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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 38 THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

THE HISTORY KEEPERS

Exploring Butte County’s past through local historians and the museums they love PAGE

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ROUNDABOUT REHAB

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BEER AT TINSELTOWN?!

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PRINCE OF DESERT ROCK

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PROVEN LEADERSHIP TAMI’S PRIORITIES * Emergency Preparedness * Housing Crisis and Homelessness * Protection of the North State’s Water

VO T E B Y MA I L T OD A Y or o n j u n e 5 th at the bal l ot b ox Paid for by Tami Ritter for Supervisor 2018 #1399354

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 38 • May 17, 2018 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES Weekly Dose

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GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writer Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Evan Tuchinsky, Cathy Wagner, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Publications Designer Mike Bravo Web Design & Strategist Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Ad Designer Catalina Munevar Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Office Assistant Amanda Geahry Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

COVER STORY ARTS & CULTURE Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fine arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . .

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CLASSIFIEDS

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REAL ESTATE

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S NANCY BROWER BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Rodney Orosco Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Elizabeth Morabito, Traci Hukill, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Support our local museums Did you know that women in the state of California

gained the right to vote in 1911, years before the 19th Amendment was passed? And how much do you know about early settlers to Butte County, many of whom came seeking gold? Did you know that an Oregonian named Peter Burnett led a group here the year before John Bidwell founded Bidwell Bar? His settlement was named Oregon City, and he went on to serve as the first governor of California. These are just two small examples of the richness of our local history, history that’s stored in our archives and museums and carefully tended to by community organizations and members who see their value and hope to share it. As chroniclers of history as it happens, we at the CN&R appreciate the work that goes into maintaining our historical structures and the stories that go along with them. There is much to be learned from our ancestors’ successes and failures. As the saying goes, those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. In our cover package this week, we shine a light on just a few passionate local individuals and groups who work tirelessly to catalog, display and, in some instances, even re-enact our history. With Friday (May 18) being International Museum Day and May

being National Historic Preservation Month, we thought it was an appropriate time to recognize their efforts. One thing we learned while exploring local museums is that many people who visit to learn end up contributing themselves, with stories about their ancestors or even historical photographs and newspaper clippings. This is encouraged! In fact, the Gridley Museum is currently soliciting local pioneer families to contribute to a new exhibit. If you think yours qualifies as a pioneer family (moved to the Gridley, Biggs or Live Oak area prior to 1910, ), go to gridleymuseum.org to apply. Obviously, Butte County’s museum offerings go beyond history, to include science, art and other curiosities. The breadth of what we have here deserves praise and celebration, in addition to appreciation. We hope you, dear readers, will take our cue and get out there to explore. Most local museums, even those with staffs, are volunteer-backed endeavors. They have bare-bones budgets that rely on fundraisers, donations from visitors and memberships, which are inexpensive—$25-$30 annually seems to be the norm. In other words, it costs relatively little to support these organizations and, in the meantime, you might just learn something. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Giving the lie to two big lies Twill believe it. Take, for instance, the Big Lie that Ivy League

ell a lie boldly and often enough and the masses

schools award degrees only to the smartest people, human beings superior to the mediocrities who get degrees from state colleges or universities, places where ambitious children of the proletariat are groomed to manage, teach or tend the worker bees. Ivy League schools will admit some of these people, but their grades had better be off the charts, along with their SATs and their groveling letters of applicaby tion, written so the bullshit isn’t Jaime O’Neill detectable, a prized skill for those The author is being prepared to assume places a retired among the privileged elite. community college Smart people graduate from instructor. Ivy League schools, of course, but hasn’t everyone noticed by now how many dunces and dullards get degrees from those places? George W. Bush holds degrees from Harvard and Yale, though his educational limitations were always obvious.

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(“Rarely is the question asked: Is our students learning?” President G.W. Bush, 2006). None-too-bright Ivy League grads are sprinkled all over our nation’s capital, undermining confidence in our leaders and the schools that legitimate their ignorance. Another Big Lie requires us to believe that New Yorkers are the cream of the crop in every profession. But take Donald Trump. Please. Or Rudy Giuliani. If these two New York titans had started out in Oroville as sons of carpenters, neither of them would have been likely to achieve the status of assistant night manager at Burger King. Trump, graduate of Wharton School, dissed The New York Times by saying “They don’t write good.” Giuliani graduated from NYU and was dubbed “America’s Mayor” after running around New York with a bull horn on 9/11. Nonetheless, in 2016, he told fellow Republicans: “[B]efore Obama came along, we didn’t have any successful Islamic terrorist attack in the United States.” Yes, indeedy, you’ve got to be pretty bright to be a New York hotshot. Michael Avenatti, the attorney for Stormy Daniels, was born in Sacramento. Nonetheless, he’s obviously smarter and better educated than Trump and Giuliani combined. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

dirt and diplomas I was excited last week to see heavy equipment posted up on Second Street, just a stone’s throw from my office. My first thought was that the city was finally getting around to landscaping the roundabout and the other strips of land adjacent to this heavily traveled entrance to downtown Chico. Just in time for Chico State’s graduation, and the throngs of visitors heading to town, I thought. Alas, it was wishful thinking. Turns out the earth-movers were there to work at U.S. Bank, which replaced its lawn with bark and drought-tolerant plants. So, the “dirtscape” between Flume and Wall streets remains at this eastern entrance to the city center. I’m kicking myself for not scattering wildflower seeds—doing a little guerrilla landscaping—to beautify the area we at the CN&R look upon day after day. It’s hard to believe, but it’s been nearly five years since the completion of the First and Second Street Couplet—aka the roundabout and the reconfigured East First and Second streets, thoroughfares that became bicycle-friendly one-way streets going west and east, respectively. Those changes have been great—most drivers have gotten the hang of the circular traffic feature, so I don’t hear squealing tires as much these days. The only thing missing is, well, the aesthetic portion of the project. It’s downright ugly out there. It happens to have been a year ago this month that I last inquired with the city about the weed patches. At the time, Brendan Ottoboni, the city’s director of public works-engineering, predicted construction on landscaping would begin in July (of last summer). I checked back in with Ottoboni this week for an update, and he sent me an impressive rendering of the design plans for the roundabout. It looks similar to Ringel Park, the small, triangular property leading into downtown from The Esplanade. Brick, check; wroughtiron, check; a welcome-to-Chico sign, check. The cherry on top, in my humble opinion, is the plan to plant a valley oak at its center. So, what’s the holdup? According to Ottoboni, the city put the project out to bid twice. The first time, last year, the city received only a single response—for about triple the city’s budget. Strike one. It went back out to bid over the winter, when contractors generally are a little hungrier, and the city heard crickets. Strike two. Ottoboni went on to explain that the project is a weird one—a “tweener” project, as he put it—because it’s on the small side for big construction outfits and a bit out of the scope of landscape contractors, generally subcontractors who aren’t set up for traffic control at major thoroughfares. As a result, Ottoboni said the city is working on alternative bid procedures. Construction is projected to take about six weeks, and includes the installation of up to four electric-vehicle charging stations in the lot that houses the Saturday farmers’ market. The hope is to have a contract in place in the next couple of weeks and to get the work done while the university is on break.

Today dECidES ToMorrow Speaking of college, congrats to the folks getting diplomas at Chico State and Butte College this week. At the university alone, more than 4,000 plan to participate in the commencement ceremonies, according to University Communications. Excelsior!

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

ATTENTION BOOMERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

About restroom access Re “Locked out” (Cover story, by Ashiah Scharaga, May 10): It is the responsibility of the Chico City Council to make restroom access available, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. All members of the council are sworn to protect public safety and to uphold the Constitution. A lack of restroom availability threatens public health, and since our poorest citizens are cited (criminalized) for relieving themselves, during the eight or 10 hours of daily closure, we are in violation of the Eighth Amendment, which prohibits cruel and unusual punishment. Last summer, in a protest appearance, I asked the City Council to resign. The council remains in breach of their oath. The roots of our current idiocy run deep. Remember the night of March 1, 2016, when former Councilwoman Tami Ritter proposed we put a portable unit in the parking lot by City Hall? The current Jesus Center director and

the current director of the Downtown Chico Business Association both spoke, but neither supported Ritter. All appearances aside (endless talk of a Portland Loo), I’ve never been convinced downtown business boosters are sincerely interested in making progress. We could solve this problem in one day: drop 10 portables now. Cheap, effective and humane. Patrick Newman Chico

I was doing yard work one chilly morning. A guy with a backpack walked past and I called out, “Have you had breakfast?” He called back, “Yes, I had some nuts along the road.” I offered to fix us both a hot breakfast and we headed into the kitchen to eat. He was friendly, appreciative, and while homeless, he moved on

without pissing on my porch. A couple with a child pulled up in front of my house in a Nissan Armada. Opulence on wheels. The mother sat on the edge of my property and held her child as he peed, while the father pointed their French bulldog deeper onto my property to relieve itself. He noticed me and said, “Oh, he’s not pooping,” as if that made it OK to use my property as their communal toilet. You can draw your own conclusions regarding biological needs, personal dignity and respect for others’ property. Though anecdotal, it appears “having to go” is more a matter of access to facilities than being homed or homeless. They drove away, and I thought of something that made me chuckle, so I smiled it off: There but for the grace of God “go” I. Peter Bridge Ord Bend

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LETTERS

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important question might be: What would be best for the Chico residents who are not homeless? A proposal has been made for the establishment of a home for the homeless in the south area near the Torres Community Shelter. Along with that consideration is the proposal that small wooden structures be established in the designated area, suitable for one, possibly two residents for each structure. One alternative to the small wooden houses might be the use of recreation trailers that would be approximately the same size as the wooden houses. In either case, wooden houses or recreation trailers, the number of units first authorized for the location could be limited to eight or 10, with the stipulation to those residents that they respect their use of the property. If empty cups, empty food containers and abandoned clothing items frequently littered the landscape, the tenants could be warned with the possibility that notices might be given. If things went well, the number of dwelling units could be increased. If things did not go well over a period of time, the project could be discontinued. Both Chico and Paradise have businesses that sell recreation trailers. Paul Smith Chico

Require insurance  Re “Ending the carnage” (Cover story, May 3): Why wasn’t the issue of a requirement for liability insurance for each and every weapon mentioned in the article? With proper background checks, weapon competency requirements and the remedies pointed out in the article, much could be done to limit the proliferation of weapons designed solely for killing people. Let the market set the rates for anyone who just has to own a killing machine. David Kensinger Paradise

Park in a flood plain Re “Riverbend Park restoration” (Downstroke, April 12): Riverbend Park was a mistake to begin with. I voiced my opinion while it was still in the planning stages. It was spearheaded by people who migrated here without 6 

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the proper insight of what they were undertaking. I’m surprised that it went through to begin with. It was built on a very well-known and very active flood plain, so it was doomed. Now they throw money at it time after time. What is this, the third or fourth time of total destruction? They could have built three parks in proper places that would still be there, but instead they choose to make a mistake again and again. Sure, it’s a cool park, but it has proven to be a bad investment; there is no way to ensure that it won’t get washed away again next year. When do we smarten up and say, “bad idea, let it go,” and stop flushing public funds down the river? Pete Mathis Oroville

Candidate shout-outs If you want a county supervisor with integrity, who’s a trusted public servant, an Air Force veteran and family man, then look to Bob Evans. He gives back to worthy organizations such as Hooked on Fishing—Not on Drugs, Chico Noon Rotary, and most recently as president of Chico Community Scholarship Association, which awards scholarships to deserving graduating high school seniors in our community. Bob currently serves on the Chico Planning Commission, and impresses with his preparation and knowledge of issues. Vote for Bob Evans, Butte County supervisor District 3. He will make smart, informed decisions so our tax dollars are used wisely and will help to make our county a safe place to live and work. Ann Nielsen Chico

I attended the League of Women Voters’ forum for Butte County supervisor candidates. Tami Ritter, candidate for District 3, stood out from all the rest, regardless of district. She was far and away the most knowledgeable, articulate and prepared. She answered all questions directly, clearly stating her position on each issue. Voters should visit her website, ritterforsupervisor.com, for more information. Heather Schlaff Chico

We are witnessing a transformation of the presidency, whether fleeting or not. Our allies are treated with contempt, and commitments on behalf of the United States and its international partners are broken without any regard as to the consequences of such actions. —roger S. Beadle

I am writing in support of Jessica Holcolmbe for Congress. I believe that Jessica will be the strongest candidate to defeat Doug LaMalfa next November. She came from a family that was poor financially, and knows what it’s like for families to struggle making ends meet. She has experience having served as a congressional intern. She supports improved Medicare for everyone, a living wage of at least $15 per hour and free college at our public universities. She is for cutting the bloated military budget, and spending those monies on addressing our vital domestic needs including here in Chico and Butte County. I am voting for Jessica Holcolmbe for Congress on June 5, and I recommend that all of my neighbors do the same. Walter Ballin Chico

