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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 42 THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Hiding in plain sight How a determined writer’s work factored into the capture of the alleged Golden State Killer BY RACHEL LEIBROCK PAGE

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 42 • June 14, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fine arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: COMPOSITE ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH HANSEL

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Catalina Munevar Custom Publications Designer Katelynn Mitrano Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Office Assistant Amanda Geahry Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

JUNE 14, 2018

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Get ready for tax talk Is the Chico City Council going to call on voters to

boost city revenues via a sales tax initiative? We can’t predict that outcome, but it’s looking as though the panel is finally going to broach the subject. We’ve been keeping tabs on this scenario for many years—and at the next council meeting (Tuesday, June 19), it appears Chico’s leaders are going to at least vote on whether to have a formal discussion about such a measure. That is, they will decide if the topic is worth putting on a future agenda. Here’s a little background: For the better part of a decade, local business leaders have been brainstorming a way for the city to generate additional revenues to pay for things like public safety and infrastructure repairs and improvements. The idea of a sales tax increase has grown increasingly popular with that bloc, as the city cut services nearly to the bone (with the exception of the Chico Police Department). Indeed, as we reported in February (see “Time to tax?” Newslines, Feb. 1), the Chico Chamber of Commerce had formed a task force to research the topic and urged city officials to “consider a revenue measure.” Why is the money needed? For starters, in the decade leading up the Great Recession, the city was far too generous with employee salaries and benefits, which rose, as we reported in 2007, “by a whopping 161 percent, while the [consumer price index] has

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

increased by just 34 percent, the population by 43.5 percent, and general-fund revenues by 112 percent.” Another problem: the specter of increasingly crushing pension obligations, which alone are projected to jump to nearly $10 million annually within five years. Interestingly, this isn’t the first time the Chamber of Commerce has investigated the prospect of raising the sales tax. Back in 2007, the organization analyzed the budget and came to a resounding conclusion: It would not support a measure because the city hadn’t done enough to rein in skyrocketing costs. Evidently, new leadership doesn’t share those qualms. As for this newspaper’s position, we’ve made it clear on numerous occasions that we won’t support an effort to hike the sales tax. That’s because it would unfairly burden poor people, who spend a greater share of their income on such taxes. Moreover, we’ve already seen taxation recently—when the council adopted a waste-hauling franchise agreement, the fees garbage companies paid to the city were passed along to their customers. Still, we welcome the discussion. Who knows? Perhaps there’s a more palatable way to generate revenue. We look forward to hearing what the council, and, more important, the public has to say. After all, such a measure would require voter approval. So, get ready. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

A condom for our souls Ogovernment. held in the not-so-safe custody of Donald Trump’s And ours. Imagine the fear, bewilderver 10,000 migrant or refugee children are being

ment and trauma visited upon those children. Imagine yourself the mother or father of one of them, not sure of where they were, or the condition they are in. Meanwhile, Trump has cut legal aid to those kids separated from their parents by his cruel edict. I happened upon a quote by Gustave Flaubert while hearing news about Trump’s policy of separating children from their parents by at the border, then storing them in Jaime O’Neill buildings where they are guarded The author is a by people of dubious character. retired community “Let us always have a vast condom college instructor. within us,” Flaubert wrote, “to protect the health of our souls amid the filth into which they are plunged.” America is surely in desperate need of some kind

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of prophylactic, something that can shield our souls from the filth that covers us now. What moral filth could be greater than what Trump and his gnomic attorney general have smeared all over our nation with this barbarous and inhumane war on children, condemned by the United Nations as a crime against humanity? And rightly so. Snatching babies as young as a year old from the arms of their mothers, taking kids who are seeking asylum in “the land of the free and the home of the brave” and putting them in cells that aren’t much better than kennels is criminal, thuggish, fascistic. Pick your own word and it won’t be bad enough to describe what is being done, not only to children, but also to the image of this nation. What metaphorical condom could be large enough to shield us from the moral disease spreading among us now? From Sand Creek to My Lai, from Birmingham to Manzanar, our country has often failed to live up to its best vision of itself. Nothing worse than this comes readily to mind. There is no justification for it and no weasel words sufficient to excuse it. Ω

Close encounters Like the author of this week’s cover story, I learned about the East Area Rapist, now known as the Golden State Killer, only recently. I was a toddler when he terrorized the Bay Area, where I grew up. And by the time I moved to the Sacramento suburbs, where he committed the bulk of his crimes, it had been 15 years since he’d struck that region. However, in the mid-1980s, I vividly remember being worried about a different serial rapist/killer. He was known as the Night Stalker and was mostly active in Southern California, though he murdered people in Northern California, too. I was a latchkey kid back in those days and—due to newspaper and TV coverage of his crimes— remember having my guard up. Two events cemented my fears. Once, while walking home from school, a classmate and I came upon a car parked conspicuously on a connector street fronted by fenced side yards that led into our neighborhood. We could see through the window a naked man holding a knife. “Did you see that?” asked Sara, my friend. “Shhh. Walk fast, and run if he gets out,” I instructed her. I can’t remember the exact year, but I attended that school only for second, third and fourth grades, so I was somewhere between 8 and 10 years old. I never told my parents about it—probably because I didn’t want to talk about seeing a stranger’s junk. The scariest encounter, though, was when a car tapped my bicycle as I was riding home from soccer practice. I’d sensed it getting close to me, but figured the driver was slowing down to pull into a driveway on the long residential street a few blocks from my house. After recovering from nearly eating asphalt, I realized it was intentional. I got up onto the sidewalk and pedaled as fast as I could toward home. Around a corner I whipped and so did the car— following until I rode into the driveway of a classmate who was playing basketball outside with his older brother. Only then did I turn to see the driver, who peeled away in his powder-blue hatchback. I was so shaken that my mom called the police—who could do little without a license plate number. I couldn’t help but think of that incident when young girls started disappearing from nearby cities. Amber Swartz-Garcia, 7, was kidnapped from Pinole in 1988; Michaela Garecht, 9, was abducted in Hayward that same year; and Ilene Misheloff, 13, vanished in 1989 from neighboring Dublin while walking from school to the local ice rink. Then, in 1991, a girl at my high school in Livermore was raped and murdered during the last week of school. Jessica McHenry’s killer, Derick Moncada, was identified through DNA evidence 16 years later. That’s also how, decades after his capture, authorities linked the Night Stalker, aka Richard Ramirez, to the rape and murder of a San Francisco girl who, like me, was 9 years old in 1984. Likewise, it’s how law enforcement found the alleged Golden State Killer, Joseph James DeAngelo, who lived in a suburb of Sacramento, the epicenter of his long crime spree. As for the other girls whose names I’ll never forget, they remain missing. I can’t help but wonder whether the monsters who took them live among us.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Pitying Franklin Re “Church, meet state” (Newslines, by Robert Speer, June 7): Seeing TV ads for Franklin Graham doing his revival thing at Shasta District Fairgrounds brought several things to mind. I recalled a book, Caught in the Pulpit, and it reminded me of other books and articles by and about others whose dads were also in the ministry. Many of them continued to preach for several years after realizing that they had become atheists. Most were assisted in career changes, but family and friend changes came with high prices. I have to pity poor Franklin for not being able to “fess up” to any doubts he may secretly have; imagine the worldwide impact of showing even a hint of doubt. He may be able to maintain a shell of denial for now, but even some of the most hardened criminals eventually break. If he should eventually lose the mental toughness needed to continue preaching, who in his circle would watch for the telltale signs or even

maybe recognize self-created life-threatening situations as a silent means of escape from such a mental weight? (Suicide does not seem to be an option; that surely would be a “confession.”) I was hoping to find a better expression of “feeling” than pity, but it’s all I know.  Dan Fregin Chico

Billy was no saint Re “A divisive message” (Editorial, June 7): Why didn’t you expose the following about Billy Graham?: 1) In a letter to President Nixon in 1969, he advocated the bombing of the dikes around Hanoi. The flooding of the Hanoi area would have killed a million Vietnamese. 2) Received a Section 8 discharge from the U.S. Army during World War II. 3) At the time of his death, his net worth was estimated at $25 million. If the Jesus as depicted in the New Testament walked on earth today, Graham would be the first

one to drive a nail into his hand because he would be a threat to his wealth and status. Roy Crabtree Chico

‘Violated constantly’ Re “Public discord” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, June 7): Over 500,000 now live in U.S. public spaces, due to 40 years of regressive social and economic policy. The human rights of homeless people are violated constantly—with lack of shelter being a violation in itself. At our last Chico City Council meeting, many voiced clear opposition to the ongoing insanity of criminalizing behaviors necessary for survival. Opposition to reinstating the sit/ lie law was clear, compelling and welcome. But how many are aware of the following?: 1) It is flatly illegal for a homeless person to sleep in the public space: what is called “camping” is indistinguishable from sleeping. 2) Restrooms are LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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locked eight hours of every day; anyone on the streets inevitably breaks laws against public urination and defecation. 3) Leaving a cart or bag unattended, for any length of time, is illegal “storage on public property.” 4) All greenways and parks are off-limits at night. 5) It is even illegal to tie a rope to a tree on city land. 6) All “violations” can be treated, at the discretion of a police officer, as either infractions or misdemeanors—meaning “offenders” can be either ticketed or arrested on the spot. It is virtually impossible for a homeless person to avoid being ensnared in the criminal justice system. Patrick Newman Chico

Focus on the Dems Re “Why I risk arrest” (Guest comment, by Cathy Webster, June 7): I am thankful for any demonstration against U.S. militarism, but mostly the antiwar movement has been long dead, co-opted or is simply unwilling to think strategically. I wish that those who oppose U.S. militarism would laser-focus their energy/demonstrations on the Democrats who have become the war party. If everywhere, demonstrators showed up at Democratic Party functions with signs “dripping blood” and quality info handouts, Democrats might begin to see the huge death and destruction, and debt, they so casually support. I recently listened to a Radcliffe Institute program—“Toward a New Global Architecture? America’s Role in a Changing World”—honoring Hillary Clinton. The panelists were Hillary-supporting, foreign policy specialists. Their sanctimonious regime-change devotion and global elitism reinforced why I am glad Hillary is not president. I remember how Hillary as secretary of state prevented the United Nations from successfully concluding a peace deal for Syria in 2012, before the carnage and the huge refugee crisis had seriously begun. She insisted that Bashar al-Assad must go first. This is Democratic foreign policy in action. World reaction to Trump is creating a multipolar world that will thrive without U.S. Democratic Party-supported militarism, and its regime change policies. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

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“[W]e have surpassed many of the crimes of those countries we once condemned.” —W. dean carrier

Touché  Re “Blame indoctrination” (Letters, by Peter Bridge, June 7): If letter-writer Peter Bridge has spent a single day of his life as a credentialed schoolteacher, or indeed even just an hour of his life in a teacher’s education course, I’ll eat my credentials. During my coursework in secondary education at Chico State I was never once subject to Mr. Bridge’s imaginary “extreme anti-American liberalism,” nor did I encounter the same at any time during my four years of undergraduate education. His attempt to correlate liberalism with mass shootings echoes exactly the indoctrination that the NRA and other pro-gun advocacy groups are engaged in—in order to obfuscate the facts, and engender anti-intellectual bias in the unfortunately under-educated sector of our populace that seems to be growing at as alarming a rate as gun ownership itself. What is Mr. Bridge’s vision of a great America? One in which gun sales rise while IQs decline? He arbitrarily concludes that “school shooters are young white males not because we let them, but because we make them.” Mr. Bridge: if you’re reading this, explain the non-difference between that cause and effect. Joe Hlebica Red Bluff

Shameful policy Attorney General Jeff Sessions made his position clear when he stated, “If you cross the border unlawfully … then we will prosecute you, it’s that simple. ... If you are smuggling a child, then we will prosecute you and that child may be separated from you as required by law.” Shamefully, the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy has resulted in thousands of children being taken from their parents.

She’s not a drug-smuggler, a terrorist, a job taker. She is the 5-year-old with the dreams of a child, fleeing horrific criminal and political violence in Central America. She has come to America with her family. She’s a refugee and as such is recognized by the United States as having the right to seek asylum as specified by international and federal law. In Brownsville, Texas, a former Walmart was converted into a detention center for migrant children, some younger than 4. Currently, there are 27 immigrant child detention centers in the Southwest. This barbaric immigration policy is being ignored by an unconcerned Republican Congress. History has shown us that a lack of moral leadership has dire consequences. So the question is, America, is this the best we can do? I think not. Vote this November. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Never in my almost 80 years as a once proud American citizen would I have even considered that my country would be charged with human rights violations by the United Nations. But, as we now rip infants and toddlers away from their parents and put them in cages to await a (so far) unplanned fate, we have surpassed many of the crimes of those countries we once condemned. I have little hope for the future of the “American Way of Life,” as I know too many proud citizens who turn a blind eye to this travesty and only worry about the availability of guns and that the cost of automobiles, beer and gasoline might increase. W. Dean Carrier Paradise

Correction A brief in last week’s issue (see “Shakeup at Stonewall,” Downstroke) incorrectly reported the date Thomas Kelem was hired as executive director of Chico’s Stonewall Alliance Center. He took that post in 2013. We apologize for the error, which has been fixed online. —ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE WATER PLANS ON PAUSE

Last Thursday (June 7), the federal district court in Fresno ordered all water transfers planned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and San Luis and Delta-Mendota Water Authority to be halted. In February, the court ruled that the agencies failed to adequately disclose, avoid or mitigate impacts from major water transfers in environmental documents that are part of their 10-Year Water Transfer Program. The documents’ flaws—specifically related to climate change, groundwater and the giant garter snake—were discovered by Chico’s AquAlliance and other organizations. They must be fixed before moving forward. “[Y]ou can’t extract massive amounts of water from some place and not hurt other people and the environment,” AquAlliance Executive Director Barbara Vlamis told the CN&R in March.

AUDITOR RACE STILL UNCERTAIN

Debra Lucero and Tami Ritter have grown more secure with their results from the June 5 election, but the contenders for Butte County auditor-controller will need to wait a few weeks to know their outcome based on the update released Monday (June 11) by Clerk-Recorder Candace Grubbs. Lucero and Ritter, running for the county Board of Supervisors, each had her margin increase from the election night tally. Flipping the election night standings, Assistant Auditor-Controller Graciela Gutierrez now has a narrow lead over Chico city Accounting Manager Kathryn Mathes: just 223 votes, with 1,034 ballots to count. Grubbs has 30 days, until July 5, to certify final results.

