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ChiCo’s News & eNtertaiNmeNt weekly

Volume 42, issue 7

thursday, oCtoBer 11, 2018

www.NewsreView.Com

FREE


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CN&R 

october 11, 2018


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 7 • October 11, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 4 4 5 5 7

NEWSLINES

8

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES

12

Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

16

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

18

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

58

BEST of

Chic 2018

COVER STORY

20

ARTS & CULTURE

58

Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Fine arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

CLASSIFIEDS

71

REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designers Catalina Munevar, Naisi Thomas Custom Publications Designer Katelynn Mitrano Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Alec Binyon, Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultant Autumn Slone Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Sara Shaughnessy, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

OCTOBER 11, 2018

CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., chico, cA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

callous disregard for victims’ rights Brett Kavanaugh’s hasty confirmation to the Supreme

Court sends a clear and decisive message to women the nation over—irrespective of political affiliation—that the president and GOP have no interest in hearing or doing anything about sexual violence. Senate Republicans’ fabricated outrage over the treatment of fratboy Kavanaugh during the vetting process is one of the most insincere theatrical episodes the legislative branch has undertaken during the trainwreck that is the Trump era. And that’s saying a lot. Their handling of the accusations levied by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and other women in Kavanaugh’s social sphere decades ago sets a chilling tone of callous disregard for victims’ rights. We know from watching the confirmation hearings that Kavanaugh is far from Supreme Court material. There, he dodged questions, vocalized conspiracy theories involving Bill and Hillary Clinton, and quarreled with those who attempted to determine if he is a serial drinker and would-be rapist. Indeed, Brett Kavanaugh showed us exactly who he is: a petty, belligerent, unstable partisan who admittedly has a penchant for alcohol. Here is a choice quote from his testimony: “This is a circus. The consequences will extend long past my nomination. The consequences will be with us for decades. This grotesque and coordinated character assassination will dissuade competent and good people

of all political persuasions from serving our country. “And as we all know, in the United States’ political system of the early 2000s, what goes around comes around.” How’s that for a not-so-veiled threat? Among his many character flaws—the drinking and misogyny, etc.—Kavanaugh is a liar. In fact, he lied under oath. Several classmates, also Republicans, have contradicted his testimony that he never drank to the point of blacking out. They also contradicted Kavanaugh’s testimony about the crude and sexist passages he penned for his yearbook entry. Moreover, he lied under oath about how he learned about the sexual misconduct allegations—he testified he’d read about them in a news story, but it’s been revealed he began to try to discredit his alleged victims months prior to the confirmation hearings. The Senate’s efforts to jam through the embattled, ultra-conservative Kavanaugh—in spite of a mound of questions as to his fitness—are demonstrative of just how out of touch the predominately white, aged, male senators are with everyday America. Many of the aforementioned pols are part of a dying breed clinging to the last vestiges of their prominence and power. The price to the republic be damned. In this case, the cost is the legitimacy of the nation’s highest court. It is marred for the foreseeable future. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Documenting the disastrous rightward lurch Fahrenheit 11/9, M clarion call to seize the opportunity we have to use what is left of our democracy to keep this counichael Moore’s new movie,

is a

try from driving off a cliff. Don’t think that you are immune to what is happening in this country because you live in a fairly prosperous, white, sheltered community. There are multiple Americas, and many of them are suffering. I was surprised at the size of the outrage just this year shown to us so clearly by this documentary and not by the media. The recently by Benjamin Hills departed CEO of CBS was quoted as saying about the whole Trump the author is a phenomenon: “It may not be good photographer, writer and film critic. He has for the country, but it’s damn good lived in chico for for us.” 19 years. The “collusion” not spoken about enough is that between the

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OctOber 11, 2018

major news networks in minimizing widespread support for Bernie Sanders. All this and much— more that led to the election of an incompetent president and the disaster for so many in the two years since is explained in this film. The poisoning of Flint, Mich., and the hopelessness of people disenfranchised by policies designed to remove the rights we have come to expect did not have to happen. The speeches of Donald Trump chosen by Moore make it clear that recent policy changes are deliberately written to advance white supremacy at the expense of the rest of America. As a 103-year-old woman who drops her ballot in the box in the film says, “This is the most important election in my lifetime.” A T-shirt on a man in one of his rallies sums up the rightward lurch Trump has precipitated, declaring “I’d rather be Russian than Democrat.” This movie is an informative history of crime, incompetence and malfeasance fueled by greed, ignorance and a lust for power. If we are lucky it will come back to a screen in town before the election. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

blasts from the past If this newspaper feels heftier than the typical CN&R, it’s because this is our annual jumbo-size Best of Chico issue. At 76 pages, it’s close to double the average. It also happens to be our most-read issue of the year. People love contests, you see. This one, now in its 35th year, is the biggest and … well … best around these parts. After we put the finishing touches on the list of winners in 146 categories of Readers’ Picks—whew, you read that right—as well as our Editors’ Picks, I began wondering what the contest was like in its beginnings. So, I headed over to our bound volumes and began skimming old issues, including the inaugural edition of Best of Chico in the mid-1980s. Remember, we’re talking pre-internet. Best of Chico definitely has evolved over the years. For starters, the Editors’ Picks back then were interspersed with the Readers’ Picks. For instance, Best Mexican Food (El Indio) is followed shortly thereafter by Best Political Feud (“gadfly Kelly Meagher and Supervisor Hilda Wheeler,” who “seek any opportunity at the Tuesday Board of Supervisors’ meeting to zap their opponents.”). I’ve lived around these parts for 20 years—and have visited family here all my life—but I learned a thing or two reading the writeups. For example, that upside down airplane that used to be on the top of the old Spirits of America gas station at Nord and Glenwood avenues was a real plane, not a prop, as I’d always assumed. According to a cheeky Best of Chico category, Best Plane in Architecture, which clearly is a staffer’s random blurb, that plane was a 1947 Ercoupe that crashed at the Paradise Airport back in 1979. Evidently, the mini mart’s owner recruited members of the Lambda Pi fraternity to hoist it on the building. “Their payment: two cases of champagne.” Sounds pretty Chico to me. Another fun one from back in the day: Best Skinny Dipping Spot. Now, the picks written by staffers aren’t bylined, but I can pretty much guarantee that one was penned by retired CN&R Editor Robert Speer. For the record, according to the write-up, it’s Brown’s Hole. More memory lane Best of Chico: Best Beer Tavern: Joe’s Place; Best Hamburger Drive-In: Foster’s Old-Fashioned Freeze; Best Basement: La Fonda; Best Closed Punk Bar: Nellie’s; Best Defunct Newspaper: The Butte County Bugle. We hope you enjoy reading the 2018 version.

SPeAking Of tHe beSt, I have a few more to mention. First off, this month marks CN&R Art Director Tina Flynn’s 40th year with the company. Tina is pretty much the anchor around here. She not only works meticulously on each page, like the lovely cover of this issue, but is truly indispensable in numerous other ways. Her duties range from—I kid you not—designing the paper to ordering supplies like toilet paper. Happy anniversary to her! And last, but not least, a heartfelt happy retirement shout-out to longtime CN&R distribution driver Mara Schultz, who, from 2002 until recently, delivered this newspaper to the Paradise Ridge, rain or shine. Before that, she worked in the classified department. Mara is a fellow animal lover and kick in the pants and all of us appreciate her long service. That includes the folks on her route, who I’m told still ask about her.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

AnTique TAlk

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

On the last issue Re “Homeless script flipped” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga), “Stepping down” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper) and “An odious letter” (Letters, by Tom Malolepszy): Thoughts on the Oct. 4 edition of the CN&R: 1) Chico has declared a “shelter crisis,” but the devil is in the details; i.e, with his motion to capture state funding for the Jesus Center—to be renamed the “Renewal Center” (a “point-of-intake” facility, replacing Chico’s only soup kitchen)— Councilman [Andrew] Coolidge signaled, once again, that all roads must lead to a “consolidation” compound. 2) Our council was again unanimous in its tone-deaf approach to human rights in the public space, as evidenced in wide support for a permanent homeless hit-squad, aka Street Crimes Unit. 3) With the closing of Stairways, 30 people will lose shelter—however squalid. It’s a disaster. Were we to learn anything

from this failure, we’d have to go much deeper into how Michael Madieros and his ally, real estate mogul Wayne Cook, manipulated the homeless issue for years, with scant understanding of how “velvet hammer” criminalization—and our failure to provide real services and decent housing—afflicts those on the streets. 4) In conflating the Brock Turner case with the Brett Kavanaugh travesty, letter writer Tom Malolepszy unwittingly illustrates the point of my guest comment: In the realm of gender, we are increasingly incapable of well-reasoned, dispassionate discourse. Patrick Newman Chico

More on homelessness It is time that we take a realistic view of the homeless situation in Chico. We have a crisis! Punishment has not worked, the homeless are not going away. Consolidation is too little too late. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled on Sept. 18, 2018,

that as long as there is no option of sleeping indoors, the government cannot criminalize people for sleeping outdoors on public property. My friend Patrick Newman has been arguing this for years! Patrick has been a consistent, loud and clear voice for the rights of the homeless. Not only has he defended their right to exist in our city, he has personally taken action to defend their right to use the plaza by distributing food and clothes each Sunday. Patrick has been right all along. Now it’s not only his opinion, it’s California law. What’s next? Now we wait for the lawsuits against the city for criminalization of the homeless. We still have a crisis with no solution in view. Rosie Kuhn Chico

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CN&R

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october 11, 2018

If they did not believe Dr. Ford, they’re not going to believe me either.

law, she would not have been shot. What would the discussion have been if Sharpe had broken free, continued to flee and then crashed into and killed a car full of innocent bystanders? The decision of the city of Chico to make this payment is a bad decision. Mark Priano Chico

—ralph Slater

“You can’t legislate morals; making a law that says you will do right.” Mr. Beadle nailed it. Quote: “Those who control the nation’s wealth will control the legislative process, and laws will favor capitalism, not democracy.” With almost any analogy, to have the insight and to express such in coherent language is to be commended. When the subject is our quality of life—whether it be financial, moral, etc.—it requires a process to not only recognize the circumstances, but also to do something about it. Take, for example, the hound dog that was sounding off with such an expression of pain that the passerby asks, what in the hell is wrong with that poor dog? The reply came back: He’s sitting on his tail. Ernie Bean Paradise

Settlement feedback Re “Settlement in sight” (Downstroke, Oct. 4): It is unfortunate that innocent victims in many cases do not receive the same support and justice from our courts as those who commit criminal acts. PursuitSAFETY does not support fleeing drivers and is disgusted at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision upholding the excessive force claim of the officer-involved shooting of Breanne Sharpe. We are dismayed that the city of Chico will offer up a settlement to her mother. This individual led police on a high-speed chase in February 2013 driving a stolen vehicle putting innocent bystanders at risk. Seven months later, she is again eluding officers in a pursuit, fleeing, running into a pole, trees, vehicles and putting the car in reverse toward officers. As a repeat offender, Sharpe again put the lives of police officers and innocent bystanders in danger. If she would not have again been breaking the

Back and forth Re “The upsell” (Letters, by Peter Bridge, Oct. 4): Mr. Bridge, I didn’t realize that your argument is that abortion is somehow OK, but shouldn’t make up 3 percent of a clinic’s business. Let’s start with your apparent premise that the word “abortion” describes a bad thing. Abortion is an option every woman has a right to. Abortion is a medical procedure. Abortion is virtually unavailable in many areas because of the Christian right’s “belief” that theirs is the only correct opinion on the matter. Abortion phobia fuels hate and murder in its addicts. Abortion is a subject 73-year-old men like me have little business opining on. Did I use “abortion” enough times that it takes the stigma of the word away? I doubt it. As for the rest, I have hiked naked, self-medicated and paid my taxes with no thought they were confiscatory. I plan on choosing the way I die if at all possible, like my late wife did. I am glad we have a strong government to provide the many services we desire, and regulate the people who would take all they can of the common (stuff that belongs to all of us) for their own enrichment. Rich Meyers Oroville

He likes Jerry Re “Faux eco gov” (Letters, by Garry Cooper, Oct. 4): I’ll add (to a recent letter) some important points in the role that Gov. Jerry Brown has accomplished in moving California to a green state. In the 1970s, Brown forced the utilities to pay manufactures for electricity produced in the cogeneration process, thus reducing the need for coal plants, like the one that PG&E proposed south of Chico, which was stopped by Jane Dolan. Brown also was the first in the country to start wind turbine farms (Altamont Pass, Bay Area).

Today, Gov. Brown is the international leader on the threats of Earth heating up, while the Republicans, led by Trump, have their heads in the sand. Over the decades I have observed some at meetings criticizing Vice President Al Gore (awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for his environmental work), Gov. Jerry Brown and other climate change leaders for not solving every problem the world is facing, yet the critics drove to the meetings in oversize SUVs or very old polluting cars. Bob Mulholland Chico

Roundabout revulsion  Re “A visual feast” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Sept. 27): I hate this new structure in the roundabout. It is too tall and obstructs my ability to see the cars about to enter the roundabout or the ones already in it. [It cost] $378,000 to make it more difficult! What a waste of money! Now I will always avoid that intersection when I go downtown. The streets around where I live aren’t even paved to the curb! And there are numerous pot holes— why can’t they fix that? Nicolette Gamache Chico

‘They’d just laugh’ “If they did not believe Dr. Ford, they’re not going to believe me either. Even the president made fun of her, and everyone laughed and clapped! They’d just laugh at me, too,” thought the distraught rape victim. Ralph Slater Chico

Correction Last week’s Healthlines story (see “Boosting positivity,” by Ashiah Scharaga, Oct. 4) incorrectly identified Mains’l Services as a nonprofit organization. It is a limited liability corporation. We apologize for the error, which has been corrected online. —ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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CN&R

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE PARTY PUNCHERS

Five people apparently tried to force their way into a private house party last week and resorted to throwing punches when turned away. That night, Oct. 4, ended in a stabbing. About 11:15 p.m., Chico police officers arrived at a home on the 600 block of West Sixth Street to find a 21-year-old man who had been stabbed in the upper leg. Witnesses told police that five unfamiliar people—three men and two women—had tried to join the festivities, and when asked to leave, they started a fight by “suckerpunching” random party-goers. Officers found the suspects and their getaway car, a white Honda Civic, the next night on Oak Street. Amarion Lang, 24, of Sacramento, was identified as the alleged stabber; and Angelo Craver, a 20-year-old convicted felon, also of Sacramento, was arrested for carrying a concealed and loaded pistol.

POT ZONING ADVANCES IN OROVILLE

Cannabis businesses hoping to operate in Oroville moved a step closer to legality last Thursday (Oct. 4), when the city’s Planning Commission passed a zoning ordinance for City Council approval. On a 3-to-1 vote, with three members absent, the commission recommended allowing dispensaries to set up shop no closer than 1,000 feet from parks, schools, day care centers and churches—up from 600 feet in an earlier draft—and prohibiting any cannabis business except for dispensaries from displaying a commercial sign. Visit tinyurl.com/OrovilleCannabis to find the provisions. The council has not yet set a date to consider the ordinance.

MISSING CHICO MAN FOUND DEAD Butte County Sheriff’s officers determined the fate of a Chico man missing for a week when they discovered his body Monday afternoon (Oct. 8) in a Concow-area canyon. Robert Gonzales, 53, last contacted his family Oct. 1. The Chico Police Department got a missing person’s report last Wednesday (Oct. 3). According to a sheriff’s office press release, family members told police that Gonzales (pictured) was planning to stay with a friend who lives in the Big Bend area of Concow. The search for him started last Friday. Sheriff’s detectives are investigating the cause of death.

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OCTOBER 11, 2018

Sign of the times Chicoans targeted for promoting equality

W States’ 45th president, Liz Michelena found her political calling. hen Donald Trump became the United

“I woke up the morning after Election Day with the dread of having to face my story and children and tell them photo by Ashiah the news,” she said. “I Scharaga had to show them when things go wrong, you ash i a h s @ stand up and you act.” n ew sr ev i ew. c o m She joined likeminded citizens who formed Mobilize Chico, dedicating themselves to the mission of defending human rights and dignity and preserving democratic values through political engagement. At the same moment, nearly 500 miles away, Nasty Women Get Shit Done PDX launched in Portland, Ore., with a similar goal. Collaborating with Portland artists, the group created an American flag image that has since been emblazoned on tens of thousands of yard signs, stickers and posters. One of those signs rests in Michelena’s yard. It reads: “In our America all people are equal, love wins, black lives matter,

immigrants & refugees are welcome, disabilities are respected, women are in charge of their bodies, people & planet are valued over profit, diversity is celebrated.” Proceeds of the flag sales have gone to organizations supporting those values. As of August, the Portland group has donated $110,350. Michelena has had her sign up for more than a year and enjoys spotting dog walkers in her California Park neighborhood who stop to read it and offer a thumbs up. Recently, however, she received an angry letter in the mail. Signed by an Edward Stevens from “Maini” Street, the letter says that the Michelena family’s sign is offensive to neighbors because it is hate speech supporting Black Lives Matter. Though BLM is a global activist movement—with members who protest police killings of black people, police brutality, racial profiling and racial inequality—the writer argues that it is a “terrorist group” that supports the killing of America’s police officers. Stevens—though the name is potentially an alias—continues by asking the Michelenas to leave the coun-

try. Beneath his signature are the initials of 13 supposed neighbors. Upon reading, Michelena felt mixed emotions of amusement, anger and disbelief. The writer bought into what she calls a “Fox News cult” mentality, fueled by misinformation and propaganda. Michelena supports BLM and police officers, and advocates for more police training when it comes to racial bias and use of nonlethal force. “It’s not an either/or,” she said. “The sign is standing up for so many threatened communities.” Michelena reported the letter to the FBI tip line, in case it is part of a larger hate campaign; bought 25 more “In Our America” signs to give to her neighbors and friends; then returned to her activist duties with Mobilize. It turned out she wasn’t the only target in

Chico. Deborah Pruitt had a chance meeting with Michelena at a recent Mobilize Chico event, in which members stood in solidarity with survivors of sexual assault and pro-


Liz Michelena’s family was targeted for displaying an “In Our America” sign in the front yard of their home in California Park.

tested Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation as Supreme Court justice. The pair were discussing this year’s election and found out they both received the same letter criticizing their “In Our America” signs, despite living in different neighborhoods. The day Pruitt received the letter in the mail, from an Edward Stevens on “Coit Tower Way,” it hit her like a slap in the face, she told the CN&R. She had been through an exhausting week with her husband, Larry Jenson, who was seeking medical care in the Bay Area. She worried that her family had been targeted and called the police, speaking with an officer who said there were no other complaints made or reports of vandalism in the area, and that the letter writer likely just wanted to be heard. When Pruitt found out there was another person impacted by this, she felt less alone. The women suspect that there are other letter recipients across the city. It’s no question that the cultural norms for acceptable behavior have changed since 2016, Pruitt said. She was a longtime professor of anthropology in the Bay Area before moving to Chico with her husband last year. “I am very sad to see how things are going in our society right now. These are core American values, and we still stand for that … I think the sign expresses confidence and openness, and then people react out of fear. That says to me they feel insecure.” This incident has caused Michelena to

reflect on her political activism. Before the 2016 election, Michelena was content voting and sharing articles online, and now she has a laundry list of ways she has become politically engaged, including canvassing for a friend running for Chico City Council, participating in protests and marches, serving as a Democratic Party delegate and attending council meetings. “The country has become so polarized, and civil discourse about why we believe the way we believe is so difficult, because we’re all in our own echo chambers,” she told the CN&R. “I want to live in a country where diversity is celebrated, women are valued and nobody feels under threat because of who they are, and all of that has tumbled so far downhill over the past two years that it feels like I’m baling out the ocean one teaspoon at a time. “Democracy takes work, and we’ve been lazy and complacent,” she added. “And that time is over.” Ω

Council seat sweepstakes Fundraising for Chico’s 2018 election reaches almost $300,000 Candidates for Chico City Council are in the

final stretch of campaign season, which means they’re ramping up spending on everything from mailers to billboards. To date, this could well be the most expensive race yet (in 2016, now-Mayor Sean Morgan raised about $62,000). The seven candidates who are accepting donations have brought in a whopping $286,718. It should come as no surprise that the conservative trio has garnered the major-

ity of that financial backing, with each of its three candidates bringing in more than $50,000. Here are the numbers, as gathered from campaign finance documents filed with the city of Chico—the most recent reporting date being Sept. 22. The majority of the spending has occurred in the past couple of months, and it’s safe to expect that to increase as we inch closer to November.

· Progressive Alex Brown has raised $20,805.25. The majority of her contributions have come in smaller denominations of less than $100—with many $27. (Bernie Sanders

SIFT ER Best in energy efficiency It’s likely not a surprise that California is one of the most energy-efficient states in the nation. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy released its 2018 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard this month. California ranked second, following Massachusetts. As the national government has loosened environmental rules, top states are those that have chosen to continue investing in energy efficiency. The report evaluates state policies/programs for utilities, buildings, transportation, combined heat/ power and appliances. Massachusetts established three-year energy savings targets and approved utility spending to update its power grid. Meanwhile, California rolled out an updated zero-emissions vehicles plan, and required new

homes and commercial buildings be net zero energy by 2020 and 2030, respectively. Overall, states invested nearly $8 billion in utility energy efficiency in 2017, up from $7.6 billion in 2016. This resulted in a 7.3 percent increase in electricity savings—enough to power about 2.5 million U.S. homes per year. Top five states: 1. Massachusetts 2. California 3. Rhode Island

4. Vermont 5. Connecticut

Scott Huber, center left, and Matt Gallaway, pictured during a light moment at a recent candidate forum, lead the progressive and conservative candidates, respectively, in fundraising for the City Council race. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

famously received an average of $27 per donor and pulled in over $8 million during his run for the presidency in 2016.) The majority of her expenditures—which actually outpace her fundraising, at $21,557.06— have gone to billboards and mailers.

