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CHICO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

VOLUME 43, ISSUE 7

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2019

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 7 • October 10, 2019 OPINION 

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

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COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

REAL ESTATE  

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CLASSIFIEDS  

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ON tHe cOVer: DesigN by tiNa FlyNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Jennifer Jenkins, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Allen Pierleoni, Thea Rood, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Art of Information Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

OctOber 10, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Forever marred by 45 How do I want to be remembered?

That’s what members of Congress should have been asking themselves for years. But the timing is especially critical for national GOP leaders, as they watch the president of the United States lose his cool over and over under the pressure of mounting evidence—including Trump’s own admissions—that he sought to have the leader of a foreign nation investigate his chief political rival. Appealing to Republicans’ vanity may be the only way to get them to face reality when it comes to the man who will go down as the most corrupt, compromised president in U.S. history. But the fact is that much more is at stake with a leader who ignores the pleas of his own cabinet’s foreign-policy experts and is enamored with ruthless dictators the world over. That’s a bad combination. Given Trump’s mercurial ways, it’s also deadly. Though the deaths of many people can be indirectly traced to the president’s policy over the past nearly three years in office—think of his lackluster response to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and the immigrant children who’ve died in U.S. detention centers—overt evidence of the lives hanging in the balance is playing out in real time this week. On Sunday (Oct. 6), Trump spoke with the

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

president of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and shortly thereafter the White House announced the president’s abrupt decision to pull U.S. forces our of a portion of Syria near the Turkish border. That is, Trump made the unilateral call—without consulting key figures in his administration—to abandon our U.S. allies, the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces, key players in the effort to tamp down ISIS. High-ranking Republicans, including senior Sen. Lindsey Graham, called it a “shortsighted and irresponsible decision.” He also pledged economic sanctions. Meanwhile, in a now-infamous tweet, POTUS said that “if Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey (I’ve done before!).” But Trump had already given Erdoğan the green light. On Wednesday, on this newspaper’s deadline, Turkey began bombing civilian areas of Syria. The toll in the region remains unknown. But the price to America’s reputation is patently clear: The U.S. can’t be trusted as an ally. Graham and his cohorts’ bluster at this time does not absolve them of responsibility here. They’ve long known who Trump is and yet they’ve stood by him. And for that, their reputations are forever marred. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

The scars of the Trump administration Tin the defeated German army is seen marching west huge columns while the victorious allies drive

here is a famous scene in Band of Brothers where

eastward in their half-tracks and personnel carriers. When one of the Yanks realizes that about half of the German vehicles are actually horse-drawn, he feels compelled to shout out, “You have horses! What were you thinking?!” Hillary Clinton was certainly not an ideal candidate, but Donald Trump lost me when he went all in on the great conspiracy about a Kenyan ascending to the Oval Office. His proof that this by might have occurred? “People are Jim Elfers saying.” His apology? Don’t hold The author is a small-business owner your breath. I will take absolutely no from Paradise. pleasure in seeing neighbors (and a handful of friends) who I know are Trumpsters once Trump is either thrown out of or voted out of office. Half of them will still think,

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

no matter how much proof otherwise, that it was all a Deep State plot to get him. But what I will feel is tragic is the time we have lost to address global warming, the international relationships that have been broken, and the scars that have been left on the American public. Our nation cannot afford a repeat of this mistake. Despite months of criticism, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has played this pretty well. Reports indicate that it was only when she threatened the White House with an impeachment inquiry that Trump decided to release the transcript of his “perfect” phone call. If she had fired that last bullet months ago, one doubts it would have happened that quickly. Pelosi said last year that she felt Trump would “self-impeach.” She was right. Pelosi reportedly said she would prefer to see him imprisoned, not impeached, and may realize that a future President Mike Pence could end up pardoning Trump. At least Trump will probably be charged by the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York for tax evasion once he is a private citizen. Isn’t that how they finally got Al Capone? Ω

Editor’s picks For the first time in my nearly 13 years with the CN&R, I didn’t contribute to the Editors’ Picks in our massive Best of Chico package. Nope, all of them (see page 54) are the handiwork of my colleagues. For the uninitiated, these unbylined write-ups allow ink-stained wretches such as myself to give a shout out to a few of the things we think deserve recognition. Only super savvy readers may be able to guess each one’s author. Typically, mine are newsy. For example, it’s probably no surprise I wrote about the newly finished Second Street roundabout last year (aka Best public art masquerading as a road improvement). Another kudos went to the folks who worked their tails off to make sure the water towers next to the CN&R’s office weren’t dismantled (aka Best save of 2018). I was happy to excuse myself from this annual ritual, but then I got to thinking about some of the things I’d like to highlight in 2019, the year following the Camp Fire. So, here are my picks, plus one very personal take:

BEST nOn-Cn&R jAB: No publication in this town is better than the CN&R at holding powerful people to account—yours truly employs snark aplenty and nobody is off limits—but I have to give credit to the student journalists at The Orion. They have done a fine job criticizing Chico State’s administration for its attempts to squelch free speech. Also derided by them: the good little soldiers in its PR department. Way to own them, Orionites! BEST SuCCESSiOn: It’s early, but we’re already seeing good things

happen under the new leadership at the Butte County Public Health Department. One to highlight: BCPHD using scientific research—aka peer-reviewed data—to explain why needle access programs work and recommend the one planned for Chico.

BEST guERRillA-STylE hElPERS: Three volunteer-run efforts get a

nod here. Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition—its naloxone workshops and giveaways have saved lives, and so will the aforementioned proposed needle program. Chico Housing Action Team—more than 100 people have roofs over their heads via the nonprofit’s Housing Now program, and many more will be housed via the future Simplicity Village. Safe Space Winter Shelter—the seasonal operation is critical for Chico’s unsheltered population.

BEST nEighBORlinESS: This one goes out to everyone who responded to the Camp Fire with kindness and generosity—from the bake sale and lemonade stand fundraisers to the development community’s work to quickly install an RV park at Meriam Park for survivors.

BEST RECOuP: City of Chico staff—led by City Manager Mark Orme— collected data to show state legislators the ways the municipality has taken a beating due to an unprecedented population increase of 20.7 percent. The result: Lawmakers allocated $3 million in one-time funds to the City of Trees. Nicely done. BEST PARTnER: Many in the community can relate to working under

immense pressure and stress for the past 11 months. In my case, I’ve been able to soldier on thanks in large part to my husband, Matt. He’s kept our home life from falling apart during an exceedingly difficult time of post-disaster coverage. We just celebrated a decade of marriage. Matt got me a gorgeous necklace. I got him a card. Yet he still loves me.


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

More studies, please Re “‘The deadliest wave’” (Covers story, by Chris Faraone, Oct. 3): Thank you for an informative and well-written article about how the drug epidemic has only gotten worse with even deadlier drugs. What I would like to see researched is why there is such a huge demand for people feeling the need to get high with tens of thousands of people overdosing and dying from it. I personally see a strong correlation between housing and health care and education costs being outside the reach of millions of people while the top 1 percent own and control more than half the wealth of the rest of the population. This means the other 99 percent are basically scrambling over what’s left over. It’s depressing and creates anxiety and anger, so they must feel the need to escape, and it’s not like the good old days of smoking a joint in the 1960s to get a little buzz.

Cannabis today is a completely different animal, and then there’s fentanyl—a tiny bit is evidently all it takes and a little bit more kills you. I haven’t seen studies about the connection between the unfairness of modern society—inequality and the drug epidemic—but I believe it would make for a very interesting and enlightening study. Phillip I. Elkins Forest Ranch

About darn time Re “Bearing the cost” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, Oct. 10): After years of protest and pleading—and 10 months of our “liberal” council’s dithering—I’m glad to see that Chico has two portable toilets open 24 hours a day. This is an important first step in addressing a fundamental human rights issue. Going forward: Does our council

have the political will to ensure that this plan succeeds? (As we know, there are those who would have it fail.) Will the council expand and improve the program? (After all, two toilets only begin to address the need.) Will the council work to decriminalize homelessness, in general, as did the city of Austin, Texas? (Every Chico arrest log continues to be dominated by petty infractions and homeless “failure to appear” warrants.) Will the council support future initiatives not in conformance with the consolidation/ segregation model—such as the Orange Street Shelter? (I’m not sure this council would have granted Orange Street a use permit.) The test of whether this is a progressive council or a status quo council is felt no more acutely than in policy regarding just treatment of those living in our public spaces. So far, the needle has barely moved, but there is life and there is hope. Patrick Newman Chico

LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

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PG&E’s overkill shutdowns

• • • •

I am writing this letter in complaint to the continual power outages by PG&E. I have suffered the loss of two pets, emotional distress, community and my way of life. As a result of the lawsuit currently being filed against PG&E, they are punishing us by shutting off our power under the guise that it is for our safety. This is harassment. They claim it is due to weather, mainly wind. But on the days that these blackouts have occurred, there has been no wind, not a cloud in the sky. There are many people who rely on power for medical devices, the ability to cook, open refrigerated appliances, light and heat. What they are doing by shutting off our power every other day for as long as they deem is nothing but cruel and vengeful. Lisa F. Wells Magalia

Just got a phone call from PG&E saying that they may have to cut off our power again. That’s after a recent 12-hour shut-off and an 18-hour shut-off before that. During the previous two shut-offs there was zero wind in Forest Ranch, and the humidity was 40-plus percent. Today there is a little breeze going, so I guess the hand at the switch is getting antsy. This power company is driving us crazy up here. No showers, for many no phones, no refrigeration if you don’t own a generator. No air-conditioning. I suppose if PG&E wants to reduce its liability to zero they might cut off our power permanently. That should satisfy their investors. Robert Woods Forest Ranch

Waste of money The final cost of the 2016 election was a whopping $6.5 billion and it’s sure to increase in 2020. Our forefathers considered the average American uninformed and unable to select the right person for president. They thought it was too reckless and would give too much voting power to highly populated areas. California and New York are populated giants with virtually no say in the presidential election, while Iowa and Wisconsin, with a

population of less than 4 million and 6 million, respectively, helped select a disgrace like Trump. Our illustrious holder of the Oval Office has already accrued a more than $250 million treasure trove for his 2020 campaign, thanks to his billionaire donors who are pleased as punch with their huge tax cuts, as are his millionaire rice farmers who received subsidies to compensate them for Trump’s China tariffs. Bottom line, either abolish the obsolete Electoral College and go to a real democratic way of voting—i.e., the one-man, one-vote popular vote system—or adopt Bernie Sanders’ campaign finance reform to get the big money out of politics. It’s getting harder by the day watching Trump and his policies play out. Ray Estes Redding

More voting thoughts  I believe that we—the over 200 million people in the U.S.— deserve the constitutional right to choose to vote against or for our 537 lawmakers on Election Day. Can you think of any reason you should not deserve the constitutional right to just vote against or for a politician? Catherine Cottle Chico

Correction In last week’s coverage of Chico’s affordable housing conference (see “Conversation starter,” by Ashiah Scharaga), the CN&R reported a dollar figure cited by City Councilman Scott Huber as what is considered affordable for renters to pay for housing expenses. The CN&R did not check Mr. Huber’s math, which was based on a fulltime, minimum-wage earner paying no more than 30 percent of his/ her income. However, Mr. Huber had used 2017 data. Based on the 2019 minimum wage, the correct figure is $624. We apologize for the error, which has been corrected online. —ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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Aidan Sobon screenprinter

I like the access to all the arts and shows, as well as the small-town community. It’s very close-knit.

Mary Ann Brandt retired

I think it’s the youthfulness of it. You can live in some towns and there’s no life. Here, mainly because of the students, everything feels more lively. I don’t feel as old as I do at other times.

Dominik Andrease student

One of the best things is living in a tight-knit community with a lot of people I know. I can just walk places without needing a car. I like walking down the street, seeing my friends, and just saying, “What’s up?” to people.

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Janine Silver studio electrician

I haven’t lived here since the early ’80s, but what I liked about it back then was the smalltown feel, and everybody was really friendly.

OCTOBER 10, 2019

CN&R

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE COUNTY TO EXPLORE HEMP

On Tuesday (Oct. 8), local hemp farmers received support from the Butte County Board of Supervisors, which decided to explore land use and zoning regulations rather than implement a moratorium on grows. The state’s 2018 Farm Bill made hemp a legal agricultural commodity in April, the county began accepting applications for industrial hemp growers and seed breeders. So far, 22 operations on approximately 400 acres have been registered. The board asked that Agricultural Commissioner Louie Mendoza bring forward updates on upcoming federal and state regulations, along with some options for land use restrictions. Multiple supervisors expressed a desire to revisit the issue when it comes to proximity to schools and residential areas—based on concerns about potential theft and health issues.

‘Have a heart’

STOP SIGNS ON THE WAY

Chico’s Public Works Department will be installing stop signs at three intersections due to public safety concerns. Two of the intersections have higher than average collisions and obstructed sightlines for drivers. At East Fourth and Flume streets, there have been eight collisions since 2012; at Parmac Road and Rio Lindo Avenue, near where many people access mental and physical health care services, there have been six collisions in the same period. On Sherman Avenue and East Third Street, the city is installing the signs because of nearby Storybook Schoolhouse Preschool and Hooker Oak Elementary.

WASTE REROUTED

The Neal Road Recycling and Waste Facility will be temporarily fuller through the rest of this year, starting Monday (Oct. 14). The Butte County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday (Oct. 8) decided to accept waste from Glenn County, which is closing its landfill and transitioning to a contractor. Up to 150 tons of waste will be transferred per day, via no more than six trailers. Supervisors expressed reservations about landfill capacity and wear and tear on the roadways. Bill Connelly (pictured) said he couldn’t support it because he saw no benefit to Butte County ratepayers. Ultimately, a majority of the supervisors agreed to move forward with two stipulations: that state routes are maximized and that Glenn County provides space for Butte County waste in the future, commensurate with the amount it is taking on this year.

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Struggling to make ends meet, in-home caregivers lobby supervisors for wage increase

RSupervisors story with the Butte County Board of on Tuesday (Oct. 8). Cottini, obin Cottini wept as she shared her

50, was born with spastic cerebral palsy and her husband, Ted, is her In Home Supportive story and photo by Services (IHSS) care Ashiah Scharaga provider, but he can barely afford to take as h i a h s @ care of her. n ew srev i ew. c o m IHSS is a state program that pays individuals—often family members like Ted—to provide home-based care to low-income seniors and people with disabilities, and the funding comes from a combination of state, federal and local governments. Butte County providers earn minimum wage and many are struggling to get by. Ted told the CN&R that after paying rent, the couple have to hope what’s left will cover their groceries until his next paycheck. Cottini joined other IHSS recipients and over a dozen employees in the United Domestic Workers of America union in the supervisors chambers to advocate for higher pay, before the board entered a closed session meeting to discuss ongoing negotiations. Cottini told the supervisors that she

has wanted to give up on life because it is a constant struggle between her health complications and trying to fight for more care hours and higher wages. Her husband and her faith have kept her going, she said. “It’s a lot cheaper and a lot easier on us—and we’re a lot happier and we live a longer life—if we’re allowed to live at home,” she said. “But there’s no way we can afford to live at home if you do not give [IHSS caregivers] a pay raise.” Union workers have maintained that because IHSS is predominantly funded by the state and federal government a 50 cent raise shouldn’t unduly burden the county. They have argued that the investment is worthwhile, because IHSS workers are part of the local economy and provide preventative care. Several IHSS workers shared stories of the lengths they have gone for their clients, driving over to their homes at 3 a.m. to help them after a fall or medical emergency; bringing them food or helping them pay the power bill. Carnella Marks told the CN&R that many IHSS caregivers are dedicating unpaid hours to serve their clients because they are restricted on the number of hours they can

be paid by the state, and there are penalties for working overtime. “We’re spreading ourselves thin to help the people we know who don’t have providers and need care,” she said. “If we see somebody who is disabled and needs our help, we don’t pass them up, even though [the supervisors] pass us up. Because that’s the kind of heart we have.” Health care providers and social workers have suggested that Cottini live in a care facility, she told the supervisors on Tuesday, but she has had bad experiences with them and she wants to be with her husband. “I’m tired of hearing the excuses. ‘We don’t have enough money to give people 25 or 50 cents more.’ That’s a bunch of crap,” Cottini said. “Somebody has to do something. Gosh darn it, it’s not just for me, it’s for other people. I’m looking out for my husband and for other people that work their butts off.” Ted said he’s hoping the supervisors come around on the raise, and “have a heart” for caregivers and the people they serve. “If I could do it for free, I would,” he said. “But I can’t make it. The cost of living is too high.”


Ted Cottini provides care for his wife, Robin, through the IHSS program. The couple and other caregivers say they need a raise.

The county is in the midst of labor nego-

tiations with the union, but this has been an ongoing issue for the workers, who have advocated for a raise above state minimum wage multiple times in the past decade. The next bargaining session is on Oct. 28, according to Dwane Camp Jr., the union’s regional coordinator for Butte County. Camp said the union is asking for a 50 cent wage increase. The county’s last offer would have been a net loss, he told the CN&R: a 25 cent increase but with the removal of health care benefits. Several IHSS employees in attendance told the supervisors that offer had felt like a slap in the face. Camp described the situation in Butte County as dire: 400 providers were displaced after the Camp Fire. Plus, data from the state Department of Social Services shows that there is a disparity in care, with 141 more recipients seeking care than available providers, as of August 2019. In his view, the county risks widening this gap by continuing to pay inadequate wages. Butte County Assistant Chief Administrative Officer Brian Ring told the CN&R later that while he cannot comment on any specifics of the negotiations, “we absolutely are trying to find something that meets everybody’s needs.” The county is trying to remain fiscally responsible while balancing many needs post-Camp Fire, he said. The supervisors mainly remained silent. When a care provider asked Supervisor Bill Connelly why he was not making eye contact with the speakers, Connelly replied that he was taking extensive notes, and had concluded that the county needs to lobby the state for the increase. The county is still deliberating. There was no announcement after its closed session negotiations. Reached for comment the morning after the meeting, Supervisor Tami Ritter told the CN&R that while the state program is flawed, the county should not wait to act. Home health care is “one of the most underpaid and unrecognized professions that we have.” The county should invest in preventative services that save taxpayers in the long run, and the care IHSS workers provide prevents unnecessary emergency room visits and costly institutional care. “I think it’s imperative that we let these workers know that they are valued and that the people that they care for are valued,” she said. Ω

GOP battles on the docket Conservatives clap back against California in court—twice Last week was a busy one for GOP-affiliated court-

room battles against the state of California. On the morning of Oct. 2, conservatives sued the state, claiming it was failing to “ensure that non-citizens are never placed on the voter rolls.” That afternoon, they scored an early, anticipated victory to block a new state law that would require presidential candidates to publish their tax returns in order to appear on the March primary ballot. First, the “illegal votes” complaint. The plaintiffs are three registered Republicans: two naturalized citizens and Corrin Rankin, who ran for state party vice chair last year. According to the filing, they all believe that their “legitimate vote is being diluted by the illegal votes of noncitizens.” “California refuses to use the data in its possession to determine citizenship eligibility,” said Harmeet About this story: Dhillon, the attorney who This is an edited filed the suit, during a San version of the original, published by CalMatters Francisco press conference. and available at But California Secretary calmatters.org. of State Alex Padilla, a Democrat, issued a statement labeling the complaint a “misrepresentation” of the law and “nothing more than an underhanded attempt to bring their voter suppression playbook to California.” At the crux of the case is the state’s “motor voter law,” a program designed to automatically register driver’s license applicants to vote as long

as they are eligible and unless they opt out. Since its rollout, the program has been riddled with administrative errors and technical glitches. The lawsuit argues that the Secretary of State’s office, which administers state election law, is not using records available to the DMV to exclude non-citizens from the program. Such records include special driver’s licenses that undocumented immigrants can seek. That, the suit argues, violates the National Voter Registration Act, a 1993 federal law that requires states to “to ensure that accurate and current voter registration rolls are maintained.” Federal law “does not require the Secretary to obtain further proof of citizenship, whether from the DMV or any other source,” Steve Reyes, chief counsel to the Secretary of State’s office, wrote in an August letter in the lead-up to the filing. There is no evidence of widespread voting by undocumented immigrants in California. President Donald Trump has falsely

SIFT ER Homeless count The Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC) has released its 2019 Homeless Point-in-Time Survey results, finding a 16 percent increase in local homeless individuals over 2017’s count. The CoC identified 2,304 sheltered, unsheltered and Federal Emergency Management Agency-housed homeless adults and children during its federally mandated biennial count on March 28, which was up from 1,983 in 2017. The hike was attributed to the Camp Fire, but the CoC stressed the number is only an estimate, and several factors, including poor weather on the day, likely affected the

quality of the results. Nevertheless, respondents reported natural disaster, family crises and financial factors as the top reasons for becoming homeless. A total of 933 people were sheltered with FEMA support. Seventy-one percent of unsheltered respondents said they were living in Butte County when they became homeless. Eleven percent said they were living outside Butte County, and 18 percent declined to answer. Go to buttehomelesscoc.com to read the full report.