All elections are important, and the June 5 primary is no exception. We in Forest Ranch feel we have a top candidate in Tami Ritter for the 3rd Supervisorial District race. She has been endorsed by our retiring supervisor, Maureen Kirk, and knows the issues of the district well. Tami will continue Maureen’s fine work for her constituents. Other outstanding candidates on the ballot include Dianne Feinstein for U.S. senator, Gavin Newsom for governor, Dave Jones for attorney general, Fiona Ma for treasurer, Jessica Holcombe for U.S. Congress, Alex Padilla for secretary of state, Betty Yee for controller, Randall Stone for assessor, Ed Hernandez for lieutenant governor, Tom Hallinan for board of equalization, Sonia Aery for state Assembly, and Debra Lucero for District 2 supervisor. The ballot is long and complex, but the June 5

primary has big implications for us all, so do your homework and cast your vote in the coming election. Robert Woods Forest Ranch

America stranded Civility and decency died in 2017. In the office of the president of the United States we are seeing on a daily basis a crass attitude toward others: foreign leaders; sitting senators; and, the rank and file of our law enforcement agencies, whose staffs have dedicated years of their lives to faithfully serving the American people. We are witnessing a transformation of the presidency, whether fleeting or not. Our allies are treated with contempt, and commitments on behalf of the United States and its international partners are broken without any regard as to the consequences of such actions. Members of the free press are attacked in a way reminiscent of the rise of fascism, past and present. At rallies the president ridicules them, calls them the enemy of the people, says they’re low lifes, liars and any other repugnant words he can conjure up, and does so to the cheering of thousands of people. Civility and decency died in 2017. The United States is losing its moral leadership in the eyes of the world, and we will not be better off because of it. An America First attitude could leave us stranded on an island of scorn. Roger S. Beadle Chico

negotiations and compromises, and progress on a democratic agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. All that before or during the moving of the American Embassy to Jerusalem. Instead we witnessed Jared Kushner—he given the task of solving the world’s problems— standing and pontificating as he shared the split-screen with blood-soaked images of violence. To add insult, it was the task of Robert Jeffress and The Rev. John Hagee, both of whom refer to Judaism, Mormonism, Catholicism and Islam as religions from “the pits of hell,” to offer the eulogies. What have we done? What are we doing? Lynn Elliott Chico

‘Where’s the humanity?’ As I write this, it’s been 24 hours since the fake news broke the story that White House staffer Kelly Sadler said about John McCain, “It doesn’t matter, he’s dying anyway.” I’m hearing lots of negative response to this, but nothing from Igor, oops, Donald Trump or the White House or the Republicans. Mocking a man Like John McCain when he’s dying of brain cancer is truly despicable. Trump’s animosity goes back to when he, Igor, said, “They call McCain a hero because he was captured. I prefer people who weren’t captured.” This is from a guy who got five deferments from the draft. John McCain spent five years as a POW in Vietnam and has lived with life-long injuries from that time. McCain has devoted his entire life to national service. A true hero. Igor Trump? Bone spurs, bankruptcies, divorces, ripping off contractors and Russia. As I write this, Kelly Sadler still has a job. And our congressman here in District 1 and the Republican Party continue to support this creep. Where’s the humanity? Ed Pitman Chico

‘What have we done?’ It could have been easier. With the supposed master of the Art of the Deal in charge, it could have been (should have been) joint

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

Own anything that belongs in a museum?

artist

A beautiful piece of art from a local painter named Tavar [Zawacki], who goes by “ABOVE.” He is from Chico, but he’s world-renowned now and is traveling the world. It’s a wood piece of an arrow pointing up that says, “Look.” He used to do woodcuts of arrows and hang them from telephone wires.

cardiac procedures tech

A box full of Nazi medals and an old World War II nurse’s uniform from Germany. It was found in the walls of my brother’s house that was built in the 1800s in downtown Milwaukee.

shipping clerk

My 1997 Toyota pickup that has 197,000 miles on it. It looks like I rolled it four times and died in it, but I didn’t.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE

Jennifer Griggs aims to foster relationships through Continuum of Care for a unified approach to ending homelessness.

CHICO BACKS DAM-WATCHDOG EFFORT

Members of the Chico City Council on Tuesday (May 15) followed the lead of the Oroville City Council and Butte County Board of Supervisors by voting unanimously to sign onto a letter of support for Senate Bill 955, which calls for a state-mandated Citizens Advisory Commission for the Oroville Dam. The bill, introduced by state Sen. Jim Nielsen (R-Gerber), calls for an independent entity within the Department of Water Resources (DWR) composed of 14 members, including Senate and Assembly members representing Oroville, and others appointed by the city of Oroville, specified counties and county sheriffs. If approved, the DWR would be required to provide the panel with on-site tours of the dam and its grounds and “all information reasonably requested by the commission regarding the construction, rehabilitation or reconstruction, operation, maintenance, and management of the dam.”

PRIMARY ELECTION WORKERS NEEDED

The Butte County Elections Office is looking to hire more than 100 people to work at the polls during the primary election on June 5. Those who are interested must fill out an application, attend a training, help set up polling places and support a local precinct on election day. Pay will range from $130-$175, based on the position: clerk, voting system specialist or precinct inspector. In general, inspectors deliver ballots, touch screens and supplies to receiving centers; system specialists help voters use the touch screens; and clerks assist voters throughout election day, cleaning up polling places at night. Find applications at the Butte Community Employment Center in Chico: 2445 Carmichael Drive, 879-3471; or the Employment Center in Oroville: 78 Table Mountain Blvd., 538-7301.

RESOURCE OFFICERS PENDING

By fall, Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien is hoping to have two full-time school resource officers working on Chico campuses. O’Brien (pictured) said it has been six years since the city has had officers acting in such a capacity, and he is “very excited and very appreciative” for the opportunity. He said that the officers will be mobile, but most likely spend a lot of time at high schools. Officers will provide student safety as well as opportunities for young people to have positive interactions with law enforcement. The positions—$145,580 each in salaries and benefits—aren’t entirely funded yet. One was approved last fiscal year. O’Brien needs about $42,000 from the City Council to be able to hire a second, as Chico Unified School District is expected to contribute about $103,000, according to the city.

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Setting priorities New countywide coordinator brings fresh outlook to Continuum of Care

Jtorsince taking on the position of coordinafor the Butte Countywide Continuum ennifer Griggs has had her hands full

of Care in January. For one, it was a job that hadn’t been filled full-time—ever. It had story and been a part-time job photo by “many years ago,” she Meredith J. Cooper said, with several of her duties falling to contracme re d i t h c @ tors to fulfill. n ew srev i ew. c o m The Continuum of Care (COC) is a multiagency body with a board of directors. Its goal is lofty, especially these days: to end homelessness. As coordinator of the COC, Griggs is an integral part of the solution, working with many agencies and helping them collaborate, supporting grantwriting, facilitating the biennial Point-inTime Homeless Survey and addressing the 10-year strategy to end homelessness. “I’ll be trying to understand everything and work through how we can get the most money possible to our county through

those grant programs,” she said by phone Tuesday (May 15). The day before, she’d addressed the full COC membership at a meeting open to the public, highlighting her progress in the few short months she’s been on the job and what she’s learned, and setting out what she sees as a core set of community priorities. Several organization heads offered status and statistical updates, and all reflected an increase in homelessness—which is a national trend that is expected to continue, reported Ed Mayer, executive director of the Butte Housing Authority. The Torres Community Shelter, for instance, saw a 4 percent increase in individuals helped in 2017 over 2016. The nightly average of guests, however, rose 28 percent. The center is currently hovering around capacity (160 beds), said Executive Director Joy Amaro. Several people agreed that the biggest obstacle organizations are up against when helping people to get into permanent housing is lack of said housing. “We’re trying to find ways to house folks

that have some pretty significant barriers,” said Tom Dearmore, program manager at the Esplanade House, which serves families with children. “Landlords, with [such a low] vacancy rate, they can be pretty picky. So, we’re spending quite a bit of our time in landlord recruitment—convincing them that this can benefit them and the community as a whole.” Quite a bit of discussion revolved around creating a coordinated entry for homeless clients, which many other COCs are pursuing but would require the coordination of Butte’s municipalities. There was also talk of legalizing a campground or RV park to temporarily offer some ease of mind to those living outdoors. New affordable housing was mentioned, but seemed an unrealistic expectation in the near future. “The cost per unit to build affordable housing is $250,000—per apartment in a complex,” one woman said. “There is no funding. But communities are finding ways at low cost to provide housing in tent camp-


ing facilities, tiny house villages … . We need to create the kind of community that recognizes our humanity, or we will keep coming back to these kinds of meetings and not solve the problems.” Other trends to watch: The average age of local homeless is rising. In Paradise, Sojourner’s House on the Ridge reported that the majority of its 18 guests are over 40. Also, while many people are able to gain income while staying at the Torres Shelter, Amaro said most of that income is not through employment, but rather through Social Security. “We can surmise that things aren’t going to get better until we can increase employment income,” Griggs said. Which brings us to priorities. The list is evolving, Griggs said; she hopes the various committees within the COC can help fine-tune it. Chief among them: Coordinated entry in Butte’s municipalities; a full-time “housing navigator”; a formal street-outreach program; cooperation with local hospitals and jails on discharge plans; a mobile clinic to help those with chronic conditions; a low-barrier seasonal shelter during the hottest and coldest months; and a 30-day housing plan for the most vulnerable populations. Griggs has a background in business, not

social service. She said that was a conscious decision by the COC when hiring her—she was chosen for her business acumen. Prior to joining the COC, she spent 20 years in sales and operations for a telecom company. She grew up in Chico and cares about the community, she said. “I chose to make a change in employment to do something more philanthropic,” she said. “I wanted to give back. This position filled a lot of boxes I wanted to check in my personal life.” She realizes she’s not coming into a well-oiled machine. The COC has been no stranger to controversy in recent years. Recall 2016, when Stairways Programming Executive Director Michael Madieros left $72,000 in funding unclaimed, citing a lack of support from and mistrust of the COC. Regardless of what’s happened in the past, Griggs said she feels she’s up to the task. “I came in with my eyes pretty open,” Griggs told the CN&R. “Not being new to Chico, I knew who the players were. I knew what players had past challenges with each other. I really have taken the approach of, ‘I’m Switzerland.’ I can’t change the past—everyone is entitled to their opinion. I just ask that if you’re working with me that you’re respectful of each other. I’m here to listen to everybody and all sides.” Ω

Heat from the dais Council members spar during long, tense meeting on budget items and homeless-related issues

‘Ito celebrate ‘Homelessness Discrimination Month,’ the hard work and prejudice that propose that the city declare June

Chico First is so diligently poisoning our community with,” Mark Herrera read from the City Council chambers lectern. “It takes a special kind of people to go out of their way to victimize and marginalize a portion of our population by using every creative tactic to criminalize the human condition of homelessness.” That’s just a taste of the tongue-lashing the one-time City Council candidate unleashed before he was escorted from the council chambers in handcuffs. Though he didn’t call out anyone by name, Herrera evidently crossed a line by referencing The Big Lebowski, calling the founder of Chico First a “human paraquat.” Mayor Sean Morgan had warned Herrera that he was “bordering on a personal attack,” but Herrera continued, to which Morgan replied by thanking him for his time and beckoning two police officers to boot him out. His dramatic exit was the climax of a tense, contentious meeting that also included a bleak financial outlook for Chico in the next decade, in light of declining revenues and increasing retirement costs, which will climb from $8 million per year to $14 million by 2030. Herrera’s comments were triggered by a request by Councilman Andrew Coolidge for the panel to consider discussing a laundry list of items homeless-advocacy watchdogs

SIFT ER Tax relief for Chicoans Looking for a little extra cash? You could be in luck. It’s the time of year when the city of Chico rolls out its utility users’ tax refund program, which gives ratepayers in certain income brackets a chance to receive a tax refund for gas, electric, water and telecommunications bills paid between May 1, 2017, and April 30, 2018. The finance office (on the first floor of City Hall, 411 Main St.) will be accepting applications through June 30. Checks will be issued for refunds, and applications may take up to three weeks to be processed. For more information or to complete an application, visit chico.ca.us or call 879-7300. Eligibility is as follows:

say are discriminatory. The run-down of items, called “Chico Safe Now” proposals, includes several championed by Chico First—specifically, earlier closing times for city parks, renewing the sit-lie ordinance and creating penalties for wayward shopping carts. However, Coolidge is also calling for discussion on declaring a shelter crisis, which could make way for the Chico Housing Action Team’s planned tiny home community, Simplicity Village. As Herrera was steered outside, Councilman Karl Ory commented, “I think that could have been avoided,” and made a motion to adjourn the meeting, before any of the proposals were brought up. It failed 3-4 along party lines. After some heated exchanges between Ory and Coolidge, and Vice Mayor Reanette Fillmer shouting at Councilwoman Ann Schwab, prompting the mayor to call for calm, the panel voted 5-2 in favor of discussing Coolidge’s proposals (Schwab and Ory dissented). Things also got heated between Ory and