· In 2017, incumbent Andrew Coolidge raised $21,445, and this year his supporters have thrown in an additional $31,160, bringing his fundraising total to $52,605. About $10,000 was a loan to himself. The majority of his contributions came in the $250 range. To date, he’s spent the most—nearly $32,000—on his campaign, $21,000 the past couple of months. About $8,500 of that has gone toward campaign literature, plus $5,000 toward radio ads. · Matt Gallaway has raised $62,721.50, with almost half of that coming in last year— $30,350—and the rest, $32,371.50, this year. The majority of his contributions were either $100 or $500, with only a handful clocking in at less than $100. As an architect and a conservative, it’s unsurprising that much of his campaign money has come from builders and developers. He’s spent about $20,000 to date, the majority on campaign literature. · Among the progressives, Scott Huber has raised the most—$37,299.41—with the majority in donations of under $150. He’s spent about $23,500, much of it on lawn signs and billboards. NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D OCTOBER 11, 2018

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· Richard Ober took in $6,720 in 2017 and ramped up fundraising this year, bringing in $23,137 for a grand total of $29,857. Most of his contributions came in the $20-$100 range. He’s spent roughly $13,000, mostly on signs, billboards and mailers. · Ken Rensink, who has vowed to not accept donations of more than $100, has raised just $10,045.61. Nearly all of that—$9,000—came in the form of a loan to himself. He’s spent about $7,000, most of it on billboards. · Kasey Reynolds has raised $59,106.85 this year. Her case is a bit unique in that she originally threw her hat in the ring for Butte County supervisor, but switched gears earlier this year. She’d raised

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The seven candidates who are accepting donations have brought in a whopping $286,718. about $12,000 in 2017 for the former and, after expenditures, transferred about $6,000 to her City Council campaign. To date, she’s spent almost $25,000.

· There’s one political action committee participating in this year’s City Council election. It calls itself Chico Citizens for Accountable Government and is campaigning on behalf of Coolidge, Gallaway and Reynolds. It has raised $21,000, the majority of which has come in the form of $5,000 donations, most of them from local developers. It’s spent about half of what it’s brought in, almost all of it on “slate placement” for Gallaway and Reynolds. Note: While the candidates may not characterize themselves as part of a slate, they technically have no control over what kinds of advertising a PAC may do on their behalf. · Candidate Jon Scott has filed no paperwork and has said he is not fundraising. —Meredith J. Cooper me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m


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political affiliation, Chris Smith has grown increasingly disappointed with the tone of political discourse. His unease hit an apex after the 2016 presidential election. “I was noticing there was a big chunk on the left and right who couldn’t talk to each other anymore,” he told the CN&R. “I think there’s also a big chunk in the middle … that can still talk and we’re seeing this degradation. Those of us on the sidelines have let our civil institutions degrade.” Smith counted himself among those “watching from the sidelines” even though he’d “been somebody who’d always been interested in politics.” At that point, he continued, “I figured it was time to stop sitting around, step up as a Viewing info: citizen and start Visit facebook.com/ trying to do NorCalNewsNow to find podcast videos, typisomething.” cally uploaded 7 p.m. What Smith Sundays. The Chico does for a livcandidates forum ing is televiMonday evening (Oct. sion and video 15) at Congregation Beth Israel should be production. In up Wednesday evening. fact, he’s won two regional Emmys for his work with teens on public service announcements. (See “The Emmy goes to …,” Scene, July 5, 2012.) So, when he discovered that friends Mike Richman and Aaron Haar wanted to launch a podcast offering politicians and other community members a forum for expressing their ideas, he jumped on as a producer. “Building a place where rational people on the left and right can talk intelligently, without shouting, is something I figured I could contribute,” Smith added. Along with Ben Weddell, who works for Smith at RocketSpots TV in Paradise, they’ve created NorCal News Now—a recurring program that streams online via Facebook as well as YouTube. It debuted in April 2017 as an audio pod-

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cast, upgrading to video this past February after 18 episodes. “Every time we could come in and do a show, Aaron would look longingly at those cameras and go, ‘Can’t we just do this on video?’” Richman recalled with a chuckle. “We started doing it, and it’s really changed the equation.” Richman hosts; Haar provides political commentary; both interview guests. Weddell, as coproducer and booker, brings in people from across party lines: Democrats such as congressional candidate Audrey Denney and Senate challenger Kevin de León; Republicans such as Travis Allen, who lost the gubernatorial primary; even a democratic socialist, David Hildebrand, who ran against de León in June. Monday (Oct. 15), NorCal News Now will hold its first public event— a forum for Chico City Council candidates—which it will broadcast two days later (see infobox). Viewership varies based on the

guest and topic. Richman cited a recent episode with Assembly candidate Sonia Aery, a Chico Democrat, as typical, drawing 2,000 views and 60 shares. Richman brings journalistic credentials to the interview desk. A Rutgers grad, he came to Chico in 2000 to write for Magical Blend magazine, then moved to Quality Digest in 2004, becoming publisher the next year. For that businessto-business publication, Richman decided in 2011 that video content was essential, so he added a weekly show—Quality Digest Live—to the website. (See “Quality control,” 15 Minutes, May 8, 2014.) He hired Smith as his producer.

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Haar, whom Richman met soon after moving from New Jersey, is active in statewide Democratic politics. He managed the 2016 congressional campaign for Jim Reed, who lost to GOP incumbent Doug LaMalfa—whom, by the way, Richman hopes they can book for NorCal News Now. Haar also serves as a Chico city parks commissioner, appointed by progressive City Councilman Karl Ory. “He’s a partisan—he would own up to it as well,” Richman said of Haar. “He’s supported progressive candidates, he’s an operative. “His knowledge is terrific, but on both sides of the equation. He knows the strategy and tactics on the other side, as well. For color commentary, he’s valuable.” When booking guests, Richman said producers “make that [affiliation] real clear … and I don’t hide the fact that I’m left-leaning, too.” He considers himself “a centrist” and, by asking about biographical information and broad ideas instead of political minutiae, Richman feels he counterbalances his co-host. “I don’t feel a real need to editorialize,” Richman added. “I feel our job is to ask good questions and give our guests two, three minutes to spread out and really say what they’re thinking. Yeah, follow up— but in a respectful way.” As for a political tone for the show, “I always try to drag it to the middle regardless of who the guest is.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva nt u c h i ns k y @new srev i ew. c o m

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HEALTHLINES Jackie Kent, left, and Alyssa Cozine at Catalyst Domestic Violence Services still see obstacles to victims reporting abuse, even in the time of #MeToo.

she was sexually assaulted by Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, prior to his appointment. Organizations across the state are encouraging people to be informed voters and hold elected leaders to a standard of deeper understanding of the violence impacting survivors, families and communities. Since its founding in Chico in 1977, Catalyst

On your side Catalyst embraces, supports victims of abuse

story and photo by

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Ahealthy than 500 presentations countywide about relationships and intimate partner

lyssa Cozine estimates she has given more

violence. During her nearly six years as Catalyst Domestic Violence Services’ community educator, she cannot think of one presentation that hasn’t led to a teen or adult sharing a story of domestic violence, either experienced personally or by a friend or relative. Cozine, who has her master’s degree in psychology, recalled one session in which she was teaching high-schoolers about the cycle of abuse—a theory explaining behavioral patterns in abusive relationships. In these instances, couples go through stages: tension—during which stress builds from daily life—leading to violence from the abuser, followed by a honeymoon, reconciliation or calm period, before tension begins

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to build again. One girl had an epiphany during the session, confiding in Cozine: “That was present in my [former] relationship. … Looking back, that was definitely what was happening.” This sort of moment—opening the eyes and minds of teens—is just one example of Catalyst’s outreach efforts, which also include preventative education in elementary schools. The private, not-for-profit agency has engaged in violence prevention and advocated for victims of domestic abuse, and their children, for more than 40 years. Though often the hardest part of its work to fund, the organization’s education and outreach team has increased by two professionals in the past five years. In the same amount of time, it has created annual events like the Love Is acoustic showcase, in which local musicians perform songs that promote healthy relationships, and Youth Empowered, a conference that teaches eighth-graders about bystander intervention—how to step in safely during dangerous situations with their peers, before an assault happens.

Every October, for Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the agency puts together educational and free events to honor the lives of those lost to domestic violence and to celebrate healthy relationships. One in 3 people will experience relationship abuse in their lifetime, and that includes emotional abuse. Cozine says it is a common misconception that in order to be a victim of intimate partner abuse, someone has to experience physical pain. This year, Catalyst has joined the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence, taking on the theme of “the personal is political,” in light of witnessing the “heartbreak of survivors having to prove their trauma on the national stage.” This was most recently exemplified by Christine Blasey Ford, who publicly testified that

has grown in many areas. In the beginning, “there was a group of women who kept seeing the need [for refuge] and hearing stories about women wanting to leave relationships, feeling unsafe and having nowhere to go,” Associate Director Jackie Kent told the CN&R. “People took it upon themselves to have a community response and invited people into their own homes.” Catalyst’s emergency shelter, Haven, opened in 1985. Today, after multiple expansions, it provides shelter for 32 domestic violence survivors of all gender identities. Catalyst also offers four single-family transitional homes. There are drop-in centers in downtown Chico and Oroville, and by appointment in Paradise. Other services include counseling, a 24/7 hotline and legal help, the most common for filing restraining orders. Last year, the agency served 1,259 adults and 72 children. It offered 8,679 nights of shelter, answered 2,731 crisis calls, welcomed 1,581 crisis drop-ins and provided 1,856 counseling appointments. Lately, Catalyst has felt the momentum from the national #MeToo movement, as victims of intimate partner violence often

appOintMent Día del Campesino Along with traditional activities celebrating National Farmers’ Day, the 28th annual Día del Campesino at Hamilton City Community Park features free health screenings, community resources and information on child and youth services, hosted by organizations including the Hispanic Resource Council of Northern California and Enloe Medical Center. The event—Sunday (Oct. 14) from noon to 5 p.m.—also includes folklórico dancing, music, Mexican food, activities for kids and prize drawings throughout the day.

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HEALTHLINES have survived sexual abuse as well. Kent, who has been with Catalyst for eight years, said the agency has really focused on continuing “to send this message to survivors that they are worthy, they are valued, we’re here for them and we believe them.” It feels like society has taken a step forward for now, Cozine added, because it’s always good when survivors feel comfortable enough to come forward and share their stories. Still, the pair agree, many obstacles exist, and they are driven to create social change. Victims still feel a lot of guilt and shame about the abuse they have lived through, Kent said, or experience a negative reaction, such as disbelief, when they first try to tell someone what happened to them. Others have a hard time recognizing that they are victims, when abusive relationships or behavior was a normal aspect of their childhood. Physical barriers to leaving or reporting abusive relationships include housing, finances and transportation.

c O n t i n u e d f r O m pa g e 1 2

Seek help:

Catalyst Domestic Violence Services: 800-895-8476, catalystdvservices.org Chico State’s Safe Place: Student Services center 430, 898-3030 Butte College’s Safe Place & Wellness Program: Swing Space a, 879-6185 Rape Crisis Intervention and Prevention: 2889 cohasset road, Ste. 2; 342-7273

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A lot of people don’t talk about healthy relationships, Cozine said, and domestic violence remains a really uncomfortable topic, especially when it comes to telling family members or friends. Creating an ongoing dialogue in communities through educational programs, events and outreach—such as Domestic Violence Awareness Month—is an important part of bringing down those barriers, Cozine said, along with embracing survivors. “The more we can talk about the real impact of violence on people’s lives and focus on promoting healthy relationships,” Kent added, “the more we’ll see a shift in the acceptability of violence in our community.” Ω

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‘I like beer’ As depicted in movies such as Dazed and Confused and detailed in testimony during Brett Kavanaugh’s infamous Senate hearing, heavy drinking was common among teens in the 1970s and ’80s. As cheesy as they may have been to the Gen X target audience, ads from MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) and D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) can be credited with a decline in teen drinking. Their programs worked—data from the National Institutes of Health show that while 17 percent of 12thgraders were binge drinkers in 2015, that is a massive decrease from the 41 percent of binge-drinking seniors in 1979. Still, alcohol is one of the most widely available and commonly used drugs among teens. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, excessive drinking is responsible for more than 4,300 deaths among underage youth each year and people age 12-20 drink 11 percent of all alcohol consumed in the United States, with 90 percent of that booze in the form of binge drinking.

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GREENWAYS Loren Poncia not only raises  cattle, he’s among California’s  carbon farmers—participants   in a state effort to suck climatethreatening particles out of  the air. 

cultivating for the climate Carbon farmers put sequestration plans into action

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Alastair Bland

Lthepowerful gust of afternoon wind. Inside warm cab, he scans the sun-browned hills oren Poncia’s idling pickup shudders in a

through his binoculars, counting his grazing cows. Poncia raises beef cattle. As he sees it, though, what he is really doing is raising soil. “I’m growing grass to feed to my cattle, but it all comes down to having high-quality soil,” said Poncia, who owns Stemple Creek Ranch in western Marin County with his wife, Lisa. He is among more than 80 farmers now engaged in a state-funded program aimed at increasing carbon concentrations in California’s soil. Part of the state’s overarching goal of curbing greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate climate change, the California Healthy Soils Initiative took effect a year ago, when the state’s cap-and-trade program made $7.5 million available in small grants to farmers like Poncia. This year, the Healthy Soils Program, one component of the initiative, is receiving about $15 million. That money is used to encourage and implement carbon farming—the buzz term for any strategic agricultural practice that helps suck carbon atoms from the air and pump them into plant tissue and the ground faster than carbon cycles back out. Over time, the process creates rich, carbon-black soil. A growing community of scientists now believes carbon farming will be essential in helping curb global warming trajectories. Participating farmers add heavy layers of compost to invigorate plant growth while avoiding tilling, which exposes raw soil to the air and allows carbon atoms to bond with oxygen and float off as carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas. More than half of the Earth’s historic soil carbon has been released

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OctOber 11, 2018

into the atmosphere by unsustainable farming, according to researchers in the field, and the mission of California’s new policy is to put some of that carbon back in the ground. Farmers receiving Healthy Soils funding are now working about 8,600 acres. “But we need to do this [on] a mass scale—we need hundreds of thousands of acres engaged in this,” said Torri Estrada, executive director of the Carbon Cycle Institute, a Petaluma-based climate solutions think tank. The top roughly 8 inches of U.S. cropland and grassland soils five years ago contained more than 18 billion tons of carbon, according to a paper in the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation. The authors, including Ohio State University soil scientist Rattan Lal, found that U.S. carbon farming eventually could lead to annual carbon sequestration of 83 million tons per year on agricultural soils. Given all available lands in the country, including forests, as much as 475 million tons of carbon could be put into the ground each year. That’s significant, if not huge: California alone emitted 472 million tons of CO2 equivalent (CO2 isn’t the only greenhouse gas) in 2016, according to the state’s Air Resources Board. In an interview, Lal acknowledged that although “U.S. soils can technically achieve this,” even modest carbon sequestration goals About the article:

cN&r contributor Alastair bland wrote this story for cALmatters.org, an independent public journalism venture covering california state politics and government.

may be a long shot for the United States, politically. Estrada says it’s reasonable to expect well-managed pasture land to sequester half a ton of carbon per acre per year. By that formula, a farmer with 1,000 acres of land could potentially offset the carbon dioxide emissions of 500 active vehicles. Statistically significant changes in soil carbon levels, however, can take decades to appear. The California Department of Food and

Agriculture, which manages the soils program, has handed out carbon farming grants to growers in more than 30 counties. Paul Kjos, agricultural commissioner of Shasta County, said he doubts regional participation rates will be politically influenced. “Some farmers have very strong political views, but I don’t think they would ever avoid doing something that’s good for their land just because it might also politically benefit someone else,” Kjos said. Thaddeus Barsotti, co-owner of Capay Organic farm in the Sacramento Valley, said he believes human activity causes planetary warming. But he isn’t sold on the state’s carbon farming program. He said his soil’s carbon levels are already increasing. “If we want to maximize the amount of carbon in soil and produce food, there is no need to coin a fancy new term,” Barsotti said. “That method exists—it is certified organic agriculture. “If getting as much carbon into the ground becomes your entire focus, you can’t also grow vegetables. Ultimately, these methods of farming they’re promoting make it more expensive to grow food.”

Though it’s still early in Poncia’s carbonfarming run, this so far seems to be the case. He said the out-of-pocket cost of creating his enormous compost reserves, which he has amassed on a hilltop, was almost $60,000—double what his three-year state grant will cover. Still, he’s gambling that spreading the fertilizer over his land will eventually result in more forage, more beef and more profit. As the Healthy Soils Program enters its second year, proponents say the state is under-funding it. Estrada contends incentives should be $80 million to $100 million. This could change with time, said Jenny Lester Moffitt, the undersecretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture: “As this program builds and gets more support, I imagine the Legislature will respond and offer more money to the program.” Ω

ECO EVENT Meep meep! Though there have been a slew of roadrunner sightings in Upper Park, perhaps your best chance to spot one is with the experts at Altacal Audubon Society when they go birding on the Yahi Trail. They’re heading out Saturday (Oct. 13). Birders of all levels and nature lovers in general are invited, especially those wanting to learn about the vast avian wildlife in Bidwell Park. The group meets at Parking Lot E at 8 a.m.; you should wear good hiking shoes, and bring water and a snack. Binoculars are recommended, but there will be a few pairs available to borrow. Visit facebook.com/Altacal Audubon for more information.


Together We’re Chico Rich

OBER

Chico City Council Whether progressive, conservative, or somewhere in between, we are first and foremost Chicoans. Let’s work together to make the city we love even better. oberforchico.com Paid for by Ober for Chico City Council 2018 FPPC #1399070

october 11, 2018

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOtO by jasOn cassidy

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Hitting the new towne Lounge

beautifying the landscape Third-generation Chicoan Jason Johnson is the proud new owner of Chico Landscape Management, a commercial landscaping company that was established by Ernie Cox in 1987. Born and raised in Chico, Johnson went to Chico High School and graduated early with a math scholarship. He attended Chico State at the age of 15, earning a “useless” degree in philosophy, and now he says he “mows lawns.” Johnson, who moved to Paradise in 2008 just before his daughter Nova was born, started landscaping 15 years ago, but began working with Cox in 2015. After three years of working together, they struck a deal and Johnson bought the company. Call him at 715-9323.

Why buy Chico Landscape Management? It’s a well-known company with a great reputation. I’m just trying to keep the level of excellence the same, which is hard because most landscapers aren’t like that, they just try to get it done as fast as they can and leave. We don’t do that; we do the best that we can.

Will you be making any changes? One thing I do different is I’m very scientific. I take soil samples and I fertilize for every plant. I’m more customized. I know plants and I know soil; I bring that to the table.

What do you like most about the landscape business? I like working with plants, I’m a plant guy. I grew up on a farm, I know a lot about it. I also love working outside. I have to work outside with my job.

What do you say to people who complain about the noise of the leaf blower? We’re just trying to get our job done, it’s about beautification. If we didn’t do it, eventually it will build up so there’s nothing but dirt and weeds. It also reduces the risk of fire by getting the dry

18

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OctOber 11, 2018

brush out. The noise is why I want to move to electric.

What’s the range of services you offer? We do trimming and shaping, irrigation, rock walls, patios, outdoor lighting and design—I would actually love to do more design. We also do droughttolerant landscaping, we use a lot of native species for that.

Are you involved in the community? I used to do a lot of trail work for the city of Chico, Bidwell Park, all kinds of stuff. I laid the Vita Course [Trail] out—it was a long time ago, I volunteered for that forever, but not for a while. With my life now, running a business and being a single dad, that’s everything, that’s all I got.

Plans for the future? In the spring I’m going to go all electric and get my second truck. I think that’ll be good for the Chico community. People are pretty conscious of the environment and they don’t like noise and pollution. —CATHy WAgner

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

When I first moved to Chico back in 2006, I wanted to shoot pool and have a couple of beers to try to meet people and I found myself at the Towne Lounge playing a game with the bartender, Meagen. I was passably good, so she offered me a spot on her women’s league team. We’re still teammates today, and I’m confident we’d still be playing at the Scrounge if it hadn’t closed. I spent a lot of time at the Towne Lounge and was sad to see it go. Turns out the owner, Woody Sjostrom, gave downtown restaurateur Will Brady the old sign— until recently, it graced the patio at B Street Public House—and now it hangs inside his third bar/eatery, Bill’s Towne Lounge. (Brady tells me that while he doesn’t go by “Bill,” it is his namesake.) “The Towne Lounge is an icon that needs to always be in Chico,” he said. I agree. And I once again found myself seated at the TL bar last Friday (Oct. 5) during its soft opening (it’s now a few blocks up Main Street, between First and Second). First things first, Brady set out to create a dive bar and he certainly accomplished that. With low lighting and loud, lounge-y music—the soundtrack playing while I was there was killer—the vibe is definitively less pub than B Street or The Banshee. It’s also swankier than the old TL, so you probably won’t find as many blue collars in there. There’s a full bar, plus a kitchen—I tried the fried chicken sandwich and, aside from being a bit messy, it was awesome. Brady says he’s trying to emulate L.A.’s “emergent chicken culture” at Bill’s, just as he aimed to elevate the hamburger at The Banshee. Expect the menu—and the hours—to expand over the coming weeks. For now, it’s open Thursday-Saturday.