EXPOSURE, TIMES TWO

Last week, police arrested Joshua Allen, 20, for allegedly approaching an 11-year-old girl with his pants around his ankles, grabbing her around the waist and kissing her on the cheek at a downtown business, according to a Chico Police Department press release. Allen (pictured) was on probation out of Shasta County for a burglary conviction. But that’s not the only news related to a man exposing himself. Despite being sentenced on May 1 to 300 days in jail on that charge, longtime local homeless man Jason Lisle, 45, was released on June 6 for time served. Lisle was ordered to stay 500 yards away from Third and Broadway streets (see “Barred from downtown,” Downstroke, May 3). He remains on formal probation with his various conditions still in force, such as the requirement to complete sex-offender-specific therapy, according to District Attorney Mike Ramsey. 8

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JUNE 14, 2018

A welcome home? Residents resistant to Base Camp Village, a transitional facility proposed for mentally ill in Thermalito grassy 4.4-acre lot at 1240 10th St. in RThermalito will be transformed to help on Reed already can envision how the

the most vulnerable people living in Butte County. A courtyard will constory and nect studio apartments— photo by Ashiah places of pride and Scharaga security for 28 people previously living on the as h i a h s @ n ew srev i ew. c o m streets and battling mental illness. The periphery will include a tranquil Public hearing: The Butte County fish pond and garden, Planning Commission horseshoe pits and a baswill consider Base ketball court. Camp Village on July The complex will 26 at 9 a.m. in the include a dining hall, Board of Supervisors chambers. For email a workshop where updates, sign up at residents can learn basic tinyurl.com/ddsemails. skills for living on their own and a counseling center. Eventually, they’ll move on from the transitional care facility, called Base Camp Village, to be reunited with their families or forge their own paths forward, healthier and happier. Then, more residents

will be welcomed. Tenth Street travels through a quiet residential neighborhood, with the lot planned for Base Camp Village just down the road from a few modest neighborhood churches, an elementary school, a gated suburb and Oroville Wildlife Area. For Reed, a defense attorney, this is a passion project. He has called Butte County home for 40 years, and as a volunteer and supporter of Stairways Programming, he has seen the difference the nonprofit has made for those living at its transitional housing facility in Chico. It’s his goal to replicate the housing-first, harm-reduction model used by Stairways. Neighbors are deeply concerned, however. Reed has been skewered with questions and accusations during multiple public neighborhood meetings, the most recent on Tuesday (June 12) at Nelson Avenue Middle School. “We’re not really doing a good job taking care of the mentally ill,” Reed told attendees, citing the point-in-time census statistic that 30 percent of the 1,983 homeless people in Butte County are grappling

with mental health issues. “I want to help, and I’m really touched when I listen to somebody say, ‘We want to help.’ I think that’s the true spirit of people in Thermalito.” That true spirit seems to be getting lost in translation, however. County staff tried to provide crowd control from the start, with a full agenda and email sign-up list at the door, and multiple officials emphasizing the value of listening and respect. No decisions were going to be made that night, said Tim Snellings, director of Development Services, so “the pressure’s off.” “Everybody can just kind of take a deep breath,” Snellings encouraged, inhaling and exhaling calmly into the microphone. The audience, packed onto the bleachers of the gymnasium, remained stone-faced. Staff took audience questions on index cards, which Supervisor Steve Lambert asked of Reed. But that didn’t prevent folks from speaking up, their voices often echoing off the gymnasium walls. “How come they didn’t send letters out


Ron Reed talks about his proposed transitional housing facility.

Building made easier

so the poor people would know what’s going on?” one man shouted out early in the meeting. “I don’t get the paper, and I don’t have a computer.” County officials replied that the formal notice to nearby residents would soon be sent, and instead of sticking with the 300-foot radius required by law, the county would be extending it to everyone within half a mile.

County supervisors relax regulations for rural residents, get Prop. 64 update

Few things seemed to be agreed upon.

Neighbors asked questions about security, their property values and project details. One woman said she agrees homeless people need help, but that a residential neighborhood was not a good location. For Reed, however, that’s the whole point: not segregating people, but instead integrating them, making them feel welcome. Michael Madieros, director of Stairways, told the CN&R that Base Camp Village will provide people with an opportunity to “transition from the streets, from basically your problem to your neighbor.” Robert Mullins argued during the meeting that the project would become a prison. Afterward, he told the CN&R he has reservations about Base Camp Village because of personal negative experiences with Stairways. “A bad seed does not put forth good fruit,” he said. Reed said the project will not attract homeless people to the neighborhood—it will be a residence. He intends to work with Butte County Behavioral Health and only accept its referrals. Those who live there will have to have an income, most likely Supplemental Security Income, and pay a portion per month for their home and food ($700 is the base figure Reed has provided). The facility will operate as a nonprofit, with eight to 10 clinical and support staff, and someone there 24 hours a day. Meda Seely shared with the attendees that she had visited Stairways earlier that day and was impressed with how clean and neat it was. “Everybody I met was so happy to be there,” Seely told the CN&R later. As she reflected on the time she spent there, spurred by Madieros’ invitation at the last community meeting, she started tearing up. If a program like that had been around the Oroville area previously, it would have really helped her brother when he was homeless, she said. “[People] see this as a threat because it’s something new. They’re just not stopping to think. We really need to help these people,” she said. “We have to start somewhere.” Ω

People who choose to live in the country, away from city life,

often also choose nontraditional homes—maybe they want to build on their own, or to use materials that might not fit in a more urban setting. What’s more, code requirements for city dwellings may not necessarily be needed in rural areas, where houses are farther apart and don’t affect each other in the same ways. That was part of the message conveyed by Nancy Springer, Butte County’s building division manager, who made a case for amending the regulations for limited-density owner-built rural dwellings at the Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday (June 12). The discussion came up as a result of similar amendments made specifically in the Concow and Yankee Hill area following the Lightning Complex fires in 2008. They were meant to make it easier for people who lost their homes to the fire to rebuild—and they’ve been successful, Springer said. She and a group of Concow community members have been working over the past decade to fine-tune the building regulations, as amended, for their rural community. Now they want to make them permanent—as Title 25, aka the “owner builder code”— and expand them to apply to all of rural Butte County. Basically, Title 25 eliminates certain building requirements that are seen as barriers for rural residents, Springer explained. For example, current regulations put a time limit of one year on building permits—Title 25 allows three years. It also allows for people to live in a finished portion of an unfinished dwelling. Those are both particularly helpful when residents choose to build their own homes, which is more common in rural areas, Springer said. There are two main reasons to support Title 25, she told the board. “It facilitates construction of affordable, owner-built homes, which are essential to the continued health and welfare of the residents and these rural communities,” she said. Plus,

SIFT ER In jeopardy The Environmental Protection Agency has rolled back more than 30 regulations since Trump’s election. Americans remain divided on whether air and water quality can be protected while making such cuts: 52 percent say yes, while 48 percent say no, according to a recent Pew Research Center poll. While renewable energy, such as solar (89 percent) and wind (85 percent), has bipartisan support, a vast political divide remains when it comes to other sources: Conservatives favor offshore drilling (73 percent compared to 16 percent of liberals), coal mining (70 percent vs. 13 percent) and expanded fracking (67 percent vs. 17 percent). Most Americans, however, believe the federal government is doing too little to protect key aspects of the environment. Here’s the percentage of adults who say the government is doing “too little,” by issue:

Nancy Springer (right), county building division manager, talks with community members who support easing building requirements for rural homes. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

it “supports both the county- and state-level goal of improving housing affordability and providing an option for more people who rebuild after disasters.” The Board of Supervisors agreed that Title 25 made sense and approved it unanimously. Also on Tuesday’s agenda was an informational presentation updating the

board on Proposition 64, given by Casey Hatcher, the county’s manager of economic and community development. In it, she broke down key areas as they relate to commercial cannabis, from how many commercial cultivation licenses have been granted throughout the state to which counties north of Sacramento have decided to allow cannabis-related businesses. Some key flaws Hatcher acknowledged in her data were due to inconsistent record-keeping among the agencies that oversee licensing and permits as well as laws that vary wildly from one city or county to the next. “One of the great benefits of Proposition 64 is that jurisdictions can personalize it,” she said, referring to the ability to allow commercial cultivation but not retail sales, for example, or manufacturing and testing but not deliveries. “But what has resulted is regulations that are all over the map.” It’s difficult, therefore, to simply follow another community’s lead. There were a few unexpected takeaways, Hatcher said, from her research. For one, she’d expected that more jurisdictions would allow medicinal businesses than recreational. That is not the case, she said. “What we’re seeing throughout the state, by and large, is that jurisdictions [that allow some form of business] are allowing it for both medical and Water ...............................................69% adult use.” Throughout the state, 144 cities allow Air......................................................64% commercial cannabis. That includes Shasta Climate change .............................67% Lake, Redding and Willows. And it soon Animals/habitats .........................63% Federal parks/preserves..........57%

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could include Oroville, Hatcher said. “On June 19, they’re going to consider putting a tax measure on the ballot,” she said, “and then subsequently they’ll be looking at regulating [commercial cannabis] within the city.” Broken down by business type, Hatcher said, there have been 570 storefront retail licenses granted within the state, 18 of them in the 530 area code. Additionally, there are 160 retail licenses without a storefront (i.e., delivery services) in the state and just two in the 530. There are 12 distributors licensed in our area code, but no testing facilities. Lessons that have been learned from other communities tended to lean toward stricter regulations rather than looser ones, Hatcher explained. That has a dual effect of limiting the number of applications that might be submitted while making it easier for staff to determine who qualifies. She pointed to Calaveras County as an example: Upon choosing to regulate cannabis businesses, it received 740 applications from interested parties. It was simply overwhelming, and that county since decided to ban commercial cannabis as a result. “Local regulations need to be really, really clear in the way that they’re applied,” Hatcher said, “because the groundswell of interest is there.” Supervisor Doug Teeter concurred. Having attended a summit last month on cannabis and opioid use hosted by the county’s Public Health and Behavioral Health departments, he said the message he came away with was to proceed with caution. “The theme of the conference was, ‘Don’t be an early adopter,’” he said. “Oroville is seemingly going to be that trial run. … I’ve always supported personal grows, but let’s not do what Calaveras County did.” In other news: The board unanimously voted to sign a letter of support for Haven of Hope on Wheels, a nonprofit based in Southside Oroville aimed at providing a mobile shower and laundry facility for homeless people in the county, as well as access to social services. (For more, see “Driving hope,” Newslines, May 24.) —Meredith J. Cooper me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m


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n the last installment of Eye on 45, back in April, we learned that Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, had lost his topsecret security clearance; Stephanie Clifford (aka porn star Stormy Daniels) had filed a civil lawsuit against the president; and the FBI had ransacked the office, home and hotel room of Michael Cohen, Trump’s longtime personal attorney. Cohen, we also learned, had only two clients aside from POTUS: One of them was Elliott Broidy, the former deputy finance chairman of the Republican National Committee, who has been embroiled in a scandal involving a pregnant former Playboy model. The other: Fox News talking head Sean Hannity. Here’s just a glimpse into the news from the past couple of months. April 19: Rudolph (Rudy) Giuliani—as well as two other former federal prosecutors—joins the president’s legal team. The move comes a month after John Dowd, Trump’s principal attorney related to the Russia probe, resigned from that post, reportedly after Trump disagreed with advice that he steer clear of being interviewed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. April 20: The Democratic National Committee files a civil lawsuit against WikiLeaks, the Trump campaign and Russia, charging the three conspired to harm Hillary Clinton’s campaign and aid Trump’s campaign in an effort to influence the 2016 general election, reports The Washington Post. April 23: Records for Trump’s visit to Russia in 2013 for the Miss Universe Pageant indicate he spent the night in Moscow, according to records obtained by Bloomberg. The problem: Trump twice told former FBI Director James Comey that he had not—a move to counter scandalous reports about what occurred during that trip that could make him vulnerable to coercion. April 24: The Trump administration’s ration ale for ending the Obama-era Homeland Security policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) does not pass legal muster, a judge ruled, reports Politico. U.S. District Court Judge John Bates was the third federal judge to reject the premise that ending DACA would “head off a lawsuit threatened by conservative state attorneys general who managed to block an expansion of the program under President Barack Obama.” April 26: The Hill reports that the president, after denying that he knew anything about the hush money paid to Daniels, acknowledged that Cohen represented him on “this crazy Stormy Daniels deal.” April 30: ABC News reports that the Trump campaign spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on legal expenses for Cohen—a move that likely will trigger an investigation into violations of campaign finance laws, as that pot of money cannot go to personal expenses. Meanwhile, The New York Times reports on Mueller’s list of questions for the presi-

Michael Cohen

dent. There are at least four dozen designed to “learn more about his ties to Russia and determine whether he obstructed the inquiry itself.” May 1: Trump becomes unhinged on Twitter following the Times’ story: “So disgraceful that the questions concerning the Russian Witch Hunt were ‘leaked’ to the media. No questions on Collusion,” he writes. “Oh, I see...you have a made up, phony crime, Collusion, that never existed, and an investigation begun with illegally leaked classified information. Nice!” Interestingly, the same day, a former assistant in Mueller’s office said he believed, based on grammatical errors in the questions, that the source of the leak is actually Trump’s team. May 3: Giuliani tells Hannity of Fox News that the president repaid Cohen for the $130,000 in hush money transferred to Daniels. This occurred in a series of payments, Giuliani said, though the president “didn’t know about the specifics of it, as far as I know.” The same day, multiple media outlets note that Giuliani’s interview directly contradicts recent statements by Trump, who told reporters he did not know about Cohen’s payment to Daniels. Additionally, Giuliani contradicted POTUS on the reason for firing Comey. Giuliani said it was because Comey would not “say that [Trump] wasn’t a target of the investigation.” Conversely, Trump’s aides have given multiple explanations, including that Comey botched an investigation into Hillary Clinton having used a private email server. May 7: Trump calls on Congress to cut $15 billion in approved spending, half of which was earmarked for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which pays for health care costs for children from low-income families, reports The Washington Post. Meanwhile, Politico reports a new policy at the Department of Homeland Security that would refer “100 percent of illegal southwest border crossings” to the Department of

Justice and include separating families. May 8: The president announces he’s pulling out of a nuclear deal the Obama administration and key U.S. allies reached with Iran. May 9: The Washington Post reports that Cohen was a consultant for a company with Russian ties that, among other things, registered multiple alternative-right-themed domain names during the 2016 election. After months of rhetoric, the president announces via Twitter that a proposed meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un will take place in June. May 10: Trump attorney Cohen was retained by several major corporations shortly after Trump entered the White House. Among the companies is AT&T, which paid him a reported $600,000 for guidance on a proposed merger with Time Warner, a move Trump has criticized, reports The Washington Post. May 22: During an interview with 60 Minutes reporter Lesley Stahl, Trump admitted offcamera to lambasting the media in order to discredit reporters and ensure the public won’t believe unflattering stories about him and his administration, reports Yahoo Finance. Meanwhile, The Washington Post reports that Cohen’s former business partner has reached a plea deal with prosecutors and is willing to cooperate with an investigation into tax fraud. The question is what exactly he will reveal to authorities about Cohen. May 24: Just weeks after the announcement of a nuclear summit between the U.S. and North Korea, Trump cancels the planned meeting. In a letter to Kim, he cites the country’s “tremendous anger and open hostility,” a reference to a statement in which Vice President Pence was referred to as a “political dummy.” June 1: During his 497 days in office, the president has made more than 3,200 “false or misleading claims,” reports The Washington Post’s Fact Checker. June 4: Giuliani told reporters that Trump “probably does” have the power to pardon himself, though “he has no intention” of doing so, reports the Post. The discussion regarding pardons follows revelations that the president’s attorneys have concluded that POTUS “could not have obstructed an FBI probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election because, as president, he has total control over all federal investigations.” That’s according to a memo they sent to Mueller. It also argues that Trump cannot be forced to testify. Meanwhile, Paul Manafort, Trump’s onetime campaign manager, has been accused of witness tampering in relation to his indictment on myriad charges—from money laundering to tax fraud. June 5: Russian President Vladimir Putin brags during a TV interview that he and Trump “regularly talk over the phone.” —MELISSA DAUGHERTY me lissad @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES Thomas Kelem, who contributed to a state guide on  mental health issues of LGBTQ seniors, says these  elders experience unique problems.

and respectful of LGBTQ people. “It’s bad enough not being healthy and being at the mercy of someone taking care of you; on top of that, if you’re fearful of how they might treat you because you’re LGBTQ, that adds a whole other level to it.” While at the Stonewall Alliance Center, Kelem

Over the rainbow LGBTQ seniors face distinct challenges

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

evantuc hin sk y @ n ew sr ev i ew. com

Kgoldenthe years.” time of life affectionately called “the Peering into the future, Kidd

ris Kidd is around two decades away from

wonders what that period will bring. Kidd, a psychotherapist in Chico, has been out as a lesbian for 25 years. The LGBTQ community—now often referred to by the acronym GSM, for gender and sexual minorities—has witnessed and experienced significant changes during that span. Yet, society has not evolved completely, uniformly, universally. Gay, lesbian and transgender seniors face not only the typical challenges of aging, but also mental health issues specific to their situations. Many do not have children. Laws do not afford them the same protections as other citizens. Stigmas linger. These and other

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June 14, 2018

factors may lead to any of a list of conditions that Kidd says includes loneliness, anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress. From living independently, elders frequently end up dependent on strangers, such as in managed care facilities. How open can they be? Kidd, who does not have children, told the CN&R by phone, “I worry about that for myself, and I’m only 51. I can see being 72 and going, Do I come out to every nurse? Do I come out to every doctor?” Kidd faced acceptance when coming out; “that [older] generation doesn’t trust as much.” Kidd and Thomas Kelem, a fellow therapist who until recently served as executive director of Chico’s Stonewall Alliance Center, described a generation of LGBTQ individuals with a tumultuous history. Violence, protests, prejudice, HIV/ AIDS—visceral developments shaped young adulthood and middle age of current retirees. Pride Month, celebrated each June, recognizes the 1969 Stonewall riots that ignited activism.

