your jackets, snowboarding gear, hoodies, denim, vintage & cold weather accessories and we’ll pay you cash right on the spot!!!

“Holy crap! I’m on fire!”

Cold Cash

forCool Style $5 IN FREE PLATOS BUCKS ON ANY PURCHASE exp 2/29/12

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1535 S. Virginia St. Reno • 775.322.0110 FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Because this movie involves Satan, it has to have some kid who is going to be sacrificed, right? That kid is Danny, played by Natalie Portman look-alike Fergus Riordan. He and his mom Nadya (Violante Placido) are running away from the Devil, played by Ciaran Hinds, replacing the original film’s dynamically charismatic Peter Fonda. The Devil wants to use Danny as a human vessel, because the Ciaran Hinds vessel presumably has disturbingly high cholesterol numbers and a bit of the gout.

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There’s some dude named Moreau (Idris Elba) who looks to protect Danny from the Devil, and eventually calls upon Johnny Blaze for a little help. For some reason or another, Moreau seems to have the power to restore Blaze’s soul, so he makes a deal to return the soul if Blaze assists. The deal is made, and Cage goes into shrieking weirdo overdrive. The first Ghost Rider had some production value behind it. While it looked good, it surrounded Cage with subpar actors (Eva Mendes, freaking Wes Bentley) and covered his head with one lousy hairpiece. At the very least, it did have something resembling a coherent story, and Cage had a reasonable level of control over his performance. This time out, it’s as if directors Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor realized they had a dud on their hands and told Cage to go into psycho Bad Lieutenant mode to attract his diehard fans. This results in random scenes of Cage doing his patented cuckoo act, something that can be amusing on some levels but just odd and out of place when poorly directed. This time out, it’s definitely odd and out of place. Many of the sets look like paper-mache. There is one slight improvement over the prior film: The flaming skull now has a charred, smoky appearance rather than the oddly clean, white skull from the first film. It’s a little creepier. Blink and you’ll miss Christopher Lambert (Highlander’s Connor MacLeod of the Clan MacLeod!) as a priest dude with writing all over his face. Pretty boy Johnny Whitworth plays ruthless nasty guy Ray, hired by the Devil to find the kid and eventually transformed into one of the dumbest-looking movie monsters ever. You have the option of seeing the film in 3D, but I would suggest the option of not seeing Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance at all. Nicolas Cage, in his seemingly eternal quest to play a comic book character, has gotten saddled with one that has nowhere to go but straight to hell on the big screen. By “hell,” I mean bad quality, and not the actual Hell. Had the Ghost Rider ridden his fiery bike to Hell in this movie that would’ve been cool. Instead, he just loiters around some broke-assed paper-mache looking sets acting all Cage-kooky. Ω


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The Artist

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Chronicle

3

An homage to silent films that’s actually a silent film, this is a funny, touching and innovative piece of work with a fun performance from Jean Dujardin. He plays a silent movie star at the dawning of the sound age, much like Charlie Chaplin, who either must make the leap to sound or slip away. Berenice Bejo plays Peppy Miller, a star on the rise. After sharing a scene in a film, their two careers go in separate directions. They’re wonderfully expressive performers, which suits Michel Hazanavicius’s film perfectly. One of last year’s biggest surprises, and they’ll be watching this one a hundred years from now.

Ryan Reynolds plays Matt Weston, a CIA operative who has spent a year sitting in a safe house bouncing a ball against a wall and listening to tunes. He longs for the big assignment in the field, but the organization seems content to keep him out of the way and performing menial tasks. Things change mightily when Tobin Frost (Denzel Washington) is brought to his house for some questioning and good old healthy waterboarding. Frost is a former agent gone rogue, selling secrets to enemy countries and making a decent living off of it. He’s also a dangerous, murderous son of a bitch. Throw into the mix that he’s also virtuous, and you have your typically complicated Washington character. Reynolds and Washington complement each other well in this action thriller that constitutes the rare Reynolds film that is good.

There’s a good movie, and a great idea, buried in the stagey muck that clogs up Chronicle, the latest entry in the “found footage” craze. There are so many of these found footage movies now, I feel like I’m writing about them every week. A movie about three high school kids finding some kind of meteor and absorbing a strange energy that gives then super telekinetic powers is a magnificent idea. But hampering the movie with the idiotic premise that everything is filmed by the characters in an attempt for a new twist on the tiresome fake documentary gimmick is a terrible mistake. There are moments of brilliance, making this a near miss. But the found footage gimmick is so tired and strained that it kills the film. That said, the finale is a real winner. Sneak in for the last 15 minutes of the movie.

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George Clooney delivers another great performance as Matt King, a rich land tycoon living a modest life in Hawaii, trying to get along with his two daughters while his wife is in a coma. Matt finds out some stuff about the wife, and his life takes some interesting turns. Shailene Woodley is excellent here as Matt’s older daughter, as is Amara Miller as the younger one. Robert Forster is both funny and sad as Matt’s bitter father-in-law, while Matthew Lillard gets a good role as a real estate agent with a secret. Written and directed by Alexander Payne (About Schmidt, Election, Sideways), it’s characteristic of his films. There are lots of good laughs to go with the heavy stuff.

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Meryl Streep is my pick for 2011’s Best Actress for her incredible, uncanny work as former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in director Phyllida Lloyd’s engaging biopic. Streep disappears into her role. Yes, it’s partly due to excellent makeup work, but it’s mostly due to Streep’s beautifully nuanced performance. She plays Thatcher at many ages, including her recent declining years, and she’s spot on. Her accent is natural, her physicality is perfection. Yes, the film glosses over a lot of the political aspects that made Thatcher controversial. It focuses mainly on Thatcher’s relationship with her husband (played in later years by Jim Broadbent), and her psychological and emotional difficulties in her elder years. This is all about Streep and seeing an actress showing the world how this sort of thing is done right.

Century Park Lane 16, 210 Plumb Lane: 824-3300 Century Riverside 12, 11 N. Sierra St.: 786-1743 Century Summit Sierra 13965 S. Virginia St.: 851-4347 www.centurytheaters.com

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This Means War

Likeable performers can’t save this silly film from running out of steam by the time credits roll. Reese Witherspoon plays Lauren, a woman with a job I can’t really explain—she’s some kind of product quality tester—who winds up dating not one but two CIA operatives (Chris Pine and Tom Hardy), who are also best friends. The two men find themselves in competition for Lauren’s hand, and they do all sorts of unethical things to win it. All three are good and funny here, but director McG can’t make the premise work for the entire running time, and the film just runs out of energy. McG, who made the weak Terminator Salvation, is quite the messy director. Full blame goes to him for this film’s failures, because the actors almost pull it off.

The Iron Lady

Reno

3

The Woman in Black

This is an old-fashioned haunted house movie from Hammer Films that takes some time to get going but gets some good scares in the end. Daniel Radcliffe plays a lawyer who goes to a village in the middle of nowhere and, quite illogically, spends a couple of nights in a haunted house. While there, he sees multiple ghosts, not the least of which is the ghost of a deranged woman angry about the death of her son. Director James Watkins sets the film in a place where it’s impossible for Radcliffe’s character to escape, adding to the dread. There are some interesting sequences—I especially like when a mudcovered young boy makes a visit in the rain—and Radcliffe makes his character somebody we can root for, even if he is dumber than a box of hammers for entering the house in the first place. This one is committed to darkness, so those looking for a good time might want to go play skee ball instead.

The latest 9/11 movie is the worst one yet, focusing on an obnoxious kid (Thomas Horn) on a quest to find the lock for a key his father (Tom Hanks) left behind after dying on 9/11. Horn is just impossible to watch, and the plotting is deplorable. Yes, the kid is making his acting debut here, and it’s a demanding role. I’m sorry—he just drove me crazy. Max von Sydow shows up in a silent role and has some fun with it. That’s about the most positive thing I can say about this trash. It wastes decent performances from Hanks and Sandra Bullock.