Secretary of State Alex Padilla during a visit to Cal State Fullerton to encourage students to register to vote in the 2016 general election. He rejects the notion that non-citizens are illegally voting. PHOTO BY CSUF PHOTOS VIA FLICKR

claimed that his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton won the 2016 popular vote by a nearly 3 million vote margin only because of the illegitimate votes of “illegal aliens.” The Dhillon Law Group is also representing the

national Republican Party in its challenge to a recently passed state law that would bar candidates from being placed on the presidential primary ballot if they do not publicly disclose their tax returns. A federal district court judge put a hold on the new law until the legal battle plays out, all but ensuring that President Trump will make an appearance on the state ballot, even if he continues refusing to disclose his returns. Judge Morrison England, a George W. Bush appointee, decided that the new law likely exceeds the qualifications the U.S. Constitution puts on candidates for office, and violates the rights of association of Republican voters in California. “While this Court understands and empathizes with the motivations that prompted California to pass the Act,” England wrote, “the Act’s provisions likely violate the Constitution and the laws of the United States.” Padilla’s office has said that it will appeal the decision. These are not the first high-profile cases that Dhillon, a Republican National Committee chairwoman, and her legal team have waged against the state or other institutions they perceive to be adversarial to conservatives. Her firm has also represented high-profile conservative plaintiffs, including Google employee James Damore and writer Andy Ngo. —BEN CHRISTOPHER

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Rojas has a lot to balance—classes, papers, exams, research. Unlike most of her peers, though, the 25-year-old Cal State Long Beach sociology major also has two extracurricular obligations: Jasper and Adeline, her todAbout this story: dlers. It is an abridged Each semesversion of the origiter, she said, she nal, which can carefully budgets be found on CalMatters.org, a her financial aid, nonprofit, nonparcalculating the tisan media venture credits she can explaining California afford, given the policies and politics. needs of her family. It’s stressful: Last semester, she and her partner, a student at Cal Poly Pomona, had to take turns skipping classes, if necessary, to tend the children. “I had to seek counseling because I was just overwhelmed,” Rojas said. “It was a really difficult time because it was just not enough resources available. You find out too late, like, ‘Oh, there’s not going to be child care for you at this time.’ It’s like, then what do you do? Not go to school?” Students such as Rojas were who Gov. Gavin Newsom had in mind this year when he injected millions of dollars into the state

higher education budget to increase financial aid for young parents attending the University of California, California State University and the California Community Colleges. More than 300,000 California students are supported by the state’s main financial aid program, known as Cal Grant; last year, about 32,000 of them also were parents. Newsom’s budget, among other things, increased awards to up $6,000 for UC, Cal State and community college students with children, promising “real relief to our parents who are getting an education at the same time.” But high demand and administrative delays have slowed that relief, and made it clear that more work remains to improve state aid for so-called “nontraditional” students. Those students—who are completing degrees later in life as opposed to right after high school— have become a policy focus as California seeks to boost college graduation rates amid a projected shortfall by 2030 of 1.1 million bachelor’s-degree-holding workers. Students with children “are increasingly becoming the norm,” said David O’Brien, director of government affairs for the California

Student Aid Commission, which administers Cal Grants. “It’s why the Student Aid Commission is at the forefront of an effort to modernize California financial aid to better serve the needs of the student of today as opposed to what was the traditional student of 30 or 40 years ago.” So far this year, room for improve-

ment has revealed itself in at least two areas of that effort. For one, the allocation of the additional grant money is structured in a way that still makes it hard for students with children to qualify. The state guarantees Cal Grants for eligible students attending college right out of high school, but aid for nontraditional students comes out of a more limited grant pool for which applicants must compete, and most students with children fall into that nontraditional group. In the 2017-18 budget year, only 25,750 competitive grants were available for the more than 340,000 qualified applicants, according to a report by the California Budget and Policy Center. Newsom’s appropriation this year increased the number of competitive grants to 41,000, but the demand still exceeded 300,000—meaning the new money for nontraditional students is still comparatively hard to get. The grant money for parents has also been delayed by procedural glitches, according to state officials. “We hope to have the initial round of grants distributed by this


November or December,” O’Brien said. “That’s just sort of a slight delay due to the rollout of the new program, the programming of the awards into our legacy system, which we’re in the process of upgrading.” Students already have received their standard grant awards and if they qualify, they also will get the first portion of the increased access award when the Student Aid Commission rolls it out. After this semester, the awards will be disbursed along with the regular schedule of Cal Grants and other aid the commission administers, O’Brien said. Rojas said that while it’s great that the money will be available to student-parents during the holidays, a time she says can be stressful financially, getting it earlier would have been even more beneficial. “It could’ve been helpful if we had it from the beginning—that way people would feel a little bit more relaxed with how we are going to be able to budget to complete school,” Rojas said, noting that finances at the start of a semester often determine how many units a student takes. “If there’s actually aid that could help you get through a whole semester full-time without having to work, that’s golden,” she said. “But if not, then you’re over here thinking ‘I’m going to take less units, so it’s going to delay graduation.’ It’s like a domino effect.” Robert Shireman, a senior fellow at The Century Foundation, a progressive, nonpartisan think tank, seconds the need for more outreach. Last April, the foundation released a report recommending sweeping changes in the state’s financial aid system, including better communication and less complexity. Shireman, whose focus is education policy, says the amount of assistance needs to be gradually ramped up, too, to about $2 billion per year in grant aid for low-income students. “We are hoping and working to encourage a budget next year that has a much larger increase in investment in Cal Grants to address the gaps that we’re seeing,” he said. “First of low-income parents, but also other low income students as well.” —AdriA WAtson

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HEALTHLINES People who’ve had cosmetic procedures are sharing the results—both positive and negative—via social media.

surgery dates and tag her surgeon, recovery house, any post-op care specialists or private nurses, and her post-op massage therapist. Recovery houses, surgery providers and massage therapists also use the hashtags to promote their services. Some of these are flooded with ads or spam. Some are used by practitioners for education about surgery. According to the American Society of Plastic

The secret world of dolls Tapping into anonymous stories of cosmetic surgery shared via Instagram by

Chaseedaw Giles

Ttheirmeticdesires surgery patients who document and results on Instagram, but

hey call themselves dolls. These are cos-

only, most say, for other patients or prospective clients. They use names and hashtags that connect the work to their provider. So, for example, KathySmithDoll would be a woman who underwent surgery with a Dr. Kathy Smith. In an era of patient empowerment, these pages—they’re called “Sx pages,” with “Sx” mimicking the prescriptive “Rx”—form a just-out-of-sight Instagram community. They serve as a cosmetic surgery shopping guide, a best-practices education system, and can also sound the alarm about bad experiences with practitioners. Some presurgery doll pages are more like inspiration pages or mood boards, collecting images of desired shapes.

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That way, “other girls doing research can find someone with a similar build to theirs and follow their journey for a glimpse at what they might look like if they got similar procedures,” said Tai Hall, a massage therapist in Maryland. On her Instagram page, she showcases before-and-after bodycontouring results; in her Facebook group, she teaches postoperative self-massage and how people can best take care of themselves while healing. These Instagram pages, she said, “are really big deals.” The Sx Instagram pages are private and anonymous, to some extent, and follow strict rules to stay that way, particularly since many feature nudity. (As a social media practice, Sx pages are fairly similar to teenagers’ private “finsta” friends-only accounts. They are, similarly, unverified and what they report is unverifiable.) Many of the bios on these pages indicate they won’t allow access to men. Each Instagram page bio often unveils elaborate details, including height and weight. The patient—the doll—will list

Surgeons, more than 1.8 million cosmetic surgeries were performed in the United States in 2018. Breast augmentation and liposuction accounted for about a third of those. And the number of “cosmetic minimally invasive procedures”—Botox, laser hair removal, soft tissue fillers and more—has grown rapidly in the United States. There were fewer than 5 million procedures in 2000. In 2018, there were nearly 16 million. (Almost half of those procedures are Botox treatments.) Cosmetic procedures are also becoming more popular among people of color. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery reports that cosmetic augmentation, like liposuctions and buttocks lifts, increased 56 percent among African-Americans from 2005 to 2013, and is still rising. As the number of savvy customers grows, doll pages provide a useful glimpse into the less glamorous side of before and after—the details that people like to overlook, like bruising, drainage and the often painfully long process of healing after significant surgeries. Patients become online advertisements for their surgeons. Surgeons develop a reputation on social media for being the best at certain procedures, for delivering a desired look, or for working with certain ethnic groups and body types. “They’ll cry and upload videos of pain and success and their struggles, or whatever they’re going through, and their surgery sisters help uplift them,” Hall said. And there is a lot to talk about, from surgeons to procedures to recovery houses to advice on how to travel with the least hassle from airport security or airline staff when patients are clad in fajas—a kind of post-op girdle—or other foam paddings. Sx pages can be an effective patient empow-

erment tool if done honestly and fairly, said Dr. Alan Matarasso, a plastic surgeon in New York and the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. “It makes sense because this is a small group of people,” he said. “Not a lot of doc-

tors do Brazilian butt lifts, but patients need to realize that they are not rating a restaurant.” Matarasso encourages prospective patients who rely on Sx pages to research and prepare in other ways as well. “The standards have to be even greater than if you had a sick gallbladder, because you don’t have to do this,” he said. “This is not like vetting a hotel room. You have to be careful.” Matarasso recommends that prospective patients ask to see the surgeon’s best results and worst results, or a random case—say, the 37th case they did that year. He suggests that prospective clients visit the American Board of Plastic Surgery websites to do research and that patients query the licensing state and find out what, if any, violations a surgeon may have had. Patients can ask board-certified surgeons their specialty and whether they are certified in it. Hall, the massage therapist, warned that patients may see women who heal faster or achieve different results than they might. As is often the case on Instagram, people tend to post fewer of their struggles and more of their highlight reels. HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT

It takes a village Rebuilding the town of Paradise will take time and the efforts of many. Join your neighbors in this journey of resilience and healing at the Paradise Revival Festival. This special all-day event takes place Saturday (Oct. 12) at the Terry Ashe Recreation Center, from 11 a.m to 8 p.m., and provides a unique opportunity for community members to heal through music, art, workshops and self-expression. There will be live music and entertainment and a variety of recovery resources available. Bring what you have to share—stories, garden surplus, tea, a hug. This is an all-inclusive day of action for everyone. Visit www.paradiserevival. com for more information.


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HEALTHLINES Sx pages might be even more valuable for patients who plan to travel internationally for their surgery. Many people in the United States do this to save money. Doll pages serve to warn prospective patients about problems that surgeons and hospitals don’t disclose. After surgery, especially if extensive travel is needed, patients may recuperate at recovery houses for a few days. Procedures like fat transfer to the buttocks leave patients unable to move around or sit; doctors may install drains to help remove fluid after surgery. In a recovery house, a caretaker can tend to their incisions, help with bathing, food, pain medications and even perform regular post-op massages. In May, the mother of an Instagram model named Yatnaa Rivera died during a procedure in the Dominican Republic. Rivera took to Instagram to ask for help and to warn others. The doctor who performed the operation, Hector Cabral, had been fined for operating in the United States without a license. He is linked to several deaths and is still practicing. (Cabral did not respond to inquiries via social media; his office answered calls but said he was on vacation.)

C O n T i n u E d f R O m pa g E 1 2

About this story:

it was produced by Kaiser Health news, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser family foundation.

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Instagram accounts tagged into his doll hashtag (#CabralDoll) to spread the message. Every day women are bombarded with images of beauty. With filters and editing apps, and the army of social media influencers who receive money or free cosmetic services in exchange for their Instagram posts, it’s often hard to know what’s real. Authentic depictions of what cosmetic surgery entails can be a reality check on what is attainable with cosmetic surgery. In May, the American College of Surgeons released voluntary ethical guidelines for social media by surgeons. Many of them address patient privacy, but they also advise practitioners to provide trustworthy medical advice and to be cautious around these “powerful educational tools.” Even so, now a real-time, crowdsourced system allows patients to cut through the surgeons’ marketing and advertising efforts. □

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Got milk? When in need of a drink, what beverage do you suppose is the most hydrating? Common sense might suggest water—it’s a pure, unadulterated thirstquencher. But according to a new study from St. Andrews University in Scotland, that might be wrong. It looks like beverages with a little bit of sugar, fat or protein are the best at keeping us hydrated the longest. The nutrient composition of a drink has a lot to do with its hydrating power. Milk, for example, contains lactose, protein, fat and sodium, all of which slow down its release from the stomach and sustains hydration over a longer period of time. These findings basically reinforce the theory that electrolyte-rich and caloric beverages result in slower gastric emptying, increasing a drink’s “quench-factor.” But that doesn’t mean you should grab that soda— concentrated sugars pull water from your body to dilute the excess sugar, so stick with electrolytes and ... milk?

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GREENWAYS WAYS Margo Robbins, president of the Cultural Fire Management Council of the Yurok Tribe, in a patch of hazel.

blue wild rye that was used for basketry and forked oak stump sprouts that were used to make cradles, he said.

Back to fire

More than 200 miles away, the Amah Mutsun

tribe near Santa Cruz is also once again starting to use cultural burns. Valentin Lopez, the tribe’s chairman, says fire serves many purposes for his people, including killing insects in the ground and purifying the trees. “Because then whenever that smoke goes up into the trees, it’s smudging the trees,” Lopez said. “It’s blessing the trees and cleansing the trees.” The tribe’s members consider fire a tool that allows them to care for the natural environment, which Lopez says they have a responsibility to do. “Creator gave us that obligation. You know, our evidence must last seven generations,” he said. Lopez also believes that the issues around climate change, which is increasing the length of the fire season in California, must be dealt with by indigenous people. “We totally firmly believe that and we are working hard to take our position to provide that leadership,” Lopez said. “And it’s not going to be indigenous knowledge only; it’s going to be blending the sciences with the indigenous knowledge, but it must be indigenous-led. But those fires, you know, I mean they’re so, they’re so important and they just creep along.” Ω

California tribes reintroduce cultural burns to care for the land story and photo by

Matt Fidler

Hpractice California managed forests with fire. The kept the forests healthy because istorically, Native Americans all over

fire killed sick and dying vegetation, provided space for plants that need sunlight and maintained prairies and meadows for game animals to graze. But many people seem to think that the land was untouched before European settlers came to California, an idea widely spread by naturalist John Muir, the “Father of the National Parks.” “What he didn’t realize, and most people don’t realize, is that the natural places that they saw were not that way by accident, or what you might call just naturally,” said Margo Robbins, president of the Cultural Fire Management Council of the Yurok Tribe in Northern California. “That humans are a part of the ecosystem and Native people took care of the land, and the land looked like that because of the interaction between humans and nature. There was no separation.” Robbins’ ancestors used fire to maintain the forests near the confluence of the Klamath and Trinity rivers in Humboldt County before the Gold Rush attracted Europeans who stopped Native Americans from burning the land, often in violent ways. “In the early 1900s, late 1800s, the Native people were actually shot for doing controlled burns,” Robbins said. “They were afraid of fire and did not understand it, and so that was a pretty effective method of shutting down fire in the landscape.” Now, for the first time in generations, the Yurok are bringing back what they call “cultural” burns to manage the forests and to support their way of life. Meanwhile, other California tribes and fire experts are returning to the practice, too.

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ECO EVENT During a recent weekend on the Yurok

Reservation near the unincorporated community of Weitchpec, Robbins described the ways the tribe is using fire. For starters, it helps propagate plants that are important to the Yurok and that need fire to thrive. This includes pepperwood, a tree sometimes called California bay laurel. Its leaves are used to help alleviate arthritis, rheumatism and stomach problems. Another important plant is hazel, which is used to create baskets. “The fire actually changes the DNA of the plant, and so it’s stronger and more flexible and it also gets rid of the bugs that will sometimes eat into the plant,” she said. Seven years ago, the Yurok tribe agreed that the biggest issue facing their community About this story:

It was adapted from “California Burning,” a podcast and radio series of North State Public Radio. Listen to the series at californiaburning.net.

was the lack of cultural burns that connect their people to their ancestral lands. Robbins noted that there’s something about putting fire on the land—that it speaks to her spirit and helps her connect with nature. Up a steep hill from the Klamath River, a private landowner had let the Yurok burn a section of her property. Eighteen months later, about a quarter mile behind the woman’s home, fresh hazel sprouts—narrower than the circumference of a pen—have come up and are ready to be picked for basket-making. In a space densely populated with small trees and brush, Robbins gathered many grocery bags full of materials that she says will be used to create a baby basket for her grandchild. According to Don Hankins, a Chico State professor of pyrogeography, both the Mechoopda Indian Tribe in Chico and the Konkow people in eastern Butte County also used fire to maintain the land. Important plants for these cultures historically included

Nature knowledge Have you ever wanted to learn how to track animals in the wild? How about identifying edible plants? Adventure Quest, Chico’s favorite crew of experienced nature explorers, has you covered. Join certified naturalist Druin Heal this Saturday (Oct. 12), from 9 to 11 a.m., for a Wildlife and Tracking Walk through the Indian Fishery. Birds, turtles, otters and even beavers call this area home. Plan to walk the trail along the Sacramento River to see what critters, tracks and plants you can find. This a free monthly program for both kids and adults, but donations are always appreciated.


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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY JOSH COZINE

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Changing of the guard

A few of my favorite things

Cindy Brochheuser always loved clothing and design. That’s why, even after years in the medical field, she decided to hang it all on the line and open Labelz Upscale Consignment Boutique. Since 2012, Brochheuser (pictured, at left) has been taking in high-end clothing and accessories from private sellers and offering it at her store on consignment. She made her first sale a week prior to opening the shop’s doors—while remodeling the space—and business has gone well ever since. But seven years later, Brochheuser is ready to retire. While planning to close up shop, one of her long-term established consignors, Jamie Withrow, decided she’d give the business a go. Withrow, a nine-year veteran in the online consignment game, has been selling through Labelz since 2014 and has been working with Brochheuser since midSeptember to make the transition as seamless to customers as possible. Stop by the shop at 974 Mangrove Ave., or call 345-1615 for more info.

The annual Best of Chico issue is always one of my favorites, even if it is a behemoth and a ton of work. It’s just really nice to get to rave about all the coolest stuff around, a nice break from the doom and gloom. So, in the spirit of the issue, I present a few of my favorite things about Chico, my own best-of list, if you will, in no particular order: Best reason to go out Monday night: No, not Monday Night Football. This one’s a toss-up, depending on my mood. If I want a quiet dinner with a glass of wine for $10 or so, I’ll head to Franky’s for its pretty rad all-night happy hour (spaghetti and a salad for $8!). If I’m craving a hamburger with a buddy, however, it’s to the Oasis Bar & Grill I go, for two-for-one burger night. Best oxymoron: The silent disco. I have yet to attend one of these mystical events, but I’ve seen them advertised at everywhere from the El Rey Theater to Parkside Tap House to the University Sports Bar. I have a feeling it’ll simultaneously be mind-blowing and nothing I’ll ever want to experience again. Best egg roll: Without hesitation, Taste of Hmong in the Nord Safeway shopping center. If you haven’t been yet, go. Best way to show you love your dog: Get his paw print permanently emblazoned on your person. (Shout out to David Singletary at Sacred Art Tattoo. And to Oliver, the best Boston terrier around.) Best Benedict: I used to be a die-hard Roost Irish Benedict fan—and that’s still fantastic—but my taste buds point me more and more toward the Icelandic at the Old Barn Kitchen—their smoked salmon is killer. And the best of the rest, which need no explanation: Mango mimosas while perusing the Filipino market—or relaxing on the patio—at Inday’s Filipino Restaurant. The carpaccio at Crush. The staff/owners of my two favorite pool halls (the aforementioned Oasis and The DownLo), where I spend way too much of my free time. The sundried tomato artichoke dip and naan chips from Guzzetti’s Catering. Getting your name on the board at La Cocina Economica (free taco!). Japanese tacos at Izakaya Ichiban. Yony’s Roasted Corn. The cheese counter at The Galley. Dave Mettler (aka the Wine Guy) at Safeway on Mangrove. The Lamb & The Wolf food truck (which is prepping a brick-and-mortar location in Rocklin). And, last, but not least, the Downtown Ambassadors, who keep our streets clean and always offer a smile.

Tell me about the transition. Brochheuser: Well, I have grandbabies now, which I didn’t have prior [to opening], and I love to travel, so those are big

parts of it. And my sister retired like a year ago, and I’m a little jealous of her. Withrow: I didn’t even know it was for sale—I came in to pick up a consignor check and the gal working here handed it over and said the store was closing. I said, “What!?” So then my [gears] started turning, and I approached Cindy, and it just kinda went from there.

How has business changed since you first opened it, Cindy? Brochheuser: It took off running. I was in here painting cabinets and getting the store ready and there was barely anything hanging on the racks, but people would walk through the door, so I started selling before I even knew what I was doing or how to work my systems, and it’s always done well. It probably took about a month to get a full

store. It’s super empty right now because I was looking to liquidate, but now talking with Jamie the last couple of days we’ve been taking stuff in again.

What are your plans for the future and for the store going forward? Brochheuser: I’m going to Hawaii two weeks after I close my last day, and then Europe after that, but I don’t have it on the books yet. Withrow: [Labelz] is just gonna stay the same, and all of our clients are very happy with it. It’s just changing ownership. Brochheuser: And she’s already got it figured out. She’s been here a few days and she’s already got it. Withrow: [Laughing] She’s gonna be getting calls from me in Hawaii, she just doesn’t know it yet. —JOSH COZINE

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

AND, SOME NEWS: Last week, local employees of UnitedHealthcare pitched in to donate and deliver over 5,000 pounds of food to Catalyst Domestic Violence Services in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. I’ve sadly referred more than one person to Catalyst as a way to climb out of a bad situation and they do great work, so I know the food will go to good use and be much appreciated.

got mosquitoes? Need to make a service request? Need Mosquitofish? Got Yellowjackets/Ticks?

Contact 530.533.6038 or www.ButteMosquito.com 18

CN&R

OCTOBER 10, 2019


Make my future clean! Ride your Bike once a week!

Take the opportunity to ride your bike once a week on your commute. Based on the average American commute it can offset up to 3 lbs of Carbon Emissions each day you choose to ride!

To Support Future Awareness: GofundMe.Com/VivianConery

~ ATTENTION ~ SEEKING WITNESSES Re: Skyway House, Inc. A civil complaint has been filed against Skyway House, Inc., the former operator of an alcohol and drug abuse recovery facility in Chico, relating to a program participant being sexually exploited by an employee. If you or someone you know has information regarding sexual relationships between Skyway House, Inc. employees and participants in the facility’s recovery programs between 2010 and 2014, please contact:

LAW OFFICE OF JOSEPH M. EARLEY III (530) 876-1111

THE CAMP FIRE EMERGENCY PROJECT IS COMPLETE We have removed hazardous trees and debris, installed wire mesh draper y to protect the public from falling rock, repaired damaged drainage systems and other impor tant highway components on SR70 and SR191. Caltrans District 3 and Nor th Region Construction will continue monitoring the highways impacted by the Camp Fire while finishing minor repair work throughout the winter and spring 2020.

CALTRANS IS PROUD TO BE PART OF THE REBUILDING OF PARADISE AND SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES AFTER THE CAMP FIRE DISASTER.

#PARADISE STRONG october 10, 2019

  CN&R 

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The best of the best 2019 This year's winners are out of this world

O

nce again, CN&R readers turned out en masse—online, that is—to recognize their favorite things about Chico. Tens of thousands of votes were cast and tallied. Some winners are perennial stars, wowing locals year after year. Others are up-and-comers, new to the scene or simply upping their game. Either way, they clearly made an impression! Peruse these pages to find out what your friends and neighbors consider the best place for a glass of wine, who gives the best massages and where to find the best selection of shoes (among many other categories). One of the things that we here at the CN&R love so much about Chico is its closeknit community (for more of our favorite things, see Editors’ Picks on page 54). So, we hope you’ll get out there and congratulate the winners—maybe even seek out a new hidden gem you didn’t know was there before.