“To a large extent, a lot of us have been traumatized by the ways we’ve been attacked over our lives,” said Kelem, 65. “Even people just yelling names can stir up trauma, which then makes the whole experience more difficult—escalates the level of fear.” Ironically, after living as “out” individuals, many seniors go back in the closet rather than reveal their sexual/gender identity to potentially unfriendly housemates and caregivers. Some go so far as to separate from partners, Kelem said, to keep their secret. In nursing homes, he continued, “generally they find they have a really horrible experience. Either people there are not accepting or are not aware of how to be comforting

participated in the creation of a state guide addressing such concerns. Titled “LGBT Mental Health and Aging Guide,” the 16-page booklet—free to download online (tinyurl.com/LGBTQaging)—comes from the Each Mind Matters project funded by the state’s Mental Health Services Act. LGTBQ Californians comprise approximately 5 percent of the state’s population; according to the guide’s authors, these people (across all ages) are almost three times more likely to experience mental health issues than non-LGBTQ peers. Along with fear, Kelem cited loneliness as a significant emotion. Elders in the community “don’t necessarily have a lot of places to go and socialize,” he said, “and don’t necessarily get out as well, even if they’re living at home. Traditionally, bars were where people congregated, until maybe the last 10 or 15 years.” Even if they do get out, they find a different scene. Kelem explained that older men, in particular, often feel rejected by those their junior. Kidd, meanwhile, described the waning of subcultures, such as “butch/femme” lesbians.

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“Then you feel like, Where do I fit?”Kidd said. “How do I out myself, how do I say where I am, when I’ve lived in this my entire life and now it’s gone? “That may affect an entire generation as well.” Kidd sees a number of clients who feel comfortable discussing their sexual and gender identities; currently, none are seniors—at least based on personal disclosure. When completing an internship at a local social services agency, Kidd did have a member of a therapy group say privately she was a lesbian; however, in sessions, the senior woman referred to her partner as a male. The CN&R contacted a halfdozen other therapists in Chico, either referred by Kelem or specialists in psychology for seniors; none said they knew of having an LGBTQ senior as a patient. Same with Passages Connections, a program from the Chico State-based senior support service Passages. Connections offers counseling and support to older adults; program supervisor Shannon Simmons said by phone that the assessment process includes an enrollment form from Butte County Behavioral

Health—a Connections funder— that asks for gender and sexual identity. “Of course, people can decline to state and then move on; in my experience, the overwhelming majority of individuals have said, ‘Oh, yeah, I’m straight’ or ‘heterosexual’—and I’ve certainly considered that maybe they’re not disclosing or don’t feel comfortable disclosing,” she said. “One reason may be a hesitancy to get actually vulnerable about anything related to identity: mental health [or] sexual orientation.” Simmons, like Kelem and Kidd, discussed the importance of sensitivity for caregivers. As noted in the guide, LGTBQ seniors may have to seek out providers with training, experience and settings that inspire their confidence. “Identifying within that population myself, I feel like I’ve probably brought at least some sensitivity to how that facet of someone’s identity could be impacting any other part of our work together,” she said. “Even if someone is comfortably out, that [distinguishing part of their identity] certainly could be in the lexicon of how they interact out in the world and their interpersonal comfort.” Ω

Finding low- or no-cost mental health resources for young people can be difficult. To expand resources, Butte 2-1-1 launched

MentalHealth4Youth.net

BeCoMe a state CertIFIed traIned seXual assault Counselor For Butte, Glenn and teHaMa CountIes neXt traInInG Course In CHICo July 10 - auGust 4, 2018 t & tH 6-10PM, sat 9aM-5PM For 4 ConseCutIVe WeeKs. Pre-InterVIeW Is reQuIred, sPaCe Is lIMIted *Accepting CSUC interns and Butte College work study

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in May. It’s a searchable guide to mental health providers who serve children under the age of 18. “No one has to struggle alone or in isolation, help is available,” says Tara Sullivan-Hames, the director of Butte 2-1-1. “This new website as well as the 2-1-1 telephone helpline serve as connecting points for people to find support when they need it.” The informative website was created in partnership with the Butte County Department of Public Health and covers a wide range of mental health needs for children and teens including suicide prevention, play therapy, grief support groups, behavior disorders, autism resources, developmental concerns, psychiatric disorders, anger management programs and violence.

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GREENWAYS Lisa Sorensen checks out a stowaway mourning cloak during the annual butterfly count at Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve. PHOTO COURTESY OF CLARA BUCHHOLTZ

Counting butterflies Citizen scientists help measure ecological health by

Josh Cozine

Fof aonlookers. shiny jet-black butterfly crossed a group A row of contrasting bright-

luttering lightly on a crisp morning breeze,

white spots dotted the bottom of its wings. As it flitted to a nearby golden poppy patch, the delicate creature drew eyes from all those who had gathered that morning to spot the flying insects. “There’s one already!” said Don Miller, professor of entomology at Chico State, as he looked up from his attendance sheet, a handwritten page with the names of those gathered June 1 at the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER) for the North American Butterfly Association’s annual butterfly count. “A pipevine swallowtail,” he said, identifying one of the more common butterflies he reckoned everyone would see a lot. His tone was nevertheless excited, his eyes still following the butterfly intently, bobbing along with the swallowtail’s movement as it weaved up and down through the poppies. A smile of wonderment remained on his face—a smile that could have just as easily belonged to a child seeing his or her first butterfly, despite his 56-year fascination with the creatures. “When do we start counting?” asked one of the onlookers, breaking his trance. “At 8:30,” Miller said to laughs—the time being closer to 8:45 a.m.—as he flipped from his roll sheet to his tally sheet and marked the swallowtail on the count. Numbering around 20 people, including multiple experts adept at identifying butterflies, the group that gathered that day was larger than expected based on past counts. Benches had to be arranged to seat everyone―in an open, bear-scat-laden area near the reserve’s parking lot and visitor center.

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The butterfly count, often compared to the Audubon Christmas Bird Count, is a citizen science project. The butterfly association compiles data—collected primarily by laypeople, at set sites and times annually— and makes it available to researchers who track migration patterns and populations. The BCCER has participated 12 times officially. The open area where the group congregated was one of many clearings in otherwise oak-canopied rolling hills. There, small, leafy bushes, many just beginning to flower after late May rains, connect into a backdrop of waving husks of golden grass. Three expert identifiers received tally sheets, containing a list of butterflies known to be in the area from past research and counts. Along with Miller, each led one of four smaller groups to cover more ground, and count more butterflies. One group left on foot to measure areas near the visitor center, while the three others braved bumpy rides on the occasional dirt road―but mostly grass trails―that crisscross the remote reserve.

Anton Dresler readied his bug-catching net.

He stared intently, taut, prepared and still— save for his not-quite shoulder-length brown hair blowing with the wind. Awaiting the right moment, Dresler gazed into a nearby waist-high bush thick with thin, light-green leaves. Just then, a flutter of black and white and orange flashed forth from the leaves.

“Catch it! Catch it!” urged a member of the small group he had led into a clearing of bushes and knee-high grasses along their route. She already had seen Dresler’s expertise with the net on several smaller, harder-to-identify butterflies he had gently snatched out of the air. Those, he’d either photographed and released, or captured in jars for later identification and confirmation with the other experts. “It’s a sister,” Dresler said, relaxing, lowering his net in favor of a pen, marking the count. Easily identifiable by its brilliant orange wingtips and bright-white bar running down the rest of its wing, the California sister―another common variety―did not need to be caught for confirmation. Despite Dresler’s knack for keeping the delicate insects alive while snatching them from midair, the practice still can be harmful or even fatal to the captured specimen, and he avoided it when possible. By late afternoon, Dresler had filled his backpack with butterflies. The four groups reconvened around 4 p.m. in a repurposed barn just across from the visitor center. Tables were littered with captured butterflies and cameras filled with pictures of other insects to be identified. “People say, ‘What’s the big deal with butterflies?” Miller told the CN&R after the crowd had cleared and captured butterflies had been released back into nature. Miller did not total the count that day; five days later, he still had numbers to crunch. A large diversity reflects a healthy environment, he said, and a lower count can mean the opposite. Ultimately, though, the event is really about getting people out and involved. “Frankly,” he said, in a quiet tone, “the more people know about these wonderful animals, the more they’ll care about them, and the more inclined they’ll be to want to preserve them for future generations.” Ω


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY CATHY WAGNER

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Exercising for life

No blight here

Michael DeSena brings his passion for using exercise and nutrition to improve every aspect of life to his new Functional Fitness classes at MH Fitness. Growing up in Grass Valley, DeSena met his own fitness challenge at the age of 18, when he lost 45 pounds thanks to major changes in his diet and family support. That’s when he started putting on what he called “fitness camps,” which were free workouts for the community, and he found his niche working with others. DeSena moved to Chico and became certified as a personal trainer in 2016. He worked as a trainer in a local gym in the SilverSneakers network (for senior fitness), which ultimately gave him the inspiration to create his own personal training business and his Functional Fitness classes, which became a reality in May. Classes are held Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 7-8 p.m., and Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-7 a.m. For more information, call 798-8809 or stop by MH Fitness at 2426 Park Ave. and try your first class for free.

What inspired you to create this class? [In my last gym], I constantly would hear, “I want to be able to bend over and pick stuff up and not have my back hurt.” Or

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

my favorite client, my first client I ever trained at that gym, all she wanted to do was be able to ride her horse again and she hadn’t ridden in like five years. She came to me, as a trainer, and said, “Hey look, I wanna be able to ride my horse, what do I need to do?” And I was like … “I can actually help this person do something they enjoy in life!”

So,“functional fitness” pertains to everyday tasks? You know, a lot of people have back issues and that comes from a lack of core strength and stability and flexibility, and so being able to help people exercise and build strength that actually applies to their everyday life, it’s gonna help them do everything that they normally do, like go to work, and make it easier.

How does exercise apply to daily life? It’s people that just go through their daily jobs and either don’t have energy or just don’t sleep

well, so they don’t perform well at their jobs and maybe that means they miss a promotion or something like that and they’re tired at the end of the day. Well, getting them into the gym and getting them exercising and active helps them sleep better and helps them feel better and have more energy, so then they can go perform better throughout their whole life … because if you’re happier, life is so much better.

What can one expect from your class? The Functional Fitness class is for anybody. I can’t premake a program for the class, it just doesn’t work that way. I have the class, I meet the people who are going to be in it and then tailor exercises to them and their goals, but in a group setting. It’s personal training in a smallgroup setting. —CATHY WAGNER

I’m very happy to report that the site of the “old” Walmart in Oroville has not—as has been the case in many other communities—become a blight on the neighborhood. Quite the opposite, in fact. Several new businesses have moved in or are in the process of doing so, breathing new life into what was once, well, Walmart. Harbor Freight was the first to open—on May 15—in a portion of the old big-box store on Oro Dam Boulevard. Discount grocer Smart & Final expects to open soon, with a grand opening tentatively set for July 11. And there will also be a Ross Dress for Less, which is under construction but has no firm completion date as of yet. And, finally, Fit Republic, the only business I was not familiar with when I heard of it, is hoping for a July 1 opening. In an effort to learn more about the 30,000-square-foot gym facility, I did a little online research and chatted briefly on Facebook with one of the company’s marketing specialists, Philip Mosley. The business launched in 2008 in Modesto and now has over 50 locations in California, the closest one being in Red Bluff. According to its website (fitrepublic.com), the philosophy is based on creating a community. “We offer a health club experience that is geared towards your state of mind, your goals and a true state of wellness.” Mosley said the company “is very excited to be in Oroville” and right now, it’s offering $1 memberships. Plus, if you bring in your cancellation confirmation from another gym, you’ll get two months free.

STEPPING UP It’s no secret there’s a big problem with homelessness and food access in our community. So while there’s a significant stigma attached to the issue these days, it’s particularly heartening to hear about businesses willing to step up and help out. Just last week, I was alerted to a Facebook post from La Cocina Economica announcing that the restaurant (at 905 Wall St.) will be closed the first Wednesday of every month in order to cook and serve lunch at the Jesus Center. Thank you, La Cocina, for pitching in for the health of our community.

MORE DO-GOODERY Sometimes big businesses give back, too, and that’s always nice to see in our little North State community. I got word last week that Raley’s had partnered with the Sacramento Kings Foundation to help build school gardens. Among the recipients was Chico’s own Chapman Elementary. The campus’ new plot is part of a push to “encourage regional garden planning, food literacy and nutritional options.” Cool stuff! STORE OPENINGS It’s been a busy couple of weeks, so I haven’t had time to stop in all the new businesses I’ve seen opening around town. Here’s a brief rundown— please drop me a note if you see something I’ve missed! Coco’s Ramen is open in the Safeway shopping center on Nord Avenue. And The Boba Stop has taken over one of the small spaces next door to the El Rey Theater (the new owners, by the way, switched the spelling from “theatre” to “theater,” probably only annoying copy editors like myself).

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CN&R

15


To catch a serial

killer by

Rachel Leibrock rac h e ll@ newsr ev iew.c o m

E

veryone had a story. Some firsthand, many passed down from parent to child. Each with similarly eerie details: The sound of twigs snapping underfoot in the backyard on a moonless night. An unnerving sense of being watched by someone driving slowly down the street. The whir of police helicopters overhead, circling endlessly. Everyone had a story about the Golden State Killer, it seemed, except me. When police announced they’d finally arrested the suspected serial killer and rapist, however, I gasped with shock.

About the author:

Rachel Leibrock, who teaches journalism at American River College, is a former editor of the Sacramento News & Review.

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JUNE 14, 2018


One woman’s obsession over One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer I’d lived in Sacramento for years but never heard of the Golden State Killer, also known as the East Area Rapist (or EAR) and Original Night Stalker, until nearly five years ago when a friend emailed, wondering if I had any memories of him. She was asking for a writer researching the subject, she said. Before my time, but it sounded fascinating, I replied—then tucked the mention of him deep into the recesses of mind. In April, I finally picked up that writer’s book, Michelle McNamara’s I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer, and realized how closely his crimes once tracked a path through my community. Then, on April 25, authorities announced they’d arrested a suspect, 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo, now charged with 12 counts of homicide, including the 1978 murders of Brian and Katie Maggiore. Turns out he’d been in the Sacramento area this whole time, living in Citrus Heights for the last 30 years. Police captured the former Auburn police officer after linking him through DNA evidence, and if they were right, they’d found the man responsible for killing a dozen people, raping as many as 50 others and burglarizing more than 120 homes across California in a crime spree that ranged between 1976 and 1986. Finally, closure for the victims and their families. Relief for the

detectives who’d spent decades chasing down clues. Validation for McNamara, who’d put in years exhaustively researching her subject in hopes of identifying him through geographic profiling, DNA and other clues. Did Michelle McNamara ultimately help nab the Golden State Killer? “That’s a question we’ve gotten from all over the world … and the answer is no,” Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones told reporters after DeAngelo’s arrest. Her work kept the story in the public eye, Jones said, but that’s it. “There was no information extracted from that book that directly led to the apprehension,” he said. Others disagreed, including those who helped to complete the book after McNamara died unexpectedly in 2016, and her husband, the comedian Patton Oswalt, who posted a video to

Author Michelle McNamara coined the moniker Golden State Killer.