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Stars Wars: Episode 1 - The Phantom Menace

Yeah … I gave this a positive review when it first came out. I was young, I was prone to huffing paint, and I didn’t have my priorities straight. That, or this simply just felt better going down in the late ’90s. Maybe seeing it in crap 3-D just brings out the worst in the film, such as the atrocity that is Jar Jar Binks. It’s a little harder to accept the irritating Jar Jar when he’s coming at you in three—or, really, two and a half—dimensions. The 3-D just sort of punches your eyeballs around, especially during the pod races which now look blurry due to the 3-D retrofitting. Liam Neeson’s wig doesn’t benefit from the 3-D; it’s far too vivid and obviously fake. The Darth Maul battle is still cool, but that’s about all for true enjoyment in this new visually abrasive version. Not excited for Attack of the Clones in 3-D. Not excited at all.

The Descendants

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Safe House

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

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FEATURE STORY

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Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe

ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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Gentle man Jeff Bernat For an artist whose album, The Gentleman Approach, reached No. 5 on the iTunes R&B charts, and who has by Marvin Gonzalez performed his music across the U.S. and Canada, and who is playing in a music festival in the UK this summer, an intimate bar in downtown Reno might be the last venue you’d expect to see 22-year-old R&B singer/songwriter Jeff Bernat. Underneath his ball cap, he bears a serious face, but his genuine smile reveals his sweet nature. He moves through his speech very calmly, and though hints of hip-hop lingo slip into his words, he speaks very maturely, very gentlemanly, which may be why he titled his album The Gentleman Approach. PHOTO/AMY BECK

“I believe in independent music,” says local R&B singer Jeff Bernat.

For more information, visit twitter.com/ jeffbernat or youtube.com/ jeffbernatmusic.

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“I’m just trying make classy R&B,” he says. And, in an industry that seems to be falling further and further down the cultural ladder, this fresh approach to R&B/Hip-Hop might be why he is catching on. But Bernat’s a local, and there’s no place he’d rather be. Like most successful people, he’s done things his own way. While most musicians usually make a name for themselves locally, and then take their music on the road, Bernat has done quite the opposite. “It’s just crazy, the power of the internet,” he says. “You just have to know how to work it, you know?” Bernat has always loved music, but it was only after high school that GREEN

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he started taking it seriously. He noticed the growing popularity of YouTube, and collaborated on a video with San Diego artist Kat Badar, who already had a decent fan base. “She let me do a video with her, and after that, that racked up my subscribers and views, and I thought ‘All right, I should put up some original music on here,’” he says. Months after putting up his first video, and after racking up thousands of views, he was getting calls from promoters all over the country. And, now he is playing a UK music festival, part of a Filipino cultural event. “A big advantage for me is to be able to reach out to the Asian population all over the world,” he says. “They are always supporting.” Though he’s attracting a lot of attention from music promoters and fans online, he has no intention of signing to a record label. He records all his music from his home studio, and worked largely with local producer Joel Cowell on The Gentleman Approach. He’s part of a new generation of artists who use non-traditional means to promote their music. “I believe in independent music,” he says. “If I could choose to be independent and be comfortable all my life I would do it. I’m not chasing to get signed with a record label. I represent the movement to put the music industry out of business.” His approach seems to be working. He’s selling his album on iTunes, and reaching new fans online and in the different cities he tours. Yet he also seems to have kept everything in perspective. “It’s not millions, but I can’t complain,” he says. His one concern is that he doesn’t play enough here in Reno, and he admits that locally he is not as well known as he’d like. He has shows lined up in Chicago, Tennessee and Virginia, but none in Reno in the foreseeable future. “There is nothing like hometown love,” he says. “I feel like I have been very slept on here. Nobody pays attention to that Asian kid.” But he hopes he can be an ambassador for Reno. “My music is very different from what you hear in this city,” he says. “And that’s why I like Reno. Everything is so different. I don’t think that people in other cities get to see our true culture. So, if anything, I just want to be one of those leaders who get to represent our city.” Ω

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

THURSDAY 2/23

FRIDAY 2/24

SATURDAY 2/25

SUNDAY 2/26

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Latin Jazz Night, 9pm, no cover

Matty T Band, 9pm, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8:30pm, no cover

775 GASTROPUB

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/27-2/29 DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Mark Castro Duo, 8pm, no cover

5162 Meadowood Mall Circle, (775) 828-0775

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Jazz Night, 7:30pm, Tu, no cover

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

THE ALLEY

Misfritz, The Reagan Years, Bury the Knightfall, Walk Away Alpha, Epinefrin, Skies, The Luminous Empty, 8pm, no cover Enslave the Creation, 7pm, $TBA

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB 188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

Victor & Penny

Hollerado, The Brooklyn Fire, 9pm, $5

THE BLACK TANGERINE

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

Feb. 24, 8 p.m. Studio on 4th 432 E. Fourth St. 786-6460

DJ JP, 9pm, no cover

The Twilight Angels Burlesque Show, 9pm, $5

Uprising Reggae Band, 9pm, $5

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

CANTINA LOS TRES HOMBRES

Tyler Stafford, 6pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

926 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-6262 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Comedy

DJ Plan C, 9pm, $3

COMMA COFFEE

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

COMMROW

Wayne Static, 9pm, $18-$35

Young Dubliners, 9pm, $20-$40 Free Fridays w/DJ Max, 11pm, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Joey Gay, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Geno Bisconte, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Kelly Bentson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

Sheldon Felich, 7pm, no cover

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Bobby Collins, Alan Bursky, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Graham Elwood, David Feldman, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Rob Cantrell, Karith Foster, F, 7:30pm; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $12, $16; Hynopt!c with Dan Kimm, F, 9:30pm, $16, $21; Karith Foster, Dan Kimm, Sa, 4pm, $15, $20

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover Whisky Before Breakfast, 6pm, no cover Roddy Radiation, 8pm, $10 BoomBox, 9pm, $13, $15

Blues Jam Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

Dust on the Bottle, 9:30pm, no cover

Frazzled, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Comedy, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Mitchell, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Mitchell, 9pm, M, no cover Karaoke w/Nick, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover

Dust on the Bottle, 8:30pm, no cover

JAVA JUNGLE

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

John Giles, Chris Fox, Jackson, 10pm, $1

The Roof is on Fire fundraiser for Brad Moore, 9pm, $3

Riptide Bandits, 10pm, $3

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Sunday be fore publication .

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

Celtic/American Tune Session, 7pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662 255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

Lagwagon, Cobra Skulls, Nothington, 8pm, Tu, $20, Loud As Folk, 7pm, W, no cover

Open mic w/Christy Lynn, 9pm, M, no cover

Number of small plate appetizers offered during our Happy Hour 15 Average cost of a small plate appetizer during our Happy Hour $5.67 Cost for a glass of house wine or well drink featuring the likes of Skyy, JW Red, Bombay, Jim Beam, Sauza and Bacardi $3.50

Custom Tattooing :: Body Piercing Clothing walk-ins welcome 11am-10pm 7 days a week

(775)786-3865

www.evolutiontattooreno.com

Number of Happy Hours per day 2 Number of years in business 35 Pounds of potatoes we use in a week for complimentary “Rap Chips” 50 Number of microwaves in our kitchen 0

1555 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV

www.Rapscallion.com

775-323-1211 • 1-877-932-3700 Open Monday - Friday at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm Sunday Brunch from 10am to 2pm