GrOceries in Paradise Last month, plans for a new Safeway at the junction of Black Olive Drive and Skyway cleared a major hurdle, as the Planning Commission granted its conditional use and tree-felling permits. The project, dubbed Black Olive Village, requires the removal of over 180 trees and must adhere to 42 conditions, Craig Baker, community development director, told me. The project is pretty massive, so I was surprised that a Google search yielded zero news coverage of it. The village consists of 67,473 square feet of retail, 54,471 of which will be a 24-hour Safeway. There will be a nine-pump gas station, plus a restaurant pad. The existing Safeway, on Clark Road, will close. The lack of a sewer system in Paradise set the project back—it will also include its own onsite wastewater treatment system. dressinG students This Sunday (Oct. 14), from 6-9 p.m., Chico Mall’s JCPenney will be closed to the public while it offers some major discounts for Chico State students (with valid ID). It’s part of a “Suit Up” campaign meant to help college students dress for success. If you don’t know how to tie a tie, they’ll even teach you!


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of the

BEST 2018 Chico’s grooviest people, places and things

Readers’ Picks

Y

Food & Drinks .......................32

ep, it’s that time of year. CN&R readers have once again flexed their voting muscles in order to recognize their favorite shops, restaurants, artists, service providers, entertainment venues and a whole lot more. And now we get to reveal the winners! Flip through these pages to see who’s taken the top spots this year—there are more than a couple upsets. We even added a dozen or so categories, giving even more people and places a chance at the spotlight. And, as is tradition, CN&R editors jumped at the chance to honor their faves as well. Can you dig it? Congratulations to Chico’s best of 2018!

20

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OCTOBER 11, 2018

Goods & Services ........22 Nightlife & The Arts .....40 Health & Wellness .......44 Recreation...................................48 Community ................................50

Editors’ Picks We love this stuff! .........54


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Goods & Services The people and places that make Chico tick

READERS’ PICKS

There’s one thing that most everyone who lives in Chico can agree on: It’s pretty darn nice here. What makes it so nice? Beyond the natural beauty and the kindness of its residents, it’s the wide variety of skilled professionals and the range of businesses that contribute to this lifestyle of easy, comfortable, semi-rural living with an urban spark. Check out this list of Chico’s favorite movers and shakers— you’re bound to find a new go-to!

S&S Organic Produce and Natural Foods

Antiques store

Auto repair shop

Bike shop

FIRST Place: Eighth & Main Antique Center

FIRST Place: Affordable Automotive

FIRST Place: Pullins Cyclery

2106 Park Ave., 892-1774

801 Main St., 342-1055

745 Main St., 893-5534

SECOND Place: Spencer Automotive 2540 Dominic Drive, 345-5600

SECOND Place: Greenline Cycles 515 Main St., 894-7885

THIRD Place: Boradori Automotive 287 Humboldt Ave., 230-0155

THIRD Place: North Rim Adventure Sports 178 E. Second St., 345-2453

SECOND Place: Vintage Hen 215 Main St., 894-1311 THIRD Place: Country Squyres Antiques 164 E. Third St., 342-6764

Appliance store FIRST Place: Ginno’s Kitchen & Appliance Center Inc.

Auto paint/body shop FIRST Place: Concours Elite 2267 Esplanade, Ste. D, 891-0234

2505 Zanella Way, 342-2182

SECOND Place: Knockout Collision Repair 3225 Esplanade, 899-9202

SECOND Place: Hudson’s Appliance Center 2525 Dominic Drive, Ste. D, 877-6312

THIRD Place: JP’s Paint & Body Works 1840 Park Ave., 342-1328

THIRD Place: Collier Hardware 105 Broadway, 342-0195 22

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OCTOBER 11, 2018

Bank/credit union FIRST Place: Tri Counties Bank Various locations, 800-922-8742 SECOND Place: Sierra Central Credit Union 352 E. First St., 800-222-7228 THIRD Place: Golden 1 Credit Union 239 W. Second St., Ste. 1, 877-465-3361

Cab company FIRST Place: G-Ride Pedi-Cab & Trolley 354-9885 SECOND Place: Yellow Cab 1330 Locust St., 893-4444 THIRD Place: Taxi Dave 566-0447

READERS’ PICKS

CONTINUED ON PAGE 24


RestauRant, tapas & BaR

FaMILY OWneD sInCe 1975 Seafood • SteakS • Lamb • bbQ RibS • QuaiL • ChiCken

(530) 891-5204 • 3355 Esplanade • Chico t he R estauRant

Open Wednesday - Sunday at 5:00pm • Closed Monday & Tuesday Check out our online menu: www.basquenorte.com october 11, 2018

CN&R 

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CBD Topicals • edibles • oils

Reduce anxiety Manage pain alleviate sleeplessness

169 cohasseT Rd. #1 chico (530) 592-3900

READERS’ PICKS c O N t i N u e D

F r O M pA g e 2 2

Glass Smoke Accessories Vape Clothing / Hats Gift Cards e

Chico • Paradise • Orovill

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Northern Star Mills

Car dealership

Call us to learn how affordable solar is today

FIRST Place: Chuck Patterson

530-433-0339

200 east Ave., 717-2646

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Style & Service for every budget..… Schedule Your FREE In Home Consultations Come check out our beautiful showroom in Chico! Great Customer Service l Installations Amazing Selection l Warranties 2525 Dominic Drive, Suite C - Next to Italian Cottage

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Hours: Mon.-Fri.10:00-5:00 and Sat. 10:00-2:00

SECOND Place: Chico Nissan Hyundai 575 Manzanita Ave., 891-1777

Feed store/farm supply

Car wash

FIRST Place: Northern Star Mills

FIRST Place: Scrubbs Hand  Wash & Detail Center

FIRST Place: Christian   & Johnson 1098 e. First Ave., 891-1881 SECOND Place: Flowers by Rachelle 2485 Notre Dame blvd., Ste. 240, 345-2661 THIRD Place: Chico Florist 1600 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 145, 345-1855

Gift shop

SECOND Place: Wilbur’s Feed & Seed 139 Meyers St., 895-0569

FIRST Place: Hubbs & Co.

SECOND Place: Surf Thru Express Car Wash 2470 Forest Ave., 801-6479

THIRD Place: C Bar D Feed 3388 Highway 32, Ste. A, 342-5361

SECOND Place: Made in Chico 127 W. third St., 894-7009

956 Mangrove Ave., 892-4940

THIRD Place: California Car Wash 150 commercial Ave., 894-3017

THIRD Place: Little Red Hen Gift Shop 897 e. 20th St., Ste. b, 897-0100

Day spa

Grocer

SECOND Place: Sweetwater Day Spa 40 Declaration Drive, Ste. 100, 894-7722 THIRD Place: Urban Medspa 3221 cohasset road, Ste. 120, 891-8772

Dry cleaner FIRST Place: 3rd Generation  Cleaners 1390 east Ave., Ste. 128, 899-0333

OctOber 11, 2018

510 esplanade, 342-7661

Florist

1020 Skyway, 893-4885

965 Nord Ave., Ste. 100, 487-7322

CN&R 

THIRD Place: Esplanade Cleaners 164 e. Second Ave., 342-4306

THIRD Place: Courtesy Automotive Center 2520 cohasset road, 866-500-4232

FIRST Place: Angels Nails &  Spa

24  

SECOND Place: Chico Express Cleaners 641 Walnut St., 343-6013; and 752 east Ave., 343-8844

Personal fave

“The downtown—I have visited many different towns and I haven’t found another city with a better downtown. The people are friendly, good restaurants/bars and shopping.” —Nicole Gavron

FIRST Place: S&S Organic  Produce and Natural Foods 1924 Mangrove Ave., 343-4930 SECOND Place: Trader Joe’s 801 east Ave., Ste. 110, 343-9920 THIRD Place: Chico Natural Foods  Cooperative 818 Main St., 891-1713

READERS’ PICKS c O N t i N u e D

O N pA g e 2 7


14

years in business

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SIT DOWN. LET’S TALK REAL ESTATE. Sandi Bauman of Chico Homes uses this mantra because she believes listening to her clients needs is the key to getting them exactly what they are looking for. Why choose Sandi to be your real estate agent? It’s simple...she has consistently performed within the top 1% of local Realtors, and has sold over 1,100 properties in Butte, Glenn and Tehama Counties. Integrity, unstoppable work ethic, honest communication

and a desire to continuously improve are the hallmarks of The Sandi Bauman Team. Clients see results as their needs are addressed and their problems solved. Exceptional service is given to each and every client they represent. Local home inventory levels fluctuate often and can make buying or selling a home difficult. It’s not an easy market to navigate. If you’re in the real estate market you need a knowledgeable realtor capable of reading the local market to get the very best deal. Sandi Bauman is that agent!

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 4

Barbershop

SECOND Place: Tammy Nails 1354 East Ave., Ste. J, 899-8912

FIRST Place: Danny’s Barbershop

THIRD Place: Bliss Nails & Spa 2033 Forest Ave., Ste. 100, 891-3538

544 Broadway, 332-0553 SECOND Place: Chico’s Barber Shop 162 E. Third St., 487-7373 THIRD Place: Gearhead Barbershop 221 Normal Ave., 894-2889

Hair salon FIRST Place: Dimensions Salon 810 Broadway, 894-2515 SECOND Place: The Hair Co. 2760 Esplanade, Ste. 150, 894-2002 THIRD Place: Two22 Salon 222 W. Third St., 592-3961

Place for a mani/pedi FIRST Place: Angels Nails & Spa 965 Nord Ave., Ste. 100, 487-7322

Baby/kids’ clothier FIRST Place: Apple Blossom Baby 977 East Ave., Ste. 90, 345-1617 SECOND Place: Kat’s Meow 138 W. Third St., 899-8811 THIRD Place: Children’s Place 1950 E. 20th St., 894-2589

Men’s clothier FIRST Place: Formal Education 127 Main St., 809-1839 SECOND Place: Men’s Wearhouse 1950 E. 20th St., Ste. 501, 342-1769 THIRD Place: Rouse & Revolt 225 Main St., 774-2658

Women’s clothier FIRST Place: For Elyse 228 Broadway, 893-0106 SECOND Place: Anika Burke 211 Main St., 918-8850 THIRD Place: Cottonparty 337 Broadway, 893-4923

Consignment/ second-hand threads FIRST Place: Labelz Upscale Consignment Boutique 974 Mangrove Ave., 345-1615 SECOND Place: Rouse & Revolt 225 Main St., 774-2658 THIRD Place: Bootleg 126 W. Second St., 895-1426

Jeweler FIRST Place: Kirk’s Jewelry 246 W. Third St., 891-0880 SECOND Place: Olde Gold Estate Jewelery 225 Main St., Ste. 3, 891-4610 THIRD Place: Gabrielle Ferrar 214 Main St., 345-1500

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Hydroponics store FIRST Place: Greenfire Hydrogarden & Organic Supply 2725 Highway 32, Ste. A, 895-8301 SECOND Place (tie): Chico Garden Center 3028 Esplanade, Ste. E, 345-8400 SECOND Place (tie): The Garden Connection 629 Entler Ave., 342-7762

Liquor store FIRST Place: Spike’s Bottle Shop

290 Airpark Blvd. (Chico Airport) • Boutique Hours Wed-Fri 1pm-5pm

THEATRICAL QUALITY COSTUMES WE OFFER

1270 E. First Ave., 893-8410

• 4000 sq.ft of theatrical quality costumes (no cheap bagged costumes) • 10 day rental special for early halloween reservations • personalized customer service

SECOND Place: Star Liquors 933 Nord Ave., 891-4842 THIRD Place: Ray’s Liquor 207 Walnut St., 343-3249

530-894-1346 ALTER EGO

Christian & Johnson

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 9

2260 A PARK AVE.

C O S T U M E S

OCTOBER 11, 2018

CN&R

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

Ignite their imagination

F R O M PA G E 2 7

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The Address

Local pet store FIRST Place: Trailblazer Pet Supply 752 Mangrove Ave., 892-1848 SECOND Place: Northern Star Mills 510 Esplanade, 342-7661 THIRD Place: Chico Pet Works & Pet Salon 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 186, 345-0934

Nursery FIRST Place: The Plant Barn & Gifts 406 Entler Ave., 345-3121 SECOND Place: Magnolia Gift & Garden 1367 East Ave., 894-5410 THIRD Place: Little Red Hen Plant Nursery 189 E. Eighth St., 891-9100

Place for electronics/ computer repair

Place for window treatments

FIRST Place: Chico Computer Clinic

2525 Dominic Drive, Ste. C, 343-3400

1450 Mangrove Ave., 636-1337 SECOND Place: Best Buy 2005 Forest Ave., 566-1012 THIRD Place: PCI Computer Services 225 Main St., 891-4152

Place to buy outdoor gear FIRST Place: Mountain Sports 176 E. Third St., 345-5011 SECOND Place: Chico Sports LTD 698 Mangrove Ave., 894-1110

Place to buy books

THIRD Place: Sportsman’s Warehouse 765 East Ave., Ste. 170, 897-0500

FIRST Place: The Bookstore

Place to buy home furnishings

118 Main St., 345-7441 SECOND Place: Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2031 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, 894-1494 THIRD Place: ABC Books 950 Mangrove Ave., 893-4342

FIRST Place: The Address 2444 Cohasset Road, 898-9000

FIRST Place: Budget Blinds SECOND Place: JCPenney 1932 E. 20th St., 899-8160

40 Declaration Drive - Chico - 530.894.7722

www.sweetwaterchico.com

FALL IS FOR PLANTING

THIRD Place: Nantucket Home 603 Broadway, 895-1038

Shoe store FIRST Place: Heel & Sole Shoes 708 Mangrove Ave., 899-0780 SECOND Place: Johnson’s Shoes 801 East Ave., Ste. 145, 343-8923

CHICO’S BULK SEED SPECIALIST

THIRD Place: Baker’s Birkenstock 333 Broadway, 345-4880

Sporting goods

ChiCo Mix

Lawn seed specially blended for a year-round dark green, fine bladed lawn for the Chico area.

FIRST Place: Chico Sports LTD

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898 Mangrove Ave., 894-1110

Dwarf fesCue

Improved drought tolerable turf-type tall fescue.

g Chico for 120 Y ear s

SECOND Place: Dick’s Sporting Goods 1922 E. 20th St., 343-3351 THIRD Place: Sportsman’s Warehouse 765 East Ave., Ste. 170, 897-0500

510 Esplanade (Opposite Bidwell Mansion)

(530)

342–7661

SECOND Place: Esplanade Furniture 1750 Esplanade, 891-4788 THIRD Place: Finds Design & Decor 1341 Mangrove Ave., 892-1905

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 3 1 OCTOBER 11, 2018

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Olivia larrabee

Realtor CalDRE #02056059 (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com 30 

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 9

Professional photographer FIRST Place: Teresa Raczynski Park Avenue Photography, 15010 Meridian Road, 521-4340 SECOND Place: Diane Nicole Diane Nicole Photography, 588-4949 THIRD Place: Steve Twist Avalon Portrait Gallery, 2667 Alamo Ave., 891-3442

Housekeeping service Ginno’s Kitchen & Appliance Center Inc.

FIRST Place: Helping Hands Cleaning Services

Tattoo parlor

SECOND Place: Holt Construction 37 Bellarmine Court, 899-1011

FIRST Place: Eye of Jade Tattoo

THIRD Place: Jim Souza 3493 Hackamore Lane, 518-6306

319 Main St., Ste. 200, 343-5233 SECOND Place: Red Room Tattoo 231 Nord Ave., 342-1287Ð THIRD Place: 12 Volt Tatoo 194 E. Eighth St., 592-3074

Thrift store FIRST Place: The Arc Store 2020 Park Ave., 343-3666 SECOND Place: Thrifty Bargain 2432 Esplanade, 774-2158 THIRD Place: Goodwill 765 East Ave., Ste. 100, 893-8578

Attorney FIRST Place: Michael Rooney Rooney Law Firm, 1361 Esplanade, 345-5678 SECOND Place: Denver Latimer Latimer & Kenkel, 330 Wall St., Ste. 20, 345-1396 THIRD Place (tie): Tim Ferris Law Offices of Ferris & Selby, 2607 Forest Ave., Ste. 130, 343-0100 THIRD Place (tie): Jodea Foster Law Office of Jodea Foster, 121 W. Fourth Ave., 894-8650

General contractor FIRST Place: Proframe Construction

Insurance agent FIRST Place: Gayle Aylward State Farm Insurance, 1277 East Ave., Ste. 110, 895-1356 SECOND Place: Joni Ginno State Farm Insurance, 1915 Esplanade, 891-5881

354-9630 SECOND Place: C & A Cleaning 15077 Coyote Song Road, 514-7738

Interior designer FIRST Place: Lauren O’Donnell Interiors

RE/MAX of Chico, 1834 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 10, 896-9300

FIRST Place: Dawson Landscaping

SECOND Place: John Barroso Barroso Real Estate, 168 E. Third Ave., 5708489

2264 Park Ave., 343-0330 SECOND Place: Abel Plumbing & Electrical 551 Country Drive, Ste. 150, 564-1023 THIRD Place: Accurate Plumbing 2288 Park Ave., Ste. A, 894-1800

220 W. 4th Street DoWntoWn (530) 893 - 3100 | hoteldiamondchico.com

1414 Park Ave. #108, By Nobby’s 828-3247

The Best Adventures Begin at Casual Clothing & Footwear

Technical Clothing & Gear 17

Mountain Sports 176 East Third Street • Downtown Chico • 345-5011 Serving Chico Since 1975 • ChicoMountainSports.com

SECOND Place: Nantucket Home 603 Broadway, 895-1038

Landscaper

FIRST Place: Earl’s Plumbing

of experience

laurenointeriors.com

Real estate agent

Plumber

16 years

17

THIRD Place (tie): Brad Jacobson Farmers Insurance, 25 Jan Court, Ste. 120, 891-7900

THIRD Place: Blue Oak Landscaping 1125 Nord Ave., 518-7248

in the Barber Neighborhood

THIRD Place: Cleaned to Perfection 520-6465

THIRD Place: Heirloom Fox 805-459-5008, heirloomfox.com

SECOND Place: Sutherland Landscape Center 2720 Highway 32, 893-4531

$16 HAIRCUTS

2005-2017

THIRD Place (tie): Kevin Baker Allstate Insurance, 389 Connors Court, Ste. G, 893-8301

1170 E. Lassen Ave., 343-0384

Luxury accommodations in the heart of downtown.

FIRST Place: Sabrina Chevallier

THIRD Place: Danielle Branham Century 21 Jeffries Lydon, 1101 El Monte Ave., 570-8402

Solar company FIRST Place: Urban Design Solar

“It’s About Time”

Watch Batteries • repair • retail

5

$

2260 Park Ave., 809-1079 SECOND Place: Alternative Energy Systems 13620 Highway 99, 855-616-1450; showroom at 876 East Ave.

Watch Battery & Installation

THIRD Place: Phoenix Solar Energy 13290 Contractors Lane, 433-0339

11128 Midway, Ste. 3, 636-4574

Up to 2 watch batteries

NEW LOCATION DOWNTOWN CHICO READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 3 2

130 W. 3rd Street • (530) 566-9110

Some restrictions apply. Expires 1-25-19

OCTOBER 11, 2018

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Food & Drinks READERS’ PICKS

Celebrating local flavors Chico’s already eclectic food scene is really growing. Mobile kitchens have rolled in to join the mix of restaurants, cafes and eateries, and an explosion of tap rooms and breweries has provided even more options for the discerning palate. Taking home a Best Of honor is more challenging than ever! This year,

there are some noticeable upsets in Best Local Restaurant (Chico), Best Chef and Best Burger categories—plus, a newcomer on the scene came in and snagged the title for Best Craft Beer Selection. Cheers to all the restaurant owners, chefs, servers and brewers who make it so fun—and delicious!—to eat out.

Local restaurant – Chico FIRST Place: Japanese Blossoms 2995 Esplanade, Ste. 104, 891-9022 SECOND Place: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328 THIRD Place: Leon Bistro 817 Main St., 899-1105

Local restaurant – Oroville FIRST Place: Safire Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Highway, 538-4560 ext. 1324 SECOND Place: Tong Fong Low 2051 Robinson St., 533-1488 THIRD Place: Feather Falls Brewing Co. 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville, 533-3885

Local restaurant – on the Ridge FIRST Place: Black Bear Diner 5791 Clark Road, 877-0877 SECOND Place: Mamma Celeste’s Gastropub & Pizzeria 5522 Skyway, 877-1190 THIRD Place: Casa de Paradiso 5667 Clark Road, 877-4107

New restaurant

(opened in the last year) FIRST Place: La Salles 229 Broadway, 487-7207 SECOND Place: OM Foods 142 Broadway, 965-5263 THIRD Place: The Lab Bar & Grill 250 Cohassett Road, Ste. 10, 894-5729

Jeramie Sabelman, Japanese Blossoms

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O N PA G E 3 5


our delIcIous Menu IteMs Are

MAde froM scrAtch, every dAy!