20

CN&R

OCTOBER 10, 2019

Readers’ Picks Goods & Services ...........22 Food & Drinks................32 Nightlife & The Arts ........40 Health & Wellness .........44 Recreation.....................48 Community ....................50

Editors’ Picks We love this stuff! ..........54


At the GuArAnteed Lowest Prices everyday! Save up to 40% in our Clearance Center

16

10

17

• Appliances

16

• Cabinets

18

• Counter Tops

17

10 • Plumbing Fixtures

10

18

2505 Zanella Way Chico | (530) 342-2182 | www.ginnos.com

10 DiamonD w western wear

Eighth & Main Antique Center

10

10

8 1 0 2 4 200 “Where the North Valley shops for treasures” 745 Main St. • 530-893-5534 • chicoantiquecenter@att.net•eighthandmain.com

of THE

10

BooTs • CLoTHing JEwELrY • HaTs aCCEssoriEs + so MuCH MorE

sHop for THE EnTirE faMiLY

10

paT’s sHoE rEpair - sinCE 1949 LoCaTEd insidE diaMond w 530-343-4522

Locally owned for 41 Years! 181 E. 2nd Street • Downtown Chico Main Store: 891-1650

op eve en r Day y

a lot more than just western wear o cto be r 10, 2019

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Celebrating all the things that make Chico special

READERS’ PICKS 2019

Longtime Chicoans

and even newbies know there’s something about this college town that makes it unlike any other. In fact, many a local started out as a visitor, perhaps planning to spend just four years here before moving on. How quickly plans can change! That’s part of what makes Chico so special—it’s a big melting pot of people from different regions and backgrounds, with their own set of skills and interests. So, here we celebrate the best places to shop, get pampered or find that perfect professional to get the job done.

Antiques store

FIRST Place: Eighth & Main Antique Center 745 Main St., 893-5534 SECOND Place: Vintage Hen 215 Main St., 894-1311 THIRD Place: Orange Street Consignment 514 Orange St., 899-7064

Appliance store

FIRST Place: Ginno’s Kitchen & Appliance Center Inc. 2505 Zanella Way, 342-2182 SECOND Place: Hudson’s Appliance Center 2525 Dominic Drive, Ste. D, 877-6312 THIRD Place: Best Buy 2005 Forest Ave., 566-1012

Da Capo Style House

Auto repair shop

Bank/credit union

Cab company

2106 Park Ave., 892-1774; 906 Nord Ave., 343-8500

Various locations, 800-922-8742

354-9885

SECOND Place: Boradori Automotive 287 Humboldt Ave., 230-0155

SECOND Place: Sierra Central Credit Union 352 E. First St., 800-222-7228

SECOND Place: Yellow Cab 1330 Locust St., 893-4444

THIRD Place: Spencer Automotive 2540 Dominic Drive, 345-5600

THIRD Place: Golden 1 Credit Union 239 W. Second St., Ste. 1, 877-465-3361

THIRD Place: Taxi Dave 566-0447

Auto paint/ body shop

Bike shop

Car dealership

FIRST Place: Concours Elite

801 Main St., 342-1055

200 East Ave., 203-5141

2267 Esplanade, Ste. D, 891-0234

SECOND Place: Greenline Cycles 515 Main St., 894-7885

SECOND Place: Chico Nissan Hyundai 575 Manzanita Ave.; and 2562 Cohasset Rd., 891-1777

THIRD Place: North Rim Adventure Sports 178 E. Second St., 345-2453

THIRD Place: Wittmeier Auto Center 2288 Forest Ave., 895-8181

FIRST Place: Affordable Automotive

SECOND Place: Knockout Collision Repair 3225 Esplanade, 899-9202 THIRD Place: JP’s Paint & Body Works 1840 Park Ave., 342-1328

FIRST Place: Tri Counties Bank

FIRST Place: Pullins Cyclery

FIRST Place: G-Ride Pedi-Cab & Trolley

FIRST Place: Chuck Patterson

READERS’ PICKS 22

CN&R

OCTOBER 10, 2019

CONTINUED ON PAGE 24


Making Memories

Lifetime

THAT LAST A

Experience amazing quality, excellent service & a knowledgeable staff for all of your special moments PARADE | GABRIELLE & CO. | VENETTI ANCORA DESIGNS | ALLISON-KAUFMAN COMPANY

18 2 0 1 6 – 2 0 18

214 MAIN STREET CHICO, CALIFORNIA | (530) 345-1500 | GABRIELLEFERRAR.COM

14

18

years in business

Sandi Bauman Owner

SIT DOWN. LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE. Sandi Bauman of Chico Homes uses this mantra because she believes listening to her clients needs is the key to getting them exactly what they are looking for. Why choose Sandi to be your real estate agent? It’s simple...she has consistently performed within the top 1% of local Realtors, and has sold over 1,100 properties in Butte, Glenn and Tehama Counties. Integrity, unstoppable work ethic, honest communication

and a desire to continuously improve are the hallmarks of The Sandi Bauman Team. Clients see results as their needs are addressed and their problems solved. Exceptional service is given to each and every client they represent. Local home inventory levels fluctuate often and can make buying or selling a home difficult. It’s not an easy market to navigate. If you’re in the real estate market you need a knowledgeable realtor capable of reading the local market to get the very best deal. Sandi Bauman is that agent!

2751 CalifOrnia Park Dr. Ste 200, Chi CO 530.864.5407 chicohomesearch.net

october 10, 2019

CN&R

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 2

Car wash

FIRST Place: Scrubbs Hand Wash & Detail Center 1020 Skyway, 893-4885 SECOND Place: Surf Thru Express Car Wash 2470 Forest Ave., 801-6479; 2573 Esplanade, 774-2363 THIRD Place: Eric’s Car Wash 1625 Mangrove Ave., 893-4400

Day spa

FIRST Place: Sweetwater Day Spa 40 Declaration Drive, Ste. 100, 894-7722 SECOND Place: Renew Float Spa 1030 Village Lane, Ste. 190, 588-7378 THIRD Place: Urban Medspa 3221 Cohasset Road, Ste. 120, 891-8772

Dry cleaner

FIRST Place: 3rd Generation Cleaners 1390 East Ave., Ste. 128, 899-0333 SECOND Place: Chico Express Cleaners 641 Walnut St., 343-6013; and 752 East Ave., 343-8844

FALL IS FOR PLANTING

THIRD Place: Esplanade Cleaners 164 E. Second Ave., 342-4306

Feed store/ farm supply

FIRST Place: Northern Star Mills

Bootleg

510 Esplanade, 342-7661 SECOND Place: C Bar D Feed 3388 Highway 32, Ste. A, 342-5361 THIRD Place: Wilbur’s Feed and Seed 139 Meyers St., 895-0569

Florist CHICO’S BULK SEED SPECIALIST ChiCo Mix

Lawn seed specially blended for a year-round dark green, fine bladed lawn for the Chico area.

Dwarf fesCue

Improved drought tolerable turf-type tall fescue.

hico for 121 ing C Yea w o rs Gr

FIRST Place: Christian & Johnson 1098 E. First Ave., 891-1881 SECOND Place: Chico Florist 1600 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 260, 345-1855 THIRD Place: Flowers by Rachelle 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., Ste. 240, 345-2661

Gift shop

FIRST Place: Hubbs & Co. 956 Mangrove Ave., 892-4940

510 Esplanade (Opposite Bidwell Mansion)

(530)

342–7661

SECOND Place: Made in Chico 127 W. Third St., 894-7009 THIRD Place: Little Red Hen Gift Shop 897 E. 20th St., Ste. B, 897-0100

Grocer

FIRST Place: S&S Organic Produce and Natural Foods 1924 Mangrove Ave., 343-4930 SECOND Place: Trader Joe’s 801 East Ave., Ste. 110, 343-9920 THIRD Place: Chico Natural Foods Cooperative 818 Main St., 891-1713

Barbershop FIRST Place: Danny’s Barbershop 544 Broadway, 332-0553 SECOND Place (tie): Chico’s Barber Shop 162 E. Third St., 487-7373 SECOND Place (tie): Gearhead Barbershop 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. C, 894-2889

Hair salon

FIRST Place: Da Capo Style House 1925 Market Place, Ste. 130, 715-7183 SECOND Place: The Hair Co. 2760 Esplanade, Ste. 150, 894-2002 THIRD Place: Two22 Salon 222 W. Third St., 592-3961

Place for a mani/pedi

FIRST Place: Angels Nails & Spa 965 Nord Ave., Ste. 100, 487-7322 SECOND Place: Tammy Nails 1354 East Ave., Ste. J, 899-8912 THIRD Place: Bliss Nails & Spa 2033 Forest Ave., Ste. 100, 891-3538

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D 24

CN&R

OCTOBER 10, 2019

O N PA G E 2 7


Locally Grown carving & baking pumpkins & gourds. Baked goods & beverages

Bring

quality

Kids activities & games on the weekends

Sept. 27th – Oct. 27th

ing y ou

Mexican

fo r 5 0 yea rs!

Fridays 3pm to Sunset Sat & Sun 10am to Sunset

food

pspumpkinpatch.com l On the corner of Jones Ave and Bell Rd

show l❤ ve thrift Mon/Sat Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sun

Buy 1 get 1 free (clothing) 50% off 30% off everything 30% off for seniors & students 50% off 30% off everything

me

954 Mangrove Ave 345.2254 www.lacomidarestaurants.com

to

s Les e im A t hiC o on C At iw e e k n i t sa d e s d ay co We l

ope

n7

Bakery • Lunch • Catering

Veterans 20% off open 7 days a week | donations appreciated 1405 Park Ave. Chico, (530) 892-9198 www.facebook.com/ShowLoveThrift

130 Main Street • Downtown Chico • www.uppercrustchico.com • 503.895.3866

ta l k w i t h a n e x P e r i e n c e d hOmetOwn exPert! 1001 Bille Rd. (at Skyway) Paradise

(530) 872-5880 l O O k f O r u s at t h e c O r n e r O f B i l l e r d . & s k y way

O f Pa r a d i s e

dre#01991235 october 10, 2019

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Elegance, Precision,

Handcrafted

Fine Jewelry for today and tomorrow

Price Matching is Our Style! Visit us at Skyway & Dominic, Chico 530.877.6312

Donate • Shop • Volunteer Save 50-75% off building materials • Appliances • Doors • Building Supplies

Custom • Wedding Estate • Restoration 246 W 3rd Street, Chico 891-0880 • KirksJewelry.com

$20 OFF

Any plumbing service Your Plumbing

Fixed Right, Right Now!

• Windows • Paint • So much more!

220 Meyers St Chico (530) 895–1271 26  

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530-879-5590


READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 4

Baby/kids’ clothier

Jeweler

FIRST Place: Kirk’s Jewelry

Place to buy books

FIRST Place: Apple Blossom Baby

246 W. Third St., 891-0880

FIRST Place: The Bookstore

977 East Ave., Ste. 90, 345-1617

SECOND Place: Olde Gold Estate Jewelry 225 Main St., Ste. O, 891-4610

118 Main St., 345-7441

SECOND Place: Kat’s Meow 138 W. Third St., 899-8811 THIRD Place: The Children’s Place 1950 E. 20th St., 894-2589

Men’s clothier

THIRD Place: Amy Waltz Designs 290 Airpark Blvd., 774-0774

Liquor store

FIRST Place: Spike’s Bottle Shop

FIRST Place: Formal Education

1270 E. First Ave., 893-8410

127 Main St., 809-1839

SECOND Place: Star Liqours 933 Nord Ave., 891-4842

SECOND Place: Men’s Wearhouse 1950 E. 20th St., Ste. 501, 342-1769 THIRD Place: Upper Park Clothing 122 W. Third St., 487-7118

Women’s clothier

THIRD Place: Mangrove Bottle Shop 1350 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 160, 342-7575

Local pet store FIRST Place: Trailblazer Pet Supply

FIRST Place: For Elyse

752 Mangrove Ave., 892-1848

228 Broadway, 893-0106

SECOND Place: Northern Star Mills 510 Esplanade, 342-7661

SECOND Place: The Outlet 232 Broadway, 999-2254 THIRD Place: 5th Street Clothing Co. 328 Broadway, 345-5754

Consignment/ second-hand threads FIRST Place: Bootleg 126 W. Second St., 895-1426 SECOND Place: The Arc Store 2020 Park Ave., 343-3666 THIRD Place: Goodwill 765 East Ave., Ste. 100, 893-8578

THIRD Place: Ron’s Reptiles 44 Rock Creek Road, 893-2095

Nursery

FIRST Place: The Plant Barn & Gifts 406 Entler Ave., 345-3121

SECOND Place: Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2031 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, 8941494 THIRD Place: ABC Books 950 Mangrove Ave., 893-4342

Many Brands of Shoes, Socks & Accessories ...and more

Place for electronics/ computer repair

Downtown Chico 345-4880

Paradise 691 Fir St. 762-0640

FIRST Place: Chico Computer Clinic 1450 Mangrove Ave., 636-1337 SECOND Place: Best Buy 2005 Forest Ave., 566-1012 THIRD Place: PCI Computer Services 225 Main St., 891-4152

Place to buy outdoor gear

FIRST Place: Mountain Sports 176 E. Third St., 345-5011 SECOND Place: Sportsman’s Warehouse 765 East Ave., Ste. 170, 897-0500 THIRD Place: Chico Sports LTD 698 Mangrove Ave., 894-1110

SECOND Place: Magnolia Gift & Garden 1367 East Ave., 894-5410 THIRD Place: Little Red Hen Plant Nursery 189 E. Eighth St., 891-9100

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 9

Serving Chico Since 1997 Bicycles , Rentals , Ser vice, Accessor ies & Electr ic Bikes!

178 E 2nd Street•Downtown Chico• (530) 345-2453•nor thr imadventure.com

Thrifty Bargain

OCTOBER 10, 2019

CN&R

27


We’re super into

clean lines. PARK PLAZA

680 Mangrove Ave, Chico 530-893-0808 M-F 9–8 | SAT 9–7 | SUN 10–5

PHEASANT RUN PLAZA

2009 Forst Ave Ste B, Chico 530-893-2727 M-F 9–8 | SAT 9–7 | SUN 10–5

AdvocAtes Needed Become a state certified Long-Term Care Ombudsman and make a difference in the lives of the residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. We need volunteers in Oroville, Glenn, Tehama and Colusa Counties.

If you have time and wish to make a difference, please call!

530.898.5927

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 7

Heel & Sole Shoes

Place to buy home furnishings

Sporting goods

FIRST Place (tie): The Address

FIRST Place (tie): Chico Sports LTD

2444 Cohasset Road, 898-9000

898 Mangrove Ave., 894-1110

FIRST Place (tie): Esplanade Furniture

FIRST Place (tie): Dick’s Sporting Goods

1750 Esplanade, 891-4788

1922 E. 20th St., 343-3351

THIRD Place: Matt Gallaway Russell Gallaway Associates Inc., 115 Meyers St., Ste. 110, 342-0302

THIRD Place: AMB Wood and Steel Designs 2700 Hegan Lane, Ste. 118, 774-3521

THIRD Place: Sportman’s Warehouse 765 East Ave., Ste. 170, 897-0500

Attorney

Place for window treatments

Tattoo parlor FIRST Place: Eye of Jade Tattoo

FIRST Place: Budget Blinds

1238 Mangrove Ave., 343-5233

2525 Dominic Drive, Ste. C, 343-3400

SECOND Place: Red Room Tattoo 231 Nord Ave., 342-1287Ð

SECOND Place: Miller Glass 745 Cherry St., 343-7934 THIRD Place: Chico Custom Tint 2819 Esplanade, Ste. B, 592-6868

Shoe store

FIRST Place: Heel & Sole Shoes 708 Mangrove Ave., 899-0780 SECOND Place: Johnson’s Shoes 801 East Ave., Ste. 145, 343-8923 THIRD Place: Birkenstock 333 Broadway, 345-4880

THIRD Place: 12 Volt Tattoo 194 E. Eighth St., 592-3074

Thrift store

FIRST Place: Thrifty Bargain 2432 Esplanade, 774-2158

Architect

FIRST Place: Greg Peitz Peitz Blueprint, 383 Rio Lindo Ave., 894-5719 SECOND Place: Gary Hawkins Gary Hawkins Architect, 3045 Ceres Ave., Ste. 135, 892-2700

Lotus FLower Imports

FIRST Place: Michael Rooney Rooney Law Firm, 1361 Esplanade, 345-5678 SECOND Place: Larry S. Buckley Law Offices of Larry S. Buckley, 1660 Humboldt Road, Ste. 5, 413-0245

530.345.6783 839 Main Street, Chico

THIRD Place: Nikki Farris The Law Office of Nikki Farris, 2607 Forest Ave., Ste. 120, 898-1488

13

General contractor

workouts for $13!

FIRST Place: Proframe Construction 11128 Midway, Ste. 3, 636-4574

SECOND Place: Goodwill 765 East Ave., Ste. 100, 893-8578

SECOND Place: Holt Construction 37 Bellarmine Court, 899-1011

THIRD Place: The Arc Store 2020 Park Ave., 343-3666

THIRD Place: Billson Construction Co. Inc. 3 Commerce Court, Ste. 100, 343-2293

Get a fright fest tumbler when you complete 13 workouts!

Join today! 530.521.7800 READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 3 1

Fitness • nutrition • results • Community OCTOBER 10, 2019

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30  

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

Thinking of buying or selling? Don’t know where to start?

F R O M PA G E 2 9

Call your Experienced Local Realtor! Elizabeth Vasquez Hablo Español!

Realtor

CA BRE # 01948909

530.966.5949 liz@preferredagents.net Altum Wealth Advisors

The Best Adventures Begin at Outdoor Wear & Gear

Casual Clothing & Footwear

Financial planner

FIRST Place: Steven and Miste Cliadakis Altum Wealth Advisors, 1074 East Ave., Ste. T-1, 924-0110 SECOND Place: Barrett O. Benson Benson Wealth Management Inc., 901 Bruce Road, Ste. 160, 891-0717 THIRD Place: Kim N. Huber Barrett Financial Services, 2111 Forest Ave., 894-2244

Insurance agent

FIRST Place: Kevin Baker Allstate Insurance, 389 Connors Court, Ste. G, 893-8301 SECOND Place: Brad Jacobson Farmers Insurance, 25 Jan Court, Ste. 120, 891-7900 THIRD Place: Sonia Aery Allstate Insurance, 1925 Mangrove Ave, 345-2351

Landscaper FIRST Place: Blue Oak Landscaping 1125 Nord Ave., 518-7248 SECOND Place: Dawson Landscaping 1170 E. Lassen Ave., 343-0384 THIRD Place: Sierra Landscape & Maintenance 546 Hickory St., 895-0263

Plumber

FIRST Place: Earl’s Plumbing 2264 Park Ave., 343-0330

THIRD Place: M.D. Plumbing mdplumbingchico.com, 345-7456

SECOND Place: Danielle Branham Century 21 Select Real Estate Inc., 1101 El Monte Ave., 570-8402

Professional photographer

THIRD Place: Dustin Cheatham Century 21 Select Real Estate Inc., 1101 El Monte Ave., 570-8402

Diane Nicole Photography, 588-4949

Roofer

FIRST Place: Diane Clifford

SECOND Place: Teresa Raczynski Park Avenue Photography, 218 W. Third St., 521-4340 THIRD Place: Mark Thau Mark Thau Photography, 566-9189

FIRST Place: Nor-Cal Roofing 2538 Highway 32, 892-9960

THIRD Place: Powell Roofing Inc. 43 Norfield Ave., Ste. 4, 354-5318

520-6465

FIRST Place: Phoenix Solar Energy

SECOND Place: C&A Cleaning 15077 Coyote Song Road, 514-7738 THIRD Place: Helping Hands Cleaning Services 354-9630

Interior designer

FIRST Place: Lauren O’Donnell Interiors laurenointeriors.com SECOND Place: Dolce Home & Design 66 Bellarmine Court, 345-9215 THIRD Place: Heirloom Fox 805-459-5008, heirloomfox.com

Real estate agent

18

Mountain SportS 176 East Third Street • Downtown Chico • 345-5011 Serving Chico Since 1975 • ChicoMountainSports.com

SECOND Place: Chico Roofing Co. 3030 Thorntree Drive, Ste. 2, 892-9071

Housecleaning service

FIRST Place: Cleaned to Perfection

18 2005-2018

Solar company

Our customers do the talking for us!

13290 Contractors Lane, 433-0339 SECOND Place: Urban Design Solar 2260 Park Ave., 809-1079 THIRD Place: Alternative Energy Systems 13620 Highway 99, 855-879-4254; showroom at 876 East Ave.

Tree service FIRST Place: Tree of Eden Tree Service 1800 Magnolia Ave., 513-6574

Check us out on Yelp!

2540 Dominic Dr. Chico | 530.345.5600 | Mon-Thurs 7am-5:30pm

Residential & Commercial Carpet, Rugs & Upholstery Cleaning

SECOND Place (tie): About Trees 1100 Fortress St., Ste. 2, 343-4533 SECOND Place (tie): North Valley Tree Service 3882 Esplanade, 893-9649

FIRST Place: Sabrina Chevallier RE/MAX of Chico, 1834 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 10, 896-9300

SECOND Place: Able Plumbing & Electrical 551 Country Drive, Ste. 150, 564-1023

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

“I’ve brought my car here twice now and have received great service both times!” —S.C. Chico, CA

O N PA G E 3 2

G N I K N A E L C by D Inc.

By Michael DeHart • 530.345.9907 OCTOBER 10, 2019

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31


From delicious dishes to service with a smile

Local restaurant – Chico FIRST Place: Japanese Blossoms 2995 Esplanade, Ste. 104, 891-9022 SECOND Place: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W 5th St, 891-6328

READERS’ PICKS 2019

Chico is lucky to have

such a wide range of options when it comes to filling our bellies with goodness. From greasy spoons to fresh-off-thefarm delicacies, this town’s got you covered. So, without further ado, feast on the best of what Chico has to offer.

