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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 2 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Camp Fire survivors find refuge at FEMA housing project in southern Butte County farming community BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA PAGE

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Welcome

to the neighborhood 16 TREES IN JEOPARDY

17 JUJITSU BIRTHDAY!

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STILL TIME TO VOTE!

See SAMPLE BALLOT, page 22

SANDWICH WARS


Accident? injured?

law oFFiCes oF

Lawrence a. Puritz F o r m e r I n s u r a n c e D e F e n s e at t o r n e y

eae Fr ion sult t

Con

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CN&R 

S ep t em b er 5 , 20 1 9

343-0500 northvalleylawyer.com


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 2 • September 5, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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27 COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF GRIDLEY CITY ADMINISTRATOR PAUL ECKERT BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Mark Lore, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Lisa Van Der Maelen, Jim Williams, David Wyles

N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Publications Art Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

trump’s America means death for sick kids Among President Trump’s many cruel actions over the

past three years is his recent move to strip protections from undocumented immigrants who live here under a special exemption for those in treatment for lifethreatening medical conditions. Last week, the administration unceremoniously decided to end the so-called “medical deferred action” policy that allows seriously ill foreigners—and their families—to stay in the United States for life-saving medical care. The issue came to light when enrollees who’d applied for extensions—as is common practice under the program—were summarily denied and ordered to leave the country within 33 days. For people whose country of origin lacks adequate medical expertise and care—including cancer-stricken children from impoverished South American countries—the decision in many cases would translate to a death sentence. Take, for example, the case of Jonathan Sanchez, a 16-year-old Honduran with cystic fibrosis, a hereditary disease that damages respiratory and digestive systems and requires aggressive treatment, including anti-inflammatory drugs. Sanchez’s sister died from the disease—having never been properly diagnosed or treated in

Honduras—so his parents brought him to Massachussetts, where the experts at Boston Children’s Hospital and access to cutting-edge treatment and technology are keeping him alive. Critics in Washington and around the nation— including over 120 federal lawmakers who rebuked the administration in a letter to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security—have responded to the savage turn of events with fierce opposition. A hearing of the Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties on the shuttering of the program is scheduled for Friday (Sept. 6). Under the intense backlash, the administration appears to be backing off on the deportations in some cases. That is, those already in the States who’d applied for an extension may get a reprieve. Don’t be quick to give the White House any credit for being compassionate, however. Remember, this is the same administration that cages refugee children after separating them from their parents. Moreover, the medical deferred action program is still eliminated. Ultimately, that means people—yes, children—won’t get the care they need and will die as a result. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Ab 430 rhetoric full of hot air AstateActlaw.ofIt’s2019,notcontinues to roll toward adoption as just its lead author and champion,

ssembly Bill 430, the Camp Fire Housing Assistance

North State Assemblyman James Gallagher, saying so—Gov. Gavin Newsom told the media during a recent visit to Paradise that “it’s flying through the Legislature.” AB 430 got the green light in the Senate on Tuesday (Sept. 3). Next up is a language cleanup vote in the Assembly before heading to Newsom’s desk. That it’s faced no significant barriers in Sacramento has provided by irresistible fodder for a segment of Evan Tuchinsky the community vigorously opposed the author, a former to progressives on the Chico City CN&r editor, spent Council. two years as a The council voted in May, along Chico planning ideological lines, to request Chico’s commissioner. removal from AB 430; Gallagher complied (see “Development divide,” Newslines, June 6). Since then, the most vocal of local AB 430 proponents take every advance in the legislative process as a golden opportunity to condemn the council majority. Here’s the thing: AB 430 may make sense for other

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September 5, 2019

cities, but not necessarily for Chico. The goal of AB 430 is to streamline approvals—including limits on the scope of environmental challenges—to create housing for Camp Fire survivors. Chico already has housing projects underway and set to start, under current regulations. Within the city, much of the land available for housing is considered “infill” (i.e., amid existing development); infill already is exempt from further environmental review. Bill language specifies that projects larger than 50 acres do not qualify for streamlining exemptions under AB 430. Such a development came to the public last Thursday (Aug. 29): the nearly 1,450-acre Valley’s Edge Specific Plan, next to Stonegate in southeast Chico’s foothills. However, a developer in such a scenario could use AB 430 to plan and build in 50-acre increments. To be clear, Gallagher’s bill doesn’t steamroll environmental concerns—notably, it excludes environmentally sensitive parcels. It got bipartisan support in environmental committees in both houses. Enthusiasm elsewhere for AB 430 shouldn’t repudiate Chico or city leadership. Whether the bill succeeds—yielding quick, affordable housing in Biggs, Corning, Gridley, Live Oak, Orland, Oroville, Willows and Yuba City—Chico’s participation is now a moot point. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

God bless Gridley The city of Gridley’s motto—the small town that loves company—is a nod to the hospitality often inherent in rural life. But that slogan is especially true now that the southern Butte County city has welcomed Camp Fire survivors with open arms. For those unfamiliar with the farming community straddling Highway 99, it’s long been the second smallest municipality in the county. Post-disaster, however unbelievable, that distinction belongs to Paradise. Gridley may be tiny but it also is mighty in terms of its response to those in need of housing. As Ashiah Scharaga reports in this week’s cover story, the town is now home to the largest FEMA community in the North State, a soft place to land for hundreds of weary and traumatized wildfire refugees. To that I say, God bless Gridley. I’m especially impressed with the folks who’ve dedicated much time and energy over the last 10 months in service to those who lost everything. I’m sure not everyone is thrilled about the sudden population growth, but you wouldn’t know it from the efforts of the volunteer relief group in the region. I have a real affection for small towns. As some readers may recall, I lived in one when I first moved to far-Northern California a couple of decades ago. That would be Hamilton City—thenpopulation 1,900. There, for more than a year, I lived alone on my late grandparents’ almond and walnut farm. Technically, I shared the property with my German shepherd and three horses. My grandfather for many years was the postmaster in that Glenn County hamlet, so it wasn’t surprising to locals when his Bay Area-born and -raised granddaughter arrived to attend college. That became clear when I started picking up mail at the post office some 17 years after his death and the friendly folks who worked there chatted me up about my roots in the area. Word travels fast in small towns. Often when I met people, I’d discover that they already were aware of whom I was related to and even where I lived. At first, I found it unnerving. Eventually, I realized it was part of the charm of life in the sticks. Several of my neighbors—especially the sweet farming couple on the property to the east—were particularly welcoming. It wasn’t long before I adjusted to people giving me what I like to call the “country wave”—even if only momentarily raising my fingers up from the steering wheel while driving the backroads to my house. Eventually, I succumbed to the pull of city life and moved to Chico, but I look back fondly at life in the orchards.

SACked Speaking of the big city, Scharaga has a scoop from the Chico City Council’s Tuesday (Sept. 3) meeting. I’m referring to the panel’s vote to part ways with its contracted law firm, the City of Industry-based Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin (see page 8). That news was revealed in the form of the council voting to put out a request for proposal for attorney services. For several reasons, the CN&R has long been a critic of the city’s attorneys. More on that in the weeks to come. In the meantime, here’s my advice to the council: Hire someone local. Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Backin’ Bernie  Re “Top contenders” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Aug. 29): The Aug. 29 CN&R seemed to prefer Elizabeth Warren to Bernie Sanders. Certainly the establishment, while dreading either Warren or Sanders as a Democratic nominee, sees Warren as more acceptable, as her foreign policy is “the usual.” Sanders and Warren have similarly wonderful economic and domestic policies, but they differ significantly on foreign policy, where presidents have the most power to act without Congress. Obama became president, having minimal knowledge or interest in world history and foreign policy, and he inadvertently wrecked Libya and Syria and oversaw the rise of ISIS, oversaw the military metastasizing ISIS over the globe, and created avoidable conflict with Russia over Ukraine. Warren, too, has minimal

knowledge of world history and foreign affairs. Those advising her are from the Washington foreign policy establishment, boding little change. While Sanders’ passion for 40 years has been improving the lives of all working people, he has always cared about foreign policy. Sanders’ gut instinct is a demilitarized, diplomacy-oriented foreign policy. Only Sanders has the vision and courage to stand up to the extraordinarily powerful, Washington foreign policy establishment and the military industrial complex. The U.S. desperately needs a foreign policy that makes the world more stable and sustainable. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

Trump’s death sentence Our world is a better place because of Maria Isabel Bueso, who suffers from a debilitating disease that paralyzes the lower

body: mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, known also as MPS 6, a rare disfiguring genetic disease. Bueso is a 24-year-old Guatemalan woman, a college summa cum laude, who graduated with honors and a degree in sociology from California State University East Bay. In 2003, when she was 7, her family immigrated here, accepting an invitation to participate in a clinical trial being conducted by doctors at UC San Francisco’s Benioff Children’s Hospital; the facility’s research and trials have resulted in treatment for her and others. Bueso has received written notification that she has 33 days to voluntarily depart U.S. soil or face deportation. The Trump administration is canceling the “medical deferred action” program, which allows for the treatment of rare or debilitating disease for immigrants, mostly children; this medical care is not LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

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available in their countries of origin. Her parents pay for her medical treatment through private insurance. She is not a threat, other than to ignorance and bigotry. Sending Bueso back to Guatemala will be a death sentence. To deprive her of life-saving medical treatment is murder. Roger S. Beadle Chico

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September 5, 2019

Change the culture Re “Council ring confrontation” (Newslines, by Andre Byik and Meredith J. Cooper, Aug. 1): Police transparency? On July 5, 2019, an 11-year-old girl was the subject of an arrest/detainment by Chico police in Bidwell Park. During this process, the police used considerable force to detain a child in responding to a family request for a “welfare check.” I am concerned about the amount of force the police used in executing this welfare check. Does it make sense for two police officers to hold an 11-year-old girl face down in the dirt, swimsuit askew, knee in her back, for a welfare check? Chico’s assistant city attorney has denied my California Public Records Act request for a copy of the police report/body cam video of this incident. For Chico to have a more compassionate police force, there are two central issues. First, the ongoing use of excessive force by the police, and second, the lack of transparency. We have to start somewhere and that must be more complete police training in de-escalation techniques and the application of these techniques in the field. The police culture on the use of force in our community must change. Video: tiny.cc/july5 George Gold Magalia

More makeouts, please Seconds after pondering the lack of “public displays of

affection,” I watched as two smitten young lovers fell into a warm embrace on the sidewalk, appropriately enough, outside the Naked Lounge. I peeked back a half block later and they were smooching it up righteously. Chico, we need more of this and less of every thing else! Bill Mash Chico

2nd Amendment blues The writers of the Constitution did a fantastic job creating a document that has kept us free for 200-plus years, but they did not write it for all of us, or they would have abolished slavery. In reference to a previous writer’s letter, I doubt you have ever sat down with a liberal and talked because if you had, you would’ve discovered that your comment about liberals wanting to take your guns is another ridiculous lie. Have you been watching Fox News—Vladimir Putin’s opinion, again? I don’t want to take away guns, but when some loony conservative can kill nine people and injure 27 others within the 32 seconds it took the police to kill him, we have a problem. I believe military-style weapons need to be banned. If you truly believe those kinds of weapons are going to do anything to protect you, knowing what kind of weapons our military has, then you are a fool. The people and knowledge are what protect us. Reporters keep the government honest and thus keep us free. Why do you think Trump’s best buddy Putin won’t allow a free press or free elections? Mona Uruburu Janesville

Write a letter tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


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I pet my dogs, eat yummy food or go to the Feather River. SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

CN&R

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE DISASTER RELIEF WINDFALL

Approximately $5 million in disaster relief is on its way to two Butte County cities, according to a press release from Assemblyman James Gallagher (R-Yuba City). Chico is slated to receive $3 million, Oroville $2 million. Each municipality’s population grew by more than 20 percent after the blaze. The funds come from a one-time state budget appropriation. Chico City Manager Mark Orme is preparing a report for the Chico City Council’s consideration with specific suggestions on how the city could “most strategically” utilize the money. “Even though it’s just a drop in the bucket of the actual impacts … it’s still a huge, huge gift to this city and its citizens and the folks who survived the fire,” he said.

Making changes

DEADLY WATERWAYS

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office has recovered the bodies of two men who went missing in separate incidents on the Sacramento and Feather rivers. Chico State student Anthony Mahr, 22, was pulled from the Sacramento River last Thursday (Aug. 29), when a fisherman spotted his body about a quarter-mile upstream of Scotty’s Landing, BCSO said. Mahr was reported missing Aug. 20, when it was said he and two friends fell in the river after their floats hit a snag (see “Mysteriously missing on the river,” Downstroke, Aug. 29). On Sunday (Sept. 1), search teams recovered the body of Omar Espinal, 40, of Chico, from the Feather River near East Gridley Road, BCSO said. Espinal reportedly fell in the river Saturday (Aug. 31), when his canoe overturned. Death investigations remain ongoing.

SERIAL RAPIST PLEADS GUILTY

Last week (Aug. 30), 25-year-old Nicholas Snowden, of Oroville, pleaded guilty to three counts of forcible rape in Butte County Superior Court, according to a press release from District Attorney Mike Ramsey. Snowden (pictured) was arrested in April after three women reported similar incidents in which a young man had offered a ride in his white SUV, then drove to a remote place where an assault took place. During the latter two attacks, in March and April, Snowden drove his victims to an area behind Golden Hills Elementary. His SUV was caught on the school’s video surveillance and identified by a decal. Sentencing is set for Sept. 27. Snowden faces up to 25 years, and at the end of his sentence, according to the release, he will be evaluated under California’s Sexually Violent Predator program. 8

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

City Council putting out bid for city attorney contract, evaluating pesticide usage

TChicocenterpiece of Tuesday’s (Sept. 3) City Council meeting, the panel

hough environmental issues were the

dropped a bombshell during its closed session report at the end of the night: a vote to put story and out to bid its contract photo by Ashiah Scharaga for the City Attorney’s Office. as h i a h s @ The city will send out n ew sr ev i ew. c o m a request for proposal (RFP) this week, and while its current firm—Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin—may choose to apply, the decision ultimately could end Chico’s ties to the City of Industry-based attorneys. The vote fell 5-1 to send out the RFP, with Councilman Sean Morgan against and Vice Mayor Alex Brown absent. City Manager Mark Orme confirmed by phone Wednesday morning (Sept. 4) that it is the first time the city has reconsidered its contract with the firm since it was hired in April 2014. Prior to that, the city attorney was an in-house position. Orme further explained that the decision means the council is “going to go out and check the market.” Assistant City Attorney Andrew Jared did not respond to the CN&R’s requests for comment by deadline.

