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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 11 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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BLUE CROSS FIASCO 9

ELECTION RUNDOWN 27

SONIC YOUTH

Fiction

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 11 • November 8, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Naisi Thomas Custom Publications Designer Katelynn Mitrano Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultant Autumn Slone

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

NOVEMBER 8, 2018

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Profits over patients Chico and the rest of the North State are a veritable

health care desert. Our region is short dozens of primary care providers, and we also are desperately deficient in specialty physicians. Despite being a small metro, Chico and the surrounding region have an exceedingly difficult time attracting and retaining doctors, especially when it comes to establishing private practices. That’s why many specialists have chosen in recent years to partner with local hospitals—consolidating billing and other departments for efficiency. But the situation is bleak for those institutions as well—at least when it comes to rural facilities. Over the last eight years, about 90 such hospitals in the nation have closed. Hundreds of others are at risk of sharing the same fate. There are a number of factors at play here, but one of the primary causes can be attributed to the abysmal reimbursement rates paid by private insurance carriers, including one of the largest in the nation, Anthem Blue Cross, a major player here in Butte County. The Indianapolis-based company has made headlines for its tendency to put profits over patients. Recall, if you will, about this time last year when it was

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

fined millions of dollars for its longstanding record of failing to resolve consumer grievances in a timely manner. Last week, the company cut ties with Enloe Medical Center—after the two parties could not come to an agreement on a new contract to keep the hospital in its network of providers. The move puts tens of thousands of area residents without access to the largest health care institution in our region. Emergency services as well as Medicare and Medi-Cal will still be covered, and there are “continuity of care” requirements for certain chronic conditions, but others will simply have to look elsewhere—or pay astronomical prices for out-of-network care. Rural hospitals and other providers often get short shrift because of lack of competition among insurers. Anthem, arguably the largest in this area, is trying to bully its way into a sweet deal that would line its own coffers while contributing little to local health care. In the meantime, it’s the patients who are feeling the pain. If you’re one of them, we urge you to not be silent. Call and express your thoughts to Anthem Blue Cross at (888) 486-4227 or the Department of Managed Health Care at (888) 466-2219. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

A dog’s lessons in love, life and heartache Iwhere receiving messages from old friends in Chico, I lived for 30 years.

n the fresh stages of grief here in Mexico, I started

We heard what happened … You need a change of scenery … You can stay with us. Just book a flight and don’t think about it … Do it now. How they found out my dog had died suddenly, I didn’t know. I moved to Puerto Vallarta five years ago and was afraid I’d feel like a ghost roaming my former haunts. But for lack of a better by Catherine Beeghly idea, I did what they said. And escaping back to Chico for a The author wrote about moving to Puerto while was a life-saver. Vallarta from Chico in People on the streets I hadn’t a CN&R cover story seen in decades welcomed me (“Gone to Mexico,” back. Many said something Sept. 8, 2016). comforting about the loss my little best friend. Others held me while I sobbed. One friend pointed to the wall of a downtown business, where his friends had mounted

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NOVEMBER 8, 2018

a photo of a dog he had lost, to that same merciless master known as Time. Snickers, the mighty Chihuahua, lived with me in Chico from 2008 to 2013. He’d been rescued in Mexico by Kathy Cangello and her Chico organization, Small Dog Rescue. Snickers performed in five theater shows with me, was hopelessly friendly, loved children and adults, and reminded me every day how to wake up in a good mood, grateful, and ready to take on the world. Anyone who’s lost a pet knows my heartache. I’ve never felt so surrounded by love and support as I did during my recent visit to Chico. I notice a chain in how Cangello saved Snickers from the streets of Tijuana, where he lived homeless his first year; Snickers rescued me, and when it was time for him to go, the heart of Chico saved me from the grief. It’s given me the perspective to marvel at how relatively easy my life has been—how free of loss, illness, homelessness and other traumas that can wreck a human soul. So many lessons, from a 7-pound pup who—once upon a time, in a land far away—nobody wanted. Ω

Election mop-up Before diving into the new makeup of the Chico City Council, I have to backtrack a little. Not to overdo it on Reanette Fillmer, Chico’s outgoing vice mayor, but she tends to do things that are newsworthy, or at least column-worthy. Case in point, check this space in the last issue to read about her getting fired (“LaMalfa’s pawn”). This week, though, I’m referring to her breaking the news that Chico’s mayor, Sean Morgan, won’t seek re-election in 2020, when his second term on the council ends. (His mayoral stint is just about over.) Fillmer blocked me on Facebook a couple of years ago, after I called her out for fibbing to me about using that platform to besmirch Councilwoman Ann Schwab (see “Disingenuous, dishonest,” Second & Flume, Nov. 3, 2016), but her recent post about Morgan made some ripples—and I have the screenshot. Speaking of talking trash about colleagues, here’s how she put the news: “2020 Schwab, [Randall] Stone, Morgan and the meanest and oldest [Karl] Ory are up. We need the three of them out and Morgan is not running again. We need 4 candidates for 2020. If you know anyone please contact Sean or I (sic).” Fillmer’s fans can say goodbye to her in person during the City Council’s Dec. 4 meeting—the one that includes the changing of the guard. Preliminary election results place Kasey Reynolds and Alex Brown in the top spots for the three open seats. Scott Huber and incumbent Andrew Coolidge trail them—separated by less than 150 votes, so it’s too close to call. As for Morgan, I suspect he won’t be thrilled with how his pending departure has been revealed—first by Fillmer in a Facebook group and especially now by yours truly in these pages. Politicians typically like to break that kind of news themselves, so I’m a little surprised Fillmer would out his plans. Then again, restraint isn’t her strong suit. What’s next for Morgan? Sure, he could change his mind and run for council again, but I suspect he’ll raise funds to enter state politics. He’s spent the past six years cozying up to the two Jims— Gallagher and Nielsen, who handily won re-election Tuesday. Gallagher is entering his second term in the Assembly and Nielsen, a senator, is terming out in 2022—creating a vacuum in the heavily GOP-centric North State. Prior to Election Day, I didn’t have the space to mention a couple of jaw-dropping Chico Enterprise-Record endorsements. Its editorial board predictably picks conservatives for City Council—four years ago, it chose Mark Sorensen, Andrew Coolidge and Fillmer (all victorious). Yes, the local daily is forever saddled with having elevated Fillmer. The E-R’s picks in 2016: Morgan, Jeffrey Glatz, Jovanni Tricerri and Loretta Torres (one for four that year—veterans Ory, Stone and Schwab joined Morgan in victory.) But this year, lo and behold, the E-R went with one of the progressive candidates, Scott Huber. More shocking perhaps: endorsing Audrey Denney for Congress. It was a lot more gutsy than the paper’s previous “Do not vote for any incumbent running for Congress” shtick. My question: Is the E-R folding? Or, as one of my cohorts guessed, has Editor David Little been abducted by aliens?

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

About that vigil Re “Shared sadness” (Newslines, by Evan Tuchinsky, Nov. 1): Where are Chico’s progressives? Over the past two years of the Trumpitization of America, there have been many street rallies in Chico—protesting the current government’s immigration policies, police shooting deaths of AfricanAmericans, we have marched for women’s rights, Palestinian rights, we have marched for peace and justice. During all of these rallies, I see the same faces again and again. Some I have become friends with, some I just recognize as fellow progressives from so many political events. But, when 11 Jewish Americans were murdered in Pittsburgh, and there was a vigil/ memorial service last Sunday (Oct. 28), about 70 people gathered at Temple Beth Israel and where were all my familiar faces? With just a few exceptions, the Temple was not packed with the hundreds, sometimes thousands, I have marched with in the past. In

fact, they weren’t there at all. I’ll let you figure it out. George Gold Magalia

On seeing a photo of David Halimi, I think: Hey, that’s the landlord who owns a chunk of downtown Chico, supports homeless criminalization—most recently, as a public champion of sit/lie—and, as quoted in our local daily, blames the indigent for the closing of Peet’s Coffee, a claim denied by longtime employees. When I read the accompanying article on local responses to the horrific Tree of Life massacre, I couldn’t shake the ugly irony: The leader of the Jewish community, with its history of horror, is a man inured to stripping human rights. A man who demonizes a scapegoated population. I never thought I’d witness people targeted and slated for ghettoization—what we are calling “consolidation.” I never thought I’d see a community looking past the means, to the ultimate end of excluding the

visible poor—especially from our downtown—with our worst nature marketed as “relocation” and “renewal.” While our best nature, formerly evident in the Jesus Center, slips away. I wonder when the Jewish community—and the Christian community—will take note of creeping authoritarianism, as it undermines our decency. When will they open their arms to their brothers and sisters on the streets? Not only in a spirit of charity, but of justice.

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Speaking of homelessness The plea came into Butte County Community Action Network from Amanda and Marcus, a couple living out of a weekly-rate motel since being evicted from 847 Warner St. in April—1 of 10 housing units purchased by Chico State to make way for a dormitory and parking lot. They are behind on LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 their weekly motel payments and are desperate for any assistance they can muster, including shoes and toiletries. Marcus says, “It’s because of people not having a heart. It seems to me that people are happy blaming people for not having a home.” I wish I could state that their situation is rare, but it isn’t. We need systemic change, but in the meantime, what happens to people caught in the midst of it? Bill Mash Chico

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The upcoming City Council decision to use the fees from parking to improve Upper Park Road seems like a good idea for emergency and fire personnel. As far as opening up the road to the end for the general public, it is not. I can see having vehicle access as it is Tuesday through Saturday, but the gate should remain locked above Bear Hole. Upper Park used to have a shooting and archery range—that was fine when the population was under 30,000 but not with 100,000. Anyone who has had to deal with the speeding, alcohol and trash know this to be true. Who will be there to police, pick up and collect the garbage? Maybe another fee, eh? Steve Kasprzyk Chico

Insulting stereotype My heart sank when I saw the photo of the winning family costume for Treat Street 2018. Dressing up as a Native American stereotype may not seem like a big deal to folks at the DCBA or the judges of the contest or those who shared it on Facebook who called the costume creative and cute, but to indigenous people, it is very hurtful. To us, this is yet another wounding event in the continuing erasure of our culture and true histories—alongside trauma from family separation, state-sanctioned massacres and forced removal of our ancestors from their lands. This costume does not honor us or represent us, but is rather an insulting figment of the arrogant and entitled imagination of settlers. Siana Sonoquie Chico

[Trump] doesn’t care about immigration, or America for that matter. He cares only about himself, his own self and nothing but himself, but definitely not you. —roger S. beadle

of empathy to the pain of victims of violence, a total disregard for a nation in mourning. This whole theater is nothing but a campaign ad, an exercise in performance art, a self-centered indulgence. He doesn’t care about immigration, or America for that matter. He cares only about himself, his own self and nothing but himself, but definitely not you. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Halloween is supposed to be a fun holiday. It’s a time for kids to let their imaginations run wild; they can be a robot, or any number of DC, Marvel or emoji characters, or a monster. Downtown Chico Business Association made a mistake on Halloween by encouraging costumes that are rooted in stereotypes, but one that is fixable through an apology, education and a donation to any one of several Native American nonprofits. The days of community members dressing up as a member of another culture or as a stereotype are long past. Many retailers of Halloween costumes are listening to concerns that they are disrespectful, harmful and promote dehumanization, and it seems that most folks get that. Cultural advocates and mental health advocates agree that these actions are harmful to children from cultures who are being mocked: Those of us in the Native American community still face this disrespect every Halloween. The holidays become a lot more fun for everyone when culture is not treated as a costume. It has nothing to do with “political correctness” and everything to do with plain old-fashioned being polite. Sam White Swan-Perkins  Chico

The day before Halloween, the chairman of the Yakima Tribe (leader of a sovereign nation) was denied entry into the U.S. Supreme Court because he was wearing a feather headdress, which is the honor of who he is and his position in his culture. The court was hearing a case about his tribe’s treaty rights. The next day, the Downtown Chico Business Association gave first prize in its costume contest to a family who dressed up as “the first Thanksgiving”—with parents as pilgrims and their kid

as an “Indian” with fake feather headdress. I have seen no one criticize this child, but I add my voice to those who say the parents and the DCBA are responsible for encouraging and celebrating cultural appropriation when actual Native people’s right to vote is being stripped from them in North Dakota, when Native women are being kidnapped and assaulted daily in the U.S. Genocide is not a thing of the past only. Native people have been saying for many years that it is disrespectful to dress up as “Indians” for Halloween. Put away the stereotypes of real people and cultures. Let’s teach our kids and community how to have fun without cultural appropriation. Rain Scher Chico

POTUS’ performance My head is on the verge of blowing up. A caravan of thousands of oppressed, poverty-stricken and economically threatened refugees from countries with horrendous conditions are walking over 2,000 miles from Central America to North America, seeking relief from their misery, hoping for the opportunity to start a new life for themselves and their families. President Trump’s response: Order 5,200 military troops to our southern border to protect the United States from this national emergency, an invasion of desperate families fleeing intolerable conditions. Oh, and by the way, these conditions are fermented due to depleted government budgets, which in part rely on the United States for economic assistance, and Trump’s answer to this problem is to stop the aid. There is something desperately wrong with Donald Trump. He has trouble speaking in sentences, comprehending a question, or seeing beyond himself. A total lack

Not blast-worthy  Re “Not a progressive” (Letters, by Lucy Cooke, Oct. 25): Lucy Cooke and other anticapitalist, socialist letter writers blame the Kamala Harrises of the political world for low Democratic voter turnout or enthusiasm. Cooke apparently chooses to ignore that two times already in the new millennium, the winner of the White House has had fewer popular votes than the loser. This really is a distraction to my enthusiasm. The phenomenon hasn’t occurred since 1888, and prior to that in 1876. We all remember the Ralph Nader fiasco in 2000 that enabled George W. Bush to wreak havoc on America. Ironically, Bernie Sanders played the Nader role in 2016, enabling the most deplorable, virulent, homophobic village idiot ever to soil the grounds of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Four times in the history of presidential elections, the president has been chosen by the majority of Electoral College votes while losing the popular vote, and guess what folks, all four were Republicans. The Electoral College actually makes a mockery of the definition of democracy (i.e., “a system of government by the whole population.” I know what the Electoral College rules are, and I vehemently disagree with them: it’s obsolete. Choose the right things to blast the Democratic party with. Kamala Harris actually voted against the “foreclosure king’s” confirmation. She has my vote in 2020, if she chooses to run. Ray Estes Redding More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

Favorite bedtime story? Asked at Butte County Library, Chico branch

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Where the Wild Things Are. A kid goes to sleep and wakes up in a weird land with monsters. They show him how to dance and stuff. It’s awesome!

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The Little Prince was my favorite bedtime story. I haven’t read it since I was a little kid, but it was my favorite when I was younger.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE TRAIN KILLS PEDESTRIAN

A train traveling southbound through Chico at around 5:30 p.m. on Saturday (Nov. 3) struck and killed a pedestrian. The collision took place at the crossing on West Eighth Avenue. According to a Chico Police Department press release, witnesses saw Marsha Hart, 67, of Chico, walking across the tracks at the intersection, failing to notice the oncoming train before it was too late. The crossing signals were on and crossing arms were down. The train conductor did initiate an emergency stop.

SUBDIVISION OK’D

A controversial subdivision was approved by the Butte County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday (Nov. 6). The panel voted 4-1, with Supervisor Maureen Kirk dissenting, to approve Nels Leen’s project at 1232 Stanley Ave. The proposal calls for the 18.5-acre lot to be divided into 18 residential lots and one open space lot, with a 300-foot setback and open space management plan. Last year, the supervisors shot down Leen’s project after significant public opposition, largely due to setback issues (see “Ag buffer backed,” Newslines, July 27, 2017). Leen revised the proposal, which was approved by the Planning Commission last month. Opposed neighbors appealed that decision to the supervisors. They contended the project is inconsistent with the very low density neighborhood and the general plan, and that an environmental impact report should be required because of impacts on aesthetics, land use and traffic.