THIRD Place: Grana 198 E. Second St., 809-2304

Local restaurant – Oroville FIRST Place: Safire

Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Highway, 538-4560 ext. 1324 SECOND Place: Tong Fong Low 2051 Robinson St., 533-1488 THIRD Place: The Exchange 1975 Montgomery St., 693-4276

New restaurant

Cheap eats

(opened in the last year)

FIRST Place: Bill’s Towne Lounge 135 Main St., 487-7031

FIRST Place: La Comida

Bill’s Towne Lounge

954 Mangrove Ave., 345-2254 SECOND Place: Aca Taco 133 Broadway St., 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. D, 343-0909

SECOND Place (tie): Old Barn Kitchen 301 Main St., 809-1451 SECOND Place (tie): Diamond Steakhouse 220 W. Fourth St., 895-1515

Food server

FIRST Place: Christina Souza

THIRD Place: La Cocina Economica 905 Wall St., 809-0370

Chef

Kalico Kitchen, 2396 Esplanade, 343-3968

FIRST Place: Ann Leon

SECOND Place: Laura Baume Japanese Blossoms, 2995 Esplanade, Ste. 104, 891-9022

Leon Bistro, 817 Main St. (now closed)

THIRD Place: Damian Jimenez La Hacienda, 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270

SECOND Place: Jeramie Sabelman Japanese Blossoms, 2995 Esplanade, Ste. 104, 891-9022 THIRD Place: Lisa Sereda Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 899-9250

Caterer

FIRST Place: Bacio Catering, Carry Out & Biz Box

Craft beer selection FIRST Place: The Commons Social Empourium

1903 Park Ave., 345-7787

2412 Park Ave., 774-2999

SECOND Place: Roots Catering & Restaurant 3221 Esplanade, 891-4500

SECOND Place: Sierra Nevada Taproom & Restaurant 1075 E. 20th St., 345-2739

THIRD Place: Chico Catering Co. 999 Marauder St., 892-8775

THIRD Place: The Chico Taproom 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114, 774-2943

READERS’ PICKS 32

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

CONTINUED ON PAGE 35


r o f s u join

h c n u l y a

d i r f 13

16

16

13

15

17

18

17

18

15

345 West FiFth street ChiCo, CA 95928 (530) 891–6328 Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am to 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour 7 days a week 4:30 to 6:00pm

Now taking Reservations at 5thstreetsteakhouse.com

october 10, 2019

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our delIcIous Menu IteMs Are

MAde froM scrAtch, every dAy!

IncludIng our fruIt JuIces!

229 BroAdwAy chIco (530) 487-7207 lAsAlleschIco.coM Open Wednesday-Friday 4PM, Saturday-Sunday 9AM Sat & Sun Brunch 9AM -2PM Daily Happy Hour 4PM-6PM Live Music Thur 6PM-9PM, Fri 4PM-6PM, Sat 11AM-2PM Check out our patio with fire pits & games to enjoy!

Wh

t ning A e p p a at’s H

d for 2 Owne y l i Fam

6 years

Voted Best Watering Hole for toWnies

Friday Lunch 11:30 Sunday Family Night Family Special, Only $2995

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(Good for in-house or pick-up, not delivery)

Monday Extended Happy Hour 4-9p.m. HAPPY HOUR Monday-Saturday, 4-6p.m.

Includes 1/2 off all wine by the glass Reservations Daily • 898-9948 • Take-Out • 898-9947 (Delivery by Entree Express) • Corner of 5th/Ivy • Open 4PM Mon-Sun • 11:30 Fri for Lunch 34

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enjoy our scrumptious food menu as you experience an ever changing collection of artisan beers. Come check out our new expansion! 2070 E 20th STE 160 Chico, CA 95928 PHone: 530-894-Beer (2337)

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 3 2

Chico’s Best Upscale Consignment Boutique

Date-night dining

Kid-friendly dining

Take-out

FIRST Place: Crush

FIRST Place: Kalico Kitchen

FIRST Place: Ginger’s Chinese Restaurant

201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000

2396 Esplanade, 343-3968

2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 100, 345-8862

SECOND Place: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328

SECOND Place: Sierra Nevada Taproom & Restaurant 1075 E. 20th St., 345-2739

SECOND Place: Happy Garden 180 Cohasset Road, 893-2574

THIRD Place: Leon Bistro 817 Main St. (now closed)

Fine dining

FIRST Place: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328 SECOND Place: Leon Bistro 817 Main St. (now closed) THIRD Place: Red Tavern 1250 Esplanade, 894-3463

THIRD Place: Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000

Clothing, Shoes, Handbags & Jewelry 974 Mangrove Ave

THIRD Place: Bacio Catering, Carry Out & Biz Box 1903 Park Ave., 345-7787

Patio

Delivery service

FIRST Place: Pour House

FIRST Place: Entree Express

855 East Ave., 893-3000

342-9791, chicoentreeexpress.com

SECOND Place: La Salles 229 Broadway, 487-7207

SECOND Place: DoorDash doordash.com

THIRD Place: Parkside Tap House 115 W. Third St., 636-4239

THIRD Place: Grubhub grubhub.com

(530) 345-1615

Monday -Friday 10:30AM–5:30PM Saturday 11AM–5PM

Breakfast

FIRST Place: Sin of Cortez 2290 Esplanade, 879-9200 SECOND Place: Cafe Coda 265 Humboldt Ave., 566-9476 THIRD Place: Morning Thunder Cafe 352 Vallombrosa Ave., 342-9717

Brunch

FIRST Place: Cafe Coda 265 Humboldt Ave., 566-9476 SECOND Place: B Street Public House 117 Broadway St., 899-8203 THIRD Place: Nash’s Restaurant 1717 Esplanade, 896-1147

Lunch

FIRST Place: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Cafe 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 200, 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., Ste. 1, 809-1545 SECOND Place: OM Foods 142 Broadway, 965-5263 THIRD Place: Broadway Heights California Cuisine 300 Broadway, 899-8075

Small bites (apps/tapas) FIRST Place: Wine Time 26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 899-9250 SECOND Place: Basque Norte 3355 Esplanade, 891-5204 OM Foods

THIRD Place: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

PHOTO BY WENDY STEWART

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 3 5

THIRD Place: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Cafe 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 200, 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., Ste. 1, 809-1545

Street food

FIRST Place: Drunken Dumpling 965-1482, facebook.com/drunkendumplingchico SECOND Place: Golden State Smokery 965-1482, facebook.com/GoldenStateSmokery THIRD Place: Gordo Burrito Eighth and Pine streets

Barbecue

FIRST Place: Smokin’ Mo’s BBQ 131 Broadway St., 891-6677 SECOND Place: Kinder’s Meats & Deli 221 1/2 Normal Ave., 342-3354 THIRD Place: Southern Zen Barbecue faceook.com/southernzenbbq

Burger

FIRST Place: Nobby’s 1444 Park Ave., 342-2285 SECOND Place: Burgers & Brew 301 Broadway, 879-9100 THIRD Place: Burger Hut 3211 Cohasset Road, 342-4555; and 2451 Forest Ave., 891-1430 Drunken Dumpling

Burrito

FIRST Place: Aca Taco

Munchies

FIRST Place: Midnite Munchies 1008 W. Sacramento Ave., 514-3345 SECOND Place: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670 THIRD Place: Aca Taco 133 Broadway St., Chico 95926; (530) 894-0191

FIRST Place: Upper Crust Bakery And Cafe 130 Main St., 895-3866 SECOND Place: Tin Roof Bakery and Cafe 627 Broadway, Ste. 170, 892-2893 THIRD Place: Lovely Layers Cakery 131 Meyers St., Ste. 120, 828-9931

Diner

FIRST Place: Cozy Diner 1695 Mangrove Ave., 895-1195 SECOND Place: Morning Thunder Cafe 352 Vallombrosa Ave., 342-9717

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Local coffee/ tea house FIRST Place: Bidwell Perk 664 E. First Ave., 899-1500 SECOND Place: Naked Lounge 118 W. Second St.

Bakery

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THIRD Place: The Roost Cafe 1144 Park Ave., 892-1281

OCTOBER 10, 2019

THIRD Place: Brave Coffee 615 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 100, 965-5539

Spot to satisfy your sweet tooth FIRST Place: Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy

178 E. Seventh St., 342-7163; and 1950 E. 20th St., Ste. C-203, 809-4151 SECOND Place: Sweet Chico Confections 121 W. Third St., 332-9866 THIRD Place: Upper Crust Bakery & Cafe 130 Main St., 895-3866

International cuisine FIRST Place: Priya 2574 Esplanade, 899-1055 SECOND Place: Cocodine Thai Cuisine 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., Ste. 250, 891-1800 THIRD Place (tie): Ali Baba 138 Broadway, 345-5000

Italian cuisine

FIRST Place: Italian Cottage 2234 Esplanade, 343-7000; and 2525 Dominic Drive, 342-7771 SECOND Place: Crush 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000 THIRD Place: Sicilian Cafe 1020 Main St., 345-2233

THIRD Place (tie): Inday’s Filipino Restaurant 1043 W. Eighth St., 520-2593

Mexican cuisine

Asian cuisine

3269 Esplanade, 342-4616

FIRST Place: Japanese Blossoms 2995 Esplanade,891-9022

SECOND Place: Cocodine Thai Cuisine 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., Ste. 250, 891-1800 THIRD Place: Happy Garden 180 Cohasset Road, 893-2574

133 Broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. D, 343-0909 SECOND Place: Gordo Burrito 1295 E. Eighth St., 809-1211 THIRD Place: Sol Mexican Grill 3269 Esplanade, 342-4616

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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FIRST Place: Sol Mexican Grill SECOND Place: La Hacienda 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270 THIRD Place: Casa Ramos 2490 Fair St., 893-5050; and 216C East Ave., 894-0119

Vegetarian cuisine

FIRST Place: OM Foods 142 Broadway, 965-5263 SECOND Place: Live Life Juice Co 220 Broadway, 566-3346

Crush


Italian Cottage Restaurants

Visit your

Lunch or Dinner Special

Certified Farmers Market

BUY ONE GET ONE 1/2 OFF Buy any lunch or dinner, get the 2nd of equal or lesser value 1/2 off! Offer good Tues, Wed, Thurs.11am – close. Not valid with any other discounts. Up to 4 guests per coupon. Expires 10.24.19.

3 Weekly Markets to Choose FroM...

“A Chico Tradition Since 1965”

Chico

year round / rain or shine saturday 7:30am - 1pm 2nd & Wall street downtown Chico Wednesday 7:30am – 1pm Pilsbury road

Come find out why we’re Chico’s best spot for great sandwiches, fresh salads, pizzas and pasta and breakfast too! 2234 Esplanade, 343-7000 • 2525 Dominic Dr., 342-7771

18 2002–2018

Pizza, Pasta, salads & More · Breakfast served everyday · ChaMPagne sunday BrunCh 6a M - 1PM · CoCktails · Beer · Wine

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IZAKAYA ICHIBAN ·

2000 Notre Dame Blvd., Chico 342-8500 Open 7 Days: 11:00am - 10:00pm Patio Seating Available Live Music Tue & Wed Evenings

Oroville

seasonal saturday 7:30am - noon Montgomery & Meyers

BIG TUNA

1722 Mangrove Ave, Chico · 345-4571 Open 7 Days 11:00am - 10:00pm

Let’s Plant! Fall Vegetables Onions and broccoli and kale OH MY! It’s planting time for your winter garden. Feast on succulent lettuce, spinach, cabbage and chard. The warm soil of fall is the perfect time to transplant cauliflower, brussells sprouts and all the cool season crops.

Mon-Fri 8aM-4pM • Sat 8:30aM - 5pM 2270 Fair Street | 343-7615

Sin a little. You Deserve it! Bloody Marys, IrIsh Coffee, MIMosas & More!

A Better ClASS of fooD

As seen on diners, drive-ins and dives on Food network

2290 esplanade, Chico | 530.879.9200 | www.sinofcortezchico.com

Baking Chico Happy for 15 Years

Thanks for being Loyal Tin Roof Customers • Artisan Pastries & Breads • Coffee & Teas • Lunch 627 Broadway Street | Chico www.tinroofbakeryandcafe.com 530.892.2893 october 10, 2019

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a true chico tradition

Family owned and operated for 81 years

Best AsiAn Cuisine Best take-Out Best Restaurant in Oroville

178 East 7th Street • (530) 342-7163 Chico Mall • (530) 809-4151 www.shuberts.com

RestauRant, tapas & BaR Seafood

FaMILY OWneD sInCe 1975 • SteakS • Lamb • bbQ R ibS • QuaiL • ChiCken

CeleBRAting 107 yeARs in Business!

Oroville 533-1488 Chico 898-1388

Japanese Blossoms A Dining ExpEriEncE you

Won’t ForgEt CeleBrating 12 years

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(530) 891-5204 • 3355 Esplanade • Chico t he R estauRant 38  

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Open Wednesday - Sunday at 5:00pm • Closed Monday & Tuesday Check out our online menu: www.basquenorte.com

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2995 Esplanade #104 • 530.891.9022 www.japaneseblossoms.com Open lunch 11:30-2 M-F | Dinner 5-9 Happy Hour 5-6 Tue-Sun | Mon all night!


READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

FrEE small Yogurt

F R O M PA G E 3 6

When you purchase 1 small or larger yogurt. Exp. 6/5/2020

3 chico locations

Sushi

FIRST Place: Japanese Blossoms 2995 Esplanade, 891-9022 SECOND Place: The Rawbar 346 Broadway, 897-0626 THIRD Place: Big Tuna Sushi Bistro 1722 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 18, 345-4571

300 Broadway (Downtown) In Phoenix Building 899-9580 1722 Mangrove Ave In Mangrove Square 899-0484 2485 Notre Dame Blvd #450 In Raley’s Shopping Center 965-5275

open 7 Days a Week 11am - 11pm

Taco

Jon &B Yog on’s ur t

Family owned for 38 Years! taste & see psa 38:4

FIRST Place: Gordo Burrito 1295 E. Eighth St., 809-1211 SECOND Place: Aca Taco 133 Broadway St., 894-0191 THIRD Place: Sol Mexican Grill 3269 Esplanade, 342-4616

Local winery – regional

(Butte/Glenn/Tehama)

Gordo Burrito

Ice cream/ frozen yogurt FIRST Place: Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy

FIRST Place: New Clairvaux Vineyard

Pizza

FIRST Place: Celestino’s 101 Salem St., Ste. 100, 896-1234; and 1354 East Ave., Ste. V, 345-7700

178 E. Seventh St., 342-7163; and 1950 E. 20th St. (inside the Chico Mall), 809-4151

SECOND Place: Farm Star Pizza 2359 Esplanade, 343-2056

SECOND Place: Jon & Bon’s Yogurt Shoppe 300 Broadway, 899-9580; 1722 Mangrove Ave, Ste. 2300, 899-0484; and 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., 965-5275

THIRD Place: Woodstock’s Pizza 166 E. Second St., 893-1500

THIRD Place: La Flor de Michoacán Paletería y Nevería 1008 W. Sacramento Ave. Ste. C, 893-9999; 1354 East Ave., Ste. K, 774-2219; 668 Mangrove Ave., 774-2461

Place for poke

FIRST Place: Halo Hawaiian BBQ & Poke Bar

26240 Seventh St., Vina, 839-2200 SECOND Place: Almendra Winery and Distillery 9275 Midway, Durham, 343-6893 THIRD Place: LaRocca Vineyards 12360 Doe Mill Road, Forest Ranch; tasting room at 222 W. Second St., 800-808-9463

Locally produced food – regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama)

FIRST Place: Live Life Juice Co. 220 Broadway, 566-3346

931 W. 5th St, Chico Open 7 Days a Week 9am - 9pm

1354 East Ave., Ste. P, 592-3898

SECOND Place: Chico Chai 1919 Park Ave., 897-0822

Lemonade

SECOND Place: LemonShark Poke 501 Main St., 774-2976

THIRD Place: Lundberg Family Farms 5311 Midway, Richvale, 538-3500

Saturday farmers’ market, 513-2044

THIRD Place: Lucky Poke 119 W. Second St., 487-7048

FIRST Place: Sweet Cottage SECOND Place: OM Foods 142 Broadway, 965-5263 THIRD Place: The Foodie Cafe 999 Marauder St., 433-5539

Pho

FIRST Place: Pho C & C 3211 Cohasset Road, 892-1415 SECOND Place: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670 THIRD Place: Vietnam Bistro 788 East Ave., 433-7108

Sandwich

FIRST Place: Spiteri’s Deli 971 East Ave., 891-4797 SECOND Place: Fast Eddie’s Sandwich Shop 1175 East Ave., 342-8555 THIRD Place: Ike’s Place

648 W. Fifth St., 924-3171

Boulder • Fitness Slackline • Community

Local brewery – regional

(Butte/Glenn/Tehama)

FIRST Place: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520

530.809.0796 • terrainparkclimbingcenter.com

Excellence in Coffee

For 43 Years

Fresh Roasted Coffee Hot & Cold Beverages • Fresh Baked Goods Wholesale & Retail Bulk Coffee & Teas • Catering

SECOND Place: Secret Trail Brewing Co. 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120, 487-8151 THIRD Place: Nor Cal Brewing Co. 180 Erma Court, Ste. 100, 592-3845

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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1078 Humboldt Ave., Chico • 6am-4pm • 530.332.9645

hasbeans.com OCTOBER 10, 2019

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READERS’ PICKS 2019

Cheers to the city’s creative charms and after-dark hotspots

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Bar

PHOTO BY JESSECA N. BURTON

I

f there’s anything that makes Chico really Chico, it’s its eclectic, inspired nightlife and arts scenes. From craft cocktails and wine-and-food pairings to local theater and visual exhibits, there’s never a lack of things to do in this fun town—see our This Week (page 58) and Nightlife (page 64) sections for proof. Naturally, locals have their go-to spots, and here they are.

Duffy’s Tavern

FIRST Place: Argus Bar + Patio 212 W. Second St., 570-2672 SECOND Place: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 THIRD Place: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670

Sports bar

FIRST Place: Bella’s Sports Pub 134 Broadway, 893-5253 SECOND Place: Oasis Bar & Grill 1007 W. First St., 343-4305 THIRD Place: Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000

Watering hole for townies

Cocktail

FIRST Place: White Linen

FIRST Place: Duffy’s Tavern

Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St., 487-7031

337 Main St., 343-7718

SECOND Place: Lower Park Lavender Parkside Tap House, 115 W. Third St., 636-4239

SECOND Place: The Handle Bar 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160, 894-2337 THIRD Place: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

THIRD Place (tie): Mojito Crush, 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000 THIRD Place (tie): Vincent’s Demise Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005


Mixologist

FIRST Place: Scott Barwick

THIRD Place: Casa Ramos 2490 Fair St., 893-5050; 216C W. East Ave., 894-0119

Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., 343-7718 SECOND Place: Liz Von Aspern Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Bloody Mary

FIRST Place: Duffy’s Tavern

THIRD Place: Vince Villegas Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

337 Main St., 343-7718

Happy hour

THIRD Place: Joe’s Bar 749 W. Fifth St., 894-3612

201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000

Karaoke night

FIRST Place: Crush

SECOND Place: Mom’s Restaurant 209 Salem St., 893-3447

SECOND Place: Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000

FIRST Place: Madison Bear Garden

THIRD Place: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

316 W. Second St., 891-1639

Place to drink a glass of wine FIRST Place: Wine Time 26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 899-9250

SECOND Place: The Maltese 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915

Place to dance FIRST Place: Madison Bear Garden

THIRD Place: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

316 W. Second St., 891-1639

FIRST Place: Tres Hombres Long Bar & Grill SECOND Place: La Hacienda 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270

GRUB Specials

Happy HOUR

4-7PM • $150 SLIDERS

1T8V’S!

CORNER 5TH/IVY | 343-7459 | RILEYSBAR.COM SUNDAY FUNDAY ATTIRE SOLD HERE

THIRD Place: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

ALL AGES WELCOME

• SUNDAY FANTASY FOOTBALL HEADQUARTERS | SUNDAY FUNDAY | CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH 9:30-1PM

SECOND Place: The Beach 191 E. Second St., 898-9898

REAL FOOD, REAL BUTTER, REAL GOOD HOME COOKING!

100 Broadway, 342-0425

A CHICO TRADITION

• 2-FOR-1 MONDAYS | ALL DAY • SATURDAY HOT DOG SPECIALS • CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH | 9:30-1PM

THIRD Place: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

SECOND Place: Unwined Kitchen & Bar 980 Mangrove Ave., 809-2634

Margarita

WHERE THOE! LOCALS G

O N PA G E 4 3

Open 6am-1:30pm 1144 Park Ave. • 892-1281

Celebrating 30 Years Voted Best Bar, Mixologist, Place to Be Seen, 18 Watering Hole for Townies & Bloody Mary! Since 1989 18

337 Main St (corner of 4th St. & Main)

530-343-7718

18 Tres Hombres Long Bar & Grill

OCTOBER 10, 2019

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Who will Be there 21st Amendment Brewery Alaro Brewing Company Babgy Beer Company Bale Breaker Brewing Co. Beachwood Brewing Bear Republic Brewing Company Berryessa Brewing Co Bike Dog Brewing Co. Breakside Brewery Caldera Brewing Co. Cigar City Brewing Crux Fermentation Project Deschutes Brewery Photo courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

Hop Harvest Festival

Fieldwork Brewing Company Fifty Fifty Brewing Company Figueroa Mountain Brewing Company Firestone Walker Brewing Company Fogbelt Brewing Co. Fort Rock Brewing

Don’t miss the fun—come explore fresh hop beers from top brewers

Fremont Brewing

By WhiP Villarreal

HopSaint Brewing Company

S

ierra Nevada Brewing Co. and the California Craft Beer Association will host the fifth annual Hop Harvest Festival on Saturday, Oct.19, where participants will include more than 50 top breweries from around the U.S. and beyond. The event will celebrate the hops harvest season and the adventurous brewers who explore the boundaries of their explosive flavors. The invitational brew festival will allow festival-goers to sample from more than 100 unique beers that aren’t usually available throughout the year. On top of that, they can munch on food provided by various local food trucks and vendors and enjoy live musical entertainment, as well as a “Hop Talks” discussion about the trajectory of hops and innovation within the craft brewing industry.

Details Sierra Nevada Hop Field 1075 East 20th Street, Chico, CA, 95928 Saturday, Oct. 19 | 3-7 p.m. General Admission $55 Early Access (one-hour prior) $75 Designated Driver $30 Tickets at SierraNevada.com/HopHarvestFestival

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Faction Brewing Company

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Garage Project Karl Strauss Brewing Company

“These breweries have planned out what their fresh hop beers are going to be and are excited to present them to the local craft beer fan in Chico,” said Molly Kopta of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. “They know good beer and brewers are excited to come to this festival and not only showcase their beer to their brewery peers, but to showcase it to a knowledgeable craft beer fan base that we have here in Chico.” Complimentary parking is available at Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, which is a short walk to and from the brewery, or a shuttle will be available on a continuous loop from 1:30 to 8 p.m. Pick-up and drop-off are at the transit center on the corner of 2nd and Salem in downtown Chico. Attendees can also leave their cars at the fairgrounds overnight and pick them up the next day.

Kern River Brewing Company Knee Deep Brewing Company Lucky Luke Brewing Company Maui Brewing Co. Modern Times Beer Moksa Brewing Co. Mother Earth Brewing Co. New Belgium Brewing Company New Glory Craft Brewery Odell Brewing Company Payette Brewing Company Pinthouse Pizza Brewing Pizza Port Brewing Co. Redwood Curtain Brewing Company Revision Brewing Company

Live music by Omar, Love & Shane of Amo Amo and more!

