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Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion/Streetalk . . . . . .4 Casey O’Lear . . . . . . . . . .6 Sean Cary . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Arts&Culture . . . . . . . . .16 In Rotation . . . . . . . . . . .18

Art of the State . . . . . . .19 Foodfinds . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Musicbeat . . . . . . . . . . .23 Nightclubs/Casinos . . . .24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Free Will Astrology . . . .31 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Bruce Van Dyke . . . . . . .31

SNOWS

PLOWED See News, page 8.

TRANSFORMERS ON THE EXTRATERRESTRIAL HIGHWAY See Green, page 11.

PLAY TIME See Arts&Culture, page 16.

TOO COOL

FOR SCHOOL See Winter Family Guide, inside.

RENO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 17, ISSUE 52

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FEBRUARY

16–22, 2012


“… jaw-dropping … a show-stopper if there ever was one!” — Classic FM Magazine

The Assad Brothers Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 / 7:30 p.m. / Nightingale Concert Hall Multiple Latin Grammy winners described by critics as nothing short of “guitar gods,” Sergio and Odair Assad have been commanding the rarefied world of guitar virtuosity for more than four decades. From jazz to the classics and in their profoundly unassuming but consummately exceptional way, they also play with such other masters as Paquito D’Rivera and cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Listen for them on the sound track of Julia Roberts’ recent film Duplicity. A compelling and brilliant duo indeed.

Tickets: Adult $30/ Senior $26/ Youth and FTLOJ $12

(775) 784-4ART | Buy tickets online at www.unr.edu/pas

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LETTERS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Fiddlesticks!

Easy like Sunday morning Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. The world has changed for journalists. Many people complain about the death of daily newspapers, and while I mourn their shareholders’ and boards of directors’ consternation at trying to maintain profits at the expense of quality, I see it more as suicide than death by internet. Mostly, I’m sad for the real, committed journalists who got into the business because money wasn’t their priority, but they now serve at the whim of predators who care only about money. Weird. I hadn’t intended on writing about that at all, but that’s the risk of stream of consciousness composition. I intended to write about cool new tools that are making journalists’ jobs so much easier, and will enable one of the hardest parts of the job, interviews, to be much more efficient. The hard thing about interviews, besides skittish sources, is getting the information you want in a useful format. If a journalist does an interview in-person or on the phone, he or she has two choices: Ask questions from a script prepared before the interview, or go in with a few questions but prepared for a lengthy interview. (Of course, there are always the fools who go in unprepared.) The problem with an indepth interview is the transcription that follows: four hours to an hour of interview. I’m loving the advances my cell phone is bringing to this chore. For one, the app Tape-A-Talk produces great sound quality for in-person interview or Google Voice is great for phoners. I can then take the .wav file and put it into VoiceBase.com, where it will machine transcribe the interview. I can then either edit it on VoiceBase or drop it into Transcribe, http://transcribe.wreally.com, for clean up. It’s still fairly work intensive, but when the transcription files are in the same place as the sound files, I only have to clean up the words that I want to appear in the newspaper. I love the future.

Re “Trump trumps Romney” (Upfront, Feb. 9): Fiddlesticks, Mr. “Wannabe” Trump. Do you suppose that Romney’s loss to Santorum had any thing to do with your endorsement? Just asking. Susie Ellis Orland, Calif.

Fiscal gee-wizards Re “Friends and family” (Feature story, Jan. 26): I am amazed that the Republican Party can’t find anyone more qualified to campaign for the party’s nomination. Newt Gingrich would be a total disaster for the nation. Every federal agency’s operation degraded [in part because of Gingrich’s actions in office]. How could this occur? It occurred because the Republican Party is dedicated to destroying the federal bureaucracy. It is impossible for anyone with Newt Gingrich’s temperament to manage the federal bureaucracy well. Recently, the nation has experienced a financial collapse approximately every eight years. The next financial collapse is due in 2016, just at the end of the next president’s term in office. The only thing that might prevent or mitigate a national financial disaster is a federal government that works well at monitoring and regulating the financial industry. Newt Gingrich is not temperamentally disposed to pay attention to the minutiae that will be necessary if the nation is to avoid a 2016 financial collapse. Considering Mitt Romney, who will the nation really get as president? The Mitt Romney who enacted the Massachusetts health insurance plan, or the Mitt Romney who wants to prevent the same plan from operating nationwide? Will one get the Mitt Romney who supported a woman’s right to choose or who now opposes that right? Similar to Newt Gingrich, there are many other issues where Mitt Romney has taken one position when it was politically advantageous only to reverse himself

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Freedom>fascism Re “Welcome to the Machine” (Feature story, Jan. 19): This article is very well written. I am not a conspiracy theorist or any of the likes, but from the view of the journalist’s article, I can see where it is a likely and probable scenario. So what would Americans do facing this type of government? I wonder if our own military would join that agenda, forcing their fellow Americans to obey the new fascism dictatorship. Or would it spark the opposite reaction and create a revolution? Would our government have the U.N. forces come police American soil against opposing forces? I am sure that in small sectors at a time the government would dominate. On the other hand, a fullon revolution of all Americans vs. the government—well, I would have to throw my money on the citizens for the win. And when I say “win” I mean that there is no way to stop or suppress freedom completely. Just one individual has the taste of it, shares it with another, the desire for it, as we know, will make a man give his life for it. That is exactly what our Founding Fathers did. History repeats itself. The Constitution and the Bill of Rights are very powerful. They were extremely well written to protect us from the evil fascism and such. Problem is that Americans are clueless to the Constitution and Bill of Rights. They don’t even know their own rights and continue to allow themselves to give their rights up. Everyone should take a moment to read the Constitution and Bill of Rights, educate yourselves to what

Fraudulent elections Re “Government-approved voters?” (News, Jan. 26): The Iowa caucuses demonstrated that Republicans place their controls at the wrong level, the ballot box. After claiming Romney the winner, they found “typos” in the vote counts from 131 precincts. Then they found counts from eight other precincts had vanished. Then they decided that they couldn’t truthfully name a winner due to the close vote and the number of screw-ups. Then they reversed themselves and declared that Santorum was the official leader. Yet they never did finally certify the results from all precincts. They reported zero instances of

Editor D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Photographer Amy Beck Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Sharon Black, Sean Cary, Carol Cizauskas, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Audrey Love, Casey O’Lear, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Bruce Van Dyke

IN ROTATION

Robert C. Leavitt Sun Valley

Donald E. Schreiber Incline Village

—D. Brian Burghart brianb@newsreview.com OPINION

voter fraud. V.I. Lenin was absolutely correct: People who vote don’t count. People who count votes do. Fraud at the ballot box is retail, difficult to arrange in sufficient volume. Wholesale fraud is far easier at the level where votes are counted, or consolidated, or reconsolidated. Yet Republicans ignore that potential. Their own system in Iowa shows the hazard of so doing.

when the former position was politically disadvantageous. On the issue of defense, Mitt Romney has advocated a larger military. A few months ago the Speaker of the House of Representatives John Boehner publicly declared that the nation was bankrupt. If the nation is truly bankrupt, how is Mitt Romney going to pay for a larger military? Considering Ron Paul, he advocates, among other things, returning to the “gold standard.” A return to the gold standard would end the world’s economy. There exists an insufficient amount of gold on the planet to provide the liquidity required for international and national commerce. And as for Rick Santorum, his performance as a Pennsylvania senator was so poor that he couldn’t get re-elected. I believe there are good Republican politicians who could well serve this nation as president. Unfortunately, the Republican Party’s base, including the Tea Party, is so out of touch with what it really takes to run this nation that no qualified Republican will contend for the party’s nomination. Such Republican politicians know that becoming the party’s nominee would require taking positions such as those advocated by Gingrich, Romney, Paul and Santorum, which won’t work for the nation or the world.

ART OF THE STATE

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Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Jesse Pike, John Miller, Martin Troye, David Richards, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Neil Lemerise, Daniel Golightly General Manager John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Senior Accountant Kevin Driskill Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Production Coordinator Sharon Wisecarver Design Brennan Collins, Marianne Mancina, Mary Key, Skyler Smith, Melissa Arendt Art Director at Large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Kelly Funderburk, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke

FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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you already own, your freedom and your complete control of your government. Government has no authority without you giving it to them. It’s that simple. Just say no! If you don’t, then you deserve to be under a totalitarian ruling society. This is just my opinion, and I am just me, one free American! Joe Daily Reno

Fuming mad Re “This is all true” (Editorial, Feb. 2): I read with interest the editorial regarding quitting smoking and the unsuccessful public health campaign with the same goal. I agree with the writer’s belief that most smokers could care less about the effects of their drug habit on themselves. Perhaps, then, more success might be met by informing smokers of the effects of their drug habit on others. In case there are nicotine addicts out there who are not cognizant of how their drug habit affects others, here’s my personal anecdote: I work at a music store where one of the teachers habitually smokes, even while teaching children. The store has become his personal ashtray. The front of the store is littered with the refuse of his habit, the inside smells like an ashtray now, and customers, clients, students and fellow employees are forced to run the gauntlet of toxic, cancer-causing air he creates in order in order for them to enter the store. It’s hard to believe one person’s drug habit could cause so much destruction and negativity, even harder to understand how one could be so callous as to not care, but there it is. Do smokers care about the misery they inflict on others? If they were made more aware of it, would they be less inclined to force their drug habit on the rest of us? I could care less if someone is foolish enough to smoke cigarettes. In fact, I say smoke ’em up. Smoke so much you render yourself infertile. Just quit making the rest of us share your disgusting, incredibly dangerous and addictive drug habit. Dennis Fecko Reno

Business Zahida Mehirdel, Shannon McKenna Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form. Cover design: Priscilla Garcia Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

FEBRUARY 16, 2012

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by Dennis Myers

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

Should contraceptives be covered by insurance? Asked at the downtown Reno post office Robert Mulvana Clipping service owner

I guess we have no choice. Yes, I think everybody’s entitled to it.

Sandra Bountis Property manager

No. I’m a Christian, and so I truly believe that we have a responsibility, you know, to pay for our contraceptives if we want them. I don’t believe that our insurance should be handling that.

Tim Smith

Hope like hell We Renoites have had our teeth kicked in these last couple of years. Many of us have gotten cynical. We’ve seen businesses we never expected to close, close. We’ve seen sophisticated organizations make absolutely predictable, but seemingly suicidal errors. We’ve seen our elected officials throw their legacies to the wind in their efforts to glad hand their buddies and establish jobs for themselves when they’re out of office. (And just watch how this increases as some approach their term-limited time in office—oops, that’s our inner cynic talking.) One definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results each time. It’s also said that hope springs eternal. If both these statements are true, then it must follow that hope is insane. So call us nuts. We hope. We hope like hell the Silver Legacy is able to work out its debt problems with its creditors. The joint venture between the Eldorado and Circus-Circus owes $142.8 million in mortgage notes on March 1. The entire casino is only valued at $98 million. That would be like making a $438,000 balloon payment on your $300,000 home in 16 days. A bank would foreclose on you faster than a Grammy tribute show could be put together for a singer who kicked it in the bathtub. The thing that gives us hope is the sheer amount of debt that casino has. Creditors would surely prefer quarters to pennies on their dollars. Cross your fingers. We hope with our whole hearts that Burning Man will work out its lottery SNAFU. The problems were predicted by more Burners than we can count. And you

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Disaster worker

know, those Burners, while creative, are not exactly known for their financial acumen. The Susan G. Komen for the Cure public relations disaster—same way. Absolute buffoons were able to hear with absolute clarity the likelihood of a nationwide freak-out when the news first broke that Komen was going to discriminate against Planned Parenthood, an organization that does so much for the prevention of cancer. The thing that gives us hope for both these organizations is that there’s so much pre-existing goodwill. Everyone screws up, now and again. Admit it and move on. Knock on wood. We’ve watched members of the Reno City Council give away so much of our taxpayers’ capital and real property that we didn’t have much hope when Our Lady of the Snows made a grab for yet another chunk of public property. Remember when Mill Street used to go all the way to Virginia Street before the City Council gave a block of our property and our right of way to the Siena Casino? We had hopes that situation would be rectified when the casino closed. That hope was unfounded. But our hope sprung eternal when, against all odds, the City Council did not give Lander Street to the Catholic school. That gives us a little hope when the same City Council begins talking about what to do with the proposed park at historic Moana Springs. There’s a capped geothermal well there that could give year-round use to that publicly owned property. Go ahead and hang that horseshoe. We hope they make the Harvey Whittemore story into a movie. Well, that’s more about cash than luck. And how crazy is that? Ω

Absolutely. It’s cheaper to not have a baby than to have one. It costs tens of thousands of dollars to have a baby. It costs to have an abortion. It costs six or eight thousand if you have a miscarriage. … So, yes, give kids and women condoms.

Brad MacKenzie Retiree

Yes. People have a right to avoid unwanted children. I think that’s reasonable.

Michelle Austin Student

I think absolutely. It’s too expensive to go out there and pay out of our pockets sometimes. It may be eliminating a lot of unnecessary pregnancies, accidents. People getting pregnant who can’t afford it necessarily—it’s just not fair to the children, being brought up where they’re unwanted or the parents can’t afford it.


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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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THIS WEEK

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APPLY LIBERALLY

Breast cancer is serious business Recently, the national Susan G. Komen for the Cure organization caused a controversy when it announced that it would no longer fund women’s health services at Planned Parenthood. After three days of public anger, the group reversed its decision. “I think the reason this resonates so much is that women were going to by lose health care that they depend on, and nobody really wants that to Casey O’Lear happen,” said Pat Elzy, public affairs caseyo@ newsreview.com director for Planned Parenthood Mar Monte, which serves Reno. “Basically, this outpour of support was people rising up to the challenge. It was really time to tell the truth about the issues and stop politicizing women’s health issues.” Elzy said Planned Parenthood affiliates in Northern Nevada have been receiving funding from Komen since 2007, and have used that funding to provide more than 4,000 clinical breast examinations and education. Since Komen’s initial announcement of its funding cuts, private donations for Planned Parenthood affiliates around the nation have risen dramatically. “The day that the announcement came out, one woman emailed me and physically came to the office,” Elzy said. “She said, ‘You found a tumor when I had my breast clinical exam at Planned Parenthood, and early detection saved my life. I’m going to give you a donation. Here’s $50—that’s all I can afford.’ That, to me, said a lot.” In the wake of Komen’s two big announcements, the public seems to have calmed down and resumed its support of Komen and other trendy To donate to Planned breast cancer awareness organizaParenthood, go to tions. But there still exist many https://secure.ppaction. problems with Komen and with the org/site/SPageServer?p agename=pp_ppol_Non “trend” of breast cancer awareness in directed_OneTimeGift. general. Komen has previously participated in questionable activity, such as threatening other charities that use the color pink or phrases ending in “for the cure.” According to Komen’s financial reports, the percentage of its money that goes to research has been declining through the years. But the Komen group is certainly not alone in its dubious participation in what has been called “breast cancer culture.”

In recent years, public awareness of breast cancer has increased in conjunction with the rise in popularity of groups such as Komen and various campaigns intended to promote women’s health. The goal to increase awareness, raise money and encourage people to talk openly about breast cancer is great, but many of these campaigns are problematic. Some popular slogans for breast cancer awareness include “save the tatas” and “feel your boobies.” Bracelets proclaiming “I Love Boobies” are sold in popular chain stores—mainly to teenagers. Although these things are well intentioned, they do not sit right with me because they make light of a serious issue and, even worse, sexualize a horrible form of cancer. Breast cancer is unique. It is an awful disease that has been fetishized and feminized in popular culture to the extent that it now has connotations of cuteness, normalcy and even sensuality. Through campaigns that dwell on the commercialization of pink jewelry and catchy slogans, the focus has shifted away from what is truly important — that this cancer afflicts about 12 percent of U.S. women and also affects men. The “I Love Boobies” bracelets are a part of the Keep a Breast Foundation. But in order to defeat breast cancer, many women are forced to remove a breast. Support for breast cancer research shouldn’t revolve around “keeping a breast” if the only way for some women to survive is to remove their breast. These campaigns promote the idea that women’s health is not as important as their breasts, which are seen as highly sexual, even in the face of life-threatening illness. It has been inspiring to see the public come together to oppose Komen’s initial decision to cease funding breast cancer services at Planned Parenthood, and it has been even more satisfying to see the immediate response to this opposition. Hopefully, though, this will inspire the public to look more critically at breast cancer charities and how the cancer is treated in the United States. Ω


RIGHT TO YOUR HEAD

The new state of campaign finance Just when I thought I’d seen it all, campaign 2012 started. From bases on the moon to Vice President Biden rooting for the Giants while campaigning in San Francisco, there is a never-ending source of fodder for us political chatterboxes. Enter Steven Colbert, host of the late night show The Colbert Report. Never one to pass up the opportunity to point out the ninby compoopery in our admittedly Sean Cary flawed political system, Colbert seanc@ decided to run for president. newsreview.com In June of last year, Colbert created the Steven Colbert Super PAC in the wake of the Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission Supreme Court ruling. The Citizens United ruling, as it’s commonly referred to, allows essentially anyone to form a Super PAC and use the funds raised through both public and private donations to support any candidate’s bid for the presidency. The broad language in this ruling doesn’t even exclude supporting candidates that aren’t real, as evidenced by Colbert supporting “Rick Parry” in the Iowa caucus. (Yes, that’s Parry with an “a.”) Colbert immediately went to work raising funds by standing on the courthouse steps soliciting donations from passersby to demonstrate the flaws he perceived in the Supreme Court’s ruling. Although not serious in his venture to capture the Republican nomination for president, Colbert has rather effectively advanced his central message that “money equals speech.” Colbert has a point, although a misguided one. Private industry has the right to protect To donate speech itself. However, in Colbert’s points or learn more about about how the money is handled he the Citizens United ruling, check out is dead on. There needs to be a www.citizensunited.org. drastic increase in transparency, accountability, and harsh penalties for those who choose not to follow the letter of the law. The Supreme Court was correct in its ruling. Free speech is a constitutionally protected right, but the explosive proliferation of these

Super PACs show that our campaign finance laws need to be constantly reexamined. Politics is big money business and an unscrupulous one at that. Over and over, we see people on both sides of the aisle doing whatever they can to circumvent our laws. The reporting deadline has come and gone. We will start to see the names of these political whales who are dumping literally millions of dollars into the airwaves across the presidential caucuses and primaries. I do not have a problem with the amounts, but rather with the lame disclosure requirements. The first full disclosure in six months comes along after the biggest of the early contests, Florida, already cast its votes. Out of the early nominating states, Florida is the prize, for it has more delegates this year than all the earlier states combined. To make matters worse, this disclosure only covers the period up until the last day of the year, meaning that the oodles of dough spent in the days leading up to New Hampshire, South Carolina, Florida and Nevada are not publicly available. There will be no more disclosures during the rest of the key primary season. In the wake of Citizens United, Congress introduced the DISCLOSE act to try and address some of these issues. On a near party line vote, DISCLOSE survived the House of Representatives, but died at the hands of a filibuster in the Senate. All 59 Senate Democrats voted for cloture, but not a single Republican defected. I’m looking at you, Sen. McCain. The right to free speech in this country is sacrosanct, but with rights come responsibilities. The American people deserve to know where every election dollar comes from, and as we look toward a $2 billion election, it saddens me that although we will eventually get the disclosure we deserve, it may be too late. Ω

For more information

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Supported by the Nevada State Health Division (NSHD) through grant numbers 3U58DP002003-01S2 and 5U58DP002003-03 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NSHD or the CDC.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 16, 2012

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Students cross Lander Street from Billinghurst Park back to Our Lady of the Snows School. This crosswalk is located at the center of the one-block section of Lander that the school wants to take over from the city.