When it came to environmental issues, the

council adopted an ordinance to create a Climate Action Commission, and also chose to reconsider its usage of pesticides. The commission will be made up of seven council-appointed members, whose main task will be to advise the council on how to best implement the city’s Climate Action Plan (CAP). It’ll be akin to other city boards, such as the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission and Planning Commission. The vote fell along party lines. In fact, the commission will come on board just in time to update the CAP. A key target, per state requirements: reducing greenhouse-gas emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels over the next 10 years. The city also is hiring a new associate planner, who will serve as the commission’s staff representative. All of the speakers who addressed the council on this item spoke in favor. Several called climate change the most pressing issue the city is facing. Sascha Sarnoff commented that she was happy to see the council making a “more concentrated effort” to address climate change locally. Mark Stemen, a Sustainability Task Force member and former chairman, told the CN&R later that “the most exciting part” of the shift is that the Climate Action

Commission will be able to work side-byside with the city’s other boards. (The task force will be dissolved once the commission is active.) “A lot of people are concerned about climate change and they feel like there’s nothing that can be done,” he said. “Now, those concerns … have a place and a process to be realized. So we can get to 100 percent renewable energy, we can get to a livable planet.” Also on Tuesday, the city took a step toward scaling back its usage of Roundup and other pesticides containing glyphosate, a controversial herbicide that some studies have linked to increased cancer risk (the Environmental Protection Agency maintains it is not a carcinogen). Erik Gustafson, Chico’s public works director of operations and maintenance, reported that the city uses just under 150 gallons of such pesticides annually across about 7,000 acres of green space. He cautioned the city against a complete ban, which could increase costs by as much as $325,000 to $425,000 more per year. This is due not only to the steeper price of organic alternatives, he said, but also because more product would have to be used, increasing labor demands. The city currently spends about $1 million for con-


Assistant City Attorney Andrew Jared (left) listens as City Manager Mark Orme provides the Chico City Council with a Camp Fire update.

tracted weed abatement services. Council members ultimately unanimously requested a staff report with specific locations of current usage and a written plan with the city’s pest management policies. Gustafson told the panel that city staff started drafting an “integrated pest management plan” about a year ago, but had “just started to scratch the surface.” Mayor Randall Stone, who brought the issue forward, said he recognized there could be a tremendous cost, but it’s worthwhile to review places where the city could phase out the pesticide’s use over time. Morgan said he supported the idea of nixing its usage in areas frequented by children, like playgrounds and parks. In an interesting turn of the night, Stone,

who has championed First Amendment rights, chose to silence regular council attendee Rob Berry, citing City Council procedural policies. Berry attempted to discuss syringe exchange programs during the business from the floor portion of the meeting. Later on the agenda was Brown’s request to hear a syringe exchange presentation from Butte County Public Health at a future meeting (approved later with only Morgan dissenting). The council does not take public comment on agendized council member requests. What followed was a tense exchange between Stone and Berry. Jared weighed in that public comment would happen at a future date, but the speaker could address syringe exchanges in general. (The speaker before Berry spoke against syringe exchange programs.) Stone cautioned Berry to avoid the topic. “This is a First Amendment right,” Berry said, arguing that he wanted to be clear why he was denied the opportunity to speak. After Berry was ordered to sit down, another regular attendee, Patrick Newman, who typically has a conflicting stance on issues, defended Berry, saying, “I hate to agree with Mr. Berry on anything, but I think I’m going to have to on that one.” Councilwoman Ann Schwab said it would be worth clarifying the rules moving forward. “I look at business from the floor as a place for people to speak on items they would not have an opportunity to speak on at any time,” Schwab said. Ω

So much for these laws Alas, paper receipt ban, we hardly knew ye: 2019 bills get winnowed some more Tax credits for renters. Consumer protection for

student borrowers. More homeless shelters that allow pets. Those were some of the hundreds of ideas that California lawmakers killed Friday (Aug. 30), as they winnowed a huge stack of bills in preparation for the Legislature’s final two-week sprint before the session ends on Sept. 13. Chairs of the appropriations committees announced their decisions in a rapid-fire ritual—and, in the Assembly, over the shouting protests of people who oppose a About this story: bill to limit vaccine CalMatters reporters Rachel exemptions. Becker, Jackie Botts, Elizabeth Here are a few Castillo, Ben Christopher, Matt Levin, Judy Lin and Felicia noteworthy proposMello contributed to this report. als that lawmakers CalMatters.org is a nonprofit, snuffed out as they nonpartisan media venture exacted on legislation in plaining California policies and the mysterious “suspolitics. pense file,” where bills can die with no public explanation: Rainforest protection: As the Amazon rainforest burns, a bill aimed at protecting tropical forests went up in smoke. Taking aim at goods such as soy, rubber and palm oil harvested from clear-cut land, it would have prohibited the state from doing business with companies whose products contributed to deforestation. Lawmakers ultimately sided with construction companies that opposed the measure.

Student loans: With student debt skyrocketing, California lawmakers proposed stricter rules for student loan servicers and creation of a borrower advocate to respond to complaints. But the bill withered under opposition from major student loan servicers, banks and credit unions. Gun control: California has a “red flag” warning law that allows law enforcement to temporarily remove firearms from those deemed by a court to be a danger to themselves or others. But legislation that would have trained officers to execute these “gun violence restraining orders” stalled because lawmakers want the state agency that trains police to focus on something else: the new standard for police to use deadly force. Homelessness: Many homeless shelters don’t allow people to bring their pets. SB 258 was an effort to change that by

SIFT ER What’s for dessert? Californians like to think of themselves as American as … go ahead, finish the sentence. Funky Chunky, a gourmet popcorn company based in Minnesota, set out on a delicious quest to discover which desserts Americans think most appropriately represent their state. After surveying 3,800 people across the U.S., apple pie came out as a clear favorite in California, with 38 percent of the votes. The Meyer lemon cake came in second place (at 22 percent) and rocky road ice cream followed (18 percent). For our northern neighbors in Oregon, marionberry pie and blackberry cobbler tied for

first place, with 26 percent of the votes, followed by brownies (18 percent). To the east, in Nevada, doughnuts were victorious (30 percent), followed by homemade ice cream (27 percent). Other survey highlights: One-third of Americans share their treats with their partners—but just as many hide them in places around the house.

Source: funkychunky.com/blogs/news/ official-state-treats

Carol Dahmen poses with a receipt that’s more than 4 feet long—for the purchase of a single item. PHOTO BY KEVIN ECKERY/CALMATTERS

giving state grants to shelters that allow homeless people to bring their furry friends. Meanwhile, AB 516 would have made it difficult for cities and counties to tow vehicles from people living in them. Housing: Affordable housing developers have complained for nearly a decade that the state needs a permanent funding source to build more units for low-income tenants. But lawmakers chose not to advance a bill that would have done just that—to the tune of $500 million annually. Also, in a loss for tenants paying high California rents, lawmakers squelched a bipartisan effort to increase the tax credit renters can claim on their state returns. And a bill that would have given landlords more incentive to accept Section 8 tenants by providing a tax break was also nixed. More landlord-tenant fights now loom, as a controversial measure that would limit annual rent increases heads for a key vote. LGBTQ equality: Though it’s illegal for an adult to have sex with a minor in California, if the age difference between the two parties is less than 10 years, the adult is not required to register as a sex offender. But that exception applies only to [vaginal] intercourse, not oral or anal sex. Gay rights advocates pushed a bill to extend the exemption to cover LGBTQ relationships also, but it got caught up in a political fight between Democrats running for a Senate seat in the Central Valley. Lawmakers declined to advance it, despite backing from the Los Angeles County District Attorney. They’ll likely consider it again next year. Campus sexual assault: With the federal NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

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government rolling back protections for college students who are assaulted or harassed, some Democratic lawmakers have been trying to recreate such protections in California—over the objections of some universities. Former Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed such a bill last year, and the effort stalled again Friday when lawmakers decided that SB 493 won’t advance this year. Shopping: Fed up with ridiculously long paper receipts and fearing the chemicals they often contain, a San Francisco assemblyman pushed legislation that would have largely banned receipts at large retailers, unless customers requested one. But the bill was criticized by grocers who like old-fashioned receipts and pundits who deemed it “micromanagement in the name of progressive politics.” Food stamps: California has one of the nation’s lowest participation rates in CalFresh, the state’s name for the federal food stamp program, leaving $1.8 billion in federal funds on the table that could help hungry people. Despite no registered opposition, lawmakers held a bill that aimed to dramatically increase enrollment in the federal food aid program, but didn’t say why. Reptiles: California is still on track to ban the importation of alligator and crocodile products, such as handbags and shoes, starting next year. In a win for animal rights groups, lawmakers tabled AB 719, which sought to delay the ban until 2025. Tax credits for filmmakers: With Georgia and other red states passing restrictive abortion laws, a California Democrat proposed giving $250 million in tax credits over five years for film productions to leave those states. But the proposal stalled amid criticism that it amounted to an effort to bribe companies to boycott. Water in your beer: Every gallon of beer or wine made in California uses five to seven gallons of water, a precious resource for a state recovering from a prolonged drought and constantly worried about the next one. Major beer companies got behind a bill to require regulators to come up with guidelines for breweries and winemakers to recycle that water (for cleaning and other nonpotable purposes), but it wasn’t enough to convince lawmakers to say “cheers.” —LaureL rosenhaLL


Auto PAint / Body ShoP

Seeking offers Oroville explores outsourcing its fire services following Camp Fire population boom 18

City Administrator Bill LaGrone is confronting Oroville’s

post-Camp Fire landscape with increased urgency. In a municipality whose population increased by 20 percent following the blaze, he fears public safety service levels are lacking. On Tuesday (Sept. 3), LaGrone, the city’s former public safety director, asked the City Council to explore a bold idea: dissolve the city-run fire department in favor of contracting with Cal Fire. “We are talking about looking at a larger organization that may be able to provide more,” LaGrone told the council. “They have a greater depth-of-service. They have a greater depth-ofequipment. They have a greater depth of—not necessarily of knowledge of this community—but they certainly have a greater depth that they can provide.” Fire department staffing and resources have not kept pace with the city’s expanding population—now over 21,000 residents—for several decades, requiring cooperative agreements between the city and outside agencies to keep up with calls for service, according to a city staff report. The City Council took a step forward Tuesday by voting to authorize staff to release a request for proposal for fire-protection services for the city, with Cal Fire being the likely applicant. Contracting with the state agency, according to staff, may improve service at a cost comparable to current spending. The move also may help address a statewide problem that LaGrone said has not spared Oroville residents: rising costs and nonrenewals of homeowner insurance policies. Rate increases and cancellations, he said, may slow down with a larger organization such as Cal Fire providing service to the city. “The reality is we can’t keep up with the growth that’s necessary to provide the service,” LaGrone told the CN&R after the meeting, explaining that the department employs 15 firefighters, which is a staffing level that hasn’t changed since the ’90s. “Our fire personnel are great people. It’s not about quality. It’s about depth. [The city owns] zero helicopters ... zero bulldozers ... zero water tenders.” Any possible change in fire service will not happen

imminently. LaGrone’s PowerPoint presentation to the City Council started with the statement: “No decision will be made tonight.” The process could take up to two years to complete, the city administrator said, and it would include public engagement and input. Any applying agency will be required to present a fire service contract that would not exceed $2.75

Cesar’s 18

Yard Service

million in its first year, a figure comparable to current city fire costs. The agency also would be required to offer jobs to current staff should they meet the agency’s employment criteria. Other things, LaGrone said, would remain the same. The city’s fire station on Lincoln Street would remain open and fire vehicles would include Oroville Fire Department and Cal Fire markings. The City Council voted 4-3 to authorize city staff to seek proposals for outside fire service, with Councilmembers Linda Draper, Janet Goodson and Art Hatley dissenting. Goodson noted the city’s proposal asks agencies to present a year-one contract that doesn’t exceed $2.75 million, but questioned whether the city would be able to keep up with rising costs—likely 3 percent to 5 percent—in subsequent years. She said revenue generated by Measure U, the city’s one-cent sales tax meant to benefit public safety, will reach only so far. Annual Cal Fire cost increases would be expected, LaGrone said, noting that current city contracts also include contract “escalators.” He also told the CN&R that revenue generated from Measure U, which went into effect April 1, is on pace to exceed $5 million in its first year, a significant amount

“This is our city. It’s not Cal Fire, and they don’t always go with our ideas of the way things should be.”

—Cheri bunker

The Oroville City Council on Tuesday (Sept. 3) voted to seek proposals from outside agencies to provide fire services for the city. pHOtO COUrteSY OrOVILLe FIre DepArtmeNt

given the city expected $4 million would be generated. The city administrator cautioned that the $5 million projection is based on one quarter of data. Forces such as the population increase post-Camp Fire, associated recovery efforts and Oroville Dam spillway construction have influenced spending habits in the city and may not continue long-term. The proposal also was criticized by Cheri Bunker, an Oroville resident who addressed the council during public comment. She said the city explored outsourcing its police and fire services around 2012, and keeping in place its existing services ultimately was more affordable. “This is not a good idea,” Bunker said. “We want our fire department, our fire department. This is our city. It’s not Cal Fire, and they don’t always go with our ideas of the way things should be.” Exploring ways to improve city services is prudent for spending taxpayer dollars, LaGrone said. When Measure U was passed, the intent was to “enhance” public safety. That may mean bucking the status quo, he added. It’s possible maintaining in-house fire services would ultimately be preferable. Proposals are due to the city by Dec. 4. The City Council could begin interviewing applicants beginning Feb. 4. “Everybody needs to be calm,” LaGrone told the CN&R. “We’re just looking at [options].” —Andre Byik a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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HEALTHLINES Ady Barkan with wife, Rachael, and son, Carl. photo courteSty of ady barkan

Medicare for All in April 2019, Barkan could no longer speak and delivered his testimony via computer. Barkan now requires round-the-clock home health aides, who account for the $9,000 out-of-pocket cost that Warren mentioned in the debate. He spoke with Anna Almendrala about the case for Medicare for All. He responded to email questions with a device that uses lasers to track his eye movements in order to type. The following interview has been edited for length and clarity. Why do you think that Medicare for All, which was once considered fringe, is now a major part of the debate among Democratic nominees?