CHICO ARTS INFUSION

Nearly a dozen local arts and culture organizations have received a financial boost, according to City Clerk Debbie Presson. The following organizations collectively took home $25,056—or 1 percent—of the city’s transient occupancy tax, for 2017-18: 1078 Gallery ($2,000 for a Brontez Purnell performance); Blue Room Theatre ($2,255 for lighting equipment); Chico Art Center ($1,300 for a 3-D printing/virtual technology space); Children’s Choir of Chico ($2,010 for a ukulele instruction program); Chico Theater Company ($2,800 for lighting equipment); Friends of Chico Community Ballet ($2,800 for Cinderella, a Magical Ballet); Inspire

School of Arts and Sciences

($2,491 for traveling arts events); Museum of Northern California Art ($2,800 for a commissioned sign/ art piece); North State Symphony ($1,000 to start its Explore Music program); Slow Theatre ($2,800 for the GarageFest tour) and Stonewall Alliance Center ($2,800 for Trans* Week arts events). 8

CN&R

NOVEMBER 8, 2018

Service interruption Enloe, Anthem cut ties; patients caught in limbo

M health insurance plans through Anthem Blue Cross—Chico State, Chico Unified School any of Chico’s largest employers offer

District, the city of Chico, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. And starting Nov. 1, those employees—plus the by thousands of others insured Meredith through work at smaller comJ. Cooper panies or through Covered m er ed i t h c @ California—can no longer n ew sr ev i ew. c o m seek most services at Chico’s largest hospital, Enloe Medical Center. At least not if they Questions answered: want those services to be billed For information about as “in network.” coverage at Enloe with “We have 900 lives on our Anthem insurance, go insurance plan—that includes to enloe.org/anthem. dependents, retirees, etc.—so Medi-Cal and Medicare patients are still this is having a huge impact on covered, as are some the city of Chico,” said Jamie procedures and Cannon, human resources and ongoing care. risk manager for the city. “Of For info on Anthem’s coverage locally, call our four plans that we offer, the number on one of them is now inoperable the back of your with Enloe. The other three insurance card. have become out-of-network benefit payments only.” The reaction Cannon has seen, she said without hesitation, was “panic.” To add to that, the city’s open enrollment ended Oct. 31, a day before the announcement that Anthem and Enloe had cut ties. She immediately sprang into action. “We reopened open enrollment through Nov. 16 and scheduled meetings for four different information sessions, in addition to fielding individual phone calls.” All of the city’s plans are with Anthem and go through 2020. Panic is a word that worries Enloe.

“We want to make it clear that if you’re in an emergency, we will take care of you,” said Mike Wiltermood, Enloe CEO. “We’ll do what we can to make sure nobody gets a surprise bill at the end of their stay or experience with us.” He was speaking to the CN&R by phone two days after sitting down with Anthem representatives to work out a contract and a day after announcing no deal had been reached. “Anthem Blue Cross has historically underpaid,” he explained. “They pay us 40 percent less than Blue Shield, and the disparity is getting bigger and bigger.” But Enloe didn’t cut ties with Anthem overnight, Wiltermood stressed. The hospital had sent a letter to the insurer in May requesting revised rates, with an expiration date of Nov. 1. It wasn’t until Oct. 30 that Anthem agreed to sit down and discuss the matter with Enloe, he said. “For Anthem to just say, ‘Oh well, I guess we’ll give you an hour two days

before the deadline’ shows that they care more about their stockholders than they do about their enrollees,” he said. Everyone who carries Anthem Blue Cross

insurance and relies on Enloe for care is getting caught in the crosshairs. In speaking with people for this story, the overall reaction has been worry—and anger. One woman, who had a planned hysterectomy coming up at Enloe, feared a huge bill. “Should I even go to my pre-op appointment?” she wondered. (Procedures that were planned before Nov. 1 will still be covered by Anthem, up to 180 days out.) Another woman expressed frustration that she’d have to find a new OB-GYN and, if she planned to have a child, look elsewhere for delivery. (Women who were pregnant before Nov. 1 and were on an Enloe birth plan are covered through pregnancy.) The scenario forces some patients to look elsewhere for care. Others will put off care due to the inconvenience.


Mike Wiltermood, Enloe Medical Center’s CEO, says Anthem was not willing to negotiate a fair contract. CN&R FILE PHOTO

Wiltermood regrets the impact this decision is having on the community, but for him it’s about standing up to a bully. As a regional—but rural—medical center, Enloe doesn’t see the same reimbursement rates that facilities in bigger cities like Sacramento or San Francisco do. Because of that, he argues, Chico hasn’t been able to attract physicians from those areas. In fact, Chico is about 25 to 30 primary care doctors short for an area its size, Wiltermood said. “Physicians in major metropolitan areas are getting two to three times as much as physicians here in Butte County,” he said. “They’ve squeezed primary care doctors until there’s nothing left to give.” There’s data to back him up. According to statistics compiled by the Rural Health Information Hub, overseen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, rural areas tend to have fewer health plans available, pushing premiums—the amount enrollees and employers pay for coverage—up due to lack of competition. Meanwhile, reimbursement rates tend to be low. Anthem provided a statement in reply to multiple requests for an interview. “We are negotiating in good faith to bring Enloe back into our network of care providers as soon as possible,” it reads. “In the meantime, consumers can access care at one of the many providers in the area who remain in our broad network.” Wiltermood contends that the negotiators he met with last week were unfamiliar with Butte County specifically and did not understand how far some people may have to travel for certain types of care without access to Enloe. For instance, Enloe is one of only two Level II trauma centers north of Sacramento. “They should take that into consideration when looking at access,” Wiltermood said. Anthem did not reply to questions clarifying the breadth of its network in Chico currently, and its website was not up-to-date regarding in-network providers at press time. Wiltermood urged people to call Anthem if they are concerned about access. He said Enloe also welcomes feedback. “The difference is, we have to live in this community; Anthem doesn’t,” he said. “The more they hear about the struggles, the more likely they might be to work something out with us.” Ω

Liberals take Chico council

Despite a loss, Audrey Denney promised on election night that, “I’m going to be working to protect our democracy and working to strengthen our communities with every fiber of my being from the rest of my life.” PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

“I’m going to be right alongside you encouraging you when you feel hopeless and discouraged. I’m going to be poking you and reminding you to get off your butt and do something good for someone else. And I’m going to be working to protect our democracy and working to strengthen our communities with every fiber of my being from the rest of my life.”

And Dems win the House, lose in other key races in Butte County and beyond At Chico’s Republican headquarters at the

Ramada Inn on Tuesday evening (Nov. 6), as area conservatives waited for the Butte County Elections Office to update results, spirits were high despite news that the Democratic Party had reclaimed the House of Representatives. For one thing, the Senate was gaining more Republican seats. Also, and most relevant to those in attendance, the seats for state Assembly and Senate as well as Congress were predicted to go the way of the incumbents, all Republican. Indeed, at about 10 p.m., Rep. Doug LaMalfa gave a victory speech—though rather than celebrating, he mostly made jabs at Democrats and the media. He commented that the party had “pounded out another strong victory in the face of a million-dollar threat,” a reference to the fundraising efforts of his Democratic challenger, Audrey Denney. Taking the stage, LaMalfa said the House may have “gone a little upside down”; he called the “blue wave” more of a “blue belch” that likely will turn into a “blue barf bag.” LaMalfa continued to say that the press would be sure to love his comments, but newspapers are “failing” anyway, and that he was feeling a “little scrappy.” “When you come after me, I get my teeth,” he added. Meanwhile, at the El Rey Theater down-

Back at the Republican headquarters, state

town, the mood was cheerful despite early indications that the lady of the night, Denney, would be defeated. With The Kelley Twins offering fun—and often funny—renditions of popular songs on stage, and beer and wine flowing, the packed theater hummed with excitement. Denney gave an energized, hopeful speech to the crowd, despite the late hour and the likely loss headed her way. She recounted the values of her campaign when it came to social justice issues, and pointed out the diversity of the ages and political backgrounds of her supporters. “We have been fighting to protect our democracy by … finding our shared common values in the middle,” she said. “We have to engage in our democracy every single day, that’s all of our jobs.

SIFT ER So, who fared well? Here are the top five cities: 1. Omaha-Council Bluffs, Neb.-Iowa 2. Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles 3. Pittsburgh, Pa. are probably among the first cities that pop to mind when thinking about the places 4. Midland, Mich. 5. Eau Claire, Wis. that draw millennials. They are culturally rich and vibrant metro areas, but also have their downsides, including being extremely expensive. That’s why RealtyHop, a home sales website, took a data-driven approach to the subject—taking results from the U.S. Census American Community Survey to account for such factors as job market, housing affordability, median incomes, diversity and education levels. How did Chico fare? Not well. It ranked No. 417 out of 448—earning a D+. To learn more, check out tinyurl.com/RealtyHop.

Millennial metros

Sen. Jim Nielsen and Assemblyman James Gallagher sailed to victory and offered celebratory speeches. Nearby, attendees excitedly took pictures with Chico City Council candidate Kasey Reynolds, who took an early lead in the ninecandidate race for three open seats. As of press time, she sat in first place with 12,758 votes. Reynolds also spoke, and said that her team ran a solid, simple campaign. “We want to enjoy our parks, we want to have a place where we want to raise our families, we want to feel safe going to downtown and we want to enjoy going to downtown. That’s what people want,” she said. In addition to the Democratic shift in Washington, one is being felt locally. Progressive Chico City Council candidate Alex Brown trailed Reynolds by about 600 votes—ensuring the panel will return to a liberal majority after four years of conservative policy-making. Reached by phone Wednesday morning, Brown said she’s excited about the work ahead and commented on the on the representation secured on a national level by young people, women, Native Americans and the LGBTQ community. “We’re just seeing a younger and more diverse generation of leadership showing up, and that means a lot for representation,” she said. “I’m going to let that motivate me. I’m excited to collaborate with the other council members and get to work.” The last seat is a toss-up between Scott Huber and incumbent Andrew Coolidge, with less than 150 votes separating them. With provisional ballots and late mail-in ballots yet to be tallied, the election may not be certified for weeks. Chico voters overwhelmingly supported term limits for City Council, with 69.17 percent of the vote. For Chico Unified School District, the seats go to newcomer Tom M. Lando and incumbents Eileen Robinson and Kathy Kaiser. There were a few other hotly contested local races with results worth noting: Oroville mayor: Political newbie Chuck Reynolds handily won the mayorship with NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D NOVEMBER 8, 2018

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Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee The Chico Unified School District is seeking community members interested in participating in a Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee (CBOC). The committee represents the public in ensuring the bond funds are expended within the constraints of the law . The CBOC is comprised of seven members who serve a two-year term and meet no more than four times annually. There is currently one open position. For consideration, the District is seeking applicants active in a parent-teacher association. Applications and bylaws can be found at:

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66.35 percent of the vote, over Vice Mayor Janet Goodson (33.65 percent). As for the council, Art Hatley was the only incumbent re-elected. New to the panel will be retired fire Chief David Pittman and Oroville Area Chamber of Commerce President Eric Smith. Orovillians also voted in favor of a sales tax (55.88 percent) as well as a tax on cannabis businesses (59.89 percent). Paradise residents voted in favor of extending the town’s sales tax (69.39 percent). Nationally, one of the big stories is

how women made strides—there will be more women in the House and in Congress as a whole than ever before. That’s not, of course, including Congressional District 1, where LaMalfa took home 56.1 percent of the vote over Denney’s 43.9 percent. (In Butte County, Denney was in the majority, earning 52.4 percent vs. LaMalfa’s 47.6 percent.) Here are some other notable races: • Governor: Gavin Newsom handily beat John Cox, 59.4 percent to 40.6 percent. (In Butte County, 45.7 percent voted for Newsom, vs. 54.3 percent for Cox.) • Lieutenant governor: Eleni Kounalakis (55.6 percent) • Secretary of state: Alex Padilla (61.7 percent) • U.S. Senate: Dianne Feinstein (54.3 percent; 43 percent in Butte County) • Prop. 1 (bonds to fund veteran and affordable housing): Yes (54.1 percent) • Prop. 2 (amend housing program for mentally ill): Yes (61.1 percent) • Prop. 3 (bond for water and environmental projects): No (52.4 percent) • Prop. 4 (bond for children’s hospitals): Yes (60.6 percent) • Prop. 5 (property tax reduction for seniors): No (58.1 percent) • Prop. 6 (repeal gas tax): No (55.3 percent) • Prop. 7 (change daylight saving time): Yes (59.8 percent) • Prop. 8 (regulate dialysis treatment charges): No (61.6 percent) • Prop. 10 (rent control): No (61.7 percent) • Prop. 11 (ambulance employees on-call pay): Yes (59.4 percent) • Prop. 12 (farm animal confinement standards): Yes (61 percent) —CN&R STAFF


SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI

Rental reprieve Council supports appeals process for taxation on Airbnb-type units Nancy Lathan and her husband started collecting

transient occupancy taxes for their short-term rental as soon as the city announced its requirements in September. Shortly after, they were shocked to find out they owed $8,200 in retroactive taxes, with about $3,000 of that in fines. “We’ve retired, we’ve lived on those proceeds, we have nothing to fall back on,” she told the City Council at Tuesday’s (Nov. 6) meeting. “I don’t know how we’re going to come up with the money, and, by the way, we were given 10 days to pay it.” In the spring, the City Council updated the municipal code to include “short-term home-sharing and/or vacation rental unit[s]” of less than 31 days on a list of properties that require a business license and must pay the transient occupancy tax (TOT), like hotels. But the city decided to collect the tax retroactively, back a full year, and most residents with rentals have balked at the fees (see “Blindsided,” Newslines, Oct. 4.). However, it looks likely that Lathan and about 200 other short-term rental owners will be granted a reprieve. During Tuesday’s meeting, the council directed City Manager Mark Orme to facilitate an appeals process. Orme said he’d likely grant amnesty to those unaware of the city’s policy changes and tax collection regarding short-term rentals, or those given incorrect information from the city—with the caveat that he would analyze each claim on a case-by-case basis. Those interested in an appeal, which could waive fees prior to Sept. 1, should contact the city manager’s office. The vote was 6-0, with Councilman Randall Stone

disqualified because he generates Airbnb fees through his real estate business. The Finance Committee will look into the best method of tax collection, and the Internal Affairs Committee will find out how the city can best facilitate the relationship between larger short-term rentals and neighborhoods, both recommendations from Councilwoman Ann Schwab. Eleven attendees spoke against the city’s retroactive taxes, and urged the city to work with Airbnb for collection. The city is currently contracting with HdL Companies, out of Fresno, which will be paid 15 percent of what it collects. Last year, the city received almost $10,000 from two or three short-term rental hosts who have been paying the TOT, and the total revenue (including hotels, motels and bed and breakfasts) was $2.8 million. Because there are about 200 short-term rentals in the city, Administrative Services Director Scott Dowell estimates the city will bring in an additional $140,00 to $160,000 per year. Also at the meeting, the sit/lie ordinance passed on its second reading, with 12 people addressing the council, split about evenly in support and dissent. The consent agenda also included a second reading regarding city parks, which will now close from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m., though it does not apply to those traveling through parks or participating in a sanctioned activity. Councilman Karl Ory voted against sit/lie and the park closure times, and Schwab and Stone against sit/ lie. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

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HEALTHLINES Dan Blaga, with hygienist Trista Carter, is among about  300 veterans who have received care at Oroville Gentle  Dentistry’s free dental days.  photo courtesy of oroville geNtle deNtistry

he’s seen veterans come from Corning, Grass Valley and the Sacramento area, he said the Ridge doesn’t seem that far to travel. What he offers is “anything that doesn’t require a lab bill” because Parrott “is not going to obligate a lab or somebody else— this is something we do.” That still covers a gamut: cleanings, exams, fillings, extractions, root canals and crowns. Kremer provides those same services but, since he’s partnered with Vogel Dental Laboratory in Chico, also can get repairs on removable partial dentures. Those patients returned another day for refitting—again, all free. Both practices draw veterans of all ages: as young as 20, as old as 96. Needs vary, just as with patients on normal business days. “We can see some pretty advanced cases,” Kremer said. “Military cases can be variable from people who have maintained their care and just need simple checkups and cleanings

red, pearly whites and blue Local dentists honor veterans with free care by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

W dentistry training, he worked hands-on at the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs hen Dr. Kevin Kremer was completing

Medical Center, near his dental school, UCLA. He hadn’t served in the military, but both grandfathers fought in World War II, and various uncles and cousins served. During that VA rotation, he saw the demand for dentistry and “how much care our veterans require.” That experience, Kremer said, was “enlightening.” Veterans in the North State are no different. Their need is great as well. Two years ago, he decided to do something about it. Kremer, who has two offices in Chico,