From left: Joseph DeAngelo in police uniform in early 1970s; composite sketch of suspect made in 1978; DeAngelo, 72, apprehended in April 2018.

Instagram the day news broke. “Looks like they’ve caught the East Area Rapist, and if that’s true they’ve caught the Golden State Killer,” Oswalt said wearily into the camera. “I think you’ve got him, Michelle.”

‘I’m more optimistic there will be closure here’ The email landed in my inbox on Nov. 1, 2013. “Do you guys remember the East Area Rapist? There’s a writer who runs a crime blog who’s been

working on the case and almost has it solved,” Apryl Lundsten wrote in a message addressed to several family members and highschool-era friends, including me. Lundsten, a writer and filmmaker now living in Los Angeles, had reached out to McNamara after coming across her True Crime Diary blog. “I wrote to her immediately, because this story has haunted me for years,” Lundsten explained. In her correspondence with Lundsten, McNamara, who’d also written on the subject for Los Angeles magazine, sought to learn more and better understand Sacramento. “I’m just looking for those kind of flavorful details that make good writing—where did the kids hang out?” she wrote. “What were considered the nicer neighborhoods and/or did neighborhoods have kind of reputations or vibes about them? Did it seem like a scary time in the ’70s or more a small town feel?” She seemed confident, too, that she’d get her man. “By the way, the investigation is progressing rapidly,” McNamara wrote in closing. “I’m more optimistic there will be closure here than I’ve ever been.” Most of Lundsten’s friends were too young to fully understand the EAR’s crimes, but recalled their parents’ fears. “I think it was before I really grasped what rape even meant,” one woman wrote, adding a detail

that stuck with her over the years. “My mom started to sleep with a hammer under her pillow.” Lundsten shared these and other memories with McNamara, many of which eventually ended up in the book. Part memoir, part true-crime study, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark mined rich detail from interviews, police reports and newspaper clippings. The prose is concise yet elegant, the reporting meticulously researched. McNamara’s interest in the case was rooted in another unsolved murder. McNamara was 14 and living in Oak Park, Ill., when a neighborhood woman, 24-year-old Kathleen Lombardo, was dragged into an alley while out jogging one late summer evening. There, someone slit her throat as McNamara, less than a half-mile away in her attic bedroom, daydreamed about starting high school. The murder haunted McNamara. “[T]he monsters recede but never vanish. They are long dead and being born as I write,” she wrote in her first chapter. I picked up the book a few months after its February release and found myself consumed with McNamara’s obsession. I read passages aloud to my husband, pored over details with friends and hijacked my book club discussion. I’d moved to Sacramento in 1983, several years after the EAR’s last known crime in the area. But now McNamara’s obsession became mine as I read stories that crisscrossed through the quiet, leafy KILLER C O N T I N U E D JUNE 14, 2018

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KILLER C O N T I N U E D

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suburban neighborhoods where I spent my teenage years, including a possible sighting of the EAR at the elementary school my brothers attended, just a few blocks from our house. It seemed obvious to me that her book, at least in some small way, led to DeAngelo’s arrest. In the course of her research, for example, McNamara made a critical decision to rename the East Area Rapist. “Golden State Killer” was more accurate, she reasoned, because his crimes eventually stretched up and down the state. There was another justification, too. “Here was a case that spanned a decade. … Neither the Zodiac Killer … nor the Night Stalker … were as active,” she wrote. “Yet the Golden State Killer has little recognition. He didn’t have a catchy name until I coined one.” A bold move, sure, but one that stuck. Upon his arrest, local law enforcement agents used McNamara’s nickname. McNamara would never see this nod to her moniker. The 46-year-old writer died in her sleep, the result of a previously undiagnosed heart condition worsened by painkillers and anti-anxiety medication. It was April 21, 2016—just two months before Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert announced the formation of a Golden State Killer task force and a $50,000 reward. Journalist Billy Jensen doesn’t believe the timing is coincidental. Jensen worked with McNamara, conducting extensive DNA research they hoped would eventually unmask the rapist and murderer. After McNamara’s death, he helped complete the book, piecing together notes and interview transcripts and revising rough drafts. McNamara’s tenacious reporting shouldn’t be dismissed, he says. “We’d been doing the same thing [law enforcement were doing],” Jensen said. “We were putting his [DNA] profile into public databases. It was just a matter of time.” Paul Haynes, a researcher who worked with McNamara for seven years, devising geographic profiles of the killer and researching any and every lead, echoes this sentiment. “Michelle put the spotlight on this case in a way that had eluded it before,” he says. “It created an impetus in the various agen-

“It wasn’t necessarily the book, it was Michelle—it was Michelle working on her book. Once she died the whole world knew about the Golden State Killer.” —Journalist Billy Jensen

cies to continue to put in time and resources.” It’s hard not to connect the dots between spotlight and outcome, between her death and that press conference. “It’s the timing of the book that’s gotten us here. It’s writing the article, it’s her working with so many people and putting it out there,” Jensen says. “It’s her dying.”

Shots fired The East Area Rapist case dogged Gary Gritzmacher for decades. It started Feb. 2, 1976, when the 27-year-old narcotics detective was working in Rancho Cordova, more worried about area drug dealers than murder. Then he got the call from dispatch. Reports of shots fired. He and his partner raced to the spot where Brian and Katie Maggiore lay bleeding. They were the first ones on the scene. Katie Maggiore was already gone, but Gritzmacher jumped in the ambulance, hoping to get something from her husband. He rode with him first to Mather Hospital and then later to UC Davis Medical Center where Maggiore died without giving a statement. Gritzmacher would spend years working on the case, laboriously sifting through tips and clues. “In those days we didn’t have computers, we didn’t have DNA, we operated off of a three-by-five lead card,” he said. Eventually he moved to a different beat but never stopped thinking about the East Area Rapist. Gritzmacher kept in touch with other detectives working the

case. He never met McNamara nor heard of her book until DeAngelo’s arrest. “I don’t think [the book] had anything to with his arrest and neither does Anne Marie Schubert,” he said. For her part, Schubert says the timing of the press conference after McNamara’s death was coincidental. The task force had formed loosely years before as a way for detectives to share information. Its official launch and subsequent reward were meant to capitalize on the 40th anniversary of the EAR’s first known assault. For Schubert, the case was personal. “I knew this case not only as a professional but [for] its significance on the Sacramento community,” says Schubert, who describes growing up carefree in her Ardenarea neighborhood until reports of


a killer on the prowl made parents take new safety measures and usher kids in long before dark. “It significantly changed the community in the way of fear; we went from an innocent town to a place where people locked their doors and women took self-defense classes.” Schubert says she first started looking into the EAR when she formed a cold case unit in the DA’s office in 2000. McNamara’s book didn’t solve the case, Schubert says, but it did bring helpful attention. “I never met her and I haven’t read the book but I have tremendous respect for her work,” Schubert said. “The story … kept people passionate about the case.” The idea that McNamara’s work didn’t help, at least indirectly, is false, Jensen says. “It wasn’t necessarily the book, it was Michelle—it was Michelle working on her book,” Jensen said. “Once she died the whole world knew about the Golden State Killer.” Certainly, a quick skim through LexisNexis, the database archiving decades’ worth of newspaper articles, reveals that Schubert’s first public mention of the “Golden State Killer”—McNamara’s nick-

Katie and Brian Maggiore were walking their dog when they were chased down and shot by the East Area Rapist, also known as the Golden State Killer. Both died from their wounds.

name for the killer—didn’t occur until that 2016 press conference. Sheriff Jones, elected in 2010, never publicly mentioned the East Area Rapist until that same day. The rush to distance the case from McNamara’s work is political, Jensen says. “If you talk to the investigators [who continued working on the case] they would tell you something different.”

‘One day soon’ Paul Holes is one of those investigators. The former Contra Costa County detective officially retired in March but stayed involved up until DeAngelo’s capture; he even helped write the suspect’s arrest warrant and is credited for tracing the genetic bread crumbs of DeAngelo. He spent a lot of time with McNamara, too, driving her around crime scenes in the East Bay and Davis. He remembers McNamara as thoughtful, curious and knowledgeable. “[Our] initial phone call, she was zinging me left and right with very detailed questions,” he says. Initially, Holes worried he’d given away too much but that first Los Angeles magazine article proved otherwise. “Once Michelle gained my trust, I was very open,” he said. Holes, along with the other detectives working the case, eventually agreed to cooperate with McNamara, and the two regularly traded leads, clues and theories. “She was naturally gifted,” he said. “I got [information] from her that I’ve never seen before in the case.” McNamara was as much a part of the Golden State Killer team as anyone else, he added. “She was my investigative partner,” he said. “She was embedded as part of a working group. Michelle had access to information no one else had access to.” Holes hasn’t read I’ll Be Gone in the Dark yet—“my wife says [I] need to hold off because of my emotional attachment to it”—but believes it was crucial. “There’s no question that Michelle’s role, even outside of the book, is significant,” Hole said. “It goes back to the Los Angeles mag-

azine article, in which she renamed him the Golden State Killer. That was a pivotal change in the public perception of the case.” Before that, Holes says, interest and attention waxed and waned over the years, never fully gaining momentum in the public eye or with the media. The magazine article, McNamara’s book, the press conference, the tireless detective work and the reward all eventually steamrolled into DeAngelo’s arrest. Still, Holes is careful to draw the line on giving McNamara’s book direct credit for the arrest. “Was there that nugget of information that led to DeAngelo? The answer is no,” he said. What the book accomplished, however, was equally important. “It didn’t just keep the story alive, it pushed the story forward,” Holes said. Ultimately, McNamara wasn’t seeking credit anyway. In a tweet, Patton Oswalt said his late wife just wanted the case closed. “Michelle McNamara didn’t care about getting any shine on herself. She cared about the #GoldenStateKiller being behind bars and the victims getting some relief,” Oswalt posted. “She was Marge Gunderson in Fargo, not Chilton in Silence of the Lambs.” Jensen agrees. All those years of work weren’t about accolades. “[McNamara’s] ultimate objective was to see this person identified, and if still living, apprehended,” he said. Soon, though, more people may know of McNamara’s obsessive dedication. An HBO docuseries is in the works and Jensen and Haynes plan to update I’ll Be Gone in the Dark with Oswalt’s help. McNamara’s closing chapter in the book perhaps shines the biggest light on her compulsion. “One day soon you’ll hear a car pull up to your curb, an engine cut out. You’ll hear footsteps coming up your front walk. Like they did for Edward Wayne Edwards … like they did for Kenneth Lee Hicks,” she wrote in “Letter to an Old Man,” the prescient final chapter that imagined DeAngelo’s eventual capture and that, in the wake of his arrest, has been widely shared by those struck by McNamara’s final words on the subject. “This is how it ends for you.” Ω

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Arts &Culture THE COUNTRY KIND

Brad Petersen plays that old-school country. PHOTO COURTESY OF BRAD PETERSEN

THIS WEEK

Brad Petersen breaks out with throwback sound

14

THU

AthePetersen moved to Chico in 2009, first show he went to was a Chico s fate would have it, when Brad

Area Music Awards (CAMMIES) blues showcase at the old by Woodreaux Cajun & Jason BBQ (the short-lived Cassidy restaurant in the space that is now Quackers’ j ason c @ newsrev iew.c om Crystal Billiards room). The lively show featured Preview: a big crowd and a bill Brad Petersen packed with some of the CD-release party Saturday, June 16, area’s best performers— 7-10 p.m. including Maurice “Big $5 cover Mo” Huffman. “One of the things I Unwined Kitchen & Bar couldn’t believe was the 980 Mangrove Ave. incredible music scene 809-2634 [in Chico],” Petersen unwinedchico.com said, and he credits that night’s introduction with getting him started on his somewhat late-blooming country music career. “I wouldn’t have met the great people I have and none of this would have happened,” he said. The most recent development for the 52-year-old vocalist/guitarist is his first recording, a six-song CD titled Second Chances, that will officially be released this Saturday, June 15, at Unwined Kitchen & Bar. “[Making a record] is something I’ve wanted to do all my life,” said Petersen, who’s been a music fanatic since he was a kid begging for rides to Recycled Records to buy the latest Rolling Stones

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JUNE 14, 2018

or Van Halen album in his hometown of Monterey. “If nothing else ever happens, I’ll leave this behind,” he said. His parents got him his first guitar, which he taught himself to play, when he was 13. However, even though he says his family’s home was always full of music, it took him a while to get up the nerve to play in front of anyone. “My great-grandfather and great-grandmother came out from Oklahoma and they worked in labor camps in Winters, and they had 10 kids. And most of them played an instrument,” Petersen said. “So when we would have family reunions, all of them would get together and sing and play country music. “When I first got the guts to sing, I got up and played a couple of Merle Haggard songs.” It was a fitting choice. Petersen has lifelong connections to the legendary country musician, starting with his music.“He was my greatest influence in country music,” Petersen said. “My parents listened to him, so I grew up listening to him all my life.” He also had a cousin who knew Haggard’s kids, and Petersen became good friends with his son Noel. While living in the Monterey area, Petersen played some open mics, but once he had a daughter—eventually raising her on his own—priorities changed. Petersen came to the North State for a job as a dental tech at a clinic in Red Bluff, and he moved his then-teenage daughter Grace with him to Chico. Encouraged by the welcoming scene, Petersen started to

hit open mics, and he also got involved with KZFR community radio. His show, “Studio 416” (Saturdays, 1:30 p.m.), is a live music/interview program—featuring local and touring artists in the studio— that’s been on the air for roughly six years. In 2014, he took the plunge, performing his first gig leading a band, Brad Petersen & Friends, at the old Cafe Flo, then making the rounds—from The Maltese to the Tackle Box. “[We play] songs I’d been doing all my life,” Petersen said. Mostly, it’s covers of the big, classic country stars—Haggard, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson. “We try to play honest versions of country songs,” he said. But Petersen also has a few originals in the mix, like “Second Chances,” the title track and one of two originals on the album. Tom Probasco recorded the CD at the local Studio Palmetto and it features an impressive cast of local guest players (Aaron Jaqua, Josh Hegg, Vera Bridges, among others) and visiting musicians, including a couple of members of Haggard’s backup band, The Strangers— keyboardist Doug Colosio and mandolinist/violinist Scott Joss. Petersen’s rich baritone is put to great use on the slow-tempo covers, including Nelson’s “Me and Paul,” Ryan Bingham’s “The Weary Kind” and a couple made famous by Haggard—“The Way I Am” and “If I Could Only Fly,” the last of which features both of the Strangers. “For me to get Scott Joss and Doug Colosio to play it with me,” Petersen said, “it’s like, I can die now”. Ω

Special Events CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS: Wags & Whiskers is looking for volunteers who can take rescue animals out for short walks. Please call 530-895-8888 for more information. Wags & Whiskers Pet

Rescue, 2156 Pillsbury #155.