We’re the richest nation in the history of the world, and yet people are going bankrupt from their medical bills. Clearly, people’s frustration with the health care system is reaching a boiling point. Tens of millions of people don’t have any health insurance. Millions more have to fight with their insurance company every day, when those companies try to deny coverage for necessary care.

Going down fighting Dying activist Ady Barkan champions Medicare for All by

Anna Almendrala

W Ady Barkan settled in to watch the second round of the Democratic presidential

hen Santa Barbara lawyer-turned-activist

primary debates, he had no idea his story would be part of the heated discussion. Barkan, 35, who has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, watched from his wheelchair as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren described how he and his family had to raise money online to help pay for roughly $9,000 a month in health care costs not covered by his private health insurance. “The basic profit model of an insurance company is taking as much money as you can in premiums and pay[ing] out as little as pos-

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sible in health care coverage,” Warren said. “That is not working for Americans.” But for Barkan, the moment was not about him. “Elizabeth Warren’s point wasn’t just to mention my name, it was to call attention to the ways our broken health care system is hurting people across the country,” he said in an email interview. Proponents of “Medicare for All” argue that a single, publicly funded insurance plan is the most effective and equitable way to deliver health care to all Americans. The concept, and whether it is politically feasible, is a dividing line among Democratic presidential candidates. Barkan, a community organizer for the progressive advocacy group Center for Popular Democracy, was diagnosed with the neurodegenerative disease in 2016 at age 32. ALS causes muscles to atrophy, and patients to lose control of their bodies. Eventually, they are no longer able to breathe without

What did you think about the debate, especially the portion in which candidates were asked about raising taxes on the middle class to pay for Medicare for All?

assistance from a ventilator. Barkan already had made a splash on the national political stage a few years earlier because of his campaign to persuade the Federal Reserve to focus on full employment and rising wages. He and his wife, Rachael Scarborough King, a UC Santa Barbara English associate professor, had welcomed their first child earlier that year. As Barkan put it, “life was perfect.” But the diagnosis plunged him into depression as he realized he likely would not live long enough to see his son grow up. People with ALS live an average of two to five years after diagnosis. His fight for better access to health care began in 2017, when he protested the GOP tax cut bill on the grounds that removing that revenue from the federal government would make it more difficult to fund disability and Medicaid payments. On the way home from the protest, he ended up on the same flight with former Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, a Republican, and used the opportunity to have a gentle but pointed conversation about how the bill would devastate families like his. The exchange, captured on video, went viral and landed him more opportunities to share his story. By then, he needed a cane to walk and could no longer hold his baby. When he was tapped to deliver the opening statement for a congressional hearing on

“We’re the richest nation in the history of the world, and yet people are going bankrupt from their medical bills.” —ady barkan When I saw the moderate candidates argue that Medicare for All will never pass because Republicans are going to call us socialists, or attack us for raising taxes, that makes me sad. It’s an argument that doesn’t give voters enough credit. Yes, Medicare for All will probably mean a new tax, but that tax will be less, way less, than how much we’re spending on health care bills. Let’s make that argument and treat voters like adults. HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

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c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 1 2

About this story:

What do you think about California Sen.  Kamala Harris’ health care plan, which  would allow more people to opt into  Medicare while also giving private insurers the chance to participate?

It raises a lot of questions for me, like why there’s such a long phasein to cover everybody, and why Sen. Harris seems insistent on preserving a role for the private insurance industry. One thing I think candidates haven’t had to do so far is make a case for why private insurance companies are good, how they actually make life better for doctors or patients. While Medicare for All is becoming a  more mainstream idea, politically it  remains a long shot, even in a state like  California. In its absence, what other  options would you support?

There are various incremental reforms that would still be important improvements over the status quo. And I am not sure that incremental reforms will be more politically viable than Medicare for All. The insurance industry will oppose a public option just like they’ll oppose single-payer. So, I guess I don’t really accept the premise of the question. But, putting that aside, I support any solution that gets more people the health care they deserve.

it is an abridged version of the original produced by Kaiser Health news, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser family foundation.

How are Rachael and your son, Carl?

Rachael is enjoying teaching and looking forward to having time off when the new baby comes in November. That’s some news for your readers—she’s pregnant with our second! How are you doing physically, emotionally and mentally?

ALS is exhausting, infuriating and inserts itself into every moment of my life. I recently lost the ability to drive my wheelchair, so other people have to do it for me. But there are always glimmers of hope. Very soon I will have access to eye-drive technology, which will allow me to drive my wheelchair with my eyes using my computer. What does it feel like to see yourself,  struggling with a debilitating disease, as  one of the most prominent faces of the  Medicare for All movement?

I am glad to be able to use my personal tragedy to support transformative change, although I would obviously give up all the attention and accolades in a heartbeat if I could be healthy. I’d much prefer to make impact the way I was before my diagnosis. □

WEEKLY DOSE Hike smart A walk in the woods is a great way to get your steps in, but something as small as a bee sting or as painful as a broken ankle can suddenly turn your hike into a rescue mission. A total of 46,609 people required search and rescue aid in this country’s national parks between 2004 and 2014, and according to research, wandering off trail, injury and bad weather are the main culprits. To prevent the worst from happening, take a few precautions before you head out. Whether it’s a day hike or a backpacking trip, experts suggest always taking these 10 essentials: first-aid supplies, extra clothing for unexpected weather, food, water, fire, sun protection, a light source, tools for emergency repairs and a shelter. If you get lost, remember this simple acronym—S.T.O.P. Stop, think, observe and plan before you lose your cool. Happy trails!

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GREENWAYS Ron Smith, left, and Robin McCollum, both former  certified arborists, stand near an oracle oak they  say has been improperly marked for removal by  Butte County.

Uprooting concerns Experienced arborists question county’s assessment of hazard trees in Butte Creek Canyon story and photo by

Andre Byik

an dreb@ n ewsrev iew. com

RaAmonth ago. longtime resident of Butte Creek

on Smith began noticing the marks about

Canyon, he spotted two vertical, parallel lines painted in orange on the trunks of oak, pine and sycamore trees that line Centerville and Honey Run roads. Further inquiry revealed the marks mean the trees have been identified as hazardous by the county and are slated for removal starting in mid-September. Smith, a former certified arborist, and others, including Robin McCollum, also a former certified arborist and retired county tree crew foreman, took a closer look at the marked trees in the canyon and say they believe roughly 20 percent of them have been improperly deemed hazardous. Some appear to have been scorched in the Camp Fire but are showing signs of healing and survival, they say. Others may have been affected by the heat of the blaze but are otherwise structurally sound. And a few don’t appear to have been touched by fire at all—a curiosity they say raises efficacy questions about the tree-removal project. “I’ve lived in the canyon for 33 years,” Smith told the CN&R on a recent trip along Honey Run and Centerville roads with McCollum. “I’m pretty familiar with most of the trees. I said to myself, ‘Well, yeah, I can agree that some of these trees need to go but not all of these trees.’” A county-hired firm has identified about 7,000 burned, dead or dying trees deemed hazardous in accordance with federal guidelines. The trees—all of which lie within the county rights-of-way—are slated for removal

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as part of ongoing Camp Fire recovery efforts. About 670 are in the canyon, with the rest identified in the Magalia, Lower Ridge, Butte Valley and Concow areas. Tree removal work outside the canyon is scheduled to begin in stages starting later this year and into next year. A vast majority of the cost of the work—which has totaled at least $3.5 million in associated contracts so far—is expected to be reimbursed through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES). Locals, however, say the number of trees they’ve identified as possibly improperly marked raises concerns that healthy trees will be unnecessarily removed. The trees, they argue, provide shade and hinder the growth of fire-driving brush and other vegetation in the area’s understory. Residents also say they have largely been left in the dark about tree-removal plans, and a system set up to dispute them— which includes sending the Public Works Department an email with a photo of the tree, GPS coordinates and reason for the dispute— is cumbersome and ill-publicized. Smith and McCollum presented their concerns to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday (Aug. 27), when the panel took up contracts supporting the tree project. There, Supervisors Debra Lucero and Tami Ritter questioned the timeline of tree removal while disputes persist, whether more community outreach can be done, and the criteria used to determine whether a tree is hazardous or not. Radley Ott, assistant public works director, said removing trees in the canyon—particularly along Centerville Road—is a priority before winter arrives because of the threat of

inclement weather knocking trees across the roadway. “It’s one way in and out through there,” Ott said. “We’re trying to get those trees out. If we have downed trees in the winter, that could be a problem.” Trees marked for removal, he said, have been deemed hazardous by the county-hired firm American Tree Medics, a Modesto-based firm that specializes in forest management and arborist services. Assessments include a 360-degree observation of a tree, as well as examination of physical features and, at times, sample collection and analysis. The process to dispute trees was put in place by Public Works Director Dennis Schmidt, Ott said, adding that work was underway to better explain and present that process to the public online. At one point during the board’s discussion, Lucero noted the issue fell within Supervisor Doug Teeter’s district and asked whether he would be open to meeting his constituents regarding tree-removal concerns. Teeter said his constituents know he is open to meeting with them. He added that he believes the dispute process set up by Schmidt is appropriate and encouraged residents to bring their concerns forward because the county can make mistakes. He also pointedly recalled his experience escaping the Camp Fire. “I think we all really forget what I went through,” he said. “People died because of vegetation along the roads. People died. I am sorry. I love trees. I don’t want people to die because of my love for trees.” Teeter told the CN&R that a Camp Fire recovery open house for Butte Creek Canyon will be held Saturday (Sept. 7), from 4-6

p.m., at the Centerville Schoolhouse. Back on Centerville Road, near Center Gap Road, Smith parked his truck near an oracle oak tree. He’s admired the 80-plus year-old tree for the past 15 years. It’s a hybrid between a black oak and interior live oak, he said. “Somewhere in nature way back when, they got together and formed this phenomenon.” In the fall, its leaves turn in contrasting yellow and green hues. A couple of years ago Smith collected seedlings from the tree following a particularly good year of acorn production, planting them and gifting them to friends. He has a few left. The tree has been marked, however, with two orange vertical lines. Smith and McCollum said it didn’t appear to be touched by fire. It’s also, in their assessment, healthy and not a threat to fall over Centerville Road. It has a cavity in its trunk likely caused by a branch that had been improperly cut, which McCollum said could signal a problem but not a significant one. “It’s not a hazard in any way, and it’s not fire-damaged,” he said, taking a walk around the tree for himself. “Poor execution of the assessment.” Smith urged county officials to re-evaluate trees marked for removal. “We have time,” he said, adding, “Slow the train. Slow the train, you know?” □

ECO EVENT

Commune with nature The Altacal Audobon Society and the Mount Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society are each hosting a journey into Lassen Volcanic National Park this weekend. Altacal is heading to crystal blue Juniper Lake for three days from Thursday-Sunday (Sept. 5-7) for a rustic camping, hiking and birdwatching adventure. You can contact Gaylord at gg2canoe@yahoo. com or Jennifer at jpchico@sbcglobal.net for more details and to secure your spot. The Native Plant Society will be taking a field trip to Ridge Lakes on Sunday (Sept. 7) where you can experience an alpine high and spectacular vistas with a bit of a climb. Contact Marjorie McNairn at 3432397 for more info.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo CourteSy of KodenKan

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

80 years of jujitsu

repurposing and craft-beer nuptials

Chico Kodenkan’s story is one of tradition, cooperation and family. The dojo practices Danzan Ryu jujitsu, an integrated martial arts system founded by Japanese-Hawaiian Master Henry Seishiro Okazaki during the 1920s. After studying with Okazaki in Hawaii, Merlin “Bud” Estes brought Danzan Ryu home, opening the Chico Judo and Jujitsu Academy in 1939. Along with Bay Area instructor Ray Law, Estes is credited with spreading Okazaki’s system throughout the mainland. In 1978, Estes partnered with sensei Richard Radcliffe and renamed the dojo Chico Kodenkan to honor Okazaki’s Hawaiian institution. The dojo moved several times before settling at its current location at 254 E. First St. This marks its 80th year in Chico. Delina Fuchs (pictured) has been with Chico Kodenkan continuously since 1978, first as a student, then as a sensei, board member and school head. The CN&R caught up with Fuchs to discuss the dojo, which welcomes all ages and skill levels with a variety of classes. Go to chicokodenkan.org for more info.

Tell me about Danzan Ryu. There are several styles of classical Japanese jujitsu that are part of [Master Okazaki’s] system, as well as influences from Chinese boxing, Okinawan martial arts and Filipino martial arts, but perhaps an even greater influence is Hawaiian lua, the tribal martial art of Hawaii. Then there is the healing arts component, Seifukujutsu, which includes massage therapy, sports medicine, bone alignment and physical therapy—comprehensive body work.

What makes Chico Kodenkan unique? We’re a volunteer nonprofit. Our nonprofit status accompanies our attitude about serving and empowering people. I’m an educator and we’re not financially motivated—I don’t get a paycheck here, there’s no belt-testing fee. The Hawaiian influence is this thing called kokua, which is to cooperate and to help one another. This is the core of our interac-

tions because we are ohana, Hawaiian for family. The dojo and the people—this is our ohana and we practice kokua—giving each other massage and helping each other out.

A lot of people default to Brazilian jiu-jitsu and Ultimate Fighting Championship when they think of jujitsu. What’s your distinction? I don’t stereotype any martial art, but the focus in this country is towards sport. Sport has a different goal. We’re a traditional martial art. This is really about mastering yourself—personal self mastery for a lifelong practice. Hence the healing arts are just as important, if not more so, than the martial arts aspect. Jujitsu that is true to its core is not about force against force, but utilizing force efficiently to execute technique.