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Chico Visual Arts Alliance (pictured at last weekend’s Art at the Matador event on The Esplanade) is one of the arts groups that could benefit from the council’s funding boost to arts and culture organizations. PHOTO COURTESY OF MARION HUNZIKER-LARSEN

Fillmer when the council considered whether to discuss the potential creation of City Council districts at a future meeting. Ory at one point slammed his fist on the dais, charging she was attempting to silence him by calling a point of order. The panel voted to 4-3 along party lines to agendize that discussion. Earlier in the meeting, Administrative Services

Director Scott Dowell told the panel that, assuming another recession hits, as is predicted, the city will need to generate additional revenue, or make cuts to services or to departments (or a combination of the two) to the tune of $4 million to $8 million, largely due to escalating retirement costs. Dowell made some suggestions, including an increase in the city’s transient occupancy tax (paid by those using Chico’s hotels and motels) from 10 percent to 15 percent, which could generate $1.4 million annually, and a business license fee increase, which could generate about $1 million. “I know that increasing taxes is not anyone’s preference,” he said before suggesting the council consider a utility tax on mobile phones in Chico, “but you need to look at NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D M AY 1 7, 2 0 1 8

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and analyze all options.” Dowell highlighted that the city is doing well currently, and wouldn’t hit a deficit until five years from now, assuming another recession hits. If the city continues to contribute to its emergency reserves, it’ll reach its target goal of around $11 million in five years, too. The presentation had a sobering effect on the council. “It’s a little bit like being on the Titanic in the middle of the day and seeing the iceberg,” Morgan said, “but thank you for that.” Also at the meeting, $40,000 in

community organization funding that used to fund a grant program for local nonprofits every year was diverted back to the general fund on a vote along party lines: Councilwoman Schwab’s desire to keep the funding set aside for community organizations was rejected. However, arts and culture organizations and public art projects did secure 1 percent of the city’s transient occupancy tax revenue, about $27,000 based on current budget figures, after the council squabbled over what the precise percentage should be and whether or not to add a “cap” of $50,000. The vote was 4-3, with Councilmembers Mark Sorensen, Fillmer and Morgan against. Sorensen called the decision “lazy budgeting,” adding that the city was throwing money at something that brings in far less tax revenue than other industries. Coolidge replied that the only way for the city to generate additional revenue is through the university and arts and culture events. “I think this is a token contribution to something that is vitally important to our community, and I think it is an outstanding statement to make.” In a bizarre moment, Fillmer pointedly asked Schwab to define what culture means while she was speaking in support. Schwab’s response: “It would be an enrichment of the visual and performance arts that creates an atmosphere of exploration of different communities and differences in ourselves, between one another, and spurs creativity,” she said. “It’s a celebration of our community and the talents we have, and … creates a sense of place.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


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NGov.ThatJerrywasBrown the familiar message reverberating from on Friday (May 11) as he unveiled his othing good lasts forever.

updated version of the 2018-19 state budget. California’s strong economy is not going to last, and Brown says he is doing everything he can to safeguard against the next recession. “Let’s not blow it now. We worked too hard for that,” Brown said. What that translates to is saving more and spending less on programs that come with ongoing costs. Instead, Brown proposes using this year’s higher-than-expected revenue toward one-time spending—using it to address homelessness and mental health and improve infrastructure at universities, state buildings and courts. In January, the governor presented a proposed budget that included a $6.1 billion expected surplus. Now that surplus has grown to about $8.8 billion, thanks to big boosts from personal income and corporate taxes. Brown said he is committed to depositing most of it into reserves and the state’s Rainy Day Fund, which will have a balance of $9.4 billion at the end of this fiscal year. As usual, much of the state’s total budget of $199.3 billion will pay for education and health care, which have seen increases since the last recession. The budget proposes spending an additional $4,600 per student compared to spending in 2011-12, which would bring the annual amount the state spends per pupil to $11,628.

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The proposed budget leaves about $4 billion toward one-

time expenditures in three areas. Half of that would go to deferred maintenance— money for universities, the state and courts to pay for upkeep on buildings, equipment and levee repairs. The state has a huge backlog of infrastructure needs with a price tag of $20 billion, said Michael Cohen, the state’s finance director. Brown also proposes distributing $359 million to help local governments combat homelessness, including $50 million for services for people with mental illness. His proposed budget also adds another $312 million to develop betAbout this story: ter early detection of mental health It is an abridged illnesses, and education for mental version of the health professionals, with a focus on original, which psychiatry. was produced by Other priorities he’s carved out CalMatters.org. include an additional $96 million for wildfire prevention efforts such as thinning forests, $134 million for voting equipment and $16 million for earthquake early warning systems. Brown’s so-called “May revise” is just one more pulse

point on the way to a final state budget. Democratic legislative leaders now have several weeks to try to squeeze in more funding for health care, education, housing and other asks before the state’s June 30 deadline to put a new budget in place. Their wish list includes a broader expansion of various health benefits for people lacking sufficient

coverage. One controversial item: health coverage for all undocumented immigrants living in California. In 2015, California approved legislation to cover undocumented children and allow them to enroll in Medi-Cal, the state’s health care program for poor people. Assemblyman Phil Ting, the San Francisco Democrat who chairs the Assembly Budget Committee, applauded Brown’s commitments toward homelessness but wants to allocate more for health coverage and higher education. “When we craft a spending plan that addresses these issues, we make our state stronger and build a brighter future with opportunity for all—while still saving for a rainy day,” Ting said in a statement. Some don’t think the surplus belongs to the state at all. State Sen. Ted Gaines, an El Dorado Hills Republican, thinks a refund to the taxpayers is in order. “This is Gov. Brown’s last budget and thankfully so. He’s spent eight years talking about fiscal discipline and prudence while supporting new taxes, fees and spending at every turn,” Gaines said. “He’s leaving behind a legacy of poverty, massive homelessness, and if he keeps this surplus, theft.” Of course, Republicans have no real influence on the final budget. The Legislature can approve its version with only a simple majority, so the Democrats who dominate both chambers are in control. —ANTOINETTE SIU

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HEALTHLINES

Upping the ratio Legislature takes on dearth of mental health counselors on college campuses by

Felicia Mello

W State University campuses came together last fall to set priorities for the academic hen student leaders from 23 California

year, improving campus mental health services received more nominations than any other issue. It beat out even the perennial concern of tuition costs. Cal State Student Association President Maggie White said she’s not surprised. “We’re seeing wait times at counseling centers that are exceeding two or three weeks, people turned away after a few appointments because they’ve exceeded the maximum allotment, and students not feeling comfortable going to counselors because no one looks like them or reflects their experience,” White said. As the stigma attached to mental health care fades, California students are increasingly clamoring for more on-campus ser-

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vices that can help them cope with anxiety, depression and the stresses of a contentious political climate and rising living expenses. Several bills pending in the California Legislature would set aside resources for mental health care at the state’s public colleges and universities. Mental health advocates say on-campus care is especially important because people often first experience psychological problems during their young adult years. “It’s so much the age when serious mental illness manifests itself, and here we have these institutions that could absolutely be identifying this early on,” said Deborah Anderluh, a spokeswoman for the Steinberg Institute, which lobbies for more funding for mental health treatment. Only eight of the Cal State system’s 23 campuses meet the standard of one counselor per 1,000 to 1,500 students set by the International Association of Counseling Services—the national accreditor for campus counseling centers—according to a survey by the student association. Chico State has

one counselor per 1,900 students, according to the California Faculty Association. The number of college students seeking

counseling on campuses nationwide grew five times faster than enrollment between 2009 and 2015, according to the Center for Collegiate Mental Health, a national consortium. Depression and anxiety were the biggest problems. Saba Ansari, a third-year political science major at CSU Fullerton, said panic attacks during her freshman year often kept her from sleeping through the night. “I have very traditional, conservative parents who wanted me to become a scientist,” Ansari said. But she wanted to go into politics. And the polarized atmosphere that accompanied President Trump’s election exacerbated the social pressures she was already experiencing as a Muslim woman, Ansari said. “I was having this identity crisis and feeling really threatened.” It wasn’t until starting on-campus therapy, Ansari said, that she realized she wasn’t the only one dealing with those challenges. Her grades improved, and she took on more responsibility in student government. But when she recommended the campus counseling center to a friend who was grieving after a death in the family, said Ansari, the friend couldn’t get an appointment. The center staff said, “‘We’re all filled up; can you call back in two weeks?’” Ansari said. Legislators are considering a proposal to ease that backlog by requiring public cam-

puses to have one full-time counselor for every 1,500 students. “We’ve put a lot of emphasis on how to get students to graduate on time,” said state Sen. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), the bill’s author. “One of the barriers is mental health issues, and we should be helping [students] overcome them. Otherwise, we’re not maximizing our investment.” CSU and the community colleges would have to hire hundreds of new counselors to meet the ratio Pan is proposing, according to a legislative analysis. The community college system has more than 7,000 students for every counselor systemwide, according to the analysis, while CSU has more than 2,000. Staffing at the University of California is more robust, with about 1,100 students per counselor overall. None of the university systems has taken a position on the bill. But Denise Bevly, CSU’s director of wellness, questioned whether mandating staff levels for counselors was the best way to improve care. “One-on-one counseling may not be it for all students,” she said. Some issues might be better addressed through prevention and early intervention such as “a stressmanagement workshop, or a peer counseling group or a yoga class.” “There’s still a gap, if we’re honest,” between the increasing demand for counseling services and the supply, Bevly said. The schools are doing what they can with the resources they have, she added. In June, the CSU system will start training a few faculty and staff from each campus to be “wellness ambassadors.” They’ll be able to direct students who are struggling with mental health or financial pressures to the right campus programs, Bevly said. Pan’s legislation may mean the most change

for community colleges. In a 2016 survey of 10 California community colleges, more than half of students said they had felt overwhelming anxiety at some time in the past year, with 39 percent saying they had been so depressed it was hard to function. One in 10 said they had seriously considered suicide. Last year, the Legislature budgeted $4.5 million for new mental health programs at community colleges—but only 15 of the state’s 114 colleges will receive the competitive grants of up to $300,000 each. American River College psychology professor Peg Scott says every week, two to three students approach her with mental health problems. “We see PTSD, bipolar, eating disorders and schizophrenia, but depression and anxiety are the two that really eat up our kids,” said Scott.


Source: California Poison Control

The Department of Commerce has assessed preliminary newsprint tariffs, which range as high as 32%.

California Poison Control tells us that it is seeing an uptick in calls related to concentrated hydrogen peroxide ingestion. The 3 percent diluted stuff in the brown bottle at drugstores is a great antiseptic for treating small cuts and wounds, cleaning house, treating ear infections, removing stains and dozens of other uses. But it’s also caught on as “oxygen therapy,” with unsubstantiated claims of boosting the body’s ability to destroy cancer cells, helping with multiple sclerosis and even treating HIV. There are no reputable studies to support these claims. Even worse, some people are using concentrated industrial-grade hydrogen peroxide, one gulp of which can cause gallons of oxygen bubbles to form in one’s gut. These bubbles can perforate intestines and travel into the arteries of the heart, lungs and brain with serious consequences including heart attacks, strokes, seizures and respiratory distress. Use H202 for inexpensive hair highlights, but please don’t drink the stuff.

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effect. UC, CSU and community colleges were all able to use some of its proceeds to launch campaigns to raise awareness of mental health issues and suicide prevention. And students say it’s become easier to talk about mental health. Students on a number of campuses have started mental health conferences and formed chapters of Active Minds, a student-run advocacy organization. Scott’s students decided not to wait for their college to provide counseling. They’re partnering with the National Alliance on Mental Illness to create peer support groups for struggling students. “The need is there, and our students are so forward-looking that they recognize it,” Scott said. □

tell congress that news matters. ask them to end the newsprint tariff.