IncludIng our fruIt JuIces!

a true chico tradition Family owned and operated for 80 years

229 BroAdwAy chIco (530) 487-7207 lAsAlleschIco.coM

Now Serving Chico at Two Locations! 178 East 7th Street (530) 342-7163

Chico Mall (530) 809-4151

www.shuberts.com

Open Tuesday-Friday 3PM, Saturday-Sunday 9AM Sat & Sun Brunch 9AM -2PM Daily Happy Hour 3PM-6PM Live Music Thur 6PM-9PM, Fri 4PM-6PM, Sat 11AM-2PM Check out our patio with fire pits & games to enjoy!

Wh

t ning A e p p a at’s H

ly Fami

5 d for 2 e n w O

years

Friday Lunch 11:30 Sunday Family Night Family Special, Only $2995 (Good for in-house or pick-up, not delivery)

2009 -2 017

Best Asian Cuisine Best Take-Out Best Restaurant in Oroville

CE LEBRATI NG 106 YEARS I N B U SI N ESS!

Oroville 533-1488 • Chico 898-1388

Monday Extended Happy Hour 4-9p.m. HAPPY HOUR Monday-Saturday, 4-6p.m.

Includes 1/2 off all wine by the glass Reservations Daily • 898-9948 • Take-Out • 898-9947 (Delivery by Entree Express) • Corner of 5th/Ivy • Open 4PM Mon-Sun • 11:30 Fri for Lunch october 11, 2018

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 3 2

The Commons Social Empourium

Celebratrding our 3 anniversary Food server

Cheap eats

FIRST Place: Christina Souza

FIRST Place: La Comida

Kalico Kitchen, 2396 Esplanade, 343-3968

954 Mangrove Ave., 345-2254

SECOND Place: Laura Baume Japanese Blossoms, 2995 Esplanade, Ste. 104, 891-9022

SECOND Place: Gordo Burrito 1295 E. Eighth St., 809-1211

THIRD Place: Ronnie Hartman, Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Chef FIRST Place: Jeramie Sabelman Japanese Blossoms, 2995 Esplanade, Ste. 104, 891-9022

THIRD Place: Aca Taco 133 Broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. D, 343-0909

Craft beer selection FIRST Place: The Commons Social Empourium 2412 Park Ave., 774-2999

SECOND Place: Ann Leon Leon Bistro, 817 Main St., 899-1105

SECOND Place: The Chico Taproom 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114, 774-2943

THIRD Place: Caleb Jones Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade, 894-3463

THIRD Place: Sierra Nevada Taproom & Restaurant 1075 E. 20th St., 345-2739

Caterer FIRST Place: Bacio Catering, Carry Out & Biz Box 1903 Park Ave., 345-7787 SECOND Place: Roots Catering & Restaurant 3221 Esplanade, 891-4500 THIRD Place: Special Times Catering 2500 Floral Ave., Ste. 10, 892-2837

Like us on Facebook For daiLy speciaLs

Fine dining

alpaCa bob’s

sandwiCh adventures

FIRST Place: 5th Street Steakhouse

and hot dogs too..

345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328

530.342.3456 672 mangrove ave., ChiCo

The BEST PLACE for Classic Diner Favorites & Breakfast

SECOND Place: Leon Bistro 817 Main St., 899-1105 THIRD Place: Red Tavern 1250 Esplanade, 894-3463

Kid-friendly dining FIRST Place: Kalico Kitchen

Discounts for Students, Seniors, and Veterans DAILY LIKE US TO SEE OUR DAILY SPECIALS!

2396 Esplanade, 343-3968 SECOND Place: Round Table 964 Mangrove Ave., 343-4254; 2201 Pillsbury Road, 891-1200; and 2027 Forest Ave., Ste. 20, 342-7265

Phone: (530) 343-5543

185 Cohasset Rd, Chico, CA 95926

THIRD Place: Hudson’s Gastropub 2760 Esplanade, Ste. 100, 636-4562

Date-night dining

Patio

FIRST Place: Crush

FIRST Place: The Pour House

201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000

855 East Ave., 893-3000

SECOND Place: 5th Street Steakhouse 345 W. Fifth St., 891-6328

SECOND Place: Parkside Tap House 115 W. Third St., 636-4239

THIRD Place: Red Tavern 1250 Esplanade, 894-3463

THIRD Place: La Salles 229 Broadway, 487-7207

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 3 5

Take-out FIRST Place: Happy Garden 180 Cohasset Road, 893-2574 SECOND Place: Tong Fong Low 2072 E. 20th St., 898-1388

Local coffee/tea house

Asian cuisine

FIRST Place: Naked Lounge

180 Cohasset Road, 893-2574

118 W. Second St. SECOND Place: Bidwell Perk 664 E. First Ave., 899-1500

THIRD Place: La Hacienda 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270

THIRD Place: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Cafe 250 Vallombrosa Ave., 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., Ste. 1, 809-1545

Breakfast FIRST Place: Cafe Coda

Spot to satisfy your sweet tooth

265 Humboldt Ave., 566-9476 SECOND Place: Sin of Cortez 2290 Esplanade, 879-9200 THIRD Place: Mom’s Restaurant 209 Salem St., 893-3447

Cafe Coda

Brunch FIRST Place: Nash’s Restaurant 1717 Esplanade, 896-1147 SECOND Place: Cafe Coda 265 Humboldt Ave., 566-9476

FIRST Place: Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy 178 E. Seventh St., 342-7163; and 1950 E. 20th St., Ste. C-203, 809-4151

THIRD Place: Tong Fong Low 2072 E. 20th St., 898-1388

Italian cuisine FIRST Place: Italian Cottage 2234 Esplanade, 343-7000; and 2525 Dominic Drive, 342-7771 SECOND Place: Crush 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000 THIRD Place: Sicilian Cafe 1020 Main St., 345-2233

Mexican cuisine

THIRD Place: Sweet Chico Confections 121 W. Third St., 332-9866

3269 Esplanade, 342-4616

International cuisine

Lunch

FIRST Place: Priya Indian Cusine

FIRST Place: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Cafe

SECOND Place: Cocodine Thai Cuisine 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., Ste. 250, 891-1800

2574 Esplanade, 899-1055

THIRD Place: Inday’s Filipino Restaurant 1043 W. Eighth St., 520-2593

SECOND Place: Broadway Heights California Cuisine 300 Broadway, 899-8075

SECOND Place: Cocodine Thai Cuisine 2485 Notre Dame Blvd., 891-1800

SECOND Place: Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery 130 Main St., 895-3866

THIRD Place: Mom’s Restaurant 209 Salem St., 893-3447

250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 200, 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., Ste. 1, 809-1545

FIRST Place: Happy Garden

FIRST Place: Sol Mexican Grill SECOND Place: La Hacienda 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270 THIRD Place: Casa Ramos 2490 Fair St., 893-5050; 216 East Ave., 894-0119

Vegetarian cuisine FIRST Place: OM Foods 142 Broadway, 965-5263 SECOND Place: T. Tea Bar & Fusion Cafe 250 Vallombrosa Ave., 895-8100; and 555 Flying V St., Ste. 1, 809-1545

THIRD Place: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670

THIRD Place: Live Life Juice Co. 220 Broadway, 566-3346

Small bites (apps/tapas)

Street food PERSONAL FAVE

FIRST Place: Wine Time

The Banshee

26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 899-9250 SECOND Place: Crush 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000 THIRD Place: Christian Michaels Ristoranté 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Munchies FIRST Place: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670

Bakery

Diner

FIRST Place: Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery

FIRST Place: Cozy Diner

130 Main St., 895-3866

SECOND Place: Morning Thunder Cafe 352 Vallombrosa Ave., 342-9717

SECOND Place: Midnite Munchies Delivery 321-4511, midnite-munchies.com

SECOND Place: Tin Roof Bakery and Cafe 627 Broadway, Ste. 170, 892-2893

THIRD Place: Aca Taco 133 Broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. D, 343-0909

THIRD Place: Lovely Layers Cakery 131 Meyers St., Ste. 120, 828-9931

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1695 Mangrove Ave., 895-1195

THIRD Place: The Roost Cafe 1144 Park Ave., 892-1281

“Hosts like Charles and Oscar at Cozy Diner who greet you like an old friend each time they see you and take the time to find out how your day is. The genuine warmth and friendliness makes it a great place to frequent.”

—loganbr

FIRST Place: Gordo Burrito Eighth and Pine streets, 809-1211 SECOND Place: Drunken Dumpling Food Truck Various locations, 282-2038 THIRD Place: Gnarly Deli Various locations, 519-1488

Barbecue FIRST Place: Smokin Mo’s BBQ 131 Broadway, 891-6677 SECOND Place: Kinders Meats & Deli 221 Normal Ave., 342-3354 THIRD Place: Uncle Skinny’s BBQ 300 Broadway, 570-4313

READERS’ PICKS C ONTINUED ON PAGE 39


Nobody does

Burgers Better

Mention this ad in-store:

$1

any reg. size pita or salad Not valid with any other offer. Exp 10.31.18

1444 Park Ave, Chico

342-2285

quality

U

R

NEW

ARTISAN MENU

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 240 Broadway St. Chico, CA | 530.899.2847 | www.pitapitusa.com

Tues-Sat 10:30am-9:00pm

Bring

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T RY

GET

ing y ou

Mexican food fo r 5 0 yea rs!

954 Mangrove Ave 345.2254 www.lacomidarestaurants.com

october 11, 2018

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THANK YOU BUTTE COUNTY

G A

K

S

B

LYN BRI K OO EL WOR DG R

E

B

FOR VOTING US AS THE BEST BAGEL IN CHICO FOR 39 YEARS!

H E A R NO E V I L. S E E N O E V I L. EAT N O EVI L .

EATING BAGELS SHOULD BE FUN! 25 different bagels · 11 low-fat schmears · 6 breakfast bagels · deli sandwiches · smoothies lunch specials · bagel dogs · great coffee · blended speciality drink · “hangover helper” special

117A West 2nd Street · Downtown Chico · 345.3443

Japanese Blossoms A DINING EXPERIENCE YOU

WON’T FORGET CELEBRATING 11 YEARS

17

17

2995 Esplanade #104 • 530.891.9022 www.japaneseblossoms.com Open lunch 11:30-2 M-F | Dinner 5-9 Happy Hour 5-6 Tue-Sun | Mon all night! 38  

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READERS’ PICKS c O N t i N u e D

F r O M PA g e 3 6

Personal fave

“The farm-to-table food scene with two year-round farmers’ markets and terrific restaurants.”

—Kathy Lashure

Burger FIRST Place: Nobby’s 1444 Park Ave., 342-2285 SECOND Place: Burgers and Brew 301 broadway, 879-9100 THIRD Place: Burger Hut 3211 cohasset road, 342-4555

Pho

Sushi

FIRST Place: Pho C & C

FIRST Place: Japanese Blossoms

3211 cohasset road, 892-1415

2995 esplanade, Ste. 104, 891-9022

SECOND Place: Noodle House 605 Mangrove Ave., Ste. 130, 345-2022

SECOND Place: The Rawbar 346 broadway, 897-0626

THIRD Place: Vietnam Bistro 788 east Ave., 909-706-1258

THIRD Place: Big Tuna Sushi Bistro 1722 Mangrove Ave., 345-4571

Pizza

Taco

FIRST Place: Celestino’s

FIRST Place: Aca Taco

101 Salem St., Ste. V, 896-1234; and 1354 east Ave., Ste. V, 345-7700

133 broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. D, 343-0909

SECOND Place: Farm Star Pizza 2359 esplanade, 343-2056

SECOND Place: Gordo Burrito 1295 e. eighth St., 809-1211

THIRD Place: Woodstock’s Pizza 166 e. Second St., 893-1500

THIRD Place: Sol Mexican Grill 3269 esplanade, 342-4616

Place for poke FIRST Place: Halo Hawaiian  BBQ & Poke Bar 1354 east Ave., Ste. P, 592-3898

Burrito

SECOND Place: Lucky Poke 119 W. Second St., 487-7048

FIRST Place: Aca Taco

THIRD Place: LemonShark Poké 501 Main St., 774-2976

133 broadway, 894-0191; and 1000 W. Sacramento Ave., Ste. D, 343-0909 SECOND Place: Gordo Burrito 1295 e. eighth St., 809-1211

Sandwich

THIRD Place: Sol Mexican Grill  3269 esplanade, 342-4616

FIRST Place: Spiteri’s Deli

Ice cream/ frozen yogurt

SECOND Place: Fast Eddie’s Sandwich Shop 1175 east Ave., 342-8555

971 east Ave., 891-4797

THIRD Place: Ike’s Place 648 W. Fifth St., 924-3171

FIRST Place: Shubert’s Ice  Cream & Candy

THIRD Place: La Flor de Michoacán  Paletería y Nevería 1008 W. Sacramento Ave. Ste. c, 893-9999; 1354 east Ave., Ste. K, 774-2219; 668 Mangrove Ave., 774-2461

Lemonade FIRST Place (tie): Fresh   Twisted Café 156 eaton road, Ste. e, 809-2489

FIRST Place (tie): Sweet Cottage 513-2044

THIRD Place: Live Life Juice Co. 220 broadway, 566-3346

Gourmet Wood Fired Pizza artisan CoFFees

Local winery – regional (Butte/ Glenn/Tehama)

Beer, Wine, KomBuCha & Fun

FIRST Place: New Clairvaux  Vineyard

LiVe music SaturdayS

26240 Seventh St., Vina, 839-2200 SECOND Place: Almendra Winery and  Distillery 9275 Midway, Durham, 343-6893

3 65 E 6th St. // (5 30) 433-0414

barbecue T S E B

THIRD Place: LaRocca Vineyards 12360 Doe Mill road, Forest ranch, 899-9463

here

Locally produced food – regional (Butte/Glenn/ Tehama) FIRST Place: Live Life Juice Co.

178 e. Seventh St., 342-7163; and 1950 e. 20th St., 809-4151 SECOND Place: Jon & Bon’s Yogurt Shoppe 300 broadway, 899-9580; 1722 Mangrove Ave., 899-0484; and 2485 Notre Dame blvd., Ste. 450, 965-5275

Good Vibes, Great Food

220 broadway, 566-3346 SECOND Place: PipeVine Chocolate pipevinechocolate.wixsite.com/chico Halo Hawaiian   BBQ & Poke Bar

THIRD Place: Lundberg Family Farms 5311 Midway, richvale, 538-3500

CHECK

FOR TODAY’S COOK LIST

300 BROADWAY SUITE A4 · CHICO 530-570-4313 · TUE – SAT 11 – 8 OR SOLD OUT

Local brewery – regional (Butte/ Glenn/Tehama) FIRST Place: Sierra Nevada  Brewing Co. 1075 e. 20th St., 893-3520 SECOND Place: Secret Trail Brewing Co. 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120, 487-8151 THIRD Place: British Bulldog Brewery 892-8759

READERS’ PICKS c O N t i N u e D

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Nightlife & The Arts When you want a stiff drink and creative fuel

READERS’ PICKS

Bar FIRST Place: Argus Bar + Patio 212 W. Second St. SECOND Place: The Banshee 134 W. Second St., 895-9670

What really sets Chico apart from other North State cities are its nightlife and arts scenes, which often go hand-in-hand. Whether you’re up for an art show, theater production or want to sip on a delicious cocktail while listening to live music, Chico is the place to go out and have some fun. There were a few upsets this year in the Best Place to Dance and Best Art Space categories. Without further ado, here are the best of the best.

THIRD Place: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718

Sports bar FIRST Place: Bella’s Sports Pub 134 Broadway, 893-5253 SECOND Place: The Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000 THIRD Place: Oasis Bar & Grill 1007 W. First St., 343-4305

Watering hole for townies FIRST Place: Duffy’s Tavern 337 Main St., 343-7718 SECOND Place: The Handle Bar 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160, 894-2337 THIRD Place: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

Cocktail FIRST Place: Lower Park Lavender Parkside Tap House, 115 W. Third St., 636-4239 SECOND Place: Margarita Tres Hombres Long Bar & Grill, 100 Broadway, 342-0425 THIRD Place: One Night Stand Crush, 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000

Lower Park Lavender at Parkside Tap House

40

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Mixologist

Bloody Mary

FIRST Place: Scott Barwick

FIRST Place: Duffy’s Tavern

Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., 343-7718

337 Main St., 343-7718

SECOND Place: Liz Von Aspern Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

SECOND Place: Mom’s Restaurant 209 Salem St., 893-3447

THIRD Place: Vince Villegas Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Happy hour FIRST Place: Crush 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000 SECOND Place: The Pour House 855 East Ave., Ste. 270, 893-3000 THIRD Place: Christian Michaels Ristorante 192 E. Third St., 894-4005

Place to drink a glass of wine

THIRD Place: Joe’s Bar 749 W. Fifth St., 894-3612

Karaoke night FIRST Place: Madison Bear Garden 316 W. Second St., 891-1639 SECOND Place: The Maltese 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915 THIRD Place: Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade, 343-0662

Place to dance

FIRST Place: Wine Time

316 W. Second St., 891-1639

26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 899-9250

SECOND Place: The Beach 191 E. Second St., 898-9898

SECOND Place: Unwined Kitchen & Bar 980 Mangrove Ave., 809-2634 THIRD Place: Crush 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000

THIRD Place: Crazy Horse Saloon 303 Main St., 342-7299

outdoor patio

Margarita

Venue for live music

FIRST Place: Tres Hombres Long Bar & Grill

FIRST Place: Sierra Nevada Big Room

100 Broadway, 342-0425

* Fiesta hour daily 4-6 pm * 125 premium tequilas * open 11:30 am daily

FIRST Place: Madison Bear Garden

private Banquet room

100 Broadway • ddowntow owntownn C h i CCoo • 5 3 0 - 3 4 2 - 0 4 2 5 •

1075 E. 20th St., 899-6138

SECOND Place: La Hacienda 2635 Esplanade, 893-8270

SECOND Place: Lost on Main 319 Main St., 892-2445

THIRD Place: Casa Ramos 2490 Fair St., 893-5050; and 216 East Ave., Ste. C, 894-0119

THIRD Place: Tackle Box Bar & Grill 379 E. Park Ave., 345-7499

READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 4 3

Sierra Nevada Big Room

Families, tourists, and art enthusiasts will all enjoy exploring unique studios, seeing how artists work, and buying local art on the Tour. Buy tickets with guides and maps at Chico Art Center, Chico Paper Co., Ellis Art, Made in Chico, Art Etc., Sally Dimas Gallery, and Broken Color Gallery in Oroville. OCTOBER 11, 2018

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

FREE DRINK

F R O M PA G E 4 1

10

10

w/ purchase of burrito 10

10

exp. 11/08/18 10

Museum of Northern California Art

Sign up for art lessons today!

2 61 E 3 R D S T , C H I C O

chicoartschool.com • 530.570.3895

10

10 10

10

Breakfast ~ Lunch ~ Dinner Open Early ~ Open Late 10

T H A N K S F O R T H E 11 YEARS OF SUPPORT! -Janet Lombardi Blixt artist, teacher

2 Locations!

10

10

10

10

DOWNTOWN

133 Broadway (530)894-0191

NORD AVE.

1000-D W. SACRAMENTO AVE 10 (530)343-0909

acataconord.com

10 10

10 10

10

10 10 10 10

10

Local music act

Theater company

Place to be seen

FIRST Place: Hot Flash

FIRST Place: Duffy’s Tavern

SECOND Place: Defcats

FIRST Place: Chico Theater Company

THIRD Place: Off the Record

166-F Eaton Road, 894-3282

SECOND Place: Parkside Tap House 115 W. Third St., 636-4239

Local visual artist FIRST Place: Janet Lombardi Blixt

SECOND Place: Blue Room Theatre 139 W. First St., 895-3749 THIRD Place: California Regional Theatre (800) 722-4522

337 Main St., 343-7718

THIRD Place: Crush 201 Broadway, Ste. 200, 342-7000

SECOND Place (tie): Caitlin Schwerin

FIRST Place: Down Lo

Art space

319 Main St., 892-2473

Casino – regional (Butte/ Glenn/Tehama)

SECOND Place: The Maltese 1600 Park Ave., 343-4915

FIRST Place: Gold Country Casino

SECOND Place (tie): Christine Mac Shane

FIRST Place (tie): 1078 Gallery 1710 Park Ave., 433-1043

FIRST Place (tie): Museum of Northern California Art 900 Esplanade, 487-7272 THIRD Place: Chico Art Center 450 Orange St., 895-8726

Place to buy art FIRST Place: Chico Paper Co. 345 Broadway, 891-0900 SECOND Place: Art Etc. 256 E. First St., 895-1161 THIRD Place: Chico Art Center 450 Orange St., 895-8726

Open mic

4020 Olive Highway, Oroville, 538-4560

THIRD Place: Blackbird 1431 Park Ave., 433-1577

SECOND Place: Feather Falls Casino 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville, 533-3885

PERSONAL FAVE

“The Butcher Shop— it’s agriculture, it’s art, it’s free, it’s home-grown. It brings together the whole community, the food is wonderful, the music is wonderful, the art and exhibits are wonderful and it’s all community-led.”

THIRD Place: Rolling Hills Casino 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning, 528-3500

Beer event FIRST Place: Oktoberfest Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520 SECOND Place: Beer Camp Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520 THIRD Place: Micro Brew Festival Soroptimist International of Bidwell Rancho, sibidwellrancho.org/microbrew-festival

ES! 16 TIM Voted Best Bar, Mixologist, Place to Be Seen, Watering Hole for Townies & Bloody Mary!

Since 1989

337 MAIN ST (corner of 4th St. & Main)

—Lochemy

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Health & Wellness READERS’ PICKS

Keeping Chico fit as a fiddle

Chico is lucky to have a wide array of medical providers and health-care practitioners ready and eager to tend to whatever ails us. Whether it’s a routine checkup, emergency care or simple relaxation you seek, you’ll find it here. With a growing number of boutique gyms popping up around town, this year we’ve added a category for those as well as one for personal trainers—for those who want to take a proactive approach to improving their health.