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

THESE DON’T Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

MIX


THURSDAY 2/23 KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

FRIDAY 2/24

SATURDAY 2/25

SUNDAY 2/26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/27-2/29

A Sight for Sore Eyes, Sound the Sirens, Club Sexy Movimiento, RJD2, Lunice, Who Cares, 8pm, $22-$50 Na Na Nonchalant, Saving Alleya, 8pm, $6 10pm, $8

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic Night/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH PUB

The Luckey Walker Show featuring Masami, 8pm, no cover

906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

PLAN:B MICRO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night w/Michelle Pappas, 7pm, no cover

Open jazz jam, 7:30pm, W, no cover

THE POINT

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Stevie D., 8pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

RED ROCK

Spencer & John Acoustic Set, 9pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 318 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 887-8879

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

John Palmore, 6pm, no cover

BoomBox

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Feb. 25, 9 p.m. CommRow 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON

Chord Soup, 8pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Johnny Cash birthday party, 9pm, no cover

Apostles of Badness, Liquorville, 9pm, M, live jazz, 8pm, W, no cover

Dropkikk, 9:30pm, no cover

Seasons of Insanity, 9:30pm, no cover

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

SIERRA GOLD

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

SIERRA TAP HOUSE

3-17, 3pm, no cover

680 S. Meadows Pkwy., (775) 850-1112 252 W. First St., (775) 322-7678

SPARKY’S

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

9570 S. McCarran Blvd., (775) 787-9669

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

Folk The System with Alan, 9pm, no cover

Drinking with Clowns, Merkin, 9pm, no cover

Greg Grenade & Matt Waage, 4pm, Mac Esposito Jazz Party, 9pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

Acoustic Jam w/Christy Lynn, 5pm, no cover, Truckee River Band, 9pm, $5

Victor & Penny, 8pm, $8, $10 High Heels & Nikes, 10pm, $5-$10

Bathtub Math w/Litemaster, Sneakymoto, Joystick, Jabberwocky, 10pm, $5

1) Grady Champion, VooDooDogz, 7pm, $8, $10

1) Forrest Day, Asphalt Socialites, Peace 1) Border Wars Emcee Battle Mafia, 8pm, $8, $10 2) Marianarchy Acoustic 8:30pm, $5, $10 2) Blunderbusst, Candy Rock Showcase, 8pm, $3 after 9pm Shoppe, Christy Lynn, 8pm, $3 after 9pm

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-6460

THE UNDERGROUND

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-2582 1) Showroom 2) Tree House Lounge

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Tom Van Ruiten, Wyatt Troxel, 7pm, no cover

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

Occupy Reno Outreach Night, 9pm, M, Dark Tuesdays w/Stefani, 9pm, Tu, no cover Kublakai Hip Hop Showcase, 6pm, M, $6 Rock & Blues Jam, 8pm, W, $5 1) Schizopolitans, Endif, Tamagawa, Drone à clochettes, 7pm, W, $5, no cover charge for women

Endif Feb. 29, 7 p.m. The Underground 555 E. Fourth St. 786-2582

Recycle

this paper.

Come See Reno’s Most Talented New & Exciting Tattoo Artists! Mention RN& R to hear our specials

Check out these local favorites!

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 7pm, no cover

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

Dining out week? this

Jazz Night w/Mike Mayhall & Friends, 7pm, no cover

APPLE CORE TATTOO & BODY PIERCING

Custom Work • Walk-Ins 7 DAYS A WEEK 1507 S. Wells // 775.448.6550

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ay Bash!

saturday, feB 25th 8pm-12am wear black, drink jack! live music

ryaN’s saLOON & BrOiLer 924 S. Wells Ave. Reno • 323-4142

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 2/23

FRIDAY 2/24

SATURDAY 2/25

SUNDAY 2/26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/27-2/29

2) Chili Sauce, 8pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 4pm, Double X Posure, 10pm, no cover

2) Chili Sauce, 4pm, Double X Posure, 10pm, no cover

2) Double X Posure, 8pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

2) Dueling Pianos Anywhere, 8pm, no cover

2) Dueling Pianos Anywhere, 8pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Tony Vee, 10pm, no cover

Tony Vee, 10pm, no cover

1) Soulive, Anders Osborne, George Porter Jr., Karl Denson, 9pm, $25, $30

1) Soulive, Matisyahu, Ivan Neville, Anders Osborne, George Porter Jr., Karl Denson, 9pm, $25, $30

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 8pm, $19.95 + 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, DJ JC, 11pm, no cover 4) Guitar Stevie, 5pm, no cover

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, 9:30pm, $19.95 + 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, DJ JC, 11pm, no cover 4) Guitar Stevie, 5pm, no cover

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, 1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, $19.95 + W, $19.95 + 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, 2) Audioboxx, 10pm, no cover M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, no cover Garage Boys, 10pm, W, no cover

1) Senses, 9pm, $15

1) Boz Scaggs, 9pm, $25-$65 4) Baila Latin Dance Party, 7:30pm, $5 6) Angeline Quinto, Sam Milby, Shelby Miguel, Ashlie Cortez, 8pm, $28-$68

1) Senses, 9pm, $15

1) Senses, 9pm, Tu, W, $15

2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, VEX Girls, 10:30pm, $20

1) G. Love & Special Sauce, Scott H. Biram, 7pm, $29.50 2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, 10:30pm, $20

1) Chicago Tribute Authority—The Music of Chicago, 8pm, $25, $30, Willie Fratto, 10:30pm, $20, $25 2) Karaoke, 6pm, Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

1) Chicago Tribute Authority—The Music of Chicago, 8pm, $25, $30, Willie Fratto, 10:30pm, $20, $25 2) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover

2) Jo Mama, 9pm, no cover 3) Eric Andersen, 6pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

2) Jo Mama, 9pm, no cover 3) Eric Andersen, 6pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 5:30pm, DJ BG Weekend Jump-Off Party, 10pm, no cover

2) Jo Mama, 8pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 5:30pm, no cover

3) Dee Lucas, 6pm, W, no cover

3) Cedric Gervais, Anthony Attalla, 10pm, $40, $100

1) Iration, Trevor Hall, Thrive, 9pm, $20, $22 3) Chris Lake, Bart B More, 5) Sander Kleinenberg, Manufactured 10pm, $40, $100 Superstars, 10pm, $40, $100

3) J Boog, 9pm, W, $15

2) Chocolate Martini, 8pm, no cover 3) Freeze Frame, 9pm, no cover 4) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Chocolate Martini, 8pm, no cover 3) Freeze Frame, 9pm, no cover 4) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

2) Chocolate Martini, 7pm, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, no cover

2) Chocolate Martini, 7pm, M, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, M, W, no cover

2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

1) Larry the Cable Guy, 6pm, 9pm, $57.50, $72.50 2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover

2) DJ Tom, 9pm, M, DJ I, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover 3) Take the Leap Masquerade Bash, 9 pm, W, $7, $10

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Shannon Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

Iration

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

Feb. 25, 9 p.m. Montbleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3353

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

1) Soulive, Luther Dickinson, 9pm, $25, $30 1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, $19.95 +

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 2) Audioboxx, 10pm, no cover 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 3) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 4) Cin Cin Bar & Lounge

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Senses, 9pm, $15 1) Theater 2) 2500 East 3) The Beach 5) Country dance lessons w/DJ Jamie 4) Xtreme Sports Bar 5) Mustangs Dancehall & Saloon “G”, Cowboy Tom, 8pm, $5 6) Summit Pavilion 7) Grand Sierra Ballroom 8) Silver State Pavilion

Karaoke

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 427-7247 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Showroom 2) Sapphire Lounge 3) Plaza 4) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

2) Jo Mama, 8pm, no cover 3) Eric Andersen, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ BG, 6pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1)Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Cabaret 5) Onsen Beach

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

2) Chocolate Martini, 5pm, Easy Money,

11pm, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge no cover 4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

FEBRUARY 23, 2012

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover

1) Rob Cantrell, Sean Peabody, 8pm, Tu, $10, $15 2) Roommate, IJV, Dubfyah, 11pm, Tu, no cover


For Thursday, February 23 to Wednesday, Feb. 29 MONTHLY SWING DANCE PARTY: High Sierra Swing Dance Club presents its monthly dance party. There will be a lesson at 7pm with the social dance at 8pm. Partners are not required. Sa, 2/25, 710:30pm. $7-$10. Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 629-9369, www.highsierrasdc.org.