There’s no counseling center at her Sacramento County community college, which has two nurses for more than 30,000 students. So Scott refers students to a county crisis center several miles away. California has a dedicated funding source for mental health programs: In 2004, voters passed Proposition 63, a 1 percent tax on incomes of more than $1 million a year. Counties can decide how to use most of the money, and a recent state audit found that hundreds of millions have gone unspent. Some lawmakers want the state to set priorities for how counties should spend those funds. Under a bipartisan measure also pending in the Legislature, counties would have to use some of the money for one of three types of mental health programs, including college counseling, or justify to the state why they did not. California’s last major effort to upgrade college counseling failed in 2016, when Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed a bill that would have set up a campus mental health trust fund, citing its lack of a specific price tag or funding source. But Proposition 63 has had some

Produced by Cal Matters, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government, this is an abridged version of a story supported by the College Futures Foundation.

threaten local news.

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GREENWAYS John Petersen, of Petersen Tree Care, trims a sycamore tree on a sunny afternoon in Bidwell Park.

Power planting Chico seeks $450,000 grant to plant trees, update urban forest inventory

story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

Awhere arborist John Petersen called down from he stood on a lift about 100 feet in the fter the buzz of the chainsaw quieted,

air under the canopy of a leaning sycamore in Lower Bidwell Park. “Does that look good, Richie?” Richie Bamlet, who celebrated his first year as Chico’s urban forester last month, called up to the city contractor: “Awesome! Very nice haircut!” Park-goers smiled at the sight of the work on Thursday (May 10). One woman taking a jaunt through Chico’s busiest park looked upward at Petersen, commenting that she didn’t at all mind waiting to walk through. When it was safe to pass underneath the tree, a bicyclist quipped that he could help by catching a falling limb. Tree-trimming is a significant part of tree care and even public safety, as it protects people from getting hit by heavy limbs that might otherwise fall. But the city’s tree division, like many other departments, was a casualty of the Great Recession, scaled back from about 11 staff members to a bare-bones crew of less than half that charged with caring for the city’s estimated 60,000 trees. Bamlet said the city has been able to ramp up its efforts now that it has climbed out of the depths of the recession and resulting budget deficit. In the last two years, in addition to hiring Bamlet, the city has added Want a tree?

If you would like a tree planted in the city sidewalk strip near your home or your front yard, email richard.bamlet@chicoca.gov, using “Tree please” as the subject, and provide your name and address. Chico Tree Advocates is also planting, and can be reached at 354-6337 or robinmccollum@sbcglobal.net. 14

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another seasonal worker and senior tree trimmer, making for one full tree crew of six. But the funding the tree division receives is still very limited: $844,000 for staffing and tree care across the city is consumed quickly, Bamlet said. He has a to-do list largely aimed at making up for lost time, and he’s hoping a grant opportunity will help the city fill those gaps. On Tuesday (May 15), the City Council gave Bamlet the green light to apply for a Cal Fire Urban and Community Forestry grant. The city is seeking $425,811, and will match $183,102 by using resources it already has: staff payroll, development impact fees and volunteer hours. The funding would be used to work with groups like Chico Tree Advocates (CTA), a program of the Butte Environmental Council, to plant 700 trees citywide over the next three years. It will start to make up for the approximately 4,500 spots where, over decades, the city tore out dead, diseased or dying trees and never replaced them. “I want to promote the idea that when we remove a tree, it’s ‘remove and replace,’” Bamlet said. If secured, the grant will allow the city to develop a new urban forest tree inventory (which is 10 years old) and a master plan. “We need to know how many of each species we have, what the size is, if they need to be trimmed [and] if there’s any risk, and that helps us form our work plan,” he said. “That’ll be our road map for developing tree-trimming and tree-planting pro-

grams, and outreach for citizens.” CTA leader Robin McCollum said the group has been encouraged by Bamlet’s approach, and is focused on helping with planting efforts, while advocating that the City Council continue to build the tree division back to pre-recession levels. “We’ve been banking on that [planting] for a long time but not depositing much,” McCollum said. “Richie’s got the long view. He’s committed beyond this grant.” Regardless of whether the grant is awarded,

Bamlet said he’s determined to plant those trees. “Right tree, right place: We’ll be working on that philosophy,” he said. “My vision is to get the tree canopy in Chico from 30 percent up to 40 percent,” he

continued, referring to the amount of shade the citywide tree cover would provide. Ultimately, Bamlet would also like to see diversification of the city’s forest to shore it up against potential disease outbreaks, and the planting of more “work horse trees” that “scrub the air, provide shade [and], ideally, [are] low maintenance.” Bamlet and McCollum stressed the value the new trees will have not only when it comes to residents’ enjoyment but for the environment. The program would allow Chico to reduce stormwater runoff by 5.2 million gallons—as the trees would absorb that water during heavy rains—save residents 4.9 kilowatt hours of energy and store 10 million pounds of CO2 equivalent over the next 40 years. “Greenhouse gas reduction is probably the most important … in terms of [planting] being a visible effort that people can understand and makes them mindful of the many places that we can deal with climate change,” McCollum said. “They can see that a tree’s been planted, and they can connect it with that other benefit of trees to sequester carbon and help us that way.” As part of the grant, disadvantaged and low-income neighborhoods will also benefit specifically from the plantings, and Bidwell Park would receive 100 of the saplings. It may seem counterproductive to plant more trees when the city’s having a hard time keeping up, Bamlet said, but all trees have a life cycle: if Chico doesn’t keep planting, then the urban forest will disappear. “Chico has been a tree city USA for 35 years now,” he said. “We want to keep it deserving of that title.” Ω

ECO EVENT FAMILY NIGHT HIKE Bidwell Park doesn’t sleep. Find out what our city’s critters do after hours on this casual stroll through Lower Park with Chico Creek Nature Center head naturalist Robert Dresden and enjoy the evening wildlife under a star-filled sky. As twilight ends, crepuscular and diurnal animals head for home while nocturnal beasts emerge to gather food, scavenge and hunt. Owls and bats swoop for prey, rodents scurry under cover and even ringtails sometimes appear after the sun goes down. Learn about the specialized adaptations that animals have developed for nighttime and explore the cosmos on Saturday, May 19, at 9:30 p.m. Call the CCNC at 891-4671 to register.


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Lovin’ summer

Ana and Tiffany Astrologo have always been interested in fitness, so opening 9Round, a kickboxing fitness gym, in Chico was a natural step in their workout evolution. Their active lifestyles were reinforced by their service in the Air Force, where Ana (pictured) and Tiffany met. They then attended college on the GI Bill and decided to move from their home in Torrance to Northern California last September to be closer to Tiffany’s family in Red Bluff. The Astrologos had been members of a 9Round gym in Torrance for about a year and fell in love with the 30-minute kickboxing workouts that include personal trainers and nine different stations with routines that change daily. So, upon settling into their new home of Chico, they decided to open a franchise. Try it out for free at 754 Mangrove Ave., in the Safeway shopping center, or go online to 9round.com/fitness/ Chico-CA-x0391.

Did you study fitness in college? I got an MBA from Pepperdine and Tiffany has a master’s in psychology. I didn’t get a degree in it, but fitness has always been a part of my life. I grew up playing basketball in high school and junior college and then, in the military, you had to work out. I was a physical training leader while I was in there, and same thing with Tiffany. Her introduc-

meredithc@newsreview.com As much as I hate to sweat, I absolutely love summer. There’s something about throwing on a pair of shorts and flip-flops and stepping out into the warm sunshine that just makes me feel free. Maybe it stems from the promises of summer vacation from school, when responsibilities were few and days spent by the pool with a good book many. Regardless, I look forward to a couple months of river floatin’, barbecuin’, readin’-in-the sun fun. May you all have some of the same. To the grads: Congrats! Whether your future keeps you in Chico or takes you elsewhere, I wish you a wonderful new adventure. And for those journalism students who’ve yet to plan their summers, the CN&R is hiring interns! For consideration, send me a few samples of your writing (or photography), with your résumé and a short cover letter explaining what you hope to gain from an internship.

tion to fitness was Billy Blanks videos her mom used to do, and workout tapes. We’ve tried many different types of workouts, but hands down 9Round is my favorite.

Do you teach actual kickboxing? This is a kickbox-for-fitness gym, so the emphasis is on fitness. [We] don’t have a fighting background ... although [Tiffany] did coach youth boxing in South Central L.A. for about a year. The beauty of it is, we’re not teaching people to fight and spar—we infuse the kickboxing techniques to make a fun workout, so when you’re doing it, hopefully you’re not feeling like, “Oh, I’m just working out”—it’s like getting your body moving and it’s just fun.

time we’re open.

How do you change up the workouts? What doesn’t change is where the stations are—you can see 1 through 9. What changes is what you do at that station every day. So, for round 2, today we did 20 toe taps and five push-ups; tomorrow it could be biceps curls and mountain climbers.

Who are your clientele?

Do you have to schedule a time to come in to see a trainer?

I would say it’s 65 percent women to 35 percent men here. I would say our demographic is working professionals—there are lots of moms, we get lots of teachers, we have a lot of nurses, mostly working adults. I feel like we’ve been pretty lucky; I genuinely like our members. They’re just cool and neat and kind people. I feel blessed and appreciate the open-arms welcome.

No, there’s a trainer here any

—CATHY WAGNER

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AGING POPULACE It’s no surprise that our population, particularly of baby boomers, is getting older. So, naturally, businesses that cater to seniors are on the rise. Turns out Chico could soon be the newest location for Right at Home, an international franchise company with headquarters in Omaha. Much like Chico’s own Happy at Home, it provides care for seniors in their own homes—everything from grocery shopping to companionship to round-the-clock caregiving. A Chico expansion could add up to 50 local jobs, many of which would be for local folks. Expect updates as the company gets closer to finding a home base in Chico and hiring. COFFEE COMING I’m pleased to announce that a new business is moving in to the old Maui Wowi Hawaiian Coffees & Smoothies spot at the corner of Mangrove and Vallombrosa avenues. That beverage spot was pretty tasty, but was in a bit of a strange location for a niche business. But the owners had lobbied long and hard for a drive-thru, which added some (much-needed) traffic to that little strip mall. A new sign recently went up for Brave Coffee. As I learn more, so shall you. BEER AND A MOVIE? Apparently that’s the plan at Chico’s Cinemark 14 theater. I’d heard a rumor about the place converting its arcade into a bar, so when I was driving by last weekend, I decided to pop in. I asked an employee, who said, yes, that’s on the horizon potentially as soon as July. COOPED UP Tractor Supply regularly holds fundraisers that benefit local communities, and its most recent effort, which raised almost $50,000 across California for Future Farmers of America programs, is no different. The Chico FFA was awarded a $2,960 grant to fund its chicken coop project. Not bad! MORE LOCAL LOVE The Enloe Foundation was recently given a hefty donation from

Courtesy Subaru of America’s Love Promise program, which “believes in making the world a better place and is a pledge to do right by the communities in which we all live and work,” according to a release. Last month, Subaru Love Promise presented the Enloe Foundation with $7,147.22, bringing its total donations over time to the not-for-profit organization, which supports the local hospital, to $52,472.

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HISTORY KEEPERS

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utte County has a rich and varied history, which stretches back to the original Maidu inhabitants and became steeped in the Gold Rush that brought settlers out West from spots across the globe. In honor of International Museum Day on Friday (May 18), which happens during National Historic Preservation Month, the CN&R took a tour of some of the county’s museums focused on keeping that history alive. In doing so, we met the people who maintain them—the caretakers, if you will, of our past.

Nancy Brower shows an antique blower and forge at the Butte County Historical Society Museum in Oroville.

Lucy Sperlin, museum director, searches through the society’s extensive archives of photos, news clippings, maps and other documents. PHOTOS BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

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Curating the past Historical group chronicles county’s past through archives, magazines and four local museums

I

n preparation for curating the current exhibit at the Butte County Historical Society Museum, which centers on World War I in honor of its centennial, Nancy Brower set about a mammoth task: Reading the local newspapers from 1914-1918. “I made copies of articles of interest, then sorted them by topic,” she said while giving a tour of the museum, which occupies a former church in Oroville adjacent to its archives, formerly church offices. But while those archives are extensive, requiring regular cataloging and only the occasional benefit of digitization, collecting materials to include in the exhibit went beyond the society’s holdings. Brower reached out to fellow local historians who had items that were appropriate for the era, and all the way to the Library of Congress for historical documents to set the national stage for the time period. Society members contributed by arranging the displays; a former longtime reference librarian, Brower is content to remain on the research side of things. What resulted is a thorough examination of what life was like in Butte County in the 1910s. There are references, of course, to what was happening on the national and international stages, but the focus at the Butte County Historical Society Museum is hyper-local.