Dr. Roy Bishop of Argyll Medical Group

North Valley Eye Care

Local health-care provider

Acupuncture clinic

Dental care

FIRST Place: Chico Community Acupuncture

FIRST Place: Nelsen Family Dentistry

100 Independence Circle, 899-0295

1815 Mangrove Ave., 345-5300

SECOND Place: Mission Ranch Primary Care 114 Mission Ranch Blvd., Ste. 10, 894-0500

SECOND Place: Chico Acupuncture 572 Rio Lindo Ave., Ste. 105, 891-1823

SECOND Place: Kremer Dental Care 3 Glenbrook Court, 892-1234; and 1430 East Ave., Ste. 5, 892-1218

SECOND Place: Enloe Medical Center 1531 Esplanade, 332-7300

THIRD Place: Regina Dagorret 13 Williamsburg Lane, 345-3382

Alternative health-care provider

Chiropractor

First Place: Prana Endura Wellness Center

Masula Chiropractic Neurology and Family Wellness, 30 Philadelphia Drive, Ste. A, 342-6441

FIRST Place: Argyll Medical Group

40 Constitution Drive, Ste. E, 520-3459 SECOND Place: True REST Float Spa 1357 E. Eighth St., 844-356-2899 THIRD Place: Vital Functional Medicine 4 Governors Lane, Ste. B, 715-2115 44

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FIRST Place: Larry E. Masula SECOND Place: Karen Escott 389 Connors Court, Ste. C, 345-4204 THIRD Place: Mark Tenenbaum Tenenbaum Chiropractic, 1049 Village Lane, 680-8920

1307 Esplanade, Ste. 4, 898-8511

THIRD Place: Willow Creek Dentistry 2765 Esplanade, 891-6611

Dermatologist FIRST Place: Kafele T. Hodari North Valley Dermatology Center, 251 Cohasset Road, 342-3686 SECOND Place: F. Paul Sajben North Valley Dermatology Center, 251 Cohasset Road, 342-3686 THIRD Place: Jacqueline Losi-Sasaki Davis Reed and Losi MDs, 270 Cohasset Road, Ste. 100, 895-1396

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Orthodontics Orthodontics Exclusively Exclusively B. Scott Hood, D.D.S., M.S., Inc. B. Scott Hood, & D.D.S., M.S., Inc. Professional, Friendly, Experienced Professional, Friendly, & Experienced

Dr. Hood and his staff are committed to Dr. Hood and his staff are committed to providing children, teens and adults with the providing children, teens and adults with the highest quality care and smiles! highest quality care brightest and brightest smiles!

Dr. Hood is a member Dr. Hood is a member of theof the American Association of Orthodontics American Association of Orthodontics specializing in Braces and a Specializing in Braces and a certified provider for Invisalign™ certified provider for InvisalignTM.

2755 Esplanade Chico CA 95973

2755 Esplanade Chico CA 95973 Phone 530.343.7021 • Fax 530.343.3672 Phone 530.343.7021 • Fax 5657 Clark Rd 530.343.3672 #5 Paradise CA 95969 Phone Rd 530.877.4951 • www.hoodortho.com 5657 Clark #5 Paradise CA 95969 Phone 530.877.4951 • www.hoodortho.com

Thank you for your votes!

H o da r i m d d E r mato lo g y and rEjuvEné

ExpEriEncE • intEgrity • compassion

Board-Certified Dermatologist

Call for an appointment today

N o rt h Va l l e y

Dermatology CeNter (530) 342-3686 x240

(530) 342-8295

Dr. Kafele T. Hodari

2 5 1 Co h a s s e t R o a d, s u i t e 240 • C h i Co 46   CN&R  o c t o b e r 1 1 , 2 0 1 8


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The Freshest Food and the Finest Service

Veterinarian

Breakfast • Lunch Menu From Around The World

FIRST Place: Matthew Bettencourt

Thank you for 14 years of business!

Let our family give your family something to smile about!

Chico Creek Animal Hospital, 3449 Highway 32, 379-2517 SECOND Place: Gary Darling Darling Veterinary Clinic, 2520 Dominic Dr., Ste. 145, 892-8910 THIRD Place: Colleen Prather Chico Animal Hospital, 3015 Esplanade, 342-0518

3221 Esplanade (530) 891-4500 Monday-Friday 8am-2pm Sunday 8am-1pm

110 yellowstone Drive ste 100 Chico, CA 95973 • 530.895.3449

Massage therapist FIRST Place: Candi Williamson Massage by Candi, 2062 Talbert Drive, Ste. 100, 521-7328

Spencer Boone (center) of Orangetheory Fitness

SECOND Place: Babette Maiss 13 Williamsburg Lane, 321-5668

Eye-care specialist

Physical therapy office

THIRD Place: Jenni Miller Prana Endura Wellness Center, 40 Constitution Drive, Ste. E, 520-3459

FIRST Place: North Valley Eye Care

FIRST Place: Avail Physical Therapy

Gym

114 Mission Ranch Blvd., Ste. 50, 891-1900

2555 Ceanothus Ave., Ste. 150, 892-2810

FIRST Place: In Motion Fitness

SECOND Place: Chico Eye Center 605 W. East Ave., 895-1727

SECOND Place: Coast Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine 1044 Mangrove Ave., 892-2966

SECOND Place: Chico Sports Club 260 Cohasset Road, Ste. 190, 345-9427

THIRD Place: Family Eye Care 2565 Ceanothus Ave., Ste. 155, 899-3939

General practitioner

THIRD Place: Enloe Medical Center Outpatient Therapy Services 340 W. East Ave., 332-6110

Plastic surgeon

FIRST Place: Julie Archer

FIRST Place: Daniel S. Thomas

Chico Primary Care, 1645 Esplanade, Ste. 1, 896-0386

619 W. East Ave., 891-4391

SECOND Place: Marcia Nelson Mission Ranch Primary Care, 114 Mission Ranch Blvd., Ste. 10, 894-0500 THIRD Place: A.M. Corky Rey Mission Ranch Primary Care, 114 Mission Ranch Blvd., Ste. 10, 894-0500

SECOND Place: Emily C. Hartmann Northstate Plastic Surgery, 1260 East Ave., Ste. 100, 513-6060 THIRD Place: Kevin D. Myers Northstate Plastic Surgery, 1260 East Ave., Ste. 100, 513-6060

SECOND Place: Daniela Morcos-Gannon 643 W. East Ave., 899-2981 THIRD Place: Ejaz Ahmed Chico Pediatrics, 670 Rio Lindo Ave., Ste. 300, 343-8522

Boutique gym

Specializing in

FIRST Place: Orangetheory Fitness

PRE & POST SURGERY, SPECIFIC INJURY, SCAR TISSUE, SPORTS MASSAGE, YOGA & STRETCHING CLASSES, PERSONAL TRAINING AND MORE.

874 East Ave., 722-4000 SECOND Place: Terrain Park Climbing Center 931 W. Fifth St., 809-0796 THIRD Place: Chic Express Fitness 1311 Mangrove Ave., Ste. E, 965-5556

FIRST Place: Spencer Boone

FIRST Place: Paul Wassermann

Many Talented Therapists

THIRD Place: Orangetheory Fitness 874 East Ave., 722-4000

Personal trainer

Pediatrician 1430 Esplanade, Ste. 5, 891-0553

1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

530-521-7328

Thanks for Making Us your Clinic Thanks for Making Us your Clinic

Book now at massagebycandichico.com

SinCe

2010

Orangetheory Fitness, 874 East Ave., 722-4000

PERSONAL FAVE

“Bidwell Park—the amount of outdoor recreation afforded us without travel is unparalleled.”

SECOND Place: Andre Fassler Chico Sports Club, 260 Cohasset Road, Ste. 190, 345-9427 THIRD Place: Marie Phillips In Motion Fitness, 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

$20-40

—Brian Kanabrocki READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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Sliding Scale

1815 Mangrove Ave., Chico | 530.345.5300 | Open Monday-Saturday OCTOBER 11, 2018

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Recreation

READERS’ PICKS

Active Chicoans tell us their faves When it comes to working out and playing in the great outdoors, Chicoans are pretty particular. The list of locals’ favorite places to recreate is wide-ranging—from dance to golf to exploring Bidwell Park.

Dance studio

Place for family fun

FIRST Place: Hype Dance Studio

FIRST Place: Bidwell Park

1033 Mangrove Ave., 898-8789

SECOND Place: Cal Skate/Funland 2465 Carmichael Drive, 343-1601

SECOND Place: North State Ballet 312 Otterson Drive, Ste. G, 774-2364 THIRD Place: Studio One 707 Wall St., 345-9465

Golf course -– regional (Butte/ Glenn/Tehama) FIRST Place: Butte Creek Country Club 175 Estates Drive, 343-7979 SECOND Place: Bidwell Park Golf Course 3199 Golf Course Road, 891-8417 THIRD Place: Canyon Oaks Country Club 999 Yosemite Drive, 343-2582

Martial arts studio FIRST Place: Azad’s Martial Arts Center 313 Walnut St., Ste. 150, 892-2923 SECOND Place: Haley’s Martial Arts Center 260 Cohasset Road, Ste. 150, 895-3114 THIRD Place: Morning Sun Martial Arts 181 E. Ninth Ave., 342-5833

Yoga studio FIRST Place: Yoga Center of Chico 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, 342-0100

THIRD Place: Rare Air Trampoline Park 1090 E. 20th St., 433-5557

Place for kids to play FIRST Place: Caper Acres Bidwell Park SECOND Place: Rare Air Trampoline Park 1090 E. 20th St., 433-5557 THIRD Place: In Motion Fitness 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

Local league to join FIRST Place: CARD Recreational Coed “E” League Friendly Pitch Softball 895-4711, chicorec.com SECOND Place: Chico Youth Soccer League 895-4711, chicorec.com THIRD Place: Chico Eastside Little League baseball 328 Southgate Ave., chicoeastsidelittleleague.com

Sporting event FIRST Place: Chico Heat 725-5444, chicoheat.com SECOND Place: Almond Bowl Chico High vs. Pleasant Valley High football THIRD Place: Chico State men’s basketball chicowildcats.com

SECOND Place: In Motion Fitness Yoga Studio 1293 E. First Ave., 343-5678

Azad’s Martial Arts Center

THIRD Place: Hot Yoga Club 1140 Mangrove Ave., Ste. B, 321-0611

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Community

READERS’ PICKS

All the volunteers and personalities that make Chico, well, Chico

Charitable cause FIRST Place: Butte Humane Society 2580 Fair St., 343-7917

When people first come to Chico, they notice our thriving arts, nightlife and restaurant scenes and recognize the grandeur of Bidwell Park. All of those things make Chico an attractive, fun place to live. But for anyone who has spent even a small amount of time here, it’s apparent that the community runs much deeper. A wide network of volunteers and nonprofits make the city a better place, as do all of the teachers, farmers and museums that enrich life in this fair town.

SECOND Place (tie): Chico Housing Action Team 520-6412, chicohousingactionteam.org SECOND Place (tie): Community Action Agency of Butte County 181 E. Shasta Ave., 712-2600

Community event FIRST Place: Taste of Chico SECOND Place: Thursday Night Market THIRD Place: Christmas Preview

Farmers’ market vendor FIRST Place: Chico Chai 1919 Park Ave., 897-0822 SECOND Place: Grub CSA Farm 3269 W. Sacramento Ave., 680-4543 THIRD Place: Guzetti’s Indian Food & Catering 117 W. 14th St., 896-1647

Bidwell Park

Museum FIRST Place: Museum of Northern California Art 900 Esplanade, 487-7272 SECOND Place: Gateway Science Museum 625 Esplanade, 898-4121 THIRD Place: Chico History Museum 141 Salem St., 891-4336

Party/event venue FIRST Place: Chico Women’s Club 592 E. Third St., 894-1978 SECOND Place: The Palms 2947 Nord Ave., 894-8000 THIRD Place: The White Ranch 214 Hagenridge Road, 342-6530 Chico Chai

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EVERY SURVIVOR’S JOURNEY IS UNIQUE Healing from INCEST seems impossible, but the guilt and shame one may feel was never theirs to carry.

Insightful Nurturing Self Courageous Empowering Self-Acceptance Triumphant STOP THE CYCLE & START THE HEALING

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN: 530.342.RAPE (7273) COLLECT CALLS ACCEPTED BUTTE/GLENN: 530.891.1331 · TEHAMA: 530.529.3980

ALL VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT WILL RECEIVE A FREE FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION, regardless of whether or not they choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS ABOUT SEXUAL ASSAULT. If you or someone you know has been sexually violated, contact Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention. 52  

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READERS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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Acupuncture

Visit the 1894 schoolhouse at the

Chinese Herbs & Massage

Colman Memorial Community Museum

Place to pray FIRST Place: Bidwell Park

Pain Management, Weight Loss, Digestive Issues & Allergies

in Butte creek canyon

SECOND Place: Bidwell Presbyterian Church 208 W. First St., 343-1484

Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Elinore Schafer L.Ac.

1-4 pm Saturday & Sunday

Group tours available! Call to make an appointment!

THIRD Place: Center for Spiritual Living Chico 14 Hillary Lane, 895-8395

Most insurance accepted

530-893-9667 13548 Centerville Rd.

Radio station

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 530.342.2895 • AmericanChi.net Mon & Thur 10am-6pm • Tues & Wed 9am-6pm Friday 9am-2pm • Sunday Noon- 4pm

www.buttecreekcanyon.info/ colman-memorial-community-museum

FIRST Place: 90.1 KZFR Community Radio SECOND Place: 103.5 KHSL The Blaze THIRD Place: 91.7 KCHO North State Public Radio

Ryne Johnson

Youth organization

Local personality

FIRST Place: Boys & Girls Clubs of the North Valley

FIRST Place: Mike “G-Ride” Griffith

601 Wall St., 899-0335

G-Ride Pedi-Cab & Trolley, 354-9885

SECOND Place: Chico Area Recreation and Park District 545 Vallombrosa Ave., 895-4171

SECOND Place: Linda Watkins-Bennett CBS 12 and NBC 24

THIRD Place: Young Life Chico/Butte County 864-9387, chicoarea.younglife.org

THIRD Place: Debbie Cobb CBS 12 and NBC 24

Instructor/ professor FIRST Place: Ryne Johnson College of Business, Chico State SECOND Place: Janet Lombardi Blixt Chico Art School & Gallery, 261 E. Third St., 570-3895

PERSONAL FAVE

“The community. I have never lived somewhere that I feel as much support from the community in life and business. I truly believe that so many small businesses thrive in this town because the community loves so well.” —Anika Rodriguez Kronmiller

THIRD Place: Sanjay Dev Math departments, Butte College and Chico State

Teacher (K-12) FIRST Place: Nicole Nye

WINS Praises from Clients Every Day “Thanks to your support, quick service, attitude and ability to solve my hearing problem, my life has been enhanced way beyond my expectations. I have dealt with 3 other companies… and none have come up to the service and love I have received from you. ~ Regg K.

“Outstanding service and technology! I was really impressed with the time they took to analyze my hearing loss and my lifestyle…Very professional, great follow-up and very affordable!” ~ Don C.

“Your service is great. I wish I would have come in years ago! ~ Bruce V.

Chico Country Day School SECOND Place: Carol Stein Sierra View Elementary School THIRD Place: Linda Leen Sierra View Elementary School

“Thank you for bringing sound back into my life.” ~ Kathryn M.

Volunteer SECOND Place: Farshad Azad THIRD Place: Lisa Currier

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Reproductive Health Know before you go

In Chico, Women’s Health Specialists and Planned Parenthood offer comprehensive, patientfocused reproductive health care, including birth control, STD testing and prevention, and abortion services. Beware of local “crisis pregnancy centers.” What they are really offering is pregnancy testing and religious-based counseling.

Changing lives through Better Hearing since 1949

FIRST Place: Nicholas Mertz

SEE

For Your

513-6507

www.ChicoHearingAid Center.com

Women on Reproductive Defense

3100 Cohasset Rd. 530.342.8367 ppnorcal.org

1469 Humboldt Rd. #200 530.891.1911 cawhs.org OCTOBER 11, 2018

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Editors’ Picks We love this stuff!

Best fairytale ending Chico Princess Parties 116 W. Second St., 809-1666

Best save of 2018 The water towers at Third and Orient streets

The iconic structures are part of the backdrop of the neighborhood just east of downtown. They have been depicted in paintings and other artworks—including this newspaper’s recent Discover Butte County magazine—but based on concerns about seismic safety last year, the structures were going to be dismantled. Thankfully, however, the community rallied. Especially vocal was the Chico Heritage Association, whose members launched a preservation campaign. The towers’ owner, California Water Co., listened and recently announced the structures would stay put. Those of us at Second and Flume streets sure are happy the landmarks will remain in our backyard.

Sisters Kelley Sexton and Shannon Rowley have been on an adventure that’s one for the storybooks. The pair, who each have a performing arts background, relocated to Chico from San Diego last fall and launched Chico Princess Parties, sharing a vision of enchanting children by bringing beloved fairytale characters and superheroes to life. This past year, the princesses of Chico Princess Parties have hosted story and tea time events and dance/gymnastic/etiquette classes, and made special appearances at parties and community events. In fact, they were so successful that by May they had outgrown their first location in north Chico and opened up a shop downtown. And Sexton and Rowley haven’t stopped there. They’ve expanded the business by opening a children’s clothing boutique and party venue, Shells & Fairytales, at the Chico Mall last month. This may just be the first chapter for the sisters, but it’s certainly one happy ending.

Best new green movement

Best way to get trashed

Strawless in Chico

Trashy Fried Chicken Tacos at B Street Public House

strawlesschallenge.com

Historian Michael Magliari with the water towers

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Chico Princess Parties

Linda Storey was on to something when she decided to remove plastic drinking straws from her restaurants—Hula’s Chinese BBQ. Spurred to action by a disturbing viral video of a sea turtle that had ingested a straw, Storey aimed to broaden the movement locally, starting a website that challenges other local businesses. Several followed her lead and even the Associated Students at Chico State saw merit in going strawless, pulling the single-use plastic from dining halls and offering paper or stainless steel varieties instead. The Sustainability Management Association also joined the movement, launching the Strawless Challenge to garner more support. It’s a small gesture in favor of the environment, and we’re certainly on board.

117 Broadway, 899-8203

There’s a particular item on the menu at B Street Public House that is so craveworthy it’s made an appearance in the dreams of one online reviewer. When we say “get trashed,” we’re not referring to an item with a hangover-inducing ABV percentage; we’re talking about binging on the pub’s Trashy Fried Chicken Tacos. They’re far from traditional, with crispy chicken, plus cilantro, slaw, pickled onions and an impressive cheese skirt, covered in cilantro ranch. Regulars describe them thusly: “Best ever.” “Must have.” “Freakin’ delish.” And “ridiculous indulgence you don’t want to miss.” We couldn’t agree more.


Shepard Fairey’s “Peace” mural

Best reason to leave downtown Booze District

No area of town has exploded in quite the same way as Chico’s newly developing Booze/Beverage/ Fermentation District along South Park Avenue. With two breweries, two cideries, a winery, a distillery and a craft beer bar all within a short distance of each other, it’s become a destination for those seeking something different from the downtown scene. Throw in a rotating schedule of food trucks and live music, plus games for kids and adults alike at most establishments, and you’ve got your evening planned. Plus, have we mentioned that the beers, ciders, honeywine and rum made by local folks are quite good? That’s reason enough to say cheers!

Best armchair travel opportunity Sons and Daughters of Italy dinners

We can’t all drop everything and hop a plane to Europe. But we can take a little trip while staying right here in Chico, thanks to the folks over at the

Sons and Daughters of Italy—and the chefs and restaurants they’ve partnered with. Each month, one of four restaurants—Christian Michaels Ristorante, Grana, Panighetti’s and Sicilian Cafe— puts together a special, prix-fixe menu based on a different region of Italy and the Sons and Daughters write up some information about that region, its food and influences. What a great way to get away without actually going anywhere! Mangia!

Sons and Daughters of Italy at Sicilian Cafe

Best new claim to fame Shepard Fairey mural

This one gets added to the list: Bidwell Park, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., Aaron Rodgers, that big-ass yo-yo and the “Peace” mural. In August, a crew of hired artists installed the artwork designed by world-famous street artist/graphic designer/activist Shepard Fairey (of Barack Obama “Hope” fame) on the side of the Chico Peace & Justice Center downtown. In addition to the giant words “Peace” and “Harmony,” the striking propagandaposter-style mural features the artist’s signature image of the giant named Andre. Serious cred points.

Best fusion of art and words CN&R art boxes

When the CN&R first launched the art box program about a decade ago, it was a ton of fun to see all the local artists’ ideas for painting our newspaper boxes. Each week, we’d receive new ones and get to ogle them as they awaited delivery around town. Well, some of them were the victims of vandalism or just aged over the years and it was time for a fresh coat of paint. So, we relaunched the campaign this

year and once again it’s such a delight to see fresh, locally created public art used to disseminate our free weekly. It’s truly great to be alternative!