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signed on to the Freedom Day USA campaign to offer free dental care for veterans. Kremer Dental Group opened its Glenbrook Court office doors at 7 a.m. Oct. 11 and, over the course of the day, treated over 50 veterans, servicemembers and family members at that north Chico location. Dr. Brent Parrott had the same idea, independently. He also has two offices, Oroville Gentle Dentistry and Paradise Gentle Dentistry. Parrott established a free dental day for veterans four years ago, coinciding with Veterans’ Day; this year’s is Friday (Nov. 9) in Oroville, starting at 8 a.m. (see infobox). Parrott’s team gave care to approximately 70 veterans last year—in total, around 300. “I just have always felt that we have what we have because of our veterans,” Parrott said by phone. “I don’t have any family that this relates to; I just have gotten frustrated that they have made the ultimate sacrifice

HEALTHLINES c o N t i N u e d

and they did not get the service[s] that they need. So if there’s something I can do to help, I do.” Mike Halldorson, commander of VFW Post 1555 (Chico’s chapter of the service organization Veterans of Foreign Wars), expressed appreciation for their efforts. “I just think it’s a wonderful thing they’re doing to help our veterans, ones [who] need dental care who may put it off or not get it,” he said. “Not all veterans are eligible [for VA dental benefits]—this is a huge thing these dentists are doing.” The VA provides dental services at clinics in Chico, Redding and Sacramento. Nonetheless, both Kremer and Parrott say veterans often must wait for appointments. Moreover, not all qualify for dental care. They and Halldorson eagerly anticipate the comprehensive health center under construction in Meriam Park, scheduled to open in April. “If our veterans can be serviced better than they are now, that’s a win-win,” Kremer said, “and we’ll be happy to fill in any voids.” The dentists pack a lot of care into veterans

dental days. Kremer and Parrott mobilize their entire staffs—dentists, hygienists, dental assistants, front office—from both locations. Parrott only uses the Oroville office, not Paradise, because it is larger; considering

o N pa g e 1 5

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HEALTHLINES

c o N t i N u e d f r o m pa g e 1 2

Event info:

oroville gentle dentistry will provide free care for veterans friday (Nov. 9), 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. appointments required; call 533-8204.

come, first-served. He discovered he prefers appointments. Parrott has found service members respect the times they reserve and likewise “deserve more respect than waiting to be taken care of.” Parrott has been struck by veterans’ esprit de corps. Many come in uniform or military garb. Mutual respect spans all branches, not just within the same branch of service. “Everybody is trying to let everybody else go first,” Parrott noted. “They all understand it’s not just them we’re helping—we’re helping everybody—and the faster we can get to everybody, the more people we can help.” Kremer, who doesn’t request appointments for Freedom Day USA, said many veterans are in no hurry. They’ll stay for hours, enjoying refreshments and sharing stories. “The sense of connection they get, and the camaraderie, is pretty cool.” Ω

This guy saves you money.

[to] people where there was definitely a lot of work to be done.” Last month, Kremer Dental Group marshaled four dentists and 10 hygienists and dental assistants. At Parrott’s upcoming clinic, Oroville Gentle Dentistry will have four dentists and a dozen hygienists/assistants; plus, however many former co-workers return to lend a hand. “Everybody who does it wants to come back,” Parrott said. “I’ve had associates who’ve gone to their own practices ask, ‘Can we come back and work with you on Veterans’ Day?’ That’s how fun it is.” All work for free. “It’s the favorite day of dentistry the entire year,” he continued. “The excitement starts to build as we get through Halloween, about a week out… . People show up early, just for fun, just to make sure everything is ready to roll.” Kremer’s crew gets the same anticipation, with some telling him they can’t sleep the night before and others waking hours early. Before creating his event, Parrott participated in a dental day that accommodated veterans first-

WEEKLY DOSE

Maybe that crunchy hippie at the hemp festival was right! A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine indicates that people who eat organic foods have a lower overall risk of developing cancer. A team of French scientists tracked the diets of more than 68,000 adults for about five years, categorizing the subjects into four groups based on the amount of organic products in their diet. The data showed that participants who consumed the highest amount of organic food had a 25 percent lower risk of being diagnosed with cancer, as compared with those with the lowest amount. In the United States, more than 90 percent of us have detectable pesticides in our urine and blood. Could the investment in organic living lower that pesticide level and prevent cancer? The French researchers said there could be other factors affecting their findings but that the correlation definitely warrants further study.

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GREENWAYS WAYS

Four-legged weed-eaters

City turns to animals for noxious species control, fire suppression at Bidwell Park

story and photos by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

Lower Bidwell Park—the weeds and lowIhanging tree leaves on either side of Petersen t’s easy to tell that something is afoot in

Memorial Way (just past the parking area off Vallombrosa Avenue) have been obliterated. On a recent chilly morning, the flock was impossible to miss—more than 500 goats lazily munching the remaining grasses and stray star thistle, occasionally bleating, butting heads and contorting themselves to scratch their rumps with their horns. Joggers and bikers couldn’t help but stop and take pictures, marvel at the animals and ask John Quinn, general manager of Rancho Cordova-based Capra Environmental Services Corp., a question or two. “Can you tell us all their names?” one woman asked, in jest. “Goat 1, Goat 2, Goat 3,” Quinn quipped. It has been 15 years since the hoofed workers—goats are technically browsers, which like shrubs, shoots and leaves, versus a grazer’s preferred diet of grasses—have made an appearance in Bidwell Park. The city’s park managers brought them back to control vegetation. Plus, given the Stoney Fire’s close brush with homes along the park’s border this past summer, it’s a strategic fire suppression decision as well.

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Targeted browsing and grazing cut down on the grasses and plants that fuel catastrophic fires, like the Tubbs Fire, which destroyed more than 5,600 structures last October, burning more than 36,000 acres in Napa and Sonoma counties. When working in concert with other land management tools such as prescribed fires and forest thinning, municipalities can reduce the fire danger within their communities. Goats work so well because they are like living garbage disposals, eating noxious and invasive plants such as poison oak, ivy, star and bull thistle, and even the leafy portions of Himalayan blackberries. “They’re really effective,” Quinn said. “If you had to take a weed eater [or tractor], it’d take forever to get this done.” Contrasted with machinery, goats are an eco-friendly way to tackle fire suppression, he added. Plus, their reach is impressive— they’ll stand on their hind legs to snap their maws around foliage as much as 6 feet off the ground. “Now, if a fire came, it wouldn’t burn much, for one, and there’s no leaves, no fuels to get it up into these trees,” he added. “What happened in Santa Rosa, it could easily happen here in Chico. … Doing this reduces fire risk, helps the environment [and] prevents noxious weeds.” City Park & Natural Resources Manager Linda Herman said if funding is available, the department would like to implement grazing all around Lower Park, and in portions

of Middle Park near Hooker Oak Park, the equestrian arena area and Horseshoe Lake, to control unruly weeds and star thistle. The price tag for the current effort is $7,000 to $8,750 total for 20 to 25 acres, at $350 per acre, and Quinn anticipates the animals will be on-site for another week or two.

Shepherd Jose Hilario watches over a herd of goats in Bidwell Park with the help of canine guard dogs Fog and Heidi. The goats eat invasive species, an eco-friendly way to cut back on fire danger and improve the health of the park.

nibble on the grasses goats aren’t interested in). For the most part, the goats are easy to work with, Quinn said. There is one Spanish goat, however, that “seems to want to jump out every time we’re loading [the trailer] and is usually the last one we catch.” If all goes according to plan, Herman will have the goats return to the park during spring and fall for at least a few more years. The animals haven’t made an appearance since 2003, when domestic dogs slaughtered a couple of them. There is definitely “a renewed interest in goat [browsing] as a vegetation tool,” Herman added, not only for fire prevention, but because goats will gobble up invasive species, encouraging native species to grow and fertilizing the soil. “It helps the environment, in general, to have that natural grazing going on,” she said. “It’s a management process we need to do to keep the park healthy.” Ω

During that recent visit to the park to chat

with Quinn, passersby commented on the impressive herding skills of black-and-white border collies Romel, Levi and Casey, and the stalwart protectiveness of Fog and Heidi, the goats’ Anatolian shepherd guardians. Their booming barks resonated whenever any canine out for a stroll got too curious. Of course, their shepherd, 21-year-old Jose Hilario, has kept the dogs in check and also made sure the goats have stayed safe. He is with the herd 24/7, camping out in a nearby trailer at night. Add the electric fence surrounding the animals, and they’re quite well-protected. While they may not have names, these four-legged workers—mostly Boer and Spanish goats—live a pretty comfortable lifestyle, traveling from pasture to pasture and gorging to their heart’s content until the next job rolls along. Quinn said they typically work for six to seven years before retiring from old age or illness. Since forming last year, the business has been in high-demand, Quinn said. The company has 2,500 goats and a small flock of sheep on hand (some are in Chico, too—they

ECO EVENT Leaf sweeps

It’s the time of year when our city of trees turns into a city of leaves. Never fear, the Chico Public Works Department has begun its annual leaf collection program, which runs through Jan. 1, 2019. During this time, residents may pile their leaves on the road for pickup. Leaf piles should be less than 4 feet high, 1 foot away from the curb for drainage, out of bicycle lanes and away from storm drains. No plastic bags, branches or trash, please. The collection route begins in the southwest part of the city and progresses north on a rotating basis.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo by cathy WagNer

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

celebrating 70 years

What’s old is new again

La Hacienda, Chico’s oldest restaurant and one of Chico’s oldest businesses, is celebrating its 70th anniversary this week (Nov. 5-11). It all began in 1948, when Nat and Tomasa Ybanez opened the original location on Nord Avenue. After a few years, they bought the lot where the restaurant now stands on The Esplanade and built the main dining room. As the business grew, they added to it. Their son-in-law, Edgar Kimball, who married their daughter Betty, bought it when the Ybanezes were ready to retire, so it stayed in the family. Kimball added the bar during his time and when he started thinking about retirement himself, he sold it to three longtime employees, Michelle Sereda (who was interviewed and photographed for this piece), Margarita Vega and head chef Javier Partida, in 2011. To celebrate, they’ll be running specials all week, culminating on Sunday with a family fun day that will include a bounce house, face-painting and balloons. Join in the celebration at 2635 Esplanade and log onto lahacienda-chico. com for more info.

What is La Hacienda best known for? We’re famous for our tostada and our secret sauce. Those are two of our original recipes that Tomasa created back in 1948. It started out to be a little dish, like an average-sized tostada that you’d get at a taqueria, and then a longtime customer said, “Why don’t you make this into

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

A number of familiar businesses are moving, transforming or returning to Chico right now, enough to take note, anyway. The biggest one, for which I have limited information, is a plan to tear down the building that once housed The Graduate and replace it with a six-story apartment building for student housing. My first thought was, six stories ?! My commute home from work will take on a drastically different feel with such a massive building along Eighth Street. Then again, looking at the boarded up Grad building every day isn’t great—so anything would be an improvement. And we definitely need housing. The plans haven’t been approved yet, as the city is looking at its parking inventory in the area. Once it gets to the architectural review phase, schematics will become public. My only hope is that they don’t make them “luxury apartments” like the ones that now line the Nord Avenue/Walnut Street corridor. They’re much too expensive—I’ve heard word that there are many vacancies—for the average college student to afford. a meal?” So, then she created a big one. So, it’s a huge tostada— I probably can only eat a third of it, but a lot of people do eat most of it.

started catering as well, so we are offering that as something that’s new as of like a month ago. We’re really excited to branch out in that way.

Do you have new specials since you took over?

Do you get involved in the community?

We added Chef Javy’s Tacos, named after our chef, Javier. They’re similar to a street taco. There’s shrimp, carne asada and Mayan pork tacos and they’re delicious. They were something he’d always make for employees, then it was like, “Why don’t we have these on the menu?” So, we added those. We’ve also competed in the Margarita Mix-Off five or six times and we’ve won four of those times. Our margaritas are pretty good.

We really feel like we have an obligation to the community. One thing that we really take a strong part in is the youth and family foster agencies around town, so we do giving trees and school supplies and donations for them. We’ve done a lot with Rotary. We’ve done the Salvation Army bell-ringing, we do that every year. We did a lot for the Carr Fire up in Redding .... It’s really good for a lot of our staff who are college-age kids that don’t really get into the town stuff too much. We get them volunteering, which is fun.

Do you host a lot of private parties? We do a lot of parties in [the main banquet room] and we just

—CATHy WAGneR

DoWN the roaD I popped in to the Winchester Goose last week after hearing a rumor that the popular pub was planning a move. Yes, the rumor is true. The Goose is in the beginning stages of transforming the old Herried’s Music space—just across Broadway from its current location—back into a bar. According to the Chico Heritage Association’s Facebook page, that building, at 824 Oroville Ave., was built in 1865 and first housed Clark & Stapp’s Junction Saloon. That block is still referred to as The Junction. Many old-time Chicoans remember it as Cabo’s. And, as I recall, when Herried’s moved in, it left the bar and stage intact. I’m curious about the parking situation; Amigos de Acapulco owns the small adjoining lot. Expect live shows, plus booze and food (I tried the trout chowder last week—awesome) at the new Winchester Goose sometime next spring/summer.

more chaNges The Bahama Hut, which opened this past summer in the kiosk within

the Safeway parking lot on Nord Avenue, has closed. Another business is already moving into its place, however, and it’s a familiar one: Midnite Munchies. Keep an eye on Facebook for updates on hours, etc. Do not fear, they’ll still make deliveries 8 p.m.-1 a.m. daily (order at midnite-munchies.com).

back iN busiNess After taking a hiatus from running its Chico taproom, Waganupa Brewing, which started in Chester, has reopened in the same location (1346 Longfellow Ave.). The vibe is pretty neat, so I hope to check it out soon.

iN the holiDay mooD For those who want to get a head start on holiday shop-

ping—or just like rad, locally made crafts—add this to your calendar: Independent Realty’s third annual Indie Art Fair. Fifteen artists’ wares will be on display, and range from jewelry to eclectic art pieces. This Saturday (Nov. 10), noon-4 p.m., at Independent Realty’s offices at 30 Landing Circle, Ste. 300.

$5 OFF

any purchase of $20 or more

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CNR coupon expires 02.08.19 Excludes ARCoffee & consignments. Not valid with other specials. One coupon per visit. November 8, 2018

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Adult winners What’s your story?

FIRST PLACE

Convection

When we finally returned home we found the pen littered with red-black bloodcrusted chunks of white fluff and flesh, stench rising over the wet ground. Bits of wing floated in puddles of mud. The dogs, wild with fear of the thunder, were unable to escape the noise, the frantic howling wind, they could only silence the geese.

Winners of the CN&R’s annual Fiction 59 contest

SHARON DEMEYER Ch ic o

W

ith the midterm elections behind us, it’s time for a well-deserved break from using up all of our words on matters of politics. Instead, the Chico News & Review is once again turning over its pages to little bites of microfiction—59 words exactly—from our readers. The annual Fiction 59 contest is a tradition that continues to endure and local writers of all ages have once again come through with a flood of creativity. Thanks, as always, to our trusted judges, the local writing professionals of the 1078 Gallery Literary Committee, this time made up of Sarah Pape, Kathleen McPartland and Marta Shaffer. Congrats to the winners, and thank you for taking part in this showcase of Chico’s creative spirit.

It’s been a few years since Sharon DeMeyer entered the CN&R’s Fiction 59 contest. However, if you’ve literally written the book on the subject—her master’s thesis for creative writing was devoted to 59-word stories—it’s probably pretty easy to pick things up again. The Chico State English Department secretary has won the contest twice before—in 2011 and 2009—and this year is back in the fold thanks to this piece that was workshopped in a writing group of creative friends.

Sharon DeMeyer

Note: In order to ensure unbiased consideration, authors’ names are stripped from all stories before judges receive them.

Andrew Hanson

SECOND PLACE

What I Learned at Summer Camp

When I went to summer camp, I learned to shoot arrows into targets, how Indians made acorn mush, and how to pee through the screen in the back window of the cabin. I also learned that you could get Twinkies from the two teenagers who worked as summer help if you let them put their hands down your shorts.

Fiction 59 judges: The 1078 Gallery Literary Committee (from left): Sarah Pape, Kathleen McPartland and Marta Shaffer.