What other classes do you offer? I also have a black belt in Nishio Ryu Toho Iaido, which is Japanese sword drawing. I opened up a weapons class for people who want to practice. The Capoeira Malês group is here and there’s also Aikijujitsu, which has its roots in both aikido and jujitsu. The Asian Healthcare Association is run by Michael Turk, a master teacher, writer and acupuncturist, who has a clinic here two days a week. We’ve got a lot going on. —NATe DAly

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

As we all know, especially here in Butte County following the Camp Fire, housing is a major issue. I was encouraged last week to see the Board of Supervisors take a major step to address it—and homelessness—via a new program and four county staff positions. Local municipalities also are taking up the issue, at workshops and in public meetings. Let’s see where this goes! In the meantime, I’ve noticed quite a bit of infill happening. Two moderate-size properties near where I live in southwest Chico were recently razed and are in the process of being replaced by what appear to be duplexes. I’m sure it’ll affect traffic in my neck of the woods, but people need places to live, so I’ll deal with it. There’s an innovative project going through the planning approval process and being proposed for the old Chico Racquet Club building on Rio Lindo Avenue, which has sat vacant for many years. Instead of tearing it down or putting a new club in its place, Airehart Construction has proposed to turn it into apartments—19 of them. The pool will remain, as well as the indoor bike parking. And there are already enough spots in the parking lot. It’s cool to see people thinking outside the box and addressing two issues at once: blight and a need for housing. Keep it up.

Craft-beer wedding I mentioned a few weeks ago the contest being held by Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. to choose an engaged couple to get married at this year’s Oktoberfest. Well, the winners have been chosen. Andrew and Katie, who live in San Francisco but hail from Chico, were deemed most worthy of the extravagant occasion: They’ll get transportation, a honeymoon suite, cake, flowers, food and photos, plus tickets to Oktoberfest for 50 guests. Not bad! One of the main criteria for the contest was demonstrating—via personal video—a deep love of craft beer. Their story was pretty compelling: “I knew it was her when she ordered a Sierra Nevada Oktoberfest on our first date,” said Andrew. “And I had a Pale Ale in my hand when I asked her to marry me.” The wedding will take place on opening night—Sept. 27—in front of approximately 3,500 people. Shout out To the mystery woman who saw me having a bad morning while trying to cheer up with good food at Old Barn Kitchen, thank you for breakfast. Your quiet generosity—and the Icelandic Benedict—brightened my otherwise murky day. new faCe I had a feeling when Gridley welcomed its huge community of fire survivors that business would start to ramp up. The first new face I’ve seen is a reinvention of the Gridley Grill. The former was down-home delicious, but the Gridley Grill & Crab Shack will certainly add something new to that stretch of Highway 99. Grand opening set for Sept. 28. (For more on Gridley’s Camp Fire Community, see “Home, sweet temporary home,” page 18.) □

got mosquitoes? Need to make a service request? Need Mosquitofish? Got Yellowjackets/Ticks?

Contact 530.533.6038 or www.ButteMosquito.com September 5, 2019

CN&R

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Home, sweet Gridley welcomes Camp Fire survivors struggling to find permanent housing story and photos by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

J

ennifer Powell sought refuge in the church parking lot across from her mobile home park as her boyfriend, Bert Jenkins, tried to fend off the flames of the Camp Fire. It was the afternoon of Nov. 8 and they were trapped in Paradise. Their car’s gas tank appeared to be on empty. In an effort to save their home, Jenkins and his neighbors grabbed buckets and trashcans— “anything we could find”—and filled them with water gushing from a nearby fire hydrant. “Right when my shoes melted, I knew I had to go,” Jenkins said. He and Powell jumped in the car and drove—they thought they’d never survive. Somehow the couple made it down the hill to Chico.

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The neighborhood is made up of 305 manufactured homes set up across approximately 70 acres (but it has a capacity for 400, depending on the need). So far, 124 households have moved in.

Almost nine months later, Powell stood over a stove cooking some cheesy pasta for lunch. She and Jenkins are among the first residents of the Gridley Camp Fire Community, a quasi-neighborhood built by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to house displaced survivors. The couple moved into their singlebedroom manufactured home early last month. It’s been a long journey to get to this point. After the fire, Powell and Jenkins stayed with family, then at a sub-par motel in Chico, then in an RV park in Redding, where they say theft was rampant. They’re not alone. Many survivors—particularly those without the means to afford increasingly higher rents in Butte County’s conBert Jenkins and Jennifer Powell are among the first residents to move into the Gridley Camp Fire Community.


temporary home tracted, post-fire market—are still in flux. Powell is thankful for the efforts of government officials who have enabled the couple to have a roof over their heads. She also appreciates how the community at large—including many dedicated volunteers—has embraced them. Powell told the CN&R they feel much safer in Gridley and that she’d feared becoming homeless, especially in the sweltering heat of summer. Plus, their cat, Houdini, is finally starting to feel comfortable again. “We’re grateful for it,” she said, “and we’re close to Chico, where my family is living.” At the same time, she knows this neighborhood is temporary. Though the city of Gridley’s lease with FEMA for the property doesn’t end until mid-summer 2021, the federal government’s deadline to vacate the space is May 2020, roughly nine months after Powell moved in and 18 months since the federal disaster declaration. Extensions are possible, but they’d have to be requested by the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES). Powell already is worried about her future. FEMA employees under the department’s Individual Assistance Program perform monthly assessments of each household’s efforts to secure permanent housing. She and Powell have been searching every day, and haven’t found anything they can afford. People have tried to persuade her to consider moving out of state, but most of her family landed in Chico after the fire, and she’d like to be near them. “We’re stranded, like everybody else,” she said. “Everything is up in the air.”

A whirlwind process Agriculture-centric Gridley—with a prefire population of just over 6,900—was the first city in Butte County to approve a manufactured home community, back in January. It’s by far the largest Camp Fire housing project: 305 units and a capacity for 400. The city estimates that upward of 900 people could eventually live there. In December, there was talk of building a 250-unit neighborhood on private land in north Chico, but the property owner backed out after public outcry. Another site has been set up at Rosewood Estates on Mono Avenue in Oroville, which has 40 manufactured homes, and a south Chico neighborhood was completed in August, with 83 units situated between Hegan Lane and Aztec Drive. (FEMA also has

more than 300 RVs scattered across various communities in Northern California, including 61 at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds and 73 at Bidwell Canyon State Park.) Gridley City Administrator Paul Eckert has worked a lot of long, “intense” days since November, when he started coordinating with the federal and state government on the concept of building a local community for survivors. FEMA and Cal OES took an interest in Gridley right away, Eckert said, because of the expansive Gridley Industrial Park. It spans about 70 acres west of Highway 99 on Independence Place, just south of downtown. It was essentially an undeveloped field. The Gridley City Council approved a lease in January, and the first residents moved in in early August. FEMA invested $55 million to install infrastructure at the site, which will serve the city well when the property reverts to an industrial park, said Eckert, who also serves as the city finance director. FEMA will pay the city approximately $1.6 million per year to lease the land, with the lease set to end no later than July 1, 2021. When the city began this process, Eckert said, locals raised a lot of concerns, primarily about increased traffic and crime. Early on, Chico residents voiced similar worries. However, while traffic volumes and accidents spiked in Chico post-Camp Fire, the city ultimately reported a decrease in crime. Eckert said Gridley officials shared data with locals to encourage them to welcome their displaced neighbors.

“We actually had, at our final meeting, to highlight the fact that ... Paradise’s crime [rate] is the lowest in the county, [and] their age is obviously older, which indicates that there’s less crime. Their educational attainment ranks higher than Gridley,” he added. Eckert acknowledged that it’s been a whirlwind process over the past seven months to facilitate the project, but things have finally started to quiet down at City Hall. “It was an extraordinarily busy period … in terms of public discourse, the contract negotiation, the design and review, and then working with [FEMA] to construct the site,” he said. “It’s been our role to work from a larger-scale standpoint to ensure that this community was successfully built and has all of the amenities that survivors need.”

A temporary home On a recent afternoon, FEMA representatives took the CN&R on a tour of the Gridley Camp Fire Community. It’s an immaculate and quiet place that’s institutional in appearance: There is no greenery. Everything is white, gray or brown, with the only pops of color being green trash bins and the red addresses on the wooden stairs leading to each home. FEMA has hydroseeded several areas The volunteer-run Gridley Camp Fire Distribution Center has operated since November, and provides free clothes, toiletries, food and other goods to those in need. Center Manager Lynne Spencer (far left) stands with Lucy Love (bottom right) and several other volunteers.

that have yet to sprout grass, including a large retention pond (for water runoff) and a small area that may serve as a community park. Down any given street—marked by white signage zip-tied to stop signs—are rows of closely situated units, ranging from one to three bedrooms. Though 124 households had moved into the neighborhood as of this newspaper’s deadline, there was little activity outside. If there hadn’t been parked cars, it would have been hard to tell whether anybody was home. FEMA has rules that are similar to those of apartment complexes in regard to guests, noise, property damage and pets. In addition, signs, ornaments and other outdoor decorations are not allowed. Michael Peacock, a spokesman for FEMA, said the regulations are designed to protect the homes from being damaged—the agency doesn’t want to have to make repairs, and the units may be reused as survivors transition in and out. “Just keep in mind that this place is temporary,” he said. “Its main focus is to provide housing while they work on their permanent housing solution.” For Edward Prescott, the community certainly could benefit from a garden or some green space. He mused that perhaps he should get some removable wallpaper to spruce up indoors, but overall, life there has been “quiet, uneventful [and] no hassle.” Originally from the Bay Area, Prescott, 59, moved to Paradise in 2008 to take care of his ailing father. He ended up staying after his dad died in 2011, living on his own for a while and then moving in with one of his sisters near Pearson and Foland roads. She’s a nurse who worked nights and Prescott helped her tend to the gardens and fruit trees on her property and “live her dream.” The morning of the fire, Prescott’s sister woke him up after one of her shifts, and “it was black as night, with raining red embers coming down and the wind was like 50 miles per hour. “She was aware of it, otherwise I would have perished for sure. I would have never known,” he said. Prescott expressed gratitude for the folks who’ve helped him since then. Like many survivors, he has moved around a lot since Nov. 8. First, he lived in his car at the Oroville Church of the Nazarene, which set up an evacuation shelter following the fire. He said the folks who showed up from around GRIDLEY C O N T I N U E D SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

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the world to help survivors were “amazingly patient and giving.” Volunteers escorted him to the hospital and stayed with him through the intake process—he was there for eight days for smoke-related pneumonia that had gone septic. He then moved to the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds in Chico, which he had to leave when the American Red Cross closed up shop. After that, he traveled from motel to motel in Tehama, Butte and Sutter counties. Before he received a spot at the Gridley Camp Fire Community, he stayed in a FEMA RV in Red Bluff. “When I came here, [FEMA] gave me an interview and showed me the place, gave me the keys the same day and everything was inside, prepped: blankets, kitchen items and stuff like that,” he said. “Everything was operational and clean and functional. … The trailer’s kind of nice, too. It’s brand new.” Prescott hopes to help his sister rebuild in Paradise—she’s been renting a room in Chico and trying to figure out if she can afford to move back, given high insurance prices and other costs. If that falls through, Prescott isn’t sure where he’ll end up. He’s a carpenter by trade, and is waiting for a settlement from PG&E to lay the foundation for the next chapter of his life—he lost all of his tools in the fire. “My family is OK. We’re resilient,” he said. “There’s always assets, you know? In any tragedy or For Edward Prescott, the Gridley Camp Fire Community could benefit from a garden, but overall, life there is “quiet, uneventful [and] no hassle.”

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anywhere you go, if you know how to find ’em.”

Ramping up services Gridley officials planned for a roughly 20 percent population increase, Eckert said. With the revenue from the lease, the city has hired an additional attendant for its recreation department and added two lunch days to its Senior Meal Program (making four total). There also are plans in the works to build new playground equipment at Manuel Vierra Park, the closest green space to the Camp Fire community. Public safety resources have grown, too. The city hired another firefighter, added a second fire engine and two community service officers. These officers are not armed, said Gridley-Biggs Police Chief Al Byers—they will do patrols and take non-emergency calls for incidents such as minor traffic collisions, relieving the workload of officers responding to high-priority incidents. Byers said the department is “very conscientious” about the fact that the town may have additional impacts due to an increased population. There has been more traffic, and more calls, but nothing out of the ordinary considering the population increase, and with the additional officers, they have been able to handle it. Plus, the Butte County Sheriff’s Office has agreed to provide deputies to assist the town if

necessary, Byers added. “I don’t see any safety concerns whatsoever with this community,” Byers said. “It’s like any other subdivision going in. Staff, we’re ready and prepared to keep the community safe.” Gridley also has benefited from a few Butte Strong Fund grants, totaling $93,000, for a K9 unit for the police department; resurfacing Manuel Vierra Park’s playground; and case management for health and supportive care for survivors, provided by Orchard Hospital. Eckert said he feels confident that, after months of planning, the town has created a mutually beneficial scenario for longtime and new residents alike. He has met several families that have chosen to call Gridley their permanent home, he added. Local developers are on a building blitz, he noted, with plans to get over 100 new homes on the market in the next two years. It’s “vitally important” that the county retains those residents, Eckert added. “These are people who have not just employment but they have deep roots with family, friends and all their associations. We want to ensure, as a group of cities within Butte County, that we all rise to the need and help [survivors] find per-

manent long-term alternatives. “We were able to see the need, but also look at the opportunity,” he continued. “And since we got in, demonstrated a can-do attitude, it resulted in a lot of federal and state resources coming to help the community.”