Best fire in the belly HeartBurn Records

A new local record label committed to punk-rock music and activism? Yes, please! Founded by local rocker Alex Kokkinakis (bassist for The Vesuvians) and her partner, recording engineer Josh Garcia (of The Electric Plant Recording Studio), the label was christened in February with the release of Out of the Cold—a six-song, threeband compilation that raised money for the Safe Space Winter Shelter. And they followed that up this summer with the much more ambitious Noise for Nor Cal, an 18-band comp that raised money for wildfire recovery in Northern California. Get your credit card out, visit heartburnrecords.band camp.com and do some good rockin’ and some good for the community. EDITORS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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EDITORS’ PICKS C O N T I N U E D

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Second Street roundabout

Best cultural infusion TOT funding for arts

The transient occupancy tax is the fee visitors pay when staying at local hotels, motels and bed and breakfasts. Back in May, Councilman Andrew Coolidge broke from the conservatives and voted to divert a small portion—1 percent—of that revenue to fund local arts projects. According to estimates, that’s about $27,000 annually, but that number is likely to rise since the city has amended policy to collect those fees from Airbnb-type rentals. That’s a tiny portion of the general fund, but it’s a big deal considering arts funding was gutted during the Great Recession. That wasn’t a wise fiscal move. As we learned from an independent study in 2015, the arts spur the economy. Indeed, the previous year, 54 Chico nonprofit groups spent $8.7 million producing artistic and cultural events, and audiences spent $8.9 million attending them, for a total of $17.7 million. That money supported 451 fulltime jobs and generated $519,000 and $1.8 million for local and state government, respectively. We’re looking forward to new projects that buoy Chico’s culture and its coffers.

Best public art masquerading as a road improvement Second Street roundabout With the chain-link fencing removed, and traffic diversion signs gone, Chicoans finally can see the fully realized vision for the junction of East First, East Second and Flume streets. The middle of the roundabout long has been a mostly flat, dirt-covered disc—drawing attention only when a horn or skid signaled an impending accident. Now, it’s a centerpiece welcoming visitors to downtown, an eye-catching display that ironically seems to have increased drivers’ focus. (Purely anecdotal evidence: We’ve heard fewer screeches.) The art piece comprises brick, metalwork, plantings and a tree. As a bonus, the city laid irrigation lines and relandscaped the surrounding sidewalk strips to match. If you haven’t seen it in person, swing by … safely.

Best local sports feat Best food epiphany Hot dogs are sammiches

Are you just hung up on the shape of the bread? Or is it the fact that the meat is in tube form? It’s still bread with meat inside! Why don’t you just get over your sandwich preconceptions already and give in to the Gnarly Deli mantra: “Hot dogs are sammiches.” The street-food vendor with the offbeat sense of humor has memes for days spreading the gospel on its Facebook page, but the real proof is in the well-conceived dogs, such as the Juan Popper (beef dog topped with cheese, barbecue sauce, sour cream and crispy fried jalepeños) and the Ooo Mommy Dog (beef dog with teriyaki, nori, green onions and wasabi mayo on a sesame bun). Check out the schedule at facebook.com/ gnarlydeli and go broaden your sandwich horizons. The Earl of Sandwich would approve.

CN&R

OCTOBER 11, 2018

Reaching state finals in basketball is never easy. That Pleasant Valley achieved this feat with both its boys’ and girls’ teams this past season is remarkable. The boys won the championship, 70-65, over Notre Dame High of Riverside—a year after the Vikings football team won a state title. The boys finished with a 32-2 record. The girls lost to Redondo Union, 57-42, finishing 25-5. Both teams played at the Golden 1 Center, home arena of the Sacramento Kings. Runner-up: The Chico Heat (RIP) won the Great West League title for the second time in its three years of existence as a collegiate wood-bat summer team.

Best democracy resource League of Women Voters of Butte County candidate forums

The all-volunteer local league of the national organization is a go-to source for voters. Each election cycle, its members organize forums that showcase the folks running for office—from city councils to our District 1 congressional representation. The events are nonpartisan and professionally operated. They are not only open to the public, but also are broadcast by the local public television station, BCAC TV, to allow busy folks to tune into them at their convenience. Hooray to that!

Gnarly Deli sammich

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Pleasant Valley High School makes the finals


Meat, deli & Groceries

S PACK T A E M IALS SPEC

Certified premium

The Hop Yard at Sierra Nevada

The Best words “100 percent contained”

Forget “covfefe,” out here in drought-stricken California, the words that offer the most comfort are those that signal the end of whichever record-breaking wildfire has been blocking the sun with oppressive smoke for weeks. Getting smoked out is, of course, of relatively minor concern when measured against the many tragedies suffered by those in the path of the flames. And the real heroes during wildfire season, the ones who deserve all of the awards and gratitude we can muster, are the firefighters and other first responders who risk their lives to protect others. Those brave souls are the Best of the Best.

Best use for an old shipping container Build a bar!

The iconic copper-coated brew kettles at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. came to Chico from Germany in the 1980s. Once the contents were unpacked, the shipping containers that housed them were tucked in a corner of the property and left to gather dust … that is, until someone had a genius idea: Turn them into a bar. This past spring, two of the big, beige metal boxes were plopped down near the brewery’s hop fields, corn hole courts were set up and Sierra Nevada beers were put on ice as the new Hop Yard outdoor bar was born. It’s still a kick to grab a cold one at the bar in the busy pub and let off steam with a friendly crowd of beer-lovers, but having the option to head outside and stretch out in the fresh air with your crew and your dog seems so natural for Chico that the only question is, “Why didn’t they do this sooner?!”

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Arts &Culture Colorful

Wyatt Hersey reclines in front of a painting of his that was inspired by a poem by Mary Oliver.

connections

THIS WEEK Ecologist/artist creates vibrant folk art from scientific observation of the natural world

Ithenwatchdrawtheasame bird for a few minutes, picture of it and describe its f you were to ask 10 random people to

behavior, chances are you’d come up with contradictory details and doodles of an array story and of strange creatures. As photo by a field biologist, Wyatt Ken Smith Hersey understands Preview: this, and he’s commitJust Lying on the ted to observing and Grass, art of Wyatt Hersey, shows through documenting the natural Oct. 28. Reception, world as accurately as with live music by XDS, possible for the sake Saturday, Oct. 13, of science and shared 6-8 p.m. perception. But put a paint1078 Gallery 1710 Park Ave. brush in his hand, and 1078gallery.org Hersey’s depictions of nature become something different entirely. Each separate leaf and petal of a single flower takes on a different primary or pastel hue; the limbs of dancing people bend with soft curves rather than at harsh, realistic angles; and the tail of a coyote, its dark fur mottled with yellow, blue and red streaks, billows and twists like a meandering river. Hersey’s folk art-informed works more resemble the illustrated pages of a children’s book than the realistic sketches found in botany and birding field guides, and he describes the juxtaposition between his two callings as that between “meticulous observation and loose expression.” Hersey’s murals can be found 58

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OCTOBER 11, 2018

around Chico—inside Naked Lounge and Tender Loving Coffee—and a collection of his work is currently on display at the 1078 Gallery. The exhibit, which opened on Oct. 4, is titled Just Lying on the Grass, based on a poem by Mary Oliver titled “Just Lying on the Grass at Blackwater.” During a recent conversation at the gallery, Hersey explained that the poem—which describes nature in colorful, emphatic terms like “the hurrying, athletic river” and joyously embraces “the possible glamour of death”—is analogous to his own work. “I love that poem because the content is very profound and deep … she’s talking about death and how amazing it would be to die and become part of the landscape again, to go back to everything,” he said. “It’s also about how just sitting and observing nature and being quiet can be the same as singing a song of gratitude. “The title is so unassuming, and I feel it fit the show because it perfectly matches the character of my art,” he continued. “It has a funny, casual, celebratory feeling to it but it’s also profound and [originates] from the same place I’m coming from, which is a love for the relationship between humans and nature.” Hersey said he has limited formal art training, but that he comes from an artistic family—his father is an illustrator, his mother makes collages and jewelry, and all of his siblings are similarly artistically

inclined. He considered art school, but “felt like I wasn’t ready to stop learning about other things yet.” Instead, he studied ecology at the Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash. After graduation, Hersey landed an internship with Point Blue Conservation Science, doing bird surveys at Point Reyes National Seashore. He continues to do field work seasonally—still mainly focused on birds—and has spent the last several summers working in the Sierra Nevadas. Hersey said his unique perspective on art and nature was largely developed through participating in an extracurricular activity while enrolled at Evergreen— an independent enrichment program called the Kamana Naturalist Training Program offered through the Wilderness Awareness School in Duvall, Wash. In addition to traditional tracking and survival skills, the program focuses on mindfulness and experiencing nature with all of one’s senses. For example, he practiced doing “fox walks” (a form of “stalking, walking meditation”) and maintained a “sit spot” (a quiet place where he could observe changes to a single plot of wilderness over time) for his entire tenure in Washington. “It helped me develop a sensory awareness of the world around me,” he said. “It helps to use all of my senses while doing field work, and also to focus on the impressions I get from nature and express through my art.” Ω

11

THU

Special Events AUTHOR READING AND BOOK SIGNING: Award-winning author Apricot Irving will read from and sign her latest book, Gospel of Trees. The memoir reflects on her childhood and teen years living on a missionary compound in Haiti and evokes a fractured family finding its way to kindness through honesty. Thu, 10/11, 6:30pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico branch, 1108 Sherman Ave. 896-0089. chicolibrary.org

TRIVIA NIGHT: What do you know? Answer tricky questions while enjoying food from Gnarley Deli and great beer. Thu, 10/11, 7:30pm. Nor Cal Brewing Co., 180 Erma Court, Ste. 100. 518-0951.

Music VOCAL TRASH: Part a cappella choir, part percussion ensemble, part dance troupe and all fun. The band does upbeat covers of hit songs from Motown jams to contemporary pop on recycled instruments including metal trash cans, ladders, buckets and homemade guitars. Think Glee meets Stomp. Thu, 10/11, 7:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovilleconcertassociation.org

Theater LORD OF THE FLIES: After surviving a plane crash on a remote island, a group of schoolgirls splits into two factions in a fight for control that rapidly descends into madness. A ferocious and savage take on William Golding’s brilliant book. Thu, 10/11, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

LORD OF THE FLIES Through Oct. 20 Blue Room Theatre

SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, THEATER


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE WILL DURST

Sunday, Oct. 14 Chico Women’s Club SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

MEN & CHILD CARE CONFERENCE: Conference MAKING GOD LAUGH: See Thursday. Fri, 10/12, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheater company.com

MURDER, MUSIC & MAYHEM: A murder mystery dinner theater whodunnit where you help solve the case. Ticket includes dinner, dessert and a fun, interactive show. Fri, 10/12, 6pm. $20. Paradise Methodist Church, 6722 Clark Road, Paradise. parumc.org

13

SAT

Special Events ALI SARSOUR ARABIC DINNER: Eleventh annual MAKING GOD LAUGH: The holidays can be brutal. Ruthie and Bill’s children—a priest, an aspiring actress and a former football star—all return home as family rituals and old tensions flare up in both humorous and touching ways. As the years pass, they discover that despite what we planned, we often arrive in unexpected places. Thu, 10/11, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

12

FRI

Special Events GOLDEN GRILL: Enjoy lunch, make new friends and play bingo. For more information, call 895-4015. Fri, 10/12, 11:30pm. $4. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Drive.

TRASH TO TREASURE SALE: Big ol’ rummage sale. Fri, 10/12, 9am. Wyandotte Grange, 4910 Foothill Blvd., Oroville.

Music MAMUSE: Acoustic folk and gospel from Karisha Longaker and Sarah Nutting. MaMuse creates uplifting music interweaving brilliant and haunting harmonies with lyrics born of honed emotional intelligence. Fri, 10/12, 6pm. $25. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

Theater DISNEY’S NEWSIES: Inspired by the real-life newsboys’ strike of 1899, this high-energy musical is set to soar with rousing dance numbers and non-stop thrills. This Tony Award-winning musical, based on the timeless Disney film, is toe-tapping fun for the entire family. Fri, 10/12, 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. 800722-4522. crtshows.com

LORD OF THE FLIES: See Thursday. Fri, 10/12, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

fundraiser and feast to support the Shalom Free Clinic, providing health care to our community. Tasty food prepared by Sarsour and friends, silent auction and great people. Sat 10/13, 6pm. $5-$15. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave. 518-8422. shalomfreeclinic.org

ART IN ACTION: Join members of the Paradise Art Center for this third annual event where you can enjoy refreshments, check out the gallery, bid in an auction and shop for $10 art. Sat 10/13, 11am. Paradise Art Center, 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

AUTUMN FEST: Pony cart rides, craft and food fair, house tours and fall activities for kids. Plus tons of pumpkins available for sale. Sat 10/13. $3-$5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham.

CHICO REPTILE SHOW: Hundreds of snakes, lizards, amphibians and other cool reptiles on display and for sale. Check out a display teaching rattlesnake aversion to dogs and pick up supplies for your cold-blooded friends, plus fun kids’ activities and drawings. Sat 10/13, 10am. $4-$8. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

teaches about learning environments that support male teachers, empowering strategies for fathers, gender roles and diversity. Keynote speech by Jonathan Mooney, writer and learning activist. Sat 10/13, 8am. $20. Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville.

OUT OF THE DARKNESS CHICO WALK: Join the effort with hundreds of thousands of people to raise awareness and funds that allow the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to invest in new research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy and support survivors of suicide loss. Registration is free. Sat 10/13, 9am. City Plaza, downtown Chico. 433-9293. stonewallchico.org

TRASH TO TREASURE SALE: See Friday. Sat 10/13, 9am. Wyandotte Grange, 4910 Foothill Blvd., Oroville.

WAYNE BRADY: A renaissance man best known for his hilarious improv songs on Whose Line Is It Anyway?, Brady has been on countless television shows, starred on Broadway, hosted a game show and sells a line of fancy hats. Expect a nontraditional comedy show full of songs and stories, real and improvised. Sat 10/13, 8pm. $45-$75. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

Music REESE WELL: Brunch tunes. Sat, 10/13, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater DISNEY’S NEWSIES: See Friday. Sat, 10/13, 2pm & 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts,

CONTRA DANCE: Traditional folk dancing with a live caller. Newcomers are welcome to attend. Sat 10/13. $5-$10. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

FREE LISTINGS! WAYNE BRADY Saturday, Oct. 13 Gold Country Casino & Hotel SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheater company.com

MURDER, MUSIC & MAYHEM: See Friday. Sat, 10/13, 6pm. $20. Paradise Methodist Church, 6722 Clark Road, Paradise. parumc.org

14

SUN

Special Events AUTUMN FEST: See Saturday. Sun, 10/14. $3-$5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham.

SONS & DAUGHTERS OF ITALY REGIONAL DINNER: This month’s themed dinner takes place

at Christian Michaels Ristorante, Sun-Wed, 10/14-17, and is focused on the region of Basilicata, Italy. Call and make a reservation today. 192 E. Third St. 894-4005.

WILL DURST MIDTERM MADNESS: Bay Area political comedian is back in Chico to roast the politics of today. No one will be spared. Hank Duke opens the show. Sun, 10/14, 7:30pm. $20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater DISNEY’S NEWSIES: See Friday. Sun, 10/14, 2pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. 800-722-4522. crtshows.com

MAKING GOD LAUGH: See Thursday. Sun, 10/14, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

1475 East Ave. 800-722-4522. crtshows.com

LORD OF THE FLIES: See Thursday. Sat, 10/13, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 60

EDITOR’S PICK

CHICO WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S: Take the first step to a world without Alzheimer’s. Sat 10/13, 8:30am. Free. Sycamore Field, Lower Bidwell Park. 308-3691. act.alz.org

MAKING GOD LAUGH: See Thursday. Sat, 10/13, 7:30pm. $14-$65. Chico Theater Company, 166

’SUP HERPS Herpetophobiacs beware! A menagerie of turtles, snakes, lizards and amphibians will slither, crawl, slink and scurry to the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds on Saturday, Oct. 13. Whether you want to add a new cold-blooded member to the family or are just looking for something fun to do, the Chico Reptile Show features dozens of vendors specializing in pets ranging from tarantulas to geckos to bearded dragons. It’s your chance to escape the ordinary and experience some truly fascinating animals. And new this year, dog owners will want to check out the information from Get Rattled, a Reno-based company that teaches rattlesnake aversion to canines.

OCTOBER 11, 2018

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SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY

ESTATE SALE

FINE ARTS

SHOW BOAT: Experience the San Francisco Opera’s stellar performance with a highdefinition screening of this musical theater classic. A poignant tale of life on the Mississippi from the 1880s to the 1920s, Show Boat is both a love story and a powerful reminder of the bitter legacy of racism. Sun, 10/14, 2pm. $10-$18. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279. 898-6333. csuchico.edu

from Master Water Colorist, local artist & World Traveler Betty Polivka” Unframed one of a kind original art in the California Style.

Open Studios Art Tour tickets available here. 493 East Ave Ste 1 & 3, Chico · 530.345.3063 www.SallyDimasArtGallery.com

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 59

Gallery hours Tues - Sat. 11AM - 4PM

15

MON

Special Events CHICO CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE FORUM: One of the final opportunities for Chico voters to hear from this election’s council candidates, together in one setting. This event will cover the social and financial issues facing the city. RSVP to mrichman@qualitydigest.com Mon, 10/15, 6pm. Free. Congregation Beth Israel, 1336 Hemlock St. 893-4095 x1003.

ERVIN R. CLARK Friday-Sunday, Oct. 12-14 830 Broadway St.

REGISTER TO VOTE!: Have you not done it? Today is your last chance. Don’t be a ding dong. Do it now: registertovote.ca.gov Mon, 10/15.

SEE ART

Theater CONSENT: Salon reading of Nina Raine’s timely new play. Read a part or just listen. Mon, 10/15, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. slowtheatre.com

16

TUE

Special Events MUTUAL AID DISASTER RELIEF: Fires, flooding and hurricanes demonstrate the disastrous effects of our climate catastrophe. Mutual Aid Disaster Relief listens to affected community members and responds with supplies, work crews and amplifying the grassroots community-led initiatives that blossom following disasters. This two-day event includes a presentation on resisting disaster capitalism on Tuesday and a community workshop on Wednesday. Tue, 10/16, 6pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. mutualaiddisasterrelief.org

17

WED

Special Events MUTUAL AID DISASTER RELIEF: See Tuesday. Wed, 10/17, 6pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. mutualaiddisasterrelief.org

UNDERSTANDING PROPOSITIONS: The League of Women Voters of Butte County presents an unbiased explanation and overview of all of the propositions up for a vote next month. Wed, 10/17, 6:30pm. Butte Country Library, Oroville branch, 1820 Mitchell Ave..

Music ALLISON SCULL & VICTOR MARTIN: Guitar and saxophone duo creates a fusion of musical forms uniquely their own, blending roots music with jazz, folk, blues and a little funk. Expect some original tunes and jazz standards laced with some French lyrics. Wed, 10/17, 7:30pm. $5-$25. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 64

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OCTOBER 11, 2018

Art 1078 GALLERY: Just Lying in the Grass, illustrations and paintings by Wyatt Hersey inspired by unity with our landscape. Opening reception on Saturday, Oct. 13, 6pm, with music from XDS. Through 10/28. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

830 BROADWAY ST.: Ervin R. Clark, solo pop-up show from renowned experimental artist whose thought-provoking paintings blur genre boundaries. Through 10/14. 830 Broadway St. ervclark.com

A BEAUTIFUL LIFE FURNISHINGS: Birds & Barns, show from local teachers Reta Rickmers and Caitlin Schwerin. Through 10/31. Free. 250 East First St., 487-7229.

B-SO GALLERY: BFA Group Show, works from talented students on display. Through 10/12. Chico State, Ayres Hall, Room 105.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Corbin, sculptures and paintings from Dan Corbin, a long-established local artist known for his figurative sculptures. Through 10/31. ARTS Building, 3536 Butte Campus Drive.

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING: Members’ Exhibit, original paintings, photographs and collage created by CSL members. Through 10/15. Free. 789 Bille Road, Paradise, 877-5673. paradisecsl.org

CHICO ART CENTER: Open Studios Art Tour Preview, sample art from this month’s open studio tour. Through 10/28. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

FEATHER RIVER SENIOR CENTER: Nostalgic Collection, works on display from Artists of River Town. Through 10/31. 1335 Myers St., Oroville. artistsofrivertown.org

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Dogg Days, solo exhibition by Trong Gia Nguyen featuring new works produced in Chico during a recent residency. Through 10/13. Free. Chico State, ARTS 121., 530-898-5864. universityartgallery.wordpress.com

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS GALLERY: Ann Pierce & Lois Cohen, works from the estates of two of Chico’s most honored artists, plus art by Pierce’s parents Frederick Trucksess and Ann Hoar. Through 10/27. Free. 254 E. Fourth Street, 343-2930.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Deep Etch, exhibition features print work by Chico State art faculty, including the late artists Richard Hornaday, James Kuiper, Ann Pierce and Claudia Steel. Through 12/8. 400 W. 1st St. janetturner.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Black & White in Black & White, exhibit examines the optimistic era of “The New Negro Movement” through the photographs of African American photographer John Johnson. In conjunction, MONCA presents Silence Out Loud, exploring non-traditional presentations of the Black image featuring members of the 3.9 Art Collective. Through 10/28. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PARADISE ART CENTER: Around Butte County, art depicting some aspect of Butte County, whether in realism, sculpture, or abstract renderings. Through 10/27. 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Susan Proctor, works in watercolors, acrylics and pen and ink contain hidden images incised into the medium. Through 10/27. 493 East Ave., Suite 1. sallydimasartgallery.com

UPPER CRUST: Artober, works by Cathy Eide. Through 10/31. 130 Main St. uppercrustchico.com

Museums GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Zoom Into Nano, hands-on exhibition demonstrates how scientists observe and make things that are too small to see. Find out how nanotechnology affects our lives through a number of awesome interactive exhibits. Through 1/6. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade.