To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

PRIME XPO JEWELRY BEAD & GIFT SHOW: The

Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

show features jewelry, beads, gems, apparel, gifts and more. F, 2/24, 11am-

6pm; Sa, 2/25, 11am-6pm; Su, 2/26, 11am-6pm. $3 at door. Harrah’s Reno,

Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

219 N. Center St., (703) 533-4830, www.primexpousa.com.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., March 15, is Thursday, March 8. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

Events

RENO CELTIC PUB CRAWL: The fourth annual

DOLLAR EXCHANGE AT NEVADA STATE MUSEUM: Reno Coin Club and The Nevada State Museum present “Coin Exchange and Minting on Old Coin Press No. 1.” All the new U.S. coins will be available at face or cost. There will be a display of ancient and obsolete U.S. coins. Free foreign coins for kids, as well as the Old Coin Press minting a new medal. Sa, 2/25, 10am-3pm. $8 adult; free for children under age 18. Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 815-8625, www.renocoinclub.org.

BUILD GOURD BIRDHOUSES: Learn the techniques for building gourd birdhouses and making them look fabulous. Growing information on gourds will also be covered. RSVP requested. Sa, 2/25, 1pm. $15 per gourd, includes all supplies. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks, (775) 355-1551, www.railcitygardencenter.com.

COMPOSTING AT HOME: Learn how to set up easy compost systems in your home. Regular and vermiculture (worm farms) will be covered. RSVP requested. Classes are free but it is encouraged that you bring a can of food for Food Bank of Northern Nevada. Sa, 2/25, 10am. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks, (775) 355-1551, www.railcitygardencenter.com.

GOLD HILL TUESDAY NIGHT LECTURE SERIES: Phil Earl presents “Buck Nimy Nevada Cowboy Artist.” Buffet dinner starts at 5pm; lecture begins at 7:30pm. Tu, 2/28, 5pm. $15 for dinner and lecture; $5 for lecture only. Gold Hill Hotel, 1540 Main St., one mile south of Virginia City on Highway 342, Gold Hill, (775) 847-0111, www.goldhillhotel.net.

CONVERSATION CORNER: Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions ideal for non-native English speakers who want to improve their speaking skills. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that involve everyday activities. W, 4:30-6pm. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 829-7323.

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES: LAKE TAHOE & THE COMSTOCK: Author and photographer Mark McLaughlin presents this lecture. Sa, 2/25, 1pm. $5 suggested donation. Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, (775) 849-4948, www.thegreatbasininstitute.org.

“Celtic Festival” Reno Beer Crawl, presented by the Sons & Daughters of Erin, will start at The Waterfall, 134 W. Second St. $5 will get you a wrist band, glass, raffle ticket and map for $1 6-ounce refills of craft beer at 15 downtown Reno locations. Sa, 2/25, 2pm. $5. Locations vary, (775) 378-0931, www.renobeercrawl.com.

RESTORING HOPE FOR RESTART: Phi Alpha, the honor society in the School of Social Work at the University of Nevada, Reno, presents this fundraiser to benefit the ReStart mental health programs of Volunteers of America. The event will feature a wine tasting, tea, music, an art auction and a raffle. Sa, 2/25, 6-8pm. $5. Se7en on West, 148 West St. Ste. A-10, (775) 322-7143.

TWO BILLION CARS: DRIVING TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY: Dan Sperling and Tom Turrentine of the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at University of California, Davis, will present their research on America’s ongoing love affair with the car and the widespread environmental impacts and global conflicts over oil supply it creates, and give insight of energy solutions of the future. No-host bar begins at 5:30pm. Presentation begins at 6pm. Th, 2/23, 5:30-7:30pm. $10 donation requested. Sierra Nevada College, Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences, Room 139/141, 291 Country Club Drive, Incline Village, (775) 881-7562, http://terc.ucdavis .edu/calendar.

All ages BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

CHESS AND MORE: Players of all ages and

SIERRA ARTS GALLERY: Can You Imagine.

skills are invited to play chess and other board games for fun. Second and Fourth Tu of every month, 3-5pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

NEW MOTHERS SUPPORT GROUP: This group offers support to first-time mothers in dealing with the changes and issues that come with having a new baby. Th, 1011:30am. Saint Mary’s Regional Medical Center, 235 W. Sixth St., (775) 770-3843, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

Pam Brekas presents a series of abstract photographs inspired by the colors, textures and details found in the rust of machinery and metal she has discovered abandoned in the landscape. Jack Taylor, a ceramicist and sculptor, incorporates non-traditional materials into his ceramic works in order to “add a twist and an element of surprise to the traditional pot.” There will be a reception on Feb. 25 from 3pm to 5pm. M-F, 10am-5pm through 3/16. Free. 17 S. Virginia St. Ste. 120, (775) 329-2787, www.sierra-arts.org.

SIERRA NEVADA COLLEGE: Geographical

Art ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Great Basin Bonanza. Artists Co-op of Reno hosts this month-long art show and sale to benefit the Great Basin Outdoor School. The art featured will be representative of the scenery and life in the Great Basin. M-Su, 11am-4pm through 2/29. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www.artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

GOOD LUCK MACBETH THEATER: Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School. This art event features music, prizes, contests and models. Bring your own art supplies. The event is open to people ages 18 and older. Th, 2/23, 69pm. $7. 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

JOLT-N-JAVA CAFE & COFFEE HOUSE: Family and Friends. The show features work by members of the Portrait Society of Reno. M-Su, 6am-5pm through 3/27. Free. 5295 Vista Blvd., Sparks, (775) 354-2121.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Printmaking Extravaganza. Artists Candace Nicol, Larry Hunt, Sue Gross, Cathy McClelland and Janet Martin will exhibit a genre of printmaking techniques from wood cuts, collagraph assemblage, screen prints, silk screening, metal etching, monotype, relief and intaglio to name a few. M, W-Su, 11am-4pm through 2/27.The Weekly’s 30 Year Anniversary Exhibit, The Weekly magazine celebrates its 30th anniversary with an exhibit of Weekly covers. M, W-Su, 11am-4pm through 2/27. Free. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

Divides: Finding Common Ground. Nevada Arts Council Traveling Exhibit present this exhibit in the Prim Library. M-F through 4/6. Free. 999 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, (775) 831-1314, www.sierranevada.edu.

TMCC MAIN ART GALLERY: Living in El Norte. Through the paintings and recordings of Alma and Ramiro’s personal experiences, Blanco De San Roman endeavors to bring a human perspective to the issues surrounding illegal immigration. M-Sa through 2/25. Free. Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini Blvd., (775) 674-7698, www.tmcc.edu/vparts/artgalleries.