Revolving petitions Supporters of a “personhood” amendment that would outlaw some forms of birth control and also ban abortion have killed their latest initiative petition and filed what appears to be a fourth version. Trying to stay ahead of lawsuits designed to stop the petitions, the group Personhood Nevada this time was responding to an American Civil Liberties Union suit seeking to overturn the third petition. The secretary of state’s office lists petitions being withdrawn on Oct. 23, Dec. 30, and Feb. 6. The fourth version was filed on Feb. 8 and is titled the “Right to Live for Young and Old Alike” petition Meanwhile, another group called the Nevada Prolife Coalition PAC has filed its own petition, titled the “Unalienable Right to Life of Every Prenatal Person is Protected” petition. Both groups are based at Las Vegas mailing addresses. Nevadans voted 226,079 to 86,335 in 1990 to retain legal abortion in the state. Birth control has not been voted on.

Bybee torture worse than Inquisitors The Bybee memorandum is back in the news again. Jay Bybee, an alleged Nevadan now serving as a federal judge, wrote a memo on torture when he was a U.S. Justice Department official. The memo was used by the Bush administration as justification for torture used by the United States (“Tortuous policy,” RN&R, Jan. 13, 2005). The memo effectively said that it is permissible to abuse a person up to the point where it becomes a level of pain. The memo offered no guidance to how such thresholds could be determined. Inflicting treatment that is “cruel, inhuman, or degrading” does not necessarily make it illegal, the memo opined. In the current Atlantic, Cullen Murphy writes that the U.S. practices supposedly authorized by the Bybee memo closely parallel practices employed in the Inquisition of the Catholic Church. Murphy, also author of God’s Jury/The Inquisition and the Modern World, wrote in the magazine that motivation, specific techniques of torture, defenses of its use, and even documentation of U.S. torture closely parallel those in the Inquisition—with one exception. Inquisitional torture was authorized by Pope Innocent III in his 1252 bull, Ad extirpanda, which Murphy describes as the Bybee memo of its day. The bull placed limits on the use of torture, but that those limits were often exceeded by inquisitors in the field. Trying to regulate torture once it is authorized “rarely works,” according to Murphy. “The Inquisition, with its stipulation that torture and interrogation not jeopardize life or cause irreparable harm, actually set a more rigorous standard than some proponents of torture insist on now,” Murphy wrote. “In [the Bybee memo], the Bush administration put forth a very narrow definition, arguing that for an action to be deemed torture, it must produce suffering ‘equivalent in intensity to the pain accompanying serious physical injury, such as organ failure, impairment of bodily function, or even death.’ To place this in perspective: the administration’s threshold for when an act of torture begins was the point at which the Inquisition stipulated that it must stop.” After he wrote the memo, but before it became publicly known, Bybee posed as a Nevadan on the strength of his teaching some law classes in the state to get an appointment to a Nevada seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. His appointment was sponsored by Nevada Sens. John Ensign and Harry Reid, but Bybee was not a member of the Nevada bar except for the period he taught the classes. There were calls for Bybee’s impeachment after the memorandum was disclosed, but the U.S. House never acted.

—Dennis Myers

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Answered prayer Neighborhood devotion and educational expansion collide Folks in the beautiful neighborhoods between Plumas, Arlington, California and Mt. by Rose streets have often had a tense Dennis Myers relationship with the city. A proposal to widen Plumas Street sparked a fierce battle in 1992 that resulted in a threatened recall campaign. When Billinghurst school was demolished, many residents wanted a park—there is no park in the neighborhood—but city officials decided to create soccer fields for citywide leagues instead. But last week residents caught a break from the city. The Reno City Council rejected an attempt by Our Lady of Snows Parochial School to take title to half of a one-block stretch of Lander Street that adjoins the school on the east side, a prelude to eventually taking over the entire parcel.

“The only solution is the school has to move.” Harold Lucas Resident The Council not only refused to “abandon” the street to the school, but urged the school—which is adjacent to Our Lady of the Snows Church—to take better care of its relations with residents of the neighborhood. The parish of Snows, as it is informally known, was created in 1938. The school opened on Sept. 4, 1951. For many years, it existed harmoniously with the neighborhood. But some residents say they were exasperated that the school never capped the number of students it serves to live

within its land. Instead, they say, school administrators kept relying on the city to solve its expansion problems. Rather than using undeveloped portions of the school property for parking or playgrounds, the school built on that vacant land and then arranged with the city to have vertical parking on Lander to increase the number of parking spaces and rented a portion of the Billinghurst parcel for playground space, necessitating children crossing the street. While some residents raised traffic as a reason for their opposition, traffic studies by the school indicate those are not really serious, with only about a hundred cars crossing the block each day and only 31 during rush hour. No figure was given for start and end of school days, when parents drop off or pick up children.What seems to bother residents more is that the school’s expansion could change the character of the neighborhood from homey and residential to institutional and erode its appeal, a concern that also motivated the Plumas Street widening opposition. Resident Harold Lucas, whose son went to Bishop Manogue Catholic High School, testified at the City Council meeting. He pointed out that when Manogue High outgrew its facilities in north Reno, it moved to larger quarters at a different location. He called on Snows to do the same. “This issue keeps coming up,” Lucas said. “It’s bothering our neighborhood. We need to just all step back and say, ‘Enough is enough.’ We’ve been imposed upon by the church and the school long enough. The only solu-

tion is the school has to move. It’s in a spot of land area that’s too small for the school.” Lance Van Lydegraf, who both lives and works in the neighborhood, said school parents have not been good drivers. “I observe, as a matter of fact, that it’s the parents of the students who cause the traffic hazards in their method of drop-off and pick-up of their children and not other members of the public.” Some residents said they were unhappy that there was no comprehensive planning as part of the abandonment process. Others said they purchased homes as part of retirement planning, and they believed closure of the street would undercut the value of their homes. Some, including parents and students from nearby Mt. Rose School, objected to the 48 parking spaces that now exists on the oneblock section of Lander being pushed out into the neighborhood. One person brought a petition with 152 signatures of people who opposed the abandonment of the street. Another made an acid comment about the tax benefits the church already gets from the public. (Nevada Revised Statute 361.125 exempts religious property from taxation.) But the school also had its defenders, some of them school parents, some residents, some both. They tended to emphasize child safety. “These kids are 40 pound, 90 pounds, and here I am in a 2,000pound vehicle, and I got rear-ended [at the school],” said Ron Frediani. “And that’s why I’m here, is because I was really concerned about what could happen to a child on that street.” “It’s not a matter of if it will happen at our school, it’s a matter of when,” said Ed Wetta. “All we ask is for the same consideration as every other school child in the state of Nevada, we just want our children to be safe,” said Stacy McGinness. In response to questions by City Councilmember Dave Aiazzi, Snows representatives said that even if the abandonment took place, drop-off and pick-up of the children would not be moved onto the presumably safer, closed environs of the Lander parcel. It would still take place on Walker or Monroe, streets running east/west that cross Lander, which runs north/south. The main church entrance faces Walker Avenue, and the main school entrance faces Lander. There was a lot of confusion about various aspects of the abandonment, including when the conditions would


be met. In addition, Councilmember Dan Gustin was concerned about another kind of vagueness. He said things were not spelled out well on paper. There was too much use, he said, of phrases like “We’d like to” and “Maybe we could.” Moreover, with some of the conditions, the school was essentially volunteering to do things the city can do itself. These included adding more vertical parking stripes to the east end of the Billinghurst parcel. “If we can add more parking over there, we can do it,” said Aiazzi. A videotape used in the traffic study probably didn’t help the school’s case. A portion showed an SUV parked at the school backing out in the path of an oncoming car, hesitating when it caught sight of the car, but then continuing to back out. Gustin—whose district includes the school—said he did not believe the school had prepared the ground for the change it was seeking. He spoke of “angst” in the neighborhood. “I can’t support an abandonment,” he said. “I think that situation is, at best, premature. … There’s more good will that you need to do.” But he also told residents they might not like what they got if the school moved because the school site is zoned “multi-family,” which would allow the construction of about 80 housing units. “Sometimes working with what you have may be better than something you don’t know,” Gustin said.

A N E V E N I N G W I T H

JOHN HANDY

“We just want our children to be safe.” Stacy McGinness Parent He urged Snows and the residents to engage in more dialogue. Mayor Bob Cashell insisted that the school go ahead and “immediately” meet the conditions even without approval of the abandonment, as a way of improving its relations with the neighborhood. Taken by surprise, the school’s representatives said it would take some time to do things like paint striping on streets. Cashell seemed to want it done by dinnertime. Besides, the conditions were offered by the school as incentive for approval of the abandonment. Without the abandonment, fulfilling the conditions anyway “takes away some of their negotiating power,” Councilmember Dwight Dortch said. The Council voted to close the street during school hours, which is actually the situation that already exists. School-hour closure had been suspended during the traffic study but will be reinstated now. There was a suggestion that parents be educated on pick-up and drop-off procedures. Councilmembers Jessica Sferrazza and Dwight Dortch went along on the vote but made it clear they preferred to approve the abandonment of the street. Ω

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24TH AT 7:30PM JOE CROWLEY STUDENT UNION THEATER, UNR GENERAL ADMISSION – $10 STUDENTS & FTLOJ MEMBERS – $5

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In downtown Reno, demonstators called attention to the case of imprisoned American Indian Movement leader Leonard Peltier, convicted in 1977 of the 1975 murder of two FBI agents on the Pine River Reservation in South Dakota. His supporters describe him as a political prisoner, and Amnesty International has raised questions about his conviction.

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GREEN

Reno is keeping the lights on The Reno City Council voted unanimously to postpone the appeal against digital billboards at an appeal meeting on Feb. 8 (“Bright blights,” Feb. 9). Scenic Nevada, the organization who filed the appeal, urged the Council to continue forward with a hearing, but a community workshop was scheduled instead that will allow for public comment. The appeal will be back on the calendar after the workshop, for which no date has been set yet.

Google has been testing autonomous technology on the Toyota Prius. Volkswagen has also made test models.

Nevada representatives get schooled The League of Conservation Voters released their congressional scorecard for 2011, which scores state representatives based on their support for environmentally-supportive Congress. Scores for Nevada’s legislators were a mixed bag. Republican scores were low, to say the least: Sen. John Ensign and Rep. Mark Amodei scored a zero, Rep. Joe Heck received a 9 percent, and Sen. Dean Heller was given an 11 percent. Democrats scored significantly higher: Rep. Shelley Berkley’s 94 percent is 2 percent higher than her 2010 score, and Sen. Harry Reid sits at a solid 100 percent. View the scorecard at www.lcv.org/.

More than meets the eye Autonomous vehicles Well, it’s official—we live in the future. Or at least, the future as envisioned by science fiction artists and writers who made us yearn for hovercrafts or homes on other planets is becoming a reality. Technology isn’t quite there by yet, but Nevada’s roadways may soon change if autonomous vehicles—selfAshley driving, or driverless, cars—become more common. Hennefer A new state law defines autonomous vehicles as “a motor vehicle that ashleyh@ uses artificial intelligence, sensors and global positioning system coordinates newsreview.com to drive itself without the active intervention of a human operator.” The law was enacted in 2011. Driverless cars have been in experimental stages since the 1980s and some commercial cars, like the Ford Fiesta, already have autonomous features—the Fiesta can parallel park by itself. But making them a mainstream option is a project spearheaded by Google, which has been modifying the Toyota Prius hybrid to navigate on the highways and testing it on roads in California. Last year, the Huffington Post reported that Nevada could be the first state to have autonomous vehicles on its roads by March 2012 when the law takes effect, but seeing them as early as next month seems unlikely. The cars aren’t even commercially available for the public. In any case, Nevada is the first state to write law to allow autonomous vehicles to be used on the road, and the Department of Motor Vehicles requires owners of autonomous vehicles to have a specific type of driver’s license. Several states including Florida and Hawaii are following Nevada’s lead. “We just want to be the ones to break this technology here in Nevada,” says Scott Magruder, spokesperson for the Nevada Department of Transportation. “It’s something in the future, and we want to be ready, and we’re a state with long roads and low traffic so it’s a good place to test it.” Studies on driverless cars have suggested several environmental benefits, including fuel efficiency and reduced carbon emissions. By removing human error, like tapping the gas, idling, or driving around while lost, congestion would be reduced because cars could be regulated to maintain a certain speed and distance behind another vehicle. Autonomy would also prevent traffic accidents caused by intoxicated, tired or distracted drivers. Another benefit of driverless cars is more efficient transport of goods. West Trak in Dayton is already testing driverless trucks to collect data and determine how they can make trucks that can safely carry resources long distances. But autonomous transport vehicles won’t be around for a while. “People ask us, could you have a truck with like five trailers like a train?” Magruder says. “I think now we’re just trying to see how smaller projects work.” “AGVs [automatic guided vehicles] are attractive because they provide labor savings, efficiency, and they reduce damage to transported materials,” states a report by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineer. Although the Google car has logged more than 1 million accident-free miles, consumers are concerned about a driverless car’s ability to respond to uncertain situations like pedestrians, sudden stops by other vehicles, or road work. And while autonomous cars could help individual drivers get around more efficiently and safer, some environmentalists argue that better infrastructure for public transportation options like a subway system should be the priority. Others insist that the only true eco-friendly modes of transportation are cycling and walking. Ω

This tastes like plastic Researchers at Yale University have discovered a fungus called Pestalotiopsis microspore that can eat plastic, with the hopes that it will help break down the amount of plastic in landfills. The fungus comes from the Amazon rainforest and eats polyurethane, the plastic that has stumped scientists who have been working on decomposing the stubborn material. By extracting the enzyme from the fungus, the Yale researchers plan to harness its decomposition properties to bioremediate—use microorganisms to rid the environment of pollutants. In an air-less environment, the fungus can grow larger, and the Yale researchers envision cultivating it in a controlled environment to consume landfill buildup. But some are concerned that it could eventually eat through any materials used to contain it.

—Ashley Hennefer ashleyh@newsreview.com

ECO-EVENT The Sierra Nevada Alliance hosts the seventh annual Wild & Scenic Environmental Film Festival on March 9. The festival will feature environmental and adventure films to inspire community action. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the festival begins at 7 p.m. Tickets will be available soon. Montbleu Showroom, South Lake Tahoe. For more information, contact Lynn Baumgartner at lynn@sierranevadaalliance.org or visit www.sierranevadaalliance.org.

Got an eco-event? Contact ashleyh@newsreview.com. Find more at the Green with NV blog, www.newsreview.com/greenwithnv, and on Facebook at facebook.com/rnrgreen.

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One of these things is not like the other.

There are times when we simply can’t help ourselves: The List Issue, No. 3

R Politic’s three-headed monster.

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eaders must surely appreciate that things can get a little serious, a little overwrought, here at the Reno News & Review. Sure we like to bite off a meaty chunk of thumbsucking issue every once in a while, spend some time tugging our forelocks, as much as the next pundits, but—jeez. Gluten intolerance? Newt, Mitt, Santorum? Caucuses and Fascism? Sometimes we just need to chill.