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: A Stitch In Time, quilts from the museum’s collection, along with the handiwork of people in our community and stunning works from the Ridge Quilters Guild. Through 11/4. 502 Pearson Rd, Paradise.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Reimagining Chico, find out what Chico looked like 100 years ago with this exhibit exploring the archaeology of our neighborhoods. Through 12/8. Free. Chico State, 400 W. First St., 898-5397.


october 11, 2018

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Colorado folkateer’s honeyed vocals and earnest acoustic by ballads, but his Robin Bacior music career is actually his second gig. His real Preview: full-time job is Gregory alan isakov performs Friday, Oct. as a farmer, and 12, 8 p.m. the Wild touring to support reeds open. his music haptickets: $25 pens during the (ticketweb.com) off season. Over Senator Theatre time, though, 517 Main St. he’s been able to jmaxproductions.net build enough of a following to sell more than 100,000 copies of his 2013 album, The Weatherman (on his own independent label, Suitcase Town Music). “Sometimes people will say, ‘You’re a musician, right?’ And I always feel like a fraud,” Isakov said during a recent interview. “It’s crazy to me that I get to even play music as a job at all. I was always the ag kid in the ag program at school, always working. You [say], ‘I’m a full-time musician, I’m gonna do this all the way’—I tried that on for a second and was like, ‘Nope, I don’t know if that’s for me.’ I feel like part of my work

with music is listening and noticing what’s going on in my life, and when you’re on tour all the time, that’s a pretty limited window of experience.” The musician/farmer balance didn’t come overnight. In fact, the lack of it is what fueled his just-released new album, Evening Machines. After extensive touring surrounding The Weatherman, Isakov returned home and began suffering from severe anxiety. “I’d never experienced that before in my life. It really opened me up,” Isakov said. “I have a lot more compassion than I used to about that.” At home, Isakov’s barn is divided into living space, a washing station for produce, and a recording studio. He began diving into the studio side and sketching out new demos in the evenings, writing not about the anxiety, but rather through it. Almost 40 songs came out. “When you’re in a place that’s really hard—which everybody goes through—music has been that place to find that sense of space,” Isakov said. “I don’t know if I’d call it a therapy, but it felt important that I play to feel that space.” Isakov eventually whittled those songs down into an album, then went to Portland to mix with

Tucker Martine (Laura Veirs, First Aid Kit). What developed with Evening Machines was a record that veered some from the soft ballads of his earlier work. Take the single “Caves,” which feels twice the sonic size of his past work, with heavy percussive steps carrying gritty metallic tones and Isakov’s voice flanked by a choir. In some ways it feels new, but for Isakov and his band, it’s more the norm. “I love making quiet records,” Isakov said. “I think mainly because I have this one record on usually at my house, and it’s always Songs of Leonard Cohen. Sometimes I’ll flip the side—every couple months. I don’t even know if I’m listening to it, I’m just hearing it. Our shows have always been heavier, a little bit more rock ’n’ roll, but I’ve always made records that are really different from what we played live, and this record, I wanted to incorporate the stuff we’ve been doing live, but also maintain a sense of spaciousness.” As Isakov moves into touring for a new record, his balance is more in place—with necessary overlap between his two worlds. “I’m always on the bus reading horticultural stuff at night, I’m doing all my farm ordering on tour,” Isakov said. “I guess I’m just a hermit-y motherfucker.” Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 10/11—WEDNESDAY 10/17 THE UGLY ARCHITECT Monday, Oct. 15 Blackbird SEE MONDAY

GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV: DIY indie folk musician from Colorado blows through Chico with his deeply personal new album, Evening Machines. The Wild Reeds open the show. Fri, 10/12, 8pm. $25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

JACOB NOLAN: Singer/songwriter

pours his heart out on stage. Fri, 10/12, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. the exchangeoroville.com

JELLY BREAD: Hot and sweaty! Get

11THURSDAY

LOW HUMS & RED RIBBON: Psych-rock, garage and fuzz, plus understated cool vibes from this pair of rad Seattle bands. Chico’s Sunny Acres also performs. Thu, 10/11, 7pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

THE AMERICAS & BLACK MAGNET: Two local badass crews return from tour with this gig on the patio that doubles as Black Magnet’s EP-release party. Ask them about roadside delights and truck stop specials. Thu, 10/11, 9pm. $3. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

VOCAL TRASH: Part a cappella choir, part percussion ensemble, part dance troupe and all fun. Thu, 10/11, 7:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovilleconcert association.org

DYLAN’S DHARMA: Funky grooves and good vibes. Thu, 10/11, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

HOT POTATO: 1930s gypsy swing group featuring Gordy Ohliger, Pam Kather and Jim Williams, and original jazz from a soulful songwriter, Axon. Thu, 10/11, 6:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 521-6473.

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12FRIDAY

BEAR GRILLZ: It’s a DJ. Fri, 10/12,

OCTOBER 11, 2018

8pm. $15. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

down with the Reno funk band, plus a set from The Gold Souls. Fri, 10/12, 9pm. $10-$13. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445. lostonmainchico.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & STEVE COOK: An eclectic mix of dinner tunes. Fri, 10/12, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

MAMUSE: Acoustic folk and gospel from Karisha Longaker and Sarah Nutting. MaMuse creates uplifting music interweaving brilliant and haunting harmonies with lyrics born of honed emotional intelligence. Fri, 10/12, 6pm. $25. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

MUSICOLE: R&B and soul in the

lounge. Fri, 10/12, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

thumb piano featured in each of Earth, Wind and Fire’s albums, Kalimba is an assembly of talent that plays the best of EWF with plenty of heart and soul. Fri, 10/12, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Jon and Chris play your requests all night long in the lounge. Fri, 10/12, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

Guitarist Stanley Jordan revolutionized the jazz-fusion world in the ’80s when Magic Touch topped the Billboard jazz charts for 51 weeks. A two-handed finger-tapping virtuoso, Jordan continues to innovate guitar techniques, playing the melody and chords at the same time. A sight to behold on stage, you can see Stanley live at Lost on Main, Wednesday, Oct. 17, with CB3 and Sacramento guitar wizard Adrian Bellue.

SOUL POSSE: Fun dance music, wine

and pizza. Fri, 10/12, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham., 828-8040.

SWAMP ZEN: Genre-spanning group

calls you to the dance floor. Fri, 10/12, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

KALIMBA: Named after the African

JAZZ FUZE

TERRA BELLA: Central California country band now calls Nashville home. Check them out when they swing back through the home state. Fri, 10/12, 9pm. $10-$15. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri,

10/12, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

13SATURDAY

156/SILENCE: Hardcore and metalcore from Pittsburgh, plus prog-metal Your Hands Write History from Medford, The Cutthroats from Vallejo, emocore band Lightfinder and Chico Feet. Sat, 10/13, 7pm. $8. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

A DEER A HORSE: Heavy and cathartic, this band puts doom riffs in the context of angular, post-punk, almost poppy songs. Their new single (available on flexi-disc!) “Double Wide” juxtaposes without contradicting. Super stuff! They

play with Down the Well and Of the Grey. Sat, 10/13, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

CREAM OF CLAPTON: Songs from

Slowhand’s songbook. Sat, 10/13, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

FEATHER RIVER GYPSIES: Gypsy jazz and swing. Sat, 10/13, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

HIGH NOON: Country music featuring four-part vocal harmonies and journeys into Southern rock, blues and beyond. Sat, 10/13, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &


THIS WEEK: FIND MOre eNtertAINMeNt AND SPecIAL eVeNtS ON PAGe 58 ArMeD FOr APOcALYPSe, tHe LION’S DAUGHter & AberrANce Sunday, Oct. 14 The Maltese See SUNDAY

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JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & STEVE COOK: An eclectic mix of dinner

tunes. Sat, 10/13, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KLAMATH: Big band performs everything from bluegrass to rock ’n’ roll. Sat, 10/13, 5pm. Rock House Dining & Espresso, 11865 Highway 70, Yankee Hill.

Simon covers online for a preview. Sat, 10/13, 7pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

SOLAR ESTATES: Indie rockers release a new EP, plus sets from Calvin Black and SCOUT. Sat, 10/13, 9:30pm. $7. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SOUL POSSE: Groovin’ R&B and soul,

plus awesome pizza. Sat, 10/13, 6:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade., 828-8040.

MUSICOLE: See Friday. Sat, 10/13,

8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

POOR MAN’S WHISKEY: Bay Area band

SWANKMASTERS: Cover band plays pop, rock and funk tunes from the 1960s through the 1990s. Sat, 10/13, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

HIRIE: Poppy reggae band, plus performances from Tenelle and The Lowtops. Sun, 10/14, 7pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. loston mainchico.com

JOHN SEID & LARRY PETERSON: An eclectic set of music for your dining pleasure. Sun, 10/14, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fourth St.

TIM MCKEE & LARRY PETERSON: Afternoon tunes. Duo plays blues, classic rock and more. Sun, 10/14, 2pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

Huge Selection Costumes • wigs • masks • hats • makeup • aCCessories

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Celebration party includes a live rendition of the Charlie Brown Christmas Album, caroling with a live band and an ugly holiday sweater contest. Mon, 10/15, 7pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Folk presents Spike McGuire and Buffalo Moses, plus special guests Zi & Baynz. Wed, 10/17, 8pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

STANLEY JORDAN: Guitar legend performs with CB3 and Adrian Bellue. Wed, 10/17, 7pm. $5-$20. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445. lostonmainchico.com

SNAILS: Bass, EDM, dub and mega beats, plus sets from Svdden Death and Ubur. Wed, 10/17, 7pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. DamnThatsEPIC.com

THE UGLY ARCHITECT: Rad night of progressive singer/songwriter-type stuff with Bryce Goldstein, Fera and Katie Barrett. Mon, 10/15, 7pm. $5. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

17WeDNeSDAY

ALLISON SCULL & VICTOR MARTIN:

Guitar and saxophone duo creates a fusion of musical forms uniquely their own, blending roots music with jazz, folk, blues, a little funk. Wed, 10/17, 7:30pm. $5-$25. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

JEFFERY BROUSSARD & THE CREOLE COWBOYS: Rustle up some Louisiana rhythms with one of the greatest accordion players of all time. This will be a ripping night of Zydeco. Wed, 10/17, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

SPIKe & bUFF

Founder of the Loud as Folk songwriter showcase and recording studio, Spike McGuire writes hard-driving guitar tunes, sings sorrowful songs and belts out ballads in a terrifically gruff voice. Buffalo Moses (pictured) taps a similar vein with mournful music that highlights his expressive vocal range. RIYL Townes Van Zandt, Ryan Adams and Wilco’s Americana side. Special guests Zi & Baynz open the show at the The Maltese, Wednesday, Oct. 17.

fixtures are fo ore t r Ls

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known for its melding of old-time bluegrass and psychedelic rock. Check out its Pink Floyd and Paul

lords rip one out during their EP release show. The Lion’s Daughter and Aberrance also perform. Sun, 10/14, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

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OctOber 11, 2018

Iic.poetically incandescent Blaze to simply call it a biopThis new film does indeed depict the short, casut doesn’t entirely do justice to director Ethan Hawke’s

ally meteoric life and career of one Blaze Foley, the singer, songwriter and back-porch visionary memorialized in songs by by Lucinda Williams and Townes Van Juan-Carlos Zandt and in a book by his ex-wife, Selznick Sybil Rosen. But Hawke, who directed and co-wrote the screenplay with Rosen, makes the life story and its details into the core and central Blaze reference point of what at times Ends tonight, feels like an amiably laid-back Oct. 11. Starring experimental film, an unhurried benjamin Dickey, Alia meditation on the moods, visions Shawkat and charlie Sexton. Directed by and ecstasies of Foley and those ethan Hawke. Pageant closest to him (especially Rosen theatre rated r. and Van Zandt). The life story gets told, from beginning to end, but not at all in strict chronological order. It’s a drifting, sideways sort of narrative, moving associatively through a nicely blended assortment of memory fragments and remembered anecdotes. One of Foley’s off-handed visionary preoccupations in the film has to do with a kind of present-tense timelessness, and in Hawke’s film, time sometimes seems to stand still, or almost so, and other times rolls over, or circles around and back.

4

Two events in particular recur, more or less as narrative “anchors.” One is a marathon bar room performance by Foley that doubles as a live recording session. The other is an extensive postmortem radio interview in which a DJ (Hawke, more heard than seen) talks with Van Zandt (distinctively well-played by Charlie Sexton) and a drummer called Zee (Josh Hamilton) about their time with Foley. The interview fragments have the additional effect of making Blaze into a double portrait, with Van Zandt (thanks in part to Sexton’s performance) assuming major character status almost as an afterthought. And, given Alia Shawkat’s quietly intense performance as Rosen, Foley’s beloved foil and muse, the picture might even be called a triple portrait. Benjamin Dickey brings a seemingly effortless conviction to every aspect (including the musical) of his performance as Foley. Three nouveaux riches Texas stooges (played by Steve Zahn, Richard Linklater and Sam Rockwell) bring a jolt of antic satire to a story much immersed in all things Texan. Kris Kristofferson makes a haunting impression, both pathetic and diabolical, in a nearly wordless performance as Foley’s institutionalized father. Bluesy country music and heavy boozing are integral to nearly every aspect of Blaze. “Drunken Angel,” the Lucinda Williams song about Foley, doesn’t turn up until the tag end of the final credits, which may be a way for the film to indicate agreement with the spirit and sentiment of Williams’ song, but only after having found its own cinematic path to similar conclusions. Ω


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Bad Times at the El Royale

Writer (Cloverfield, The Martian) and director (The Cabin in the Woods) Drew Goddard wears both hats for his new film about a group of seven strangers staying at a hotel with dark secrets on the California/ Nevada border. Featuring an impressive ensemble that includes Jeff Bridges, Jon Hamm, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Chris Hemsworth and Nick Offerman. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

First Man

Damien Chazelle (La La Land, Whiplash) directs this biopic about Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) and the events leading up to and including the first mission to the moon. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween

The second film in the most recent series of adaptations of R.L. Stine’s classic youthhorror fiction series follows a group of kids living out one of the author’s stories as they try to save the world from a Halloween apocalypse. Starring Jack Black, Wendi McLendon-Covey and Ken Jeong. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Reopening this week

5

BlacKkKlansman

The latest “Spike Lee joint” is a periodpiece action movie of sorts, but of course it’s also much more than that: a stark appraisal of race and American social history; an undercover police story set in the 1970s with historical references ranging from the recrudescence of the KKK circa World War I to the white supremacists of Charlottesville, Va., in our own time; a nifty roundelay about self and American identity; a half-comic epic that entertains without ever losing sight of its most serious and urgent concerns. The central story premise has to do with the actual case of a black police officer named Ron Stallworth who successfully infiltrated a KKK chapter in Colorado in the late-1970s. Stallworth (versatile John David Washington) talked his way into the group via telephone calls, then shadowed a fellow undercover cop named Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver) who pretended to be the “white Aryan” that Stallworth concocted. The racial tensions are at times ferocious and there is an extraordinarily intimate and riveting quality of suspense in the moments in which the guile and daring of Stallworth and Zimmerman put them in danger of all-out misadventure. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Now playing

4

Blaze

Ends tonight, Oct. 11. See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

1

Hell Fest

Natalie (Amy Forsyth) joins some friends for an evening of terror as they

visit an amusement park full of haunted houses, death mazes and masked cast members running around with a mandate to scare the shit out of them. Walking among the paid crew in a mask and a hoodie similar to many other characters in the park is an anonymous man who isn’t going for make-believe. He likes to really kill people with ice picks, mallets, guillotines, syringes and standard-issue knives. Much of the action takes place in the dark, with flashing strobe lights, shades of red and stock horror sound effects—so, there’s a pretty good reason why none of this is scary. Plus, director Gregory Plotkin and crew filmed it in a way that renders the locales flat, cheap-looking and stagey, just like your average amusement park haunted house. Maybe in real life this stuff would be a little scary, but sitting in a movie theater watching folks enter these themed rooms is not. This is conveyer-belt horror at its worst, with a lame cliffhanger ending that suggests there will be a lame sequel. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

The House With a Clock in Its Walls

Eli Roth (Hostel, Cabin Fever) takes a break from the horror genre to direct Jack Black, Cate Blanchett and Owen Vaccaro in this adaptation of the 1973 young-adult mystery by John Bellairs (illustrated by Edward Gorey) that unveils a magical world of witches and warlocks hiding in a sleepy town. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Night School

Kevin Hart stars as a screw-up who joins a crew of troublemakers attending a night school class taught by a no-nonsense instructor (Tiffany Haddish) who uses unconventional methods to get through to her students. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

The Nun

A spinoff from The Conjuring series of horror films that follows a priest sent by the Vatican to Romania to investigate a nun’s suicide and ultimately confront an evil force. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

A Simple Favor

A mystery/thriller starring Anna Kendrick as a mommy-blogger trying to uncover the truth behind the sudden disappearance of her best friend (Blake Lively). Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Smallfoot

In this 3D animated feature, the Bigfoots (i.e., Yeti) are astonished to discover that the Smallfoots (humans) are real. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

A Star Is Born

The directorial debut of Bradley Cooper is a remake of the 1976 musical film (itself adapted from the 1937 original)—with Kris Kristofferson and Barbra Streisand—about a hard-living rocker/movie star (Cooper) who falls for and helps promote an undiscovered young artist (played by Lady Gaga). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Venom

Tom Hardy stars as the title character, the conflicted Marvel Comics superhero whose powers come via the alien that’s taken over his body. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

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OctOber 11, 2018

preferences can change over time as he floats through by the haze of explorAlastair ing beers, one by Bland one, until, one day, he lands on an old favorite and discovers he’s arrived at a new sensory paradigm. That’s what happened to me two weeks ago when I bought a six-pack of Anderson Valley Brewing Co.’s Hop Ottin’ IPA—a beer I remember drinking routinely in the early 2000s but which I’ve since gone perhaps a decade without trying. It did not taste at all like I remembered—or, at least, thought I remembered. It was malty and toffee-like in flavor, with just a faint hint of IPA bitterness. What happened? My palate, it was clear, had drifted. This beer was first made in 1995, and at the time it was one of the big trendsetting IPAs. However, as time went by, and new breweries upped the ante on hop-loading and bitterness—and using new hop varieties—my tastes seemed to change. To gauge how much things have changed over time, I went on an IPA spree the next day, buying a variety of old-school IPAs that many of us know, and which I hadn’t tasted in some time. Just as I suspected would be the case, each of them tasted subdued and less fruity than I prefer my IPAs today. Lagunitas’ flagship IPA was

probably the most bitter of the bunch, followed by Marin Brewing Co.’s India Pale Ale—which I also found to be the fruitiest, though its grain character remained prominent, with some caramel and toast flavors. Ninkasi Brewing Co.’s Total Domination IPA had the elements we expect in the style—tropical fruit, pine, citrus and bitterness—but also a sweet and bready malt base that I believe many breweries today would try and bury with hop flavors. I liked the beers—but not as much I once did. Actually, I’m not sure it’s accurate to say my palate has drifted. Rather, brewing styles have changed, and my taste buds have followed along. In the case of IPAs, hops are the most obvious ingredient to toy with, and the clear thing to do for many breweries as the beer market became more competitive in the past six or seven years was to add more, and so went the trajectory. Beers became increasingly bitter while the added hops—often new varieties developed in recent years by Pacific Northwest breeding programs—showcased new flavors, often with over-the-top, dazzling tropical fruit notes. Alcohol and sugar levels were

elevated as well, to accompany and give balance to the hops. Many breweries began adding fruit to their IPAs—generally aromatic ones like citrus, pineapple, guava and various other tropical fruits that complement fruit-forward hop varieties. Breweries—notably Stone Brewing Co. out of Escondido— launched campaigns to encourage customers to drink their IPAs as soon as they could to make sure they were getting the full experience of the hops, which fade quickly in a stored beer. There were also the session IPAs, in which brewers pulled way back on the malt and alcohol while keeping the hop profile loud and accentuated. And most recently we’ve experienced the hazy trend, with cloudy unfiltered IPAs that explode with fruit flavors and aromas. All the while, those early craft IPAs remained as they were— humble landmarks that watched the IPA craze sail away but which, thankfully, remained as they were. Today, these classic, well-balanced beers—such as Sierra Nevada’s still popular Torpedo extra IPA— allow us the chance to retrace the evolution of craft beer and rediscover an old favorite along the way. Ω


october 11, 2018

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has popped up in Chico. Over in the student-heavy south campus ’hood, right in the middle of it all at Five and I, ike’s Place sandwich shop has started hosting occasional shows. Last weekend, Oakland emo-ish pop-punkers (with the perfect name) Pity Party were joined by locals sunny acres and Helicopter Kids for a lively Sunday night gig, which was followed by what I’ve heard was a roof-raising tour kick-off party for PERVERT the following night. Ike’s manager and booker Ben schlotthauer is an alum of Chico State’s soTa Productions program and he says he has a handful of shows in the works for the fall/winter (bands can message him at facebook.com/IkesChico about playing). Next up: an amazing threeband bill featuring super-rad punky indie rock from San Jose’s awakebutstillinbed plus locals Thin air (solo experimental chillness) and Helicopter Kids (punk trio), Thursday, Oct. 18.