CAR & BIKE NIGHT: Wanderers MC host this monthly show with a raffle and music. Thu, 6/14. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

PARTY IN THE PARK: The first date in this summer series includes a farmers’ market, vendors, food and live music from Looking 4 Eleven. Thu, 6/14, 5:30pm. Free. Paradise Community Park, 5570 Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

Theater ENCHANTED APRIL: Set on a remote Italian island, this romantic musical comedy follows four Englishwomen looking for an escape from their monotonous lives. During their Mediterranean adventure, the ladies fall under the spell of their sun-drenched surroundings as they struggle to reconcile their normal lives and relationships. Based on the 1922

EMPTY SPACES: PINK FLOYD TRIBUTE Friday, June 15 El Rey Theater


COMMUNITY CONVERSATION ON POLICE OVERSIGHT

FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

Monday, June 18 Butte County Library, Chico Branch SEE MONDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

FOOTLOOSE: See Thursday. Sat, 6/16, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

17

SUN

Music MELVIN SEALS & JGB: Ripping Hammond B3 player and Jerry Garcia Band alum shows off his magical fingers. The jam band pioneer performs two sets of blues, rock, funk and jazz with his own groovy band. Sun, 6/17, 6:30pm. $30. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. 530-895-0706. kzfr.org

Theater novel, Theatre on the Ridge’s production will transport you to a far-off land where a little change could do you good. Thu, 6/14, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

FOOTLOOSE: Of all the great ’80s dance movies, only one featured the late Chris Penn as a country boy who learned to shake a tail feather. We’re not sure how that role translates in the musical version of Footloose, but we’re excited to find out. Thu, 6/14, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

15

FRI

Special Events BAREFOOT DANCE COMPANY: Gridley dance troupe performs its spring showcase.

MELVIN SEALS Sunday, June 17 Chico Women’s Club SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC

Tickets available at the door. Fri, 6/15, 6:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. barefootdanceco.com

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Get stoked for the sequel with a screening of The Incredibles. Most food court restaurants will offer deals. Fri, 6/15, 7pm. Free. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. 530-343-0706. shopchicomall.com

FORK IN THE ROAD: A dozen food trucks, live music, beer and wine, playground for the kids, sprinkler fun and more. Fri, 6/15. DeGarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.

Music EMPTY SPACES PINK FLOYD TRIBUTE: Laser-light show, slow-motion Nick Mason drum fills, fuzzed out guitar solos and lasers on sprawling prog-rock gems from the golden era of Floyd. Did we mention LASERS? Fri, 6/15, 8pm. $20-$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Smoking six-piece Hot Flash plays fun covers in the plaza. Fri, 6/15, 7pm. Free. City Plaza.

Theater ENCHANTED APRIL: See Thursday. Fri, 6/15, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

FOOTLOOSE: See Thursday. Fri, 6/15, 7:30pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany.com

16

SAT

Special Events BAREFOOT DANCE COMPANY: See Friday. Sat 6/16, 3pm and 6:30pm. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. barefootdanceco.com

BUTTE COUNTY OLIVE FESTIVAL: Back for its eighth year and bigger than ever with a craft fair, food vendors, live music and olive and olive oil tasting. The event is a fundraiser for the Butte County Historical Society. Sat 6/16, 9am. Old Courthouse Park, Lincoln and Robinson streets, Oroville.

ENCHANTED APRIL: See Thursday. Sun, 6/17, 2pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

FOOTLOOSE: See Thursday. Sun, 6/17, 2pm. $16$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 530-894-3282. chicotheatercompany. com

18

MON

Special Events

the relationship between law enforcement and the people of Chico, with the goal of establishing a citizen oversight group. The community event is hosted by Concerned Citizens for Justice, a group formed last summer after Chico Police officers shot and killed Desmond Phillips and Tyler Rushing in separate incidents. Mon, 6/18, 6pm. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave.

19

TUE

Special Events JAMIE WHITMORE: U.S. Paralympian shares her inspiring story of fighting cancer to become a silver and gold medalist in the 2016 Rio Paralympics. Please email RSVP to office@ redrockfinancialgroup.com or 530-8920253. Tue, 6/19, 6:30pm. Free. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. 530-520-0497.

20

WED

Special Events FLEET FEET 40 FUN RUN: Celebrate the store’s 40th anniversary with a jog, raffle and prizes. Wed, 6/20, 6pm. Fleet Feet Chico, 241 Main St.

COMMUNITY CONVERSATION ON POLICE OVERSIGHT: Learn about how you can help enhance

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

CLASSIC CAR SHOW & BREAKFAST: Cruisin’ Classics of Paradise, the Rotary Club of Paradise and Sojourner’s House on the Ridge host a fun morning of cool cruisers to celebrate Father’s Day. Bring your dad out for a free breakfast, kids’ activities and raffles. Sat 6/16, 8am. Free. Hope Church, 6933 Pentz Road, Paradise. 530-228-4627. shorparadise. org

JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION: African American Family & Cultural Center’s annual event commemorates the announcement of the abolition of slavery. Celebrate the day with music, dancing, food and a lot of community fun. Sat 6/16. Martin Luther King Park, 2821 Wyandotte Ave., Oroville.

Theater ENCHANTED APRIL: See Thursday. Sat, 6/16, 7:30pm. $16-$20. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

WHEELS OF STEEL A ferocious competitor from an early age, Jamie Whitmore grew up swimming, playing softball and volleyball, running in high school and college, and then as a professional triathlete, winning a massively impressive 37 races— more than any other competitor at the time. In 2008, she was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and lost the use of her left leg. She beat cancer, but was told she’d never run or cycle again. Proving doctors wrong, she returned as a paracyclist, racked up nine world titles, won an ESPY Award and came home with silver and gold medals from the 2016 Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro. Hear the courageous woman’s story when she speaks at the El Rey Theater on Tuesday, June 19. Talk is free; reservations are required: 530-892-0253.

JUNE 14, 2018

CN&R

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Art BLACKBIRD: Ken Swain, painter’s work incorporates collage, pop art, portraiture and a wicked perspective. Reception Fri, 6/15, 7:30pm. Through 6/30. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Puzzle Show, community project features work from 300 artists of all ages and experience. Joined together, they form what organizers are calling the largest puzzle installation ever created in Chico. Bid on individual puzzle pieces at the gallery and contribute to this unique fundraiser. Through 6/29. 450 Orange St.

EAST OUT WEST GALLERY: Michael Hooper & Brian Gonzales, gallery showcase, live painting and blacklight art on display. Live music, plus wine, cheese and snacks available. Through 6/15. 228 Main St.

HEALING ART GALLERY, ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Ernest King, mixed-media paintings by Northern California artist. Through 7/20. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 530-332-3856.

IDEA FAB LABS CHICO: Taking Over, fresh, uplifting new pieces from Christian V. Davila. Crafter extraordinaire transforms the venue into a sanctuary for her whimsical and graceful sculpted creations. Through 6/16. 603 Orange St.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS GALLERY: Clowns & Portraits, multiple medium works by Lynn Criswell. Through 6/30. Free. 254 E. Fourth St., 530-343-2930. jamessnidlefinearts.com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Persistence, featuring impressive works by 60 female artists from Northern California including Ann Pierce, Siana Sonoquie, the late Claudia Steel and many more local talents. Through 7/15. 900 Esplanade.

NAKED LOUNGE: Photography, stark, thoughtful images from local artist Michael Bone on display. Through 6/30. 118 W. Second St.

22

CN&R

JUNE 14, 2018

ORLAND ART CENTER: The American West: A Way of Life, Oregon photographer Tracy Libby tells the story of the American West through her sepia tones, stark black and white images and brilliant color work. Through 7/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland. orlandartcenter.com

PARADISE ART CENTER: Water Media, watercolor, acrylics and mixed water media in a variety of styles including abstract and realistic, colorful and monochromatic. Through 6/30. Free. 5564 Almond St., Paradise. paradiseart-center.com

UPPER CRUST: Havana, Paris & Chico, artist Michael Goloff shares photos from his travels to Cuba and France, as well as shots from his hometown. Through 7/1. Free. 130 Main St., 530-514-6264.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: What Is It?, part quiz show and part museum lecture, Jerry Kelly presents common objects and you guess what it’s actually used for. Kelly’s presentation is both entertaining and educational. 6/16, 10am. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville. boltsantiquetools.com

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. Through 12/15. 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Summer Exhibits, learn how our climate catastrophe is affecting the acidification of the oceans and changing California’s wildflower blooms, and life beneath the sea with coral reefs and hammerhead sharks. Plus, rotating investigation stations. Through 9/8. $5-$7. 625


SCENE

Stars of Enchanted April: (from left) Samantha Lucas, Eva Hilsee and Teresa Hurley-Miller. PHOTO BY JAY CHANG

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A Mediterranean transformation on The Ridge Enchanted April Oin Paradise, playing at Theatre on the Ridge is a charming romance n one level,

, now

about the healing power of flowers, warm weather and gorgeous by Mediterranean Robert Speer views. On another r ober tspeer@ newsrev iew.c om level, however, it’s a protofeminist tale of Review: English women Enchanted April shows seeking freedom Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, from their over2 p.m., through weening and June 24. patronizing husTickets: $12-$16 bands by runTheatre ning away to a on the Ridge country known 3735 Neal Road, for its sunshine Paradise and flowers— 877-5760 Italy. totr.org Enchanted April is also a play about recovery from the trauma of war. Written and first staged in 2003 by Matthew Barber, it’s based on a best-selling 1922 novel by Elizabeth von Arnim that is set in the 1920s, just following World War I and the death of more than a million British soldiers in that blood-soaked conflict. It ran for 167 performances (including previews) at the Belasco Theatre and was nominated for a Tony for Best Play. Its main character is Lotty Wilton (played Eva Hilsee), a supremely enthusiastic and ebul-

lient young woman (she has “a mind like a hummingbird” and “would make Pollyanna ill,” other characters say of her). She is frustrated not only by the incessant London rain, but also by her stodgy solicitor husband, Mellersh (Addison Turner), who treats her like a child. When Lotty sees an advert in the newspaper seeking to rent San Salvatore, a medieval castle in Italy, for the month of April to anyone who “appreciates wisteria and sunshine,” she jumps at the opportunity. She soon enlists a woman from her church, Rose Arnott (Teresa Hurley-Miller), to join her and help defray costs. Rose is even more dissatisfied than Lotty, though it’s only later that we learn the cause of her pain. Two other women join the crew: the beautiful but melancholic Lady Caroline Bramble (Samantha Lucas) and the hilariously snooty Mrs. Graves (Mary Burns), who, when unable to understand someone speaking Italian, declaims “I speak only the Italian of Dante.” Act I is set in a dark, dreary and

rain-soaked London, but following intermission the curtain is drawn to reveal a world of flowers, colorful furniture and, in the distance, mountains and the ocean. TOTR’s stage is tiny—I call it “Plays in a Box”—but set designer Jerry Miller, who also directed and plays Rose’s husband, Frederick—did

a remarkable job of opening it up and evoking the spirit of San Salvatore, whose name suggests joyful salvation. Hilsee, as Lotty, was absolutely delightful on the night I attended (Friday, June 6). Playing a woman who expects everything to turn out well and shares that optimism freely, she made us fall in love with her. In some ways, Hurley-Miller had a more difficult role; her Rose is a complex woman who is hiding secrets, and Hurley-Miller let us see into her psyche while keeping her secret from the other characters. As Lady Caroline, Lucas was terrific—and she’s only 16! She seemed much older in her role as a troubled “modern” woman (read: flapper) struggling to process a great loss in the war. The male actors gave creditable performances in roles that were basically setups for the women. I especially enjoyed Andy Hafer as Anthony Wilding, the castle’s owner, who showed up mostly to flirt with the women and provide comic relief with Costanza the cook (a very funny Natalie Valencia). When the men arrive at San Salvatore, the characters resolve their issues so that everybody can go home happy and in love. For the women, this means they have relationships with their men that are based on equality. And those who have experienced loss are able once again to smile at life. Ω

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ATTENTION LOCAL BUSINESS OWNERS:

Best of

Chico

VOTING IS COMING! The CN&R is designing Best of Chico Posters with a QR code that links directly to the Official Best of Chico 2018 online ballot. It’s the perfect way to remind your customers that it’s time to vote for you, their favorite! This 11x17 poster will be available at no cost to you. (Limit 2 per business)

DON’T MISS YOUR ONLY OPPORTUNITY TO RECEIVE POSTERS FOR THIS YEAR’S BEST OF CHICO CONTEST Mark your calendar to pick up your FREE posters at the CN&R office July 30–August 3, 9am-5pm BEST OF CHICO VOTING BEGINS THURSDAY, AUGUST 9 ONLINE

JUNE 14, 2018

CN&R

23


NIGHTLIFE

THuRSDAY 6/14—WeDneSDAY 6/20 specials and dance music with Soul Posse. Fri, 6/15, 5pm. Free. Chico Elks Lodge, 1705 Manzanita Ave., 530-828-8040.

BuCKeTHeAD Tuesday, June 19 Senator Theatre

EMPTY SPACES PINK FLOYD TRIBUTE:

See TueSDAY

Sciences. Thu, 6/14, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 530-521-6473.

KELLY TWINS ACOUSTIC: Acoustic “living room” music with Jon and Chris. Thu, 6/14, 6pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

PUNK ’N’ STUFF: All ages rock with Iced, Outside Looking In, Mr. Bang and Helicopter Kids. Thu, 6/14, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

THROWBACK THURSDAY: DJ Lil 50

14THuRSDAY

33 BLACK: Country music on the

patio. Thu, 6/14, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Jazz jams go

underground. Thu, 6/14, 8pm. Free. DownLo, 319 Main St.

INSPIRE HIGH SCHOOL PERFORMERS: An evening of music featuring performers from Inspire School of Arts and

spins old school tunes. Thu, 6/14, 9pm. Panama Bar Café, 177 E. Second St.

15FRIDAY

BOB’S COMEDY NIGHT: Bob Backstrom hosts Chad Opitz and Geneva RustOrta, plus a slew of local comics. After the funnies, Black Fong gets funky. Fri, 6/15, 8:30pm. $8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

CHICO ELKS TGIF PARTY: Happy hour

Slow-motion Nick Mason drum fills and long, fuzzed out guitar solos on sprawling prog-rock gems from the golden era of Floyd. Fri, 6/15, 8pm. $20-$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Smoking sixpiece Hot Flash plays fun covers in the plaza. Fri, 6/15, 7pm. Free. City Plaza.

GOTCHA COVERED: It’s a cover band.

Get it? Fri, 6/15, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & CHRIS WENGER: An eclectic mix of dinner

music. Fri, 6/15, 6:30pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

KELLY TWINS: Dueling piano brothers

showdown in the lounge. Fri, 6/15, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3

Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

MOJO GREEN: Funked-out Reno septet brings its mobile dance party to town, with a ripping horn section, deep pockets of soul and a captivating lead singer. Fri, 6/15, 9pm. $10. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 530892.2445. lostonmainchico.com

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts this weekly

event. Sign ups at 7:30pm. Fri, 6/15, 8pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

OPEN MIC NIGHT: Calling all musi-

cians, poets, and local authors. Fri, 6/15, 6pm. Free. Barnes and Noble Booksellers, 2031 Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, 530-894-1494.

OROPUNK SHOW: All-ages rager at new Oroville music venue with Republicans on Welfare (Kenosha, Wisc.), Slutzville (Grass Valley), Kitten Drunk (North Bay) and Public Trash (Yolo County). Fri, 6/15, 6pm. $5. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

DOOM TOWn PunK

Seasonal affective disorder is for real! Portland punks Dark/Light (pictured) channel the dark, wet Oregon months into positive jams and spread that energy around at every show. The group’s latest release, “Kill Some Time” (on the excellent Dirt Cult Records), features dual vocals colliding and crashing into each other for great, chaotic effect. D/L plays with pop-punk trio Severance Package and adorable sad saps Ivër at Naked Lounge on Saturday, June 16. Buck up! It’s summer now.

RETROTONES: Classic rock covers and

good times. Fri, 6/15, 8:30pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

RIGAMOROLE: Eight-piece band sports a hefty horn section. Fri, 6/15, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

ROYAL OAKS: Chico rock band goes up the hill, and they’re bringing a saxophone. Fri, 6/15, 9pm. Free. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise.