Russian River Brewing Company Secret Trail Brewing Company Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Societe Brewing Company The Hop Concept Three Weavers Brewing Company Trillium Brewing Company

Sierra Nevada Brewing Company 1075 East 20th Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 893-3520

Trumer Brewery Urban Roots Brewing


READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

FREE DRINK

F R O M PA G E 4 1

10

10

w/ purchase of burrito 10

10

exp. 11/07/19 10

Coffee Pastries Breads Pies Sandwiches Soups Salads

10

10 10

10

Breakfast ~ Lunch ~ Dinner Open Early ~ Open Late 10

2 Locations!

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10

10

DOWNTOWN

133 Broadway (530)894-0191

Fresh as a country morning!

NORD AVE.

1000-D W. SACRAMENTO AVE 10 (530)343-0909

acataconord.com

10 10 10 10

Final Closeout 10

10 10

10

10

S AL E 10

Janet Lombardi Blixt

Venue for live music

Place to buy art

1075 E. 20th St., 892-4647

345 Broadway, 891-0900

SECOND Place: La Salles 229 Broadway, 487-7207

SECOND Place: Art Etc 256 E. First St., 895-1161

THIRD Place: Unwined Kitchen & Bar 980 Mangrove Ave., 809-2634

THIRD Place: Chico Art Center 450 Orange St., 895-8726

FIRST Place: Sierra Nevada Big Room

FIRST Place: Chico Paper Company

Local music act Theater FIRST Place: Hot Flash company

SALLY DIMAS

Place to be seen

Art GAllery

FIRST Place: Parkside Tap House

SECOND Place (tie): La Salles 229 Broadway, 487-7207

Casino – regional

(Butte/Glenn/Tehama)

166-F Eaton Road, 894-3282

4020 Olive Highway, Oroville, (800) 334-9400

SECOND Place: Blue Room Theatre 139 W. First St., 895-3749

SECOND Place: Feather Fall Casino 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville, 533-3885

FIRST Place: Janet Lombardi Blixt

THIRD Place: California Regional Theatre (800) 722-4522

THIRD Place: Rolling Hills Casino 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning, 528-3500

SECOND Place: Christine Mac Shane

Open mic

Beer event

FIRST Place: Blackbird

FIRST Place: Oktoberfest

1431 Park Ave., 433-1577

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520

Local visual artist

THIRD Place: Ashley Penning

Art space

FIRST Place: 1078 Gallery 1710 Park Ave., 433-1043 SECOND Place: Museum of Northern California Art 900 Esplanade, 487-7272 THIRD Place: Chico Art Center 450 Orange St., 895-8726

SECOND Place (tie): The Maltese 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915 SECOND Place (tie): Tender Loving Coffee 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414

493 East avEnuE ChiCo • 530.345-3063 • www.sallyDimasartGallEry.Com

SECOND Place (tie): Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718

FIRST Place: Gold Country Casino

THIRD Place: Off the Record

50% Off For All Accessories • Most Furniture 25% Off Open StudiO tOur ticketS available here!

115 W. Third St., 636-4239

FIRST Place: Chico Theater Company

SECOND Place: Lo & Behold

Original Art by Local Artists, Framed & Unframed

SECOND Place: Beer Camp Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520 THIRD Place: Secret Trail Brewing Co. Anniversary Party 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120, 487-8151

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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READERS’ PICKS 2019

An ode to those who keep us fit and feeling good I

t’s kind of impossible to enjoy all of the wonderful things about Chico when you’re sick or in pain. So, this town would be nothing without its wide network of health care professionals and those who help motivate us to stay fit and relaxed so we can get out there and experience all that life has to offer. Our hats off to the health and fitness professionals that keep this community well.

Dental care

FIRST Place: Nelsen Family Dentistry 1307 Esplanade, Ste. 4, 898-8511 SECOND Place: Kremer Dental Care 3 Glenbrook Court, 892-1234; and 140 Independence Circle, 892-1218

Local health-care provider

THIRD Place: Chico Dental Arts 2539 Forest Ave., 342-6064

Dermatologist

FIRST Place: Butte Home Health and Hospice

FIRST Place: Kafele T. Hodari

10 Constitution Drive, 895-0462 SECOND Place: Argyll Medical Group 100 Independence Circle, 899-0295

North Valley Dermatology Center, 251 Cohasset Road, 342-3686

Kafele T. Hodari

SECOND Place: F. Paul Sajben North Valley Dermatology Center, 251 Cohasset Road, 3423686

THIRD Place: Paradise Medical Group 254 Cohasset Road, 872-6650

Alternative healthcare provider FIRST Place: Chico Community Acupuncture 1815 Mangrove Ave., 345-5300 SECOND Place: Simply Pilates 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 190, 570-3897 THIRD Place: True Rest Float Spa 1357 E. Eighth St., (844) 356-2899

THIRD Place: Jacqueline Marie Losi-Sasaki 270 Cohasset Road, Ste. 100, 895-1396

Acupuncture clinic

Chiropractor

1815 Mangrove Ave., 345-5300

1635 Magnolia Ave., 895-0224

SECOND Place: Chico Acupuncture 572 Rio Lindo Ave., Ste. 105, 891-1823

SECOND Place: Joyce Family Chiropractic 9 Frontier Circle, 899-8500

THIRD Place: American Chi Center for Health 1209 Esplanade, Ste. 1, 342-2895

THIRD Place: Tenenbaum Chiropractic 1049 Village Lane, 680-8920

FIRST Place: Chico Community Acupuncture

FIRST Place: Preference Chiropractic Clinic

Eye-care specialist

FIRST Place: North Valley Eye Care 114 Mission Ranch Blvd., Ste. 50, 891-1900 SECOND Place: Chico Eye Center 605 W. East Ave., 895-1727 THIRD Place: Family Eye Care 2565 Ceanothus Ave., Ste. 155, 899-3939

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All the Charm you Expect!

Absolutely AdorAble 2 bedroom dollhouse on a gigantic lot! All the charm you’d expect in a vintage home: Refinished wood floors, arched doorway, built-in hutch, huge front porch, and a private patio under a canopy of trees. But this charmer has also been brought up to date with new roof, dual pane windows, paint, electrical, fixtures, appliances, remodeled bath, ceiling fans, skylights, mini blinds, and more! Truly the best of both worlds! And the kicker is the 225 ft deep lot complete with green waste area, raised beds, and fabulous west side soil. This darling avenues neighborhood is semi-secluded yet conveniently close to Enloe and CSUC. $289,950

Dufour realty

Tanny Johnson • DRE #00787674 • 530-570-2233 october 10, 2019

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

Thank you for your support

F R O M PA G E 4 4

General practitioner

Plastic surgeon Gym FIRST Place: Daniel S. Thomas

FIRST Place: In Motion Fitness

FIRST Place: Julie Archer

619 W. East Ave., 891-4391

1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

Chico Primary Care, 1645 Esplanade, Ste. 1, 896-0386

SECOND Place: Emily C. Hartmann Northstate Plastic Surgery, 1260 East Ave., Ste. 100, 345-5900

SECOND Place: Chico Sports Club 260 Cohasset Road, Ste. 190, 345-9427

SECOND Place: Seema Aggarwal Afsari Argyll Medical Group, 100 Independence Circle, 899-0295 THIRD Place: J. Randal Sloop 2068 Talbert Drive, Ste. 150, 809-0009

Pediatrician

FIRST Place: Daniela MorcosGannon 643 W. East Ave., Ste. 3, 899-2981 SECOND Place: Paul Wassermann 1430 Esplanade, Ste. 5, 891-0553

THIRD Place: Kevin D. Myers Northstate Plastic Surgery, 1260 East Ave., Ste. 100, 345-5900

Massage therapist:

FIRST Place: Candi Williamson Creating a Sustainable You, 811 E. Fifth Ave., 521-7328 SECOND Place: Babette Maiss 13 Williamsburg Lane, 321-5668

THIRD Place: Kathleen Sullivan 194 Cohasset Road, 893-2303

THIRD Place: Nikki Ashley Bodywork by Nikki, 341 Broadway, Ste. 309, 570-6311

Physical therapy office

Veterinarian

FIRST Place: Avail Physical Therapy 2555 Ceanothus Ave., Ste. 150, 892-2810

SECOND Place: Coast Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine 1044 Mangrove Ave., 892-2966 THIRD Place: Butte Premier Physical Therapy 125 Raley Blvd., 891-8220

FIRST Place: Evers Veterinary Clinic

2010

THIRD Place: Orangetheory Fitness 874 East Ave., 722-4000

$20-40

Boutique gym

Sliding Scale

1 8 1 5 M a n g r ove Ave . , C h i c o | 5 3 0 . 3 4 5 . 5 3 0 0

FIRST Place: Orangetheory Fitness 874 East Ave., 722-4000 SECOND Place: Chic Express Fitness 1311 Mangrove Ave., Ste. E, 965-5556 THIRD Place: Jazzercize Chico Fitness Center 116 W. 17th St., 896-9743

Personal trainer

FIRST Place: Spencer Boone Orangetheory Fitness, 874 East Ave., 722-4000

1150 El Monte Ave., 343-0713

SECOND Place: Marie Phillips In Motion Fitness, 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

SECOND Place: Chico Creek Animal Hospital 3449 Highway 32, 343-3516

THIRD Place: Elaina Zinko Orangetheory Fitness, 874 East Ave., 722-4000

THIRD Place: VCA Valley Oak Veterinary Center 2480 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, 342-7387

SinCe

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 4 8

In Motion Fitness

Compassionate Oral Surgery In The North State for Over 25 Years

Dr. Womack is a Board Certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon supported by a team of highly trained, enthusiastic professionals.

Mark G. Womack, DDS Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon

952 Lupin Ave, Suite 110, Chico • (530) 345–7127 • jawmender.com OCTOBER 10, 2019

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From workouts to fun in the sun

READERS’ PICKS 2019

Chico is known for being

an active place to live. Take, for instance, Bidwell Park—what a great spot for all kinds of recreation, from biking to hiking to, well, even praying. Take it from the locals—here are the hotspots for sweating it out, getting competitive and watching the action.

Dance studio

Caper Acres

Martial arts studio

Place for family fun

1033 Mangrove Ave., 898-8789

313 Walnut St., Ste. 150, 892-2923

2465 Carmichael Drive, 343-1601

SECOND Place: North State Ballet 312 Otterson Drive, Ste. G, 774-2364

SECOND Place: Haley’s Martial Arts Center 260 Cohasset Road, Ste. 150, 895-3114

SECOND Place: Bidwell Park

THIRD Place: Chico Creek Dance Centre 1144 W. First St., 893-9028

THIRD Place (tie): Morning Sun Martial Arts 181 E. Ninth Ave., 342-5833

FIRST Place: Hype Dance Studio

Golf course – regional

(Butte/Glenn/Tehama)

FIRST Place: Azad’s Martial Arts Center

THIRD Place (tie): Americana Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu 1950 E. 20th St., 712-7007

Yoga studio

FIRST Place: Cal Skate/Funland THIRD Place: Rare Air Trampoline Park 1090 E. 20th St., 433-5557

Place for kids to play FIRST Place: Caper Acres Bidwell Park

FIRST Place: Bidwell Golf Course

FIRST Place: Yoga Center of Chico

3199 Golf Course Road, 891-8417

250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, 342-0100

SECOND Place: Rare Air Trampoline Park 1090 E. 20th St., 433-5557

SECOND Place: Butte Creek Country Club 175 Estates Drive, 343-7979

SECOND Place: Hatha House 707 Wall St., 884-4130

THIRD Place: Chico Children’s Museum 325 Main St., 809-1492

THIRD Place: Canyon Oaks Country Club 999 Yosemite Drive, 343-2582

THIRD Place: In Motion Fitness 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

Local league to join

FIRST Place: CARD Recreational Coed “E” League Friendly Pitch Softball 895-4711, chicorec.com SECOND Place: Chico Youth Soccer League 894-1088, cyslsoccer.com THIRD Place: Chico Artistic Skate Club Cal Skate, 2465 Carmichael Drive, 343-1601

Local team to cheer for

FIRST Place: Pleasant Valley High School football SECOND Place: Chico High School football THIRD Place: Chico State men’s basketball

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Protect Their Future Making Pesticides safe

Butte College Environmental Horticulture Club & Nursery

Fall Plant Sale All PhAse is an all natural, tastless, & odorless pesticide. can be used at any phase in the crop cycle to fight off: Aspirgilis, Grey Mold, Powdery Mildew

Same coSt or leSS than current remedieS indoor & outdoor Safe

Learn more at CCSciences.com or Call 530.782.5324

& 30% OFF 50% OFF

Thursday, October 17 9am–3pm

ALL Plant Material

Friday, October 18 9am – 12pm

Selected Items

On the main campus at the Environmental Horticulture Department Nursery off parking lot #4

3536 Butte Campus Drive Oroville, CA 95965 For questions: 530-895-2515 or wrenhe@butte.edu We accept cash, credit cards and checks

october 10, 2019

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All the people and places that make Chico great

READERS’ PICKS 2019

When it comes to making a

place a home, it takes more than a wide variety of businesses and services—it also takes heart. So, in the spirit of community, we celebrate all of the volunteers, personalities, teachers and soulful gathering places that really make Chico a wonderful place to live.

Charitable cause

FIRST Place: Butte Humane Society

Taste of Chico PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

Party/event venue FIRST Place: Chico Women’s Club 592 E. Third St., 894-1978

3269 W. Sacramento Ave., 680-4543

2580 Fair St., 343-7917 SECOND Place: Chico Housing Action Team 518-9992, chicohousingactionteam.net

THIRD Place: Pine Creek Flowers 2532 Oak Way, 203-981-4966

THIRD Place: North Valley Community Foundation 240 Main St., Ste. 260, 891-1150

Museum

FIRST Place: Taste of Chico

SECOND Place: Wildflower Music Festival THIRD Place: Thursday Night Market

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

Place to pray FIRST Place: Bidwell Park

SECOND Place: Bidwell Presbyterian Church 208 W. First St., 343-1484 THIRD Place: Center for Spiritual Living Chico 14 Hillary Lane, 895-8395

FIRST Place: Museum of Northern California Art

Radio station

FIRST Place: 90.1 KZFR Community Radio

900 Esplanade, 487-7272 SECOND Place: Chico Children’s Museum 325 Main St., 809-1492 THIRD Place: Gateway Science Museum 625 Esplanade, 898-4121

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THIRD Place: The White Ranch 214 Hagenridge Road, 342-6530

FIRST Place: Grub CSA Farm SECOND Place: Chico Chai 1919 Park Ave., 897-0822

Community event

SECOND Place: The Palms 2947 Nord Ave., 399-0404

Farmers’ market vendor

SECOND Place: 91.7 KCHO North State Public Radio Lisa Currier

THIRD Place: 106.7 ZRock

READERS’ PICKS

CONTINUED ON PAGE 53


EVERY SURVIVOR’S JOURNEY IS UNIQUE Healing from INCEST seems impossible, but the guilt and shame one may feel was never theirs to carry.

Insightful Nurturing Self Courageous Empowering Self-Acceptance Triumphant STOP THE CYCLE & START THE HEALING

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN: 530.342.RAPE (7273) COLLECT CALLS ACCEPTED BUTTE/GLENN: 530.891.1331 · TEHAMA: 530.529.3980

ALL VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT WILL RECEIVE A FREE FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION, regardless of whether or not they choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS ABOUT SEXUAL ASSAULT. If you or someone you know has been sexually violated, contact Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention. october 10, 2019

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Dispose of Your Waste the RIGHT Way

BRouGHT To You BY:

Get rid of your household hazardous waste easily and for free in Butte County Butte County residents can dispose of household quantities — 5 gallons or 50 pounds at a time — of a variety of hazardous wastes at one of three facilities in the county.

Butte Regional Household Hazardous Waste Facility

Recology of Butte Colusa Counties

Ord Ranch Transfer Station

1101 Marauder St., Chico, CA 95973 866-429-2288 Friday, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

2720 South 5th Ave., Oroville, CA 95965 530-533-5868 First and third Fridays of the month, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

119 Ord Ranch Rd. (about a mile east of Highway 99, just north of Gridley) 530-846-0810 Open weekends for general waste but accepts antifreeze, batteries, oil, and paint (ABOP) and e-waste the second Sunday of the month from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Residents of Paradise are welcome to visit any of the above locations to dispose of their household hazardous waste items.

Accepted Common Household Items • Batteries • Furniture polish • Latex- and oil-based paint • Paint thinner, stains, varnish, lacquers

• E-waste such as cellphones, computers and televisions • Pool chemicals • Motor oil • Fluorescent lights

• Chemical fertilizers • Cleaning supplies • Antifreeze • Gasoline • Oil filters • Pesticides • Aerosols

• Bleaches • Solvents • Craft and hobby supplies • Mercury thermostats and thermometers

• Small consumer electronics • Herbicides • Poisons • Polishes • Televisions and electronic waste

Prohibited Items • Tires • Appliances • Radioactive waste, including smoke detectors • Fireworks

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• Ammunition — Contact local law enforcement to dispose of any quantity of live ammunition.

• Solar panels • Garbage • Explosives

For more info, visit: buttecounty.net/recyclebutte/ householdhazardouswaste


READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 5 0

Local video/ audio show FIRST Place: Banana Grape Stomp KIXE SECOND Place: Eve of Destruction KZFR THIRD Place (tie): Devastation Sounds KZFR THIRD Place (tie): Radio Daze KZFR

Youth organization

Instructor / professor

FIRST Place: Lindsay Briggs Chico State SECOND Place: Sanjay Dev Chico State/Butte College THIRD Place (tie): Janet Lombardi Blixt Chico Art School THIRD Place (tie): Neisa Schuler North State Ballet

Teacher (K-12) FIRST Place: Gina Vernau Emma Wilson Elementary School SECOND Place (tie): Nicole Nye Chico Country Day School

601 Wall St., 899-0335

SECOND Place (tie): Jennifer Rossovich Hooker Oak Elementary School

THIRD Place: Youth for Change 3259 Esplanade, Ste. 103, 877-8187

Volunteer

“Passing Forward To Our Community Since 1959” Open Mon-Fri10-4 • Sat 10-1

FIRST Place: Lisa Currier SECOND Place: Farshad Azad

Local personality

DISCOVER OUR

TREASURES!

FIRST Place: Boys & Girls Clubs of the North Valley SECOND Place: Chico Area Recreation and Park District 545 Vallombrosa Ave., 895-4711

Community Radio

THIRD Place: Brian Fredson

315 FLUME ST., CHICO 530-343-1326

FIRST Place: Mike “G-Ride” Griffith

excellence

G-Ride Pedi-Cab & Trolley, 354-9885 SECOND Place: Linda Watkins-Bennett CBS 12 and NBC 24 THIRD Place: Cort Klopping CBS 12 and NBC 24 SEE

EDITORS’ PICKS O N

• Tuition free, college-prep curriculum • Over 70 Elective options • 12 student majors • 14 CTE pathways

PA G E 5 4

• Small, personalized learning environment

Call now to schedule a tour!

Grub CSA Farm

Science

Arts

(530) 891-3090 www.inspirechico.org

Teresa Larson top producing agent •

Looking for an agent with Initiative, Drive, and a Proven Reputation? • Teresa is a Chico Native who knows the area. •www.ChicoListings.com She handles all of her transactions with care.

chiconativ@aol.com • 1101 el monte avenue

DRE #01177950 OCTOBER 10, 2019

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All the things we love

Resilience Butte County Proud IPA

Best Place for Cock and Bull The Allies Pub

426 Broadway Ste. 130, 809-1650

One of Chico’s newest eating and drinking establishments, The Allies Pub certainly brings a little bit of Britain to downtown. And we’re not just talking about the owners’ accents. The beer is British to a T (unless you’ve chosen the American varieties), but where Allies really sets itself apart is with its traditional pub food. The bar serves bangers and mash, shepherd’s pie and Scotch eggs. And then there are the pasties (pronounced past-ees), which come in four varieties. Our favorites happen to be the Cock and the Bull, one filled with chicken and the other beef (guess which!). Not only are they delicious hand pies, they also make great conversation starters. Perfect for relaxing on the patio around the fire pit, wrapped up in a complimentary blanket with your mates.

Best Word

Best Comeback

Resilience

Shakespeare in the Park

Butte County has had a rough year—especially those living in areas devastated by the Camp Fire—and if there’s one word that characterizes the community as it works, struggles, hopes and recovers, it’s “resilience.” It was an inspired choice by the folks at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. to name the beer they started brewing a couple weeks after the fire to raise money for recovery efforts: Resilience Butte County Proud IPA. It has been a massive effort, one that included more than 1,400 partner breweries using Sierra Nevada’s recipe and ingredients donated by its suppliers to brew a total of 17,000 barrels (about 4.2 million pints’ worth) of the beer that was estimated to raise more $10 million in donations for the Sierra Nevada Camp Fire Relief Fund.

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facebook.com/LegacyStageChico

There was a time in Chico when the hot summer months meant sitting outside on temporary bleachers and waving away the heat with your program as you watched local thespians sweat through the Bard’s masterpieces. It’s been six years since Shakespeare has appeared in a park

in Chico, but it is finally back. And in the fall! The new Legacy Stage—a collective of local theater folks, including Erin Horst, Jami Witt and Lara Tenckhoff—debuted its maiden performance, Macbeth, in Cedar Grove this past weekend. The new troupe won’t always do Shakespeare or have its shows outside, but for the rest of October at least (the show runs ThursdaysSaturdays through Nov. 2), there is a coolweather version of Shakespeare in the Park to enjoy.


Best Place to Stock Up on Za’atar and Rose Water

Best Kept Secret Strong Water 27 Lost Dutchman Drive, 894-5743

This retro cocktail bar is one of Chico’s best kept secrets in part because of its design: It’s modeled after a Prohibition-era speakeasy. Strong Water has a minimal online presence, and its actual location, near the Lost Dutchman Taproom and Wine Time, is unmarked and easy to miss. CN&R staffers heard about the place through excited whisperings, typically along the lines of: “Have you been to the Chico speakeasy? Oh, you have to check it out!” Once inside, patrons will find a cozy, quaint space with moody lighting and vintage poster decor. But it’s not just the vibe that makes this place stand out; its $10 specialty drinks are creative and superb.