Foods I can no longer enjoy primarily due to RN&R influence Carbohydrates Elmer’s Glue-All Processed carbs Processed meats Dairy products Feedlot beef and swine Factory chickens Prepared packaged foods Human fetuses Anything from McDonald’s

Websites on which I spend too much time arguing with people Reddit Facebook TreeHugger ArsTechnica Gizmodo


The first apps I removed from my Droid 2 Global when I rooted it

15 most played songs on my iPod 1. “Play with Fire,” The Rolling Stones 2. “Congratulations,” The Rolling Stones 3. “Shadowboxin’,” GZA 4. “15 Steps,” Radiohead 5. “Heart of Stone,” The Rolling Stones 6. “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg,” The Temptations 7. “Alone Again Or,” Love 8. “Summer Babe (Winter Version),” Pavement 9. “Reckoner,” Radiohead 10. “White Rune,” Iceage 11. “Shame on a Nigga,” Wu-Tang Clan 12. “4th Chamber,” GZA 13. “Time is on my Side,” The Rolling Stones 14. “Bo Diddley,” Bo Diddley 15. “Nude,” Radiohead

Amazon Blockbuster City ID Skype VZ Navigator My Verizon 3G Hotspot

Things I hate about politics The faux issue of the day The faux solution of the day Politicians The two-party system Reported victories for the people that are actually victories for the banks Closed caucuses Wind-testing bloviators People who vote against their self-interest War Lies and liars Voter apathy

12 available band names

Countdown of my 10 most enjoyable meals of 2012 so far 10. Dinner at Great Basin Brewing Co. 9. Lunch at Mi Ranchito 8. Lunch at Citrus Club Noodle House in San Francisco 7. Birthday dinner for my brother, Cameron, at Palais de Jade 6. Lunch at Michael’s Deli 5. Dinner of my wife’s homemade kale-and-lentil winter soup 4. Lunch at Kokopelli’s Sushi 3. Birthday dinner for my friend Michelle at Campo 2. Breakfast at La Torta Gorda in San Francisco 1. Dinner at 168 Café Chinese Food

Five Brad Bynum doppelgooglers A dentist in Valdosta, Ga. The chief financial officer of an oil company in Houston, Tex. A proud parent in Charlotte, N.C. A martial arts enthusiast in Spring, Tex. A minister, and eponymous uncle, in Destin, Fla.

Things to think about when doing cardio on the elliptical trainer

Fat Jaywalkers Them Elves A Special Kind of Hug Smoking Hot Wives Dry Nurse The Ultra Maroons The Steve Miller Band U.K. The Bung Hunglers Handsome Children Google (band) Brad Bynum’s Sexy Massage Parlour and Rock ’n’ Roll Emporium You People

Google Trends Hot Searches, Feb. 10, 2012, 3 p.m. 1. kevin youkilis 2. cpac 3. kim jong un 4. tesla model x 5. jeremy lin 6. safe house 7. the vow 8. jenny mccarthy 9. woolly mammoth 10. chocolate covered strawberries 11. droid 4 12. westminster dog show 13. josh powell 14. pebble beach 15. luol deng 16. attwireless 17. wheres my refund 18. channing tatum 19. george washington carver 20. chicago weather

Youkilis, you’re killin’ me.

Majors I declared in college before switching to English Atmospheric science Chemistry Theatre Information systems Women’s studies

People in the market for tattoo removal Dawn Gibbons (“Big Jim”) Dick Gammick (“Tokers rule”) Geno Martini (“Who needs sales taxes?”) Guy Rocha (“Mark Twain slept at the Ormsby House”) Jim Gibbons (“Pandering is my God”)

“LIST BE NOT PROUD” continued on page 14

Amazon.com’s recommendations based on my past purchases Duct tape The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook Gas mask Gator machete Best Practices in Environmental Journalism Potassium iodine tablets Preacher Vol. 1 Emergency thermal blankets Fedora for Beginners Gaming headset Star Trek cufflinks The ABCs of Erotica – A is for Anal

Sex

PHOTO COURTESY OF YUNNER

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” PROUD T O N E “LISTueBd from page 13 c o n t in

22 anagrams of Washoe, none of which mean much of anything: A HE SOW A WHOSE A SHE OW A HEW SO A SEW HO A SEW OH SAW HOE SHEA OW SEA HOW SEA WHO AH WE SO HA WE SO HAS WOE OSHA WE HAS OWE ASH OWE ASH WOE AS HE OW AS HOWE AS WE HO AS WE OH WAS HOE

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Five weapons I’d want to have during an apocalypse Pocket knife Bow Crowbar AKM Rocket launcher (depending on the apocalypse)

Strokes of genius Selling off the county hospital to a private company to improve service Lowering the railroad tracks to usher in a new era of casino prosperity Shifting state government from reliance on the property tax to the sales tax for some reason no one can now remember

List Issues Feb. 1, 2007, “The List Issue” Oct. 29, 2009, “The Return of the List”

If I were king Baseball caps are outlawed Driving in the passing lane while not passing is a capital crime The word that is stricken from the English language Restaurants in desert states may not serve water unless asked (unprompted) by customers Republican leaders may no longer be drawn from the cast of the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Democratic leaders may no longer be drawn from the ranks of the On-theother-hand Club. Reporters who produce stories speculating on how long the Legislature will be in session will be disemboweled PBS cannot run one program on British royalty until it first runs ten programs on the British workers who must pay for the royals. The semicolon is abolished. Ω

The baseball cap is the least of this guy’s worries.


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Advanced stages Northern Nevada theater companies usher in a new era this spring Spring is the perfect time to shake off the dust of days gone by and try something new. Theater companies around Northern by Jessica Santina Nevada are taking that idea to heart, with performance schedules that include world premieres, cutting-edge new plays, Pulitzer Prize winners, innovative adaptations and even a few new players.

A Rep for taking chances: Nevada Repertory Company “After almost being eliminated last year, we really wanted to make a splash this season,” says Larry Walters, Nevada Rep’s managing director, explaining how the University of Nevada, Reno’s resident theater company is about to bring its second world premiere of the 2011-2012 season, Anne Garcia Romero’s Juanita’s Statue, to its stage this March. 16

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Ryan Kelly, left, and Adam Semas rehearse scenes from TMCC's production of Next to Normal.

Originally commissioned by the New York Shakespeare Festival, the play—a modernized, cross-dressing retelling of the Don Juan story—has until now only been read on stage a number of times; this full production by Nevada Rep will be its first. The playwright herself will work with the cast and do one postshow discussion with the audience. Following that is Cole Porter’s Anything Goes, a jazz musical set on a ship in 1934 that involves romance, mistaken identity, and a whole lot of schtick, with a number of highly recognizable songs, including the title song and “De-Lovely.” Adam Cates, a UNR graduate who hails from the Reno area, returns from a stint on Broadway to direct and choreograph this show. Walters will retire after the spring semester, leaving Nevada Rep in the hands of department chair Rob Gander. Tickets and information: UNR.edu/nevadarep.

around the country for nine years prior to moving to Reno, Sweet looks forward to helping push the Reno theater scene onto the national stage. GLM’s spring line-up includes A.R. Gurney’s Love Letters, a Pulitzer Prize-winning, two-person show that tells the story of two old lovers, revealed through letters they’ve exchanged since childhood. Multiple casts provide for interesting shifts in couple dynamics from performance to performance, all in March. Following that, in mid-April, comes And the World Goes ’Round, a musical revue of the songs of Kander and Ebb, whose Broadway hits have included Chicago and Cabaret. That’s followed by a stage adaptation in June of Robert Redford’s film, Ordinary People, about a family struggling to cope with the loss of a beloved son. GLM’s Artown offering will be Shakespeare’s The Tempest, with set design by artist Lance Dehne. Tickets and information: GoodLuckMacbeth.org.

New blood: Good Luck Macbeth

Exploring fringes: TMCC Performing Arts

Another company losing a mainstay is Good Luck Macbeth. Founding president and artistic director Scott Reeves went to follow his dreams in New York, leaving the GLM producingartistic-director duties in the capable hands of Chad Sweet. Having worked in professional theater companies

TMCC’s talented performers are taking on some bold projects in 2012, starting with Tony- and Pulitzer-winning musical Next to Normal, a show that’s been called brave, bold and even capable of taking theater into a new direction. This emotional story focuses

on a family coping with its matriarch’s mental illness. “Bold” would characterize TMCC’s next production, a doubleheader of The Laramie Project and The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later, running simultaneously in the first two weeks of May. The plays document the immediate and decade-later reactions of Laramie, Wyo., residents to the murder of gay university student Matthew Shephard. Tickets and information: PerformingArts.TMCC.edu.

Spring of ambition: Brüka Theatre Nobody looking at its spring/ summer line-up would ever accuse Brüka Theatre of laziness. With one 2012 play already under its belt, in March Brüka launches into The Wild Party, a musical based upon Joseph Moncure March’s 1920s poem of the same name. Following that, in May, is Yasmina Reza’s God of Carnage, about two sets of parents coming together to iron out a dispute between their children, only to end up behaving more childishly themselves. In May comes another Pulitzerwinning play, Paula Vogel’s How I Learned to Drive, about an unsettling relationship between a young woman and her uncle. With July and Artown comes Tennessee Williams’ Orpheus

PHOTOS/AMY BECK

In Rotation 18 | Art of the State 19 | Foodfinds 20 | Fi¬m 22


FAMILY WINTER 2012

GUIDE

EXPLORE THE GREAT

OUTDOORS

6

LEARNING TO

DRIVE 11

HEALTHY COMPETITION 5

ADVENTUROUS SPIRITS

4

THE WORLD

IS YOUR CLASSROOM

8

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Welcome to the winter 2012 RN&R Family Guide “You need to have a baby,” RN&R news editor Dennis Myers said to me a few weeks ago. “I need something to play with.” I think I just laughed awkwardly in response, because I don’t plan on having rugrats of my own any time soon, but he has a point. Kids are fun, even when they’re hard work, and adults like playing with them. And who doesn’t like to play? But somehow, we’ve made playtime secondary to the dreaded R word—responsibility—for adults and children. There’s no reason the two can’t coexist. Having a bit of structure isn’t a bad thing, and some of us need it to actually get important things done, but humans of all ages function best when given time and space to explore and play and soak in the world. In this issue, we investigate some new approaches to education that allow students to be in charge of their own exploration and learning process. Think your kid is playing too much by immersing themselves in video games? There’s actually a lot of cool cognitive activity happening while they quest through dungeons. As Tim Hauserman points out, despite their small statures, kids are resilient—adults are usually the ones setting up boundaries for them when we should be breaking them down and letting them experience the world independently. And that’s a lesson I’m learning firsthand as I worry about my younger brother getting his driver’s license. Want to get in on the play time? We also found some tips on how to travel safely and efficiently with a baby strapped to your back. Here’s to working hard, and playing harder. Cheers, Ashley Hennefer Special projects editor, RN&R

TABLE OF CONTENTS

4 5 6

FLY AWAY

8

FREE LEARNING

11

TAKE THE WHEEL

Tips for traveling with young children

GET YOUR GAME ON

KING TUT

“Wonderful Things” from the Pharoah’s Tomb

Video games can offer valuable life skills

IMPORTANCE OF PLAY

Send the kids outside and let them explore Alternative education options for parents and teens A big sister learns to let her brother grow up

Editor D. Brian Burghart Special Projects Editor Ashley Hennefer News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Photographer Amy Beck Designer Marianne Mancina Contributors Tim Hauserman Design Manager Kate Murphy Advertising Sales Kelly Funderburk, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Office/Distribution Manager Karen Brooke Exec. Assistant Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Daniel Golightly, Neal Lemerise, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, James Richardson, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach

General Manager John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Director of Human Resources Tanja Poley Controller Kevin Driskill Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Jane Corbett, Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

NOW through May 23, 2012

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3


y a w Fly a Tips to traveling with little ones by

Ashley Hennefer

B

efore your little bundle of joy arrived, you and your

partner were thrill-seeking adventurers, like all couples are before they become parents … right? The ease of picking up and going without having to pack three bags of supplies or worry about sleeping and feeding schedules is something that many people take for granted before starting a family, but an adventurous life doesn’t have to end once children are in the picture. Traveling with a baby or young child takes some planning, but it’s not impossible. Kids are tough creatures and quick to adapt to new circumstances. “Travel is education,” writes Michelle Duffy, author of WanderMom.com. “It’s as simple as that. I can travel with my children without leaving my home, using books and the internet to show them people and places around the world. But when I can, I prefer to actually travel with them, to explore and discover the world together.” While pediatricians recommend that infants shouldn’t fly on a plane until they are at least several weeks old, there’s no reason that a healthy baby can’t come along for a trip. Many parents prefer to wait until their children are older so they will remember their experiences, but travel is a chance to broaden their minds while they are young. “What if we allowed the idea, ‘Will they remember it?’ to govern all our decisions on what to expose them to?” says David Robert Hogg, who documents his travels with his wife and two young sons at MyLittleNomads.com. “It’s hard to think of anything really interesting you’d do with them. But of course, it’s not just about them remembering it. It’s about their growth and development—what they take as normal and what they see as weird.” So go ahead and book that trip to Nepal. Just don’t forget to pack some extra diapers.

ashleyh@newsreview.com

You’ll have your hands full already with a diaper bag and a regular assortment of luggage, but a few books and games can distract a toddler on a long flight or car ride. Find picture books about the place to which you’re traveling, and a game kit with a container or magnetic pieces will ensure parts don’t get lost during turbulence.

RESEARCH HOTELS

If you plan on bringing a stroller, check hotels ahead of time to determine the layout of the hotel. Many hotels in Europe or Asia, for example, don’t have elevators, so lugging a stroller up a tiny staircase might be an unnecessary stress. Hotels also may have strollers available to rent or borrow. You should also ask about bathrooms and if changing stations are available. When possible, find a hotel with a bathroom in the room, but if you plan to stay in hostels, you may be sharing a shower area with other travelers.

RESEARCH HOSPITALS

Research is vital for any traveler, and with kids in tow, it’s imperative to know where a hospital is located and what the health system is like in that country. It helps to bring a bag of medications for emergencies if you plan to really go off the grid. Doctors can write prescriptions for antibiotics or specific medications like asthma inhalers and allergy tablets to keep on hand if a hospital is hard to find or if there is a language barrier.

GET BUSY ON YOUR FIRST DAY

While it’s tempting to take a long nap after arriving at your destination, keeping yourself and your kids awake and busy will help reduce jetlag so you can all fall asleep at night. Keeping them on a schedule close to the one at home will make them energetic when it’s time to explore and tired when it’s time for mom and dad to sleep.

KEEP PASSPORTS CURRENT

Traveling with kids means that airport security closely scrutinizes parents to make sure that people aren’t smuggling another person’s child into other countries—an unnerving thought, but it happens— and some countries require that children’s passports are not only current for the duration of the trip but also several months after. For kids under 15 years old, a passport lasts for five years, so if you get one for your toddler, it’s a good practice to update their photo as they age.

PACK COPIES OF IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS

Travelers should do this anyway, but it’s important to have copies of necessary documents such as Social Security cards, birth certificates, medical prescriptions or doctor’s notes and bank cards. However, this is data on your family and finances that should be kept extremely safe, so keep it on your person or in a bag that never leaves your side.

GET YOUR SHOTS

The chances of contracting some foreign disease in the rain forests of Brazil or the savannas of Africa are actually pretty low if you take preventative measures to get vaccinated ahead of time. Certain shots are required for kids at different ages, so check with your doctor several months before you plan to depart.

4 | WINTER FAMILY GUIDE 2012 |

BRING BOOKS AND GAMES

TAKE PICTURES OF INTERACTIONS, NOT JUST THE TOURISTY STUFF FIND A RELIABLE BABY CARRIER

If you’re heading to a destination with a plan to hike up a mountain or ride an elephant—or even just wander around the Louvre for a few days—a baby carrier is essential. Traveling parents have given favorable reviews to carriers like the BabyBjorn, which situates the child facing outward and leaves the parent’s hands free. Be nice and share carrying duties with your partner.

BOOK A NONSTOP FLIGHT Not only will a nonstop flight ensure that your child can take a nap, but having to transfer planes at another busy airport with your child and belongings in tow is an unnecessary hassle. Set a watch to the time back home to measure when your child normally sleeps and eats and when possible, book a flight during a time where they can sleep through the night.

FEBRUARY 16, 2012 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

Taking pictures is a must, but documenting your child buying fruit from a vendor may become a better memory than a photo of them standing in front of the tower of Pisa. “You’ll look at the photo of your kids walking down the beach together or the one where they’re walking through a little village in Cambodia and you’ll wish you could jump right back into the picture,” Hogg writes.

RELAX

We Americans are spoiled by our immense safety regulations. Things like seatbelts and car seats are necessary here in the states, but it’s easy to forget that not every country has them. When possible, stay as safe as possible—and don’t be afraid to speak up if you’re uncertain about transportation options or questionable circumstances—but be reasonable about your fears. “It’s not always easy to know where to draw the line. You are traveling in a foreign country where the idea is to adopt that country’s norms and standards,” writes Hogg. While it’s better to be safe than sorry when traveling abroad, the odds are, you and your family will remain safe. Prepare to be unprepared, and let your children have adventures. Ω


Characters in games represent qualities that teens want.

Get your

game on Video games may be good for your teen

It seems video games and parents have gotten

off on the wrong foot. Somehow, games have gotten a bad reputation, much by Ashley Hennefer worse than that of books, television or film. Games are often thought of as ashleyh@ addictive, isolating, violent and a waste newsreview.com of time, and are frequently blamed as a reason for unstable behavior. But now that the National Endowment of the Arts has finally acknowledged video games as a legitimate art form, families are starting to notice what gamers have been saying for years—games are a cool, innovative source of entertainment and cognitive development. And games are better than ever. Graphics improve with each new installment of a series, and intricate, unique storytelling devices require players to be actively immersed in a plot, taking on the role of both “writer” and “reader,” as game studies researcher James Alberti argues. Games differ from literature, film and television because the players must make choices and think critically about why they are making those choices, because the consequences are immediate. They also must acutely observe the setting, dialogue and characters. There’s a lot happening in teenagers’ heads when they focus intently on sniping a terrorist or forming a guild of dwarves. Most games require strategy and problem solving skills, and playing on a console is often suggested by pediatricians to help kids improve their hand and eye coordination. Computer gaming has also been used successfully as a type of treatment for children with ADD, ADHD and autism because they allow kids to wander through worlds, make decisions on their own, and revisit levels and puzzles that are complex— all while sitting quiet and focused.