Call for Artists ARTISTS CALL FOR APRIL EXHIBIT: The exhibit A Child’s World targets the expressions of a child’s world through different mediums of art. This can include original artwork, wooden furniture and toys, sculpture, fabric art/clothing or story books. An application is available online. Tu-Su, 11am-4pm through 3/16. North Tahoe Arts Center, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

THIS WEEK

continued on page 30

Musical legacy Reno Philharmonic continues its 2011-2012 MasterClassics season with a concert titled “Inspired Tradition.” The fifth concert in the series focuses on composers who built on the musical heritage of their predecessors. Johannes Brahms was considered a traditionalist and an innovator because his music was rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of Baroque and Classical composers. However, he took those structures and created new approaches to harmony, melody and rhythm. The Reno Phil’s program will feature his Concerto for Violin in D Major, op. 77, performed by violinist Rachel Barton Pine (pictured). The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra will also perform Zhou Tian’s “The Palace of the Nine Perfections,” a 21st century take on the tone poem, and Richard Strauss’ Suite from Der Rosenkavalier, op. 59, which is considered a return to traditional harmony after his more adventurous experiments with tone poems. The RPO performs at 4 p.m. on Feb. 26 and 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 28 at the Pioneer Center for the performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $20-$73 with senior and student discounts. Call 323-6393 or visit www.renophil.com. —Kelley Lang

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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Sons & Daughters of Erin

43rd Annual

St. Patrick's Dinner & Show Airport Plaza Hotel 1981 Terminal Way 4:30-10p

March 10, 2012 Emceed By Former Assemblyman Bernie Anderson and Sparks City Councilman Mike Carrigan RSVP By 5pm, Monday, March 5 Advanced Tickets Sales Only.

Featuring

The Blarney Band The Blanchette Irish Dancers Sierra Highlanders Bagpipe Band Whiskey Tasting For Tickets And Info, Call 378-0931 or visit www.irishnv.org The Sons And Daughters of Erin is a non-prot organization that supports local charities.

Museums NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM (THE HARRAH COLLECTION): Mutant Rides: Origin of a Species. Burning Man automobile creations. M-Su through 7/25. $10 adults; $8 seniors; $4 kids ages 6-18; free for children 5 and younger. 10 S. Lake St., (775) 333-9300.

NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY: Basque Aspen Tree Art Exhibition. This exhibition showcases images that were carved by Basque sheepherders in aspen trees across Nevada. Photographs will be included to help tell the story of the Basque sheepherder. W-Sa, 10am-5pm through 4/28. $4 adults; free for children age 17 and younger; Reno: Biggest Little City in the World. This exhibit features artifacts, photos, manuscripts, gaming memorabilia and art specific to the history and development of Reno. Incorporated in the exhibit will be custom “Pickles” drawings

created specifically for the exhibit by Sparks cartoonist Brian Crane. W-Sa, 10am-5pm. $4 adults; free for members, children age 17 and younger. 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 688-1190.

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-F, Su through 7/1; In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows, W-Su through 5/20; Out of the Forest: Art Nouveau Lamps, W-Su through 5/20; The Canary Project: Landscapes of Climate Change, W-Su through 4/29; Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection, W-Su through 5/20; August Sander: Face of Our Time, W-Su through 4/22; Peter Liashkov: Paper Cowboy, W-Su through 4/15; Tim Hawkinson: Totem, W-Su through 10/7; This is Not a Trojan Horse, W-Su through 3/11; Art, Science, and the Arc of Inquiry: The Evolution of the Nevada Museum of Art, WSu through 7/1; Jean-Luc Mylayne: The Heavens Are Blue, W-Su through 3/11. $1-$10;

free for NMA members. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM: Celtic Heritage Exhibit. The Sparks Heritage Museum presents a Celtic exhibit in their changing gallery displaying loaned items from the Northern Nevada Celtic community. The local chapter of the Sons and Daughters of Erin will hold a reception at 2pm on March 4, which will include Celtic music, a performance by Blanchette Irish Dancers and a lecturer presenting an Irish-themed program. M-Su through 4/30. $5 donation for reception. 814 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 355-1144, www.sparksmuseum.org.

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM, RANCHO SAN RAFAEL REGIONAL PARK: King Tut: Wonderful Things from the Pharaohs Tomb. The exhibit features more than 130 replicas of many of the artifacts found in the tomb of King

The Gaia next door I’m an Occupy girl, age 45, into eco-shamanism and planetary consciousness. I’ve mostly dated engineers who initially seemed open to my interests but quickly became resentful of them. My boyfriend of two years is different—easygoing and willing to expand his horizons. He actually reads the articles I post on Facebook and discusses them with me. We laugh effortlessly and are very giving to each other, but I can’t shake the feeling I should look for somebody more artistically, politically and spiritually inclined. I fantasize about meeting an artistic shamanic guy who is gorgeous and shares my sense of purpose, but the truth is, guys in my social milieu can be competitive, neurotic and immature. If you can imagine a better partner, does that mean you should break up? If a guy thinks a girl’s hot, he’ll buy into whatever her trip is for as long as he can. My steak-loving boyfriend once dated a militant vegan. He’d hit the Burger King drive-through on his way home. But your current restlessness may stem from the notion that it’s a great big drum circle out there with a lot of chakra healer-boys and past-life counselors in it. Having a lot of choice sounds great, but research by social psychologist Dr. Sheena Iyengar suggests that most people get overwhelmed when they have more than a handful of options. Essentially, when it seems the sky’s the limit, we’re prone to keep looking skyward. We end up not choosing at all, or we choose poorly and end up dissatisfied. A solution for this is “satisficing,” a strategy from economist 30

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Herbert Simon of committing to the “good-enough” choice—instead of marching off on a never-ending search for spiritually evolved, Burning Man-certified perfection. Sure, you can probably find your eco-shamanistic cloneboy—a guy who’ll take the initiative in signing you both up for “soul retrieval training” when you worry that you forgot yours at Macy’s in a past life. But then maybe he’ll go all hateful on you on the way home about whether to save the whales or go to the movies. The longer your list of must-haves in a man, the more you shrink your pool of potential partners. Your own appeal is also a factor, and it’s probably narrowed by things like not being 22 and your plumpitude, if any. Consider whether it’s possible to have friends be your spiritual colleagues and have that be enough. You can wish for the gorgeous, artistic, shamanic perfect man—along with world peace and all the hemp bacon you can eat. But, maybe the realistic man is your sweet spiritual trainee who is fun and giving, dutifully rinses off his used foil, and smiles and pulls the Prius over when you tell him that your spirit animal needs to pee.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


Treat yourself to gift certificates up to

Tutankhamun. Additional artifacts help bring life to the turbulent times of King Tut’s reign while telling the story of the “Boy Pharaoh.”

RENO WIND SYMPHONY: The Reno Wind Symphony program “The British Are Coming!” is dedicated to the music for the wind band written by English composers. The concert will include Holst’s First Suite in E Flat for Military Band and Walton’s “Crown Imperial.” Su, 2/26, 3pm. Free. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

W-Sa, 10am-4pm through 5/23; Su, 12-4pm through 5/20. $9 adults; $8 children age 17

and younger, seniors age 62 and older. 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

Film TROUBLE IN PARADISE: Artemisia Moviehouse

RUSSIAN TREASURES: Carson City Symphony performs music by Strauss, Tchaikovsky, Borodin and Glazunov. Guest violinist Carla Trynchuk performs Alexander Glazunov’s Violin Concerto. Meet-the-soloist preview begins at 3:15pm. Su, 2/26, 4-6pm. $15 general; $12 students, seniors; free for youth age 16 and younger. Carson City Community Center, 851 E. William St., Carson City, (775) 883-4154, http://ccsymphony.com.

presents a screening of Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 crime/comedy/romance film starring Miriam Hopkins, Kay Francis and Herbert Marshall. Su, 2/26, 7-9pm. $7 general; $5 GBFS members, bicyclists, students. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

Poetry/Literature

UNIVERSITY BAND-O-RAMA: The Campus Band, Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble perform wind band music of all types, including works by American composer Julie Giroux. M, 2/27, 7:30pm. Free. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

BOOK LAUNCH: CAR TAG: This reception celebrates the launch of Car Tag, the latest novel written by Nevada author H. Lee Barnes. Barnes will give a short reading followed by Q & A session and book signing. F, 2/24, 6:30-8pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188.