‘We’ve got to be there for them’ Volunteers and service groups of the “small town that loves company” have been working tirelessly to make sure their new neighbors not only feel welcome and comfortable, but also consider staying in Gridley long-term. They launched a local distribution center in November that is still open. And since January, they’ve met twice a month as the Gridley Camp Fire Relief Group. Last week, about a dozen or so volunteers assembled for the relief group’s latest meeting. Representatives of government agencies, such as the Gridley Recreation Department, FEMA and Cal OES, had gathered to work in concert with those from church groups, the Rotary Club of Gridley, Butte County 2-1-1 and Orchard Hospital. They didn’t waste time, diving

Laura Huth and her daughter Audri Oppenheim drop by the Gridley Camp Fire Distribution Center. Their family settled down in Gridley in March, and feels welcomed by the small town.

right into agenda items that hit at the heart of their mission: helping meet the needs of Camp Fire survivors. They discussed childhood programs available through Head Start (all survivors qualify), grants that can help volunteers restock food pantries, vouchers that provide transportation to and from Orchard Hospital, and free upcoming events hosted by schools and the community. One of their busiest members is Lynne Spencer. Since the disaster, she has divided her time between relief group efforts; running the Gridley Area Chamber of Commerce, where she is the president; and managing the Gridley Camp Fire Distribution Center. Spencer often passes along important information to survivors through the center, which is open once a week, Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Each new visitor receives a welcome bag with a list of local resources and programs. Word of the facility has spread. Last week, more than 60 people traveled from communities across the North State to pick up free goods, clothes and food for their


Above: The Gridley Camp Fire community, located at the Gridley Industrial Park west of Highway 99 on Independence Place, is the largest temporary housing site set up by the Federal Emergency Management Agency post-disaster. PHOTO COURTESY OF FEMA

Left: City Administrator Paul Eckert says the town of Gridley acted quickly to meet the emergency and permanent housing needs of survivors post-Camp Fire.

families. Just before the doors opened that morning, folks mingled and shared stories of the day they fled from the fire. The amount of goods volunteers have stored and organized inside 893 Hazel St. is impressive. There are clothing racks and shoe displays, shelves with canned goods (and fresh food, when available), and tables with toiletries and household necessities, books, school supplies and toys. In the back, more donations are stored in boxes piled as tall as the ceiling.

Get involved:

To volunteer or donate to the Gridley Camp Fire Distribution Center, find the organization on Facebook, or call the Gridley Area Chamber of Commerce at 846-3142. The chamber also can provide information on how to participate in the Gridley Camp Fire Relief Group.

Spencer restocks the center each week. The building’s owners, Dan and Mary Boeger, have opened up the space rent-free. They’re also volunteers. Right now, the hope is to raise enough money to get an airconditioning unit installed—the heat has shortened their hours, Spencer said. She typically helps people check in at the front (they have to provide proof that they are survivors). Spencer also assembles special boxes with items such as towels, toilet paper, and pots and pans for folks moving into their new homes. One of her favorite things to do is to help families find a special treat for their children. Just before Easter, she met a family of five and gave a miniature electronic backhoe and a Barbie bus to the parents. “I brought it out to the dad and there were tears [in his eyes]. To see that, it just really touched my heart,” she said. “Those are the things that make it really worthwhile for me.” Several volunteers at the center also are survivors, like Lucy Love. She lived in Paradise for more than 40 years and now calls herself a “Gridley gal.” She bought a home in town this past January and started volunteering at the center three months ago because she loves meeting people, she told the CN&R. She does a little bit of everything there,

greeting survivors at the door, helping them find and carry items, and making them feel welcome. It helps that she knows what they are going through, Love added. “You just give ’em hugs. That’s all you can do.” Since the center started operating in November (it’s moved a few times, and been at its current location since February), Spencer has heard countless stories from survivors and “shed a lot of tears with a lot of these people. “There’s a lot of them that are physically [and] emotionally compromised from this. It’s going to affect them for a long time,” she said. “We’ve got to be there for them.” Last week at the center, Powell and Jenkins were able to take home a few shirts and some snacks. Other folks left with bags full of toiletries and food, and each household was offered a case of bottled water. All expressed gratitude for Spencer and her volunteer crew’s efforts. Among those gathered was 3-year-old Audri Oppenheim, who sat in her stroller clutching a bright pink bear with a sunhat. Her mother, Laura Huth, said Audri and her sister are adjusting well to their new life in Gridley. After the fire, her family stayed in a hotel in Sacramento for a while, and started renting a place in Gridley in March. They’re considering settling down there and purchasing a house, Huth said. Some days they feel a bit discombobulated, and others they feel settled in. But they have felt welcomed and embraced. “I really like that it’s a small town,” she said. “It makes it feel like home.” Ω SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

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25


Arts &Culture olling stones R

Ethan Miller and his crew, Howlin’ Rain.

world of highly produced pop Init’sa“You refreshing to hear a raw, live take. probably shouldn’t overthink songs,

it—just let the recorder be a fly on the wall, capture some good nights, capture some bad ones, capture some magic,” said Ethan Miller, founding member and frontman of San Francisco rock outfit Howlin’ Rain. The four-piece has released its newest collection, Under The Wheels: Live by Robin Bacior From Both Coasts, Volume 1, a kind of sonic scrapbook of tour highlights—a Preview: Howlin’ Rain, night at Union Pool Thursday, Sept. 12, in Brooklyn and a 8 p.m., with Trox & warm celebratory The Terribles, Horse Bay Area homecomthe Hunter and DJ Matthew Garcia. ing at Starline Social Tickets: $10/advance Club in Oakland. (eventbrite.com); The second half $15/door comes out later this fall, both as specialArgus Bar + Patio 212 W. Second St. edition vinyl issues facebook.com/ through Miller’s own argusbar label, Silver Current Records. “It’s been an idea I’ve had in the back of my head,” Miller said. “Now that capturing live

records has gotten so much easier, it’s still a crapshoot as to whether you get anything good,” Miller said. The collection serves not only as a snapshot of tour life, but also as a marker of how far the band has come. Miller started the project back in 2004 while still active in noisy psych-rock crew Comets on Fire (now on hiatus) and quickly gained momentum in the Bay, eventually signing a record deal with Rick Rubin and Columbia Records. By 2015, Miller had parted ways with the major label and his full band, and essentially restarted from scratch. He put together a new lineup, consisting of Jeff McElroy, Dan Cervantes and Justin Smith, and recorded Howlin Rain’s 2018 release, Alligator Bride. “A band has solidified again,” Miller said. “A long-lasting substantial band— with its own language that’s forming. Once a group’s got its own language, and got its own sound and loves to play together, a lot of times it’s just a matter of putting the right lyrics and vowels together, finding the kind of riffs you like to play, and the band itself, the energy is just waiting to express itself in the song. Makes things easier, in other words.” The live album captures just that— four minds working in tandem, cracking songs wide open into thunderous jams

meandering off into psychedelic explorations and returning to simple melodies and classic-rock fun. “Nothing that ended up on the record or the second volume—none of those [songs] did we go into the evening saying, ‘We have to get this specific song.’ I think we just tried to roll through with a good performance,” Miller said. The band is rolling through another performance Sept. 12 at Argus Bar + Patio, and in addition to featuring opening sets by Nevada City’s Horse the Hunter and locals Trox & The Terribles, the show is an anniversary celebration of five years of local vinyl-DJ and popup record shop Outpatient Records. The night will be Howlin’ Rain’s first stop after a round of sessions working on an upcoming full new record, so the band likely will treat the crowd to some brand-new stuff. Miller is looking forward to returning to Chico for its third local gig and what’s become a welcoming scene. “[The shows there are] always fun, and Outpatient is killer,” Miller said. “Matt [Garcia, Outpatient owner, show promoter and DJ for the night] is a pretty great character when you look at Chico and the kind of effect he can have on the music scene and providing an outlet for the community.” Ω

PHOTO BY KRISTY WALKER

Rain ’ n i l How on s r e r entu compilati v d a roll ew live ’ n ’ Rock elease n r

THIS WEEK 5

THU

Special Events JUNIPER LAKE CAMPING & BIRDING: Multi-day camping, hiking and bird-watching adventure. Contact Gaylord at gg2canoe@ yahoo.com or Jennifer at jpchico@sbcglobal.net for more details and to reserve your spot. Thu, 9/5, 8am. Lassen Volcanic National Park. 519-4724.

RESEARCH UPDATES ON ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA: Claire Day, Chief Program Officer of the Alzheimer’s Association, shares the latest study results, theories and discoveries that will help bring the world closer to breakthroughs in dementia science. Thu, 9/5, 6pm. Free. Enloe Conference Center, 1528 Esplanade. 895-9661. communityresourcefinder.org

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 9/5, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

BEAUTIFUL, BOLD, AND BEETHOVEN Sunday, Sept. 8 Zingg Recital Hall SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC

26

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 5, 2019


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

BREW FLOW: Yoga and beers with Chelsea West. Sat 9/7, 11am. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

CASA GRILLED CHEESE FEST: Gathering of local restaurants and food trucks serving their best grilled cheese. There will be beverages, desserts, music, games and more. Sat 9/7, 11am. $10-$15. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. chicoswims.ticketleap.com

CHICO PRINT PARTY: Celebrate all things print with two-day print fair featuring original lithographs, etchings, woodcuts, silkscreens and digital prints available for purchase directly from the makers. There will also be printing demos, food pop-ups, special guest prints and live music. Sat 9/7, 11am. Free. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

fashion, entertainment and raffle prizes. Sat

9/7, 12pm. $15-$20. Eagles Lodge, 1940 Mulberry St.

LULU MEETS THE KING OF POO: Janice Condon reads from her children’s book on gut microbes. Sat 9/7, 11am. ABC Books, 950 Mangrove Ave.

RIDGE LAKES HIKE: Experience an alpine high with a view of flowers and spectacular vistas. Meet at Chico Park & Ride (Hwy 32/99) west lot. Call Marjorie McNairn 343-2397 for info. Sat 9/7, 8:30am. Lassen Volcanic National Park.

RISQUE ROUXXXLETTE BURLESQUE: For just $1 you can spin the wheel and troupe members will perform that song. Sat, 9/7, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

CLIC MAIN STAGE SHOW: Two hours of both shortform and long-form comedy, 100 percent improvised, BYOB. Sat 9/7, 7pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

VINCENT

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

FALLING FOR FASHION: Annual fundraiser for high

Thursday-Saturday, Sept. 5-7 Chico Women’s Club

school scholarships featuring lunch, fall

SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, THEATER

Theater THE SUNSHINE BOYS: Neil Simon’s classic comedy, directed by Jerry Miller and featuring a famous vaudeville duo who couldn’t stand each other yet get back together for one last performance. Thu, 9/5, 7:30pm. $12$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

VINCENT: Slow Theatre presents this play written by Leonard Nimoy, constructed around letters between Vincent van Gogh and his brother, Theo. A one-man performance starring Loki Miller, plus musical accompaniment by Olivia Cerullo. Directed by Deanna Alexich. Thu, 9/5, 7:30pm. $20-$22. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. slowtheatre. weebly.com

6

FRI

Special Events POETRY READING: End-of-summer poetry reading with Bob Garner, Muir Hughes, Marta Shaffer and Linda Serrato. Light refreshments served. Fri, 9/6, 6pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in the cleanup of various spots throughout the park by picking up

THE SUNSHINE BOYS Opens Thursday, Sept. 5 Theatre on the Ridge

SEE THURSDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

EDITOR’S PICK litter and pulling weeds. For more info, call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 9/6, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music KYLE WILLIAMS: Enjoy music under the stars with local singer/songwriter. Fri, 9/6, 4:30pm. Sierra Nevada Hop Yard, 1075 E 20th St. sierranevada.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Local singer/songwriter plays for happy hour. Fri, 9/6, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater GHOST QUARTET: Song cycle presented by 4 musicians featuring vocal harmonies and 24 different instruments in various styles including jazz, folk, and Sondheim. Fri, 9/6, 7:30pm. $18-$20. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.net

THE SUNSHINE BOYS: See Thursday. Fri, 9/6, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

VINCENT: See Thursday. Fri, 9/6, 7:30pm. $20$22. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. slowtheatre.weebly.com

7

SAT

Special Events ANNIE’S STAR QUILT GUILD EXHIBIT: Locally made quilts on display at the mansion and visitor center. There will also be an opportunity to quilt! Sat 9/7, 11am. $3-$6. Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

PRINT FOR THE PEOPLE Celebrate all things print this Saturday and Sunday (Sept. 7-8) at the 1078 Gallery. The Chico Print Party will feature original lithographs, etchings, woodcuts, silkscreens and digital prints available for purchase directly from the makers, and that’s not all. There will be printing demos throughout both days, local food pop-ups, fresh-brewed coffee and a DJ, plus live music on Sunday after 7 p.m. This is an opportunity for regional printmakers to showcase their work and connect to the greater community, and a chance for the community to support the artists and buy some cool stuff.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

CN&R

27


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THIS WEEK continued from page 27 SHORTZ FILM FESTIVAL: Annual international  short film festival showcasing the best  and brightest short films from around the  globe.  Sat, 9/7, 1pm. Chico Theater Company,  166 Eaton Road, Ste. F.

THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER: Australia’s hottest  male revue performs.  Sat, 9/7, 8pm. $20$35. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive  Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

Music RON MATHEWS: Smooth brunch tunes.  Sat, 9/7, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner 240 Broadway st. chico, ca | 530.899.2847 | www.pitapitusa.com

Theater GHOST QUARTET: See Friday.  Sat, 9/7, 7:30pm and 10:30pm. $18-$20. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W.  First St. blueroomtheatre.net

THE SUNSHINE BOYS: See Thursday.  Sat, 9/7, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735  Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

VINCENT: See Thursday.  Sat, 9/7, 7:30pm. $20$22. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.  slowtheatre.weebly.com

8

Sun

Special Events ANNIE’S STAR QUILT GUILD EXHIBIT: See  Saturday.  Sun, 9/8, 11am. $3-$6. Bidwell  Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

CHICO PRINT PARTY: See Saturday.  Sun, 9/8, 11am. Free. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.  1078gallery.org

FARM TO TABLE DINNER: Live music, drinks, farm  tours, and dinner provided by Grana Woodfired Foods.  Sun, 9/8, 5pm. $70. Farmelot  Farms, 3950 Vadney Ave., Vina.

Music BEAUTIFUL, BOLD, AND BEETHOVEN: Chamber music  recital featuring Bradley Martin, pianist;  Anna Presler, violinist; Leighton Fong, cellist;  and Russell Burnham, clarinetist.  Sun, 9/8, 2pm. $20. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State.  csuchico.edu/soa

SUNDAY IRIS: Enjoy the sweet folk/soul stylings  of local duo and vegan brunch.  Sun, 9/8, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Jam with Chico’s best  musicians at this weekly pro jam. Rock,  blues, country, funk—anything goes.  Sun, 9/8, 2pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway St. (408)  449-2179.