Jane McGonigal, game designer and author of Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World, argues that teenagers tend to get “addicted” to games because they are somehow dissatisfied with their reality and seek refuge in a virtual world, looking for tools that they can then apply back to their own lives. “Games are showing us exactly what we want out of life: more satisfying work, better hope of success, stronger social connectivity, and the chance to be a part of something bigger than ourselves,” she writes. Characters in games represent qualities that teens want— physical strength, a unique identity, and interesting world to explore independently and a set of clear obstacles to overcome. They have the chance to experiment with a personality before adopting the traits they admire in others as their own. If your teen is old enough to watch shows on cable television, they’re probably not going to be so influenced from a round of Call of Duty that they’ll feel compelled to shoot at the neighbors with an airsoft gun. Games can be gritty and raunchy, but they can paint an honest portrait of war and struggle and support the idea of collaboration. McGonigal suggests limited your child’s game time to less than 21 hours a week, and encourages parents to get in on the action. Playing with them ensures that you know what kind of media they’re consuming, and you’ll get some bonus points from them for engaging in an activity on their level. The Xbox Kinect, PlayStation Move or Nintendo Wii all offer family games that will also give you a good workout. And you never know—you may find yourself signing up for a World of Warcraft account before you can say “paladin.” Ω A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | FEBRUARY 16, 2012 | WINTER FAMILY GUIDE 2012 |

5


T

y a pl of

e h

r t a o n p c m e i

Send the kids outside and let them explore

W

hen I was a kid, we played. We left the house in the morning and spent the day running through the woods, playing whiffle ball in the driveway, or football on the street.As long as we were running and trying to outwit each other, we were happy. When the weather was nasty, we played in by Tim Hauserman the snow until we got cold, then we invented indoor games. One of my favorites involved using a hanger crammed into the top of a door jamb as the basket, and two rolled up socks as a ball. It was the only place this smallest kid in the class could actually stuff the basket. Parents? I am not sure where they were. They had more important stuff to do than worry about kids playing. 6 | WINTER FAMILY GUIDE 2012 |

We were not obese. We were not bored. We were exploring and discovering our environment, and letting our imaginations fly. We had no idea that we were also developing our brains and learning personal responsibility. We were just playing. So what happened? Why did our society give up on free play? Somehow we decided that free play is too dangerous for kids, when in fact, it is more dangerous for the future of kids not to play. As Lenore Skenazy says in her book, Free Range Kids, we have changed to a society where “any risk is seen as too much risk.” Even though we live in a time that is actually much safer than it was when we I was a kid, we feel it must be much more dangerous. I mean look at the kidnappings that keep popping up on TV… and apparently if you watch the news you learn that it is dangerous to be a pretty blonde and travel to a Caribbean island. In reality, murder just got dropped off the top 15 causes of death in the United States for the first time in a long time, but you won’t hear about that on the local news. With parents too scared to let kids go out on their own and play, we have developed structured athletic activities instead. The problem with that, says Hara Marano, author of A Nation of Wimps: The High Cost of Invasive Parenting, “is that the organized sports many kids participate in are managed by adults; difficulties that arise are not worked out by kids but adjudicated by adult referees. Nor is it, in any sense of the term, free play. It doesn’t arise from desires or rules

FEBRUARY 16, 2012 | A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW

that emanate from the kids themselves. There is no spontaneity. It doesn’t reflect the free-flowing mental activity of children.” It is this free-flowing part of playing that helps kids learn how to handle situations on their own and grow up to become responsible adults. Instead of keeping our kids between the straight lines of a soccer field, they need to start running in the woods and take their feet wherever their brain takes them. Marano says, “The protectionism that takes all the free play and all the risk out of life for kids rests on a notion of children’s frailty—the assumption that children are easily bruised. The fact is, too much protectionism creates frailty. Not only do children fail to develop coping skills for life’s vicissitudes, and fall apart when they hit a speed bump, kids come to think that something must really be wrong with them if they need so much protection.” Sure, car seats and bike helmets make sense. But attempting to protect our kid from every split lip or skinned knee will make them too afraid to take on the realities of life. We need to return to this approach to life: I fall down, I get up, I try again—compared to the now more common approach: I fall down, it must be someone’s else’s fault, who can I sue? Anybody can play. It does not require props or rules, just an imagination and time. We have decided that kids need to be busy every minute of every day with structured activities, so sometimes free time is in short supply, but it’s worth cut-


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ting back somewhere else to make time for play. Turn the technology off, leave the homework at home, and go play. Playing is building forts out of rocks and twigs or racing between the second tree on the right and that big bush on top of the hill. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about heading somewhere without knowing where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going until you get there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By its very ambiguous nature play gives brains a workout,â&#x20AC;? Marano says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Play is cognitively challenging. It requires attention and so it sharpens senses. It both demands and inspires mental dexterity and flexibility. It thrives on complexity, uncertainty and possibility.â&#x20AC;? With all the mental development brought about by play, it is no wonder that some brain experts believe that the rise in ADHD problems coincides with the reduction in free play. When it comes to our brains, staring at computer screens or studying for tests are not the only way we learn. In fact, for most of human existence, we have learned by doing the things kids do when playing, exploring our environment and seeing what we find. And if we want to keep our brains developing throughout life, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave all the fun to the youngsters, adults should hit the woods and do a little playing themselves.

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paling in comparison to those in other

Education in countries, it’s not just parents who want to try something new. Teachers, America is rapidly too, are starting to look at the possibilities beyond the classroom. changing. With Unschooling advances in techHomeschooling has been around for a nology, learning few decades—and longer, if you want to count the old days when children outside of a tradiwere educated at home and trained to tional classroom is be apprentices—and has gathered a few negative associations along the becoming an way, including the stereotype of the awkward, antisocial homeschooled kid. option for parents “I think those who have a negative view of homeschooling have only and students who it when it’s failed,” says Carol want to be more in seen Williams, owner of independent resource World of Wonders control of their own learning in Sparks. Williams, a former public school teacher, homeschools her 13education. Teenagers and adolescents have several options to choose from, all of which can help students complete high school, receive a diploma, and then move on to college or trade school, or continue to gain knowledge and skills independently. But it’s not just about getting kids through another educational system—it’s about instilling a love for learning and a desire for self-discovery. You know, the reasons we’re all supposed to go to school in the first place. With college tuition rates rising and the test scores in traditional schools

year-old daughter, who wants to enter a public high school next year. A subset of homeschooling is unschooling, an educational philosophy established in the 1970s by educator John Holt that allows the child to dictate when, where and how they will learn and study. The name can be misleading because an unschooling “classroom” can resemble that of a traditional school, except for few big differences—the students are there

Alternative school resources Northern Nevada Home Schools connects homeschooling families and provides information about classes, assessment, and opportunities for collaboration. www.nnhs.org

WiloStar3D is a video game type of schooling where the student interacts with an online community in a virtual world. www.wilostar3d.com

Nevada Online School Network is an accredited online program for grades 6-12, and is part of the Washoe On-line Learning for the Future (WOLF) and Carson Online programs. www.nevadaonlineschoolnetwork.com PLATO Pathways is a computer-based program for grades 112 and offers course options for most subject areas including social studies, reading, language arts, writing, math and science. www.washoe.k12.nv.us/district/departments/educational technology/plato The Massachusett’s Institute of Technology’s famous Open Courseware isn’t an accredited program yet, but it’s rigorous free courses taught by MIT professors is a good way to prepare students for college or help them delve further into a topic that interests them. www.ocw.mit.edu/index.htm Like the MIT open courseware, the Khan Academy offers hundreds of free courses on a variety of subjects, although most of the classes are math related. While some of the lessons are fairly advanced, some introductory lessons are available. www.khanacademy.com

The Open Source Education Foundation focuses on the use of free software in K-12 settings and provides resources to aid in nontraditional school settings. www.osef.org

“FREE LEARNING”

continued on page 10

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE RENO NEWS & REVIEW | FEBRUARY 16, 2012 | WINTER FAMILY GUIDE 2012 |

9


“FREE LEARNING” continued from page 9

It’s not just parents who want to try something new. Teachers, too, are looking ... beyond the classroom.

because they choose to be and are given choices for how they pursue learning subject material. It’s up to them to drive the lessons. Unschooling is an idea open to interpretation, which makes it difficult to define, according to Williams. “I define unschooling as child-led, and what the student is really interested in,” she says. There’s not a lot of empirical research on unschooling. For some parents, the concept of letting students establish their own curriculum is daunting, and at times, unrealistic. But unschooling educators argue that people have an innate drive to learn, and will seek out almost all subjects independently when given the chance. “If their basic needs are met, children are excellent learners, but by changing learning into something called education that is forced on children, formal schooling undermines healthy development and learning,” writes Karl Wheatley, an early childhood teacher and unschooling parent. “When children spend their days learning outside the four classroom walls, they can learn from fertile, moment-to-moment real life in a way that schools cannot match. “For example, a wonderful opportunity for learning from life can be

found in examining the erosion on a beach ... rather than reading about it in a textbook. While many teachers can’t imagine taking their classes on even four field trips a year, unschoolers might do one hundred.”

Open source learning Open source is a phrase thrown around a lot by techies since it’s mostly associated with the open source software movement, where programs are free and can be adapted to fit the needs of the users. Educators are taking this approach to curricula and even teaching itself, especially in organizations like public libraries, museums and collectives, which already offer free or inexpensive resources, lessons, and workshops for the public. Crowdsourced teaching is already used on websites like YouTube, where people with a skill make a video tutorial and share it with the public for free. Accredidation isn’t always an option through open education, but it can be used as supplemental instruction for students to pursue topics in depth outside of school. The demand for open source learn-

ing has increased in the midst of a bad economy because there is now a population, many of whom have become unemployed after years in the work force, want to return to school but don’t want to pay the cost for a degree. Essentially, it’s a throwback to the classical system of scholarship—discuss, collaborate and share, on one’s own accord. There’s a lot of crossover between open source learning and unschooling, and the philosophies are similar: people should be free to learn, and learning itself should be free. Williams hopes that parents will see that they have options available to them in the community. “Nevada is so homeschool friendly,” she says. “It’s really nice. We’re allowed so much freedom. We don’t take it for granted. “I don’t think people understand what it’s like for parents to really know that they’re free. They are free to let their child pursue their own interests and guide them along the way so they can thrive. So many parents don’t feel that they are free, and they feel like they have to follow this very traditional narrative. But there are so many stories to pursue.” Ω

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As my brother matures, I need to learn to back up This spring, my baby brother Steven will turn 16. The age difference between us is seven years, which means that we’re close by Ashley Hennefer enough to get along well and hang out together, but far enough apart that I ashleyh@ take my role as older sister very serinewsreview.com ously and spend much of my time worrying about his well being and hovering around him like an annoying third parent. So when he talks about getting his driver’s license and—gasp—actually using it to drive around, in an actual car, on the freeway or highway or to the grocery store to get more milk, I start to freak out a bit. Now that I’m past my teen years and in my jaded early 20s and now know everything, 16 seems like a ridiculously young age to be in charge of a potentially destructive vehicle. I mean, what is society thinking? This is the kid who “accidentally” dumped a cooler full of ice water on me during our annual family trip to Camp Richardson; the one who makes eight-minute-long movies about his friends jumping off tables in the school yard. (How many minutes does it really take to show someone jumping from a bench to another bench?) He spends more time on his smartphone than I do, and wore a pretend beard when he dressed up like Brian Wilson for Halloween because he couldn’t grow his own yet. And we expect him to operate a moving vehicle? It’s not that I don’t trust him. He took driver’s education. He was an Eagle Scout at 14, and is always the first to say “I love you” when we get off the phone with each other. He also makes a pretty damned good breakfast burrito. But driving is a big deal, especially in the rural Nevada town where I grew up and where he still lives with our parents. It’s almost a necessity to

get to school, to work, to a friend’s house. And he just seems so young. And yet when I was 16, I had my license, a tattoo, a job, and a trip to Europe under my belt. I remember feeling mature, and yet annoyed that my parents lectured me about driving safety. They insisted that “It’s not you we’re worried about—it’s them,” meaning, the rest of the world with their eyes more focused on text messaging or reapplying lipstick than on the road. While I’ve never been in a car accident—knock on wood—or had any major vehicle catastrophes, I’ve had a few close calls, and only through experience was I able to develop the necessary reaction time to prevent disasters. It’s hard for me to admit that I’m scared. I can’t bear the thought of anything happening to my precious sibling. There are a lot of bad drivers out there, and I want him to be prepared if something happens. And I want him to be aware of the repercussions of his actions if he makes a bad decision. But in the very near future, he’ll be driving when the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles decides he’s ready and not when I deem it so, and I’ll have to let him take the wheel. And soon enough he’ll be off to college and experiencing life on his own, and my parents and I will need to back off and let him make mistakes and get a little lost before he can find himself—on his own terms. I’m excited for him, because I remember how cool being 16 was—and then being 18, and then 21—and figuring out what kind of person I wanted to be with the whole world ahead of me. And I’m excited to have a grown up brother who can drive me to the movies or drop me off with my friends. But there’s no way in hell he’s getting a tattoo yet. Ω

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Sarah Rodriguez and JJ von Nolde rehearse Juanita’s Statue.

Descending. Stacey Spain directs this story of a young woman married to an older man, dealing with the confines and judgments of her small town. Meanwhile, Brüka has other projects in the works, including another installation in its children’s theater series, Hansel and Gretel; three more installments of its Original Play Readings series; the late-April continuation of its Living Newspaper project, centering on the Virginia Street Bridge in Reno; and a twoweek youth theater camp that will culminate in a production of Alice in Wonderland. Tickets and information: Bruka.org

About a girl: Reno Little Theater This month, you can catch Leading Ladies at RLT’s brand-new theater off Wells Avenue. The comedy is about two down-on-their-luck actors masquerading as women in order to steal an old woman’s inheritance. This new space is smaller than their former Hug High School digs, meaning some people have been turned away at the door; it’s why the company is considering extended runs of all shows, as needed. April brings the black comedy August, Osage County, a play for mature audiences about a dysfunctional family coming together to plan the funeral of the pill-addicted matriarch who has recently gone missing. Starting in mid-May is Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, a modernized mystery involving Conan Doyle’s crime-solving genius. RLT’s Artown production will be Noel Coward’s Private Lives, a classic comedy about a pair of exes who both remarry and wind up staying next door to each other on their honeymoons. Tickets and information: RenoLittleTheater.org.

learns that the phone’s owner is deceased and becomes strangely drawn into the callers’ lives. Following that, in May, is Stage Fright, a biting comedy in which two disgruntled actors kidnap and torture the theater critic who once cruelly maligned them. Artown’s Family Series will include the TWNN production of Curiosity Cat, which tells the story of displaced children, homeless cats, the importance of family and the value of curiosity. Tickets and information: TWNN.org.

PJ’s and PC: Western Nevada Musical Theatre Company At the Sleep-Tite Pajama Factory, all is not well. In Pajama Game, as labor battles management for a 7.5-cent raise, Sid, the superintendent, falls for Babe, the head of the grievance committee. Company Director Stephanie Arrigotti says this May production features “splashy production numbers” like “Steam Heat” and “Hernando’s Hideaway,” as well as classic ballads like “Hey, There.” Tickets and information: WNMTC.com.

Playing well with others: Brewery Arts Center Carson City’s cultural home is now host to three theater companies, each of which brings its own unique flavor. Wild Horse Theater Company, founded by former BAC-ers Carol and Jeffrey Scott, is a family-friendly, allinclusive, community theater company that on March 30 presents Forever Plaid, a ’50s-era musical comedy about a singing group resurrected from a fatal car crash to perform the show of a lifetime. Resident children’s troupe BAC Stage Kids presents the Disney version of Pinocchio, opening April 27, and will host two summer youth theater camps. In May, the adult troupe Proscenium Players presents 12 Angry Men, about a dissenting juror in a murder trial who must convince fellow jurors that the facts aren’t as clear-cut as they first seemed. Tickets and information: BreweryArts.org. Ω

Black comedy spring: TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada TWNN opens Sarah Ruhl’s Dead Man’s Cell in mid-March. A woman answers the incessantly ringing phone left on the table near her in a café, OPINION

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Justin McMahon Second Chances and Irreparable Mistakes

In the Mix is a monthly column of reviews of albums by musical artists local to the Reno area. To submit an album for review consideration, send a physical copy to Brad Bynum, Reno News & Review, 708 N. Center St., Reno NV 89501 or a digital link to bradb@ newsreview.com.