TENNESSEE RIVER: Seven-piece band

pays tribute to Alabama. Fri, 6/15, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

16SATuRDAY

ARISE ROOTS: Soulful reggae and roots rock from Los Angeles. Plus, the For Peace Band from Guam brings a message of love to Lost. Local reggae outfit Triple Tree opens the gig. Sat, 6/16, 9pm. $10-$12. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 530-892.2445. lostonmainchico.com

BRAD PETERSEN & FRIENDS: Country and Americana music. Sat, 6/16, 7pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

COTTONWOOD: Oldies, rock ’n’ roll,

classic country and easy lis-

tening in the lounge. Sat, 6/16, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DARK/LIGHT: Portland pop-punk band performs with locals Severance Package and darkwave duo Ivër. Sat, 6/16, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

DISCO DRAG: Get funky with your bellbottoms and platform shoes for a glitzed-out Saturday Night Feverinspired edition of this monthly

? t e P e t u C Visit Chico News & Review’s Facebook page and reply to the petcontest post with a photo of Scrappy, Silly or Sam—and get your friends to “Like” your pic! The readers’ choice winner and our faves get local-pet fame in the CN&R’s 2018 Pet Issue (published July 7), and the owner of the winning pet gets four tickets to a Chico Heat home game. The winner will be selected based on how many

Prove it!

people “Like” a posted photo, and the rest of the featured pets will be chosen by the CN&R editors. By entering this contest, you agree to allow the CN&R to run your submitted photo in the 2018 Pet Issue, along with your name and city of residence.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: JUNE 27, 9 A.M. facebook.com/ChicoNewsandReview 24  

CN&R 

June 14, 2018

307442_4.9_x_5.4.indd 1

6/7/18 10:31 AM


THIS WEEK: FInD MORe enTeRTAInMenT AnD SPeCIAL eVenTS On PAGe 20 tunes to will the pockets of your parachute pants. Sat, 6/16, 9pm. $12-$20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

STeVe KIMOCK Wednesday, June 20 Lost on Main See WeDneSDAY

drag event. Sat, 6/16, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

FORTUNATE SON: I can hear the bull frog callin’ me. Come on home to “Green River” with this spoton John Fogerty and Creedence Clearwater Revival tribute act. Sat, 6/16, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

GOTCHA COVERED: See Friday. Sat,

6/16, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino &

Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON & CHRIS WENGER: See Friday. Sat, 6/16,

6:30pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

LASSEN: Globe-trotting singer/

songwriter from Bend, Ore., performs uplifting songs with soul-shaking harmonies. Sat, 6/16, 7pm. Free. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham, 530-343-6893.

MIXTAPE: Fun-time party band

plays your favorite hits. Sat, 6/16, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582

Esplanade.

THE POSEYS: Have a fun evening dancing under the pines as Laurel Posey performs swing, jazz and blues on the patio. Sat, 6/16, 5:30pm. Free. Rock House Dining & Espresso, 11865 Highway 70, Yankee Hill, 530-532-1889.

SPAZMATICS: Geek out with the goofiest ’80s cover band in California. New wave, synth rock and dance

17SunDAY

ABC LOVE: Trashy lounge music with a creepy vibe. Get over your hangups with weirdo Brazilian artist Gevard when he brings his Serge Gainsbourg-inspired act through town. XDS and Portland psych-pop trio Night Heron also perform. Sun, 6/17, 9pm. $7. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

DEADBEAT DAD’S COMEDY ROAST: This one’s for all the messed up adults in the world and the dad’s who didn’t love them. Non-dad comedians roast dad comedians for cheapbeer chuckles. Sun, 6/17, 7pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

MELVIN SEALS & JGB: Jam band pioneer performs two sets of blues, rock, funk and jazz with his groovy band. Sun, 6/17, 6:30pm. $30. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 530895-0706. kzfr.org

PARADISE BIG BAND: Swinging sounds

and dancing for Father’s Day. Sun, 6/17, 7pm. $8. Studio One Ballroom, 707 Wall St., 530-345-9465. studiooneballroom.com

18MOnDAY

Duo. Wed, 6/20, 8pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JAZZ JAM: Uncle Dad’s Art Collective

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Tell jokes on stage.

hosts this monthly event, typically highlighting the music of a specific artist. Mon, 6/18, 7:30pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

Not intimidating at all! Sign ups start at 8pm. Wed, 6/20, 9pm. Free. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, 925-577-0242.

19TueSDAY

BUCKETHEAD: Oddball shredder and

performer extraordinaire plays a huge variety of music from metal and blues to funk and bluegrass. His show incorporates bizarre dancing, virtuoso guitar playing and, if you’re lucky, nunchakus. Tue, 6/19, 9pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

20WeDneSDAY DUFFY’S DANCE NIGHT: DJ Lois and

Amburgers spin funk, pop and hip-hop. Wed, 6/20, 10pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

FULL HOUSE BLUES JAM: The Southside Growlers perform and host an open jam. Wed, 6/20, 7:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

INDIE FOLK ACOUSTIC: L.A. folk artist Ronhaar performs with Weiner, Silent Towns and the David Mosier

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed, 6/20, 7pm. $2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise,

530-877-4995.

STEVE KIMOCK: Known as the “Guitar Monk,” Kimock’s impeccable tone and steadfast commitment to excellence contribute to a singular sound. He co-founded fusion band Zero in the 1990s, toured with Bob Weir in RatDog and contributed to many of the post-Dead groups. The Ascenders 2.0 open the show. Wed, 6/20, 7:30pm. $20-$25. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 530-892-2445. loston mainchico.com

CReePOID BRAZILIAn LOunGe PORn

Now that we have your attention… ABC Love (aka A Band Called Love) is the lounge-lizard project of Gevard, a masked São Paulo-based artist and musician who comes off as an exhumed Antônio Carlos Jobim. The tunes here are straight out of the Ramada Lounge time capsule, with breathy Portuguese vocals complementing the synthy, somewhat chilling music. This is one you’ll need to see in person, folks, which you can do when the show comes to Duffy’s on Sunday, June 17, with XDS and the excellent Night Heron.

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June 14, 2018

  CN&R 

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CN&R

JUNE 14, 2018

Sierra Nevada’s Sierraveza PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

From Vienna to Mexico City Craft breweries embrace the Mexicanstyle lager

AKazakoff in Fairfax, brewer Christian has become a great fan

t Iron Springs Pub and Brewery

of the Mexican-style lager—an easy-drinking beer characterized by by Alastair flavors of rice, corn Bland and breadcrust— and routinely brews his own version. Kazakoff labels it the “Vienna lager” for its historical roots in Europe, but it’s similar to the lager style that has gained fame from breweries south of the border, where Austrian and German migrants settling in Mexico in the 1800s began making the beers they were accustomed to drinking back home. “They were making beers that were flavorful and not too heavy,” Kazakoff says. As it happens, the beers, he added, were “also climate-appropriate.” These days, the Mexicanstyle lager—more accurately categorized as a pale lager, rather than Vienna-style—is marketed as a summertime perfect-forthe-beach beer, since Mexico, it would seem, is one giant beach. These beers are also said by many thoughtful writers to be the “perfect” accompaniment to Mexican food. Anyone who tells you this has forgotten that you’ll enjoy your fish tacos regardless of what is in your glass. Oh, but just listen to me go! I’ve digressed into my hatred of beverage-food pairing pretenses. Back to the beer: The best

Mexican lagers are crisp, clear and clean-tasting, according to Kazakoff. He explains that the lager yeast used to make these beers creates little extra flavor, the way that ale yeasts do. Belgian-style ales, for example, get their fruity, banana-and-citrus scents largely from esters created by the particular yeast strains used to make them—sloppy, clumsy yeasts that, so to speak, leave a stink in the air after they’ve had a meal. It just happens that people like these smells. Lager yeasts dine with comparatively impeccable table manners, leaving little trace behind —except, of course, alcohol. “So these lagers are tricky to make,” he says. “They can highlight a lot of flaws because the yeast is so clean. You’re really putting yourself out there when you make one.” The best-known Mexican lagers are made by Pacífico, Modelo, Corona and Dos Equis. As an ale drinker primarily, I find it amusing and mystifying that these big companies, which I would categorize with Bud, Coors and all that swill, are gaining applause right now from some craft beer fans in America. I am reminded of how Pabst Blue Ribbon became trendy

about a decade ago among urban hipsters, who apparently felt—or pretended to feel—some sort of trucker-cap-and-flannel kinship with the brand. But now we have skilled, no-nonsense brewers praising mass-produced Mexican lagers, and I am beginning to think I need to take a case of Modelo Especial to a beach and experience the magic everyone is so jazzed about. Actually, I think I’ll skip the big brands and go small. Nor Cal examples of the style come from Iron Springs, as well as Adobe Creek Brewing in Novato. El Sully by 21st Amendment has gained widespread acclaim as one of the best Mexican lagers around. Even Sierra Nevada has an offering, Sierraveza—billed as “golden and crisp, with a balanced malt flavor and a hit of floral hops”—that is very crisp and flavorful (smells and tastes of toasted grains) and currently available in its 12-bottle, four-beer “Party Pack.” This style is on the rise in the craft world, but only time will tell if Mexican-style lagers have the staying power of other trends that have become staples, like sours, saisons and those mighty IPAs. Ω


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Incredibles 2

The CGI superheroes and all their voices (Holly Hunter, Craig T. Nelson, Samuel L. Jackson) are back in this sequel that finds Elastigirl fighting crime on her own while Mr. Incredible takes care of the kids. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

The Seagull

new haunts An unsettling and excellent horror debut

W than impressive. Hereditary is a horror movie that will bruise your brain, make your blood run cold and riter-director Ari Aster’s feature debut is more

stay in your system well after you’ve left the theater. Annie (an incredible Toni Collette) by has just lost her controlling, creepy Bob Grimm mother. She has some control issues of her own, which manifest in her bg rimm@ newsrev iew.c om creation of miniature models, often depicting scenes from her home life with husband Steve (Gabriel Byrne, doing his best work in years), son Peter (an impressive Alex Wolff) and daughter Charlie (Milly Shapiro, who Hereditary will break your heart). While every Starring Toni Collette, member of the family seems to be Alex Wolff, Ann Dowd, earnest and decent, they are also dysGabriel Byrne and functional with a capital “D.” Milly Shapiro. Directed Her mom’s death, pressure from by Ari Aster. Cinemark 14, Feather River an upcoming show for her miniatures Cinemas, Paradise and the demands of parenthood have Cinema 7. Rated R. Annie on edge, to the point where she seeks counseling. At a support group for people mourning the recent loss of loved ones, Annie meets Joan (the remarkable Ann Dowd), a cheery woman who, nonetheless, has recently lost her son. Joan ends up teaching Annie how to do a séance and communicate with the recently departed, and it all seems innocent enough until apparitions start appearing and malevolent spirits begin messing things up for Peter, who responds by hitting the bong hard. The movie is a ghost, demon and witch story rolled

5

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

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Excellent

into one, with elements of The Witch, Rosemary’s Baby, The Exorcist and even The Sixth Sense (that vibe owes a lot to the presence of Collette). It’s also one of the more powerful depictions in recent years of a family falling apart, making for a deep and layered horror excursion. The creeping dread factor starts early in Hereditary and never lets up. Aster proves to be a master of atmospheric scares, relying less on jolts and gore and more on lingering shots in dark corners where you can sort of make out something staring at you. Everything works up to a frightening puzzler of a finale that might have you initially asking, “WTF?” but eventually thinking, “Oh, that’s some messed up shit right there.” Collette tears your face off as Annie, a seemingly decent person who reveals a lot of mommy issues (regarding her own mom and her new role as a matriarch). Annie isn’t an openly bad person, but as the demons start to manifest and her mother’s past boils to the surface, she becomes a seriously, epically bad mom. Collette mixes a quiet, withdrawn demeanor with moments of visceral, outward nastiness that make Annie unreliable at best. She makes every step of this tormented mom’s unfortunate journey mesmerizing. Wolff gives an incredibly raw, emotionally jarring performance as the son who doubts his mom and craves stability. The destruction of his home life coincides with his transition to manhood, and Wolff has moments in this movie when he seems so realistically disturbed that you might mistake Hereditary for a documentary. Aster gives the horror genre an instant classic. It has some images that will haunt your dreams, for sure. It also has a sort of enveloping darkness that will leave you perhaps a bit unsettled and on edge. It’s as unpleasant as they come, and, as a horror movie fan, I say “amen” to that. Ω

forming the mutant supercrew X-Force while also becoming a trainee of the much more conservative X-Men team. Deadpool’s first mission with his crew is a screamer, especially due to the participation of Peter (Rob Delaney), a normal, khakis-wearing guy with no powers and a killer mustache who joins the force because he saw an ad and thought it might be cool. Deadpool gets a worthy adversary in the time-traveling Cable (Josh Brolin), a half-cyborg mound of angst with a human side. The sequel earns its hard-R rating much as its predecessor did: thanks to a steady stream of intermittently hilarious profanity and constant gore. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

Everyone among a group of friends and family members on a summer retreat falls in love with someone who loves someone else. Saoirse Ronan, Annette Bening and Corey Stoll star in this film adaptation of Chekov’s first great play. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

5

Superfly

Hotel Artemis

Remake of the classic 1972 blaxploitation flick about a drug dealer looking for that big score that’ll help him retire from the game. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Tag

A comedy starring Jeremy Renner, Jon Hamm, Ed Helms, Hannibal Buress and Jake Johnson as five friends who, every May for the past 30 years, have been playing an epic game of tag. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Re-opening this week RBG

Documentary on the life of 25-year Supreme Court justice and pop-culture icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg returns for one night only, Sunday, June 17, 7 p.m. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Now playing Adrift

A young couple’s romantic sailing adventure in the Pacific turns into a survival story after they get caught in a hurricane. Based on a true story. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Avengers: Infinity War

The Avengers, the Guardians of the Galaxy, and Black Panther and his Wakandan army join forces to try and defeat Thanos before he destroys the universe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Book Club

After reading Fifty Shades of Grey in their book club, four single, professional older women (played by Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen) restart their stalled sex lives in what looks to a much more lively film than the one adapted from the source book. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

3

Deadpool 2

The happily profane superhero party continues with Deadpool 2, a sequel that brings the anarchistic spirit of the original without necessarily blazing any new trails. Ryan Reynolds’ Deadpool/ Wade Wilson character continues the break-the-fourth-wall schtick here—Ferris Bueller-style—and while the gimmick definitely leads to some good laughs, it does start to feel a little too cute and repetitive. Much of the movie involves Deadpool

Hereditary

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —B.G. Drew Pierce, creator of the British superhero comedy series No Heroes, directs Jodi Foster as a nurse presiding over a members-only hospital for criminals in a dystopian near-future Los Angeles. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Life of the Party

Melissa McCarthy stars in this comedy about a divorcée who returns to college, joining her college-aged daughter in class and the party scene. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Ocean’s 8

This time, an all-female crew of specialist thieves teams up for a big heist. Starring Sandra Bullock, Rihanna, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Helena Bonham Carter, Sarah Paulson and Awkwafina. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

3

Solo: A Star Wars Story

After a tumultuous production, Solo: A Star Wars Story makes it to screens, completed by a different director (Ron Howard) than the ones who started the gig. The finished film definitely feels like more than one director had his hands in the pot. It’s sloppy, tonally challenged, and scenes crash into each other at times. There are also plenty of positives, though not enough to keep Solo from being one of the weaker Star Wars films. Stepping into the iconic role of Han Solo is Alden Ehrenreich, a guy who has very little in common with Harrison Ford. He doesn’t look like him, he doesn’t sound like him, and he lacks that bemused Ford swagger. He does have his own charms, however, and is a likeable actor, and he puts his own spin on the character. The film is an origin story of the scoundrel with a heart of gold, willing to shoot first and ask questions later and also put his life on the line to save the universe. I had no need to see Han’s past romantic relationships, but it is undeniably enjoyable when he meets Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo) and Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover) for the first time. The budding bond with Chewbacca made me smile, and Glover does Billy Dee Williams proud as the young Lando. In my opinion, he is the film’s shining star. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Upgrade

In a tech-controlled near future, a man agrees to a have a chip implanted on his spine, giving him superhuman fighting ability and the means to exact revenge on those who murdered his wife. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

June 14, 2018

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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

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CN&R

JUNE 14, 2018

These tariffs are already being collected. Local newspapers, printers, and book publishers cannot absorb these costs. This will lead to fewer jobs and less access to local news in our community.

if you have any questions please call

Go to: stopnewsprinttariffs.orG

(closed June 9th, 2018)

tell congress that news matters. ask them to end the newsprint tariff.