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ANDREW HANSON Chico

As luck would have it, the day after he was interviewed for this little bio, Andrew Hanson’s first novel was published. In addition to writing three 59-word stories that made it into this issue (see honorable mentions for the other two), the retired Chico State education professor has just finished working on Revelation, a sci-fi book about a spaceman and five orphans who “give humans another chance to become galactic citizens.”


HONORABLE MENTIONS

Fiction 59 reading

Hear the stories come to life as the winners and honorable mentions (all are invited!) read them aloud tonight, Nov. 8, 6:30 p.m., at the home of Fiction 59 sponsor The Bookstore (118 Main St.).

A Wish for Normalcy

Schlup, schlup. Carlos’ pant cuff dragged on the sidewalk. He borrowed the pants from his younger brother, only half his age but still taller. The shoes stuffed with paper were Jorge’s though. He would pound Carlos if he knew. He passed behind his mother as she cracked eggs, yelling “I’m not hungry,” while shuffling out. Now his stomach growled. EMILY SALMON Pa rad i se

Sunday Morning

Not wanting to be late for church and suffer her mother-in-law’s reproach, she sped out of the driveway. Turning sharply onto the highway, the back door of the old Caddie flew open, and out tumbled her four-year-old daughter. It was the faux fur coat, hat, and muff that saved her. Grandma swears it was Jesus. SHARON DEMEYER

Tea Time Jen White

THIRD PLACE

Scenic

Danny rides his Harley alongside Jason, who’s on a German rocket, as they cruise from the Bay Area up the 101 to the Redwoods. Both are silent; the wind thick as a wall. They share a father, decades apart. They try to spread his ashes as they ride and not get their tires too close; urn slips, tires tap. JEN WHITE Chi co

Jen White rounds out a top three this year that includes three writing professionals. In addition to working as a Butte College English instructor, White spearheads two annual publications of student writing—The Dill Pickle (a journal of academic writing) and the Inky Squib (highlighting creative writing). Also, in the spring you can find White and her husband at the farmers’ market selling flowers under the banner of Down to Earth Tulips.

The details of my mother’s untimely death are sparse; a murder mystery truly stranger than fiction. The only evidence found was unidentifiable residue at the bottom of her teacup. Poison, of course. The likes of which the FBI, FDA and CDC had never seen. Expertly homemade. Untraceable. “THEODORE JENSWALD JONES! Can you do nothing right?! TEA TIME!!” “Coming Mother.” MORGAN DIETZ Chico

Melancholy Bliss

In the hospital, there was a small succulent beside her. It had a yellow flower just barely growing from its spines. The deep cuts on her wrist began to bleed again and she turned to the nurse. “I didn’t know cacti have flowers, how beautiful.” “There is beauty in everything, darling.” She wrapped her wrists tighter with fresh bandages. BROOKE KENNEY Chico

Rediscovering That Competitive Edge

Forty hit me hard and I trained to win my age division in a fun run. It became me and an Abercrombie me trudging toward the tape, new gray hairs protruding for the spectacle.

“Statistically speaking, if someone drops of heart attack,” few big mouth breaths, “it would be you or me.” And I ran hard, like a child. JOHNNY STAFFORD Qu incy

friend with the braces. He wouldn’t take his legs inside. The braces, the stares. When he came they danced freestyle to the pulsating music. He admired how her legs moved easily. She loved the smoothness of his face. KAREN AIKEN Ch ic o

Nature

OK, I’m going to read three of these short stories out loud. When I’ve finished reading them, I’ll reassess. If the fucking hippy in the next campsite is still banging away on her little vibraphone thing, I will murder her. I can read and write in prison. That’s all I want to do anyway. And she’ll be carbon neutral. RACHEL HENEBRY Or ov ille

Morning Companions

A fine thread tickled my mind as I sat drinking morning light, editing songs. I pulled it away, held it in my hand; a delicate copper strand coiled about gnarled fingers. Smiling, I laid it upon the table, a new breakfast companion reflecting sun. “My hair,” she said, “will find its way into your soul,” and perhaps it has.

Business as Usual

DALE YOUNG Ch ic o

His feet are wet. Again. Today it’s the living room. Last week, the porch. A month ago, the yard went under. He grabs a beer from the cooler. Turns the crank on the emergency radio. Climatologists are saying, “Expect to experience a 300-foot rise in the world’s oceans.” He pops the tab. Doesn’t believe a word of it. ALEXANDRA HEATH Ch ic o

Fishing

My Father Almost Killed Me When I Was Four

He let me cross the street in front of our house to get the mail, but only after he looked both ways and declared it was safe. I had an airmail letter in my hand when he gave the signal to come back. I jumped off the curb. There was an unexpected breeze. A door handle tickled my nose. ANDREW HANSON

Noah didn’t bring just two of us on board. He brought two hundred in a big wooden box filled with dirt and table scraps. He even relocated a lucky few every day to the roomier “digs” he had built for us on deck. Because of these astonishing accommodations, we worms considered ourselves Noah’s, and by implication, God’s favorite animals. ANDREW HANSON

Bubblegum Bitch

She sits in front of me. Smacks her gum and rolls her eyes. Her attitude so cold I need to put my jacket on. She let her wiry dark locks fall onto my desk. MY desk. Consequently, chewing my gum at the appropriate speed, I quietly remove the spearmint and gently place it in her ringlets. Sorry not sorry. ERIN MOORE Ch ic o

Friday Night Support Group

Bogy

He jolted his neck toward the sound across the dark kitchen. He scanned for the source of it, but nothing. Then there were no more sounds besides his heart pounding in his chest and the whistling wind. “Hello, is anyone there?” He stuttered. He peered out the window into the twilight and saw his fateful doom, standing alone, staring. JANESSA RAMIREZ Pa rad ise

“Just Right”

Cautiously I dipped my foot into the crystal turquoise water. Fabulous, not cold, not warm. Like Goldilocks I thought, “Just right.” I swam out and then enjoyed the free buoyancy only treading in water can bring. Surrounded by green mountains and blue skies, I swam to the dock then watched as a cougar sniffed my clothes on the shoreline. RONELLE HERRICK Ch ic o

She couldn’t take her face inside the dance studio. The stares, the scars. She waited in the shadowy alley for her

FICTION C O N T I N U E D NOVEMBER 8, 2018

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High school winners HONORABLE MENTIONS

The Split Second FIRST PLACE

Quality Time

Julio met his father three times; a permanent Chinese dragon slithered across his cheek. His weathered mom always tried, but to her dismay the blue and red flashing lights pulled Julio in yet again. He didn’t cry or even think of his father, of course until he saw the unfamiliar dragon in an orange jumpsuit not unlike his own.

Colin Bailey

COLIN BAILEY Chico 15

SECOND PLACE

THIRD PLACE

For 17 years I’ve waited to hit the distillery; I’m still fermenting. I feel as if the world just wants to stop my shine. I’m the moon, you’ll never see my dark side. I’m talkin’ real talk with them moon rocks. This is surreal fiction with a vision. People can’t breathe around me because I have no atmosphere. Moon$hine.

John raked his blonde hair after an everyday shower. Pulling on a scratchy blue atrocity he tightened the federal noose around his neck. He wearily drove his economical car to the bus. Sitting next to the rest of New York’s suits he heaved People Magazine from his briefcase. Fantasizing about gold and silver he hiked heavily to his cubicle.

Federal Noose

Gravity

SEAMUS MOON Los Mol i n os 17

If you notice a flow and rhythm to Seamus Moon’s fantastical story, it’s no accident. The 17-year-old hip-hop musician loves to produce his own beats and instrumentals (the “Moon$hine” at the end of the piece is his stage name). When asked what he wants to do after he graduates, Moon said, “I just really want to make music and see where it takes me in the world.”

COLIN BAILEY

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NOVEMBER 8, 2018

MICHELLE TIPPITS 13 Pa rad ise

’80s Night

The neon pink scrunchie in her hair made my heart do somersaults. “It’s the ’80s!” she said, skating towards me. “So it is.” Our love danced like the lights on the disco floor. She grabbed my hands. Shivers zinged down my spine. We’d skate in circles until the place closed, our speed increasing and our bodies transforming into magnets. ALANA MERZ 14 Ch ic o

Car

Grey paint crackles in mid July sun, a calm, cool, distracted reptile. A crooked car with metallic sounds hidden deep in its belly. It holds early morning coffee refuge, lacy, velvet moonlit drives home. It holds stocking feet and breakfast to go, crying, and sighing and window gazing, allowing the world to rush past like a melodic slide show. SEVEN MILLS 16 Ch ic o

Seamus Moon

20

Colin Bailey, this year’s first- and third-place finisher, is the real deal both when it comes to Fiction 59—where he’s placed in the top three many times over the years—and when it comes to skating. Both he and his brother, Cedar (see first place in the junior high category), took first in their respective divisions in the recently completed Nor Cal Skate Series, a string of skating competitions across the North State.

One day in the woods, Raccoon sprinted to Owl and Deer, yelling that someone was following him with a long and pointed thing. Suddenly, there was a faint sound like someone stepping on dried leaves. Seconds later, Raccoon fell to the ground, lifeless. The hunter picked Raccoon up, wondering what kind of hat he was going to make himself.


Junior high winners FIRST PLACE

THIRD PLACE

Alex was driving his rusty pink Volkswagen to McDonald’s. The yellow sign read, “Alex White missing.” For a second he thought it was someone else missing, but realized the sign was for him and the reward: $100,000. Honking out of the drive through, he viciously ate his Big Mac, flooring the pedal in a race to turn himself in.

Other times the tears appeared out of nowhere. Daniel wished it would stop—he wanted happiness. He rubbed the redness out of his eyes, which made them a darker shade. Daniel’s irises were so blue against the red they resembled the ocean resisting sun’s shine on a summer day. I’m trying so hard, but I can’t even care anymore.

Real Boys Don’t Cry

Missing

iley r Ba Ceda

CEDAR BAILEY Chi co 12

When he’s not writing, Cedar Bailey can probably be found at the skate park, which is appropriate considering he and his brother, Colin (see first- and third-place in the high school division), and their sister, Clover (see honorable mentions in kids), were a big part of the community activism that helped secure funds to expand the Humboldt Skate Park. When asked what the latest trick was that he’s trying to land, Cedar said probably a kick-flip 180. If you head over the skate park you’ll probably find him practicing it.

SABRINA HOWELL Ch ic o 13

Sabrina Howell’s entry did not start out at 59 words. The Forest Ranch Charter School student had written a longer story as part of assignment for class, and her instructor encouraged her to edit it to 59 words for the contest, and she says she “butchered the story” into shape. Besides creative writing, Sabrina enjoys studying history, reading (currently, To Kill a Mockingbird) and playing volleyball.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Paparazzi Avriella Whiteley

Sabrina Howell

SECOND PLACE

Cold Night, 1935

We were all jolly and talking when suddenly the door swung open. Letting the cold air in, Mr. Dixon stood there, breathing heavily and groaning. Ma shone a lantern on him. His black face was oddly pale. He’d been shot in the leg. “Who would go and do that?” I exclaimed. Ma shushed me. “Sadie, send for the doctor.” AVRIELLA WHITELEY G ri d l ey 12

Fiction 59 has been part of Avriella Whiteley’s life for half of her years on Earth. The South Sutter Charter School student has had her work published since her first honorable mention as a 6-year-old in 2012. Since then she’s placed third twice, and this year moves up to second place.

Camera flashes that are bright enough to blind one’s eye crowded densely on her like a blood-pressure monitor squeezing tightly on one’s arm. A ringing, some may say, as a metaphor, “only dogs can hear,” but of course, she wasn’t a dog. What she was was passed out, her dark black hair fanning over her red Hollywood star. ABIGAIL HOLMAN Durham 13

The Babysitter

The Future?

One morning, Mark woke up coughing. He looked out his window, hoping to see a clear sky for a change. But all that he saw was an endless smoke. He couldn’t see the ground even though he was only six stories above it. Animals were dying. Mountains of trash piled sky high. Is this what our planet will become? OSCAR SCHLICTING Ch ic o 12

Shelly Davis’ long hair shone golden when she tossed it back, laughing. I hid behind my mom. “Well hello there, mister big boy out of diapers.” I blushed. She still thought of me as a baby. “Hi, Shelly, I said weakly. She giggled and hugged me. I smelled her honey-vanilla shampoo. I felt like I was gonna faint. AVRIELLA WHITELEY

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Kids winners Aveline Travis

SECOND PLACE

Selah P aulson

The Sassy Drainage Pipe

I’m Arnold, a drainage pipe. One day a rock came down my pipe. I held on to the rock. It could have fit down my pipe. You can guess it clogged my pipe. Workers replaced me with a newer pipe and threw me in the dump. I wish I would have stayed down there even though it was boring. SELAH PAULSON Chico 11

FIRST PLACE

The Sound of Downtown

That man. He keeps downtown alive during the autumn rain. Playing his saxophone to make someone’s heart feel warm when it is cold. He doesn’t speak, he just plays. Not for money. He plays in front of the coffee shop with the huge mural of the cat. The large cat. People buy him hot coffee. Dark blend, no sugar.

Selah Paulson joins a long line of Sherwood Montessori students who’ve been published in the CN&R’s writing-contest issues. The school’s instructors send us folders full of their classes’ writing. Selah says that, in addition to this specific assignment, “I like writing short stories.” She also enjoys drawing, soccer and playing with her friends.

AVELINE TRAVIS Chi co 11

Sherwood Montessori student Aveline Travis’ favorite school subject is history. In her spare time, however, she likes to sing, dance (hip-hop and tap), bake (chocolate chip cookies) and, she says,“I like studying Greek mythology … I love the story of Athena.”

HONORABLE MENTIONS Ilya Salmon

The Three Weird Dimensions

Well guys, this is the worst day of my life. I got stuck in a parallel universe. With random people from the different dimensions, with people from the milky way riding on cows. There were aliens. There was even horse people with magic wands. Seriously guys, this is the end. Wait, one more thing, this is the only story.

THIRD PLACE

JAXSON RANSBARGER Ch ic o 11

Why the Lake is Sparkly

There was a giant named Flutter who was doing an art project. She tripped on a stick and glitter fell. Little people below saw glitter sparkling down from the sky. It made the lake sparkly. The little people said to the giants, “Look at the sun sparkling down onto the lake.” Flutter said, “I dropped some glitter.” They hugged.

Untitled

What if dragons did exist—or what we imagine them to be. They would be at the top of the food chain. Almost everything would be their prey. There would be more fires, too. Most animals would go extinct. Who knows, some things like us might not even evolve and just become extinct like the rest. That might happen. LIAM STEFFENSON Ch ic o 9

ILYA SALMON Parad i se 6

Ilya Salmon’s mom, Emily (see honorable mentions, adult division, page 19), says that “Juniper”—the nickname she’s used for her daughter since she was a baby—wrote her fantastical tale during a car ride to the beach. The Blue Oak Charter School student uses her creativity mainly to do crafts and stitching, and when she’s not doing either of those, you’ll find her swimming or riding her bike.