A rough and ready rock band or rapper can usually handle a negative record review. They don’t give a shit. But it’s hard to bag on an earnest, confessional coffee shop troubadour like Justin McMahon. The whole point of music like this is to be open and honest and sensitive. He does give a shit. And these songs seem like they were written by a nice, likable guy. But I just don’t care. I’ve tried to care, but these songs just aren’t convincing me. McMahon is part of the same burgeoning local singer-songwriter scene that produced FOLK The Novelists’ Backstory and Tyler Stafford’s On a String, two recent records I liked more than I expected. McMahon has a pleasant voice, an unpretentious songwriting perspective, and an ability to turn a decent phrase. But nothing grabs the ear. It might be an album that needs more time and repeated listens—the best records usually take a few spins to click—but I’ve listened to it four times, and it hasn’t happened yet. The melodies are routine, and the instrumentation sounds like studio pros backing songs written for an acoustic guitar rather than a road-tested band. The arrangements are incredibly polite, everything sounds

The Reagan Years Victory

quiet and safe, partly by design, I’m sure, to give some intimacy to McMahon’s voice, but some instrumental risks would add some much needed dynamism to these songs. Occasional lyrics pop out as above average, like in “Blue Bathrobe,” when he sings, “But we were doomed from the beginning”—long pause—“When I slept with that other girl.” And decent lyrics in an inoffensive setting might be enough for some people, but I’d prefer to hear McMahon collaborate with a wild melodicist, a rude instrumentalist or an insane producer—someone to give these round songs some edge.

This is a record meant to be cranked by college dropouts, punching each other in the shoulders, shotgunning cheap beers, giving out homemade tattoos, shotgunning more beers, singing along with fists in the air, vomiting into trashcans, shotgunning more beer. Whether that bromantic lifestyle interests you or not, only you can say, but if it does, here you go. The sound is basically Warped Tour-style PUNK high-volume, pick-sliding punk mixed with dramatic glam metal and just a hint of old-school rock ’n’ roll. Imagine Social Distortion covering Mötley Crüe. Or, maybe imagine Mötley Crüe covering Social Distortion. Whichever of those two options sounds more appealing. Probably the latter, because thankfully, when it comes to lyrics, vocalist-guitarist Billy Gunn leans more toward the morning-after-sickness country of Social D than the hard partying debauchery of the Crüe.

—Brad Bynum bradb@newsreview.com

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PHOTO/AMY BECK

Hair force

Megan Kay and Toni Ortega have an intimate exhibition at McKinley Arts & Culture Center.

Toni Ortega and Megan Kay Hair can be highly symbolic. It’s part of our body, but it changes constantly. It grows and falls by out. It can be altered with scissors, dyes, Megan Berner and accessories. And it can be revealed or concealed. Hair can represent sexuality and is a visible expression of growth and time. For these reasons, and others, the artists Megan Kay and Toni Ortega have chosen to make it the subject of their latest exhibition, Let It Fall. Sincerely,. The exhibition at the McKinley Arts & Culture Center consists of complementary Let It Fall. Sincerely, is bodies of work—a series of photographs on display at the and a set of vintage, embroidered handkerMcKinley Arts & Culture chiefs. The artists describe the show as Center, 925 Riverside collaborative, although the work was creDrive through March 9. The closing reception will ated individually, exploring similar themes. be March 1 at 5:30 p.m. The work is arranged on two walls with Ortega’s hand-embroidered handkerchiefs facing Kay’s color portraits. The sets have different approaches and tones to them, resulting in a visual dialogue that leaves the viewer to make the connections between the two. The sense of intimacy that both

artists create in their work helps bind them together. “For me, the work is really introspective,” says Ortega of her vintage handkerchiefs embroidered with individual strands of her hair she plucked as she needed them. The embroidery is ambiguous in most cases, relating very personally to aspects of the artist’s life. “It has to do with a sense of time and me growing gracefully. … The words and images I chose to embroider are all a gesture to people and places.” The handkerchiefs exude an intimacy, drawing upon the traditional use of the object as something one keeps close to their body, often embroidered on and given to someone as a flirtatious gesture. “It really boiled down, for me, as a motive, that ever since I was a little girl, I wanted to embroider my hair into something for a lover,” Ortega says. “I realized I didn’t have to have anybody to give it to, I could give those things to myself.”

Similarly, Kay’s photographs hold the same intimacy although her approach is more literal. Although the compositions are careful and deliberate, many of the photographs, given the use of flash and subject matter, have a snapshot quality and a documentary feel. “The photographs deal a lot with the passing of time in relation to yourself and growing and growing up,” says Kay of her work. “I like documenting my friends. It’s documentary but not completely documentary. When I photograph, I have a particular narrative in mind. In this case, it had to do with Toni’s hair.”

The two artists communicated while creating work for this show, and the photographs were taken over a period of a few months. The most revealing image is a photograph in which Ortega’s back is to the camera. Her hair literally takes the place of her face and becomes her identity. “I was thinking about the way different women grow into their sexualities and just into themselves and I wanted to document it,” says Kay. “I feel like [Toni and I] have been through a lot of the same benchmark things growing up.” The two bodies of work play off each other nicely—sometimes subtly, other times more blatantly. At its heart, the show is a look into what it means to grow and change, a way to mark the passing of time. It’s done in a way that is tender and sweet, in a sentimental sort of way. “Because our lives are in progress, it feels like the show is still in progress,” says Kay. Ω

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A wok to remember CJ Palace

129 Los Altos Parkway, 626-8878 The culinary appeal of Chinese cooking has taken Western culture by storm. Those who experience this Asian nirvana know by Dave Preston how good and economical Chinese food can be. And you won’t be disapdavep@ pointed when you sit down at a table newsreview.com in CJ Palace in Sparks. The bonus here: It’s got sushi, too. All in the family, Chef Dau Ngu masterfully wields the wok in the kitchen while wife, Kelly Leing, watches the front-of-the-house, and her brother Donne rules the rolls at the sushi bar. CJ’s offers a Chinese menu as long as the Great Wall. There’s a decent offering on the sushi side, but I was there for the wok wonders.

PHOTO/AMY BECK

flour, garlic, chili peppers, sweet potatoes and assorted seasonings. The meat was hot, moist and the breading was firm bordering on crisp, not greasy. The cascade of flavors from garlic to sweet to spicy was balanced and consistent in every bit. From the Mandarin region came Mongolian beef ($10.95), a thinly sliced “steak-cut,” stir-fried with vegetables in a savory brown sauce, made with hoisin sauce, soy sauce and chili peppers. The beef was paired with scallions and served over steamed rice. The meat was tender and the flavors of the sauce complemented the beef with a garlic, mild heat, back-ofthe-mouth, slightly sweet finish. The flavor of the subtle, sweet onion scallions are always welcome to punctuate the flavors on my palate. Lastly, triple delight ($15.25), a Cantonese dish with shrimp, scallops and chicken with traditional, steamed vegetables, in a light, garlic-lemon sauce then masterfully stir-fired. The vegetables were thoroughly cooked yet firm and full of flavor defined by the sauce and the shrimp, scallops and chicken, not over-cooked and generous on the plate. They also snuck in a sushi long roll, the Tiger ($9.50): shrimp tempura, crab, avocado, cooked shrimp, two special sauces, and scallions. Lunch prices run from $6.50-$8.95 and dinner run from $6.95-$13.95 for a la carte. There are complete meal lunches ($6.50-$8.75) and dinner specials ($12.99-$15.99 per person). You can get a whole duck for $25.50 and a whole flounder for $20.95. There’s a modest wine list and domestic and imported beers. I went with the traditional green tea ($2.49 a pot). Both the cooking and consumption of Chinese food are great culinary experiences. Besides appealing to our taste buds and eyes, food prepared in the Chinese manner is nutritious, retaining its vitamins with quick and minimum cooking. CJ Palace brings honor to the art of Chinese food. The only thing missing was someone to ring the giant gong. Ω

The Mongolian beef is one of the wonders from the wok at CJ's Palace.

CJ Palace is open 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.cjpalace.com.

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First, the Hunan-style, General Chicken ($10.95) named after General Tso Tsung-tang of the Qing Dynasty, the last dynasty of China, ruling to 1912. He was a general and statesman who was said to have enjoyed it, and perhaps helped create the dish, but there are no recorded recipes. The real roots of the dish lie in the post-1949 exodus of Chinese chefs to the United States. It was served in New York in the early 1970s. At CJ’s, out came a generous portion of boneless, white meat chicken pieces marinated in soy sauce, lightly battered and deep-fried to a crispy, golden brown before being coated with a sweet-hot sauce made with dried chilies, more soy, honey, vinegar, a hint of orange, and a little hoisin sauce. Hoisin is a tangy reddish-brown bean sauce, also known as Peking sauce. It’s an Asian pantry staple made from soybeans, sugar, vinegar,


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Safety dance Safe House Ryan Reynolds is actually in a good movie! Mind you, the dark and bloody Safe House is not a great film, but it does feature Reynolds and a little guy named Denzel Washington providing some potent acting fireworks. They combine to make this action thriller well worth watching, and the rare good film for Reynolds to add to his mostly stank resume. Reynolds plays Matt Weston, a CIA operaby tive who has spent a year sitting in a safe Bob Grimm house bouncing a ball against a wall and listening to tunes. He longs for the big bgrimm@ newsreview.com assignment in the field, but the organization seems content to keep him out of the way and performing menial tasks. Things change mightily when Tobin Frost (Washington) is brought to his house for some questioning and good old healthy waterboarding. Frost is a former agent gone rogue, selling secrets to enemy countries and making a decent living from it. He’s also a dangerous,

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“Don’t make me turn this car around!”

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murderous son of a bitch. Throw into the mix that he’s also virtuous, and you have your typically complicated Washington character. Much goes wrong when a band of baddies infiltrates the safe house, and Matt must take Tobin for a high-speed ride. This particular car chase is bona fide proof that director Daniel Espinosa does a bang-up job with action scenes. It sets the bar high for the rest of the film, and Espinosa doesn’t disappoint. The film is stacked with great chase scenes, car crashes and nerve-wracking shootouts.

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4 VERY GOOD

5 EXCELLENT

Reynolds, an actor I like a lot, is very good here as a sensitive agent who will break your freaking neck if you push him too far. The role is a physically demanding one, as Matt is put through the wringer with many hand-to-hand combat scenes. Reynolds can look beat up with the best of them. As he did with Chris Pine in the also fun Unstoppable, Washington does a great job working with a youngster. He and Reynolds make for a great, albeit complicated, screen team. Watching Washington here, you just get a sense of an old pro knowing exactly what he needs to do to provide substantial entertainment. It’s not up there with his best roles, but Washington certainly makes Frost a memorable character. The film is full of reliable actors and actresses. Vera Farmiga is good as a senior agent with questionable motives, as is Brendan Gleeson. Sam Shepard is fun as the man in charge of it all who seems to have had enough of the whole spy game thing. Ruben Blades is great in a small and pivotal role as Frost’s friend. The film has a few flaws. The romance between Matt and his justifiably confused girlfriend (Nora Arnezeder) is a disposable one. That element of the film could be left out and not missed at all. While some of Matt’s choices seem tragically stupid, that could be chocked up to his being a novice. Still, his stupidity gets a bit grating at times. There’s a good mystery at the center of the picture, and I won’t spoil any of it here. I’ll just say that it kept me guessing until the very end. It’s hard to pull the wool over these well-worn eyes, but Espinosa and friends managed a good job of it. Making Espinosa’s feat all the more impressive is that Safe House is his English-language film debut. Judging by his success putting film together here, I’m thinking he’ll get some more work. So there you have it. Ryan Reynolds in a good movie. He manages about one in every five or six. Having Washington’s name in the mix usually means a good movie, so Reynolds had the movie gods on his side this time. I’m curious to see if he will be able to keep the good streak going in the future. Ω

The Artist

An homage to silent films that’s actually a silent film, this is a funny, touching and innovative piece of work with a fun performance from Jean Dujardin. He plays a silent movie star at the dawning of the sound age, much like Charlie Chaplin, who either must make the leap to sound or slip away. Berenice Bejo plays Peppy Miller, a star on the rise. After sharing a scene in a film, their two careers go in separate directions. They’re wonderfully expressive performers, which suits Michel Hazanavicius’s film perfectly. One of last year’s biggest surprises, and they’ll be watching this one a hundred years from now.

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Contraband

Mark Wahlberg can be cool in a movie. In fact, he’s cool in most of his movies, and the right director can make the man look like a pro. But, oh boy, when Mark Wahlberg stinks, he stinks real bad. Like, The Happening bad. Wahlberg looks clueless and tired in this movie, and who can blame him? Director Baltasar Kormakur packs this silly actioner full of so many garbage subplots and locales that most actors would probably grow weary. Chris Farraday (Wahlberg) has gone legit after a career as a smuggler. Life is good due to beautiful wife Kate (Kate Beckinsale) and his alarm system business. But when his brother-in-law gets into trouble, Chris goes back into the criminal world, which inexplicably involves long boat trips and gunfights with Panamanians while his wife is terrorized back home by a drug dealer (Giovanni Ribisi). This is an overstuffed mess.

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Chronicle

There’s a good movie, and a great idea, buried in the stagey muck that clogs up Chronicle, the latest entry in the “found footage” craze. There are so many of these found footage movies now, I feel like I’m writing about them every week. A movie about three high school kids finding some kind of meteor and absorbing a strange energy that gives then super telekinetic powers is a magnificent idea. But hampering the movie with the idiotic premise that everything is filmed by the characters in an attempt for a new twist on the tiresome fake documentary gimmick is a terrible mistake. There are moments of brilliance, making this a near miss. But the found footage gimmick is so tired and strained that it kills the film. That said, the finale is a real winner. Sneak in for the last 15 minutes of the movie.

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The Descendants

George Clooney delivers another great performance as Matt King, a rich land tycoon living a modest life in Hawaii, trying to get along with his two daughters while his wife is in a coma. Matt finds out some stuff about the wife, and his life takes some interesting turns. Shailene Woodley is excellent here as Matt’s older daughter, as is Amara Miller as the younger one. Robert Forster is both funny and sad as Matt’s bitter fatherin-law, while Matthew Lillard gets a good role as a real estate agent with a secret. Written and directed by Alexander Payne (About Schmidt, Election, Sideways), it’s characteristic of his films. There are lots of good laughs to go with the heavy stuff.

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Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

The latest 9/11 movie is the worst one yet, focusing on an obnoxious kid (Thomas Horn) on a quest to find the lock for a key his father (Tom Hanks) left behind after dying on 9/11. Horn is just impossible to watch, and the plotting is deplorable. Yes, the kid is making his acting debut here, and it’s a demanding role. I’m sorry—he just drove me crazy. Max von Sydow shows up in a silent role and has some fun with it. That’s about the most positive thing I can say about this trash. It wastes decent performances from Hanks and Sandra Bullock.

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The Grey

4

The Iron Lady

Liam Neeson battles nature and puts up a good fight in director Joe Carnahan’s totally absorbing and devastating survival pic. The Grey tells the scary and surprisingly emotional tale of some Alaskan oil drillers who find themselves stranded in the middle of frozen tundra after their plane crashes. There’s scant chance of survival due to lack of food, lack of shelter and lack of time before temperatures drop and people freeze. There’s also the little matter of nasty, evil wolves trying to dismember them as they fight to stay warm and find food. The animals in The Grey have very little in common with White Fang. Actually, they make the werewolf from An American Werewolf in London look like an elderly pug. Frank Grillo, Dermot Mulroney and Joe Anderson all shine in supporting roles, but this is Neeson’s movie, containing some of his best work. Meryl Streep is my pick for 2011’s Best Actress for her incredible, uncanny work as former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in director Phyllida Lloyd’s engaging biopic. Streep disappears into her role. Yes, it’s partly due to excellent makeup work, but it’s mostly due to Streep’s beautifully nuanced performance. She plays Thatcher at many ages, including her recent declining years, and she’s spot on. Her accent is natural, her physicality is perfection. Yes, the film glosses over a lot of the political aspects that made Thatcher controversial. It focuses mainly on Thatcher’s relationship with her husband (played in later years by Jim Broadbent), and her psychological and emotional difficulties in her elder years. This is all about Streep and seeing an actress showing the world how this sort of thing is done right.

1

One for the Money

Katherine Heigl is Stephanie Plum, a former Macy’s employee who goes into the bail-bond business. Her first gig is to go after a cop in trouble, Joe Morelli (Jason O’Mara), a guy she lost her virginity to and tried to run over with a car. It’s all based on the first of a popular string of novels by Janet Evanovich, and my guess is that director Julie Anne Robinson missed something in the translation from book to film. The movie is a dull dud. O’Mara is an actor who has a talent for making every line irritating. He’s just so intense. This is a guy who visits the catering table for coffee a lot during the shoot. Heigl does her best with lazy material, and Debbie Reynolds shows up in the kooky grandma role. This isn’t the movie that will take Heigl to the next level. Actually, I see direct-to-video movies in her future.

3

The Woman in Black

This is an old-fashioned haunted house movie from Hammer Films that takes some time to get going but gets some good scares in the end. Daniel Radcliffe plays a lawyer who goes to a village in the middle of nowhere and, quite illogically, spends a couple of nights in a haunted house. While there, he sees multiple ghosts, not the least of which is the ghost of a deranged woman angry about the death of her son. Director James Watkins sets the film in a place where it’s impossible for Radcliffe’s character to escape, adding to the dread. There are some interesting sequences—I especially like when a mudcovered young boy makes a visit in the rain—and Radcliffe makes his character somebody we can root for, even if he is dumber than a box of hammers for entering the house in the first place. This one is committed to darkness, so those looking for a good time might want to go play skee ball instead.

Grand Sierra Cinema 2500 E. Second St.: 323-1100 Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.: 329-3333

Carson City

Sparks

Horizon Stadium Cinemas, Stateline: (775) 589-6000

Century Sparks 14, 1250 Victorian Ave.: 357-7400

Galaxy Fandango, 4000 S. Curry St.: 885-7469

Tahoe


Prove your metal Envirusment Like many contemporary music genres—and worst than most—heavy metal has suffered from excessive subdiviby Brad Bynum sion. There’s stoner metal, sludge metal, groove metal, glam metal, bradb@ speed metal and thrash metal—just newsreview.com to name a few. Black metal fans and death metal fans bicker over which is more extreme. And then there are the unholy hybrids: funk metal, metalcore and rap metal. And on and on and on. PHOTO/BRAD BYNUM

Men of metal: Envirusment is, clockwise from top left, John Shafer, Jeff Stewart, Wes Deputy, Steven Morris and Don Woods.