JEANNIE KLERK DE-VRIES BOOK SIGNING: De-Vries will sign copies of her book My Mother’s Nightmare: A Holocaust Diary. Sa, 2/25, 2pm. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

Sports & fitness ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

Music COME IN FROM THE COLD: Contraband performs a mix of folk and rock music as part of the family entertainment series. Sa, 2/25, 7pm. $3 suggested donation per person. Western Heritage Interpretive Center, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 828-6612.

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT CLASSES: Guild certified Feldenkrais practitioner and teacher Carole Bucher teaches ongoing classes. Tu, 5:30-7pm. $12 drop-in fee. Center for Spiritual Living Carson City, 1927 N. Carson St., Carson City; Th, 5:306:45pm. $12 drop-in fee. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

DMITRI ATAPINE & ADELA H. PARK CONCERT: Ludwig van Beethoven’s monumental cycle of five Sonatas for Cello and Piano is widely recognized as one of the founding pillars of cello repertoire. All five sonatas will be performed in a single evening with two intermissions by University of Nevada, Reno music faculty member Dmitri Atapine, cello, and guest pianist Adela H. Park. Presented by the Argenta Concert Series. Sa, 2/25, 7pm. $20 adults; $5 UNR students. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

AN EVENING OF SONGS AND STORIES WITH SCHALL ADAMS & JASON KING: Reno Tahoe Comedy presents this ride through the lives of popular musicians, new and old. Hear favorite songs and stories about the songs. Th, 2/23, 7:30-9pm. $13 advance; $17 day of show. Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-5233, www.renotahoecomedy.com.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

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PILATES FUNDAMENTALS: This mat class focuses on three Pilates principles for the seven exercises in the modified basic and basic mat routines. Recommended for students with no previous classic Pilates experience. Call to reserve your spot. Th, 6:15-7:15pm through 12/27. $15 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St. Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB: Runners and walkers are invited to join this Tuesday night group run. Meet in the men’s sport shoe shop. Tu, 6:30pm through 11/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

VARIETY YOGA: Each week the Sunday class is taught by a different instructor. Su, 10:3011:20am through 12/30. $15 drop-in fee. Mind

WOLF PACK BASEBALL: The University of Nevada, Reno plays Utah Valley. F, 2/24, 2pm; Sa, 2/25, 1pm; Su, 2/26, 1pm. $5-$11. Peccole Field, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-7225, www.nevadawolfpack.com.

Onstage EMPIRE COMEDY ANNIVERSARY SHOW: Empire Comedy celebrates four years of improv comedy in Reno. The group performs longform improv in two acts: “The George Collection” and “Like a Banshee.” F, 2/24, 910:30pm. $10. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (530) 414-0050, www.empireimprov.com.

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LEADING LADIES: Reno Little Theater presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two down-ontheir-luck English Shakespearean actors who hatch a plan to pose as an elderly woman’s nephews in order to get their hands on her fortune. When the pair find out that these relatives are actually nieces they continue the scheme in drag, but things become more complicated when one of the men falls for the woman’s actual niece. F,

2/24, 7:30pm; Sa, 2/25, 7:30pm; Su, 2/26, 2pm. $15 general; $12 students, seniors. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 329-0661, www.renolittletheater.org.

NEXT TO NORMAL: TMCC Performing Arts presents the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning show. F, 2/24, 7:30pm; Sa, 2/25,

7:30pm; F, 3/2, 7:30pm; Sa, 3/3, 7:30pm; Su, 3/4, 2pm; Th, 3/8, 7:30pm; F, 3/9, 7:30pm; Sa, 3/10, 7:30pm; Su, 3/11, 2pm. $17 general; $15 students; $10 TMCC students, seniors. TMCC Redfield Performing Arts Center, 505 Keystone Ave., (775) 789-5671, www.showtix4u.com.

Classes BEGINNING TO INTERMEDIATE WATERCOLOR CLASSES: Artist and teacher Eileen Fuller conducts ongoing classes. Call for a suggested materials list and reservations. M, W, 9-11:45am & 6:30-9:15pm. $25 per class. Wildflower Village, 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769, www.wildflowervillage.com.

HEARTSAVER CPR AED: The Heartsaver AED Course teaches one-rescuer CPR, Automated External Defibrillator use and relief of choking in adults, children and infants. The use of barrier devices for all ages will also be covered.

Sa, 2/25, 9am-1pm; W, 3/14, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 3/24, 9am-1pm; W, 4/11, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 4/28, 9am1pm; W, 5/9, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 5/19, 9am-1pm; W, 6/13, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 6/23, 9am-1pm; W, 7/11, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 7/28, 9am-1pm; W, 8/8, 5:309:30pm; Sa, 8/25, 9am-1pm; W, 9/12, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 9/29, 9am-1pm; W, 10/10, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 10/27, 9am-1pm; W, 11/14, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 11/17, 9am-1pm; W, 12/12, 5:30-9:30pm; Sa, 12/15, 9am1pm. $45. REMSA Education & Training Center,

230 S. Rock Blvd. Ste. 23, (775) 858-5700, www.remsaeducation.com.

THIS WEEK

Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St. Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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continued from page 31 JIMMY BEANS WOOL MONTHLY KNIT NIGHT: Bring your current project and knit with a group of enthusiastic knitters. Knitter and crocheters of all ages are welcome. Th, 2/23, 6-8pm; Th, 3/22, 6-8pm. $5. Jimmy Beans Wool, 1312 Capital Blvd., Ste. 103, (775) 827-9276, www.jimmybeanswool.com/class.asp.

RENO PORTRAIT SOCIETY: There will be a live model for artists to paint or draw in the medium of their choice. No formal instruction, but participants can learn from experienced artists. The event is open to all ages and abilities. W, 9am-12:30pm. $10. Nevada Fine Arts, 1301 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-1128, www.nvfinearts.com.

WEST AFRICAN DJEMBE DRUMMING CLASS: Liz Broscoe will teach West African Djembe class once a month from January through March. Beginning class, 6-7:20pm. Intermediate class, 7:30-9pm. No pre-registration required. Drums available for rent for an additional $5. Contact Liz for drum rental. Tu, 2/28, 6-9pm; Tu, 3/20, 6-9pm. $20. Sierra Arts Gallery, 17 S. Virginia St., Ste. 120, (530) 318-2330, www.drumchik.com.

Community BREAST CANCER—ON WITH LIFE: This support group provides a highly educational approach to looking at breast cancer. The latest research is discussed, along with alternative therapies, side effects of chemotherapy, reconstruction and community services. The group meets on Tuesdays at Saint Mary’s Center for Health’s Radiation Oncology Department. Tu, 4:30-6pm. Free. Saint Mary’s Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave., Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

BRIDGEWIRE—MAKERSPACE OPEN SPACE NIGHT: Learn about this member-funded, non-profit makerspace, hackerspace workshop. Th, 69pm through 12/27. Bridgewire, 1055 Industrial Way, Ste. 20, Sparks, (775) 219-7987, http://renobridgewire.org.

CROCHET CONNECTION: Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 4-5:45pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, located at Lazy 5 Regional Park, Spanish Springs, (775) 424-1800.

DEPRESSION BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: The Reno chapter of the national DBSA meets. Fourth Th of every month, 7-8:30pm. Renown Health Boardroom, 1495 Mill St., (775) 835-6410.

FRIDAY NIGHT BALLROOM DANCING: Every Friday night The Senior Dance Club of Nevada presents ballroom dancing featuring live music by the Ninth Street Band. Singles and beginners are welcome. F, 8-10:30pm. $7 members;

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$9 non-members. Washoe County Senior Center, 1155 E. Ninth St., (775) 828-1993, www.lreidenbaugh@washoecounty.us.