9

mon

Special Events ANNIE’S STAR QUILT GUILD EXHIBIT: See  Saturday  Mon, 9/9, 11am. $3-$6. Bidwell  Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

FARM STAND: Fun farmer’s market featuring  local growers, plant starts, homemade  bakery goods and medicinal herbs.  Mon, 9/9, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

PRISONER LETTER WRITING: The North Valley  Prisoner Support crew gathers to write letters to incarcerated individuals.  Mon, 9/9, 6pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

for more MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE on page 32

28

CN&R

September 5, 2019


Shows through Sept. 29 1078 Gallery SEE ART

Art 1078 GALLERY: Field Notes, artists Rebecca Shelly and Rebecca Wallace applied different approaches of working en plein air to create their work. Exhibit showcases a variety of mediums. Reception Friday, Sept. 6, 6-8pm. Through 9/29. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

B-SO GALLERY: What Happens in Davis... Ceramics Show, exhibit of Chico State students’ ceramic work as shown in Davis gallery last spring. Through 9/5. Free. Chico State, Ayres 105. 898-5331.

CHICO ART CENTER: On Track, exhibit of railroad art to celebrate and encourage participation in California Railroad Safety month. Reception on Friday, Sept. 6, 5-7pm. Through 9/27. Free. 450 Orange St., 895-8726. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Bernie Lubell, sculptures exploring the relationship between humans and machines, and visitors to the exhibit get to be active participants. Exhibition/gallery talk Thursday, Sept. 19, 5:30 pm. Through 10/12. Chico State, ARTS 121.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Give Voice, Empower Me Art presents exhibition of Northern California artists/ survivors of sex-trafficking. The organization’s goal is to empower victims of sex trafficking to use their creative spirit to help earn their financial independence and stability, and permanently escape their exploiters. Through 9/29. Also, Walls

We Create, exhibition reflects the cultural experience of “barriers.” Through 9/29. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Group Show, 29 artists from all over California show their work. Through 9/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Summer’s End, featuring original paintings by local artists Ray Eastman, Joan Smith and Gary Baugh. Through 9/28. 493 East Ave., Ste. 1.

THE MATTHEWS’ GARDEN: Local Color, one-day, pop-up art show and sale featuring local artists Dolores Mitchell, Candy Matthews and Eva Farley. Through 9/7. 665 Bryant Ave. (off Vallombrosa Ave.), 521-0205.

THE TURNER: Drawn In–By Hand Graphic Prints, exhibit reveals how the act of drawing creates an acuity of vision. Exhibition talk Thursday, Sept. 12, 5:30 pm, at Zingg Recital Hall with reception to follow at The Turner. Through 9/28. Free. 400 W. First St., 898-4476. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore, including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

FIELD NOTES

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SCENE

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For San Francisco sculptor Bernie Lubell, the viewer is part of the exhibit

W up in New York City in the 1950s, he was a big fan of Rube

hen Bernie Lubell was growing

Goldberg, the famous cartoonist known primarily story and for his popular photo by depictions of Robert Speer goofy gadgets rober tspeer performing sim@newsrev i ew.c om ple tasks in indirect and humorReview: ous ways. bernie Lubell: As a kid, Aspirations, shows through Oct. 12. Lubell liked to Gallery talk, Sept. 19, take things apart 5:30 p.m. and put them back together. Later, in Jacki Headley University Art college, he studGallery ied engineering, Arts & Humanities then switched to building, Chico State social psycholheadleygallery csuchico.com ogy, receiving 898-5864 a master’s from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. But what he really wanted to do, it turned out, was make art— specifically, a uniquely interactive type of art, Goldberg-inspired wooden contraptions that take on meaning only when viewers activate them. Lubell, who lives in San Francisco, was in Chico last week for the inauguration of Bernie Lubell: Aspirations, an exhibit of his sculptures at the Jacki Headley

University Art Gallery. On Thursday (Aug. 29), he gave a slide lecture in the Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall that was a lot like his sculptures: whimsical, even zany at times, but also serious in elucidating Lubell’s desire to foster collaboration and cooperation in the world. For instance, consider the huge piece (it’s an 11-foot-tall tower) called “Party of the First Part.” It’s activated when one person pedals a stationary wooden bicycle on one side of the piece while another walks on a treadmill on the opposite side. The results are sent through a chain of pulleys to make a disc on the top of the tower roll one way or the other—or, as Lubell delightedly put it, “with the right amount of cooperation, to not roll at all.” It doesn’t bother him that his sculptures seem slapped together and not altogether stable. In that sense, he says, they’re like his beater truck and, closer to home, his troubled heart (he’s twice had surgery). “We’re fragile machines,” he says, which is why his sculptures are meant to seem vulnerable. They’re also unplanned and take shape and establish purpose only as they grow organically. Most of the time Lubell starts with nothing more than a title and builds from there. Every part of his pieces has a role

to play, but how they fit together is often mysterious. They’re also fun and, at times, comical. “Aspirations” is also the title of one of the major pieces in the show. It includes a couple of blowup “lounges” in which two people lie and pull on strings connected to small blowers that provide the air that keeps the lounges inflated. In his statement, Lubell notes that “Aspirations” allows participants “to explore collaboration, competition, and communication as they negotiate how much air to keep for themselves and how much to share with their partner.” Lubell is constantly tinkering with his pieces, even when they’re on exhibit. He futzed over “Aspirations” even while busily discussing it with a group of art students. Nothing is permanent, he says. He laughs when he talks about his penurious life as an artist. In his decades-long career, he’s garnered a profit in only three years, despite having been featured in galleries all across the United States and in Europe and Japan. He supports his artwork by doing carpentry. To see a number of videos of Lubell and his work, go to vimeo. com/user5685214. And to fully enjoy the exhibit, take a friend to the gallery and just have fun. □

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31


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 09/05—WEDNESDAY 09/11 TOWNSHIP: Local rock band plays the hits. Thu, 9/5, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

6FRIDAY

ARISE ROOTS: Roots-reggae band from LA performs, One Sol and DJ PhG share the bill. Fri, 9/6, 9pm. $10-$13. Lost On Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445.

BREW KETTLE COMEDY NIGHT: Dillon Collins presents a lineup of local and out-of-town comedians. Show is free and all-ages. Fri, 9/6, 7pm. The Brew Kettle Taproom and Bottle Shop, 995 Nord Ave, Ste. 150.

BLACK FLAG Tonight, Sept. 5 Senator Theatre SEE THURSDAY

DECADES: Chico five-piece band

5THURSDAY

dance along with: top-40, “throwback” or EDM. . Thu, 9/5, 8pm. $7. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

BLACK FLAG: Legendary punk group— featuring original and founding guitarist Greg Ginn—performs with The LineCutters and King Nun. Thu, 9/5, 9pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 9/5, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408) 449-2179.

ON DRUGS: Rad art-rock band from Portland performs. Joined by Bay Area punks The Brankas and Chico favorites Pervert and Iver. All ages. Thu, 9/5, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat

SILENT DISCO: Pop on your headphones and pick one of three playlists to

32

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

with a rotating list of DJs spinning all vinyl until late. Thu, 9/5, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

performs hits from the 1940s to today. Fri, 9/6, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

GHOST QUARTET: Song cycle presented by four musicians featuring vocal harmonies and 24 different instruments in various styles including jazz and folk, plus the music of Sondheim. Fri, 9/6, 7:30pm. $18-$20. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

JOSH BUDRO BAND: Nor Cal country-

rock. Fri, 9/6, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

KING DREAM: Psychedelic indie rock from the Bay Area along with local fave Cat Duo (aka Cat Depot plus

one). Fri, 9/6, 8pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign-ups at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 9/6, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

REBEKAH CHASE BAND: High-energy band gets you on the dance floor. Fri, 9/6, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SPECTRAL SOUNDS

Friday and Saturday (Sept. 6-7), the Blue Room Theatre presents Ghost Quartet, a unique touring production described as “a song cycle about love, death and whiskey.” The show features four musicians performing sweet vocal harmonies and playing 24 different instruments in various styles ranging from jazz to folk to Sondheim. Enjoy a range of characters, including a treehouse astronomer, a bear and the ghost of Thelonious Monk, plus an extraordinary plot that spans seven centuries.

RIFF RAFF: Celebrate the opening of the new Blaze N’ J’s with popular DIY American rapper and others. All ages. Fri, 9/6, 8pm. $20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

THE SNUBS: High energy rock band from Seattle performs. The Primers and local sorcerers Satanic Mountain Witches share the bill. Fri, 9/6, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

SURF NOIR KINGS: Hang loose with an evening of original surf music. Fri, 9/6, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

7SATURDAY

CLIC MAIN STAGE SHOW: Two hours of both short-form and long-form iprovised comedy. BYOB. Sat, 9/7,

7pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

DANCE NIGHT: Cut a rug with DJs J-Ho & Amber. Sat, 9/7, 10pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

GHOST QUARTET: See Friday. Sat, 9/7,

7:30pm and 10:30pm. $18-$20. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

HOUSE OF FLOYD: Bay Area band plays the best of Pink Floyd with sound effects, moving lights, lasers and video projection. Sat, 9/7,


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 26 THE SNUBS

9MONDAY

Friday, Sept. 6 Naked Lounge SEE FRIDAY

ENTRAIL: Unearthly sounds from

THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER: Australia’s hottest male

revue performs. Sat, 9/7, 8pm. $20$35. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

8SUNDAY

9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

JAHNY WALTZ: Live music for late night happy hour. Sat, 9/7, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

MIXTAPE: Local cover band plays

the hits. Sat, 9/7, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

NOCHE LATINA: Put on your good clothes for a night of dancing to a wide range of Mexican beats. 21-over. Sat, 9/7, 8pm. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. chicoelrey.com

REBEKAH CHASE BAND: See Friday. Sat, 9/7, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

RETROTONES: Classic rock hits on the patio with local band. Sat, 9/7, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

RISQUE ROUXXXLETTE BURLESQUE: For just $1 you can spin the wheel and troupe members will perform that song. Sat, 9/7, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

ROCKHOUNDS: Classic-rock cover

band. Sat, 9/7, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

SOUL POSSE: Party on the patio with fun cover band playing your favorite hits. Sat, 9/7, 7pm. Lovelock Restaurant, 16115 Skyway Road, Magalia.

THE HIP ABDUCTION: Florida band draws inspiration from indie rock, African rhythms, dub, roots and soul. The Manimals, a pop/punk band from Brooklyn, shares the bill. Sun, 9/8, 8pm. $10-$13. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

SPIRITUAL CRAMP: Bay Area punk band performs with Seattle fuzz-pop band Supercrush and local powerpop/rock trio Dorothy Vallens (feat. Sawyer the Destroyer). Sun, 9/8, 8:30pm. $10. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SUMMER LIKE THE SEASON: Indie/art rock from Detroit performs with local artists Scout and Similar Alien. Sun, 9/8, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

Olympia-based musician along with This Valve Controls, Static Declaration and more for a night of noise, goth and punk. All ages. Mon, 9/9, 8pm. $7. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

PUNK/HARDCORE NIGHT: Get sweaty with killer line-up of locals and outof-towners: For Your Health, The Viles, Culture Tourist and Nothing Left. All ages. Mon, 9/9, 7pm. $5-$7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

10TUESDAY

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 9/10, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

11WEDNESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 9/11, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

QUALITY SUNDAY FUNDAY

Spiritual Cramp (pictured) may be the best band name in recent history—and this killer Bay Area punk band will be headlining a rad lineup at Duffy’s Tavern on Sunday (Sept. 8). Seattle’s Supercrush will sling some catchy, modern pop to tug on your heart strings and new local rock trio Dorothy Vallens (featuring Sawyer the Destroyer) will be there to knock your socks off. It’s still the weekend!

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State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com Cascade Theater, Redding • Sat, Nov. 16, 7:30- 9:30PM • www.cascadetheater.org EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

CN&R

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Samara Weaving kills in deadly funny black comedy Ash vs Evil Dead ASamara and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Weaving plays the lead in Ready or Not and fter strong but smallish roles in

totally kills it. As Grace, a newlywed who has one of the worst wedding days in cinema history—right up there with Uma Thurman in Kill Bill—Samara is so good it makes you wonder how she hasn’t had more starring roles in her 11 years of actby ing. She commands the screen with Bob Grimm a fierce, comedic energy that helps bg ri m m @ make Ready or Not a memorable, if new srev i ew. c o m predictable, horror/thriller show. Directed by Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett, the movie is a scathing indictment of both affluence and the institution of marriage—all in Ready or Not good fun, of course. Starring Samara When we meet Grace, she’s about Weaving, Andie to marry Alex Le Domas (Mark macDowell and Henry O’Brien) and enter into a very rich Czerny. Directed by matt bettinelli-Olpin family. That family, led by Tony and tyler Gillett. (Henry Czerny) and Becky (Andie Cinemark 14, Feather MacDowell) Le Domas, has built its river Cinemas. empire upon board games and sports rated r. teams, so their requirement that Grace play a game with them on her wedding night, while wacky, makes some sense. As part of a family rite, Grace must draw a card from a mystery box and determine which game to play with her new in-laws. The card she draws reads “Hide and Seek.” As it turns out, she probably would’ve been much better off drawing chess or checkers. Armed with an array of both modern and antique weapons (from guns to crossbows) and a bewilderingly crazed purpose, the Le Domas family—which includes seemingly grounded brother Daniel (Adam Brody) and crazily

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September 5, 2019

bitter Aunt Helene (Nicky Guadagni)—is determined to find and kill Grace before dawn. Hey, tradition is tradition. Unfortunately for them, Grace won’t go easy. She’s got a lot of fight in her, and a lot more than just one person will be dying on this wedding night. Czerny is especially outrageous as the dad who refuses to veer from tradition, and MacDowell, who has developed a reputation for a being a little bit of a stiff actress through the years, proves perfect as the wicked mom whose bow-and-arrow skills are a little rusty. Brody has fun as the wild card brother who may or may not be evil, and Guadagni’s permanent scowl is one of the funniest things in the movie. While satire is the main driving force behind the plot, the ending throws a curve that breaks from the predictability of some of the character arcs. Weaving, who progresses from blushing, pristine bride to blood-smeared, determined warrior delivers pitch-perfect work. Grace remains real throughout, no matter how unreal things get. While the film is indeed fun, it felt like more of a goof than anything truly eventful. Still, it’s an undeniable good time. Of note on Weaving’s future slate: playing daughter of Bill (Alex Winter) in next year’s Bill & Ted Face the Music, the long-awaited third film in the franchise. Ready or Not proved that she has the chops for this kind of comedy, and it also showed she has wide range. I wouldn’t be surprised if there were some deep dramas coming her way as well. □