For instance, most people learned in school that women were put to work while the men were sent to war. But while national history books and documentaries depict women in munitions factories and at telephone company switchboards, the local exhibit features the “farmerettes,” those who joined the Women’s Land Army to tend the crops, of which there were plenty right here. “That was really the beginning of feminism,” remarked Brower, president of the society. Other displays focus on topics ranging from local baseball leagues to film production to the fashion and home decorating trends of the time. And others yet feature headlines of the day, such as one that lamented the death of nine to the Spanish flu in one day in Chico. Advertisements warned people to not go out in public without a mask. In the meantime, prominent local physicians were not immune to the draft. One newspaper clipping announces that Dr. N.T. Enloe, who had opened Enloe Hospital in 1913, was assigned


Silas Deanda is the caretaker for the Oregon City School, the oldest schoolhouse still standing in Butte County.

and cooled,” she added. But that’s not so in Bangor or Oregon City. The Bangor Church, in fact, closes during the hottest and coldest months of the year. Even so, being able to provide visitors with a true example of what life was like for early settlers to the area is worth the trouble, Sperlin said. A fascination with history is what

medical duty in San Francisco during the war. The museum isn’t limited to just one exhibit, however, and features several permanent installations, including the jail door that once confined Ishi, the “last wild Indian,” who wandered into Oroville before being sent to San Francisco and scientists’ study. Other displays offer lessons on early Thermalito and the resort at Richardson Springs. “What distinguishes us from the other museums in Butte County is that we are concerned with the entire county, while most of the others focus on a smaller area,” said Lucy Sperlin, museum director. “Butte County has such a fascinating and broad history.” The museum is just part of the picture

for the Butte County Historical Society (BCHS), which is to say it’s one of four museums it oversees within the county and only a portion of its focus, which extends to archiving and telling stories. Also in Oroville, BCHS runs the Ehmann Home—referred to as

Butte County Historical Society:

The BCHS Museum is at 1749 Spencer Ave., with the archives next door at 2335 Baldwin Ave. in Oroville. Additionally, the BCHS oversees three other museums. For more info, call 533-9418 or visit buttecounty historicalsociety.org Bangor Church 5370 LaPorte Road, Bangor, 679-2112 Open first and third Sat., noon-2 p.m. Ehmann Home 1480 Lincoln, 533-5316 Open Sat., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Oregon City School 2100 Oregon Gulch Road, Oregon City, 533-1849 Open Sat.-Sun., 1-4 p.m.

“the house that olives built,” as it was once home to the grandmother of the preserved olive, Freda Ehmann. That’s where it holds its biggest fundraiser of the year, the Olive Festival (this year, it will be June 17). Then there’s the Bangor Church, built in 1882 and the oldest standing church in Butte County—inside is the original Bible used by S. Kinsey, a preacher who rode on horseback from Brownsville on Sundays. The building barely escaped last summer’s fires. And, finally, the Oregon City School, which is likewise the area’s oldest schoolhouse, where you’ll learn about the group of Oregonians that settled the spot while looking for gold, led by Peter Burnett— who served as the first governor of California. (Its big annual barbecue fundraiser is May 27.) A visit to the Oregon City School illuminated perhaps the biggest struggle for the society—maintaining its buildings, which are naturally very old. Silas Deanda, who lives on the property caretaker of the building, offered a tour, which included a walk around the outside of the one-room schoolhouse. In the rear, he pointed to supports that had been placed underneath the building, which over the years had begun to sink into the ground. He also has problems with vandalism, which is why he lives on-site and also why the museum holds little of value—there’s no security system, he said, but he wishes they’d put one in so he could beef up the offerings. “There’s a lot of fiscal consumption in just maintaining these old buildings,” Sperlin acknowledged. “We keep the museum and archive buildings heated

attracts most people to the museums and to the society itself (membership, which includes a subscription to the quarterly Diggin’s magazine, is $25). But Sperlin and Brower agreed that the group has discovered a deeper calling than just sharing their love of the past with each other. “At some point, it morphed from a society of people enjoying history to a service organization serving the entire community,” Sperlin said. The organization was formed in 1956. Maintaining the region’s historical record is helpful in myriad ways, she said, from being able to contribute to history books to supplying documentation used in environmental studies to simply satisfying people’s curiosity about their ancestors. The archives aren’t fully digitized, though they work on it in batches, Sperlin said. They do, however, have a very meticulous catalog of their holdings, so people looking for details on an ancestor or an old map can call or C.F. Lott Home email to find out what information they may have. While membership in the society tends to weigh on the older side, Sperlin said they are beginning to see more interest among young people—if not to join and volunteer, at least to come view exhibits and research history. As Brower likes to say, “If you don’t enjoy history, you probably had a bad teacher.” Sperlin agreed. Good history is told through good stories, she said, that give meaning to what we do and enjoy today. “Every time I drive from Chico to Oroville, I know I’m driving on the old pioneer road. [Knowing the history] gives you a sense of place—every place you go, it makes it more interesting.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

Get out there More museums to get your historical juices flowing Butte County is home to over a dozen history museums, each with its own unique focus. Here’s a rundown, plus a short list of resources for those interested in doing their own research. For a full list of museums in Butte County, pick up a copy of the Chico News & Review’s Discover Butte County.

Museums Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park

Bidwell Mansion is Chico’s most famous home. The three-story, 26-room, pink-and-brown Victorian mansion was built in 1868 and named for its first occupants, Chico’s founder John Bidwell and his wife, Annie. Open 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat.-Mon. 525 Esplanade, 895-6144, bidwellmansionpark.com

Centerville Schoolhouse and Colman Museum

The historic Centerville Schoolhouse, built in 1894, is located alongside the Colman Museum, which focuses on the region’s history. Open Sat.-Sun., 1-4 p.m. 13458 Centerville Road, 893-9667

C.F. Lott Home—Sank Park

This Victorian revival home was built in 1856 by “Judge” C.F. Lott, a Gold Rush pioneer and founder of California’s first citrus exchange. Tours reveal the history of the Lott family, including the love story between Lott’s daughter Cornelia and Jesse Sank. The grounds cover a full city block and include a carriage house, gardens, a gazebo and flower garden. 1067 Montgomery St., 538-2497

Gold Nugget Museum

This museum is an ode to the history of the Ridge, from the infamous 54-pound gold nugget found in 1859 to the Maidu Indians who inhabited the region prior to European settlement. The grounds feature farm and mining equipment, a replication of an Old West mining town, a working blacksmith shop, gold panning sluices and a picnic area. Open Wed.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise, 872-8722, goldnuggetmuseum.com

Gridley Museum

Rotating exhibits in the museum, which is housed in the historic Veatch Building, depict early life in Gridley. Pick up a downtown walking tour map there or arrange for a docent-led tour. Open Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 601 Kentucky St., 846-4482, gridleymuseum.com

Paradise Depot Museum

Dedicated to the history of the Paradise Depot, one of four depots serving the Butte County Railroad and built in 1904. Open noon-4 p.m. on weekends. 5570 Black Olive Drive, 877-1919 MUSEUMS C O N T I N U E D M AY 1 7, 2 0 1 8

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History in the hills Memories of long-gone logging operations live on at the Stirling City Museum

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side from semi-regular meetings and holiday presentations by the local Poets and Liars Club, at which Stirling City locals share their literary scribblings and tall tales with other townsfolk in a community center housed in a closed-down school, live entertainment is a rare treat in the historic logging town northeast of Paradise. But the Stirling City Historical Society (SCHS) is planning quite a spectacle this Memorial Day weekend (May 26-27) to commemorate the seasonal reopening of the Stirling City Museum.

That Saturday, two figures from the North State’s wild west past— gentleman outlaw Black Bart and a singing, female stagecoach driver named Amy Morrison—will be onhand to bring history to life. The duo are played by historical re-enactors Lee Dummel and Mary Schaefer, the latter of whom serves—as she describes it—as the historical society’s “secretary, event coordinator and a whole bunch of other stuff.” Dummel will bring along a trio of truly unique artifacts—three of the actual lockboxes stolen by his bandit counterpart— and other Stirling City citizens will contribute baked goods to raise funds for the society and the museum it oversees. “The ladies in town do an incredible job with the food,” Schaefer gushed during a recent interview with her and husband, Marshall, SCHS president, at the museum. “There’s fresh-baked loaves of Back in time: bread and

The Stirling City Museum will reopen on Memorial Day weekend (Sat.-Sun., May 26-27) and is open every other weekend through Labor Day. The Stirling City Historical Society also holds regular public events. For information and museum hours, call 873-1598 or go to stirlingcityhistory.org.

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mile-high pies … we’re fortunate to have such helpful, involved people.” In fact, the Schaefers said about 90 of the town’s total population, which has hovered around 300 for decades, are members of the historical society. Roughly a dozen core members actively participate by sitting on the society’s board, working as volunteer docents, curating museum displays and serving in other capacities. The couple said that community spirit is part of what drew them to the town from the Santa Barbara area 12 years ago. Sitting at 3,575 feet above sea

level, Stirling City was founded in 1903 by the Diamond Match Co., which logged and milled lumber there to be transported—initially by rail and flume, and eventually by truck—to its factory in Chico’s Barber District. In the mountain town’s heyday, as many as 4,000 people lived there, and Marshall noted it had an indelible impact on surrounding communities, as it contributed to turn-of-the-20th century construction and population booms in Paradise and Chico. The once-thriving town was home to a district populated by immigrants called Little Italy, a grand

inn called the Raynor Hotel, and a saloon and brothel located next door to one another, respectively named the Red Devil and White Angel. Stirling City was already in a state of decline when the sawmill closed in 1958, with many of the town’s original buildings having burned during a series of fires in the early 1930s. During the Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps—a New Deal-era work relief program—built a two-building complex for the Department of Forestry in the footprint of the Raynor Hotel, which since 2003 has housed the museum. The SCHS was formed in 1993, and was deeded the property by Cal Fire. The museum’s displays include an array of vintage matchbooks and Diamond memorabilia. There are also scale models of lost buildings like the Raynor Hotel and the mill itself, as well as the still-standing mill superintendent’s house. Other relics include an ancient wooden wheelchair and wooden skis and snowshoes like those early residents used during the area’s harsh winters. On the lawn between the two

buildings sits a huge, bright yellow, meticulously clean 1946 Caterpillar logging tractor. Marshall’s business card reads “caretaker of our history,” a title he doesn’t take lightly: “The entire purpose [of the SCHS] is to keep this history alive,” he said. “It’s the reason we exist.” He said building relationships with nearby museums and historical societies is essential to that mission, and that his organization has participated in events with Paradise’s Gold Nugget Museum and the Yankee Hill Historical Society. Re-enactments like the one scheduled for Memorial Day weekend are part of the SCHS’ outreach program, which is headed up by Mary. The re-enactments also allow her to recapture some of her youth. In her teens and early 20s, Mary was a stage actor, sang professionally, worked at Bob Hope’s Movie Ranch in Southern California (“He was a wonderful man,” she said of the Hollywood legend) and even appeared as a background player in a feature film—1966’s Jesse James Meets Frankenstein’s Daughter. Though it’s devoted to preserv-

Mary and Marshall Schaefer serve as secretary and president, respectively, of the Stirling City Historical Society, which oversees the Stirling City Museum. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

ing the past, Marshall said the museum’s future relies on modern technology. SCHS volunteers maintain a comprehensive website and social media presence, but a lack of broadband in Stirling City limits internet potential. “Most of these small-town museums like us are very remote, and the best way for us to keep up with the times is to go virtual,” he said. For that reason, one of the historical society’s goals is to work with the state’s Public Utilities Commission to obtain funding for infrastructure and to find a utility provider willing to do the work. Until then, visitors have to visit the museum the old-fashioned way, with a roughly one-hour drive from Chico through forested foothills to a town that hasn’t quite caught up to the present. And, lack of broadband aside, that’s part of its charm. —KEN SMITH


What’s old is new again

Chico History Museum gets a new lease on life in chronicling this city’s past

H

ad you entered the former Chico Museum—now renamed the Chico History Museum—a couple of weeks ago, you would have heard the screeching of electric saws attacking the building’s south wall. Serious construction was going on to finish installing the museum’s iconic Chinese temple. It was a sure sign that the CHM—located in the historic Carnegie library building at Second and Salem streets—was up and running again and moving forward.