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My Chance

I am sound asleep. Out of a fog I hear: “Do you want to go for a walk?” I am up hoping I didn’t miss my chance. Suddenly, I have a leash on me. I pull towards the dirt path as hard as I can and they follow me! The smells, the squirrels, the trucks. I hear, “Good dog.” CLOVER BAILEY Ch ic o 8


CCPRA FINALS

FRI-SAT, NOV 9-10 DON'T MISS IT

DON'T MISS IT November 8, 2018

CN&R 

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Arts &Culture Khruangbin: (from left) Mark Speer, Laura Lee and Donald “DJ” Johnson. PHOTO BY MARY KANG

intercoNtinental Riffs Khruangbin jams on a world of undiscovered funk and soul

I“YYZ,” mental-only songs such as Rush’s the Allman Brothers’ “Jessica” n the golden age of rock ’n’ roll, instru-

and Average White Band’s chart-topping “Pick Up the Pieces” received significant radio airplay and introduced iconic melodies to the broader culture. They weren’t just fodder for by movie and TV show Howard soundtracks. Hardee But pop music has become overwhelmPreview: ingly singer-centric Folkyeah presents in recent decades. Khruangbin In fact, Baauer’s Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2013 viral sensation 8 p.m. (doors 7 p.m.). Will Van Horn opens. “Harlem Shake” is Tickets: $25, available the only instrumenat eventbrite.com tal song other than Kenny G’s rendiEl Rey Theater tion of “Auld Lang 230 W. Second St. 570-8575 Syne” (2000) to crack elreychico.com the top-10 this century. These days, if it doesn’t have vocals, it’s background music. That’s an unwelcome development for the three members of Houston, Texasbased rock band Khruangbin. Speaking to the CN&R ahead of their show at El Rey Theater on Wednesday (Nov. 14), the trio of Donald Johnson (drums), Mark Speer (guitar) and Laura Lee (bass) argued that strong melodies transcend context, and a human voice isn’t the only instrument capable of capturing listeners’ attention. 24

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NOVEMBER 8, 2018

But hooks are necessary, and in Khruangbin’s case, they’re delivered by the guitar. “The way we’ve structured it, Mark is the vocalist for the band,” Johnson said. “The guitar sings.” “When I’m playing guitar, I’m definitely trying to take the place of a vocalist and play really strong, distinctive melodies you can hum along with,” Speer agreed. “Sometimes we’ll play a show and the entire crowd is singing along to a song that has no words, which is really abstract to me, but awesome.” Khruangbin’s music isn’t entirely instrumental. Every so often, wispy vocal melodies drift through the mix like incense smoke, but never take center stage. The funky soundscapes on the most recent album, Con Todo el Mundo, are influenced by a wide range of underground funk and soul sounds born outside the Americas—the Mediterranean, Middle East and especially 1960s and ’70s Thailand. And the songs flow, sounding almost freeform, though in fact they are meticulously arranged. Johnson stays in the pocket, holding down the backbeat; Lee’s basswork is precise and mathematical. Speer, the only member of the band who dabbles in improvisation, is prone to ripping extended and inventive guitar solos. The guitarist consistently amazes his bandmates, even though they play roughly 150 shows a year. “I see Mark do something different every

night,” Lee said. The trio’s songwriting process goes like this: Johnson creates a drum loop and then Lee riffs on bass, sometimes for an hour or more. Once the foundation of a melody and a groove is established, Speer chops up the pieces he likes using a digital audio workstation, arranges them into a song structure, and then plays guitar over it. The group treats the earliest version of a song as a demo; nothing is set in stone before the three of them get together to work on things in an old barn they converted into a rehearsal space. “There’s definitely some magic that happens when we have to learn it and play it together,” Lee said. “There are mistakes that happen and there are things that lock in.” Like most instrumental music, Khruangbin’s style of atmospheric rock is open-ended. And there’s no lyricist telling the listener how to feel. Emotions are communicated by the melody, shifting dynamics and each player’s individual expression. “Most classical instrumental music is instrumental, and you’d be hard-pressed to find any vocal music that is as emotive as that stuff, at least in the Western world,” Speer said. “By nature, classical music—especially impressionistic classical music—creates a mood and a feeling. That’s definitely something we take as influence, in that respect.” Ω

THIS WEEK 8

THU

Special Events COMPELLING RECIPROCITY: Jessica Horton discusses native art and diplomacy in the 1970s. Thu, 11/8, 7:30pm. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279.

FIRE ECOLOGY TALK: Chico State professor Dr. Don Hankins discusses pyrogeography, water resources policy and planning. Thu, 11/8, 7pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

MYSTERY THURSDAY: Local author Emily Gallo gives a presentation and book signing on her new work, Murder at the Columbarium. Live music from harpist Brenda LockieKnight. Thu, 11/8, 7pm. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

SERENDIPITY: Inspire School of Arts & Sciences’ fall dance showcase. Thu, 11/8, 7pm. $ -$8. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. red.vendini.com

RED, WHITE & BLUES FESTIVAL Sunday, Nov. 11 Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS oN NeXT PAGe

oN WINGS oF SoNG Saturday, Nov. 10 Harlen Adams Theatre See SATURDAY, MUSIC

NEIGHBORHOOD TREE PLANTING: The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago; the second best time is now. Help enhance our urban canopy with the BEC crew. Sat 11/10. Butte Environmental Council, 313 Walnut St., Ste. 140. becnet.org

POP TALKS: A series of pop-up talks from local growers, bakers, brewers and more. This session: Untamed Bakeshop, TurkeyTail Farm, Lassen Traditional Cidery and the Butte Environmental Council. Sat 11/10, 10am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Theater HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: Written and directed by TOTR’s own Jerry Miller, this rock ’n’ roll musical takes the Academy Awardwinning film High Noon and gives it a modern twist. Thu, 11/8, 7:30pm. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-8775760. totr.org

THE WALWORTH FARCE: Laughs and mayhem abound in this disturbing, moving and hysterical play by Enda Walsh. A misfit family of Irish expats confine themselves to their London apartment, reenacting a bizarre domestic drama, but when a stranger enters the scene, things spin wildly out of control. Thu, 11/8, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. tickets.vendini.com

9

FRI

Special Events ADOBE CRAFT FAIR!: Support local artists, crafters, and small businesses. at the annual holiday craft fair. Lunch and beverage available for purchase. Fri, 11/9, 11am. Free. Durham Adobe Church, 2404 Durham-Dayton Hwy, Durham. 530-570-0825.

THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI: The first screening in the theater’s Classic Film Series includes popcorn, a commemorative pin, live 1940s piano music in the lobby, the national anthem on the Wurlitzer, a short film about Veterans Day, color guard presentation and a whistling contest during intermission. Fri, 11/9, 7pm. $12-$20. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St. Oroville. orovillestatetheatre. com

Music PHILIP H. ANSELMO & THE ILLEGALS: The former Pantera frontman continues to work out his aggression and own his checkered past through hardcore, thrash and metal. Detroit noise rock outfit Child Bite also performs, along with local acts the Deprived and Shadow of Crows. Fri, 11/9, 8pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

URAL THOMAS & THE PAIN: Ural Thomas is nearing 80 and still peaking. The septuagenarian released a few singles 50 years ago and then went silent. He’s back with a ripping band, kicking out funk grooves and smooth R&B with decades of pent-up creativity. Comedy rock act Legit Supreme opens. Fri, 11/9, 8pm. $12-$15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

Theater HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: See Thursday. Fri, 11/9, 7:30pm. $12-$22. Theatre On The Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

THE WALWORTH FARCE: See Thursday. Fri, 11/9, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. tickets.vendini.com

10

SAT

Special Events

VETERANS DAY 5K HOORAH RUN/WALK: Fun run to

Americana singer/songwriter Justin Farren opens the show. Sat, 11/10, 7pm. The Rendezvous, 3269 Esplanade, Suite 142.

ON WINGS OF SONG: Chico State’s A cappella Choir, Chamber Singers and University Chorus invite you to an evening of soaring melodies that will guide you through a magical musical journey. Sat, 11/10, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, PAC 144. 530-898-5152.

Theater

help raise money to support veteran scholarships at Chico State. Sat 11/10, 8am. $20. Kendall Hall, Chico State.

HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: See Thursday. Sat, 11/10, 7:30pm. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge,

WONDERFUL WOODLANDS TREE WALK: Enjoy a short walk through the World of Trees. Sat 11/10, 10am. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E.

THE WALWORTH FARCE: See Thursday. Sat, 11/10, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First

3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760.

St. tickets.vendini.com

Eighth St.

Music CATURDAY BRUNCH: The House Cats provide the soundtrack to your champagne brunch. Sat, 11/10, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. DAVID WILCOX: Folk singer with a knack for terrific storytelling and a smooth baritone.

11

SUN

Special Events IN FOCUS FILM FESTIVAL: Be inspired by two short films about water issues in California,

ADOBE CRAFT FAIR!: See Friday. Sat 11/10, 10am. Free. Durham Adobe Church,

THIS WEEK CoNTINUeD oN PAGe 26

2404 Durham-Dayton Highway, Durham. 530-570-0825.

EDITOR’S PICK

BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATION WORKSHOP: Renowned botanical illustrator Joan Keesey leads this class, concentrating on accurate botanical drawing and graphite techniques. Sat 11/10, 9:30am. $30-$40. Holt Hall, room 129, Chico State. friendsofthechicostateherbarium.com

CONTRA DANCE: Traditional folk dancing with a live caller. Newcomers are welcome to attend. Sat 11/10. $5-$10. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

GIRLS ON THE RUN FALL 5K: After 10 weeks of

NoRTH STATe SYmPHoNY: moZART’S INFLUeNCe

training, elementary school girls tackle a 5K race. Sat 11/10, 7:45am. One-Mile Recreational Area, Bidwell Park. gotrnorthstate.org

INDIE ART FAIR: Fifteen local artists show their stuff. Sat 11/10, 12pm. Independent Realty Group, 30 Landing Circle, Ste 300.

Sunday, Nov. 11 Laxson Auditorium See SUNDAY, MUSIC

UNDeR THe RADAR FRee LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m. one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

You may not know Darrell Scott, but you’ve certainly heard his music. One of Nashville’s premier sidemen and session players, he wrote the Dixie Chicks’ “Long Time Gone” and Patty Loveless’ “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive,” and he’s collaborated with Robert Plant, Steve Earle, Emmylou Harris, Jimmie Dale Gilmore and many more musical luminaries. A talented multi-instrumentatlist and emotional songwriter, he’ll play the Chico Women’s Club on Tuesday, Nov. 13. A poet, reader and thinker, he’s able to find wonder and an uplifting outlook in the worst of times. The world is amazing, and so is Darrell Scott.

NovembeR 8, 2018

CN&R

25


“It’s all about the Dirty Sauce”

Soul Shake ecStatic Dance Music • Movement • Community 11/11 dj Medicine Heart 11/18 dj jacia 11/25 dj Karisha 12/2 dj Forest

Vegan options aVailable

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EVERY Sunday 10am-Noon | Find us on 775 E 16th st.Chico | www.edance.org/chico

THIS WEEK continued from page 25

FINE ARTS

followed by a panel discussion concerning water resource allocation. Sun, 11/11, 4pm. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

VETERANS DAY DINNER: The Exchange Club of Oroville, The Butte County Regional Guild, Mission Impossible Catering, Argonaut Parlor #8 NSGW and The Southside Community Center host a dinner to honor veterans with proceeds going to Veterans Matter, an organization to help homeless veterans. Sun, 11/11, 7pm. $5-$10. Southside Community Center, 2959 Lower Wyandotte Road, Oroville.

VETERANS DAY LUNCH: Paradise Elks Lodge welcomes all Ridge veterans and active duty military as guests for lunch. Sun, 11/11, 12pm. Paradise Elks Lodge, 1100 Elk Lane, Paradise.

VETERANS DAY PARADE: Community event hosted

C H I CO P E R F O R M A N C E S

Upcoming Events NOVEMBER 17 24-25 30

CINDERELLA A Magical Ballet CINDERELLA A Magical Ballet LYLE LOVETT & ROBERT EARL KEEN

DECEMBER 7-9 13 CINDERELLA

19

BELIEVE

Inspired By the Polar Express

CELTIC WOMAN

The Best of Christmas

LEANN RIMES

You and Me and Christmas

JANUARY 13 14 24-26 LYLE LOVETT & ROBERT EARL KEEN

29

SUSANNAH

SF Opera Grand Cinema Series

DAVID SEDARIS MADONNA

Uncle Dad’s Art Collective

AIR PLAY

An Airy Circus Spectacle

FEBRUARY 10 17 23

POPPIN’ Jazz Reach ARGUS QUARTET PAT HULL & HANNAH JANE KILE Chico Voices

MARCH 6 BELIEVE

12

PETER GROS

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom

KEN WALDMAN

Alaska’s Fiddler Poet

by the Exchange Club of Oroville to honor our veterans. Sun, 11/11, 11am. Downtown Oroville.

Music NORTH STATE SYMPHONY - MOZART’S INFLUENCE: Mozart’s iconic 40th Symphony, plus violinist Timothy Chooi, one of Canada’s most exciting young artists, joins the symphony for of Tchaikovsky’s powerful violin concerto. You’ll also hear Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture, featuring the newly created North State Symphony Youth Philharmonic and the Shasta College Chamber Strings. Sun, 11/11, 2pm. $10-$40. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. 530-898-5984. northstatesymphony. org

RED, WHITE & BLUES FESTIVAL: A full day of music and craft beer featuring performances from Jane Lee Hooker, Commander Cody, Curtis Salgado and Davy Knowles. Sun, 11/11, 1pm. $30. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

Theater HIGH NOON ON WALL STREET: See Thursday. Sun, 11/11, 2pm. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr. org

13

TUe

Music A NIGHT OF SOUTHERN GOSPEL MUSIC: A night of free music. Tue, 11/13, 6:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St. Oroville.

DARRELL SCOTT: Renowned singer-songwriter’s poetic songs may bemoan the state of the world, but will never leave you despaired. Tue, 11/13, 8pm. $40. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

14

WeD

Music KHRUANGBIN: Totally rad Texas trio gets busy on ’60s and ’70s southeast Asian funk and R&B riffs, psyched-out sounds and smokin’ surf rock à la Sublime Frequencies comps. Pedal steel guitarist Will Van Horn opens with his band. Wed, 11/14, 8pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

898-6333

26

CN&R

November 8, 2018

Art BLACKBIRD: Natoshi Sakamot, solo show

For more MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE oN pAGe 28

Shows through Dec. 14 Jacki Headley University Art Gallery See ArT

featuring recent works. Through 11/30. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Dia de los Muertos, works of momento mori, vanitas, totems, relics, portraiture and a community altar. Through 11/23. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Legal Gender The Irreverent Art of Anita Steckel, featuring the work of the politically engaged artist Anita Steckel (American, 1930-2012), the show focuses on her innovative use of collage and appropriation as a feminist strategy to counter the dominant male narratives endemic to art history and American society. Through 12/14. Free. Chico State, ARTS 121, 530-898-5864. headleygallery csuchico.com

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Deep Etch, exhibition features print work by Chico State art faculty, including the late artists Richard Hornaday, James Kuiper, Ann Pierce and Claudia Steel. Through 12/8. 400 W. First St. janetturner.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Coming Out for Art, Stonewall Alliance’s 10th annual all-inclusive show focuses on the LGBTQ community’s feelings and attitudes surrounding sexuality and gender through artwork, spoken word, dance and music. Through 11/11. $10. Also: Habitat for Humanity ReStore Repurposed Art Competition project, through 11/13; and Mandala of the Lotus, Lama Losang Samten is creating a stunning mandala sand painting in the MONCA library. Mandala dissolution Nov. 10, 11am. 900 Esplanade. (530)893-3336. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: A Handsome Harvest, ceramicist Michelle Turner and watercolor painter Marilyn Walsh display a beautiful bounty of skill and talent. Through 11/24. 732 Fourth St. Orland.

PARADISE ART CENTER: Teachers &

TICKETS NOW ON SALE

MORE INFO AT: WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM

LeGAL GeNDer: THe IrrevereNT ArT oF ANITA STeCKeL

Facilitators, works on display feature a range of media and artistic styles by Paradise Art Center’s talented instructors and staff. Through 11/30. 5564

Almond St. Paradise. paradise-artcenter.com

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Ann Pierce & Betty Polivka, estate sale, plus new works by by C. Preble Miles and Sally Dimas. Reception on Friday, Nov. 9, 4-7pm. Through 12/31. 493 East Ave. Suite 1. sallydimasartgallery.com

SECOND FLOOR CRITIQUE SPACE: Convalesce, the Chico State Painting and Drawing Club hosts a three-day show and fundraiser in honor of Erika Warmington, a former Chico State student and victim of the Carr Fire. Reception and silent auction on Thursday, Nov. 8, 5pm. Through 11/9. Chico State, Arts & Humanities Building.

THIRD FLOOR ART GALLERY: Voices What’s Going on in Our World?, pop art exhibit from the Art Education Student’s club DaDa and AE401: Manga and Beyond. Through 11/13. BMU, Chico State.

Museums GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Zoom Into Nano, hands-on exhibition demonstrates how scientists observe and make things that are too small to see. Through 1/6. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade.

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM: Working farm and museum with rotating exhibits open every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm. Through 12/30. 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Reimagining Chico, find out what Chico looked like 100 years ago with this exhibit exploring the archaeology of our neighborhoods. Two excavations have yielded historic artifacts from boarding houses located on campus and the long abandoned historic Chinatown. Through 12/8. Free. Chico State, 400 W. First St. 530-898-5397.


MUSIC

15th Street

Velvet Starlings (from left): Michael Whitmore, Christian Gisborne and Roni Weiderman.