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week The Art of Self Defense

Jesse Eisenberg plays a meek accountant who, after being brutally attacked by a motorcycle gang, seeks guidance and karate training from a disturbingly charismatic sensei. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

It Chapter Two

It’s been 27 years since the kids of the Losers Club defeated the evil clown Pennywise, but children have started to disappear in Derry once again, and the now-grown crew must reconvene to try and destroy It once and for all. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing Angel Has Fallen

Gerard Butler and Morgan Freeman return for this third Fallen film (following Olympus Has Fallen and London Has Fallen), with the former as a Secret Service agent now on the run after being framed for an assassination attempt on the latter (now playing the U.S. president). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Angry Birds Movie 2

It’s angry birds vs. green pigs in installment two of the video game-turned-animated-film series. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Bennett’s War

An American soldier is medically discharged from combat after he breaks his back during an IED explosion as part of the Army Motorcycle Unit. When he returns home, he needs to support his family, so—say it with us—“against all odds” he rehabs and trains to become a pro motocross rider. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

3

Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Hobbs & Shaw is actually a spinoff from the series. In other words, rejoice! The leaden, dreary Vin Diesel is nowhere to be seen in this movie. Now we can have some real fun! Hobbs & Shaw is a bizarre hybrid of spy thriller, action flick, screwball comedy and science fiction. Here, Furious franchise regulars Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and Shaw (Jason Statham) are tasked with protecting the latter’s sister, Hattie (Vanessa Kirby), after she injects herself with something that will have worldwide consequences if she’s captured. The main antagonist is Brixton (Idris Elba), a former Shaw ally who has turned into some sort of bionic badass dubbed, by himself, “Black Superman.” Stuntman-turned-director David Leitch, who gave us the first John Wick and Deadpool 2, knows his way around an action scene, and his edits create constant action and laughs—thanks in large part to Johnson and Statham’s great timing and onscreen

It Chapter Two

chemistry. And while it’s expected that the tough-guy leads will kick ass in movies such as this, it’s Kirby who steals the show as the action hero of this installment. She is a total badass. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Good Boys

Three sixth-grade boys embark on an epic, R-rated coming-of-age odyssey. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Lion King

Jon Favreau (Elf, Iron Man) directs this photorealistic CGI remake of the 1994 Disney animated classic that features an impressive cast of voice actors, including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver and, naturally, James Earl Jones as Mufasa. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

5

Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood

When Quentin Tarantino is behind the camera, mayhem and artistic license win out—history and conventionality be damned. Movie No. 9 is a dreamy doozy, and maybe the director/screenwriter’s most unapologetic film yet. Set in 1969, Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood captures the dying days of both sixties culture and the Golden Age of Hollywood. And through Tarantino’s storytelling lens, they die hard—in mysterious and hallucinogenic ways. For leading men, we get the pairing of Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt starring as insecure, has-been actor Rick Dalton and his trusty stuntman, Cliff Booth, respectively. Dalton’s career has devolved into playing the bad guys on weekly installments of TV’s The F.B.I., while the blackballed and past-his-prime Booth is relegated to driving the actor around and acting as his confidant. The setup allows Tarantino to go hog wild with the sixties visuals and soundtrack. The end of the sixties was bona fide nuts, and this is a nutty movie. It also manages to be quite heartfelt and moving. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

Overcomer

A Christian-based film about a high-school basketball coach who faces a crisis of faith and a new challenge as a mentor for an unlikely cross-country athlete. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Peanut Butter Falcon

The story of teen boy with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) who runs away and sets off on a journey to a wrestling camp to realize his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. Also starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson and Bruce Dern. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

3

Ready or Not

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Alvin Schwartz’s 1980s series of children’s scary short stories gets the cinematic horror treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

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Can you tell a story in 59 words— no more, no fewer?

The Chico News & Review’s annual Fiction 59 flash-fiction contest is back. Submit your 59-word stories today for the chance to have your work published in the annual Fiction 59 issue of the CN&R, on stands Oct. 24. Winners will also be invited to share their works during a live reading at The Bookstore (118 Main St.). NEW THIS YEAR: Six-Word Stories Go really micro with your fiction and tell a story in only six words. Here’s a famous example (possibly by Ernest Hemingway): For sale: baby shoes, never worn. Please do not include a title with six-word story. Six-word stories will not be separated by age category. All other rules for Fiction 59 apply. For submission guidelines, visit newsreview.com/fiction59

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9, AT 11:59 P.M. SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

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CHOW Burger  King’s  Impossible  Whopper  and Popeye’s  Crispy  Chicken  Sandwich.

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Across enemy lines Dipping a toe in the fast-food sandwich wars

W I was parked in the drive-thru of Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen on Mangrove Avenue, where the party here were you during the sandwich war?

was going off at 8 p.m. last Wednesday night. The line of cars was at a standstill, and the parking by lot and restaurant were just as jammed. Jason Cassidy Someone behind me rolled down a window to let their speakers release j aso nc@ newsrev i ew.c om some bowel-rattling bass; and someone behind them rolled a fat one and let loose a cloud of smoke that lingered in the still air. We were all waiting for the $3.99 crispy chicken sandwich. Actually, sandwich wars is more accurate. American soil has been home to not one, but two overhyped fast-food battles this summer: Popeyes’ crispy chicken sandwich vs. Chick-fil-A’s chicken sandwich, and Burger King’s Impossible Whopper vs. everyone else’s meatless options. The triggering event for the war of the chickens was a Twitter beef between the two restaurants that caused internet observers to lose their minds and—in an effort to compare the newcomer’s version to Chick-fil-A’s— line up at Popeyes around the country and order crispy chicken sandwiches until they ran out two weeks later. (The restaurant’s website features an image of an empty sandwich wrapper with the words: “Chicken sandwich … be right back.”) And Burger King’s bold move has put it way ahead of McDonald’s and most of the rest of its main competitors in the race to bring an appealing vegetarian option to a fast-food restaurant. With the roll out of Impossible Foods’ Impossible Burger 2.0—the plant-based patty that uses genetically engineered yeast to “beef up” soy-based heme (a molecule also found in abundance in beef)—earlier this year, the fast-food giant introduced meatless Whoppers nationwide at the beginning of August. (Carl’s Jr. already had a less-hyped burger made with Beyond Meat that it debuted earlier in the year, and last week Kentucky Fried Chicken sold out of Beyond Meat chicken nuggets during a test run at an Atlanta location.) So, even though I usually stay away from fast food,

all the buzz was too much for me to resist. I ventured out last week to taste what the fuss was all about. First course was the Impossible Whopper (with no onions), which I purchased at the Burger King at the corner of Skyway and Notre Dame Boulevard. Tasted like a fast-food burger. Not much flavor other than the mayo. I dissected and inspected the “beef,” squeezed it and was pleasantly surprised to see juices flow out. Tasted on its own, the patty was fine. The texture was beef-like, but there was little savoriness. For comparison’s sake, the beef Whopper is $4.89 and has 660 calories, 40 grams fat, 12 grams saturated fat, 980 grams sodium and 28 grams protein, and the Impossible version is $6.19 and has 630 calories, 34 grams fat, 11 grams saturated fat, 1080 grams sodium and 25 grams protein. If I were a vegetarian, the Impossible would be as passable of an option as anything else Burger King serves. Second course, some fried chicken on bread. When I pulled into the Popeyes lot, I was taken aback. I did not expect it to be such a scene. As I made my way to the front door, a bedraggled Popeyes worker shuffled into the parking lot for a brief break. “Whoa! I can’t believe the drive-thru isn’t backed up into the parking lot,” she said as she opened her car door to retrieve her smokes. She told me they’d been selling the new sandwiches nonstop—more than 1,000—since they opened at 10 a.m. She’d been there all day. Inside, the line was almost to the door and the manager was strategizing with an employee how to fairly distribute the 22 sandwiches that remained. When she told her people to stop serving the dining room until she checked how many the drive-thru line was ordering, I bolted to my car and steered into the line in time to get one of the last ones. And dang! With a fat, very juicy slab of breast meat inside an extra-crispy crust on a buttered, lightly toasted brioche bun, with mayo and a couple of large pickle slices, the sandwich was pretty great. Perfect really. And it was only $3.99! It blows away the meek flaccid-patty, limp-pickle offering I had during one visit to a Texas Chick-fil-A. I will raise a rainbow flag in victory for Popeyes and count the days until the sandwich returns. □

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A R R I V I N G O C T . 10 , 2 019

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Have you heard about the painter, Vincent Van Gogh?/Who loved color and who let it show … He loved, he loved, he loved life so bad/His paintings had twice the color other paintings had/So bad, so bad that the world had to know/The man loved color and he let it show. —“Vincent van Gogh,” by Jonathan Richman

Vincent, theo and Loki The basic outline of Vincent van Gogh’s life is wellknown: 19th century Dutch artist creates post-impressionist paintings in France, struggles with mental illness, cuts off his ear and eventually kills himself at the age of 37 having sold only one painting. Van Gogh has become the quintessential example of the tortured artist, and for the “artist” part of that description, his narrative has of course flipped more dramatically than he could’ve ever imagined during his life. He’s now widely regarded as one of the most influential “The Painter on His Way to Work,”  Vincent van Gogh artists of all time and his paintings today sell for upward of $80 million. But the “tortured” tag, while merited on many levels, is a bit dismissive when considering the man, and the need to fill in a little more of the color of van Gogh’s life was at least part of the inspiration behind Vincent, a one-man play written by (and originally starring) the late star Trek actor Leonard nimoy. This weekend, slow Theatre is bringing the show to the Chico Women’s Club for three performances (Sept. 5-7, 7 p.m.), and delivering the monologue will be one of Chico’s most intriguing artists: Loki Miller. The sole character in the play is Vincent’s brother, Theo, who is speaking to the audience a week or so after his brother shot himself with the hope of setting the record straight about his life. The vehicle for his presentation, and the source material for the play, is a collection of 500-plus letters Vincent sent to Theo during his life, as well as the 100 or so Theo sent in return. The actor on his way to New York Most of the letters are held at the Van gogh Museum in Amsterdam, and you can enter this “window to van Gogh’s universe” at vangoghletters.org. They are full of revealing biographical details and beautiful words that illuminate the artist’s vision, his connection to the world and the beings he encounters in it: “There’s nothing more truly artistic than to love people.” In an online video promo for the play, director deanna alexich suggests there are some universal issues addressed in the work, drawing parallels between van Gogh being viewed as a madman and similar judgments made of those seen living on the streets today. “I think [the play is] an opportunity for us to go deeper than what we see,” she says. “Start tapping into what we feel.” The show—which features olivia Cerullo on keyboard accompaniment— also will serve as a going-away party of sorts for Miller, who leaves next week for a two-year conservatory program at The american academy of dramatic arts in New York. Miller has been one of Chico’s most prolific artists over the past decade. He’s been both a fearless and intense actor with roles in nearly 100 plays/musicals (from Hank Williams sr. in The Lost Highway at the Blue Room to multiple appearances in shakespeare in the Park), and one of the busiest musicians in town—playing guitar and singing in multiple solo, duo and group cover acts, and adding his incendiary guitar leads as a sideman for many local projects (danny Cohen’s near death Experience, Black Fong, Uncle dad’s art Collective, etc.). Visit slowtheatre.weebly.com to purchase tickets and help give a local son a proper send-off.


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of August 19 - August 26 , 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

4205 Anjou Ct 961 E 7th St 130 Mud Creek Rd 1134 Bidwell Ave 414 Sandy Cove Dr 1453 Saratoga Dr 3 Aldrin Ct 3056 Hudson Ave 3186 Sespe Creek Way 1675 Carol Ave 846 Alan Ln 42 Titleist Way 1283 Glenshire Ln 340 Mission Serra Ter 1022 Sir William Ct 18 Morning Rose Way 7 Kimberlee Ln 1 Leafwood Ct 14 Coleman Ct 1098 Poplar St 16 Betsey Way 8 Olympus Ln 1328 Bruce St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$782,500 $619,000 $534,000 $530,000 $515,000 $505,000 $495,000 $479,000 $459,000 $425,000 $395,500 $395,000 $375,500 $373,000 $371,000 $370,000 $367,000 $365,000 $350,000 $325,000 $310,000 $310,000 $228,500

4/3 3/2 3/3 1/1 3/2 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/1 3/1 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 2/2

SQ. FT.

2839 1998 2865 400 1956 1881 1909 1869 1867 1550 1132 1653 1471 1797 1852 1600 1544 1385 1404 1056 1378 1119 1225

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

31 Dean Way

Chico

$180,000

3/2

1278

504 Mission Santa Fe Cir

Chico

$150,000

3/2

1333

555 Vallombrosa Ave #88 Apt 1765 E 8th St

6 El Cortez Cir

Chico Chico Chico

$178,000 $115,000 $77,000

1/1 3/1

3/1

SQ. FT.