On April 17, the president of its board of directors, Amy Kao, had signed documents finalizing negotiations to make the museum an independent nonprofit agency. It is now entirely separate from its former overseer, the Far West Heritage Association. (FWHA remains the steward of the Patrick Ranch Museum on the Midway south of town.) That’s the good news. The not-so-good news is that CHM no longer has a paid staff and is running entirely on volunteer energy. It desperately needs to raise money. Separation from Far West has also meant separation from FWHA’s endowment fund, some $2 million, said David Rush, a CHM board member and local attorney. Betty Nopel, who first broached the idea of going independent to the museum’s steering committee, explained it this way: “We were always worried that if Chico History Museum: 141 Salem St., 891-4336, we insisted on [our share of] the chicohistorymuseum.org money, the Far West board would Open Thurs.-Sun., 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

turn to another group to run the museum.” “That was like the elephant in the room,” said Dianne Donoho, a CHM board member. “It was heartbreaking to think that Far West wouldn’t help us.” After all, CHM board members say, the endowment fund was created well before FWHA existed and was originally meant to benefit only the Chico Museum. The negotiations were amicable, the board members report, but only so long as they did not insist on being given a percentage of the endowment fund. (A message left with FWHA seeking comment was not returned.) The decision not to challenge the loss of access to the endowment

fund was also an indication of the directors’ confidence that they could run the museum as an all-volunteer enterprise. So far it seems to be working. The museum now features an extensive exhibit, called “Chico Through Time,” that includes several displays focused on historically significant events (the filming of The Adventures of Robin Hood), families (a nice spread on the pioneering Moreheads) and buildings (“Chico’s Grand Hotels”). Also featured are displays illustrating the Chico Army Airfield; logging, flumes and the Diamond Match Co.; the Butte County Railroad; Chico schools; and much more, including, of course, John and Annie Bidwell. The museum will now focus entirely on Chico and let the Patrick Museum speak for the history of farming in the area. Randy Taylor has taken on much of the curatorial work, in part because his personal collection of historic photos and artifacts is so large, but also because he is so knowledgeable. He is joined in that role by fellow board member Dave Nopel, who is the caretaker of the huge collection his late father, John Nopel, created. The museum is also on good terms with Special Collections at Chico State University, which has a vast digital collection of photos and documents. The exhibits will be changed frequently, Taylor said. “We’re always doing something to keep it fresh.” The group also has big long-term plans for the historic Carnegie library building to increase its useable space on the main floor as well as in the basement. Right now, the goal is to keep the museum’s doors open and raise money. It has a five-year, dollar-a-year lease with the city, which owns the building, and “we need to make sure sure it comes out healthy” when the lease is up, Betty Nopel said. “We live in a very special place,” Kao said. “It’s important that we know and celebrate its history.” —ROBERT SPEER rob e r t s pe e r@new srev i ew.c o m

Volunteer Jim Johnson talks with a visitor at Chico History Museum about the city’s historic hotels, featured in its exhibit “Chico Through Time.” PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

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Patrick Ranch Museum

Patrick Ranch serves as an “interactive agricultural and natural history learning center.” Its stately Glenwood Farmhouse, built in 1877, houses the indoor museum, but the expansive acreage surrounding it boasts all the trappings of a working farm, including antique tractors and outbuildings, bucolic fields and a chicken coop. Open Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., from mid-February through December. 10381 Midway, Durham, 342-4359, patrickranchmuseum.org

Pioneer History Museum

Opened in 1932, this museum is an ode to everything that came to the region before it, including a large collection of Native American artifacts in addition to items from some of Butte County’s Gold Rush towns. 2332 Montgomery St., Oroville, 538-2497

Stansbury Home

This gleaming-white Victorian home, built in 1883, sits at the corner of West Fifth and Salem streets. This is Chico’s most well-preserved example of late-19th century Italianate architecture. Hours: Sat.-Sun., 1-4 p.m. 307 W. Fifth St., 895-3848, stansburyhome.org

Yankee Hill Historical Society Museum

Formed in 2002, the society calls the Messilla Valley School, built in 1856, its home base. It’s also the site of a well-maintained museum and community center. The society also has a great website with historical videos and links to old newspaper stories. 11666 Concow Road, Yankee Hill, yankeehillhistory.com

Yuba Feather Museum and Gold Trader Flat

This indoor-outdoor museum offers a variety of exhibits based on early life in the region and includes genealogical information as well. The flat, outdoors, is a replica Gold Rush town, complete with schoolhouse, church, saloon and jailhouse. 19096 New York Flat Road, Forbestown, 675-1025

Archives and research Butte County Hall of Records

Maintained by the county. 155 Nelson Ave., Oroville

Butte County Library

Various locations, buttecounty.net/bclibrary

Chico Heritage Association

History of buildings and people. City directories, newspapers from 1897-1952, fire maps. Plus a regular schedule of speakers and local history walks. Open Mon.-Thurs., noon-3 p.m. 225 Main St., Ste. D (inside the Garden Walk mall), chicoheritage.net

Meriam Library Special Collections

Extensive collection of photographs, maps and manuscripts. Meriam Library 305, Chico State campus, 898-6342, library.csuchico.edu/specialcollections

Paradise Genealogical Society

Thousands of books and periodical articles of local genealogical interest. Call for hours. 5587 Scottwood Road, 877-2330, pargenso.org —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Arts &Culture Prince of desert rock, Mdou Moctar. PHOTO BY JEROME FINO

Fretboard nomad North African guitarist and songwriter Mdou Moctar brings desert music to America

SNorth style of the nomadic Tuareg poets who’ve long traversed Africa’s eternally shifting desert landscapes. He also adds ongwriter/guitarist Mdou Moctar sings in the language and

modern elements to his songs through his boundary-pushing style of playing electric guitar and affinity for drum by machines, synthesizers and auto-tuned vocals to Howard craft music that is soothing and hypnotic while Hardee also evoking feelings of longing and loneliness. And Moctar has serious guitar chops. When his three-piece band reaches a peak, his fingers Preview: sweep across the fretboard as nimbly as any Mdou Moctar performs modern rock player. Wednesday, May 23, Moctar is from a small village in Niger, amid 8 p.m, at the Naked Lounge. XDS and the vast, arid expanse of rolling sand dunes, Donald Beaman open. rocky plateaus and ancient river valleys in the Tickets: $10 west-central Sahara Desert. As a child, he taught himself to build and play his own guitars made Naked Lounge 118 W. Second St. from planks of wood. When he was 16 years 487-2634 old, he went to Libya to work and help support nakedloungechico.com his family, met a musician who inspired him, and brought home a real electric guitar—despite living in a place where Western rock instruments are generally frowned upon. “My family is a religious family,” he said with a heavy accent during a recent phone interview. “It’s no problem now that I’m older, but when I was young, my family did not like the music. [Religious people] there think a lot of musicians are maybe doing the cocaine and a lot things very bad. A lot of musicians do it, and my mother and my father thought it would be something like that.” With some assistance from a translator, Moctar spoke to the CN&R ahead of his show at Naked Lounge (May 23), one stop in a rigorous tour—30 shows in 40 days—of the U.S. Moctar went on to explain that he didn’t pick up the guitar to pursue a hedonistic rock star lifestyle—far from it. He’s always 22

CN&R

M AY 1 7, 2 0 1 8

viewed music as a means to explore themes of spirituality, religion and the human heart, and to connect with people. “Music is my life,” he said. “I like the music because I send messages to the people. It’s about the education first.” He plays guitar in the traditional Tuareg style of takamba, and also draws influence from the desert-guitar sound—a mix of traditional North and West African music, blues and world music— popularized by groups like renowned Tuareg/Malian ensemble Tinariwen. Moctar’s music became popular in Niger through an underground trading network of cellphones and memory cards, and he traveled to Nigeria in 2008 to record his first album, Anar. In 2015, he co-wrote and starred in a Saharan reworking of Prince’s film Purple Rain, titled Akounak tedalat taha tazoughai or “Rain the Color Blue with a Little Red In It.” His latest album, 2017’s Sousoume Tamachek, was recorded in Portland, Ore., but it sounds a world away. Building circular grooves with quivering guitar lines, Moctar creates a meditative soundtrack that brings to mind desert landscapes. Moctar’s focus now is bringing his music to America and breaking down the ignorant-yet-pervasive notion that all Muslims are terrorists. “I send messages on religion and Islam because people think if you are Muslim, you are [a] terrorist,” he said. “That is not true. We are not the terrorists. Muslims don’t like the terrorists, because they make the religion dangerous. Tuaregs don’t like the terrorists, either. They are different.” Moctar has been encouraged by the responses from American audiences so far, especially since he signed to the record label Sahel Sounds, which features music from West Africa and other artists who are applying new technologies to traditional ideas. “I love the United States better than every place in Europe because the reception is good for me,” he says. “I don’t have any problems here.” Ω

THIS WEEK 17

THU

Special Events POETRY READING: Live poetry, plus refreshments, every third Thursday. Thu, 5/17, 6:30pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St. WORLD BAZAAR SUMMER SALE: Sustainable, fair trade and folk art, inspired summer wardrobe selections, graduation gifts and outdoor living styles from Bali, India, Nepal, Mexico and Guatemala. The sale benefits the museum’s educational mission. Thu, 5/17, 11am. Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology, Chico State.

YMCA GRAND REOPENING: The only YMCA in Butte County reopens its doors following renovations. Ribbon-cutting ceremony, followed by tours and refreshments. Thu,

5/17. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St., Oroville. ymcasuperiorcal.org

Music INSPIRE VOCAL CONCERT: Vocal groups and soloists from Inspire School of Arts & Sciences perform their spring event. Thu, 5/17, 7pm. $5-$8. First Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave.

Theater GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: A group of cutthroat real estate salesmen will go to any lengths to unload parcels of land on unsuspecting buyers in David Mamet’s crackling satire. The top salesman wins a new Cadillac. The loser cleans out his desk. Director Amber Miller leads an excellent cast through this brutal laceration of the American Dream, which won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for drama. Thu, 5/17, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

18

FRI

Special Events FORK IN THE ROAD: More than a dozen food trucks, Duffy’s beer garden and music from the Alice Peak Project. Fri, 5/18, 5:30pm. DeGarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.


PHOTO BY THERESA THOMPSON VIA FLICKR

FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE REGISTER TO VOTE

Primary Deadline: Monday, May 21 registertovote.ca.gov SEE MONDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

HARVEY MILK DAY

Tuesday, May 22 Trinity United Methodist Church SEE TUESDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS to benefit Sherwood Montessori Charter School. Kids are free. Sat 5/19, 4pm. $15-$25. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. 530345-6600. sherwoodstock.org

SPRING OPEN: See Friday. Sat 5/19. Chico Racquet Club, 1629 Manzanita Ave.

Music CATURDAY BRUNCH: The House Cats provide the soundtrack to your champagne brunch. Sat, 5/19, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: See Thursday. Sat, 5/19, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

WAR OF THE WORLDS: Inspire students offer a sneak preview of their adaptation of the H.G. Wells classic. Sat, 5/19, 7pm. $10. Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, 335 W. Sacramento Ave.

20

SUN GISELLE: Northern California Ballet presents the crown jewel of Romance-period Russian ballets, a haunting and tender masterpiece that spins the tragic story of a young peasant girl who falls for the flirtations of a deceitful nobleman. Fri, 5/18, 7:15pm. $15$20. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. 530-872-1719. northerncaliforniaballet.com

KINDER MORGAN PROTEST: One of the largest fossil fuel companies in the United States, Kinder Morgan’s transfer terminal holds thousands of barrels of petroleum products.

CHICO VINYL EXCHANGE Sunday, May 20 Blackbird

SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Our city takes on the risks of pollution and the potential for a toxic disaster. Protest organized by the Chico Progressive Advocates. Fri, 5/18, 12pm. Kinder Morgan, 2570 Hegan Lane.

SPRING OPEN: Annual tennis tournament with singles, doubles and mixed events. Runs May 18-20. $40 to enter and free to watch. Fri, 5/18. Chico Racquet Club, 1629 Manzanita Ave.

WINE IN THE PINES: Shops and vendors will be offering specials, wine tasting and other delectable fare. Fri, 5/18, 5pm. $25-$35. Skyway, between Birch & Wildwood roads, Paradise. ParadiseChamber.com

Theater GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: See Thursday. Fri, 5/18, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

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SAT

Special Events BLUE OAK SCHOOL’S MAY FAIRE: Maypole dance, food, live music, local vendors and crafts to support the school. Sat 5/19, 10am. Blue Oak School, 450 W. East Ave.

BUNCO IN THE BARN: Bonkers for bunco? Come roll dice at the ranch and enjoy a tasty lunch. Sat 5/19, 10am. $10. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham. patrickranchmuseum.org

CHICO HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE SHOW: Science is awesome! Check out experiments from local students. Sat 5/19, 2:30pm & 6:30pm. $3-$4. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave.