Café

Photo by maddie mathews

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sonic youth

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Chico teen’s band takes off

Itoomore in Chico, Christian Gisborne has homework do. Before he hits the books, though, the 15-year-old

t’s Sunday night, and like any other high school soph-

needs to finish tracking the song he’s working on in his dad’s home recording studio upstairs. After that, he wants to listen to the by Jason Cassidy SiriusXM radio show of Rodney Bingenheimer (aka “Rodney on the j aso nc@ ROQ”) because the Los Angeles radio newsrev i ew.c om legend is slated to play three songs by Christian’s band, Velvet Starlings, on the program. And later in the evening, Preview: he’ll tune in to KROQ FM’s weekly velvet starlings, with eyes Like Lanterns Locals Only show to find out whether and Get Foxy, his Chico/L.A.-based band’s “Sold saturday, Nov. 10, Down the River” is still in the top five. 8 p.m. In the midst of all that, Christian Cost: $5 takes time to sit down for an enthuNaked Lounge siastic conversation about perform118 w. second st. ing live and his love of classic rock, nakedloungechico.com before cramming in some school work before his Monday classes at Inspire School of Arts & Sciences. The busy scene this past weekend at the Gisbornes’ home might not resemble that of your average local household, but it’s becoming increasingly typical for the young musician and his family. In roughly one year’s time, Velvet Starlings has gone from demos recorded by the then-14-year-old to a three-piece band that has performed all over Southern California and at two music festivals in Sweden, recorded two EPs’ worth of riffy indie rock drenched in some serious 1960s nostalgia, produced a video and garnered radio airplay in L.A. as well as Japan. You might be asking, “How’d a young Chico musician get so much notice, so quickly?” A big part of the answer is the age-old “who you know” truism. In this case, the “who” are his parents, Roger and Anita Gisborne, a music producer/record-label owner and music-industry lawyer, respectively. Roger has been in the music business since he was a member of ’90s Brit-rockers Plastiscene, and is now founder/owner of Sound x3 Records and Rock N Rolla Records, the latter

of which is the label releasing and promoting his son’s music. The couple split their time between Chico and the L.A. area, and that, along with their connections, gives their son access to a much larger market than the average Chico musician. However, it’s unfair to say that’s all there is to Christian’s success. First, he can flat-out shred, while also hopping around the stage with a combo of reckless youthfulness and savvy-beyond-his-years stage presence that is very engaging. And, his dad is quick to point out that, as soon as Christian started writing songs, he knew his son was onto something. “He would come to me with these demos, [and it would be] a blueprint of a house I’d like to build,” Roger said. The first lines of that blueprint started coming into shape when Christian was 12, not long after he’d picked up the guitar and started teaching himself White Stripes and Who covers, when he ventured out to play solo during Thursday Night Markets. “I kind of instantly liked the feeling of being in front of people,” he said about the experience. “That’s where I earned my stripes.” “I’d just sit [at] Burgers and Brew and have a lager and watch, and people were just digging it,” Roger said. “I attribute so much to the 20 shows he played there.” Christian’s program at Inspire provided invaluable resources as well. “I can go in at lunch and just play guitar,” he said, adding that the novelty of having access to a state-of-the-art recording program like ProTools has allowed him to record new songs and even put together demos to help his bandmates—bassist/keyboardist Roni Weiderman and drummer Michael Whitmore—learn their parts. Velvet Starlings’ self-titled debut EP was recently released (available at velvetstarlings.bandcamp.com), and a second EP is slated to come out next year. In the meantime, Christian will fit in shows with his band when he can (such as this Saturday, Nov. 10, at Naked Lounge), and continue to try to balance school and music. But with new opportunities and accolades rolling in—such as “Sold Down the River” going to No. 1 on KROQ’s Locals Only show—it’s probably only a matter of time before the scales start tipping. Ω

7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday 1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~

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CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THUrSDAY 11/8—WeDNeSDAY 11/14

Colfax Speed Queen

CoLFAX SPeeD QUeeN, ALvIe & THe breAKFAST PIGS & SUNNY ACreS Friday, Nov. 9 Ike’s Place See FrIDAY

oNe more TIme AroUND

Pumps and Five Mile Myth. Fri, 11/9, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave..

ROCKIN’ ROLLZ: Loud, fast and trashy, Denver’s Colfax Speed Queen and San Francisco’s Alvie & the Breakfast Pigs storm Chico with a little help from locals Sunny Acres. Fri, 11/9, 8pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W Fifth St., 925-575-0813.

TOO $HORT: Oakland hip-hop legend Durham., 530-343-6893.

8THUrSDAY

9FrIDAY

BRANDED: Danceable country in the

lounge. Fri, 11/9, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

BLITZEN TRAPPER: On the heels of the

10th anniversary release of Furr, Portland’s experimental country and folk rock band comes to Chico, along with Australian indie-folk duo Luluc. Thu, 11/8, 8pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

HA’PENNY BRIDGE: Chico’s California Celtic band returns to the stage to perform its energetic originals. Thu, 11/8, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

HILLCREST AVENUE: Cover band plays Sublime, Johnny Cash, Green Day and more. Fri, 11/9, 6pm. Free. Shakey’s Pizza, 2890 Olive Highway, Oroville., 775-771-4116.

JETT BENATAR: Tribute to the queens of ’70s and ’80s rock ’n’ roll: Joan Jett and Pat Benatar. Fri, 11/9, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

JOHN CRAIGIE: Americana artist touring to raise money and donation items for Volunteers of America performs with the Rainbow Girls. SOLD OUT! Thu, 11/8, 7pm. $21. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.. kzfr. org

LIVE MUSIC FRIDAYS: Dance to a different band each week, plus wine, cocktails, beer, pizza and small bites. Fri, 11/9, 6pm. Free. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway,

THE PAWNS OF COMEDY: Chico ex-pat impresario/comedian DNA brings his touring comedy show home: starring Nick Stargu aka DJ REAL and featured comics Chad Opitz, Emily Catalano and Chris Storin. Fri, 11/9, 8:30pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

PHILIP H. ANSELMO & THE ILLEGALS: The former Pantera frontman continues to work out his aggression and own his checkered past through hardcore, thrash and metal. Detroit noise rock outfit Child Bite also performs, along with local acts the Deprived and Shadow of Crows. Fri, 11/9, 8pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.. jmaxproductions.net

REGGAEHOP: Soulmedic and Galactik Vibes perform reggae and hip-hop, plus DJs. Fri, 11/9, 9pm. $12. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

ROCK EUPORA: Fuzzed out pop with punchy guitars and dope melodies, plus the always catchy Scarlet

Time to PARTY! Now Accepting Reservations for holiday parties Call 530-487-7207 ask for Courtney View AVAilAbility online lAsAlleschico.com

Like Lee Fields and the late Charles Bradley, Ural Thomas started his career decades ago, first as a member of The Monterays and then as a solo performer. He found some success, but hung up his mic after disappointing music industry experiences. That interest was rekindled when drummer and DJ Scott Magee enlisted Thomas to sing at an old-school soul project. The Pain was born and you can catch the band live at Lost on Main, Friday, Nov. 9, where it’ll perform throwback funk and smooth R&B.

performs cuts from his new album, The Pimp Tape, as well as classics like “The Ghetto” and “Blow the Whistle.” Blaze1 and B-Lee open. SOLD OUT! Fri, 11/9, 9pm. $30-$40. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.. tackleboxchico.com

TOUGH LOVE: Classic rock and country hits. Fri, 11/9, 9pm. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise.

URAL THOMAS & THE PAIN: Ural Thomas is nearing 80 and still peaking. The septuagenarian released a few singles 50 years ago and then went silent. He’s back with a ripping band, kicking out funk grooves and smooth R&B with decades of pent up creativity. Comedy rock act Legit Supreme opens. Fri, 11/9, 8pm. $12$15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.. lostonmainchico.com

10SATUrDAY

33 BLACK BAND: Country band per-

forms during a late happy hour. Sat,

11/10, 9:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

BRANDED: Danceable country in the

lounge. Sat, 11/10, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

CARAVANSERAI: Santana tribute. Come for Abraxas, but get out before “Smooth.” Sat, 11/10, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DAVID WILCOX: Folk singer with a knack for storytelling and a smooth baritone. Americana singer/songwriter Justin Farren opens. Sat, 11/10, 7pm. The Rendezvous, 3269 Esplanade, Ste. 142.

DIRTY REVIVAL: With a jaw-dropping vocalist and enough soul to fill a stadium, this seven-piece soul and funk outfit returns to Lost. Sat, 11/10, 9pm. $10. Lost On Main, 319 Main St., 530.892-2445.

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November 8, 2018

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THIS WEEK: FIND more eNTerTAINmeNT AND SPeCIAL eveNTS oN PAGe 24 THIS WILL DeSTroY YoU Monday, Nov. 12 Sierra Nevada Big Room See moNDAY

Gymshorts dish out raging punk ’n’ roll. Pervert opens. Sun, 11/11, 8:30pm. $10. Duffy’s, 337 Main St. www.brownpapertickets.com

SAFETY ORANGE: See Saturday. Sun,

11/11, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &

TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Reggae, dancehall, dub and roots music and Jamaican buffet to celebrate Hailie Selassie Coronation Day. Sat, 11/10, 12pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road. siphosjamaica.com

sumably, some AC/DC songs. Sat, 11/10, 9pm. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise.

LO & BEHOLD: Funky rock and R&B

group gets down. Sat, 11/10, 8pm. $5. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave..

LOCAL SHOWCASE: Get Foxy, Eyes Like Lanterns and the Velvet Starlings perform. Sat, 11/10, 8pm. $5. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St..

THE LOCO-MOTIVE BAND: Birthday boy JpRoxx leads the band through a night of rock ’n’ roll debauchery. Sat, 11/10, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

LOST IN BASS: Reggae, dubstep and EDM with AZ.Redsmoke, Jahsun, Whyno, Selecta Diesel and Otter. Sat, 11/10, 9pm. $5. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

OVERDRIVE: ’70s and ’80s classic

rock. Sat, 11/10, 8:30pm. Ramada Plaza Chico, 685 Manzanita Court.

SAFETY ORANGE: Goofy San Diego trio

plays surf, rock and reggae. Sat, 11/10, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

STRUNG NUGGET GANG: Bluegrass swing with a twist. Sat, 11/10, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

HYPE OR DIE TOUR: Riot Ten, Krimer, Carbin and Sab3rtooth do beats. Wed, 11/14, 8pm. $15-$20. Senator Theater, 234 W. Second Ave.. jmaxproductions.net

’60s and ’70s southeast Asian funk and R&B riffs, psyched-out sounds and smokin’ surf rock. Pedal steel guitarist Will Van Horn opens. Wed, 11/14, 8pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St..

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UP TO ELEVEN: Eighties metal and hard rock tribute band performs Metallica, Priest, Maiden, Dio, Motorhead and more. Sat, 11/10, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.. tackleboxchico.com

JAUZ: Big ol’ beats and skittery EDM rhythms during his Bite America Tour. Holy Goof and Skepsis also twist knobs. Mon, 11/12, 8pm. $30. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. Tickets at www.eventbrite.com

THIS WILL DESTROY YOU: Dark, weird and noisy post-rock band that manages further experimentation with each new release, plus local noisethrashers Black Magnet. Mon, 11/12, 8pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

PSYCH/PUNK PILeUP

The Death Valley Girls and Gymshorts hail from opposite ends of the rock spectrum and country: ultra cool, gloomy psychedelic burners from Los Angeles and amphetaminelaced, carefree punk blasters from Providence, respectively. The two are ouring together and hitting Duffy’s on Sunday, Nov. 11, where you can experience a couple of the most relevant and talented underground bands in America. Local heroes Pervert open this rad show with a wild mashup of rap, metal, punk and experimental noise.

THE VILLAINS BALL: Get a little evil celebrating Priscilla De’Vills birthday with a night of comedy, burlesque and drag. Sat, 11/10, 8:30pm. $6. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

11SUNDAY

DEATH VALLEY GIRLS & GYMSHORTS: Scuzzed our garage rock from the DV Girls, plus Providence’s

14WeDNeSDAY

ALLVARET: Big show! Anthemic Swedish punch brings a stadium feel to the Spirit, plus sets from Helicopter Kids and Get Out. Wed, 11/14, 7:30pm. $7. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

BUNGO & SIMILAR ALIEN: Extraterrestrial rock for hungry astronauts. Wed, 11/14, 8pm. $5.

November 8, 2018

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REEL WORLD 11film1 Queen/Freddie Mercury legacy reduced to by-the-numbers rock bio.

Is this just fantasy?

NO.

Queen/Freddie Mercury legacy reduced to by-the-numbers It rock Is A bio Complete sentenCe image in production

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Is this just fantasy? Queen/Freddie Mercury legacy reduced to by-the-numbers rock bio

RRhapsody. lead singer of Queen, in the new biopic, Bohemian That and a competent recreation of Queen’s ami Malek gives it his all as Freddie Mercury, the late

famous Live Aid domination at Wembley Stadium are just about the only good things you can say about this mostly embarby Bob Grimm rassing effort that falls way short of telling the actual story of this bg ri m m incredible person and his sadly @new srev i ew. c o m short life. Mercury died in 1991 at the age of 45 due to complications from pneumonia while battling AIDS. He wasn’t diagnosed with the illness Bohemian until 1987. The film has Mercury Rhapsody learning of his diagnosis before his Starring Rami Malek. incredible 1985 Live Aid perforDirected by Bryan mance, even telling the band of his Singer and Dexter illness shortly before they went on Fletcher. Cinemark 14, stage. This is complete bullshit, and Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. a total injustice to Mercury and his Rated PG-13. band’s legacy. The film also suggests that Queen was broken up for years before hitting the stage for Live Aid. While the band members did, in fact, put out some solo albums and dialed back the live performances, the four continued as a unit. They recorded; they were friends. The film purports to show Live Aid as their reunion gig, but the band was already on a live tour when it took the stage for those legendary 20 minutes. More bullshit. Then there are the details of Mercury’s love life— especially with regard to his end-of-life boyfriend, Jim Hutton (played by Aaron McCusker), and Mary Austin

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(Lucy Boynton), the woman Mercury considered his common-law wife—which are altered and exploited to fit the dramatic needs of the by-the-numbers biopic. The movie screws with Mercury’s timeline, invents a bunch of unnecessary events and homogenizes this hard-living rock star’s life for a generic PG-13 film that doesn’t feel anything close to authentic. Why distort the story like this, especially when the life in focus is so damned interesting and could fuel five incredible movies instead of one hokey, mostly made-up soap opera? Director Bryan Singer was fired from the movie (and replaced with uncredited Dexter Fletcher) after conflicts between him and the producers as well as with Malek. Was his take a more realistic one? Sacha Baron Cohen was originally slated to star as Mercury, but fell out with producers and the remaining members of Queen when the milquetoast vision for the movie was truly taking form. One can only imagine what we would’ve gotten had he remained involved. Malek, acting through a set of big fake teeth made to capture the look of Mercury’s four extra incisors, is decent in the role. He actually sang on set, his voice blended with a Mercury soundalike to keep the movie from being a completely lip-synched affair. The musical sequences, including the Live Aid gig, are fun to watch. But if I wanted to simply experience music by Queen, I’d just seek out the albums and videos of music by Queen. Ω

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Opening this week Colette

Keira Knightley stars as the title character in this biopic about the early 20th century French novelist (and mime, actress and journalist) who was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and whose best-known work, Gigi, was adapted into an Academy Award-winning film and Tony Award-winning musical. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

The Girl in the Spider’s Web

David Lagercrantz took over the Millennium novel series after the death of its creator, Stieg Larsson. This film adaptation is based on his first crack at the story—No. 4 in the series—and features antiheroine Lisbeth Salander (played by Claire Foy) exacting vengeance on men who batter women in a world of cyber criminals and corrupt politicians. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

The Grinch

Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas gets the 3-D CGI treatment with Kenan Thompson, Rashida Jones, Pharrell Williams and Benedict Cumberbatch (as the Grinch) voicing the characters. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Overlord

Set during the events of D-Day, this warhorror flick follows American paratroopers who’ve landed behind enemy lines to find themselves doing battle with both German soldiers and horrific creatures born of Nazi experiments. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Nowp laying

1

Bohemian Rhapsody

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween

The second film in the most recent series of adaptations of R.L. Stine’s classic youthhorror fiction series follows a group of kids living out one of the author’s stories as they try to save the world from a Halloween apocalypse. Starring Jack Black, Wendi McLendon-Covey and Ken Jeong. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Halloween

This direct sequel to the first film in the franchise picks up 40 years after the events of the 1978 original and features Laurie (Jamie Lee Curtis) squaring off against her old murderous nemesis, Michael, who has escaped from captivity and is apparently bent on taking care of unfinished business. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

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The Nutcracker and the Four Realms

Lasse Hallstrom (The Cider House Rules, Chocolat) and Joe Johnston (Jumanji) direct this fantasy-adventure retelling of the classic Christmas story/ballet. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Nobody’s Fool

The latest Tyler Perry comedy follows a woman who, after being released from prison, reunites with her sister who might be the victim of a catfishing scam. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas7. Rated R.