702 894 989

100 Country Oaks Dr

Oroville

$650,000

2/2

2095

5360 Falco Ct

Oroville

$400,000

4/3

2810

177 Crane Ave

120 Summit Ave

213 Mira Loma Dr

50 Mountain View Dr 1360 Feather Ave 26 La Foret Dr

Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

187 Redbud Dr

Paradise

5300 Xeno Pl

Paradise

5281 Filbert Ct 721 Roe Rd

218 Valley View Dr

3631 Connie Cir B Apt 3593 Connie Cir A

3606 Connie Cir C Apt

Paradise

Paradise

Paradise

Paradise

Paradise

Paradise

$475,000 $330,000 $285,000 $270,000 $250,000 $249,000

$565,000

$500,000

$470,000

$379,000

$375,000

$230,000

$230,000

$230,000

3/2 3/1 4/2 2/2 3/1 2/2

4/3

2/4

3/3

2/3

2/2

2/2

2/2

2/2

September 5, 2019

2167 1738 1687 1505 1156 1188

2789

4048

2365

2114

1415

1140

1080

1284

CN&R

39


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MACKRAY MANAGEMENT at 2599 Oak Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. JESSE GRIGG 1704 Oak Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSE GRIGG Dated: July 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000850 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROOTS LANDSCAPING at 1513 Sherman Ave. Chico, CA 95926. BRADLEY SULLIVAN RELF 1513 Sherman Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRADLEY RELF Dated: July 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000851 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DEER PARK COUNSELING AND CONSULTING at 15A Williamsburg Lane Chico, CA 95926. DEVJANI BANERJEE-STEVENS 2446 Villa Vista Drive Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DEVJANI BANERJEE-STEVENS Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000925 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ILLUMINAID, OMPT, ONE MEDIA PLAYER PER TEACHER, ONE MOBILE PROJECTOR PER TRAINER, POLDER, INC at this Legal Notice continues

645 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. POLDER, INC 645 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: PATRICE YORK, SECRETARY/TREASURER Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000922 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LG CONSTRUCTION at 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. LUIS ALBERTO GARCIA 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. MA DEL ROSARIO GARCIA 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. LG AND SONS CONSTRUCTION INC 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LUIS GARCIA, PRESIDENT Dated: August 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000930 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CRYO SKIN AND BODY at 1366 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926 AMANDA MICHELE BATES 1531 Downing Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA BATES Dated: July 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000901 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIMPLE SIMIAN, SIMPLE SIMIAN CREATIVE, SIMPLE SIMIAN SUSTAINABLE ARTWEAR at 1483 Trenta Dr Chico, CA 95973. JOSHUA ANTHONY BIGGINTON 1840 Manzanillo Lane Corning CA, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: JOSH BIGGINTON Dated: August 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000935 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SIINXBRE at 2181 Oroville Chico Hwy Durham, CA 95938. CINDY CASTANEDA SANCHEZ 1564 Nord Ave Spc 1 Chico, CA 95926. BREANNA VALDOVINOS 1425 Nord Ave Apt 20 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BREANNA VALDOVINOS this Legal Notice continues

Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000944 Published: Aug 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OLOFAT ONE-BITE BARBEQUE, OLOFAT ONE-BITE BBQ at 2769 Ceres Avenue Chico, CA 95928. SIGRAH BILLYOS 757 Hillgrove Court Chico, CA 95926. MD OBET 1050 Columbus Ave. #19 Chico, CA 95926. This busisness is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SIGRAH BILLYOS Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000939 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing busines as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95960. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HOPE IN HEALING COUNSELING SERVICES at 6 Governors Lane Suite A Chico, CA 95926. ALISHA READY 15 Glenbrook Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALISHA READY Dated: August 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000954 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STUDIO 4, STUDIO FOUR at 823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTINE ANN DICKINSON 823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINE A. DICKINSON Dated: July 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000828 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOGTOWN HOWLER at 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. TAMMY WALLER AVILES 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. this Legal Notice continues

Signed: TAMMY WALLER AVILES Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000968 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 245 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000871 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000872 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as XTRM STEEL at 175 Inglewood Dr. Oroville, CA 95966. XAVIER DIAZ 12 Ruths Ct Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: XAVIER DIAZ Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000969 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SILVERLEAF AGRICULTURE, SILVERLEAF ORGANIC at 679 E 7th Chico, CA 95928. MARC MONROE BRECKENRIDGE 679 E 7th Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: MARC BRECKENRIDGE Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000926 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THOUSAND ACRE WOOD BOOKS at 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. TERESA TRAVER 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERESA TRAVER Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000948 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CB WOOD ARTS at 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG ARTHUR BONNER 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRAIG A. BONNER RH Dated: August 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000979 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SECRETS OF PARADISE at 6433 Skyway 9 Paradise, CA 95969. GABRIELL HERNDON 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. ESTEFANIA MIRANDA 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: ESTEFANIA MIRANDA Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000984 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KREMER DENTAL CARE PHILADEPHIA SQUARE at 140 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973. KEVIN KREMER, DDS, NORTH STATE, INC. 3 Glenbrook Ct. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KEVIN KREMER, PRESIDENT Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000959 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CONNECTIONS COUNSELING at 15 Ilahee Lane Suite 100 Chico, CA 95973. HEATHER MARIE BOGGS 291 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HEATHER BOGGS Dated: August 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000986 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TREE CITY FILMS at 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. SHAWN DYER 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAWN DYER Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000967 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEART BEAN COFFEE at 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. FAELIN KLEIN 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAELIN KLEIN Dated: August 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000980 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADVENTURE QUEST at 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. DRUIN DANIEL HARVEY HEAL 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. ELIZABETH (HEAL) MARTIN 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DRUIN (DANIEL) HEAL Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000982 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SANTINOS CATERING at 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. KAELEN DAVIS 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAELEN W. DAVIS Dated: August 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000994 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUILDING MARKET INTELLIGENCE, MISSING MIDDLE METRICS, PELOTON RESEARCH ECONOMICS at 125 W 3rd Street, Suite 250 Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD FRANKLIN HUNT 1040 Macy Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD F. HUNT Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001007 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CORVO JEWELRY at 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. CORVO LLC 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: LILY ANN RAVEN, CEO Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000938 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 127CC COURTNEY BOYDEN 6x12 (Boxes, Furniture, Suitcases, Misc.) 284SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Boxes, Containers, Misc.) 006CC1 THOR BAILY 5x7 (Boxes, totes, cabinets) 205SS CARA MAY 6x12 (Households, Furniture, Boxes, Bags) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday September 14, 2019 Beginning at 1:00PM Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: August 29, September 5, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LOR ZE LEE and SEE VANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LINA MAI NENG LOR-LEE CHARLIE LOR Proposed name: LINA MAI NENG LEE CHARLIE TOU LEE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 6, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02210 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEBBIE ANN LYNCH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEBBIE ANN LYNCH Proposed name: DEBBIE ANN BROOKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02343 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DANA CATHERINE YU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DANA CATHERINE YU Proposed name: DANA CATHERINE WUNDERLICH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 1, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02309 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner this Legal Notice continues

WILLIAM MORGAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER Proposed name: HUNTER LEE MORGAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA MOSBARGER Dated: July 24, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01178 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARTHA MAYR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELLA PHYLLIS BUNTING MILLIE BEATRICE BUNTING Proposed name: ELLA PHYLLIS MAYR MILLIE BEATRICE MAYR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: August 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02426 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

CLaSSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 42

For the week oF September 5, 2019

by rob brezSny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): John Muir

the marvelous that only the marvelous has power over me. Anything I can not transform into something marvelous, I let go. 4. Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage. 5. It was while helping others to be free that I gained my own freedom.

(1838-1914) was skilled at creating and using machinery. In his 20s, he diligently expressed those aptitudes. But at age 27, while working in a carriage parts factory, he suffered an accident that blinded him. For several months, he lay in bed, hoping to recuperate. During that time, Muir decided that if his sight returned, he would thereafter devote it to exploring the beauty of the natural world. The miracle came to pass, and for the rest of his life he traveled and explored the wilds of North America, becoming an influential naturalist, author and early environmentalist. I’d love to see you respond to one of your smaller setbacks— much less dramatic than Muir’s!—with comparable panache.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Of all the

children on the planet, 3% live in the United States. And yet American children have 40% of the world’s toys. In accordance with astrological omens, I hereby invite you to be like an extravagant American child in the coming weeks. You have cosmic permission to seek maximum fun and treat yourself to zesty entertainment and lose yourself in uninhibited laughter and wow yourself with beguiling games and delightful gizmos. It’s playtime!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The ama are Japanese women whose job it is to dive to the sea bottom and fetch oysters bearing pearls. The water is usually cold, and the workers use no breathing apparatus, depending instead on specialized techniques to hold their breath. I propose we make them your inspirational role models. The next few weeks will be a favorable time, metaphorically speaking, for you to descend into the depths in quest of valuables and inspirations.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Renowned

Cancerian neurologist Oliver Sacks believed that music and gardens could be vital curative agents, as therapeutic as pharmaceuticals. My personal view is that walking in nature can be as medicinal as working and lolling in a garden. As for music, I would extend his prescription to include singing and dancing as well as listening. I’m also surprised that Sacks didn’t give equal recognition to the healing power of touch, which can be wondrously rejuvenating, either in its erotic or non-erotic forms. I bring these thoughts to your attention because I suspect the coming weeks will be a Golden Age of non-pharmaceutical healing for you. I’m not suggesting that you stop taking the drugs you need to stay healthy; I simply mean that music, nature and touch will have an extra-sublime impact on your well-being.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you visualize what ancient Rome looked like, it’s possible you draw on memories of scenes you’ve seen portrayed in movies. The blockbuster film Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe and directed by Ridley Scott, may be one of those templates. The weird thing is that Gladiator, as well as many other such movies, were inspired by the grandiose paintings of the ancient world done by Dutch artist Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912). And in many ways, his depictions were not at all factual. I bring this to your attention in the hope that it will prod you to question the accuracy and authenticity of your mental pictures. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to get fuzzy and incorrect memories into closer alignment with the truth, and to shed any illusions that might be distorting your understanding of reality.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I don’t know

if the coming weeks will be an Anais Nin phase for you. But they could be if you want. It’s up to you whether you’ll dare to be as lyrical, sensual, deep, expressive and emotionally rich as she was. In case you decide that yes you will, here are quotes from Nin that might serve you well. 1. It is easy to love and there are so many ways to do it. 2. My mission, should I choose to accept it, is to find peace with exactly who and what I am. 3. I am so thirsty for

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “When you’re

nailing a custard pie to the wall, and it starts to wilt, it doesn’t do any good to hammer in more nails.” So advised novelist Wallace Stegner. I hope I’m delivering his counsel in time to dissuade you from even trying to nail a custard pie to the wall—or an omelet or potato chip or taco, for that matter. What might be a better use of your energy? You could use the nails to build something that will actually be useful to you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I hid my

deepest feelings so well I forgot where I placed them,” wrote author Amy Tan. My Scorpio friend Audrey once made a similar confession: “I buried my secrets so completely from the prying curiosity of other people that I lost track of them myself.” If either of those descriptions apply to you, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to secure a remedy. You’ll have extra power and luck if you commune with and celebrate your hidden feelings and buried secrets.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“No Eden valid without serpent.” Novelist Wallace Stegner wrote that pithy riff. I think it’s a good motto for you to use in the immediate future. How do you interpret it? Here’s what I think. As you nourish your robust vision of paradise on earth, and as you carry out the practical actions that enable you to manifest that vision, it’s wise to have some creative irritant in the midst of it. That bug, that question, that tantalizing mystery is the key to keeping you honest and discerning. It gives credibility and gravitas to your idealistic striving.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The

coco de mer is a palm tree that grows in the Seychelles. Its seed is huge, weighing as much as 40 pounds and having a diameter of 19 inches. The seed takes 7 years to grow into its mature form, then takes an additional 2 years to germinate. Everything I just said about the coco de mer seed reminds me of you. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ve been working on ripening an awesome seed for a long time, and are now in the final phase before it sprouts. The Majestic Budding may not fully kick in until 2020, but I bet you’re already feeling the enjoyable, mysterious pressure.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you

throw a pool ball or a bronze Buddha statue at a window, the glass will break. In fact, the speed at which it fractures could reach 3,000 miles per hour. Metaphorically speaking, your mental blocks and emotional obstacles are typically not as crackable. You may smack them with your angry probes and bash them with your desperate pleas, yet have little or no effect. But I suspect that in the coming weeks, you’ll have much more power than usual to shatter those vexations. So I hereby invite you to hurl your strongest blasts at your mental blocks and emotional obstacles. Don’t be surprised if they collapse at unexpectedly rapid speeds.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the 13th

century, the Italian city of Bologna was serious about guarding the integrity of its cuisine. In 1250, the cheese guild issued a decree proclaiming, “If you make fake mortadella … your body will be stretched on the rack three times, you will be fined 200 gold coins and all the food you make will be destroyed.” I appreciate such devotion to purity and authenticity. And I recommend that in the coming weeks, you commit to comparable standards in your own sphere. Don’t let your own offerings be compromised or corrupted. The same with the offerings you receive from other people. Be impeccable.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. September 5, 2019

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARINA DALIA CARINO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARINA DALIA CARINO Proposed name: MARINA DALIA ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02498 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JODIE LYNN BROWN AKA JODIE LYNN MORSE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), this Legal Notice continues

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the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: September 28, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV03195 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT JENNY L. MASON You have been sued by petitioner: JASON E. BONHAM You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court North Butte County Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: JASON E. BONHAM 2455 Oro Bangor Hwy. Oroville, CA 95966 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 28, 2019 Case Number: 19FL01149 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ROBERT SCOTT DOBYNE AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD ON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE TO THE PROPERTY, AND DOES 1 THROUGH 100 this Legal Notice continues

September 5, 2019

YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: JUNE E. RICHARDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOEL B. MASSAE, ESQ. PO Box 3104 Paradise, CA 95954 Tel. (530) 872-2375 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 6, 2019 Case No: 19CV01710 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: LANDES MEDICAL GROUP, A MEDICAL CORP.;, WILLIAM LANDES, MD, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-5 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: CARWOOD SKYPARK, LLC NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper this Legal Notice continues

legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOSEPH L. SELBY 249546 FERRIS & SELBY 2607 Forest Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 343-0100 Dated: May 21, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01535 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE PATRICIA A. LESAN, also known as PATRICIA ANN LESAN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PATRICIA A. LESAN, also known as PATRICIA ANN LESAN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JERRY O. LESAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JERRY O. LESAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many

this Legal Notice continues

actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: August 12, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00357 Published: August 22,29, September 5, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DOUGLAS JOHN MEYER, aka DOUGLAS J. MEYER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DOUGLAS JOHN MEYER, aka DOUGLAS J. MEYER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PAMELA C. HANDLEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PAMELA C. HANDLEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. this Legal Notice continues

The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: ERWIN WILLIAMS MCKERNAN, LANAM, BAKKE & WILLIAMS LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Dated: August 20, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00371 Published: August 29, September 5,12, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE NADINE I. REGAS, also known as NADINE IDA REGAS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NADINE I. REGAS, also known as NADINE IDA REGAS, A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JUDITH K. TESSIEN this Legal Notice continues

in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUDITH K. TESSIEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 24, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: August 28, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00384 Published: September 5,12,19, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE this Legal Notice continues

BETTY ANN VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY A. VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY VANDEGRIFT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BETTY ANN VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY A. VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY VANDEGRIFT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARK D. VANDEGRIFT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARK D. VANDEGRIFT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 24, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: August 28, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00385 Published: September 5,12,19, 2019


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