DEMOCRATIC ACTION CLUB OF CHICO LUNCHEON: Meet local candidates, enjoy Mexican food and help raise funds for the Democratic campaign headquarters. If you’re wondering how to get involved in progressive politics, the DACC is a good place to start. Sat 5/19, 11am. $35. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

DINNER IN THE GARDEN: Sierra Nevada serves up an estate garden dinner, complete with Sierra Nevada beer pairings. A great option for graduation. Sat 5/19, 6:30pm. $75. Sierra Nevada Estate Garden, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

GISELLE: See Friday. Sat 5/19, 2:15pm & 7:15pm. $15-$20. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. (530) 872-1719. northerncaliforniaballet.com

LOWER PARK NIGHT HIKE: Experience a completely different park and nighttime animals during this leisurely two-hour stroll under a crescent moon. Sat 5/19, 9:30pm. Free. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

PAWS ON THE PATIO: Free tastings for your canine friends from TrailBlazer Pet Supply. Sat 5/19. Bidwell Perk, 664 E. First Ave. SHERWOODSTOCK FAMILY FUN FESTIVAL: Food trucks, drinks, fun games and activities, and music from The Alice Peake Experience, Velvet Starlings, Dial Up Days and Delta Sonic

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events CHICO VINYL EXCHANGE: For crate diggers and those who love them. Buy, sell and trade records on the patio, plus DJ sets by Crackers Actually, HC Jherri, Ayejay and DJ the Rev. Junkyard Loomdog. Sun, 5/20, 10am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SHAVUOT & PENTECOST DINNER: Join the Hebraic Heritage Community for a delicious Mexican biblically kosher dinner. Sun, 5/20. $10. 710 Tehama St., Orland.

SPRING OPEN: See Friday. Sun, 5/20. Chico Racquet Club, 1629 Manzanita Ave.

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

GHOST DANCER Massively popular upon its 1841 premiere and an enduring triumph among the classical ballet canon, Giselle tells the otherworldly tale of a beautiful peasant girl and her bravery beyond the grave. After falling in love with Duke Albrecht, Giselle learns that he is already betrothed to another. She dies of heartbreak and finds herself in the netherworld enlisted into the Wilis, a ghostly army of jilted maidens forced to haunt the forest. In a final act of undiminished love, Giselle is able to both spare her lover and release the Wilis from their burden. Northern California Ballet performs this classic Friday and Saturday, May 18-19, at the Paradise Performing Arts Center.

M AY 1 7, 2 0 1 8

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TOUR DE CHOCOLATE: Eight, 15 and 20-mile bicycle routes through the pines and up to Paradise Lake, followed by lunch in the park. Part of Paradise Chocolate Fest. Sun, 5/20, 8pm. $10-$25. Paradise Community Park, Paradise. chocolatefest.us

21

MON

Special Events BEYOND THE BIRDHOUSE: CHS seniors will be selling all kinds of cool woodworking projects to benefit their Sober Grad Night. Event opens with a silent auction, followed by live bidding for furniture, dog houses and more. Mon, 5/21, 5:30pm. Chico High School, Lincoln Center, 901 Esplanade.

CALIFORNIA OPIOID SUMMIT: An opioid epidemic is ravaging our country and is a key factor in our growing homelessness crisis. Butte County is certainly not immune. Community health officials will hear from experts on opioid addiction and treatment strategies, and learn what is being done to combat opioid issues during this two-day training event. Mon, 5/21, 8:30am. Free. Bell Memorial Union, Chico State, 400 W. First St. 530-891-2891.

22

TUE

HARVEY MILK DAY: Stonewall Alliance hosts speakers and musicians to pay tribute to Harvey Milk, the first openly gay elected official in California. The event highlights local LGBTQ community members sharing their thoughts on Milk’s message, the mark he made on history and the battles he fought. Free and open to all. Tue, 5/22, 6pm. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St. 530893-3336. stonewallchico.org

INSTRUCTIONAL GROUP RIDE: Want to take part in group rides, but unsure of the etiquette? Bring your whip and get the skinny during this fun, laid-back ride. Route is flat and approximately 16-20 miles. Tue, 5/22, 5:45pm. Free. AMain Cycling, 2070 E. 20th Street, Suite 100.

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SEE MUSEUMS

to register in the June 5 primary election. Register by midnight on May 21! Mon,

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Wednesday, May 23 Gold Nugget Museum

5/21. registertovote.ca.gov

CALIFORNIA OPIOID SUMMIT: See Monday. Tue, 5/22, 5pm. Free. Bell Memorial Union, Chico

This is Officer Draper of the CHP on Thursday afternoon, May 10th on Highway 70 near Oroville, changing the tire of an elderly person as cars sped by. Thank you, Officer Draper, this could have been my mom and dad.

TATTOOS: THE HISTORY OF BODY INK

REGISTER TO VOTE - PRIMARY DEADLINE: Deadline

Special Events

24

FINE ARTS

B O U T IQ U E

COngratulatiOns Graduates!

Servicing Chico & the Surrounding area since 1982

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

23

WED

Special Events THINGS MY FATHER TAUGHT ME: Awards program for the Chico Heritage Association featuring a talk from Bud Tracy, who has renovated historic buildings in the county and whose father built Eastwood Park. Wed, 5/23, 7pm. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 26

Art

Museums

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING, PARADISE:

BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Memories

Jim Lawrence’s abstract art on display in the Social Hall. Exhibit covers over 20 years of his work. Through 5/31. 789 Bille Road, Paradise., 530-877-5673.

CHICO ART CENTER: Bodies In Motion, juried exhibition challenges the way we look at dance traditions by highlighting diverse forms of movement, cultural fusion and trends around the world. Through 5/25. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Ink & Clay, juried student print exhibition showcases outstanding student work in printmaking, complemented by corresponding works of excellence in ceramics. Through 5/19. Free. 400 W. First St., 530-898-4476.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: MONCA Honors Our Veterans, the museum welcomes 25+ vets to share paintings, ceramics, drawings, sculpture and more. Check the website for special events including films, panels and workshops. Through 5/27. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Dancing to Different Tunes, mother and daughter Pat Vought and Alyson Mucci display their diverse works. Through 5/19. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

PARADISE ART CENTER: Wild, wildfire, wilderness, wild nights, wild in the streets. Multiformat show brings wild perspectives into the gallery. Through 5/26. 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

SATORI HAIR SALON: Faded Glory Photographs of Havana, Michael Goloff’s photographs of Cuban buildings and street scenes. Through 5/31. Free. 627 Broadway, Suite 120, 530-5146264. michaelgoloffphotography.com

of War, Vietnam veteran Ron MacInnes presents two short documentary films he produced while working with the WWII Veterans Memorial Project. Plus, permanent tool exhibits. 5/19 at 10am. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. Through 12/15. 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Closed for installation of new exhibits. Reopens May 25. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: Tattoos The Art of Body Ink, the history of circus, military, jailhouse and current popular tattoos, along with information on the tattoo process. Through 5/23. $5-$10. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise, 530-8728722. goldnuggetmuseum.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Imprisoned at Home, excellent and enlightening exhibit on Japanese Americans held at the Tule Lake Incarceration Camp during WWII. Through 5/18. Chico State, 530-898-5397.


SCENE

a high note

SPRING 2018 STRAWBERRY MUSIC FESTIVAL May 24th - 28th | Nevada CouNty FairgrouNds, grass valley Ca taJ Mahal, luKas NelsoN & ProMise oF the real, dave alviN & JiMMie dale gilMore, aNders osBorNe & JaCKie greeNe, todd sNider, ghost oF Paul revere, liNdsay lou, aNd MaNy More!

Symphony’s Masterworks series ends with Tchaikovsky’s grand No. 5

music ∙ camping ∙ food FOR THE FULL LINEUP OR TO BUY TICKETS VISIT WWW.straWBerryMusiC.CoM or M-F, 9-5 Call (209) 984-8630

NSeaton Director and conductor Scott is a teacher and a showman orth State Symphony Artistic

as well as a musician. He does all he can, musically and otherwise, to engage his audiences and help them appreciate symphonic music. Like his predecessor, Kyle Wylie Pickett, he offers free preconcert discussions of each program. He goes a step further, however, by hooking up a projector to YouTube and showing video snippets of other musicians playing the pieces the North State by Symphony will Robert Speer be playing in just rober tspe er@ a few minutes. newsrev iew.c om Saturday evening (May 12) in Laxson Review: Auditorium we north State saw a snippet of, Symphony: as Fate Would have It, for example, the Saturday, May 12, late Jacqueline Laxson auditorium. du Pré attacking the dirge-like opening chords of Edward Elgar’s Cello Concerto in E Minor, with a young Daniel Barenboim, her husband, conducting. Another snippet featured the late, great Leonard Bernstein conducting Tchaikovsky’s monumental Symphony No. 5 in E Minor. In both cases, Seaton explained the dynamics of the pieces—what the composer was trying to say and how he went about it—in a way that prepared audience members for the live performances. He also used it as a way to introduce his guest cellist, Evan Kahn. Seaton often uses the program’s intermission, after the audience has reassembled, to talk about the concluding piece—in this case the Tchaikovsky symphony—using

Scott Seaton, conductor and artistic director of the North State Symphony. Photo by SeSar Sanchez

the orchestra to illustrate his comments. Saturday evening he paid particular attention to the symphony’s opening motive, explaining that it represents a kind of fatalistic self-doubt and depression that had led Tchaikovsky to believe he no longer could compose. Then Seaton had the full orchestra play a snippet from the fourth and final movement, in which that same troubling motive has been transformed into joyous optimism. “Watch for it,” he told the audience. The evening’s program, called

As Fate Would Have It, began with a delightful warm-up piece, the Russian composer Mikhail Glinka’s “Overture” to his opera Ruslan and Lyudmila, which premiered in 1842. The opera is rarely performed these days, but the spirited “Overture” is very popular. In his notes to the North State Symphony’s concert program, Theodore Bell points out that Glinka wrote of finding inspiration at a dinner party, where “the clattering of knives, forks and plates made such an impression on me that I had the idea to imitate them on the prelude to Ruslan.” “Overture” lasts only four minutes, but it’s so lively and fun that one wishes it lasted longer, especially when played with such sprightliness. It was followed by the Elgar cello concerto, featuring guest soloist Kahn. A native of Los Angeles, Kahn now lives in San

Francisco and performs with several Bay Area chamber and orchestral groups, including Symphony Silicon Valley, where he is principal soloist. He acknowledged during the preconcert discussion that this was the first time he’d performed the Elgar concerto since high school. That didn’t seem to limit him, however, as he offered a rhapsodic but precise take on this sometimes melancholic but always moving mainstay of the cello repertoire. He received a welldeserved standing ovation. As good as the concerto was, the Tchaikovsky symphony was the star of the evening. Seaton had warned that it was big, both in sound and number of musicians, and he wasn’t fooling. For Seaton, it must have seemed like they were wrestling a Russian bear to the ground. In his program notes, Bell describes the symphony well, writing that it is “characteristically evocative with large, emotive contrasts blended together with brilliantly nuanced timbres and swept along in a graceful, perpetual motion.” Seaton is an athletic conductor, one who uses his full body as well as his arms and baton to drive the music forward, and this symphony was a workout. The result was an altogether magnificent performance by conductor and orchestra alike. It too garnered a standing ovation and was a perfect finale for the season. Ω

Join us in our EstatE GardEn for a familystylE dinnEr, focusEd on our EstatE producE, world class bEEr and Good chEEr.

M ay 1 7, 2 0 1 8

CN&R

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDay 5/17—WEDNESDay 5/23 COUNTRY MILE: Country classics and modern pop favorites from Merle to Miranda. Fri, 5/18, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

WaILING SOULS Thursday, May 17 Lost on Main

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Chuck Epperson Jr. Band rocks the plaza. Fri, 5/18, 7pm. Free. City Plaza.

SEE THURSDay

KELLY TWINS: All-request dueling 7:45pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

SUDS & MIKE.ILL: Super bass, trance

and dope remixes. Thu, 5/17, 9pm. $10-$13. Panama Bar Café, 177

E. Second St.

17THURSDay

DIAL UP DAYS, ELWOOD & THREE DAY RUNNER: Alternative and indie

rock. Thu, 5/17, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

HOT POTATO: Retro-swing gypsy jazz trio, plus original songs by Stevie Cook and Diane Garner. Thu, 5/17, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 530 891-3354.

JAZZ NIGHT: The Chico Jazz Collective

gets down. Thu, 5/17, 7pm. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

KELLY TWINS ACOUSTIC: Jon and Chris dust off some old favorites with an

acoustic evening of “living room” music. Thu, 5/17, 6pm. Two Twenty Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St.