art walk warm-up The annual county-

wide open studios Tour hosted by Chico art Center kicks off the weekend of Oct. 20-21

awakebutstillinbed

(and continues Oct. 27-28), but if you’d like to tour some art, like, today (Oct. 11), cruise down to Chico state for the fall semester open studios: 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for the BFA studios in Ayres Hall; noon-2 p.m. for the MFA studios and Interior Architecture students in the Arts & Humanities Building; and 1-4 p.m. for the BFA studios in that same building.

art grant deadlIne Yo, local artists. Thanks to the recent reinstatement of designating 1 percent of the city’s transient occupancy tax for local arts, the Chico arts Commission is now accepting applications from artists and arts organizations for the City of Chico arts Grant Program. The deadline is tight, however. You have until Monday (Oct. 15), at 4 p.m., to visit nvcf.org/ city-of-chico-arts-grant-program and apply for a share of the approximately $27,000 available for the 2018-19 fiscal year. suppOrt lOcal fIlmmakers I recieved an email from sue Hilderbrand, producer/director for the nearly complete documentary american Totem, this week letting me know that her film is in the running for distribution support from duplass Brother Productions via something called the Hometown Heroes initiative. To qualify for the next phase in the competition, Hildebrand says that her film about gun violence in America needs to get 1,000 supporters and raise $25,000 in donations. Visit seedandspark.com/fund/american totem to help. chIcO playlIst, part three Dang! I thought I’d wrapped up my local music roundup last week, but it turns out there was an amazing release that just slipped past my radar. Longstanding local punk-rock power-trio severance Package just dropped the download/streaming version of its long-awaited new album, Pariah days, and it is a fierce and fun slice of catchy, riff-tastic, fist-pumping punk rawk. “Scissors Gonna Cut Ya” is the hit single, but my current jam is “Fear Farina,” a modern American anthem for the pissedoff, frozen-with-fear masses. CDs and other merch is on the way, but you can download the tunes today: severancepackage.org/ album/pariah-days 70

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OctOber 11, 2018


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF october 11, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): In his book

The Snow Leopard, Peter Matthiessen describes his quest to glimpse the elusive and rarely seen creature in the Himalayas. “Its uncompromising yellow eyes, wired into the depths of its unfathomable spirit,” he writes, give it a “terrible beauty” that is “the very stuff of human longing.” He loves the snow leopard so much, he says, that it is the animal he “would most like to be eaten by.” I bring this up, Aries, because now would be a good time, astrologically speaking, for you to identify what animal you would most like to be eaten by. In other words, what creature would you most like to learn from and be inspired by? What beautiful beast has the most to give you?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Richard

Nelson is an anthropologist who has lived for years with the indigenous Koyukon people of Alaska. He lauds their “careful watching of the same events in the same place” over long periods of time, noting how this enables them to cultivate a rich relationship with their surroundings that is incomprehensible to us civilized Westerners. He concludes, “There may be more to learn by climbing the same mountain a hundred times than by climbing a hundred different mountains.” I think that’s excellent counsel for you to employ in the coming weeks.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “It is sad

that unless you are born a god, your life, from its very beginning, is a mystery to you,” writes Gemini author Jamaica Kincaid. I disagree with her because she implies that if you’re human, your life is a complete and utter mystery; whereas my observation has been that for most of us, our lives are no more than 80 percent mystery. Some lucky ones have even deciphered as much as 65 percent, leaving only 35 percent mystery. What’s your percentage? I expect that between now and November 1, you can increase your understanding by at least 10 percent.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You Can-

cerians may not possess the mental dexterity of Virgos or the acute cleverness of Geminis, but you have the most soulful intelligence in the zodiac. Your empathetic intuition is among your greatest treasures. Your capacity to feel deeply gives you the ability to intensely understand the inner workings of life. Sometimes you take this subtle acumen for granted. It may be hard for you to believe that others are stuck at a high-school level of emotional skill when you have the equivalent of a PhD. Everything I just said is a prelude to my advice. In the coming weeks, I doubt you can solve your big riddle through rational analysis. Your best strategy is to deeply experience all the interesting feelings that are rising up in you.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do you ever

experience stress from having to be so interesting and attractive all the time? It may on occasion feel like an onerous responsibility to be the only artful egomaniac amidst swarms of amateur egomaniacs. I have a suggestion that might help. Twice a year, celebrate a holiday I call Dare to Be Boring Week. During these periods of release and relief, you won’t live up to people’s expectations that you keep them amused and excited. You’ll be free to be solely focused on amusing and exciting yourself, even if that means they’ll think you’re dull. Now is an excellent time to observe Dare to Be Boring Week.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A Chinese

proverb says, “Tension is who you think you should be. Relaxation is who you are.” I’m happy to let you know that you are currently more receptive to this truth than maybe you have ever been. Furthermore, you have more power than usual to change your life in ways that incorporate this truth. To get started, meditate on the hypothesis that you can get more good work done if you’re calm and composed than if you’re agitated and trying too hard.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): My astrologi-

cal analysis suggests that life is conspiring

by rob brezsny to render you extra excited and unusually animated and highly motivated. I bet that if you cooperate with the natural rhythms, you will feel stirred, playful and delighted. So how can you best use this gift? How might you take maximum advantage of the lucky breaks and bursts of grace that will be arriving? Here’s my opinion: Be more focused on discovering possibilities than making final decisions. Feed your sense of wonder and awe rather than your drive to figure everything out. Give more power to what you can imagine than to what you already know. Being practical is fine as long as you’re idealistically practical.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): How far

is it from the Land of the Lost to the Land of the Lost and Found? What’s the best route to take? Who and what are likely to provide the best help? If you approach those questions with a crisply optimistic attitude, you can gather a wealth of useful information in a relatively short time. The more research you do about the journey, the faster it will go and the more painless it will be. Here’s another fertile question to meditate on: Is there a smart and kind way to give up your attachment to a supposedly important thing that is actually quite burdensome?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): In her only novel, Save Me the Waltz, Zelda Fitzgerald described her main character like this: “She quietly expected great things to happen to her, and no doubt that’s one of the reasons why they did.” That’s a bit too much like fairy-tale wisdom for me to endorse it unconditionally. But I do believe it may sometimes be a valid hypothesis—especially for you Sagittarians in the coming months. Your faith in yourself and your desire to have interesting fun will be even more important than usual in determining what adventures you will have. I suggest you start now to lay the groundwork for this exhilarating challenge.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Armenian philosopher George Gurdjieff taught that most people are virtually sleepwalking even during the day. He said we’re permanently stuck on automatic pilot, prone to reacting in mechanical ways to every event that comes our way. Psychology pioneer Sigmund Freud had an equally dim view of us humans. He believed that it’s our normal state to be neurotic; that most of us are chronically out of sync with our surroundings. Now here’s the good news, Capricorn. You’re at least temporarily in a favorable position to refute both men’s theories. In fact, I’ll boldly predict that in the next three weeks you’ll be as authentic and awake and at peace as you’ve been in years.

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All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades. aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainetenance. (800) 725-1563 (AAN CAN)

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Every

year, people discard 3.3 million pounds of chewing gum on the streets of Amsterdam. A company named Gumdrop has begun to harvest that waste and use it to make soles for its new brand of sneakers, Gumshoe. A spokesperson said the intention was to “create a product people actually want from something no one cares about.” I’d love it if you were inspired by this visionary act of recycling, Pisces. According to my reading of the cosmic omens, you now have exceptional powers to transform something you don’t want into something you do want.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AG PEST SOLUTIONS at 24895 Post Ave Orland, CA 95963. ROBERT BRANDON THOMSON 24895 Post Ave Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT B THOMSON Dated: September 6, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001148 Published: September 20,27, October 4,11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as POLISHED 530 at 1324 Mangrove Suite 210 Chico, CA 95926. SHANNON POMEROY 2404 Pheonix Way#1 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHANNON POMEROY Dated: August 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001133 Published: September 20,27, October 4,11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LIAN’S ARTISANIA at 6605 Grandview Avenue Magalia, CA 95954. JAMES W COX 6605 Grandview Avenue Magalia, CA 95954. SANDRA MATA HERNANDEZ 6605 Grandview Avenue Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: SANDRA MATA-HERNANDEZ Dated: September 11, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001172 Published: September 20,27, October 4,11,2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In

the late 19th-century, American botanist George Washington Carver began to champion the nutritional value of peanuts. His influence led to the plant being grown and used more extensively. Although he accomplished many other innovations, including techniques for enhancing depleted soils, he became famous as the Peanut Man. Later in life, he told the story that while young he had prayed to God to show him the mystery of the universe, but God turned him down, saying, “That’s for me alone.” So George asked God to show him the mystery of the peanut, and God agreed, saying, “That’s more nearly your size.” The coming weeks will be a great time for you to seek a comparable revelation, Aquarius.

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MODERN MEDIA CARTEL at 1460 Hobart Street Chico, CA 95926. EVAN WHITIS 1460 Hobart Street Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EVAN WHITIS Dated: September 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001169 Published: September 20,27, October 4,11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE FATHER’S HOUSE SCHOOL OF TRANSFORMATION at 2656 Fort Wayne Street Oroville, CA 95966. THE FATHER’S HOUSE CHURCH OF OROVILLE, INC. 2656 Fort Wayne Street Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARK STEVEN ORSILLO, PRESIDENT Dated: August 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001128 Published: September 20,27, October 4,11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as S.C. NARAYA at 1252 E 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. ANTHONY DEL PRETE III 219 Myrtle Ave Santa Cruz, CA 95060. MALAMA M. H. MACNEIL 1252 E 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: MALAMA M. H. MACNEIL Dated: September 12, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001176 Published: September 20,27, October 4,11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO’S TAQUERIA at 645 West 5th Street #110 Chico, CA 95928. SALVADOR HERNANDEZ HERNANDEZ 43221 County Rd 17 Woodland,

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CA 95776. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SALVADOR HERNANDEZ Dated: August 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001131 Published: September 20,27, October 4,11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASCEND CLIMBING SCHOOL at 473 E 4th Street, Chico, CA 95928. NICHOLAS FERGUSON 1328 Salem Street, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NICHOLAS FERGUSON Dated: September 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001188 Published: September 20,27, OCtober 4,11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BLAST OFF at 1 London Ct Chico, CA 95973. PANCO ENTERPRISES, INC. 1 London Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DAVE PANZER, SECRETARY Dated: September 12, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001177 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WHIPSNAP MUSIC at 1620 Hemlock St Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT ARNOLD GARNER 1620 Hemlock St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT GARNER Dated: August 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001121 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DIAMOND STEAKHOUSE at 220 West 4th Street Chico, CA 95928. ALISA VIRGINIA COOK-SCOTT 690 Esplanade Chico, CA 95928. DENNIS GREGORY SCOTT 690 Esplanade Chico, CA 95928. TWO TWENTY RESTAURANT GROUP, LLC 220 West 4th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ALISA COOK-SCOTT, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: September 21, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001213 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as YOUR MODERN HOME at 1453 Saratoga Drive Chico, CA 95973. DANIELLE ALBINI 1453 Saratoga Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: DANIELLE ALBINI Dated: August 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001086 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIGHTTHOUGHTS at 6 Verde Ct Chico, CA 95973. KATHLEEN SCHULZ 6 Verde Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN SCHULZ Dated; August 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001061 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18,2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMPUTERS PLUS at 2477 Forest Avenue Suite 150 Chico, CA 95928. INTELLIMICRO INC 2477 Forest Avenue Suite 150 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SHAHID IQBAL, SECRETARY Dated: September 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001181 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JAMIE C PHOTOGRAPHY at 1910 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95926. JAMIE CHRISTY LEONARD 1910 W Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JAMIE LEONARD Dated: August 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001126 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DREAMERS AUTO SALES at 2961 Hwy 32 Ste 18 Chico, CA 95973. DREAMERS AUTO SALES LLC 2961 Hwy 32 Ste 18 Chico, CA 95973.

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This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ERIKA FINK, MEMBER MANAGER Dated: September 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001205 Published: September 27, October 4,11,18, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEAVY METAL BULLION, HEAVY METAL COINAGE, HEAVYMETALBULLION.COM, HEAVYMETALCOINAGE.COM at 5517 Paloma Ave Unit B Paradise, CA 95969. ROBERT GREER DAVIS 5517 Paloma Ave Unit B Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT G. DAVIS Dated: September 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001226 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ARWEN ENTERPRISES at 2550 Lakewest Dr Suite 50 Chico, CA 95928. ARWEN TRACY FUNK 1125 Sheridan Avenue #22 Chico, CA 95926. HERBERT WALTER FUNK 1125 Sheridan Avenue #22 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: ARWEN TRACY FUNK Dated: August 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001110 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as YOUR HOME HELPER HANDYMAN at 1380 East Ave Ste 124-196 Chico, CA 95926. YOUR HOME HELPER HANDYMAN LLC 1380 East Ave Ste 124-196 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DANIEL BOTSFORD, OWNER/MANAGER Dated: September 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001217 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OLDE TYME REALTY at 6200 Clark Road Ste B Paradise, CA 95969. LISA EGLESON DIEGO 5699 Cherry Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LISA EGLESON DIEGO Dated: September 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001238 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name OLDE TYME REALTY at 6200 Clark Road #B Paradise, CA 95969. TAMMY SPIRLOCK 13589 Miwok Court Magalia, CA 95954. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAMMY SPIRLOCK Dated: September 27,2018 FBN Number: 2017-0001373 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

OCTOBER 11, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as VANDERHALL OF CHICO at 590 East 5th Ave Chico, CA 95926. SSA III VENTURES, LLC 590 East 5th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: STEPHEN S. ADAMS, III, MANAGER Dated: September 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001202 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAZEL STREET VINTAGE AND COMPANY at 901 Hazel Street Gridley, CA 95948. NELDA ZOE ANDES 542 B Street Biggs, CA 95917. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NELDA Z. ANDES Dated: September 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001179 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DPG ENTERPRISES LLC at 1385 E. LINDO AVE #11 Chico, CA 95926. DPG ENTERPRISES LLC 1385 E. Lindo Ave #11 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: BRUNO A. BICOCCA JR, PRESIDENT Dated: September 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001224 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO SEASONS at 1260 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE AUVINEN 1260 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY AUVINEN Dated: Otober 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001269 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ASIAN MASSAGE at 2070 E. 20th Street #140 Chico, CA 95928. LINDA LIU 1842 Bedford Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed; LINDA LIU Dated: September 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001208 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TURNKEY CLEANING SERVICES at 1530 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. KAYLA CASTILLO 1530 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAYLA CASTILLO Dated: September 28, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001242 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOOTHILL PROPERTIES at 1834 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. BLAKE ANDERSON 695 E 4th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BLAKE ANDERSON Dated: October 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001249 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMMIGRATION ADVERSITY DOCUMENTATION at 1721 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. NANCY A BRYANT 1721 Dayton Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NANCY A. BRYANT Dated: August 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001111 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name TEB PANTRY at 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. ALI EMDADIAN 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. MOHAMMADREZA SOLEYMANI 1982 Modoc Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ALI EMDADIAN Dated: August 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2017-0001106 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTURY 21 SELECT COMMERCIAL GROUP, CENTURY 21 SELECT REAL ESTATE INC at 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JACUZZI LYDON LTD 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed; DANIEL C. JACUZZI, PRESIDENT Dated: September 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0001239 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

2018 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: October 4,11, 2018

1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03171 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITION

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUAN CARLO DELPORTILLO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JUAN CARLO DELPORTILLO Proposed name: CARLO KNIGHT WOLF THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 24, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03089 Published: October 4,11,18,25, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JASON PAUL NELSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JASON PAUL NELSON Proposed name: JAYSON PAUL NELSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: September 28, 2018 Case Number: 18CV03177 Published: October 11,18,25, November 1, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. KARENA MICHELLE BAUMGART-COBB 476ACC 5x6 (Suitcases, boxes, bags, misc.) SHERRI BULLARD 327CC 5x10 (Boxes, misc.) DOLORES DAVENPORT 072CC 6x10 (Clothes, Boxes) DAVID DUNCAN 504CC 6x7 (Boxes, tools) SHANE GOINS 300SS 5x10 (Bed, electronics, boxes) SUSAN JOHNSEN 367SS 12x15 (Misc.) DEBBIE KLUMP 187SS 6x12 (Boxes, Containers) CARA MAYS 205SS 6x12 (Boxes, misc.) BRANDY RAMSEY 073CC 5x5 (Bags, misc.) MAX SCIARINI 299SS 5x5 (clothes, mattress, misc.) CANDACE CARBY 219SS 6x15 (clothes, furniture, misc.) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: October 20,

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner HARRY VAUGHN BOATRIGHT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HARRY VAUGHN BOATRIGHT Proposed name: VAUGHN BOATRIGHT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court

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NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

CHARLES PATRICK MCCLURE, AKA PATRICK MCCLURE, CHARLES P. MCCLURE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLES PATRICK MCCLURE, AKA, PATRICK MCCLURE, CHARLES P. MCCLURE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JACK WAYNE MCCLURE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JACK WAYNE MCCLURE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 6, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DIRK POTTER Jacobs, Anderson, Potter & Chaplin 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 Case Number: 18PR00419 Dated: September 20, 2018 Published: September 27, October 4,11, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

SOLOMON HUANG To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SOLOMON HUANG A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CELINA L. HUANG in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CELINA L.

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HUANG be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 Case Number: 18PR00410 Dated: September 19, 2018 Published: September 27, October 4,11, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

THELMA WARREN To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: THELMA WARREN aka THELMA A. WARREN aka THELMA ARVESTA WARREN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LESLEY MARCH in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LESLEY MARCH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicls, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBD Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the

this Legal Notice continues

date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: LESLEY MARCH 4325 Caballo Way Chico, CA 95973 Case Number: 18PR00278 Dated: September 25, 2018 Published: October 4,11,18, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE

DEN CONG HA To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DEN CONG HA A Petition for Probate has been filed by: XA THI LE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: XA THI LE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 30, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 8 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965. (530) 533-5661 Case Number: 18PR00434 Dated: October 1, 2018 Published: October 11,18,25, 2018


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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

3935 Barbados Ct 68 Eagle Nest Dr 205 Mill Creek Dr 3271 Middletown Ave 787 Sierra View Way 14093 Garner Ln 6 Real Tree Ct 966 Royal Dr 1582 Filbert Ave 6 Vintage Ct 12 Goldeneye Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$760,000 $590,000 $505,000 $505,000 $474,000 $425,000 $412,000 $380,000 $375,000 $370,000 $365,000

4/3 3/4 4/2 4/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2

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OCTOBER 11, 2018

AFFORDABLE... move in ready! Cozy home, 2 bd/1 bath, sits on large lot w/large side area for parking and RV access to back yard. Home includes a basement (3 rooms) A Must See...

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Reduced educed to

$229,500

Lic# 01506350

Joyce Turner

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Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc. SQ. FT. 2802 3582 2202 2132 1925 1878 2154 1666 1484 1844 1588

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

12 Amber Way 11 Spinnaker Way 1077 E 5th Ave 3004 California Park Dr 1463 Filbert Ave 1682 E 8th St 13 Avante Way 8 Elisha Ct 1709 Sunset Ave 8 Highland Cir 160 Remington Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$359,000 $356,000 $355,500 $350,000 $345,000 $337,000 $330,000 $330,000 $327,500 $320,000 $315,500

3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/3 2/1 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2

SQ. FT. 1318 1833 1631 1705 1307 1509 1440 1614 1064 1601 1391


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Butte valley 2 custom homes, private setting on 235 acs, horse or cattle..................... $1,899,000

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Park loCation! Wonderful 3 bed/2.5 bth, 1,874 sq ft PARK, .53 ac with horse area ........... $525,000

Durham 3 bed/2 bth, 1,600 sq ft in town, easy care lot, home has upgrades! ...................... $278,500

Cal Park, gorgeous kitchen, lot’s of extras, 3 bed/2 bth, 1,713 sq ft.................................... $369,900 DINsqGft updated kitchen + bath, large yard ............................ $469,900 Beautiful 4 bed/2.5 bth, 2,457 PEN

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Immaculate 3 bedroom home with a bonus room that could easily be a 4th bedroom. Built in 2000 and has new carpet and new interior paint, 1842 sq ft, $327,000.

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of Septemer 24- September 28, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

3006 California Park Dr 3199 Godman Ave 6 Courtland Cir 783 Lorinda Ln 2598 White Ave 2194 Floral Ave 533 W 6th Ave 954 Karen Dr 1587 Lexus Ln 687 E 7th St 447 Hillcrest Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville

$315,000 $298,000 $285,000 $279,000 $275,000 $269,000 $267,500 $260,000 $237,000 $200,000 $423,000

3/2 3/2 4/2 4/2 3/2 2/1 2/1 3/2 2/2 3/1 3/3

SQ. FT. 1140 1435 1384 1390 1127 1106 1080 1175 1029 1274 2518

ADDRESS 5123 Ve Ave 6904 Dean Pl 1864 Vineyard Dr 5880 Cameron Ln 134 Valley Ridge Dr 5250 Bennett Rd 5212 Old Clark Rd 5265 Edgewood Ln 1549 West Dr 1690 Bandtail Ln 1130 Bille Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$287,000 $489,000 $489,000 $440,500 $430,000 $400,000 $299,000 $282,000 $270,500 $269,000 $265,000

3/2 3/3 3/2 3/3 3/3 4/2 2/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 2/2 OCTOBER 11, 2018

SQ. FT. 2056 2359 1997 2232 2184 2790 1536 2647 1464 1593 1050

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Profile for News & Review

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Best of Chico 2018

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Best of Chico 2018