1974-2018

threaten local news.

Thank you!

Trump’s Tariffs

To all who have supported Chico Beauty College for the past 44 years. We would like to say

The Department of Commerce has assessed preliminary newsprint tariffs, which range as high as 32%.

Thank you, EVERyonE!

GIVE PEACE SOME CASH This is not a drill, Chico! Arts DEVO is calling on all arts lovers and fans of super-rad shit happening in our little city to pony up so we can get an original mural by the legendary street artist/graphic designer Shepard Fairey (of the Andre the Giant “OBEY” stencil and Barack Obama “HOPE” poster fame) on the side of the Chico Peace and Justice Center. The work is scheduled to go up this August, and as of this writing, the fundraising campaign is at $1,130 of its $5,500 goal. Go now and donate to increase Chico’s cred: gofundme.com/ shepard-fairey-quotpeace quot-mural. SUMMER IS FOR MUSIC

Shepard Fairey mural?

The local albums for the season are here! Get thee to Bandcamp and/or Facebook to download Chicogrown tuneage for your summer jammage. • For backyard grillin’ and high-fivin’: Mr. Malibu, self-titled. Four great Chico songwriters—Lisa Marie (Bunnymilk, Skin Peaks), Kerra Jessen (The She Things, Skin Peaks), Don Parrish (Bran Crown, Bad Mana) and Jake Sprecher (Yule Logs)—teamed up with engineer Scott Barwick (another great local songwriter) for this fun collection of tuneful fuzzed-out garage-rock jams. • For frolicking and butterfly-chasing: MaMuse, Prayers of Freedom. I often tease when it comes to the crunchier side of the Chico hip/hippie tribe, but I have a serious crush on the jams of the earth mamas of MaMuse. And the acoustic duo’s latest is another irresistibly soulful exercise in positive vibing via gorgeous harmonies that’ll make Mr. Malibu you want to throw your shoes out the window. • For slo-mo headbanging in cut-offs on the shore of Big Chico Creek: Amarok, Devoured. Chico’s doom/sludge warriors had the cops show up when recording their debut full-length down at L.A.’s Big Bad Sound with Sanford Parker (who has worked with the likes of Yob, Voivoid, etc.), so it’s, you know, loud and stuff. It’s also super-epic, with just four songs on double-vinyl (one song per side!). Hear teaser track “VIII - Skeleton” on Bandcamp now, and the full release starting MaMuse - Prayers of Freedom June 22.

THAT’S THE SPIRIT! This week, a new live-

music venue called The Spirit opened its doors in Oroville. Yes! Finally, some fun for the kids and kids-at-heart in the ’ville. It looks like a promising spot, too. Oroville musicians Andrew Bernard and Nathan Teboul have refurbished the old KRBS station’s space at 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, just outside of downtown, and have curated an eclectic schedule so far. The first show (June 12) featured Austin, Texas-based pscyh/dream/ Amarok - Devoured electro-rocker SMHU, S.F. indie duo Lofi Legs and Reno “mathrap” crew Redfield Clipper. And next up, Friday, June 15, at 6 p.m., is a gutterpunk party presented by Yolo Pyrate Punx, with Republicans on Welfare, Slutzville, Kitten Drunk and Public Trash.


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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Adult Diaper Use Declines Thanks to an Amazing New Bladder Control Pill A new bladder control pill stands to free millions of Americans from embarrassment, stress, sexual anxiety, and poor quality of life. Users report a dramatic decline in diaper use. Allan Stevens, The Associated Health Press AHP− Adult diaper sales are expected to plummet as results from a clinical trial on a new, patented bladder control pill have finally been released. Sold under the brand name UriVarx™, the new pill contains key ingredients that keeps the bladder from releasing voluntarily, which reduces accidents and frequent bathroom trips. Perhaps more impressive, it also targets the tiny muscles around the bladder, which helps the bladder to create a tighter seal. This would explain why the average UriVarx™ user in clinical trials experiences a 66% reduction in urinary incontinence symptoms, such as day and night leaking and sudden urges to urinate.

NEW DISCOVERY IN BLADDER CONTROL Until now, doctors believed it was impossible to strengthen the muscles that control the bladder. They are amazed to see that it can now be done with the non-prescription UriVarx™ pill. “As you get older, and the involuntary muscles around your bladder weaken, you lose urinary control. With your bladder wall unable to properly seal, you constantly leak and feel pressure to urinate” explains Dr. Henry Esber, creator of the new pill. “UriVarx™ targets the bladder muscles and help restores vital kidney health, reducing urgency and frequency. It also helps you “hold it” for hours so you never have to worry about embarrassing accidents ever again!”

FREEDOM FROM SUDDEN URGES AND LEAKS

“After my third child, I couldn’t control my bladder. I was running to the bathroom all the time! And once I hit my 60s it became so unpredictable I needed to wear adult pads every day” explained one sufferer. “I was embarrassed so before going to my doctor I decided to try UriVarx and I’m so glad I did! The urgency is gone and I no longer feel like my bladder is about to explode. I can also “hold it” when I need to so I’m no longer living in constant fear of finding a bathroom.”

IMPRESSIVE CLINICAL RESULTS The exciting clinical results published on the government clinical website clinicaltrials.gov show that UriVarx™ can strengthen your bladder fast, significantly reducing the urine urgency and leaks. In a new double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, 142 men and women with bladder control issues were separated into two groups. The first group was given a placebo while the other received UriVarx™. The results were incredible. The participants who received UriVarx™ saw major improvements in leaking, pressure, and the urgency to go − all without the usual side effects seen in prescription drugs! They also reported fewer trips to the bathroom both day and night. Overall, the UriVarx™ group experienced: • 56% Reduction in Urge Incontinence • 66% Reduction in Stress Incontinence • 61% Reduction in Urgency • 33% Reduction in Frequency • 46% Reduction in Nighttime Bathroom Trips

Since hitting the market, sales for the patented UriVarx™ pill have soared and there are some very good reasons why.

Additionally, at the end of clinical trial and after seeing the results, 84% of the participants taking UriVarx™ said it significantly improved their quality of life.

To begin with, the double blind large clinical studies published in the clinicaltrials.gov have been impressive. Participants taking UriVarx™ saw a stunning reduction in urinary frequency, which resulted in fewer bathroom trips both day and night.

“The clinical findings are incredible, but people still wonder if it will really work” explains Dr. Esber. “It’s normal to be skeptical, but we’ve seen thousands of UriVarx™ users get results exactly like the participants in the study. It’s an amazing product.”

They also experienced a dramatic decrease in incontinence episodes, such as leaking and bed wetting.

HOW IT WORKS

The active ingredients in UriVarx™ comes from a patented formula. It is both safe and healthy. There are also no known serious side effects in its history of use.

UriVarx™ is a pill that’s taken just once daily. It does not require a prescription. The active ingredients are patented natural extracts.

Scientists believe that the ingredients target the muscles of the bladder to grow stronger. These muscles are responsible for keeping the bladder tightly sealed. They also help the bladder to completely empty, allowing bacteria to be flushed from the urinary tract.

Research shows that as we get older, the muscles which surround the bladder weaken. This is caused by hormonal changes in the body that causes the muscles to atrophy and weaken.

Research has shown that as you get older, certain hormonal changes in the body cause these muscles to shrink and become lose. This is what causes the bladder to be over active and the resulting urine accidents and why UriVarx™ seems to be so effective in the published clinical trials.

When they become too small and weak, they cannot seal your bladder shut, which causes leaking, accidents, among other incontinence symptoms.

EXCITING RESULTS FROM URIVARX USERS

UriVarx’s™ active ingredient targets the muscles around the bladder, making them stronger. Supporting ingredients in UriVarx™ support kidney function and overall urinary health.

Many UriVarx™ users say their bladders have never been stronger. For the first time in years, they are confident and in complete control. Adult pads and diapers are no longer a big worry.

It also prevents your bladder from fully emptying, which can result in persistent bacterial infections and UTIs.

Free UTI testing strips also ship with every bottle of Urivarx.

NEW PILL MAY REPLACE DIAPERS FOR BLADDER CONTROL: This new patented clinically proven pill solution is now available nationwide. Initial users see a dramatic decline in diaper use.

The company advises to monitor urinary health closely until Urivarx gets every back under control. Women and men (especially with a history of prostate issues) are prone to infection.

BLADDER PROBLEMS GONE With daily use, UriVarx™ can restore strong bladder control and help users overcome leakage without the negative side effects or interactions associated with drugs. Leakage sufferers can now put an end to the uncontrollable urges, the embarrassing accidents, and enjoy an entirely new level of comfort and confidence.

HOW TO GET URIVARX IN California This is the official release of UriVarx™ in California. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to anyone suffering from bladder issues who calls within the next 48 hours. In addition, UTI testing strips will be given away with every bottle of Urivarx until supplies last. A special hotline number and discounted pricing has been created for all California residents. Discounts will be available starting today at 6:00AM and will automatically be applied to all callers. Your Toll-Free Hotline number is 1-800-436-7537 and will only be open for the next 48 hours. Only a limited discounted supply of UriVarx™ is currently available in your region.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY. CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN BEFORE TAKING THIS SUPPLEMENT. URIVARX IS NOT A DRUG. 308222_10_x_10.5.indd 30   CN&R  j u1n e 1 4 , 2 0 1 8

6/8/18 12:13 PM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF June 14, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): My Aries

acquaintance Tatiana decided to eliminate sugar from her diet. She drew up a plan to avoid it completely for 30 days, hoping to permanently break its hold over her. I was surprised to learn that she began the project by making a Dessert Altar in her bedroom, where she placed a chocolate cake and five kinds of candy. She testified that it compelled her willpower to work even harder and become even stronger than if she had excluded all sweet treats from her sight. Do you think this strenuous trick might work for you as you battle your own personal equivalent of a sugar addiction? If not, devise an equally potent strategy. You’re on the verge of forever escaping a temptation that’s no good for you. Or you’re close to vanquishing an influence that has undermined you. Or both.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have

caressed and finessed The Problem. You have tickled and teased and tinkered with it. Now I suggest you let it alone for a while. Give it breathing room. Allow it to evolve under the influence of the tweaks you have instigated. Although you may need to return and do further work in a few weeks, my guess is that The Problem’s knots are now destined to metamorphose into seeds. The awkwardness you massaged with your love and care will eventually yield a useful magic.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Whether

you love what you love or live in divided ceaseless revolt against it, what you love is your fate.” Gemini poet Frank Bidart wrote that in his poem “Guilty of Dust,” and now I offer it to you. Why? Because it’s an excellent time to be honest with yourself as you identify whom and what you love. It’s also a favorable phase to assess whether you are in any sense at odds with whom and what you love; and if you find you are, to figure out how to be in more harmonic alignment with whom and what you love. Finally, dear Gemini, now is a key moment to vividly register the fact that the story of your life in the coming years will pivot around your relationship with whom and what you love.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Con-

gratulations on the work you’ve done to cleanse the psychic toxins from your soul, Cancerian. I love how brave you’ve been as you’ve jettisoned outworn shticks, inadequate theories, and irrelevant worries. It makes my heart sing to have seen you summon the self-respect necessary to stick up for your dreams in the face of so many confusing signals. I do feel a tinge of sadness that your heroism hasn’t been better appreciated by those around you. Is there anything you can do to compensate? Like maybe intensify the appreciation you give yourself?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I hope you’re

reaching the final stages of your year-long project to make yourself as solid and steady as possible. I trust you have been building a stable foundation that will serve you well for at least the next five years. I pray you have been creating a rich sense of community and establishing vital new traditions and surrounding yourself with environments that bring out the best in you. If there’s any more work to be done in these sacred tasks, intensify your efforts in the coming weeks. If you’re behind schedule, please make up for lost time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Necessity

is the mother of invention,” says an old proverb. In other words, when your need for some correction or improvement becomes overwhelming, you may be driven to get creative. Engineer Allen Dale put a different spin on the issue. He said that “if necessity is the mother of invention, then laziness is the father.” Sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein agreed, asserting that “progress is made by lazy men looking for easier ways to do things.” I’m not sure if necessity or laziness will be your motivation, Virgo, but I suspect that the coming weeks could be a golden age of invention for you. What practical innovations might

by rob brezsny you launch? What useful improvements can you finagle? (P.S. Philosopher Alfred North Whitehead attributed the primary drive for innovative ideas and gizmos to “pleasurable intellectual curiosity.”)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Would you

have turned out wiser and wealthier if you had dropped out of school in third grade? Would it have been better to apprentice yourself to a family of wolves or coyotes rather than trusting your educational fate to institutions whose job it was to acclimate you to society’s madness? I’m happy to let you know that you’re entering a phase when you’ll find it easier than usual to unlearn any old conditioning that might be suppressing your ability to fulfill your rich potentials. I urge you to seek out opportunities to unleash your skills and enhance your intelligence.

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The

temptation to overdramatize is strong. Going through with a splashy but messy conclusion may have a perverse appeal. But why not wrap things up with an elegant whisper instead of a garish bang? Rather than impressing everyone with how amazingly complicated your crazy life is, why not quietly lay the foundations for a low-key resolution that will set the stage for a productive sequel? Taking the latter route will be much easier on your karma, and in my opinion will make for just as interesting a story.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Each of us harbors rough, vulnerable, controversial, or unhoned facets of our identity. And every one of us periodically reaches turning points when it becomes problematic to keep those qualities buried or immature. We need to make them more visible and develop their potential. I suspect you have arrived at such a turning point. So on behalf of the cosmos, I hereby invite you to enjoy a period of ripening and self-revelation. And I do mean “enjoy.” Find a way to have fun.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For

the next two-plus weeks, an unusual rule will be in effect: The more you lose, the more you gain. That means you will have an aptitude for eliminating hassles, banishing stress, and shedding defense mechanisms. You’ll be able to purge emotional congestion that has been preventing clarity. You’ll have good intuitions about how to separate yourself from influences that have made you weak or angry. I’m excited for you, Capricorn! A load of old, moldy karma could dissolve and disperse in what seems like a twinkling. If all goes well, you’ll be traveling much lighter by July 1.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I sug-

gest you avoid starting a flirtatious correspondence with a convict who’ll be in jail for another 28 years. OK? And don’t snack on fugu, the Japanese delicacy that can poison you if the cook isn’t careful about preparing it. Please? And don’t participate in a séance where the medium summons the spirits of psychotic ancestors or diabolical celebrities with whom you imagine it might be interesting to converse. Got that? I understand you might be in the mood for high adventure and out-of-theordinary escapades. And that will be fine and healthy as long as you also exert a modicum of caution and discernment.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I suggest

that you pat yourself on the back with both hands as you sing your own praises and admire your own willful beauty in three mirrors simultaneously. You have won stirring victories over not just your own personal version of the devil, but also over your own inertia and sadness. From what I can determine, you have corralled what remains of the forces of darkness into a comfy holding cell, sealing off those forces from your future. They won’t bother you for a very long time, maybe never again. Right now you would benefit from a sabbatical—a vacation from all this high-powered character-building. May I suggest you pay a restorative visit to the Land of Sweet Nonsense?