Envirusment will perform with Testament, Prong and Sinister Scene at the Knitting Factory, on Sat., Feb. 18 at 8:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.reverbnation.com/ envirusment

OPINION

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NEWS

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So it’s great to encounter a band like Envirusment, what some might call a true metal band. It’s heavy metal—straight up, no chaser. Drummer John Shafer fires off shots like an automatic weapon wielded by an accurate assassin—heavy and relentless, but precise. Guitarist Wes Deputy and bassist Don Woods gallop ahead with monster riffage like a stampede of wild horses. And lead guitarist Jeff Stewart takes squealing, thrilling solos in the grand classical-inspired shredder tradition of Randy Rhoads. “And we don’t have the same trendy, typical vocals as most bands,” says singer Steven Morris, referring to the barking Cookie Monster vocal style. “I call ’em punch vocals. They have their place.” Morris is able to convey those growling, punchy low notes, but he’s also able to hit the high notes with a full-throat projectile voice, when most male vocalists would only be able to squeak ’em out with a whispered falsetto. Morris’ versatility with the high notes means the group is able to pull off convincingly faithful covers of songs like Iron

GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Maiden’s “Wrathchild” and Led Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song” —complete with banshee howls. Envirusment’s Led Zep cover takes one of the prototypical early metal songs and amps up the heaviosity a few notches. “We wanted to make it a faithful cover, but also more metal,” says Morris. The group also practices in one of the most metal places imaginable: in a room above a paintball gun facility in Panther Valley. They’re one of a dozen or so bands that practice there—Morris calls it a heavy metal dormitory. And to complete the metal picture, the band’s original tunes have titles like “Parasitic Prophesy” and “Inner Terrorism.” Morris is also the vocalist for the band Demension 13, which he describes as “more organic” than Envirusment, which he describes as “ravenous, like a pack of wolves.” “Our goal is to destroy, professionally, every band before us and after us,” he says. “We want everyone to leave talking about us.” “It’s like in boxing,” says Woods. “There’s no animosity toward the other fighter. But once you step into the ring, it’s on, and you’re vicious. And then afterward you shake hands and tell each other good job.” The band is able to perform a lot of variations of heavy, relentless music. They write songs with openended structures not hindered by pop considerations, and use key changes, tempo shifts and volume dynamics. And Stewart’s solos explore musical ideas a bit more complex than the major pentatonic scale. “Modern metal is the modern classical music,” says Woods. “There’s no right or wrong,” says Morris, of the group’s unpredictable approach to songwriting. The metal alloy that Envirusment probably falls closest to is the thrash metal variety—and they cite Testament, with whom they’ll be playing at the Knitting Factory on Feb. 18 as an influence. But there are a lot of shards in there—they maintain grooves, the vocals soar and rumble, the guitars speed up and slow down, the drums rock and roll—so, overall, what kind of metal is Envirusment? The heavy kind. Ω

IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

| MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 16, 2012

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RN&R

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23


THURSDAY 2/16 3RD STREET

FRIDAY 2/17

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

SATURDAY 2/18

SUNDAY 2/19

MoFo Party Band, 9pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/20-2/22 DG Kicks, Jakki Ford, 9pm, Tu, no cover Early Bird Open Mic, 6:30pm, W, no cover

Moon Gravy, 8:30pm, no cover

ABEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Jazz Night, 7:30pm, Tu, no cover

2905 U.S. Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 345-2235

THE ALLEY

The Mentors, Get Shot!, Old Glory, City of Vain, 8pm, $10

The Phenomenauts, Kepi Ghoulie: Electric, Z-Man, DJ True Justice, Distant Relatives, Kosha Dillz, 8pm, Tu, $10 Union Hearts, Handsome Vultures, 7pm, $10 DJ Ricky Switch, 4 Trees, 8pm, $10

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB 188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

Themsonsofbitches, Drag Me Under, Swamp Donkey, 9pm, $5

Shadow Arcade (alt/goth) w/DJs Tigerbunny, JP, Bat Brains, DC Grave, 9pm, no cover

THE BLACK TANGERINE

Schall Adams Band, 9:30pm, $5

Schall Adams Band, 9:30pm, $5

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

The Phenomenauts

CANTINA LOS TRES HOMBRES

Michelle Pappas, 6pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

CHAPEL TAVERN

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

926 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-6262

Feb. 18, 7 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

James Wilsey Jr., 9pm, no cover Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover

COMMROW

Free Fridays w/DJ Max, 11pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Comedy

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Wayne Walsh, W, 9pm, no cover

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Frances DiLorinzo, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Joey Gay, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

1805 W. Williams Ave., Fallon; (775) 428-5800

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Serina Dawn Band, 7pm, no cover

Tommy Castro, Jason King Band, 8pm, $20-$40

Blues Jam Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm W, no cover

Mark Castro Band, 9pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Merle Jagger, 9:30pm, no cover

Thom Crowder & Friends, 1771, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Nick, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

FUEGO

Karaoke w/Mitchell, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Mitchell, 9pm, M, no cover Karaoke w/Nick, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

Sunday Music Showcase, 4pm, no cover

Java Jungle Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Sean P and Friends, F, 7:30pm; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $12, $16; Hynopt!c with Dan Kimm, F, 9:30pm, $16, $21

Large Bills Accepted, noon, M, no cover

THE DAILY GRIND

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Sunday be fore publication .

Danny Sturtevant, 7pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Joe Starr, Tony Camin, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Bobby Collins, Alan Bursky, W, 9pm, $25

Open mic comedy night, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Comedy, 9pm, no cover

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Sucka Punch, The Let Downs, 7:30pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

JAVA JUNGLE

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Jazz Jam w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Live jazz w/First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

#1 - Reno News & Review - 02-16-2012

COMEDY AT

honky tonk

Hweek week

Number of small plate appetizers offered during our Happy Hour 15

roots rock

endH

Average cost of a small plate appetizer during our Happy Hour $5.67

PlAyIng For Blood g for keeps and the people n i play

FrI 9:30PM FeB 17

The Gunners Daughter oPens the show

sAt 9:30PM HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH FeB 18

THOM CROWDER & FRIENDS

ADAM RAY

FEBRUARY 16 – 18

Cost for a glass of house wine or well drink featuring the likes of Skyy, JW Red, Bombay, Jim Beam, Sauza and Bacardi $3.50

WILLIE FRATTO FEBRUARY 23 – 25

2-FOR-1 SHOW OFFER FOR LOCALS. JUST SHOW VALID ID.

Number of Happy Hours per day 2 Number of years in business 35

For reservations visit the Total Rewards® Center, call 775-788-2900 or book online at HarrahsReno.com

Pounds of potatoes we use in a week for complimentary “Rap Chips” 50

Management reserves the right to change or discontinue offer without notice. Visit the Total Rewards ® Center for show age restrictions. Show schedules vary. Entertainment subject to change without prior notice. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC. #1600-12-20

Number of microwaves in our kitchen 0

WITH

SEVENTEEN- 71

1555 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV

www.Rapscallion.com

775-323-1211 • 1-877-932-3700 TUeS 9PM

24

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Karaoke RN&R

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wed 9PM

Open Monday - Friday at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm Sunday Brunch from 10am to 2pm

OPEN MIC

FEBRUARY 16, 2012 V1_68595.1_3.9x5.67_4c_Ad.indd 1

2/13/12 4:49 PM


THURSDAY 2/16 JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Cash’d Out, 8:30pm, $13-$26

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL 405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

FRIDAY 2/17

SATURDAY 2/18

Gone Beyond, Blabbermouth, 9pm, $TBA

Gypsyhawk, Walk Away Alpha, 10pm, $TBA

SUNDAY 2/19

Dennis is Dead, Shadow of the Giant, Testament, Prong, Sinister Scene, Delirium Process, Seven Churches, 8pm, $6 Envirusment, 8:30pm, $20-$41

Mat Kearney, Robert Francis, 8pm, M, $18-$40

Saving Alleya, 9pm, $5

When Echos Fail, 9pm, $5

Open Mic Night/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Gone Beyond, Blabbermouth, 9:30pm, no cover

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Stevie D., 8pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Silk & Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Buck & Bob, 2pm, no cover Road Daddy, 8pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

PONDEROSA SALOON

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RED ROCK

Spencer & John Acoustic Set, 9pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/20-2/22 Open mic w/host Jackson, 9pm, M, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7:30pm, W, no cover

John Palmore, 6pm, no cover

Mike & Karl of The Others Brothers, 2pm, no cover

The Lonesome Heroes

Benefit show w/Boogie Monsters, Big City Hoedown, 9pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Pilgrimage to Mecca: A Night of ’80s & ‘90s Golden Era Hip Hop, 9pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON

Hip Hop Open Mic, 9pm, W, no cover Apostles of Badness, Liquorville, 9pm, M, live jazz, 8pm, W, no cover

Chord Soup, 8pm, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Feb. 20, 9 p.m. Red Rock 241 S. Sierra St. 324-2468

The Lonesome Heroes, 9pm, M, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

SIERRA GOLD

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

680 S. Meadows Pkwy., (775) 850-1112

SPARKY’S

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

9570 S. McCarran Blvd., (775) 787-9669

Jamie Rollins, 9pm, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

Jazz Night w/Mike Mayhall & Friends, 7pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

STREGA BAR

Plastic Chaos w/Rhiboot, DJ EF Word, 9pm, no cover

DJ Winston Smith, 9pm, no cover

DJ Winston Smith, 9pm, no cover

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

Occupy Reno Outreach Night, 9pm, M, Dark Tuesdays w/Stefani, 9pm, Tu, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

Spoken Views Poetry Slam, Glimpse Trio, Whatitdo, 9pm, $5

Songwriters in the Round, 8pm, $5-$8

Renopocalypse Comedy Show, 8pm, no cover

Silky Soul Sunday featuring Groove Centric, 6pm, no cover

Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, Steve Starr Show, Cliff Notes Live Jam, 8pm, W, no cover

THE UNDERGROUND

1) Crush, She’s So Provocative, Scarlet Presence, The Oscillators, 6:30pm, $8-$10

2) Liver Scars, Voted Best Band, Slut Fungus, 8pm, no cover before 8pm, $3 after

1) Eclipse, Renegade, 8pm, $10

Burning Peace, Wayne Carlson, The Hellbusters, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Open Mic, 7pm, no cover

Nü Fridays, 10pm, no cover charge for women till 2am

Reso, Evol Intent, Man Machine, Motorhome, CTRL ALT DELETE, Gasmik, 10pm, $10

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-6460 555 E. Fourth St., (775) 786-2582 1) Showroom 2) Tree House Lounge

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

WURK

Hype, 10pm, no cover

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

Mat Kearney Feb. 20, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Come See Reno’s Most Talented New & Exciting Tattoo Artists! Mention RN& R to hear our specials APPLE CORE TATTOO & BODY PIERCING

Custom Work • Walk-Ins 7 DAYS A WEEK 1507 S. Wells // 775.448.6550

www.applecoretattooreno.com

THESE DON’T

MIX

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period. OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 16, 2012

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RN&R

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25


THURSDAY 2/16

FRIDAY 2/17

SATURDAY 2/18

SUNDAY 2/19

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/20-2/22

2) Steppenstonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppenstonz, 4pm, The Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) Steppenstonz, 4pm, The Palmore Brothers, 10pm, no cover

2) The Palmore Brothers, 8pm, no cover

2) Electric Rush, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Henhouse Prowlers, 8pm, no cover

2) Mick Martin and the Blues Rockers, 8pm, no cover

2) Mick Martin and the Blues Rockers, 8pm, no cover

2) Mick Martin and the Blues Rockers, 6pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Rebekah Chase, 10pm, no cover

Rebekah Chase, 10pm, no cover

Rebekah Chase, 10pm, no cover

1) Gomez, Hey Rosetta!, 9pm, $20, $23

1) Dead Winter Carpenters, Buster Blue, 1) Love Fool, 9pm, $10 9pm, $8, $10

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CIRCUS CIRCUS

500 N. Sierra St., (775) 329-0711

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

Soulive

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

Feb. 22, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 4) Cin Cin Bar & Lounge

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Senses, 9pm, $15 1) Theater 2) 2500 East 3) The Beach 5) Country dance lessons 4) Xtreme Sports Bar 5) Mustangs Dancehall & Saloon w/DJ Jamie “G”, Cowboy Tom, 8pm, $5 6) Summit Pavilion 7) Grand Sierra Ballroom 8) Silver State Pavilion

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 356-9799: F-Sa, 7pm, Tu, 6pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Red’s Golden Eagle Grill, 5800 Home Run Drive, Spanish Springs, (775) 626-6551: Karaoke w/Manny, F, 8pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 8474467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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RN&R

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, 9:30pm, $19.95 + 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, DJ JC, 11pm, no cover 4) Guitar Stevie, 5pm, no cover

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, 1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, $19.95 + W, $19.95 + 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover M, DJ Chris English, 10pm Tu, Audioboxx, 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 10pm W, no cover

1) Ultimate Reno Combat 31, 8pm, $25-$100

1) Senses, 9pm, $15 4) Baila Latin Dance Party, 7:30pm, $5

1) Senses, 9pm, $15

2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, VEX Girls, 10:30pm, $20

1) Kenny Loggins, 7:30pm, $69 2) Arthur Hervey, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ/dancing, VEX Girls, 10:30pm, $20

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

Karaoke

26

1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 8pm, $19.95 + 1) Benise—Nights of Fire!, 7pm, $19.95 + 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 3) Live piano, 4:30pm, DJ JC, 11pm, 3) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover no cover 4) Guitar Stevie, 5pm, no cover

1) Matisyahu, Soulive, 9pm, W, $25, $30 2) Black Rock City Allstars, 11pm, Tu, no cover

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15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 427-7247 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) VEX

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Showroom 2) Sapphire Lounge 3) Plaza 4) Convention Center

1) Adam Ray, 8pm, $20

1) Life in the Fastlane—Songs of the Eagles, 1) Life in the Fastlane—Songs of the Eagles, 8pm, $25, $30, Adam Ray, 10:30pm, $20 1) Life in the Fastlane—Songs of the Eagles, 8pm, $25, $30, Adam Ray, 10:30pm, $20 2) Karaoke, 6pm, Club Sapphire, 9pm, 8pm, $25, $30 2) Club Sapphire, 9pm, no cover no cover

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1) Reno Jazz Orchestra—Jazz Alive!, 8pm, $10 2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, no cover 3) Bobby Adams, 5:30pm, no cover 5) DJ BG, 6pm, no cover

1) Reno Jazz Orchestra—Jazz Alive!, 8pm, $10 2) Stew Stewart, 9pm, no cover 3) Bobby Adams, 6pm, no cover 5) Thom and the Tikis, 5:30pm, DJ BG, 10pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Cabaret 5) Convention Center

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Cabaret 3) Terrace Lounge 4) Edge 5) Aqua Lounge

FEBRUARY 16, 2012

2) Stew Stewart, 8pm, no cover 5) Thom and the Tikis, 5:30pm, no cover

1) Wayne Brady, 9pm, $40, $50 3) EOTO, Eliot Lipp, 10pm, $20, $25

2) DJ JayCeeOh, 10pm, $5

2) Bayou Boys, 7pm, Tu, no cover 3) Marcus Anderson, 6pm, W, no cover

2) Nathan Owens, 5pm, Easy Money, 11pm, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, no cover 4) Bad Girl Thursdays, 10pm, no cover charge for women

2) Nathan Owens, 8pm, no cover 3) Maxxt Outt, 9pm, no cover 4) Salsa dancing, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 10pm, $20

2) Nathan Owens, 8pm, no cover 3) Maxxt Outt, 9pm, no cover 4) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

2) Nathan Owens, 7pm, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, Maxxt Outt, 9pm, no cover 4) Black Rock City Allstars, 9pm, $15

2) Nathan Owens, 7pm, M, no cover 3) Chris Costa, 7pm, M, W, no cover

2) DJ I, 10pm, no cover

2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

1) The Fray, 8pm, $49.50, $59.50 2) Dueling pianos, 9pm, no cover 3) Dance party, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ REXX, 10pm, no cover 3) Salsa Etc., 7pm, no cover

2) DJ Tom, 9pm, M, DJ I, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover 3) Dudes Day, 7pm, Tu, Country Night, 7pm, W, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Ballroom 5) Drinx Lounge

2) Stew Stewart, 9pm, no cover 3) Bobby Adams, 6pm, no cover 5) Thom and the Tikis, 5:30pm, DJ BG, 10pm, no cover

1) Senses, 9pm, Tu, W, $15


For Thursday, February 16 to Wednesday, February 22 YOUR LYIN’ EYES: EYEWITNESS TESTIMONY: Deborah Davis, professor of psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno, presents this talk. Tu, 2/21, 6:30pm. Free. Walden's Coffeehouse, 3940 Mayberry Drive, (775) 784-6544, www.unr.edu/inbre.

To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review.

BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIMES: Staff members

Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

and guest readers tell stories to children. Sa, 10am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 5555 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-8882.

NEW MOTHERS SUPPORT GROUP: This group

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., March 8, is Thursday, March 1. Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

offers support to first-time mothers in dealing with the changes and issues that come with having a new baby. Th, 1011:30am. Saint Mary’s Regional Medical Center, 235 W. Sixth St., (775) 770-3843, www.supportsaintmarys.org.