ABC Market

715 W. Ninth St., 891-8350

ABC Market

Inside the unassuming liquor mart on West Ninth Street is a hidden gem, a place where you can find everything you need to make falafel wraps with couscous, dolmades and baklava. And a whole lot of other Mediterranean delights. Want to add a hint of rose flavor to your flaky pastry? There’s rose water. Looking to create a flavorful dip or add a little zest to your hummus with za’atar? Look no further. When ABC added shelving and row upon row of ingredients from the other side of the world, our jaws dropped—and we started drooling. Oh, the possibilities! Apparently, the owners, who are Syrian, were tired of driving down to Sacramento for ingredients to cook with and decided to open their own market. We’re thankful they did. Considering Chico’s climate is Mediterranean, a lot of the recipes you’ll find online will work just fine here—especially with the right ingredients. Eat up!

Best (Potentially) Lethal Dish

Best Cause to Support Chico Housing Action Team’s Simplicity Village Notre Dame Boulevard

Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT) started researching and working on its plans to create a tiny home community more than six years ago. In the meantime, the tireless group of volunteers has housed more than 120 people, including students and families, in 36 homes across Chico through its Housing Now master lease program. After the City Council declared a shelter crisis last October (just a month before the Camp Fire), CHAT’s dream of creating Simplicity Village and housing approximately 45 homeless seniors appeared to be in the home stretch. But there has been some pushback from a neighboring lumber yard. It’s unclear what will happen in the next few months, but we know this: Chico was in dire need of housing before the Camp Fire and there is a lot of support from the community for this plan to house seniors, including fire survivors.

Guy Fieri visits the Banshee

Ackee and Salt Fish at Sipho’s Jamaica 1228 Dayton Road, 895-1866

It’s a good thing the folks at Sipho’s Jamaica restaurant are experts at the art of cooking Caribbean food. Because if prepared improperly, Jamaica’s national dish, ackee and salt fish, could be the last meal you eat. The poisonous ackee fruit (which is related to the lychee and longan) must be harvested at just the precise time, when they burst and reveal their toxic, shiny, black seeds. Unripe ackee and their seeds contain hypoglycin, which, if consumed, causes Jamaican vomiting sickness, which can lead to coma or even death if left untreated. Luckily, the FDA has stringent regulations on ackee imports. And doubly lucky for Chicoans is the fact that Sipho’s Jamaica has the expertise to prepare the dangerously delicious dish. The fruit itself looks somewhat like scrambled eggs, and is buttery and tangy. At Sipho’s, the imported ackee is prepared to perfection, with sauteed onions, sweet peppers, tomatoes and tender, salted cod, paired with rice and peas. Well worth the risk, indeed.

Ackee and Salt Fish

Best Guy Fieri

The mayor of Flavor Town loves Chico! Guy Fieri, the spiky-haired host of the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives show, was on the ground immediately after the Camp Fire broke out, serving meals to first responders. A couple of months later, he came back with his film crew

and documented six of Chico’s bestloved local eateries—The Banshee, Grana, Momona, The Rawbar, Sin of Cortez and Upper Crust Bakery—and featured them across four different episodes of his signature show. Butte County thanks you, Guy. You’re the real deal. EDITORS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D oOcCt ToObBe ErR1 01 1, , 22001 198

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EDITORS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

Best Pork Combo

F R O M PA G E 5 5

Belly on broth at Coco’s Ramen

1008 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. 1, 965-5541

The barometer for a Japanese noodle house is its tonkotsu. If the masterminds in the kitchen do the time-consuming work of developing the flavors of the traditional pork bone broth, one can be confidant that they take care with all their cooking. And the wonderful tonkotsu at Coco’s Ramen is just about perfect. The holein-the-wall shop in the Nord Safeway shopping center has been open since last December, but the dinner-only restaurant is already one of the most consistently busy places in town. Coco’s version of the classic dish is made with a tonkotsu base and pork-and-chicken stock and topped with black mushrooms, bamboo shoots, green onions, a sheet of nori and half an egg. For all the ramens, you choose your spice level and whether you want added garlic, black garlic or no garlic at all. You also get your choice of meats: beef, chashu pork or most perfectly indulgent, braised pork belly. The broth is opaque and meaty—like a liquid version of the pork belly—and the chewy noodles are simply elegant in the rich soup. A most welcome addition to Chico’s food scene.

Coco’s Ramen

Best Way to Celebrate a Birthday Have an Adventure Quest facebook.com/quest4adventure

Tender Loving Coffee

Best Place to Chill with a Drink and Book Tender Loving Coffee 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414

Tender Loving Coffee is a lot of things: a coffee roaster, brunch spot, wood-fired pizza joint and live music venue. It’s also one of the few spots in town where it feels just as comfortable stopping in with friends to share a Neapolitan pizza and hanging out solo for a while with a craft beer and book. Lushly decorated with bar and counter seating, the cafe’s casual vibe continues in the tradition of Midtown Local, which previously operated in Tender Loving’s space next to the Pageant Theatre. Another plus: It’s home to a prime window seat. Immediately turn right as you enter.

What do you get when you take a certified naturalist who’s fluent in the art of survival and throw in a love of medieval times and Lord of the Rings-type adventures? Apparently, a whole lot of fun. The idea behind Adventure Quest was born out of the Ranger Corps, a Chico Creek Nature Center program created by Druin Heal. This past year, Heal launched his company, which specializes in creating personalized experiences—from Indiana Jones-type adventures to pirate-themed treasure hunts. A skilled leathersmith, Heal creates his own props and quest items to be found. He sets up scenarios in which participants—it could be a child’s birthday party or a week-long work retreat— must fight off adversaries or solve clues to reach the goal. But clearly, the experience itself is what it’s all about. Ω

Climate action crusaders

Best Hope for the Future Chico’s climate action crusaders

It’s been a significant year for global climate mobilization, and Chicoans have rallied to make their voices heard, including a few new groups, like the Chico Sunrise Movement, which champions the Green New Deal, and #ClimateUprising, a grassroots bipartisan organization. Local activists organized last month’s successful Climate Strike and have public discussions and other calls to action planned in the coming months. Their fervor has only intensified against the backdrop of the Trump administration’s actions to quell progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the Camp Fire, a disaster worsened by years of drought and extreme heat attributed to our warming planet. Local government is listening: The City Council declared a climate emergency earlier this year, and recently created the Climate Action Commission, which will advise the panel on how to best implement the city’s Climate Action Plan and curb emissions. It’s about time everyone started stepping up to the plate.

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Dine in | Take OuT | On Line DeLivery 1997

PresenT

Voted Best Pizza in Chico

15 Years!

CaLzOnes | Pizzas | sanDwiChes | saLaDs

530-896-1234 | Corner of First & salem Downtown Chico | celestinos.com october 10, 2019

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Arts &Culture Something wicked this way comes: John Crosthwaite as Macbeth. PHOTO BY CAREY JEAN PHOTOGRAPHY

THIS WEEK

Roving outdoor version of Macbeth is ‘a revelation’

10

THU

Special Events ADULT STORY HOUR: Author Becky Brown and illustrator Mary

Atroupe. tainly is for Chico’s newest theater Legacy Stage takes advantage of ll the world’s a stage, indeed. It cer-

multiple natural sets throughout Lower Bidwell Park for its debut production, a mobile version of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. And the by opening-night perforJason Cassidy mance last Thursday (Oct. 3) was nothing j aso nc@ newsrev i ew.c om short of a revelation—one of the most Review: gratifying theatrical Macbeth, presented by experiences I’ve had Legacy Stage. Shows Thursday-Saturday, in Chico. It’s been more 7:30 p.m., through Nov. 2. than a decade since Tickets: $25 (limited to Shakespeare in the 25 people per show) Park was held in Cedar Grove Lower Bidwell Park’s Bidwell Park tree-lined Cedar legacystage.org Grove. And as the audience stood in that meadow in the dark during his introduction to the night’s experience, director Matthew Teague-Miller spoke fondly of what was once a crucial component of Chico’s arts identity, while also promising that this return to the park was going to be something completely different. To start with, we were all holding flashlights on him has he spoke. The audience would continue to act as the night’s lighting technicians as it was up to us to illuminate the scenes with the tiny flashlights that Legacy handed out 58

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

upon our arrival. Our cue for moving from one to the next was a hardy “Hut hut!” from the lead usher, who, over the course of the play, led us down 2 miles’ worth of trails—ranging from the winding paths of the World of Trees nature trail to the banks of Big Chico Creek on the other side of the paved South Park Drive. (There’s a note in the play’s promo that “all attendees must be able to stand and walk for two hours.” There is no intermission—so don’t hydrate too much beforehand.) The genius of this kind of immersive theater is having the inherent drama of the natural world at one’s disposal, and Teague-Miller and company made some stunning choices for the various “sets.” It would spoil the fun of the experience to paint a picture of any scene here. Part of the thrill was having a new world come into focus once the 25 audience members (tickets are limited to keep the production manageable) were ushered into place. I will say that a certain bend in the creek provided a gorgeous natural amphitheater. I’ll also say that as Macbeth’s servant Seyton (played by Lief Bramer) quietly broke the news—“The queen, my lord … is dead,” the sound of a sudden breeze wooshing through the sycamore overhead to punctuate line was a sublime bit of unplanned sound design. In addition to all the nature-made drama and the mind-boggling choreog-

raphy of the endeavor (kudos to stage manager Angelina Calderon), the players brought a crucial energy to the farflung proceedings. The two lead performances were especially memorable. Chico State theater instructor Jami Witt was scary good as Lady Macbeth, sinking her teeth into the role with a jarring emotional commitment. And John Crosthwaite—a veteran stage and television actor who teaches theater in the Bay Area and rarely performs locally—was just as impressive in the title role. As soon as he started murdering his way to the top, Crosthwaite’s Macbeth started walking the madness tightrope, and the actor played it with convincing bipolarity— from subtle whimperings to raging at the stars. His best moment, and quite possibly the most powerful scene of live theater I’ve ever witnessed, was the first scene of Act 4, where the wicked Macbeth returns to the three witches demanding further prophecies. The framing of the moment is perfect—thanks to a particular arrangement of several tall, skinny trunks in the World of Trees area—and Crosthwaite’s charging performance was startling and thrilling. Again, I don’t want to give it all away here—I’ll just say the experimental arboretum provides many appropriately dramatic environs for a play set in a dark and scary Scotland. Ω

Rose Lovgren read from their new chapbook, Mammals of North America. It’s ust like children’s story hour, only with wine and literary fiction. Thu, 10/10, 7pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

FREE DENTISTRY FOR VETERANS: Fourth annual Freedom Day, featuring local dentists offering free dental care to active military, veterans, their spouses and their children under 18. Call 892-1234 or 892-1218 for info; bring military ID. Thu, 10/10, 8am. Kremer Dental Care, 140 Independence Circle.

Music THE BROTHERS COMATOSE: Popular Americana five-piece string band performs its signature West Coast-style of bluegrass, country and rock ’n’ roll. Limited seating; prepare to dance. Goodnight Texas opens. Thu, 10/10, 7:30pm. $20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: Offbeat musical based on the beloved 1960s television series. Fri, 10/11, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste F. chicotheatercompany.com

THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE: An adaptation of the classic horror tale of a house filled with dark secrets and the family that lives there. Thu, 10/10, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

SIERRA ORO FARM TRAIL PASSPORT WEEKEND

Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 12-13 Sierra Oro Farm Trail SEE SATURDAY & SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


THE BROTHERS COMATOSE

FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

Tonight, Oct. 10 Chico Women’s Club SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC

students, and other friends.  Sat, 10/12, 7:30pm. Free. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall,  Chico State. csuchico.edu/soa

massage therapy.  Sat 10/12, 11am. Free. The  Terry Ashe Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway,  Paradise. paradiserevival.com

SECRET TRAIL PARKING LOT PARTY: Celebrate the 

SUM 41: Popular pop-punk band from the early  2000s is still rocking. The Amity Affliction  and The Plot In You share the bill.  Sat, 10/12, 7pm. $30. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.  jmaxproductions.net

Trail’s two-year anniversary with live music  from Soul Posse, Smoky Knights, and Katy  and the Boys. Food trucks, too.  Sat, 10/12, 12pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers  St., Ste. 120.

SIERRA ORO FARM TRAIL PASSPORT WEEKEND: Food  and wine extravaganza featuring more  than 30 local farms and wineries. Enjoy  artisan olive oils, specialty nuts, awardwinning wines and the opportunity to meet  the farmers and winemakers.  Sat 10/12, 10am. $37. sierraoro.org

SNOWBOARDING FILM: Teton Gravity Research 

MACBETH: New local theater group Legacy  Stage presents classic Shakespeare play in  a nontraditional format. Performance will  take place at night in Lower Bidwell Park,  beginning in Cedar Grove and then traveling  to several different locations. Runs through  Nov. 2.  Thu, 10/10, 7:30pm. $25. Cedar Grove,  Bidwell Park. legacystage.org

11

FRI

Special Events HARVEST SIDEWALK SALE: Downtown Chico businesses celebrate changing of the seasons  with sidewalk sales, fall-themed restaurant  menus and autumn-themed decorations.  Fri, 10/11. Downtown Chico. downtownchico.com

VIVA MOMIX: Chico Performances presents the  legendary dance/illusion troupe that will  bring a multimedia experience featuring  athletic dance, music, outrageous costumes  and inventive props.  Fri, 10/11, 7:30pm. $15.  Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. chicoper  formances.com

Music KOLTON CUTLER: Local musician plays happy  hour.  Fri, 10/11, 4pm. La Salles, 229  Broadway St.

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thursday.  Fri, 10/11, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166  Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercom  pany.com

THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE: See Thursday.  Fri, 10/11, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W.  First St. blueroomtheatre.com

MACBETH: See Thursday.  Fri, 10/11, 7:30pm. $25.  Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park, 1890 E. Eighth  Street. legacystage.org

SWEENEY TODD: California Regional Theatre  presents the dark, witty, Tony awardwinning tale of love, murder and revenge  set against the backdrop of 19th century  London.  Fri, 10/11, 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD  Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows. com

12

SAT

Special Events AUTUMN FEST: Pony cart rides, craft and food  fair, house tours and fall activities for kids.  Plus tons of pumpkins available for sale.  Sat 10/12, 10am. $5. Patrick Ranch Museum,  10381 Midway, Durham.

BBQ SPOOKTACULAR: Tri-tip, chicken, hot dogs,  salads, snacks and drinks, live music by  Mud Creek Misfits. Call 533-1000 for tickets  and info.  Sat 10/12, 1pm. $10-$20. The Barry  Kirshner Wildlife Foundation and Educational  Center, 4995 Durham-Pentz Road.

BLACKBIRD’S B-DAY: Celebrate two years with  an all-day party featuring live music by  Scout, Teeny Nymph, Jonathan Richman, The  October Coalition and Truck Stop. Enjoy Near  & Dear Vegan Baked Goods and more. Music  starts at noon.  Sat 10/12, 8am. $5-$10.  Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO REPTILE SHOW: Check out thousands of  exotic pets, a huge reptile breeders sale,  a rattlesnake display, kids activities and  more.  Sat 10/12, 10am. $4-$7. Silver Dollar  Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and  pulling weeds in the park. For more info call  Shane at 896-7831.  Fri, 10/11, 9am. Bidwell  Park.

BLACKBIRD’S B-DAY Saturday, Oct. 12 Blackbird

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

HARVEST SIDEWALK SALE: See Friday.  Sat 10/12. Downtown Chico. downtownchico.com LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS PANEL: Oh, Give Me A  Home: Equality of Opportunity for All, featuring speakers on renters’ and landlord  rights, Section 8 vouchers and current  legislation.  Sat 10/12, 11am. Pleasant Valley  Recreation Center, 2320 North Ave.

NORM MACDONALD: Saturday Night Live alum  and legendary stand-up comedian with patented deadpan delivery is in town.  Sat 10/12, 8pm. $35-$65. Gold Country Casino & Hotel,  4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountry  casino.com

PARADISE REVIVAL FESTIVAL: Community resiliency celebration featuring a revival of local  art and music. Also: classes, workshops and  a healing space with free acupuncture and 

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

presents screening of Roadless, documenting three snowboarders journey through  the Yellowstone wilderness. Will include  panel discussion with athletes, production  team and more.  Sat 10/12, 6pm. $15. Sierra  Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierra  nevada.com

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thursday.  Sat, 10/12, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166  Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercom  pany.com

THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE: See Thursday.  Sat, 10/12, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W.  First St. blueroomtheatre.com

MACBETH: See Thursday.  Sat, 10/12, 7:30pm. $25.  Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park. legacystage.org

SWEENEY TODD: See Friday.  Sat, 10/12, 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts,  1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

VOLUNTEER SATURDAYS: Meet at the Woodland  entrance parking lot (across from 977  Woodland Ave.) at One-Mile Recreation  Area. Litter pick-up and removal of invasive  vegetation. Call Shane at 624-1102 for more  info.  Sat 10/12, 12pm. Bidwell Park.

WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S: World’s largest  event to raise awareness and funds for  Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  Visit act.alz.org, call 895-9661 or email   chicowalk@alz.org for more info.  Sat 10/12, 8am. Sycamore Field, Lower Bidwell Park.

WILDLIFE AND TRACKING WALK: Join Adventure  Quest to learn about wildlife, edible plants  and tracking at the Indian Fishery. Adults  and kids welcome!  Sat 10/12, 9am. Free.  Indian Fishery, 12161 River Road.

13

SUN

Special Events AUTUMN FEST: See Saturday.  Sun, 10/13, 10am. $5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381  Midway, Durham.

SIERRA ORO FARM TRAIL PASSPORT WEEKEND: See  Saturday.  Sun, 10/13, 10am. $37. Butte  County. sierraoro.org

Music ASTRONAUT ICE CREAM: Local dance-pop space  explorers fill the museum with cosmic 

Music JARROD MULLAN: Live local music for  brunch.  Sat, 10/12, 11am. La Salles, 229 

tunes. Tang will be served.  Sun, 10/13, 3pm. Gateway Science Museum, 625  Esplanade.

Broadway St.

LOW BRASS CHOIR AND ALUMNI: Featuring Our  Own, a program of music written and  arranged by current students, former 

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 60

EDITOR’S PICK

TURD FERGUSON, ANYONE? Longtime stand-up comedian, writer and actor Norm MacDonald will be performing at Gold Country Casino & Hotel this Saturday (Oct. 12), showcasing his always funny, often incendiary material in his signature minimalist style. Often remembered for his stint as a surly anchor on SNL’s Weekend Update or his hilarious Burt Reynolds impression on Celebrity Jeopardy, MacDonald has been plenty busy since then. He writes and acts for both television and film and currently hosts an audio/ video podcast and the variety show, Norm MacDonald Has a Show, on Netflix. He is also known for retiring his old jokes, so expect the unexpected.

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THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 59

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EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Artisan brunch with local duo playing covers of popular songs and a few originals. Sun, 10/13, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Weekly pro jam. Rock, blues, country, funk—anything goes. Sign up early. Music starts at 2. Sun, 10/13, 2pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

TAJCI: Oroville Concert Association presents pop superstar from Croatia to perform a musical cabaret-style show. Mon, 10/14, 7:30pm. $25. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thursday. Sun, 10/13, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166

THEATRICAL QUALITY COSTUMES

Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

SWEENEY TODD: See Friday. Sun, 10/13, 2pm. $15$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

14

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Special Events FARM STAND: Fun farmers’ market featuring

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FINE ARTS

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local growers, plant starts, homemade bakery goods and medicinal herbs. Mon, 10/14, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

3RD STORY: PRINTS WITH PROSE

PRISONER LETTER WRITING: The North Valley

Shows through Dec. 14 The Turner Museum

Prisoner Support crew gathers to write letters to incarcerated individuals. Mon, 10/14, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

16

WED

Special Events ANTARCTICA: A SCIENTIFIC ODYSSEY: Join geologist Fraka Harmsen for a journey to the South Pole to hear about her research and adventures in this mysterious frontier. Features photo display of Antarctica by Michelle Ott. Wed, 10/16, 7:30pm. Free. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade.

EXPLORERS FAIRE: This free event focuses on increasing children’s awareness and interest in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) careers by showcasing business, industry and education in the North Valley. Visit explorersfaire. org for more info. Wed, 10/16, 5pm. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

FIBER ARTS NIGHT OUT: Bring your own knitting, crocheting, hand sewing, cross-stitch, embroidery or other fiber project and work on it in the company of other hand-crafters. Wed, 10/16, 4pm. Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Avenue.

Music FRONT COUNTRY: KZFR presents Nashville-based bluegrass/Americana band with an electropop heart. Wed, 10/16, 7:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

SEE ART

Art BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Cognitive Dissonance, collection of colorful, whimsical and funky wall hangingand figures made of repurposed thrift store finds by Sacramento artist and professor Linda Gelfman. Closing reception Oct. 24, 4-6 pm. Through 10/24. ARTS Building, 3536 Campus Drive.

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18. Free. 265 Cohasset Road.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Bernie Lubell, artist’s sculptures explore the relationship between humans and machines, and visitors to the exhibit get to be active participants. Through 10/12. Chico State, ARTS 121. headleygallery csuchico.com

MONCA: Points of Departure, exhibit of 18 artists who used fiber and mixed-media to create forms that transcend definition. Through 11/3. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

NAKED LOUNGE: Facade, group show featuring artists Emily Jara, Kelsey Fernandes, Martin Townsend and Val Thomas. Artist Talk and Reception: Saturday, Oct. 12, 6-7pm. Through 10/27. 118 W. Second St.

ORLAND ART CENTER: Two Powerful Points of View, exhibit featuring work by artists Valerie Payne and Chuck Prudhomme. Reception Friday, Oct. 24, 3-7pm. Through 11/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 64

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

PROVISIONS GALLERY: The Art of Absolute Ama, exhibit at gallery located inside the downtown Upper Park Clothing store. Through 10/31. 122 W. Third St.

THE TURNER: 3rd Story Prints with Prose, prints alongside Chico State students’ flash-fiction works inspired by the museum’s collection. Exhibition talk Thursday, Oct. 17, 5:30 p.m. in the Zingg Recital Hall, reception to follow at the museum. Through 12/14. 400 W. First St. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Families in Northern California, exhibition represents the culmination of one year of research and collaboration between Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal experts, museums studies students, faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Chico State.