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 99BATS, ADAMAS SPORTS at 3030 Thorntree Dr. Suite 12 Chico, CA 95973. INFINITE HORIZONS, LLC 3030 Thorntree Dr. Suite 12 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: NATHAN KANEMOTO, CO-OWNER Dated: May 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000667 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WILD MAMA BREWS at 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. CINDY PAULINE JONES 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. MARK ALAN JONES 6281 Woodbury Drive Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: CINDY PAULINE JONES Dated: May 15, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000668 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CASEY AND AUTUMN STUDIOS at 498 E 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SEAN CASEY APLANALP 498 E 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: S. CASEY APLANALP Dated: May 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000672 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SHOSHONE FURNITURE COMPANY at 3216 Godman Ave 1 Chico, CA 95973. THOMAS CANADA MOLESWORTH 13193 Orchard Blossom Lane Nord, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THOMAS C MOLESWORTH Dated: May 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000676 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROOM FOR BEAUTY at 2241 St George Lane #3 Chico, CA 95926. DORHANDA MARIE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. WOODROW WAYNE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DORHANDA M SOULLIERE Dated: May 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000616 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARK AVE AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE at 1814 A Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. MIKE PELAK 3083 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MIKE PELAK Dated: April 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000564 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RW ENTERPRISES at 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. BRIAN D. WHITE 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. SUZANNE M. WHITE 188 Valley View Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: SUZANNE WHITE Dated: May 11, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000658 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GREEN CLEAN NATURAL CARPET CLEANING at 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. MARITZA ALVAREZ 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. JUAN CARLOS HUERTA 3549 Esplanade Space 251 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: MARITZA ALVAREZ Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000521 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AMB WOOD AND STEEL DESIGN at 2368 Brown Street Durham, CA 95938. AARON BARR 2368 Brown Street Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON BARR Dated: May 14, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000662 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RAWMAZING at 132 W 2nd Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JOSHUA JAMES HERNANDEZ 132 W 2nd Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA HERNANDEZ Dated: May 22, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000707 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DROP IN THE BUCKET at 1938 Oak Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ROSEANNE LUCY NELSON 1938 Oak Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROSEANNE LUCY NELSON Dated: May 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000712 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as H AND M HIGHWAY SUPPLIES at1521 Warren Rd Paradise, CA 95969. KAYLA HAMPTON 1135 1st Ave Oroville, CA 95965. FRANK ANTHONY MEDINA JR 1521 Warren Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KAYLA HAMPTON Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000689 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as T L C PATIENT ASSOCIATIONS at 6219 McReynolds Ct Magalia, CA 95954. T L C PATIENT ASSOCIATIONS 5327 Edgewood Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELLE LAFOND, SECRETARY/VICE PRESIDENT Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000692 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COCO’S at 1008 W Sacramento Ave Ste 1A Chico, CA 95926. YANSUN ZOU 100 Sterling Oaks Dr #237 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: YANSUN ZOU Dated: April 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000596 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY 4149 at 1947 E 20th Street Suite A Chico, CA 95928. ADVALI GROUP INC 1325 Turker Way Chico, CA 95973. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. CRUEITA MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000654 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY # 44154 at 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380 Chico, CA 95928. ADVALI GROUP INC 3251 Tinker Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 370 #269 Chico, CA 95928. CRUCITA MENA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 370 #269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000653 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUBWAY 1561 at 1000 W Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ADVALI VENTRUES INC 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95926. RAVI GUNDIMEDA 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95926.

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2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 380-269 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RAVI GUNDIMEDA, PRESIDENT Dated: May 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000655 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COSMETIC TATTOOING BY STEPHANIE at 142 W. 2nd Street Chico, CA 95928. STEPHANIE POTTS 420 Oakvale Ave. Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHANIE POTTS Dated: May 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000687 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LAW OFFICE OF HARLEY MERRITT at 1280 E. 9th St, Suite D Chico, CA 95928. HARLEY E MERRITT 2 Lacewing Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HARLEY E. MERRITT Dated: May 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000686 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FULL SUN ORGANICS at 1161 Palmetto Ave Chico, CA 95926. QUINTIN LOWELL TROESTER 1161 Palmetto Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: QUINTIN TROESTER Dated: May 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000722 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DESIGN BY HUMANS at 1262 Humboldt Ave Chico, CA 95928. DBH WORLDWIDE LLC 1262 Humboldt Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JEFF SIERRA CO-OWNER Dated: May 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000717 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D2A NETWORKS, SHOE TEMPTATIONS at 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. WIRELESS WIZARD SOLUTIONS, LLC 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DAVID GUADRON, MANAGER Dated: May 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000726 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ART ETC at 256 East First Street Chico, CA 95926. CALEB PAUL KLUNGTVET 609 Victorian Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. LARRY DALE KLUNGTVET 5732 Shady Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CALEB P. KLUNGTVET Dated: June 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000747 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEAVEN TO EARTH NATURAL SOLUTIONS at 100 Sterling Oaks Dr Apt # 173 Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL KEIICHI MCNEAL 100 Sterling Oaks Dr Apt # 173 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL K. MCNEAL Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000688 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TINY HINIES at 3456 Fletcher Rd Oroville, CA 95966. GRACIE ANGELICA STEWART 3456 Fletcher R Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GRACIE STEWART Dated: May 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000693 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LUCKY PENNY INTERIORS at 6679 Brook Way Paradise, CA 95969. TARA LYNN BISHOP 6679 Brook Way Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TARA BISHOP Dated: May 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000741 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as INCANDESCENT BRIDAL at 1095 Columbus Ave Chico, CA 95926. SHEILA FAY HALALI 1095 Columbus Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHEILA HALALI Dated: May 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000723 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EL RANCHO BOOTS at 1365 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. FERNANDO CAMPA 110 8th St Orland, CA 95963. PERLA ADRIANA MEZA 110 8th St Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a General Partnership.

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Signed: PERLA MEZA Dated: June 6, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000759 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROUBAIX ENTERPRISES at 204 W Lassen Ave Chico, CA 95973. ROUBAIX ENTERPRISES INC 7700 Irvine Center Drive Ste 800 Irvine City, CA 92618. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TERRY DECOTTIGNIES, PRESIDENT Dated: May 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000713 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LAS TAPATIAS at 1950 E 20th Street B209 Chico, CA 95928. KARLA CAZARES DELGADO 3156 Esplanade Spc 272 Chico, CA 95973. GILBERTO VALLADARES 3156 Esplanade Spc 272 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: GILBERTO VALLADARES Dated: June 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000751 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GOLDEN STATE SMOKERY at 16260 Stage Road Forest Ranch, CA 95942. BRIAN FIELDS 16260 Stage Road Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIAN FIELDS Dated: June 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000768 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ESPLANADE FURNITURE at 1750 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. ESPLANADE FURNITURE CORPORATION 1750 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DANN MOSER Dated: May 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000735 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. HURSHELL BOLMANSKI #232ss (Bikes, tools, misc. items) CANDACE CARBY #219ss (clothes, tools) KENNETH MASSINGALE #086ac (dvds, clothes, furniture) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: June 23, 2018 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage,

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65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID MICHAEL KIEL Proposed name: MICHAEL DAVID CHRISTIAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 14, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01533 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JESSICA SOCORRO BAZURTO-BERLANGA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESSICA SOCORRO BAZURTO-BERLANGA Proposed name: JESSY SOCORRO BERLANGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 15, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01266 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELICA IVET BAZURTO-BERLANGA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name:

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ANGELICA IVET BAZURTO-BERLANGA Proposed name: ANGELICA IVET BERLANGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 29, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01265 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ETHEL ELEANOR HARRIS Proposed name: CHRIS ELEANOR JACKSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 0900 Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01453 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ISRAEL LEON JUNIOR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ISRAEL LEON JUNIOR Proposed name: ISRAEL LEON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard

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and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 8, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01239 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MEGAN COOPER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KADE DALE SHELTON Proposed name: KADE ALLEN COOPER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 22, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 3, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01235 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELO GONZALO TABIOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANGELO GONZALO TABIOS Proposed name: ANGELO GONZALO CARTOSCELLI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA

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Dated: May 18, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00692 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KYLE GERARD FERGUSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KYLE GERARD FERGUSON Proposed name: KYLE WILLIAM NABORS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 29, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 8, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01418 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DIANE ELIZABETH SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DIANE ELIZABETH SMITH Proposed name: DIANE ELIZABETH PRINCE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 22, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01624 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PATRICIA ELAINE PETROPOULOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RENAE JANE LEFLORE

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Proposed name: RENAE JANE PETROPOULOS-LEFLORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 11, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01532 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOSE RIOS VILLEGAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JOSE RIOS VILLEGAS Proposed name: JOSE RIOS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 20, 2018 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: May 24, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01638 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2018

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DOMINIQUE N PEOPLES YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper

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SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: REBECCA S OSBORNE AKA REBECCA S EGGLESTON AKA BECKI S EGGLESTON YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you

may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: July 10, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02044 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

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legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: November 3, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV03274 Published: May 24,31, June 7,14, 2018

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530-894-2300 june 14, 2018

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33


REAL ESTATE

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ADVERTISING IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION, CALL 530-894-2300

Love’s Real estate

Carbon Law

6613 Firland dr, Paradise | $429,000 It’s Cooler Up Here! This beautiful custom home was built by the owners as their dream home. The open floor plan gives a sweeping view of large open beam family room. Don’t miss the stunning sun room. Dreamy kitchen was remodeled in 2015 with granite and over and under cabinet lighting. Formal living room and extra office/sewing room. Walk in pantry. Catalytic wood stove and forced air HVAC. Lighted attic for extra storage. Exceptional landscaping and .58 acres with RV area. Solar for low utility bills. Oversized garage. Call for a list of amenities.

“Patty G.” McKee

CEnTURy 21 SELECT REAL ESTATE, InC. (530) 518-5155 PATTyG_C21@mSn.COm

Dear Landlord, It’s time to get right with the law, if you haven’t already. Carbon Monoxide Detectors are a must-have in all rental properties. They are life-savers, literally. If you don’t have them installed, you are not only breaking the law, you are recklessly endangering the lives of your occupants. Please read the law: The Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act requires carbon monoxide detectors to be installed in every “dwelling unit intended for human occupancy.” Every owner must install an approved carbon monoxide device in each dwelling that has a fossil fuel burning appliance, fireplace, or an attached garage. Q. Are there any penalties for noncompliance with this law regarding installation of carbon monoxide detector devices? A. Yes. A violation is an infraction punishable by a maximum fine of $200 for each offense. However, a property owner must receive a 30-day notice to correct first. If an owner who receives such a notice fails to correct the

BRE LIC # 01428643

problem within the 30-day period, then the owner may be assessed the fine. Q. Can a buyer of a “dwelling unit intended for human occupancy” rescind the sale if the dwelling doesn’t have the necessary carbon monoxide detectors? A. No. However, the buyer may be entitled to an award of actual damages not to exceed $100 plus court costs and attorney’s fees. Q. Do landlords have any special obligations regarding carbon monoxide detectors? A. Yes. All landlords of dwelling units must install carbon monoxide detectors. The carbon monoxide device must be operable at the time that a tenant takes possession. However, the tenant has the responsibility of notifying the owner or owner’s agent if the tenant becomes aware of an inoperable or deficient carbon monoxide device. The landlord is not in violation of the law for a deficient or inoperable carbon monoxide device if he or she has not received notice of the problem from the tenant.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon. Email escrowgo@aol.com, or call 530-680-0817. See an archive of columns at douglovesrealestate.com.

WWW.PARADISEHOmETEAm.COm

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com 3/2 2100 sq ft home, shop, studio apt New construction just blocks to Bidwell Park: 3/2 $349,000 20 acres with views $145,000 Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

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530.228.1305

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Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in chico, Orland, Willows.

EmmEtt Jacobi Kim Jacobi (530)519–6333 CalBRE#01896904 (530)518–8453 CalBRE#01963545

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

4315 Tuliyani Dr 650 Royce Ln 680 Royce Ln 3599 Keefer Rd 10 Lindo Park Dr 1417 Winkle Dr 1475 Sale Ave 1664 Vallombrosa Ave 1034 Sir William Ct 2990 Nord Ave 1034 Richland Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

34  

CN&R 

june 14, 2018

PRICE $680,000 $660,000 $640,000 $559,000 $520,000 $490,000 $487,000 $484,500 $465,000 $444,000 $435,000

BR/BA 5/3 3/3 5/3 4/3 2/3 3/3 4/3 2/2 4/2 3/4 3/2

SQ. FT. 3018 3009 3312 2346 2092 2391 2260 1872 2326 2503 2150

Single-story 3bd/2ba Super-Clean, end-unit, in3bd/2ba centrally Updated located w/ homecomplex in N. Chico pool On $159,900! cul-de-sac Call for$274,900 more details.

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

2439 Alamo Ave 16 Commonwealth Ct 3167 Sawyers Bar Ln 3162 Rogue River Dr 558 Grand Smokey Ct 778 Brandonbury Ln 1622 Harvest Glen Dr 2583 State Highway 32 25 Paseo Haciendas 23 Noyo Ct 2613 Sedona Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

PRICE $432,000 $410,000 $399,000 $375,000 $368,000 $365,000 $359,000 $350,000 $343,000 $334,500 $320,000

BR/BA 3/2 3/2 5/3 5/3 3/2 3/3 4/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 2206 1663 3202 2523 1473 1608 2029 1390 2023 1376 1471


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26.6 ac walnuts with 5800 sq ft home $1,495,000 6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic and power in place $115,000 5 ac lot. Owner carry $29,500 2 bed 1 bath downtown, $209,000 Campus close, newer 4/2 $369,000

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 28, 2018 – June 1, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

ADDRESS

TOWN

194 Rio Lindo Ave

Chico

$298,000

PRICE

BR/BA 3/2

SQ. FT. 1344

1519 B St

Chico

$162,500

PRICE

BR/BA 1/1

SQ. FT. 480

5 Hillary Ln

Chico

$295,000

3/2

1204

287 E 12th St

Chico

$155,000

2/1

708

970 Mathews Dr

Chico

$280,000

3/2

1296

1114 Nord Ave #34

Chico

$140,000

3/2

960

2226 Hutchinson St

Chico

$272,500

2/2

1500

139 W Lassen Ave #27

Chico

$99,000

2/1

766

379 E 7th St

Chico

$255,000

2/1

920

670 Mount Ida Rd

Oroville

$460,000

3/3

3028

873 Wisconsin St

Chico

$238,500

3/2

1273

140 Oliva Ave

Oroville

$410,000

3/2

1691

2358 Alba Ave

Chico

$217,000

3/1

1051

8 Naranja Ave

Oroville

$297,000

3/2

1536

2410 Tom Polk Ave

Chico

$212,000

3/1

1089

6283 Dawnridge Ct

Paradise

$428,909

3/3

2037

2099 Hartford Dr #16

Chico

$205,000

3/2

1375

5640 Butte View Ter

Paradise

$331,000

3/2

1648

862 Cleveland Ave

Chico

$200,000

4/2

1342

6631 Paragalia Way

Paradise

$329,000

2/3

1801

2932 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico

$165,000

2/2

904

283 Roe Rd

Paradise

$310,000

2/2

1925

june 14, 2018

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sexual violence has no boundaries

All Gender Identities, Races, Ages, Social Classes & Ethnicities are Affected • 1 in 5 women will be raped in their lifetime • Nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men experience sexual violence victimization other than rape at some point in their lives • Intimate partner sexual assault and rape are used to intimidate, control, and demean survivors of domestic violence • Intimate partner sexual assault is more likely than stranger or acquaintance assault to cause physical injury • 40-50% of women in abusive relationships will also be sexually violated during the course of the relationship • 18% of female survivors of spousal rape say their children witnessed the crime • Only 1 in 10 report being sexually violated. Marital rape is the most under-reported form of sexual assault.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS about sexual assault. If you, or someone you know, has been sexually assaulted you can receive a free forensic medical examination, regardless of whether or not you choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

We aRe HeRe TO lISTeN

24hr CRISIS lINe: 530-342-RaPe (7273) Collect Calls accepted

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 2889 Cohasset Rd., Ste 2, Chico • 725 Pine St., Red Bluff Business office: Monday-Friday 10am-6pm, excluding holidays

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