SCHEELS KIDS KLUB: WALK OF PRESIDENTS: Kids Su, 2/19, 11am-3pm. $12 adults; $10 children, seniors; free for children age 2 and younger. Animal Ark Wildlife Sanctuary and Nature Center, 1265 Deerlodge Road, off Red Rock Road, (775) 970-3111, www.animalark.org.

ABWA RENO TAHOE EXPRESS LUNCHEON: Fritz Battcher, Esq. of Holland & Hart will present “The Legal Pitfalls of Business,” which covers topics such as leaving an employer, choosing a business entity and requirements of Securities Laws. Please RSVP. W, 2/22, 11:30am-1pm. $20 members; $25 non-members. Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 848-1306, www.abwa-reno.com. Preservation Society presents Michael Fischer, former acting director of the Nevada Department of Cultural Affairs. He will talk about Center Street, a hub of activity in Reno during the early 1930s. W, 2/22, 7-8:30pm. Free. Mount Rose Elementary School, 915 Lander St., (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

CLARA DRISCOLL, THE TIFFANY GIRLS AND ART OF THE TIFFANY ERA: Art historian Martin Eidelberg is one of the foremost scholars of Tiffany art glass and lamp designs. Eidelberg’s talk will look into the life, art and history of Louis Comfort Tiffany and the art glass crafted in his studio. Sa, 2/18, 10:3011:30am. $10 NMA members; $15 non-members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

MARDI GRAS DANCE PARTY: The Reno Blues Society holds its 18th annual dance party featuring headliner Sista Monica Parker. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Sa, 2/18, 7pm. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Ramada Reno Downtown Hotel and Casino, 1000 E. Sixth St., (775) 786-5151, www.renoblues.org.

will learn about the Presidents of the United States displayed in Scheels and receive a free ride on the Scheels Ferris Wheel. Meet at the Thomas Jefferson display. M, 2/20, 6pm. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

WINTER PRUNING OF TREES AND SHRUBS: Learn how to correctly prune trees, shrubs and fruit trees. Proper tools and techniques will be covered. Please RSVP. Classes are free but participants are encouraged to bring a can of food for Food Bank of Northern Nevada. Sa, 2/18, 10am & 1pm. Free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way, Sparks, (775) 355-1551, www.railcitygardencenter.com.

CENTER STREET HEYDAY: Historic Reno

TMCC MAIN ART GALLERY: Living in El Norte.

Local artists Bryan Christiansen, Jen Graham and Leah Ruby showcase their work in non-traditional media exploring domestic objects and utilitarian craft. Tu-Sa, 3-6pm through 2/18. Free. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

JOLT-N-JAVA CAFE & COFFEE HOUSE: Family

All ages

Listings are free, but not guaranteed.

Events

THE HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: Homebodies.

and Friends. The show features work by members of the Portrait Society of Reno. There will be an artists’ reception on Feb. 19 featuring refreshments and a performance by world music duo Serendipity. M-Su, 6am-5pm through 3/27. Opens 2/18; Su, 2/19, 12-4pm. Free. 5295 Vista Blvd., Sparks, (775) 354-2121.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Printmaking Extravaganza. Artists Candace Nicol, Larry Hunt, Sue Gross, Cathy McClelland and Janet Martin will exhibit a genre of printmaking techniques from wood cuts, collagraph assemblage, screen prints, silk screening, metal etching, monotype, relief and intaglio to name a few. M, W-Su, 11am4pm through 2/27.The Weekly’s 30 Year Anniversary Exhibit, The Weekly magazine celebrates its 30th anniversary with an exhibit Weekly covers. M, W-Su, 11am-4pm through 2/27. Free. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

Through the paintings and recordings of Alma and Ramiro’s personal experiences, Blanco De San Roman endeavors to bring a human perspective to the issues surrounding illegal immigration. M-Sa through 2/25. Free. Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini Blvd., (775) 674-7698, www.tmcc.edu/vparts/artgalleries.

Call for Artists NORTH TAHOE ARTS OPEN CALL FOR MARCH EXHIBIT: North Tahoe Arts invites artists to submit artwork for its March exhibition Wildlife in Wild Places. The show has an all-animal theme and is open to all mediums. Send three images of your work on a CD or email to info@northtahoearts.com. Label your CD with your name and a self-stamped enveloped for its return. A non-refundable application fee of $20 is required for processing. Deadline for applications is Feb. 17. North Tahoe Arts Center, Art Gallery & Gift Shop, 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

SIERRA NEVADA COLLEGE: Geographical

Art ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Great Basin Bonanza. Artists Co-op of Reno hosts this month-long art show and sale to benefit the Great Basin Outdoor School. M-Su, 11am-4pm through 2/29. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896.

RUNthe Devil NING WITH

Divides: Finding Common Ground. Nevada Arts Council presents this traveling exhibit in the Prim Library. M-F through 4/6. Opens 2/16. Free. 999 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, (775) 831-1314, www.sierranevada.edu.

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Broadway Comes to Reno continues its 2011-2012 season with the musical comedy Damn Yankees, a Faustian tale about a middleaged baseball fan who trades his soul to the Devil so his favorite team can win the league pennant. The musical was based on Douglass Wallop’s 1954 novel The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant and was adapted into a musical in 1955 with the book written by Wallop and George Abbott and music and lyrics by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross. The original production ran for 1,019 performances, and has enjoyed several revivals since its 1955 debut on Broadway. The musical won seven Tony Awards in 1956, including the best musical, best actor, best actress and best choreography categories. Damn Yankees performances are at 8 p.m. on Feb. 17-18, 7 p.m. on Feb. 19, and 2 p.m. on Feb. 18-19 at the Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $43-$83. Call 686-6600 or visit www.pioneercenter.com. —Kelley Lang

RENO ROTARY FOOD AND WINE TASTING: The 20th annual event features a Mardi Gras theme, food and wine, a silent auction and a variety of festive entertainment. The event benefits local programs supported by the Rotary Club of Reno. Tu, 2/21, 6-9pm. $50. Reno Ballroom, 401 N. Center St., (775) 8463539, http://renorotary.com.

RIVERWALK DISTRICT WINE WALK: Visit any Riverwalk District Merchant on Wine Walk day to get a map of participating Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, with a valid photo ID, you’ll receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Every month offers a different theme and part of all proceeds are donated to a local charity. Third Sa of every month, 2-5pm. $20. The Riverwalk District, downtown Reno along The Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

WILD WINTER WEEKENDS: Animal Ark will be open to visitors this weekend. The winter weather agrees with some of the wildlife sanctuary’s residents including lynx, bobcats, cougars, Arctic wolf and Arctic fox. Call prior to your departure, as severe weather or unsafe facility conditions will cancel the festivities. Sa, 2/18, 11am-3pm;

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TICKETS AT COMMROW.COM

Museums NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM (THE HARRAH COLLECTION): Mutant Rides: Origin of a Species. Burning Man automobile creations. M-Su through 7/25. 10 S. Lake St., (775) 333-9300, http://automuseum.org.

NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY: Basque Aspen Tree Art

TOMMY MY Y CASTRO CASTRO SAT | FEB 18 | 8p

WAYNE W AYNE STA AYNE S STATIC TAT TIC

Exhibition, This exhibition showcases images that were carved by Basque shepherds in aspen trees across Nevada. The arborglyphs documented what was important to the Basque sheep herders from 1920s thru the 1960s. Photographs will be included to help tell the story of the Basque sheepherder. W-Sa, 10am-5pm through 4/28; Reno: Biggest Little City in the World. This exhibit features artifacts, photos, manuscripts, gaming memorabilia and art specific to the history and development of Reno. Incorporated in the exhibit will be custom “Pickles” drawings cre-

ated specifically for the exhibit by Sparks cartoonist Brian Crane. W-Sa, 10am-5pm. $4 adults; free for members, children age 17 and younger. 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 688-1190.

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper, W-F, Su through 7/1; Tim Hawkinson: Totem, W-Su through 10/7;This is Not a Trojan Horse, W-Su through 3/11; Art, Science, and the Arc of Inquiry: The Evolution of the Nevada Museum of Art, W-Su through 7/1; Jean-Luc Mylayne: The Heavens Are Blue, W-Su through 3/11; Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions, W-Su through 2/19; In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows, W-Su through 5/20; Out of the Forest: Art Nouveau Lamps, W-Su through 5/20; The Canary Project: Landscapes of Climate Change, W-Su through 4/29;Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection, W-Su through 5/20; August

Sander: Face of Our Time, W-Su through 4/22; Peter Liashkov: Paper Cowboy, W-Su through 4/15. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 3293333, www.nevadaart.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM: Celtic Heritage Exhibit. The Sparks Heritage Museum presents a Celtic exhibit in their changing gallery displaying loaned items from the Northern Nevada Celtic community. The local chapter of the Sons and Daughters of Erin will hold a reception at 2pm on March 4, which will include Celtic music, a performance by Blanchette Irish Dancers and a lecturer presenting an Irish-themed program. M-Su through 4/30. $5 donation for reception. 814 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 355-1144, www.sparksmuseum.org.

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THURS | FEB 23 | 8p

Dim and her I’m having a whirlwind romance with a man I met online on Thanksgiving. I moved across the country to live with him on Dec. 20, and we’re building a life together. The problem is I have a high IQ (137), and he’s very unintelligent and illogical. It’s hard to have a good conversation unless we talk about sex. It’s too late to leave now, so any advice on how to keep our IQ difference from ripping us apart? I really love him, as he’s pure of heart and great in bed! So far, I’ve held back from telling him when he’s gullible or irrational, but I worry that I’ll eventually call him something nasty—like “idiot.” I don’t want to hurt him. I love him for who he is, not what he knows.

YOUNG DU DUB DUBLINERS UBLINERS BLINERS FRI | FEB 24 | 8p RENO’S LOOKING UP 255 N.Virginia St. I at the Arch 28

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FEBRUARY 16, 2012

Is there a chance you cheated on your IQ test? You pride yourself on your intelligence, yet you spent a few weeks chitchatting on the internet with some dull blade, dropped everything and moved across the country to live with him. Now, you lovebirds are “building a life together”—that is, whenever you aren’t too busy grumbling about needing an intellectual equal. You might “love him for who he is,” but you also despise him for who he isn’t. Oops. Marriage researcher Dr. John Gottman found that expressions of contempt are the greatest predictor that a couple will go kaput. Of course, anybody you get involved with will have some annoying habits or flaws that challenge the relationship. Relatively benign bad habits are things like snoring, and for that, you can get those little strips to put on your partner’s nose.

What’s the answer here, strapping a piece of duct tape across his mouth? Check out your completely lame excuse for staying: “It’s too late to leave now.” Now check your feet. Bolted to the floorboards? If not, what’s keeping you there is probably irrational thinking that economists call the “sunk cost fallacy”—deciding to keep investing in some endeavor based on what you’ve already invested rather than assessing how your investment will pay off in the future. In The Folly of Fools, anthropologist Dr. Robert Trivers explains self-deceptions like yours, noting the difference between intelligence and consciousness: “You can be very bright but unconscious.” When you realize you’ve been unconscious, you can choose to wake up and cut your losses—before you start saying cutting things to your goodhearted sexy simpleton. To live less sleepwalkingly in the future, reflect on what got you into this—what void you tried to fill by telling your rationality to shut up so you could congratulate yourself on the great love you found. And goody for you on what you actually found—some really great sex—but let’s call a cabana boy a cabana boy.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


e

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Onstage THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ERNEST: Good Luck Macbeth presents Oscar Wilde’s play about a couple of English aristocrats pretending to be the same made-up person in order to escape burdensome social obligations in Victorian London. F, 2/17; Sa, 2/18. $17 general; $14 students, seniors; $20 at the door. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

IN THE NEXT ROOM (OR THE VIBRATOR PLAY): Brüka Theatre presents Sarah Ruhl’s comedy “about marriage, intimacy and electricity.” Th, 2/16, 8pm; F, 2/17, 8pm; Sa, 2/18, 8pm. $18 general admission; $16 students, seniors and military; $20 at the door. Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org.

LEADING LADIES: Reno Little Theater presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two down-on-theirluck English Shakespearean actors who hatch a plan to pose as an elderly woman’s nephews in order to get their hands on her fortune. When the pair find out that these relatives are actually nieces they continue the scheme in drag, but things become more complicated when one of the men falls for the woman’s actual niece. F,

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM, RANCHO SAN RAFAEL REGIONAL PARK: King Tut: Wonderful Things from the Pharaohs Tomb. The exhibit features more than 130 replicas of many of the artifacts found in the tomb of King Tutankhamun. Additional artifacts help bring life to the turbulent times of King Tut’s reign while telling the story of the “Boy Pharaoh.” W-Sa, 10am-4pm through 5/23; Su, 12-4pm through 5/20. $9 adults; $8 children age 17 and younger, seniors age 62 and older. 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-5961.

Film BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL: The seventh annual film festival returns for a second showing. The program features nine films, including festival award-winners Solitaire, Chalk and Ski and Breaking Trail. Tu, 2/21, 7-10pm. $10 general, $5 with student ID (cash only). Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 337-9111, www.artemisiamovies.org.

Music

Sports & fitness

ALBERT AU AND KAREN TONG: The pop stars will present a mix of Chinese music. Su, 2/19, 8pm. $58. Reno Ballroom, 401 N. Center St.,

ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for

(775) 325-7333.

ASSAD BROTHERS: Brazilian-born guitar duo Sérgio and Odair Assad perform as part of the University of Nevada, Reno’s Performing Arts Series. Th, 2/16, 7:30pm. $5-$30. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Complex, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/pas.

COME IN FROM THE COLD: Singer-songwriter and cowboy poet Richard Elloyan performs as part of the family entertainment series. Sa, 2/18, 7pm. $3 suggested donation per person. Western Heritage Interpretive Center, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 828-6612.

JUSTIN MCMAHON’S CD RELEASE SHOW: The singersongwriter performs songs off his second full-length album Second Chances and Irreparable Mistakes. Th, 2/16, 7:30pm. $15 advance; $20 day of show. Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., Pioneer Center plaza on Virginia and Mill streets, (775) 686-6600, www.renotahoecomedy.com.

MOVIE NIGHT: INSIDE JOB: Occupy Reno presents a showing of the critically acclaimed film which tells the story behind the economic crisis of 2008. W, 2/22, 8-11:30pm. Free. Wells Fargo Auditorium, Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center, 1664 N. Virginia St. University of Nevada, Reno, (775) 784-4636, www.occupyreno.org.

KUNR JAZZ BRUNCH: Scot & Graham Marshall perform at the monthly event presented by KUNR Radio and Nevada Museum of Art. Su, 2/19, 11am-1pm. Free; admission fees apply to art galleries. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333.

THREE WITH BRIDGES: Churchill Arts Council’s series concludes with a screening of the 1985 film Jagged Edge, starring Jeff Bridges, Glenn Close and Peter Coyote. F, 2/17, 7pm. $7 CAC members; $10 non-members. Oats Park Art Center, 151 E. Park St., Fallon, (775) 423-1440.

NATIONWIDE GOSPEL SHOWCASE BENEFIT EVENT: New Believers Christian Fellowship presents its JAMS (Jesus Anointed Music Servants) Nationwide Gospel Showcase Benefit Concert featuring choir groups, praise dance teams, praise teams, gospel rappers, poets, mime acts, stage play acts, musicians, singers, and more. The church hopes to raise $1 million and more to purchase more than 200 roundtrip tickets to send ministers, pastors, gospel artists, youth team groups, etc., to Jerusalem, Israel, to support its Praise and Worship Tour. Sa, 2/18, 7-9pm. Free. New Believers Christian Fellowship Church, 680 Montello St., (775) 250-9003.

URBANIZED: Black Rock Institute presents a screening of this feature-length documentary by director Gary Hustwit. Urbanized looks at the issues and strategies behind urban design and features some of the world’s foremost architects, planners, policymakers, builders and thinkers. Th, 2/16, 6-7pm. $8 NMA members; $10 non-members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

Poetry/Literature BOOK SIGNING: LAMA LOSANG SAMTEN: The Venerable Losang Samten will give a brief Dharma talk in addition to signing and presenting his latest book Ancient Teachings in Modern Times: Buddhism in the 21st Century. Sa, 2/18, 1:302:30pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org.

RUSSELL MOORE AND 111RD TYME OUT: The bluegrass band performs. W, 2/22, 7:30pm. $21 general; $18 students, seniors; $16 BAC members. Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976, www.breweryarts.org.

DAVID GABRIEL BOOK SIGNING: The author will sign copies of his book Beast of Denial. Sa, 2/18, 2-4pm. Free. Zephyr Books, 1501 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-6657.

DAVID SCHEFFER BOOK SIGNING: Scheffer signs and

VISITING ARTIST CONCERT & LECTURE: Composer,

presents All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals. Su, 2/19, 2-3:30pm. Free. Sundance Bookstore & Music, 121 California Ave., (775) 786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

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teacher and performer John Handy will perform and discuss his experiences as part of Black History Month. University music faculty members David Ake, Hans Halt and Andy Heglund will perform with Handy. Th, 2/16, 7:30pm. $10 general; $5 students, For the Love of Jazz members. Joe Crowley Student Union, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/arts.

people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

FAMILY AFTERNOON SNOWSHOE AT NORTHSTAR: Introduce your little ones to the great outdoors in a fun, friendly atmosphere. The tours are open to all ages and will be an easy snowshoe for the whole family. Reservations are required and have a 24hour cancellation policy. W, 2/22, 1-4pm. Call for info. Northstar-at-Tahoe Resort, 100 Northstar Drive, Truckee, (800) 466-6784, www.northstarcalifornia.com.