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SCENE

Broadway west A pro local production of Sondheim musical

Sweeney Todd: The W Demon Barber of Fleet Street, California Regional Theatre once again has shown that it is the only ith its current production of

theater group in the North State that can successfully mount a full-scale production of a Broadway musical. Credit its owner and executive director, Bob Maness, for having the vision that such a company could succeed in the North State. He has a knack for finding talent and knows how to make good use of the Center for the Arts, the most technologically advanced and spacious stage in Chico and, indeed, the entire region. Now Maness and company have taken on one of the most demanding of all musicals, Steven Sondheim’s marvelously macabre Sweeney Todd, which debuted in 1979 by and has been staged thousands of Robert Speer times since. And, once again, direcrober tspee r@ tor Maness has made the parts of a newsrev i ew.c om stunning production fit together with almost frictionless ease. This is community theater with a professional Review: California Regional gloss. Set in London in the mid-19th Theatre presents Sweeney Todd: The century, the musical—an adaptation Demon Barber of by Sondheim (with book by Hugh Fleet Street, FridaySaturday, 7:30 p.m. Wheeler) of a 1972 stage rendering and Sunday 2 p.m. of a Victorian-era tale—centers on through Oct. 13 Benjamin Barker (played by Michael Tickets: $20-$30 Burchett), who, hoping to remain anonCUSD Center ymous, is now calling himself Sweeney for the Arts Todd. He is returning to England with 1475 East Ave. revenge on his mind after spending 15 crtshows.com years in exile in Australia. He was sent there by the amoral Judge Turpin (Jim Sandiford), who raped and murdered Todd’s wife, Lucy, and made their daughter, Johanna (Kaila Davidson), a ward of the court confined to the judge’s home. When he disembarks at the dock, he is joined by young Anthony Hope (Joseph Slupski), whose life he had saved during a storm. Anthony subsequently glimpses Johanna framed in a window and falls in love with her—as she later does with him. Meanwhile, Sweeney Todd returns to his old stomping grounds on Fleet Street, where he sets up a barbering business above Mrs. Lovett’s meat-pie shop. Unbenownst to his customers, the barber chair in which they sit is designed to enable Todd to slit their throats and then send their dead bodies down a chute that empties into Mrs. Lovett’s bakery on the floor below. Thus he disposes of

all those who had anything to do with The butcher and the baker: Sweeney Todd his wife’s death. (Michael Burchett) and Mrs. Lovett (Ashiah Scharaga), Mrs. Lovett (Ashiah in turn, welcomes this new source Scharaga). of meat and money and becomes PHOTO BY JENNIFER REDEKER Todd’s partner in murder. Most of this plot development, it should be noted, is conveyed in song. Some 80 percent of the story is told by the lyrics deployed in some 27 musical numbers. Fortunately, all nine of the principal players have great voices, as do the seven members of the ensemble who portray the neighborhood chorus. Another aspect of this production that stands out is the richness of the individual portrayals. A good example is Scharaga (full disclosure: She is a reporter for the CN&R). When we first meet her, she is a virtual whirlwind, pounding dough with a rolling pin and commanding the stage while singing “The Worst Pies in London” with consummate skill. I was especially impressed by Burchett, whose deep bass-baritone seemed to manifest Todd’s inner darkness, and Natalie Kusie, who played the child-like Tobias Ragg and sang as sweetly as the birds he loved. Maness designed the elaborate but highly flexible set, with its two levels, several sets of stairs and fabled death chute, and Olivia Cerullo served as music director—a formidable challenge given the amount of music in the production. Which brings us back to Sondheim, the greatest musical playwright of the modern era. As you might imagine, the music in Sweeney Todd is anything but warm and fuzzy. Sondheim’s genius is in his ability to make us enjoy it despite the dark themes. Ω OCTOBER 10, 2019

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 10/10—WEDNESDAY 10/17 SWAMP ZEN: Longtime local  booty-shakin’ jam/rock band performs.  Thu, 10/10, 7pm. Argus Bar +  Patio, 212 W. Second St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive  Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts  welcome. Signups 7pm, music  7:30.  Thu, 10/10, 7pm. Studio Inn  Lounge, 2582 Esplanade. 

CHICO LATIN ORQUESTA Saturday, Oct. 12 Duffy’s Tavern

11FRIDAY

SEE SATURDAY

ALEX VINCENT: Chill tunes with guitar  and vocals.  Fri, 10/11, 8pm. The  Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St.,  Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

10THURSDAY

be announced at the end of each  show.  Thu, 10/10, 6pm. Madison  Bear Garden, 316 W. Second St.

BASTARD SALT: Portland punk band  

performs with local noise-makers  West by Swan and the Satanic  Mountain Witches (featuring  members of the Sex Hogs and Pink  Bandana). All-ages.  Thu, 10/10, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W.  Second St.

BILL HAMMOND: Local guitarist and 

CHRIS LAKE: LA-based house DJ on  Stay With Me tour with support  from Shdws, Wiggybeats, and  Forester. 18 and over.  Thu, 10/10, 8pm. $20. El Rey Theater, 230 W.  Second St. elreychico.com

RIOT TEN: Dubstep/hard-trap artist  on Hype or Die tour. Support from  Al Ross, Jessica Audiffred and  Stouttymusic. All ages.  Thu, 10/10, 8:30pm. $18-$20. Senator Theatre,  517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

vocalist performs.  Thu, 10/10, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. 

Sixth St.

BULLFROGS: Live music on the 

patio. Thu, 10/10, 6pm. La Salles,   229 Broadway St.

ROSE O’BRIEN TRIO: Eclectic mix of 

CHICO UNPLUGGED FALL 2019: Singer/ songwriter competition. Signups  start at 6pm sharp. The winners will 

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

folk, jazz and pop.  Thu, 10/10, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359  Esplanade.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Soulful songs and tasty 

tunes for dinnertime.  Fri, 10/11, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220  W. Fourth St.

THE KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Allrequest song and dance party on  the patio.  Fri, 10/11, 8pm. $10. Argus  Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

LA CUBANESA: A special night of AfroCuban music with master musicians  from Cuba and Venezuela along with  locals Shigemi Minetaka and Ethan  Swett. Two shows.  Fri, 10/11, 7pm and 9pm. $10-$15. Tender Loving Coffee,  365 E. Sixth St.

THE MOTHER HIPS: The legendary  California folk-rock band returns to  its birthplace of Chico. Sold out.  Fri,

10/11, 8pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room,  1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

IKE’S ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW: Celebrate all-ages music and  rock out with Teeny Nymph, Steak  Sauce Mustache, Culture Tourist  and more.  Fri, 10/11, 6pm. $7. Ike’s  Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

REUNION: Deep cut dance party with  tribute band playing your favorite  ’70s radio hits.  Fri, 10/11, 9:30pm. $5.  Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3  Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SILENT DISCO FUNDRAISER: Dance to  your favorite songs with Black  Noise silent disco and raise some  funds for Soroptimist International  Bidwell Rancho . No host bar;  21-over.  Fri, 10/11, 6pm. $20. The  Grange Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

SOUL POSSE: Five-piece band playing upbeat dance music from all  genres.  Fri, 10/11, 6pm. Almendra  Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway  Road, Durham.

TOTALLY ’80S DANCE PARTY: DJ  Barndoor will be crankin’ out all  your favorite fluorescent-colored  tunes.  Fri, 10/11, 9pm. $3. The  Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

VINYL TO THE PEOPLE!: Open decks!  Bring your own records and play  what you want, any genre. All  ages.  Fri, 10/11, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431  Park Ave.

WORLD PARTY

Three visiting musicians will join local jazz performers Shigemi Minetaka and Ethan Swett this Friday (Oct. 11) at Tender Loving Coffee for La Cubanesa, a night of Afro-Cuban music. There will be two concerts, one after the other. Trombonist and vocalist Obrayan Calderon and percussionist Niobel Cintra Cascare, both from Cuba, will perform along with percussionist/vocalist Jose Antonio Morales Castro from Venezuela. This promises to be an incredible night of multicultural jazz.

12SATURDAY

3PINTS DOWN: Sing-along tunes from  a variety of genres.  Sat, 10/12, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359  Esplanade.

CHICO LATIN ORQUESTA DANCE NIGHT: Local Afro-Caribbean band  will play salsa, cumbia, merengue  and more.  Sat, 10/12, 9pm. $10.  Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

CHRIS BROKAW: Legendary musician  (of bands Codeine and Come) leads  five-piece instrumental ensemble  made up of guitar, cello, two drummers and trumpet. Donald Beaman 

and Guest No. 66 share the bill.  Sat, 10/12, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W.  Second St.

DEATH, THE SEASON: Spooky season  special with Chico’s favorite improv  troupe. BYOB.  Sat, 10/12, 7pm. Chico  Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo  Ave.

DEFCATS: Upbeat dance, pop and  classic rock with five-part vocal  harmonies by local band of veteran  musicians.  Sat, 10/12, 9pm. $5.  Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

DIATOM DELI: Vocalist and multiinstrumentalist Delisa Neblett  performs classical guitar with  layered harmonies, synths and  samplers to create moving melodic 


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 58 Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmax productions.net

SWEET PLOT: Funk/jam band with a

GOTH NIGHT

Wednesday, October 16 Naked Lounge SEE WEDNESDAY

1970s sound. Local high-energy folk-rock trio The Exclusionaries open. Sat, 10/12, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Day and night party featuring reggae, dancehall, dub and roots from Nor Cal’s top DJs, bands and soundsystems. Plus, a delicious $20 buffet. Sat, 10/12, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road.

YURKOVIC: Sweet and swampy

blues with local band. Sat, 10/12, 8pm. Taps Bar And Grill, 407 Walnut St., Ste. A.

Curse JEFF KING: Smooth grooves, drinks and

soundscapes. Experimental folk and country musician Thom Roy shares the bill. Sat, 10/12, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

food. Sat, 10/12, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

ELWOOD OF CHICO: Self-described

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: See Friday. Sat, 10/12,

“uncool” local pop rock duo celebrates EP release. Down the Well and The Tighties share the bill. Sat, 10/12, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

REUNION: See Friday. Sat, 10/12,

try favorites and some modern tunes for late-night happy hour. Sat, 10/12, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SMOKEY THE GROOVE: Fun funk/jam

EPIC LOCAL METAL NIGHT: A three-

SUM 41: Popular pop-punk band from

selection of rock hits. Sat, 10/12, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &

the early 2000s is still rocking. The Amity Affliction and The Plot In You share the bill. Sat, 10/12, 7pm. $30.

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SALIVA: The Memphis-born alt-rockers had a string of big albums in the 2000s (even a Grammy nomination), and despite many lineup changes over the following decade, the band is still at it. Andrew Boss, Down the Well and Myth share the bill. Tue, 10/15, 7pm. $15-$18. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

TENDER LOVING TRIVIA: Test your knowledge of a range of topics with Annie Fischer. Prize for first place, a portion of the proceeds go to a local nonprofit. Tue, 10/15, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 10/15, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

3PINTS DOWN: Live music from a range

band will lure you to the dance floor. Sat, 10/12, 9pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

INSIGHT: Good-time trio plays a broad

presents pop superstar from Croatia to perform a musical cabaret-style show. Mon, 10/14, 7:30pm. $25. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillesta tetheatre.com

Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón, so come on down and get on the list. Tue, 10/15, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

15TUESDAY 16WEDNESDAY

9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

HIGH VOLTAGE: Classic rock hits, coun-

14MONDAY

TAJCI: Oroville Concert Association

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran

headed monster with Armed For Apocalypse, Touch Fuzzy Get Dizzy and Lyfecoach. Tue, 10/15, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

of genres on the patio. Wed, 10/16, 6pm. Allies Pub, 426 Broadway, Ste. 130.

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 10/16, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax every Wednesday for your boogie-ing pleasure. Wed, 10/16, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

GOTH NIGHT: Chico Area Punks presents dark night of rad tunes with Curse (Baltimore), False Figure (Oakland) and locals Iver and Desperate Hell. All ages. Wed,

10/16, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

MAITA: Portland indie-rocker newly signed to Kill Rock Stars comes to town. Locals Alex Draper and Bran Crown share the bill. Wed, 10/16, 7:30pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

THE MIDNIGHT HOUR

In an effort to find the perfect record to end the night, Chris Brokaw (former member of slowcore innovators Codeine and indie blues-rockers Come, as well as guest artist with the likes of Thurston Moore and The Lemonheads) created a moody, instrumental album titled, The End of the Night. For his current tour, he’s leading a five-piece ensemble of veteran musicians playing cello, guitar, trumpet and drums. Catch the band this Saturday (Oct. 12) at the Naked Lounge. Donald Beaman and Guest No. 66 open.

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TickeTs $25 Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com Cascade Theater, Redding • Sat, Nov. 16, 7:30- 9:30PM • www.cascadetheater.org EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com OCTOBER 10, 2019

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REEL WORLD

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

Joke’s on us Inspired lead can’t save unoriginal reboot

JmissedCrime, will go down as one of the year’s big opportunities. Director/co-screenwriter Todd oker, the latest take on DC Comics’ Clown Prince of

Phillips apparently had the green light to do whatever he wanted with the character’s story, and he also landed the perby fect lead (Joaquin Phoenix) for Bob Grimm the title role. This was a chance to tell a fresh, dark origin story from bg ri m m @ new srev i ew. c o m the Joker’s point of view. Phillips blew it. Phoenix, on the other hand, did not. He is otherworldly good as Arthur Fleck, a severely troubled clown and wannabe standup comic Joker (and mama’s boy) with a condition Starring Joaquin that causes him to laugh uncontrolPhoenix, Frances Conroy and Robert De lably at inappropriate moments. He Niro. Directed by Todd physically and mentally disappears Phillips. Cinemark 14, into the part—to the point where Feather River Cinemas. you may become concerned for the Rated R. actor’s well-being. He accomplishes this in a film that has a major identity crisis. It’s trying to do something new (mostly via the use of extreme violence), while also riffing on something old (Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, as well as various other comic book and cinematic influences). What’s delivered is a muddy, predictable and ultimately unoriginal film. There are many borrowed elements here—from the story of “subway vigilante” Bernie Goetz to films like Death Wish and a couple of Martin Scorsese/ Robert De Niro classics. We’ve seen the plot mechanisms before in Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy (Phillips even casts De Niro as a talk show host).

2

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When we first see Fleck, he’s dressed as a clown, spinning a sign and generally having a good time. He promptly gets his ass kicked, and not for the last time in this movie. We then see him in therapy and living in poverty with his quirky mother (Frances Conroy). Fleck slowly but surely starts to lose all sense of his humanity as he grows into a criminal monster. Phoenix does a thing with hysterical laughing early in the movie, where his Fleck struggles as it hurts his throat and challenges his smoker’s lungs. As the film progresses, it appears that the Joker’s laugh muscles are strengthening, a sort of training for his future criminal career, when the laughter will no longer cause pain. Touches like these, and the depiction of Gotham as a 1970s version of New York City are impressive. But any good is ultimately ruined. Fleck’s standup comedian aspirations don’t make a whole lot of sense, other than to provide a convenient plot device to reach the movie’s predictable finale. Everything to do with Fleck’s mother plays like a poor-man’s Psycho. For a movie that was supposed to be a new approach to the Joker, nothing feels original other than the creativity sparking off Phoenix. It’s boringly familiar. And about that much-advertised violence … is it too much? That would depend on your personal threshold for fake mayhem in movies. I, for one, was shocked at how visceral some scenes were, and can say this goes well beyond your typical Avengers movie or the playfully crazed violence of something like Deadpool. The violence in this movie is ugly, extremely downbeat, and leaves you with knots in your stomach. I don’t know how Joker won the Best Film award at this year’s Venice Film Festival. Maybe the voting panel was on mushrooms? Ω


Opening this week The Addams Family

The creepy family made famous in the 1960s television series gets the CGI animation treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Gemini Man

Ang Lee (Brokeback Mountain, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon) directs Will Smith as an aging hitman who is tracked down by a cloned version of his younger self. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Jexi

When a young tech-addicted loser starts to come out of his shell thanks to advice from Jexi, the voice in his smartphone, the A.I. life coach starts to sabotage his love life. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice Documentary on the life and career of legendary singer Linda Ronstadt, one of the most recognizable voices in the history of recorded music. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Abominable

A computer-animated feature about a teen girl who finds a Yeti on her roof and helps her new friend find his way back to his home at Mr. Everest. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Downton Abbey

The popular British television show comes to the big screen, with the familiar cast of characters being visited at their English country house by the king and queen. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Hustlers

Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez, Julia Stiles and Cardi B star as a crew of strippers who hustle money from Wall Street clients who frequent the club. Inspired by a true-life 2015 story that appeared in New York magazine. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

2

It Chapter Two

If you look at this sequel as a standalone, it’s a big mess. The movie picks up 27 years after the first part, with the grown-up Losers Club—played by Bill Hader (Richie), Jessica Chastain (Beverly) and James McAvoy (Bill), among others—being called back to their hometown where a rematch with the morphing Pennywise the clown is in order. That’s it for the plot. The adults split up, suffer some individual horrors at the hands of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard), then wind up back together for the finale. After a solid start, the performers just run from set piece to set piece, setting the table for some CGI scares mixed with the occasional practical effects. Even at nearly three hours, this movie comes off as rushed and haphazard. Despite this, Hader rules as Richie in the same way Finn Wolfhard ruled the character in the first one. He’s funny, he’s aces at looking scared, and he can handle the heavy drama. He and Skarsgard make chunks of this movie worth watching. It Chapter Two drags the overall grade for both movies together to somewhere around a B-minus. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

2

Joker

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

Judy

Renée Zellweger stars as actress/singer Judy Garland in this biopic centered on a six-week run of shows in London toward the end of her tragically short life. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Gemini Man

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

FILM SHORTS

OCTOBER 10, 2019

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18

PhOTO By hEnRy BuRROws (via FliCkR)

Fmore than once a year. That’s what brewers and beer ew people buy pumpkin beer

marketing experts have told me, anyway. If true, it would mean that the by brewery that floods Alastair Bland shelves with the first pumpkin beer of the season gains a huge marketing advantage, and that the brewer who decides, in the wholesome spirit of the fall season, to wait to roll out its pumpkin brew on Halloween or Thanksgiving might sell only a fraction of the batch. The race to be the first with a pumpkin beer is what drove brewers to release these beers earlier and earlier each fall, until a few years ago, as pumpkin beers crested the wave of mainstream popularity, we began to see them in August. This marketing strategy is called “seasonal creep,” and we see it with just about all holiday-related products. When it comes to pumpkin beers, I’m all for seasonal creep, since it means maybe they’ll be gone by Thanksgiving. Did I say that? I don’t dislike pumpkin beers. I just don’t see the point, because few actually taste like pumpkin. That’s because many brewers who make them tend to

go heavy on additions like allspice, nutmeg, clove and cinnamon. In effect, many pumpkin beers taste like pumpkin pie—but not pumpkin. Larry Berlin, brewer at State Room Brewery in San Rafael, says he once worked with a brewery that made an autumn pumpkin beer—and it was sort of a mockery of the concept. “It was just a brown malty ale with a bunch of pie spices dumped in and with no pumpkin at all,” he says. Berlin, for one, will not be making pumpkin beer this year. But the acclaimed Magnolia Brewing Co. in San Francisco already has. In September, the landmark brewpub made a handful of interesting pumpkin beers, including a hazy blood orange pumpkin IPA cheekily named Trendy Trainwreck; Brother Gourdo, a light Belgian table ale with pumpkin, coriander and orange peel; and Insult to Injury, a sour pumpkin peach ale. But don’t go looking for pumpkin beer at Iron Springs Pub & Brewery in Fairfax. “Iron Springs is a pumpkinbeer-free zone,” says owner Mike Altman, who thinks the seasonal deluge of pumpkin products—especially pumpkin beers and pumpkin lattes—“sickened a lot of people of

pumpkin beers.” Now, he says, “pumpkins should be saved for baking, not brewing, but that’s just my opinion.” Berlin thinks using pumpkins for brewing is actually a fine idea—as long as the pumpkin itself contributes in a meaningful way to the brew. In making beer, starch is converted via enzymes into sugar, at which point yeast can ferment the sugar into alcohol. The starch generally comes from barley and wheat. “But there are lots of alternate forms of starches to use in brewing,” Berlin says, including pumpkins. He added that, years ago, he pondered making a sweet potato porter. “But I wasn’t sure I could pull it off, so it never did it,” he says. I love pumpkins—especially the great kitchen varieties like kabocha, red kuri, delicata, jarrahdale and buttercup, among others. Baked and served with melted butter and salt, these squashes are some of the finest things to eat. But I don’t necessarily need to drink my pumpkins, especially when most of the beers made with them are distinguished by the spices and not the squash. □


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

three words for you: treat yo self “It’s the best day of the year!” Fans of the TV show Parks and Recreation know that Oct. 13 is Treat yo self day. That’s this Sunday, and this year I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider this to be a reasonable thing for arts dEVo and every person reading this column to celebrate in an effort to improve our mental health during this most stupid period of American history. Let no pleasure or indulgence within your grasp go unfulfilled. Buy those shoes. Get that massage. Tuck into a blanket with other warm bodies and binge watch 12 episodes of anything. Open the good wine. Buy the prime cut. Read on the grass, nap, repeat. Host a potluck, turn up the boom box loud enough for the neighbors to join in, and dance until you pass out. Pleasure yourself. Pleasure others. Finish each meal with ice cream. Dogs. Tacos. Whiskey. Sunset. Stars. For one goddam day let’s let our moans of contentment and howls of abandon drown out the noise of manufactured chaos. anniversary parties! When new amazing places in Chico start celebrating anniversaries, it is a sin to not honor them. Three of the most righteous curators of community are celebrating milestones this weekend, and if you appreciate how rad their work makes Chico, show them some love! Both secret Trail Brewing Co. and Blackbird books/cafe/gallery are hosting all-day Ben Schlotthauer two-year birthday parties in their parking photo by sean Mellon lots this Saturday (Oct. 12). The former will have live music (smoky Knights, Katie B & the Boys and soul Posse), food trucks and games, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; at the latter you’ll find near and dear Baked Goods, Pedal Press screenprinting, a book sale and live music (with Jonathan Richman, scout, october Coalition, Teeny nymph and Truck stop). Food starts at 11 a.m.; music at noon; screeprinting at 1 p.m. The night before, Friday (Oct. 11), starting at 6 p.m., ike’s Place is throwing an epic bash to mark one year since the sandwich shop started hosting live music. The marathon night will feature “chaotic partycore” crew steaksauce Mustache (Medford, Ore.), Sac’s orphan, plus a slew of local acts: 5 Mile Myth, Teeny nymph, Culture Tourist, shades of Glam and Real Friends Company. If you are of correct mind and realize the importance of all-ages venues for the health of a music scene, you’ll ride your bike to Five and I and give Ike’s promoter (and bassist for sunny acres and Culture Tourist) Ben schlotthauer a high five and buy him a drink (it’s his birthday, too!). devotions:

• Call for Camp Fire artists: The Museum of northern California art is seeking entries for Reflection and Hope, a group exhibit featuring art reflecting on the first year since the Camp Fire. The exhibit opens Nov. 7 and entries will be accepted through Oct. 18. Visit monca. org or contact the museum at 487-7272 or submissions@monca.org for more info and submission guidelines. • Burn scar drops: The new album from Chico prog-metal quartet shadow Limb comes out officially on Friday (Oct. 11). Order and download at shadowlimb.bandcamp.com. • arts dEVo’s music pick: I know there is a lot of live entertainment to choose from in the coming week, but if you’re filling out your calendar, don’t sleep on Maita, coming to Maita The Maltese Wednesday (Oct. 16, 8 p.m.—alex photo by tristan paiige draper and Bran Crown open). The Portland, Ore., singer/songwriter was just signed to Kill Rock stars, and if you are a fan of Mirah or Sufjan Stephens, you are already in love with her music. Hear at maita.bandcamp.com. october 10, 2019

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Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com 530.345.6618 Steve Ka SprzyK (Kas-per-ziK) You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 28 years representing clients in our area Century 21 Select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com (530) 518–4850 License#01145231

2354 Tiffany Way 3 bd 2 ba, Pool $419,000 2625 Lakewest Dr 3 bd 2 ba $459,900 2308 Ritchie Circle IN G $499,000 E N DSolar 5 bd 3.5 ba,PPool, 880 Whispering Winds S o lD $1,489,000

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Updated Home in the Avenues located on a tree lined cul de sac. Home features 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. $310,000 galow located near adorable bUNgalow downtown Chico. has a garage D IN G P E NHome and very large backyard. $275,000 ome across from Lindo ClaSSiC CHiCo Home Channel! HomePhas immaculate D IN G wood flooring EN and a park like back yard. $285,000

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Homes Sold Last Week

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of September 23 - September 27, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

453 Southbury Ln

Chico

$650,000

4/3

SQ. FT. 2678

2625 Lakewest Dr

Chico

$480,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 1777

5 Temperance Way

Chico

$615,000

3/2

2054

792 Bridlewood Ct

Chico

$480,000

3/3

2402

4242 Caballo Way

Chico

$600,000

3/2

2128

1458 Colonial Dr

Chico

$479,000

4/3

2020

1674 Filbert Ave

Chico

$550,000

4/4

2697

1285 W Lindo Ave

Chico

$475,000

3/1

1113

145 W Frances Willard Ave

Chico

$520,000

7/4

2230

1904 Laburnum Ave

Chico

$475,000

2/2

1271

1807 Wisteria Ln

Chico

$520,000

3/2

1808

2343 Lombard Ln

Chico

$465,000

3/3

2698

119 W Frances Willard Ave

Chico

$485,000

3/2

1554

607 El Varano Way

Chico

$455,000

3/2

1956

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How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the professionals at Century 21 Select 530.345.6618 www.C21SelectGroup.com Wonderful 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 3,014 square feet on 1.71 acres. Features large rooms, shop/outbuilding, fruit

horse barn, creek, pond, gazebo .................................................................................................................. $849,000

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oWned Solar! Wonderful Pebblewood Pines condo offering 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 1889 square feet with 2-car garage and more! ............................................................................................................................................$339,000

eaSy maintenance toWnhouSe near shoppinggand Little Chico Creek Elementary, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,

in

Pend 1375 sq ft............................................................................................................................................... ......$245,000 ..............................................................................................................................

g sq ft-3 bed, plus offic creek location + inground pool, 3.13 acs, 2,603 office, 2.5 bath ........................$875,000 e n d in Pcustom

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

359 Silver Lake Dr 3017 Boston Dr 174 Via Mission Dr 1064 Manzanita Ave 3014 Top Hand Ct 28 Lawnwood Dr 630 W 9th St 44 Redeemers Loop 1564 East Ave 3253 Rockin M Dr 1252 Calla Ln 11 Glenoak Ct 1734 Sunset Ave 803 Black Walnut Way 117 Winchester Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$450,000 $440,000 $419,000 $417,500 $415,000 $406,500 $400,000 $400,000 $399,500 $353,500 $350,000 $345,000 $325,000 $319,000 $308,000

3/2 4/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 2/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 2/1 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 1765 1881 1809 2002 1929 1528 1204 1598 1125 1357 1248 1338 1008 1173 1220

3/2 in California Park $315,000 3/2 close to Meriam Park $315,000

as a local realtor, i am here to help. call me!

gorgeouS 4 bed/3 bth! 3,600 + sq ft, RV parking, 3-car garage, in ground pool!.........................................$699,000

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

Location, Location, Location

Searching for a home?

trees and in-ground pool! ............................................................................................................................ $779,900

large cuStom home, 3 bed/3.5 bath, 3,528 sq feet on 5.95 acres, living rooms, music, play room, 30 X 50 shop,

CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

ADDRESS 21 Alameda Park Cir 2538 White Ave 1125 Sheridan Ave #39 1125 Sheridan Ave #65 555 Vallombrosa Ave #39 130 Mclaughlin Way 186 Via Mission Dr 7 Westminster Ct 5018 Guntren Rd 1268 Broadway St 2380 Cassandra Dr 4022 Cedar Ranch Rd 7165 Citrus Ave 6368 Woodman Dr 1600 Graystone Ct

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

TOWN

PRICE

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise

$295,000 $235,000 $197,000 $175,000 $167,500 $164,000 $134,000 $123,273 $100,000 $95,500 $619,500 $360,000 $350,000 $345,000 $359,000

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

2/2 3/1 3/2 2/2 1/1 2/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 2/2 3/3 2/2 3/1 3/3 3/2

1452 1140 1035 1009 702 1440 1845 1435 1555 1638 2606 1771 1121 2744 2391

O c t O ber 10, 2019

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CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

Get better response from your newspaper advertising with the Butte County Living R e a l e s t a t e s e c t i o n in the Chico News & Review. With 105,000-plus readers and a proven track record, we’re confident you’ll quickly realize the benefits of advertising in Butte County’s #1 newspaper. Over 42,000 copies of the CN&R are distributed to over 750 locations in Butte County.

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All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

Call your News & Review advertising representative today, (530) 894-2300

some upgrades.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BRASS CONNECTION, SWING SHIFT at 702 Mangrove Ave Ste 165 Chico, CA 95926. TIMOTHY PAUL HOWEY 758 Cleveland Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIM P. HOWEY Dated: September 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001043 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EXCLUSIVE TATTOO CO. at 2109 Esplanade Ste 110 Chico, CA 95926. JOE ANTHONY SANCHEZ 1542 1/2 Citrus Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE SANCHEZ Dated: August 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000989 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE COUNTY LOCAL FOOD NETWORK at 2483 Streamside Court Chico, CA 95926. PAMELA MARIE LARRY 2483 Streamside Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PAMELA LARRY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001004 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEST ASIAN MASSAGE at 1360 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL L ARIZA this Legal Notice continues

1145 W 2nd St Apt 9 Chico, CA 95928. BEST ASIAN MASAGE 1145 W 2nd St Apt 9 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: M. L. ARIZA Dated: September 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001051 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DAVE BOUL IT CONSULTING at 1312 Purcell Ln Chico, CA 95926. DAVID A BOUL 1312 Purcell Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID BOUL Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001048 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RIVER OAK GARDENS at 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. KRISTA KNECHT 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. MATTHEW MORRISSEY 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KRISTA KNECHT Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001046 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE DARLING BEE at 8995 Troxel Road Chico, CA 95928. AMANDA WYLIE DARLING 8995 Troxel Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA DARLING Dated: September 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001068 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BBMP WEALTH MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE SERVICES at 1074 East Ave Ste. K3 Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL BELLOTTI 26 Striped Moss Ct Roseville, CA 95678. CHRISTOPHER BODNEY 9 Hidden Grove Ct Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT MARCUS 11000 E Woodbridge Rd Acamp, CA 95220. MATTHEW PATTERSON 9488 Skye Court Granite Bay, CA 95746. This business is conducted by Copartners. Signed: CHRISTOPHER BODNEY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001002 this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO ECSTATIC DANCE COLLECTIVE at 1988 Wild Oak Lane Chico, CA 95928. MARY EWING 222 W. Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. EVELYN LAWSON 2107 Shoshone Chico, CA 95926. GLEN ORCUTT 1988 Wild Oak Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: GLEN ORCUTT Dated: September 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001038 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MATA CLOTHING at 617 Hayfork Creek Terrace Chico, CA 95973. EDUARDO MATA 617 Hayfork Creek Terrace Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EDUARDO MATA Dated: September 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001076 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DELPHINE at 180 Pauletah Place Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER CRANE 180 Pauletah Place Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER CRANE Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001045 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HALEY MUSIC THERAPY, THE MUSIC INITIATIVE at 138 West 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. HALEY MUSIC THERAPY 138 West 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. ERIN HALEY 2 Aldrin Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ERIN HALEY, PRESIDENT Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001047 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name WILDFLOWER SALON at 2995 Esplanade Ste 101 Chico, CA 95973. this Legal Notice continues

BRIELYN LEDFORD 28 Lawnwood Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIELYN LEDFORD Dated: August 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000616 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, PRESIDENT Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001086 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

11128 Midway Suite A Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SHAWN MACNEILL, PRESIDENT Dated: September 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001075 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PHANTASM JEWELRY at 13450 Oak Ranch Lane Chico, CA 95973-9274. AUBREY CHRISMAN 13450 Oak Ranch Lane Chico, CA 95973-9274. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AUBREY CHRISMAN Dated: September 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001057 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE REDWOOD SANDWICH COMPANY at 1354 East Ave Ste U Chico, CA 95926. BENJAMIN BRACKEN 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. KAITLYN BRACKEN 6904 Dean Place. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KAITLYN BRACKEN Dated: August 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001008 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EYE OF JADE at 1238 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. BENJAMIN LUCAS 11576 Dairy Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BEN LUCAS Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001121 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PEDROS GARDEN at 13109 Jordan Hill Rd Concow, CA 95965. NATHAN CACERES 13109 Jordan Hill Rd Concow, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NATHAN CACERES Dated: August 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001012 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIERRA WATER UTILITY at 2618 Navarro Dr Chico, CA 95973. MICHAEL BUTLER 2618 Navarro Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL D. BUTLER Dated: September 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001089 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5263 Royal Oaks Dr Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, PRESIDENT Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001087 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5 Skyline Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WATER TANGO at 1272 Arch Way Chico, CA 95973. SALVATORE VETRANO 1272 Arch Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SALVATORE VETRANO Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN NUmber: 2019-0001107 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SERA HOSTING SERVICES at 4644 Wilder Drive Chico, CA 95928. STEPHEN E WILDER II 4644 Wilder Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHEN E. WILDER II Dated: September 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001092 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLEAR REFLECTIONS OF CHICO at 1612 Sherman Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICHARD J. WEMETTE 1612 Sherman Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD J WEMETTE Dated: August 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000957 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as OAK RIDGE CONSTRUCTION at 11128 Midway Suite A Chico, CA 95928. OAK RIDGE ENTERPRISE, INC. this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AGRA MARKETING GROUP, AGRA SERVICES at 60 Declaration Drive, Suite A Chico, CA 95973. AGRA TRADING, LLC 60 Declaration Drive, Suite A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: NICHOLAS B. CARTWRIGHT Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001116 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUNNY DAY FARMS at 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. MARY ANN BARR 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. LORRAINE M DAY 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: LORRAINE M. DAY Dated: September 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001095 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO AQUAJETS, CHICO AREA SWIM ASSOCIATION, CHICO MASTERS at 3156 Canyon Oaks Ter Chico, CA 95928. CHICO AREA SWIM ASSOCIATION 1675 Park View Lane Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VERONICA COATES, TREASURER Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001118 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage this Legal Notice continues

Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. G&D SELF STORAGE 2687 Highway 99 Biggs, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #A22 ERIK SUTTER Tag number 6273285 Items: Miscellaneous household items, boxes, camping chairs Unit No. #B08 TERI JOHNSON - Tag number 6273260 Items: Miscellaneous, clothes, boxes Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, October 19, 2019 Time: 10:00am Location: Lien sale will start at Gridley first. 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 94948 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: October 3,10, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. GRIDLEY SELF STORAGE 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #A006 ZACHERY EVENSON - Tag number 6273287 Items: Miscellaneous household items, Boxes, Toolbox, Furniture, books Unit No. #AX321 MISTY RICHARDSON - Tag number 6273286 Items: Roll top desk Lien Sale will be held: Date: Saturday, October 19, 2019 Time: 10:00am Location: 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 94948 Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: October 3,10, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA. Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain boxes, personal household items, tools, furniture, miscellaneous. Unit 32 EDWARD RONGLEY this Legal Notice continues

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For the week oF october 10, 2019

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Love is

and upgrade the inspiration you feel about the activities that are most important to you—the work and the play that give you the sense you’re living a meaningful life. So how do you boost your excitement and motivation for those essential actions you do on a regular basis? Here’s a good place to begin: Visualize in exuberant detail all the reasons you started doing them in the first place.

when you meet someone who tells you something new about yourself,” wrote poet André Breton. I think that’s an excellent principle to put at the top of your priority list in the coming weeks. To be in maximum alignment with cosmic rhythms, you should seek input from allies who’ll offer insights about you that are outside your current conceptions of yourself. You might even be daring enough to place yourself in the paths of strangers, acquaintances, animals and teachers who can provide novel reflections. There’s just one caveat: Stay away from people who might be inclined to fling negative feedback.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): C.P.

Cavafy’s poem “Waiting for the Barbarians” imagines the imminent arrival of an unpredictable agent of chaos. “The barbarians are coming today,” declares the narrator. Everyone in town is uneasy. People’s routines are in disarray. Faces look worried. What’s going to happen? But the poem has a surprise ending. “It is night, and the barbarians haven’t come,” reports the narrator. “Some people have arrived from the frontier and say that there aren’t any more barbarians.” I propose that we use this scene as a metaphor for your life right now. It’s quite possible that the perceived threat isn’t really a threat. So here’s my question, taken from near the end of the poem: “What are we going to do now without the barbarians?”

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some

folklorists prefer the term “wonder tales” rather than “fairy tales.” Indeed, many such stories are filled with marvelous events that feature magical transformations, talking animals and mythical creatures such as elves and dragons and unicorns. I bring this up because I want to encourage you to read some wonder tales. Hopefully, as you do, you’ll be inspired to re-imagine your life as a wonder tale; you’ll reframe the events of the “real world” around you as being elements in a richly entertaining wonder tale. Why do I recommend this? Because wonder tales are like waking dreams that reveal the wishes and curiosities and fascinations of your deep psyche. And I think you will benefit profoundly in the coming weeks from consciously tuning in to those wishes and curiosities and fascinations.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I suspect

that in the coming days you’ll be able to see into everyone’s souls more vividly than usual. You’ll have a special talent for piercing through the outer trappings of their personalities so as to gaze at the essence beneath. It’s as if your eyes will be blessed by an enhancement that enables you to discern what’s often hidden. This upgrade in your perception may at times be unsettling. For some of the people you behold, the difference between how they present themselves and who they actually are will be dramatic. But for the most part, penetrating to the depths should be fun, enriching, even healing.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “This heart is

rusty,” writes poet Gabriel Gadfly. “It creaks, it clanks, it crashes and rattles and bangs.” Why is his heart in such a state? Because he has been separated from a person he loves. And so he’s out of practice in doing the little things, the caring gestures and tender words, that a lover does to keep the heart well-oiled. It’s my observation that most of us go through rusty-heart phases like this even when we are living in close proximity to an intimate ally. We neglect to practice the art of bestowing affectionate attention and lowkey adoration. We forget how important it is for our own welfare that we continually refresh and reinvigorate our heart intelligence. These are good meditations for you right now.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “All the effort

in the world won’t matter if you’re not inspired,” writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. I agree! And that’s a key meditation for you right now. Your assignment is to enhance

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I hope you

are embarking on a vigorous new phase of self-redefinition. I trust you are excited about shedding old ways of thinking about yourself and eager to revise and reimagine the plot of your life story. As you do, keep in mind this helpful counsel from physicist Richard Feynman: “You have no responsibility to live up to what other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be like they expect me to be. It’s their mistake, not my failing.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ve

probably heard the saying, “Genius is 99 percent perspiration and one percent inspiration.” It’s often attributed to inventor Thomas Edison. Michelangelo expressed a similar idea. “If you knew how much labor went into it, you would not call it genius,” he said about one of his masterpieces. I’m guessing that you have been in a phase when these descriptions are highly apropos. The work you’ve been doing may look productive and interesting and heroic to the casual observer, and maybe only you know how arduous and exacting it has been. So now what do you do? I say it’s time to enjoy the fruits of your efforts. Celebrate! Give yourself a thrilling gift.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you,” declared astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. If that’s even a little bit true, I bet you won’t believe it in the coming weeks. According to my analysis, the universe will make a great deal of sense to you—at times even exquisite, beautiful, breathtaking sense. Life will be in a revelatory and articulate mood. The evocative clues coming your way about the nature of reality could tempt you to believe that there is indeed a coherent plan and meaning to your personal destiny.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In

2005, Facebook was a start-up company barely on the map of the internet. Its president asked graffiti artist David Choe to paint murals on the walls of its headquarters. Choe asked for $60,000, but the president convinced him to be paid with Facebook stock instead. Years later, when Facebook went public, Choe became a multi-millionaire. I suspect that in the coming months you will be faced with choices that are less spectacular than that, but similar and important. My conclusion: Be willing to consider smart gambles when projects are germinating.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Experiment is the sole source of truth,” wrote philosopher and polymath Henri Poincaré. “It alone can teach us something new; it alone can give us certainty.” He wasn’t merely referring to the kinds of experiments that scientists conduct in laboratories. He was talking about the probes and explorations we can and should carry out in the course of our daily lives. I mention this because the coming days will be prime time for you to do just that: Ask provocative questions, initiate novel adventures, and incite fun learning experiences.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In my

opinion, Piscean singer, poet and actor Saul Williams produces high-quality art. So he has earned a right to critique mediocre art. In speaking about movies and TV shows that are hard to enjoy unless we dumb ourselves down, he says that “we have more guilty pleasure than actual f---in’ pleasure.” Your assignment in the coming weeks is to cut back on your “guilty pleasures”—the entertainment, art, and socializing that brings meager returns—as you increase and upgrade your actual f---in’ pleasure.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. october 10, 2019

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personal/household items, tools, furniture, miscellaneous. Unit 149 TRAVIS DIXON personal and household items Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on Saturday October 19, 2019 beginning at 10 am Sale to be held at: South Chico Mini Storage 426 Southgate Ct Chico CA 95928 530-891-5258. Published: October 3,10, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 278SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Personal items, Containers, Misc.) 284SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Boxes, Containers, Misc.) 519CC GERRARD WHITE 5x12 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) 520CC GERRARD WHITE 11x7 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) 073SS BRANDY RAMSEY 5x5 (Boxes, Camping gear, Large cases) 222SS GLENN D MICHAELS 4x5 (Boxes, Bags, Totes) 435CC RANDLE KENTA 5x10 (Boxes, Bags) 395CC1 PATRICK D BOOTH 6x12 (Boxes, Tires, Totes) 219SS CARBY CANDANCE 6x15 (Tools, Bags, Boxes, Furniture) 330CC DANIELLE CREWS 7x12 (Tubs, Toys, Playhouse) 173SS DOLORES DAVENPORT 7x12 (Totes, Boxes, Furniture) 072CC DOLORES DAVENPORT 6x9 (Totes, Boxes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday October 26, 2019 Beginning at 1:00PM Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: October 10,17, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. GRIDLEY SELF STORAGE 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #B023 - JENNIFER BETTENCOURT - Tag number 6273263 Items: Miscellaneous household items, Boxes, Yard tools, furniture dolly Lien sale on-line Storagretreasures.com Date: Saturday, November 26, 2019 final bid Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Go to Gridley Self Storage at 1264 Highway 99 in Gridley, CA to pick up items. Published: October 10,17, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. G&D SELF STORAGE 2687 Highway 99 Biggs, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #C01 - KATRINA BARTON - Tag number 6273262 Items: Miscellaneous household items, vacuum, tools Unit No. #A15 - LISA TAYLOR Tag number 6273264 Items: Miscellaneous boxes, tent, vaccuum Lien sale on-line Storagretreasures.com Date: Saturday, November 26, 2019 final bid Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Go to Gridley Self Storage at 1264 Highway 99 in Gridley, CA to pick up items. Published: October 10,17, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. DISCOUNT SELF STORAGE 5100 Clark Road Paradise, CA 95969 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #C37 - DOUGLAS PACINI - Tag number 6273288 Items: Miscellaneous items, Boxes, tires, fishing poles, tools Unit No. #C09 - STEPHANIE SAENZ - Tag number 6273289 Items: Miscellaneous items, Boxes, Bike Lien sale on-line Storagretreasures.com Date: Saturday, November 26, 2019 final bid Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Go to Discount Storage in Paradise, CA to pick up items. Published: October 10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LONNIE JERAMIAH JUNGERS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LONNIE JERAMIAH JUNGERS Proposed name: LONNIE KENNETH HOWLAND

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THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02738 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ROSEMARY AMANDA BELAK filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ROSEMARY AMANDA BELAK Proposed name: ROSEMARY OCHOA MEDELLIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02708 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VANESSA MARIE PULLEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VANESSA MARIE PULLEY Proposed name: VANNESSA MARIE GRAMPS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described

above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02724 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PATRICK STUART HUTLER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PATRICK STUART HUTLER Proposed name: PATRICK STEWART HARVEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 19, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02799 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEBORAH RENEE BENNETT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEBORAH RENEE BENNETT Proposed name: JESSI LEE RAMONE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition

without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02654 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WENDY JO MORROW filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WENDY JO MORROW Proposed name: WENDY JO GEBICKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02906 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUDITH ANNE BEDBURY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JUDITH ANNE BEDBURY Proposed name: JUDITH ANNE JOHNSTON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN

Dated: October 3, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02877 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

(530) 893-2882 Dated: September 16, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00423 Published: September,26, October 3,10, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ISABEL A. WEBB To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ISABEL A. WEBB A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARK MAXEMIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARK MAXEMIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Avenue Chico, CA 95926

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JANET HOPE STOTT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JANET HOPE STOTT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHERYL FLETCHER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHERYL FLETCHER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CARL B. LEVERENZ Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn (530) 895-1621

Case Number: 19PR00338 Published: October 10,17,24, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE PAMELA JEAN OATES To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PAMELA JEAN OATES A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DONA OATES in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DONA OATES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 12, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLARA YANG, ATTORNEY AT LAW 2810 Coloma St., Ste. A Placerville, CA 95667 (530) 621-3624 Case Number: 19PR00434 Published: October 10,17,24, 2019


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