LAWYER IN THE LIBRARY: The Volunteer Lawyers of Washoe County present a Lawyer in the Library program where lawyers provide general guidance on a variety of legal topics. W, 5-7pm. Free. Washoe County Law Library, 75 Court St., inside Washoe County Courthouse, (775) 328-3250, www.washoecounty.us/lawlib.

LIFESCAPES: The memoir writing program for seniors meets. Second and Fourth Th of every month, 10:30am. Free. South Valleys Library, 15650A Wedge Parkway, (775) 851-5190, www.washoe.lib.nv.us.

MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: This support group is available to any male who has been impacted by cancer, including survivors and caregivers. Every other Th, 4:15-5:15pm. Saint Mary's Center for Health & Fitness, 645 N. Arlington Ave., Ste. 100, (775) 722-1222, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

OPEN THROW CERAMICS: This is a community night where people can come work on a pottery wheel or hand-build ceramics in a ceramics studio. Experience in a ceramics studio is preferred. The fee includes clay, studio time, tools and a bisque firing. W, 6-9pm through 12/26. $20 for non-members; free for members. The Wedge Ceramics Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

SUICIDE LOSS SUPPORT GROUP: This support group is open to people who have lost loved ones to suicide. M, 6-8pm. Free. Call for location, (775) 784-8085.

WEST COAST SWING DANCING: High Sierra Swing Dance Club sponsors dancing event. Dance lesson begins at 5:45pm. No partner necessary. Practice your swing moves or just check out the dance at this fun, non-structured event. Tu, 5:45-9pm through 10/1. $8 for lesson; free admission to dance. El Charro Avitia, 4389 S. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 629-9369, www.highsierrasdc.org.

ZEN-STYLE MEDITATION GATHERING: All meditation experience levels are welcome. Special instruction is available for beginners. Please enter from the Taylor street entrance. Second

and Fourth W of every month, 5:30-7:30pm; Last W of every month, 5:30-7:30pm. Free. Reno

Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 348-6603, www.renobuddhistchurch.org.


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Gregg Braden Author Scientist Visionary

2012 – The Awakening And what it means to us all Special Reno appearance! Friday & Saturday, March 2nd & 3rd Center for Spiritual Living, Reno New York Times best selling author Gregg Braden is internationally renowned as a pioneer in bridging science and spirituality. Following a successful career as a Computer Geologist during the 1970’s energy crisis, he worked as a Senior computer Systems Designer during the last years of the Cold War. For more than 22 years, Gregg has searched high mountain villages, remote monasteries, and forgotten texts to uncover their timeless secrets. To date, his work has led to such paradigm-shattering books as The Isaiah Effect, The God Code, The Divine Matrix, Fractal Time: The Secret of 2012, A New World Age, Spontaneous Healing of Beliefs and Deep Truth.

Friday, March 2nd, 7-9pm $35 Lecture: What’s Next for Humanity? Braden explores the deep truths at the root of humankind’s greatest threats, and how new discoveries hold the key to life-affirming changes.

Saturday, March 3rd 9am-4pm $110 Workshop: Thriving in a New World A new world has arrived and life as we’ve known it has changed forever! The question is no longer when will a great shift occur, but where will these changes lead, what can we expect, and what does it mean for us. TICKETS MAY BE PURCHASED AT Center for Spiritual Living, Reno 4685 Lakeside Drive, Reno TICKETS: $35 for Friday’s lecture and $110 for Saturday’s workshop SPECIAL PACKAGE PRICE FOR BOTH DAYS: $125 CALL (775) 826-0566 or visit www.cslreno.org for more information

BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I invite you to

identify all the things in your life that you really don’t need any more: gadgets that have become outdated, clothes that no longer feel like you, once-exciting music and books and art works that no longer mean what they once did. Don’t stop there. Pinpoint the people who have let you down, the places that lower your vitality, and the activities that have become boring or artificial. Finally, Aries, figure out the traditions that no longer move you, the behavior patterns that no longer serve you, and the compulsive thoughts that have a freaky life of their own. Got all that? Dump at least some of them.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you’re a

woman, you could go to the perfume section of the department store and buy fragrances that would cause you to smell like Jennifer Lopez, Britney Spears, Eva Longoria or Paris Hilton. If you’re a man, an hour from now you could be beaming an aroma that makes you resemble a celebrity like Antonio Banderas, Usher, David Beckham or Keith Urban. You could even mix and match, wearing the Eva Longoria scent on your manly body or Usher on your female form. But I don’t recommend that you do any of the above. More than ever before you need to be yourself, your whole self, and nothing but yourself. Trying to act like or be like anyone else should be a taboo of the first degree.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I try to take

one day at a time,” says Ashleigh Brilliant, “but sometimes several days attack me all at once.” I think you may soon be able to say words to that effect, Gemini—and that’s a good thing. Life will seem more concentrated and meaningful than usual. Events will flow faster and your awareness will be extra intense. As a result, you should have exceptional power to unleash transformations that could create ripples lasting for months. Would you like each day to be the equivalent of nine days? Or would four be enough for you?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When actor

Ashton Kutcher is working on the set of his TV show Two and a Half Men, he enjoys spacious digs. His trailer is two stories high and has two bathrooms as well as a full kitchen. Seven 60-inch TVs are available for his viewing pleasure. As you embark on your journey to the far side of reality, Cancerian, it might be tempting for you to try to match that level of comfort. But what’s more important than material luxury will be psychological and spiritual aids that help keep you attuned to your deepest understandings about life. Be sure you’re well-stocked with influences that keep your imagination vital and upbeat. Favorite symbols? Uplifting books? Photos of mentors? Magic objects?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Veterans of war

who’ve been wounded by shrapnel often find that years later, some of the metal fragments eventually migrate to the surface and pop out of their skin. The moral of the story: The body may take a long time to purify itself of toxins. The same is true about your psyche. It might not be able to easily and quickly get rid of the poisons it has absorbed, but you should never give up hoping it will find a way. Judging by the astrological omens, I think you are very close to such a climactic cleansing and catharsis, Leo.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Distilled water

is a poor conductor of electricity. For H2O to have electroconductivity, it must contain impurities in the form of dissolved salts. I see a timely lesson in this for you, Virgo. If you focus too hard on being utterly clean and clear, some of life’s rather chaotic but fertile and invigorating energy may not be able to flow through you. That’s why I suggest you experiment with being at least a little impure and imperfect. Don’t just tolerate the messiness. Learn from it. Thrive on it. Even exult in it.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to my

reading of the astrological omens, you are neither in a red-alert situation nor are you headed for one. A pink alert may be in effect, however. Thankfully, there’s no danger or emergency in the works. Shouting and bolting and leaping won’t be necessary. Rather, you may simply be called upon to

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come up with unexpected responses to unpredicted circumstances. Unscripted plot twists could prompt you to take actions you haven’t rehearsed. It actually might be kind of fun as long as you play with the perspective Shakespeare articulated in As You Like It: “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear Rob:

For months I’ve had a recurring dream in which I own a pet snake. Here’s the problem: The only cage I have to keep the snake in is sadly inadequate. It has widely spaced bars that the snake just slips right through. In the dream I am constantly struggling to keep the snake in its cage, which is exhausting, since it’s impossible. Just this morning, after having the dream for the billionth time, I FINALLY asked myself, what’s so terrible about letting the snake out of its cage? So I gratefully wrote myself this permission note: ‘It is hereby allowed and perfectly acceptable to let my dreamsnake out of its cage to wander freely.’ —Scorpio Devotee.” Dear Devotee: You have provided all your fellow Scorpios with an excellent teaching story for the upcoming weeks. Thank you!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For

million of years, black kite raptors made their nests with leaves, twigs, grass, mud, fur, and feathers. In recent centuries they have also borrowed materials from humans, like cloth, string, and paper. And in the last few decades, a new element has become quite popular. Eighty-two percent of all black kite nest-builders now use white plastic as decoration. I suggest you take inspiration from these adaptable creatures, Sagittarius. It’s an excellent time for you to add some wrinkles to the way you shape your home base. Departing from tradition could add significantly to your levels of domestic bliss.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There

are many examples of highly accomplished people whose early education was problematical. Thomas Edison’s first teacher called him “addled,” and thereafter he was homeschooled by his mother. Winston Churchill did so poorly in school he was punished. Benjamin Franklin had just two years of formal education. As for Einstein, he told his biographer, “my parents were worried because I started to talk comparatively late, and they consulted a doctor because of it.” What all these people had in common, however, is that they became brilliant at educating themselves according to their own specific needs and timetable. Speaking of which: The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you Capricorns to plot and design the contours of your future learning.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Nigeria

has abundant deposits of petroleum. Since 1974, oil companies have paid the country billions of dollars for the privilege of extracting its treasure. And yet the majority of Nigerians, over 70 percent, live on less than a dollar a day. Where does the money go? That’s a long story, with the word “corruption” at its heart. Now let me ask you, Aquarius: Is there a gap between the valuable things you have to offer and the rewards you receive for them? Are you being properly compensated for your natural riches? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to address this issue.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Gawker.com

notes that American politician John McCain tends to repeat himself—a lot. Researchers discovered that he has told the same joke at least 27 times in five years. (And it’s such a feeble joke, it’s not worth re-telling.) In the coming week, Pisces, pease please please avoid any behavior that resembles this repetitive, habit-bound laziness. You simply cannot afford to be imitating who you used to be and what you used to do. As much as possible, reinvent yourself from scratch—and have maximum fun doing it.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Sign man Doug Smith

There aren’t many people in Reno who have a better pool of knowledge about billboard law than the chair of Scenic Nevada, Doug Smith. He has served as a Reno planning commissioner and on the original Regional Planning Commission, where he worked on billboard issues. He was a key player in the 2000 ballot measure that capped the number of billboards in Reno. Information on Scenic Nevada can be found at http://scenicnevada.org.

Why is a group like Scenic Nevada needed? Scenic Nevada is needed to preserve, protect and enhance the scenic character of Nevada.

What have been some of the issues you’ve gotten involved in? Some of the major issues have been billboards, open space, cleaning up highways and so on. But primarily the billboard industry has been our primary problem.

Have you been involved with legislative lobbying? Yes, we have. Las Vegas at one time—the billboard industry down there—had a bill in the Legislature on amortization of billboards.

What’s amortization? Amortization of is a method of reimbursing the billboard owner over a prescribed number of years such as five to 10 years for

On the digital billboards, because of the fact that they rotate every six to eight seconds, why that’s a problem. Most people I’ve talked to … believe that they voted no new billboards, and a digital billboard is a new billboard. It’s not the same technology or anything. No way is it related to what the standard billboard is. removing his billboards due to non-compliance or developments and providing just compensation. The Nevada Legislature eliminated the cost approach to values in the 2001 session and actually legislated a much higher valuation methodology as well as prohibiting amortization.

How do you feel about what the Reno City Council is doing on billboards that are digital? I think they are very much uninformed as to what the results of digital billboards are. They want us to trade one standard billboard for a digital billboard. A digital billboard brings in about 12 times the amount of income that a standard billboard does. So, therefore, it’s really a big advantage to them. It’s a cash cow.

Can you get the nuances of that issue through to the public? I think we can. We’re working on some programs now. We’ve had people come in from other states that are working with Scenic America … and I think we will work on a campaign to try to make people a little better informed. In other words, we need new blood.

recently chatted with an old Floridian who lived for years in the Tampa-St. Pete area. she reports that “Tampa in August is basically Hell on Earth.” Meaning, of course, the heat. Meaning the humidity. Especially the bleepity bleep humidity. There are probably more showers taken in the month of August in Tampa than in the other 11 months combined. If we ever send astronauts to Venus, they will likely go to Tampa for late August training. It would appear that the chances are quite good for delegates from every state west of the mighty Mississip to have at least one moment at the event where they say, “Doggone it, I didn’t bring enough shirts.” Followed quickly by, “I’d like to meet the bleeping chowderhead who gave the green light to have this bash in bleeping Tampa.” Now, sure, of course they’re gonna always be inside, utterly dependent on the a/c, as is the total norm down there. But you just can’t help but wonder if some Democrat or Libertarian or

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A billboard is a billboard as far as content is concerned, but the technology is entirely different. We’re saying, as an example, we have 278 billboards allowed in Reno. If we take an exchange on an equal rate [one digital for one traditional] we’d basically have 10 times, which would be about 2,700 billboards.

What issues do you see coming up? I think open space is always going to be a situation we need to look at. I think also we will be looking at billboards as far as whether they pay their fair share. In other words, a billboard uses all of the highways, byways. They’re the only ones that don’t pay a user tax. They really make a lot of money, but that’s not really fair. Ω

brucev@newsreview.com

This Space has as good a time as any other godless space that puts the Earth above men when it comes to giving a friendly noogie inspired by the bleeps, bloops, and blunders of the Republican Party. And lord knows, this curious bunch just keeps on giving and giving and giving when it comes to stuff that honestly gives you pause and makes you say, “Uh—what?” So I couldn’t help but launch the eenseeist little grin the other day when I realized just where and when this year’s Republican National Convention is goin’ down. If you haven’t heard, our political pachyderms are gonna gather this year from August 27-30 in one of North America’s most truly wretched cities—Tampa, Fla. Wretched, that is, when you’re talking about late August. I’m a Westerner and totally unfamiliar with the meteorological reality of the South, so it didn’t immediately hit me that the Grand Old Deciders Committee for this year’s shindig may have stepped in a big, fresh, stinky one with this choice. I NEWS

Aren’t you arguing that, because of content, because there are multiple, rotating messages on a digital billboard, it’s more than one billboard? Why shouldn’t a billboard be a billboard, regardless of digital or traditional?

∫y Bruce Van Dye

Hot and wet

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To the public, a billboard is a billboard, whether it’s traditional or digital. How do you get a difference across?

ARTS&CULTURE

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Green Occupant prankster is at this very moment planning to head on down and fire up some good ole eco-terrorism on some of the gigoonderous Frigidaire units that will be counted upon to keep the Tampa Bay Times Forum filled with 72 degree air throughout this affair. My prediction— messin’ with the a/c in Tampa is gonna be mighty risky business, and no place for amateurs. Republicans know that monkey-wrenchin’ wackos will take total sadistic delight at the sight of extremely bitchy delegates all bogged down in a Category 5 perspiration storm, so they’ll have all a/c units under super paranoid surveillance. Whoever is gonna even think of taking on this assignment had better have it completely together. That is why the President shouldn’t even leave it to chance. He should just send in Navy Seal Team Six and get the job done right. Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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“The most compelling American violinist of her generation.” — ALL MUSIC GUIDE

Inspired Tradition Sunday, February 26 Tuesday, February 28 Laura Jackson, Music Director Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts This concert features the internationally acclaimed Rachel Barton Pine performing the Brahms Concerto for Violin. Virtuosic technical mastery, lustrous tone and perceptive WLYMVYTHUJLZPUHÄLY`YLKOHPYLKWHJRHNL This concert is generously sponsored by the Reno Philharmonic Endowment Trust.

Tickets from $18 7PVULLY*LU[LY)V_6ɉJL  4-HT[VWT pioneercenter.com

getyourcultureon.com | 775.323.6393 NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 23, 2012

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R-2012-02-23