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT CLASSES: Guild certified Feldenkrais practitioner and teacher Carole Bucher teaches ongoing classes. Tu, 5:30-7pm. $12 drop-in fee. Center for Spiritual Living Carson City, 1927 N. Carson St., Carson City; Th, 5:306:45pm. $12 drop-in fee. Reno Buddhist Church, 820 Plumas St., (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

REDISCOVER YOUTHFUL MOVEMENT WITH FELDENKRAIS: Gain flexibility, strength and balance while improving cognition, coordination and overall well-being with The Feldenkrais Method. Tu, 10am; Sa, 3pm. $12 drop-in fee. ACHIEVE Fitness, 600 S. Center St., (775) 2407882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

RENO BIGHORNS: The NBA D-league team plays Idaho Stampede. Tu, 2/21, 7pm; F, 3/30, 7pm; Sa, 3/31, 3pm. $8-$125. Reno Events Center, 400 N. Center St., (775) 284-2622, www.renobighorns.com.

SCHEELS RUNNING AND WALKING CLUB: Runners and walkers are invited to join this Tuesday night group run. Water and snacks will be available after the runs. Meet in the mens sport shoe shop. Tu, 6:30pm through 11/27. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Drive, Sparks, (775) 331-2700, www.scheels.com/events.

VARIETY YOGA: Each week the Sunday class is taught by a different instructor. Su, 10:3011:20am through 12/30. $15 drop-in fee. Mind Body & Pilates, 670 Alvaro St., Ste. B, (775) 745-4151, www.yogareno.com.

WOLF PACK WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: The University of Nevada, Reno plays Utah State. Th, 2/16, 7pm; the team plays University of Idaho. Sa, 2/18, 7pm. $8 adults; $5 children 14 and younger, seniors age 65 and older. Lawlor Events Center, 1500 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-7225, www.nevadawolfpack.com.

YOGA BASICS: This is an introductory course taught in six weekly sessions. It will introduce you to the principles, philosophy, movements, breathing and relaxation techniques of yoga. Pre-registration is required. M, 7:15-8:45pm through 2/20. $81 for six classes. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990.

2/17, 7:30pm; Sa, 2/18, 7:30pm; Su, 2/19, 2pm; F, 2/24, 7:30pm; Sa, 2/25, 7:30pm; Su, 2/26, 2pm. $15

general; $12 students, seniors. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 329-0661, www.renolittletheater.org.

Auditions AUDITIONS FOR THE WORLD GOES ’ROUND: Good Luck Macbeth seeks five people (three women and two men) to fill roles for its upcoming production of Kander and Ebb’s The World Goes Round. All cast members need to have movement skills and have the ability to learn and hold harmony. Please prepare 16-32 bars of a song that would be appropriate for a Kander and Ebb show. Bring sheet music in your key (an accompanist will be provided). No recorded music. You may be asked to learn a portion of a song from the show, and you may be asked to move at the audition. Please wear suitable clothing. Auditions are by appointment only. Send an email to chad@goodluckmacbeth.org containing your name, phone number, day and half-hour time slot request. Sa, 2/18, 3-5pm; Su, 2/19, 3-5pm. Good Luck Macbeth Theater, 119 N. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.goodluckmacbeth.org.

AUDITIONS FOR TWELVE ANGRY MEN: Proscenium Players holds open auditions for their May production of Twelve Angry Men, directed by Jeff Fast and produced by Jonni Moon. This dramatic stage version, adapted by Sherman Sergel, is based on the Emmy award-winning television movie by Reginald Rose. There are 13 roles for men age 18 and older. Those audi-

tioning will be asked to do cold readings from the script. Performances will be held at the Brewery Arts Center in Carson City on May 11-13, 18-20. Rehearsal dates and time will be determined on the availability of those being cast. W, 2/22, 6:30-9pm. Carson Royal Mobile Home Park Clubhouse, 1871 N. Lompa Lane, Carson City, (775) 883-9386.

Classes BANKRUPTCY EDUCATION CLINIC: Nevada Legal Services Inc. and Washoe Legal Services host this legal education clinic. Pre-registration requested to ensure the availability of materials. First Tu of every month, 1:30-3:30pm; Third Th of every month, 1:30-3:30pm. Free. Nevada Legal Services, 654 Tahoe St., (775) 284-3491 ext. 214.

BEGINNERS’ CERAMICS CLASS: This is an introduction to a ceramics studio and using the pottery wheel. You will learn how to work with the clay, the tools, glazing and techniques of throwing on the wheel. Classes are first come, first served, so call to sign up in advance. No previous experience is required. Sa, 2-5pm through 12/29. $40 per person. The Wedge Ceramics Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 770-4770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

BEGINNING TO INTERMEDIATE WATERCOLOR CLASSES: Artist and teacher Eileen Fuller conducts ongoing classes. Call for a suggested materials list and reservations. M, W, 9-11:45am & 6:30-9:15pm. $25 per class. Wildflower Village, 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769, www.wildflowervillage.com.

COMEDY WORKSHOP WITH KINSIE DAMON: Local comedienne Kinsie Damon will host a standup comedy workshop for beginning and aspiring comics. The workshop will cover the basics of writing, rehearsing and performing, and includes one-on-one coaching and critiques. This workshop is ideal for first-timers, as well as those who want to improve their speaking and presentation skills. Sa, 2/18, 11am-5pm. $40 per person. FBSG Building, 419 W. Plumb Lane, (775) 677-7575.

CONVERSATION CORNER: Washoe County Library presents a series of English language learning sessions ideal for non-native English speakers who want to improve their speaking skills. The group will practice speaking English around various scenarios that involve everyday activities. W, 4:30-6pm. Free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, (775) 829-7323.

CROCHET 102—BEYOND THE BASICS: Learn to crochet in the round for projects like toys, hats, doilies and more. Sa, 2/18, 11am-1pm; Sa, 3/17, 11am-1pm. $25. Jimmy Beans Wool, 1312 Capital Blvd., Ste. 103, (775) 827-9276, www.jimmybeanswool.com/class.asp.


by D. Brian Burghart PHOTO/D. BRIAN BURGHART

BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): What do you

typically do just before you fall asleep and right after you wake up? Those rituals are important for your mental health. Without exaggeration, you could say they are sacred times when you’re poised in the threshold between the two great dimensions of your life. I’ll ask you to give special care and attention to those transitions in the coming week. As much as possible, avoid watching TV or surfing the internet right up to the moment you turn off the light, and don’t leap out of bed the instant an alarm clock detonates. The astrological omens suggest you are primed to receive special revelations, even ringing epiphanies, while in those inbetween states.

any further. We human beings, on the other hand, are asked to be in a lifelong state of metamorphosis, continually adjusting and shifting to meet our changing circumstances. I’ll go so far as to say that having a readiness to be in continual transformation is one of the most beautiful qualities a person can have. Are you interested in cultivating more of that capacity, Libra? Now would be an excellent time to do so. Remember that line by Bob Dylan: “That he not busy being born is busy dying.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This would be an excellent time to round up a slew of new role models. In my astrological opinion, you need to feel far more than your usual levels of admiration for exceptional human beings. You’re in a phase when you could derive tremendous inspiration by closely observing masters and virtuosos and pros who are doing what you would like to do. For that matter, your mental and spiritual health would be profoundly enhanced by studying anyone who has found what he or she was born to do and is doing it with liberated flair.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Have you

ever gazed into the eyes of goats? If you have, you know that their pupils are rectangular when dilated. This quirk allows them to have a field of vision that extends as far as 340 degrees, as opposed to humans’ puny 160-210 degrees. They can also see better at night than we can. Goats are your power animal in the coming week, Taurus. Metaphorically speaking, you will have an excellent chance to expand your breadth and depth of vision. Do you have any blind spots that need to be illuminated? Now’s the time to make that happen.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

WD-40 is a spray product that prevents corrosion, loosens stuck hinges, removes hard-to-get-at dirt, and has several other uses. Its inventor, Norm Larsen, tried 39 different formulas before finding the precisely right combination of ingredients on his fortieth attempt. The way I understand your life right now, Sagittarius, is that you are like Larsen when he was working with version number 37. You’re getting closer to creating a viable method for achieving your next success. That’s why I urge you to be patient and determined as you continue to tinker and experiment. Don’t keep trying the same formula that didn’t quite work before. Open your mind to the possibility that you have not yet discovered at least one of the integral components.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the ani-

mated film The Lion King, two of the central characters are a talking meerkat named Timon and a talking warthog named Pumbaa. Their actions are often heroic. They help the star of the tale, Simba, rise to his rightful role as king. The human actors who provided the voices for Timon and Pumbaa, Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella, originally auditioned for the lesser roles of hyenas. They set their sights too low. Fortunately fate conspired to give them more than what they asked for. Don’t start out as they did, Gemini. Aim high right from the beginning—not for the bit part or the minor role but rather for the catalyst who actually gets things done.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A

person who emits a huge angry shout produces just .001 watt of energy. Even if he or she yelled continuously 24/7, it would still take a year and nine months to produce enough energy to heat a cup of coffee. That’s one way to metaphorically illustrate my bigger point, which is that making a dramatic show of emotional agitation may feel powerful but is often a sign of weakness. Please take this to heart in the coming week, Capricorn. If you do fall prey to a frothy eruption of tumultuous feelings, use all of your considerable willpower to maintain your poise. Better yet, abort the tumult before it detonates. This is one time when repressing negative feelings will be healthy, wealthy, and wise.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “He who is

outside his door already has a hard part of his journey behind him,” says a Dutch proverb. Ancient Roman writer Marcus Terentius Varro articulated a similar idea: “The longest part of the journey is said to be the passing of the gate.” I hope these serve as words of encouragement for you, Cancerian. You’ve got a quest ahead of you. At its best, it will involve freewheeling exploration and unpredictable discoveries. If you can get started in a timely manner, you’ll set an excellent tone for the adventures. Don’t procrastinate.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’re so close to

finding a fresh perspective that would allow you to outmaneuver an old torment, Leo. You’re on the verge of breaking through a wall of illusion that has sealed you off from some very interesting truths. In the hope of providing you with the last little push that will take you the rest of the way, I offer two related insights from creativity specialist Roger von Oech: 1. If you get too fixated on solving a certain problem, you may fail to notice a new opportunity that arises outside the context of that problem. 2. If you intensify your focus by looking twice as hard at a situation that’s right in front of you, you will be less likely to see a good idea that’s right behind you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Thirty-two car-

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Jeep vehi-

cles always feature seven slots on their front grilles. Why? For the manufacturer, it’s a symbolic statement proclaiming the fact that Jeep was the first vehicle driven on all seven continents. Let’s take that as your cue, Aquarius. Your assignment is to pick an accomplishment you’re really proud of and turn it into an emblem, image, glyph, or talisman that you can wear or express. If nothing else, draw it on dusty car windows, write it on bathroom walls, or add it to a Facebook status update. The key thing is that you use a public forum to celebrate yourself for a significant success, even if it’s in a modest or mysterious way.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A sign outside

the Apostolic Bible Church in Bathurst, New Brunswick invited worshipers to meditate on a conundrum: “Why didn’t Noah swat those two mosquitoes?” After all, if the builder of the Ark had refused to help the pesky insects survive the flood, we’d be free of their torment today. (Or so the allegorical argument goes.) Please apply this lesson to a situation in your own sphere, Pisces. As you journey to your new world, leave the vexatious elements behind.

rier pigeons were awarded medals by the United Kingdom for their meritorious service in the World Wars. Of course, they probably would have preferred sunflower seeds and peanuts as their prize. Let that lesson guide you as you bestow blessings on the people and animals that have done so much for you, Virgo. Give them goodies they would actually love to receive, not meaningless gold stars or abstract accolades. It’s time to honor and reward your supporters with practical actions that suit them well.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The caterpillarto-butterfly transformation is such an iconic symbol of metamorphosis that it has become a cliche. And yet I’d like to point out that when the graceful winged creature emerges from its chrysalis, it never grows

OPINION

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FEATURE STORY

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700. |

ARTS&CULTURE

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River quest Stacey Perez

Who knew there was a business based downtown where participants would be given clues and puzzles to find the “X marks the spot” finish line? Not us, certainly. Stacey Perez has been operating just such a business—X-marks the Spot Adventure Quests—since last summer. More information can be had by calling 848-4501 or on the web at http://x-marksthespot.net.

What made you come up with this idea? I had done it a long time ago, but I was doing a different quest for each individual that signed up for it, and it was just so time-consuming and so much that I quit the business and stopped for a while. Then my sister and I were doing something similar to what I’m doing down in Santa Monica last year. We sat up until 2 o’clock in the morning, laughing, and just being sisters together about how I should open my business back up and go for it. I got back up to Reno and told my husband and my 10-year-old son my idea, and they encouraged me, “Lets go for it.” So I started back up, and we’ve been running in downtown Reno, and now we’re expanding to Sparks.

Why don’t you tell me what a typical adventure could be. That’s the interesting thing about it. It is whatever the team makes it out to be. I’ve had teams take shots at every bar that they walked by. I’ve had teams that [were] a family, and they’ve had kids come in with candy. The

How much does it typically cost? teams also decide whether they want to do it leisurely or if they’re going to set the record and try to be the team that finishes the quest and all the puzzles in the least amount of time. So it’s pretty much whatever they want to make out of it.

Tell me a little bit more. Say they want to do shots at every bar. It is the same quest. Every team gets the same clues in the same order and all of that. And you get a group, and it’s two people or more, depending on how many you want on your team. And then you sign up for the quest, then on Saturdays and Sundays, I will email the starting line clue. Then I hand them their first clue, and off they go in solving the first clue. ...

I assume you’re busier in the summer, is that right? Well, we just started up again last July, and I did pretty good, and I did pretty good in the winter because it’s been such a mild winter. But my hard part is getting the word out that

•••

Yes, I still think the Mittster is gonna get the call to take on Barack, but obviously Rick Santorum ain’t done yet after his recent Tuesday Trifecta in Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado. So it’s still fair to note what Santorum said recently about contraception in

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We’re running a spring special; it’s $20 for an adult, $10 per kid. I’ve had teams take four hours to complete it. I’ve had one team that decided they wanted to be the record holder finish in 2 hours and 4 minutes.

How cool. Have you had any especially crazy adventures? I want a Red Hat Ladies Society, and I’d also love to see a stroller brigade with moms and babies and strollers get out and compete in a quest. I’ve just had families or friends, I haven’t had any really weird Santa Pub Crawl-type things.

What else should my readers know about you and your business? Well, they have to know about the website, for sure. [See intro, above.] That has information on how to register for the Quest. It’s all done online. They go in and set up the form, and it emails me, and I get them signed up on a day that I’m running a quest. Also if they look at the calendar on the website, they can see days are blocked off because I already have a commitment for the weekend. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

This and that The Grammys: 2012. 1. When was the last time Brian Wilson and Paul McCartney were in the same building? That was pretty darn cool. A nice moment for all of us in the geezer gallery. Hope they got a chance to hang out backstage, smoke a doob, and shoot the shit. Yeah, sure they did. 2. Adele and Kelly Clarkson—living proof you don’t HAVE to be an ultra skanky ultra-babe to be a female singing star these days. Which is nice. 3. The guys doing the sets stole the freakin’ show. The technical production for the performances was insanely brilliant and brain-boggling. Wow. 4. Never has a musical genre been so dependent on its fans being totally high than dubstep. Just sayin’ …

the service is here. A little tiny ad in the newspaper, I don’t have the room to explain the whole thing. TV and radio are just so expensive, that my biggest hurdle is getting the word out that I’m going. I did a Groupon and a Living Social and a Deal Chicken last summer, and I got quite a few people off of that. Now I’ve got a database of people who loved it and want to do more. So when Sparks opens, I’m going to email all them, and we’re doing another Deal Chicken, too. And then I called all the newspapers and said, “Hey!”

brucev@newsreview.com

America. “Many of the Christian faith have said, well, it’s OK, contraception is OK. It’s not OK. It’s a license to do things in a sexual realm that is counter to how things are supposed to be.” OK, Rick. Fine. Way to get that Neo-Puritan thing revved up. But I’m guessing you just kissed that tantric yoga vote goodbye, amigo. Please, Republicans. Please nominate this guy. Please? •••

The Burnal Equinox approacheth, the B.E. being the day from which it’s six months until the first day of B-Man. This year’s B.E. is Feb. 27 and the massive ticket c.f. is now in full swing. What can one do? Well, the first thing one can do is nothing. Don’t flip out. There’s plenty of time for that. And by all means, don’t bend over and flash the Visa on Ebay, Stubhub, Vivid and the like. Those fiends are already charging $700 to $2,000 for a ticket, so you might as well take a deep breath, kick back, and see how this all plays out. NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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MISCELLANY

One thing for sure is that the B-Man folks are just as distraught, embarrassed, and weirded out about all of this as you are. They will earnestly try like hell to make lemonade out of this Dumpster full of lemons. A Dumpster that was created, ironically enough, by the new lottery system that was supposed to be a solution, not a problem. I mean, way to double demand for an event that’s gonna be a sellout anyway! Oh, well. Hindsight and all that. But the bizarre truth is every major theme camp of Black Rock City is now running around with its thongs/skivvies/boxers around its ankles and a wad of glow sticks stuck up the tailpipe of its $65,000 art car. Oops! Next week, a look at some ideas of repair that are sure to be ignored. For example, say “never mind!” and declare a do-over. More to come, so stay stuned. Ω |

FEBRUARY 16, 2012

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