3

The Old Man & the Gun

Robert Redford stars the real-life serial bank robber Forrest Tucker. But you should also know that the film has Sissy Spacek playing Jewel, a widowed Texas rancher who takes a liking to Forrest without really knowing what it is that he does when he’s “at work,” and it has Casey Affleck as a moody police detective whose personal investment in Forrest’s case keeps expanding in unexpected ways. Redford’s character is the heart of the matter, of course, but Old Man at its best is also the story of the Spacek and Affleck characters, as reflected through their respective encounters with Forrest. All in all, the film shapes up as a genial kind of outlaw ballad. Forrest Tucker, the “gentleman bandit” with a friendly smile, is quoted as saying that robbing banks is not a way of “making a living,” but rather a way of living. John and Jewel come to understand and respect that in contrasting ways, but the film as a whole clearly shares the sentiment. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Smallfoot

In this 3D animated feature, the Bigfoots (i.e., Yeti) are astonished to discover that the Smallfoots (humans) are real. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

3

A Star Is Born

The familiar story is still there (a turbulent show-biz romance between a rising star and one who’s about to fall), but there’s very little about this latest A Star Is Born that feels seriously outdated. This time, a gifted and very alcoholic country music star named Jackson Main (Bradley Cooper) takes an aspiring young singer (Lady Gaga) under his wing professionally and into his days and nights romantically. Cooper, who is also making his directorial debut, gives a powerfully modulated performance, with reckless extremes and soulful reversals balanced in a kind of perilous harmony. But Ally (Lady Gaga) is the star being born here—a singer getting her big break within the story, but also a movie star emerging, in the movie and with it. Cinemark 14, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Venom

Tom Hardy stars as the title character, the conflicted Marvel Comics superhero whose powers come via the alien that’s taken over his body. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

NOVEMBER 8, 2018

CN&R

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search of sidewalk fruit trees from which I could glean enough of a harvest to flavor my next by bucket of homebrew. I picked persimAlastair mons, berries, plums and figs this Bland way—and each season I noticed, but thought little of, a particular backyard tree in San Rafael that grew heavy with strangelooking apples, shaped almost like papayas, that rained to the lawn uneaten each October. Nobody in the house, it seemed, wanted to eat them, and the tree was too far from the fence for me to have a sample. Years later, I realized what was wrong with these apples: They were quinces, and—generally speaking— who but a stovetop jam-maker wants to eat a quince? This Eurasian native, after all, does not make itself easy to love. The quince is a fruit that has come 90 percent of the way toward being a perfectly delicious apple or pear but then, in the last stages of ripening, steers off track toward its final form—essentially a sour, acidic apple made palatable only by an elaborate process in the kitchen. But quinces have their assets. Taxonomically, these apple-and-pear cousins are remarkable for having a genus all their own, Cydonia. Culinarily, they are notable for their potent aroma; when those San Rafael quinces were spoiling on the ground, I could sometimes smell them from the street—a potent scent of guava, pineapple and rose. Thus, it should be no great surprise that some brewers have turned to the quince as a novel

and fragrant means of capturing autumn in a bottle. (Quince beers, too, are a fine alternative to pumpkin beers, a more common expression of autumn for the brewer.) Most recently, perhaps, North Coast Brewing Co. made a beer with quince—a tart Berliner Weisse-style ale that also has cranberries in the mix. The fact that North Coast, based in Fort Bragg, has used quinces in a beer seems more like a favor to the quince than a boon to the beer. But North Coast is known for its restraint and its selective approach toward making beer, and my policy has long been that if North Coast makes it, it’s probably worth drinking. So, it seemed a good bet to buy a few bottles of the beer, which is now on shelves at BevMo! and other stores with large beer selections. The Berliner Weisse is generally a tart and sour style, but North Coast’s rendition is somewhat the opposite, nearly as sweet as soda with only some faint acidic fruit notes—from the cranberry, I think. The tropical fruit aromas, I venture to guess, come from the fragrant quince. I enjoyed the beer, which I found refreshing on a hot afternoon. Would I buy it again? Probably not. The online beer-critiquing forum RateBeer.com shows 39 quince beers and ciders in its inventory of reviews. That’s a tiny slice of the craft beer pie. Even beers made with another unusual ingredient—spruce tips—number 198. By style, the quince beers are all over the board, with IPAs, strong winter warmers and a variety of sour and barrel-aged beers on the list. My impression is that, unlike jam-makers, brewers don’t know quite what to do with the humble quince. Ω


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

Arts DEVO has worshiped basketball since he was in the eighth grade and his parents gave him his first TV. It was a little black-and-white set with rabbit ears and all I could tune in to was PBS and CBS. That first night—May 31, 1983—I sat with my face 1 foot away from the screen, mesmerized by what turned out to be the final game of the NBA Finals between the Lakers and 76ers. My jaw was on the floor as I watched players with superhero-sounding names— Magic, Dr. J, Moses, Kareem—do superhuman things. I was hooked. I latched on to Magic and the Lakers at first, but when the Jackie Moon: baller. much-less likable Kobe came along at the same time as the fun-loving Kings of the Vlade/Webber/Peja/White Chocolate era, I committed myself to the local team. Things haven’t been that fun with the Kings in a while, but basketball—both pro and college—is more amazing than ever, and there are new superheros coming up every year—Curry, the Greek Freak, The Brow, Zion, Bol Bol (Manute’s son!). There’s even a new hero on my lowly team, point guard De’Aaron Fox—aka Swipa the Fox—a basketball artist whose superpower is video-game-level speed, so maybe it’ll be good to be a King again soon.

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KYLE’S DEAD I am not a fan of poems written to the dead/As if their ghostly bodies could hover over the reader/listening to the words and snapping their fingers like/haunted assholes at a Dead Poetry Slam That was not a poem written to the dead. Kyle Bowen—local writer, comedian, poet, mortician and one-time ice-cream man—died Monday, Nov. 5, at the age of 59, and those four lines open a poem called “A Note Before You Leave, Kyle.” It was written and performed for Bowen by his friend, San Jose poet/ comedian Mighty Mike McGee, while Bowen was sick and dying but before he was gone. The idea, of course, being that “the person who deserves to see and hear it most,” as McGee says in the piece, could actually enjoy the words along with everyone else. It’s a great way to go about things and is a mindset that Bowen, a mortician by trade, was intimately aware of and intent on not shying away from when he sweetly and frankly brought us along for the experience via social media over the last month. Death is a rad and messy finale to a rad and messy everything else. (Another excerpt from McGee’s poem.) Bowen was a friend and source of inspiration for McGee and a lot of other artists around the world, most recently in Chico, where he lived for the past 15 or so years. He came to town on the heels of a successful run as a slam poet (was a member of San Jose’s 2001 national team), took up work here as an ice-cream man before returning to his work as a mortician, and along the way hosted spoken-word open mics, performed comedy, wrote and performed for NPR’s Snap Judgment storytelling series and even won the CN&R’s 2015 Keep Chico Weird Talent Show. And he definitely did that—kept Chico weird and a little more honest with his “Kyle Bowen” uncompromising approach to art. PAINTING BY HEATHER BENNETT Rest in power.

This guy saves you money.

BASKETBALL’S ALIVE Basketball is my favorite sport, I like the way they dribble up and down the court —Kurtis Blow

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34312162_10_x_10.8.indd   CN&R  n o v1e m b e r 8 , 2 0 1 8

10/31/18 3:35 PM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF November 8, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 1994,

Aries pop diva Mariah Carey collaborated with an associate to write the song “All I Want For Christmas Is You.” It took them 15 minutes to finish it. Since then it has generated $60 million in royalties. I wish I could unconditionally predict that you, too, will efficiently spawn a valuable creation sometime soon. Current planetary alignments do indeed suggest that such a development is more possible than usual. But because I tend to be conservative in my prophecies, I won’t guarantee anything close to the $60-million figure. In fact, your reward may be more spiritual in nature than financial.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): An

interactive post at Reddit.com asked readers to write about “the most underrated feeling of all time.” One person said, “When you change the sheets on your bed.” Another extolled “the feeling that comes when you pay all your bills and you’ve still got money in the bank.” Others said “dancing under the rain,” “physical contact like a pat on the back when you’re really touch-starved” and “listening to a song for the first time and it’s so good you just can’t stop smiling.” I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I suspect that the next two weeks will bring you a flood of these pleasurable underrated feelings.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Beer

makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer,” wrote Gemini author Henry Lawson. Do you have any methods for making yourself feel like you’ve drunk a few beers that don’t involve drinking a few beers? If not, I highly recommend that you find at least one. It will be especially important in the coming weeks for you to have a way to alter, expand or purify your consciousness without relying on literal intoxicants or drugs. The goal: to leave your groove before it devolves into a rut.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Study the

following five failed predictions: 1. “There is no likelihood man can ever tap the power of the atom.” —Robert Miliham, Nobel Laureate in Physics, 1923. 2. “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.” —Western Union internal memo, 1876. 3. “Rail travel at high speeds is not possible because passengers, unable to breathe, would die of asphyxia.” –Dionysius Lardner, scientist, 1830. 4. “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.” —Ken Olson, president of Digital Equipment Corporation, 1977. 5. “Most Cancerians will never overcome their tendencies toward hypersensitivity, procrastination, and fear of success.” —Lanira Kentsler, astrologer, 2018. (P.S. What you do in the next 12 months could go a long way toward permanently refuting the last prediction.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): German scientists

have created cochlear implants for gerbils that have been genetically modified, enabling the creatures to “listen” to light. The researchers’ work is ultimately dedicated to finding ways to improve the lives of people with hearing impairments. What might be the equivalent of you gaining the power to “hear light”? I understand that you might resist thinking this way. “That makes no sense,” you may protest, or “There’s no practical value in fantasizing about such an impossibility.” But I hope you’ll make the effort anyway. In my view, stretching your imagination past its limits is the healing you need most right now. I also think that doing so will turn out to be unexpectedly practical.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here’s useful

wisdom from the poet Rumi: “Our defects are the ways that glory gets manifested,” he said. “Keep looking at the bandaged place. That’s where the light enters you.” Playwright Harrison David Rivers interprets Rumi’s words to mean, “Don’t look away from your pain, don’t disengage from it, because that pain is the source of your power.” I think these perspectives are just what you need to meditate on, Virgo. To

by rob brezsNy promote even more healing in you, I’ll add a further clue from poet Anna Kamienska: “Where your pain is, there your heart lies also.” (P.S. Rumi is translated by Coleman Barks; Kamienska by Clare Cavanagh.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Artist David

Hockney is proud of how undemanding he is toward his friends and associates. “People tell me they open my e-mails first,” he says, “because they aren’t demands and you don’t need to reply. They’re simply for pleasure.” He also enjoys giving regular small gifts. “I draw flowers every day and send them to my friends so they get fresh blooms.” Hockney seems to share the perspective expressed by author Gail Godwin, who writes, “How easy it was to make people happy, when you didn’t want or need anything from them.” In accordance with astrological omens, Libra, I suggest you have fun employing these approaches in the coming weeks.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I am

not currently a wanderer or voyager or entrepreneur or swashbuckler. But at other times in my life, I have had extensive experience with those roles. So I know secrets about how and why to be a wanderer and voyager and entrepreneur and swashbuckler. And it’s clear to me that in the coming weeks you could benefit in unforeseen ways from researching and embodying the roles of curious wanderer and brave voyager and savvy entrepreneur and prudent swashbuckler.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“The best thing one can do when it is raining is let it rain.” That brilliant formulation came from poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Does it seem so obvious as to not need mentioning? Bear with me while I draw further meaning from it, and suggest you use it as an inspiring metaphor in the coming weeks. When it rains, Sagittarius, let it rain; don’t waste time and emotional energy complaining about the rain. Don’t indulge in fruitless fantasies about how you might stop the rain and how you’d love to stop the rain. In fact, please refrain from defining the rain as a negative event, because after all, it is perfectly natural, and is in fact crucial for making the crops grow and replenishing our water supply. (P.S. Your metaphorical “rain” will be equally useful.)

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“Every true love and friendship is a story of unexpected transformation,” writes activist and author Elif Shafak. “If we are the same person before and after we loved, that means we haven’t loved enough.” I bring this to your attention because you’re in a phase when your close alliances should be activating healing changes in your life. If for some reason your alliances are not yet awash in the exciting emotions of redemption and reinvention, get started on instigating experimental acts of intimacy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I

suspect you will be an especially arousing influence in the coming weeks. You may also be inspiring and disorienting, with unpredictable results. How many transformations will you unleash? How many expectations will you dismantle? How many creative disruptions will you induce in the midst of the daily grind? I hesitate to underestimate the messy beauty you’ll stir up or the rambunctious gossip you’ll provoke. In any case, I plan to be richly amused by your exploits, and I hope everyone else will be, as well. For best results, I will pray to the Goddess of Productive Fun, begging Her to ensure that the commotions and uproars you catalyze will be in service to love and kindness.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Gonzo jour-

nalist Hunter S. Thompson wasn’t always a wild and crazy writer. Early in his career he made an effort to compose respectable, measured prose. When he finally gave up on that project and decided he could “get away with” a more uninhibited style, he described it as being “like falling down an elevator shaft and landing in a pool full of mermaids.” I foresee a metaphorically comparable development in your future, Pisces.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

Ultimate Soothing Massage Call Michelle (530) 566-6477 A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session (530) 321-0664

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FULL CIRCLE LANDSCAPING at 1241 Honey Run Road Chico, CA 95928. ANNA ISAACS 1241 Honey Run Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANNA ISAACS Dated: October 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001287 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TWO LOVES THRIFT at 6171 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. KAYLA RENEE DURAN 5429 Foster Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAYLA DURAN Dated: October 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001280 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOPHEAD at 5585 Scottwood Rd Paradise, CA 95969. THERESA KEREAZIS-PAGE 5585 Scottwood Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THERESA KEREAZIS-PAGE Dated: September 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001184 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DAYCAMP COFFEE, DAYCAMP COFFEE COMPANY at 1925 Market Place Ste 150 Chico, CA 95928. DAYCAMP COFFEE, LLC 30 Aroyo Vista Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by

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a Limited Liability Company. Signed; MARK ROZELL, MEMBER Dated: October 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001284 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CLASSIC CABINETRY at 3178 Hwy 32 Chico, CA 95973. ADAM DONALD SCHNEBERGER 1842 Cummings Lane Durham, CA 95938. DONALD GEORGE SCHNEBERGER 1842 Cummings Ln Durham, CA 95938. NICHOLAS ANDREW SCHNEBERGER 157 Picholine Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DONALD SCHNEBERGER Dated: October 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001273 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOUNTAIN TRAFFIC SERVICES at 5521 Paloma Ave Paradise, CA 95969. KEVIN JAMES SCOTT JR 5521 Paloma Ave Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN JAMES SCOTT Dated: September 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001200 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CALICONCEPT KITCHEN at 864 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. CALIFLOUR FOODS, LLC 1057 Village Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JAMES P. LACEY, CFO Dated: October 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001322 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAPPY HONEST HOME REPAIR at 1056 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. SCOTT CHESTER OGBORN 1056 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT OGBORN Dated: October 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001304 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ARCANELY MADE at 1174 1/2 Palm Ave Chico, CA 95926. LUCEY RAINS 1174 1/2 Palm Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LUCEY RAINS Dated: October 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001314 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The folling persons are doing business as PARTNERS IN REAL ESTATE at 702 Mangrove Ave #263 Chico, CA 95926. DAVID A LANDECK 3355 Shallow Springs Ter Chico, CA 95928. PARTNERS IN REAL ESTATE 702 Mangrove Ave #263 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVID A LANDECK, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: October 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001327 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as

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JR FLAGGING SERVICES at 2928 Elm St Live Oak, CA 95953. BALDO BOTELLO JR 2928 Elm St Live Oak, CA 95953. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BALDO BOTELLO JR Dated: October 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001337 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NOR CAL FLAGGERS at 622 Richards Ave Gridley, CA 95948. MARIANO MONTENEGRO VALLEJO 9625 Cannon Way Live Oak, CA 95953. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARIANO VALLEJO Dated: October 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001342 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

Cn&r is looking For An Advertising ConsultAnt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Advertising ConsultAnt The CN&R is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. If you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful Ad Consultant. You must be selfmotivated, ambitious and an independent person who wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business. Bilingual/fluency in Spanish is a plus.

For more inFormAtion, visit www.newsreview.Com/ChiCo/jobs

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as B AND R FOODS at 6000 Maxwell Dr Apt F Paradise, CA 95969. GARY ALAN BATES 14833 Magalia Dr Magalia, CA 95954. BRADEN CHARLES SHAW 6000 Maxwell Dr Apt F Paradise, CA 95969. ROBERT BLAINE SHAW 6000 Maxwell Dr Apt F Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ROBERT B. SHAW Dated: October 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001343 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as UNITED IRONWORKS at 2944 Heritage Road Oroville, CA 95966. MARK ALLEN GODFREY 2944 Heritage Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK A. GODFREY Dated: October 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001290 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOUNGE A-GO-GO at 1541 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. CAROLYN S ENGSTROM 1541 Palm Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAROLYN S. ENGSTROM Dated: October 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001309 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GO GO LOCAL at 243 W 9th Street Chico, CA 95928. VERONICA VANCLEAVE-HUNT 20 Green Acres Crt 1 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VERONICA

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november 8, 2018

VANCLEAVE-HUNT Dated: October 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001353 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY FARMS at 2862 Bancroft Dr Chico, CA 95928. IMRAN BABU 3072 Rae Creek Dr Chico, CA 95973. MOHAMMAD FAROOQ NAMIT 2862 Bancroft Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: IMRAN BABU Dated: October 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001356 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRETTY NAILS AND SPA at 555 Flying V Street #3 Chico, CA 95928. NGUYEN THI THU HONG 1419 Ridgebrook Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HONG THI THU NGUYEN Dated: October 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001349 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LUNATIC FRINGE BOHEMIAN BOUTIQUE at 1462 Myers Street Suite A Oroville, CA 95965. MICHELLE PALOMA-HUDKINS 309 Bonite Street Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHELLE PALOMA HUDKINS Dated: October 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001260 Published: November 1,8,15,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLOOM at 1163 East Avenue, Suite 103 Chico, CA 95926. LYNN FLOWERS 3424 Peerless Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNN FLOWERS FBN Number: 2018-0001311 Dated: October 15, 2018 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ZAVATTERO’S GROCERY COMPANY at 15509 Nopel Ave Forest Ranch, CA 95942. ZAVATTERO GROCERY COMPANY 15509 Nopel Ave Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KYLE ZAVATTERO, PRESIDENT Dated: October 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001266 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOS ARCOS AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD at 2454 Notre Dame Blvd Ste 100 Chico, CA 95928. ANTONIO HERNANDEZ 1804 Kofford Rd Gridley, CA 95948. LUIS HERNANDEZ 9288 N St Live Oak, CA 95953. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: LUIS HERNANDEZ Dated: October 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001326 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as VERMIBUENA at 49 Reginald Way Oroville, CA 95966. REBECCA MARIE KNIGHT 49 Reginald Way Oroville, CA 95966. JOSEPH ANTHONY ONATE 49 Reginald Way Oroville, CA 95966. This busines is conducted by Copartners. Signed: JOSEPH A. ONATE Dated: October 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001312 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DAX-IT RECOVERY SERVICES at 1215 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965. WASHINGTON BLOCK LLC 265 Lodgeview Drive Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: BERT TAYLOR, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dated: October 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001354 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RAGIN HOT WILDLAND FIRE CREW at 709 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. THOMAS BENTON GRANER 709 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THOMAS GRANER Dated: November 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001379 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as REFUEL NUTRITION at 206 Walnut Street Suite A Chico, CA 95928. ANN E MINKLER 24 Misty Way Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA VERNON 2797 Swallowtail Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ANN E. MINKLER Dated: October 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001377 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the

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following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. JOSE ARTEAGA 238ss 6x10 (Furniture, Boxes) JAMES BUI 502cc 6x7 (Furniture, Boxes) MICHAEL DONAGHUE 507Ac 6x12 (Boxes, Misc) ANTOINETTE GRIFFITH 332cc 6x12 (Furniture, Appliance, Misc) REBECCA LAAKSO 533cc 5x7 MARK PIXLEY 364cc1 6x12 (Furniture, Boxes) CARSON REEK 494cc 6x12 (Boxes, Misc) CHRISTIAN SHEAFFER 259ss 5x6 DARRELL SHEALY 229ss 5x12 THOMAS VANERT 446cc (Misc.) 5x5 DAVE WAITE 427Ac (boxes, Misc.) 6x10 Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: November 17, 2018 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: November 1,8, 2018

ORDER ON REQUEST TO CONTINUE HEARING Petitioner/CARISSA MORRIS, through her attorney of record RODNEY E. BENSON of MCGLYNN & CLARK, 737 Washington Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080 (530) 527-1117, has filed a Request for Order re Modification of Visitation with the Tehama County Superior Court located at 1740 Walnut Street, Red Bluff, CA 96080, Civil Division, (530) 527-3484 in the matter of CARISSA MORRIS, Petitioner vs. ERIC CARLSON, Respondent, Case No. FL63165. There will be a court date of Monday, December 17, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in Dept. 5 of the Tehama County Superior Court. This document was filed with Tehama County Superior Court on October 9, 2018. This is for notice to ERIC CARLSON, Respondent in the matter. Published: October 25, November 1,8,15, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EMILEE STILTNER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EMILEE STILTNER Proposed name: EMILEE RAY ARKOSE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 16, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV02999 Published: October 18,25, November 1,8, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NASSIM LEBNAN MAJED AAD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NASSIM LEBNAN MAJED AAD Proposed name: ALEK LUCIANO BEY HAWCK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 14, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 18, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03287 Published: October 25, November 1,8,15 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MOLLY ELLEN CONKLIN ROE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MOLLY ELLEN CONKLIN ROE Proposed name: MOLLY ELLEN LITTLEBIRD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 21, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBD Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: October 23, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03303 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ROSEMARY SAYEGH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ROSEMARY SAYEGH Proposed name: SEVEN SAIGE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to

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show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 28, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: October 30, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03556 Published: November 8,15,21,29, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE EMMA TOKIKO ROGERS aka EMMA T. ROGERS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: EMMA TOKIKO ROGERS aka EMMA T. ROGERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CAROLYN M. PADILLA and KATHERINE A. ROGERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CAROLYN M. PADILLA and KATHERINE A. ROGERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 13, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 8 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal

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representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965. (530) 533-5661 Case Number: 18PR00461 Dated: October 15, 2018 Published: October 25, November 1,8, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HELEN MARIE CITRANO To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HELEN MARIE CITRANO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DAWN MARIE POWELL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DAWN MARIE POWELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 20, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of

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letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: DAWN MARIE POWELL 9414 PUTNEY DRIVE, DURHAM CA, 95938-0771 Case Number: 18PR00483 Published: November 1,8,15, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LOUISE W. PALMER (also known as LOUISE WHEATON PALMER, LUISA PALMER, BETTY LOUISE PALMER, and BETTE LOUISE WHEATON PALMER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LOUISE W. PALMER (also known as LOUISE WHEATON PALMER, BETTY LOUISE PALMER, BETTE LOUISE WHEATON PALMER, and LUISA PALMER) A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SCOTT PALMER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SCOTT PALMER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 4, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

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IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Avenue Chico CA, 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 18PR00494 Published: November 8,15,21, 2018

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530-894-2300 november 8, 2018

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REAL ESTATE

For more InFormATIon AboUT ADverTISInG In oUr reAL eSTATe SeCTIon, CALL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Fast Talk

$349,000 ad #125 Something unique, private, serene, with the sound of the creek below. This home sits near the end of the lane, so you won’t hear much of anything except nature. The home offers 2456 square feet, with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room/game room and this room looks into the atrium. There is a family room with a brick fireplace that has a wood insert for serious warming in the winter. At one end of the family room, there is room for your dining table, so this is a great room. There is also a breakfast nook in the Kitchen. The kitchen has newer appliances, including a refrigerator that stays with the home and just outside the kitchen and family room, you will find the large patio and hot tub and your peaceful setting anytime of the day, or evening. The master bedroom is downstairs and is expansive. There is a bonus room upstairs off one of the bedrooms and it has a small deck, or balcony that is brand new. If you are looking for a very pleasant place to century 21 select 5350 skyway be and relax, call to make an appointment to see this home.

Sue mawer paradise, ca 95969 530-520-4094 bre#01155605

This nice, young-sounding guy called me on the phone. He talked fast and there was road noise interference on his end, so the conversation was sketchy, but I’ll give the best rendition I can: “My dad sends me your real estate columns, and he said I should pay attention to that last one about Grandma worried about horror stories for her granddaughter buying a house because my dad is also freaked out about me buying my first house here in the Bay Area where I live and the prices are crazy high and everything goes so fast, but here’s the thing see I went ahead and made an offer on this place in a funky neighborhood in one of the only neighborhoods I can afford but funky as it is there were still a bunch of offers on it and I got pressed to-” That’s where the call dropped, and we were disconnected. Like I said, the guy talks fast, and I was just thinking about how strong that Bay Area coffee must be, when he called back.

“Sorry, I’m crossing the bridge and going through the tunnel, hey, thanks for taking the time for me, anyway, as I was saying, I got pressed by my agent to write my offer with no contingencies and a big deposit which is how they do things around here so I went with it but my dad says I’m crazy because it’s too late to back out without getting my ten grand deposit money back and now I’m freaking out because the house has all these problems and-” Gone again. I called back his number and left a voice mail: “I can’t get in the way of your agent by jumping in the middle of your transaction, but I will say it’s a dangerous game to write an offer with no contingencies. If you haven’t signed the Transfer Disclosure Statement, it may be an out for you. Now talk to your agent and find out where you stand. And please say hi to your dad.”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at C-21 in Chico. Got comments or suggestions? Call or text 530-680-0817, or email Doug.love@gmail.com. License #950289

Homes are Selling in Your Neighborhood Shop every home for sale at www.C21SelectGroup.com

530.345.6618 Beautiful Home

32 Glenshire Ln 3 bed, 2 bath, 1,472 sq ft North Chico.

3 bd 2 bth with lots of upgrades. Call now for more info and private showing.

$275,000 Call me for details.

$499,975

Steve KaSpRzyK (KAS-peR-ziK) You don’t have to spell it out for me to sell it!

(530) 518–4850 License#01145231

CalDRE #02056059

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

336 Denali Dr 2275 E 8th St 2955 Ruby River Dr 1990 Preservation Oak Dr 13454 Centerville Rd 1979 E 8th St 6 Via Los Arboles 3415 Rodgers Ave 3208 Mystery Run 1428 Half Dome Way 2697 Chantel Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$529,000 $525,000 $520,000 $500,000 $444,000 $440,000 $435,000 $403,000 $389,000 $376,000 $372,000

4/3 3/3 4/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/3 4/2 4/3 4/3

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CN&R 

november 8, 2018

AFFORDABLE... move in ready! Cozy home, 2 bd/1 bath, sits on large lot w/large side area for parking and RV access to back yard. Home includes a basement (3 rooms) A Must See...

Buying Or SeLLing a HOme? CaLL LL tOday! i Can HeLp SMILeS ALWAyS!

Reduced educed to

$219,900

Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2609 1874 2564 2146 2454 1884 2143 2048 2215 2130 1940

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

26 Redding Ct 1373 Huggins Ave 20 Elisha Ct 2146 Moyer Way 900 Greenwich Dr 1016 Southampton Dr 1115 Spruce Ave 1315 Salem St 2224 Mariposa Ave 2215 Mulberry St 2948 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$365,000 $349,000 $329,000 $325,000 $320,000 $282,500 $278,000 $258,000 $248,000 $220,000 $205,000

3/1 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 2/1 2/1 3/1 2/1 2/2

SQ. FT. 1050 1392 1614 1703 1424 1215 1114 908 1111 744 904


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Richard.Graeff@CaliberHomeLoans.com www.RichardGraeff.com Purchase • Refinance VA • FHA • USDA • Conventional 1st Time Buyer & Investment Properties 2580 Sierra Sunrise Terrace STE 200, Chico CA 95928 Caliber Home Loans, Inc., 1525 S. Beltline Rd Coppell, TX 75019 NMLS ID #15622 (www. nmlsconsumeraccess.org). 1-800-401-6587. Copyright © 2018. All Rights Reserved. This is not an offer to enter into an agreement. Not all customers will qualify. Information, rates, and programs are subject to change without prior notice. All products are subject to credit and property approval. Not all products are available in all states or for all dollar amounts. Other restrictions and limitations apply. Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act.

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the Professionals at Century 21 Select

530.345.6618 | www.C21SelectGroup.com Senior mobile in park 3 bed/2.5 bath, 1,992 sq ft with many updates! ........................................ $95,000

open Floor plan! 4 bed/3 bth, 1,767 sq ft. Nice touches! .............................................................$329,900

butte ValleY 2 custom homes, private setting on 235 acs, horse or cattle ................................$1,899,000

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

$229,000 1050 ft in North Chico, LD SOsq home features a 1 car garage and very large backyard

DurHam 3 bed/2 bth, 1,600 sq ft in town, easy care lot, home has upgrades!.................................$273,500 beautiFul updated home offering 3 bed 2 bth, 1,126 sq ft with lots of nice touches! ....................$289,900 Cul De SaC, RV PARKING, 3 bed 2 bth, 1,776 sq ft ........................................................................... $360,000 branD neW eXterior paint!,, 4 bed, 2,070 G sq ft., Park location!. ................................... $425,000 DIN ENbth, P2.5

New 2100+ home, 3 car garage $479,000 Lot in Butte Meadows $76,900 20 acres with views $145,000

Immaculate 3 bedroom home with a bonus room that could easily be a 4th bedroom. LDcarpet and new Built in 2000 and SO has new interior paint, 1842 sq ft, $327,000.

WalnutS! 2.56 acs, + newer manufactured 3 bed/2 bth, 1,716 sq foot nice home!...................... $385,000

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

CalBRE #01312354

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 Lic# 01318330

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of October 22- October 26, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

443 W 4th Ave 1318 Dayton Rd 1216 Jackson St 578 E 9th Ave #1 973 Virginia St 661 E 16th St 1420 Sherman Ave #14 4 Satsuma Ct 79 Galaxy Ave 342 Canyon Highlands Dr 3431 Morningside Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$200,000 $195,000 $185,000 $180,000 $169,000 $141,000 $135,000 $355,000 $305,000 $285,000 $220,500

2/1 3/2 3/1 1/1 2/1 2/1 2/2 3/3 3/2 2/2 3/1

SQ. FT. 957 1300 1026 546 936 974 915 2116 2000 1498 1259

ADDRESS 52 Arbol Ave Vae 5760 Vista Del Cerro 1939 Dean Rd 5501 Alpine Ct 1810 Stark Ln 5825 Golden Oaks Rd 5780 Pentz Rd 5512 Newland Rd 5370 Pentz Rd 8415 Montna Dr 1558 Wagstaff Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$208,500 $202,500 $419,000 $409,000 $250,000 $239,000 $235,000 $229,500 $227,000 $226,000 $189,000

3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 2/2 4/2 3/2 2/2 3/2 2/1

1984 1120 2007 2490 1405 1434 1681 1232 1386 1636 1064

november 8, 2018

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EVERY SURVIVOR’S JOURNEY IS UNIQUE Healing from INCEST seems impossible, but the guilt and shame one may feel was never theirs to carry.

Insightful Nurturing Self Courageous Empowering Self-Acceptance Triumphant STOP THE CYCLE & START THE HEALING

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN: 530.342.RAPE (7273) COLLECT CALLS ACCEPTED BUTTE/GLENN: 530.891.1331 · TEHAMA: 530.529.3980

ALL VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT WILL RECEIVE A FREE FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION, regardless of whether or not they choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS ABOUT SEXUAL ASSAULT. If you or someone you know has been sexually violated, contact Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention.

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