OPEN MIC: An open mic hosted by Andan Casamajor on the third Thursday of the month. Thu, 5/17, 6pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

OPEN MIC AT THE LIBRARY: Share everything from haiku to sonnets, short stories to autobiographies, and folk songs to instrumental guitar pieces. Thu, 5/17, 7pm. Chico Library, 1108 Sherman Ave., 530-891-2726.

SCARLET PUMPS: Full night of catchy hooks, old favorites and songs from the band’s latest album. Thu, 5/17,

WAILING SOULS: Jah give us life! Kingston legends bring their wallshakin’ reggae to Main Street. Thu, 5/17, 8pm. $13. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

18FRIDay

lounge. Fri, 5/18, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

CAREY ROBINSON: Singer-songwriter,

plus tasty eats from Gnarly Deli. Fri, 5/18, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville. purple linewinery.com

Moonalice is a supergroup par excellence featuring drummer John Molo, guitarists Barry Sless and Roger McNamee, and Pete Sears on bass and keys. Individually, they’ve played with everyone from Bruce Hornsby and John Fogerty to Phil Lesh and Rod Stewart. You’ll hear original tunes, several recognizable covers and a handful of extended jams during the band’s freewheeling concert at the Chico Women’s Club on Sunday, May 20. The show is a KZFR fundraiser.

pianos show with Jon and Chris in the lounge. Fri, 5/18, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

KENNY FRYE BAND: Pop country and classic favorites from this Sacramento quintet. Fri, 5/18, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

LOCAL SHOWCASE: Rock ’n’ roll with Rigmarole, Brother and Elwood of Chico. Fri, 5/18, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts music, comedy,

AUDIOBOXX: Classic rock in the

JaM aLL-STaRS

poetry and more. Fri, 5/18, 6pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main Street. lostonmainchico.com

SOUL SCRATCH: Funky, driving rhythms and a ripping horn section from this retro L.A. outfit, plus an opening set from local trippers GravyBrain. Fri, 5/18, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

TOUGH LOVE: Classic rock and country hits with a modern twist. Fri, 5/18,

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9pm. Free. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise., 530-877-7100.

YURKOVIC: Lo-fi swamp blues. Fri, 5/18,

8pm. $5. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

TYLER DEVOLL: Happy hour tunes. Fri, 5/18, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway

St.

YBN NAHMIR: Underground hip-hop, plus sets from Akarii The Assassin, Squid Squad, Shogun Joseph and Matty Aston. Fri, 5/18, 9pm. $22.50. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmax productions.net

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The CN&R’s annual Entrepreneur Issue will be on stands June 21. Tell your entrepreneurial story to our nearly 118,000 readers with a profile in this issue. For more information about how to participate, call your News & Review advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTaINMENT aND SPECIaL EVENTS ON PaGE 22 BLACK FONG: John McKinley and Co.

OPEN MIC TWOFER: The evening kicks

school you on how to get down! Funk, soul and R&B classics, plus sprawling originals. Sat, 5/19, 8pm. $5. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave., 530-321-9534. unwinedchico.com

CULTS & XDS

BLUE HIPPIES: Upbeat originals and fun cover tunes in the lounge from this Chico party band. Sat, 5/19, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

BRAD PETERSEN BAND: Americana and rock. Sat, 5/19, 9pm. Free. White Water Saloon, 5571 Clark Road, Paradise., 530-877-7100.

CHICAGO THE TRIBUTE: Rock ’n’ horns. Yes, “25 or 6 to 4” still rules. Sat, 5/19, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DRAG SHOW: Get your drag on and

dance! Sat, 5/19, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

THE FRITZ: Salsa, latin, rock and

funk. Sat, 5/19, 6pm. $5. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham., 530-343-6893.

LONE STAR JUNCTION: Outlaw coun-

try trio from Humboldt. Sat, 5/19, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

Sunday, May 20 Sierra Nevada Big Room ROBERT OTEY: Singersongwriter, scientist and author performs. Sat, 5/19. Rock House Dining & Espresso, 11865 Highway 70, Yankee Hill.

RUNNING IN THE SHADOWS: Get out your scarves and chiffon for this Fleetwood Mac tribute. Sat, 5/19, 8:30pm. Ramada Plaza Chico, 685 Manzanita Court.

20SUNDay

CULTS: Noir bedroom pop duo turns up the sunshine on its latest album, with lush arrangements and catchy hooks. Local tight board shorts aficionados and freak-out artists XDS open the gig. Sun, 5/20, 8:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

SEE SUNDay

off with Jimmy Reno’s musical open mic, followed by a comedy session until midnight. Mondays are bring your own mug, so you can get up to 40 oz. of Sierra Nevada for five bucks. Mon, 5/21, 6pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

23WEDNESDay

BLUES JAM: Hosted by Mora Sounds

MOONALICE: Psych-rock supergroup featuring Barry Sless (Phil Lesh & Friends), Pete Sears (Rod Stewart), John Molo (Bruce Hornsby) and Roger McNamee (Doobie Decibel System). Sun, 5/20, 7:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

NEIGHBORHOOD BARBER-Q: Barber get together with beer from Secret Trail and meat from Chico Locker & Sausage, plus King Tommy spins surf, soul and reggae. Sun, 5/20. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

21MONDay

GAME NIGHT: Play board games and

eat pizza. All ages and skill levels invited. Mon, 5/21, 6pm. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St.

and featuring Franky Z and Mojo Trinity. Wed, 5/23, 6pm. Ramada Plaza Chico, 685 Manzanita Court.

SCUZZ ’N’ FUZZ

Arkansas psych-rock crew Ten High (pictured) is on the road with Salt Lake City garage thumpers Brain Bagz and the bands hit our burg for a night of sleazy rock vibes, cheap beer and rad times. Ten High’s latest album, Self Entitled, includes a pack of three-minute bangers that would make the Gories proud, while Brain Bagz holds up The Cramps’ end of the bargain. They play the Maltese on Wednesday, May 23, with lo-fi pop band Similar Alien and local creepoids Bad Mana.

DUFFY’S DANCE NIGHT: DJ Lois and Amburgers spin funk, pop and hiphop. Wed, 5/23, 10pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

GARAGE ROCK: Get out of your head with Bad Mana, Brain Bagz (SLC), Ten High (Fayetteville, Ark.) and Similar Alien. Wed, 5/23, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebar chico.com

MDOU MOCTAR: Desert rock (the West African variety, not Kyuss), plus XDS and Donald Beaman and the Spirit Molecules. Wed, 5/23, 8pm. $10. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only open mic, all musicians get two songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed, 5/23, 7pm. $2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise, 530-877-4995.

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Ryan Reynolds returns as the wisecracking badass to form X-Force, a team of “morally flexible” mutants that’ll do whatever it takes to protect a young mutant boy from some other mutants. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

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Documentary on the life of 25-year Supreme Court justice and pop-culture icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

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Real dogs get human voices (Ludacris, RuPaul, Shaq!) in this comedy about a crimefighting Rottweiler who goes undercover at a dog show to stop an animal-smuggling ring. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

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Melissa McCarthy stars in this comedy about a divorcée who returns to college, joining her college-aged daughter in class and the party scene. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Overboard

The male and female roles that Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell made famous in the 1987 version of this comedy are flipped with Eugenio Derbez playing the rich jerk with amnesia and Anna Faris as the blue-collar worker with life lessons to impart. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

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John Krasinski directed, co-wrote and stars—he’s Lee, a father trying to protect his family in a post-apocalyptic world besieged by horrific aliens who will tear you apart if you make so much as a peep. The aliens don’t respond to regular ambient sounds—a river running, birds chirping—but rather sounds that are more interruptive, like fireworks or a person screaming after stepping on a nail. The gimmick lends itself to some faulty logic at times, but it does provide an overall interesting premise. Playing Lee’s wife Evelyn, Emily Blunt gives a standout performance as somebody forced to keep quiet in especially difficult circumstances—e.g., after a painful injury, or giving birth in a bathtub while an alien clicks and claws nearby. And Krasinski complements his impressive directing chops with a fine performance as a guy doing everything to keep his sanity and protect his family, including a young deaf daughter (played by the superb Millicent Simmonds, who is actually deaf) and son (Noah Jupe). Both of the kids are terrific here. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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Craft cidermakers add pineapples to the mix

IoverBut,thehappily, cider is changing. Cidermakers all country are following in the footsteps of craft remember when it used to be all about the apples.

brewers by looking beyond traditional ingredients and incorporating a wide variety of fruits, spices and other ingredients into their by Alastair products. Hops, ginger, jalapeños, tea, Bland coconut, grapefruit, rose petals and cactus flesh have all found their way into ciders recently. But more than any other single added ingredient, pineapple (among my favorite fruits) seems to be having its day. At the recent San Francisco Cider Summit, the annual cider tasting held in the Presidio, pineapple-infused apple ciders flowed from taps and bottles in all directions. Schilling Cider, from Washington state, was pouring its Passport Pineapple and Passionfruit. Jester & Judge, also from Washington, was offering a cider called Pineapple Express. New West Cider, from Portland, Ore., had a pina colada cider. Reverend Nat’s, also of Portland, was pouring Viva la Pineapple! I saw one cider called Pineapple Macaroon (I think it also had coconut), and another named Pineapple Paradise. I tasted one made with pineapples that had been grilled before going into the pot. Sadly, I can’t say I could distinctly taste pineapple in that one, though the owners certainly went to some trouble to make the stuff. Ace Cider, in Sebastopol, makes what it claims on its website to be the “first pineapple cider developed in the world.” Golden State Cider, also based in Sebastopol and rapidly growing into one of the state’s best-known cider brands, also has a new pineapple cider out in cans, but it won’t be around for long. Called Radical Paradise, the cider is fermented with apples, fresh

pineapple and cinnamon sticks, and the company is already sold out. Look for whatever is left in fourpacks at your better craft-beverage outlets. Jolie Devoto, co-founder of Golden State, told me the pineapples—fresh and ground—were added after fermentation of the apple juice. “We let the bin sit open air overnight, and then pressed it the next day and blended it into dry cider,” she says. “After that, we topped off the carbonation and packaged it.” The pineapples give an acidic, spicy zest to the dry cider, though the flavor is subtle. An acidic blend of apples, one might speculate, could produce much the same effect. Pineapples are finding their way into craft breweries, too. The iconic tropical fruit is appearing in IPAs, sours and saisons. There have even been a surprisingly large, though widely scattered, number of pineapple stouts—the strangest sounding style I have yet to taste in the craft beer kingdom. Cigar City Brewing, in Tampa, Fla., once made a Rum French Oak Pineapple Cocoa Stout. (Read that twice if you need to.) Storm Brewing in British Columbia made a pineapple chocolate stout. Tacoma Brewing Co. once made an oak-aged pineapple stout. Online reviews indicated the pineapple could not be tasted. I suppose some consumers are comforted just knowing they are eating, or drinking, pineapple. IPAs are a natural fit for pineapple, and one of the more notable Nor Cal selections is the Pineapple Shake hazy IPA made by San Francisco’s Bare Bottle Brewing Co. After all, fruity hops are wildly popular, and tropical fruits of many sorts are often added to hop-heavy styles to complement the flavors. Thus, it’s not surprising to see pineapple finding its way into cider and beer, even though we can’t always tell that it’s there. □


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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

DOLLAR RAP Arts DEVO and the poodle Honey were walking the downtown

lunch loop last week and unbeknownst to us, it was Freestyle Friday. Luckily, we ran into Waldough West on the corner of Second and Broadway and he was offering up raps for cash. I had $1, and in exchange, the Sac MC spit about a minute of smooth freestyle and gave Honey some dap as we went on our way. His best line? “I went to rehab to relax/when I got out I relapsed.” Dang, wish I’d had more cash on me. Stay strong, WW. #freestylefridayforeva

OUT WITH THE OLD ART The Beatles mural

is gone. Many people are pissed about it. Personally, I always thought it was kind of cheesy to have a copy of a British band’s album cover on a Chico wall. It was an advertisement for the different music stores that used to occupy the Main Street space, but its emergence as an iconic local mural never made sense to me. Now, if it had been a painting of some local musicians—maybe local faves the Mother Hips—I’d be on board. Downtown bar kingpin Will Brady’s latest venture is going in on the other side of the now blank wall, and he says a new, different mural will be put up in its place. Might I suggest an extended Mount Rushmore of Chico Waldough West tunesmiths? How about Tim Bluhm, Moriss Taylor, Barbara Manning, Danny Cohen and Sourdough Slim? I’d bet the original mural’s artist, Gregg Payne, would be down for the commission!

IN WITH THE NEW ART Some fresh art in

our little city this week:

• Art at the Upper Crust: Badass local photographer and heavy-metal videographer Michelle Camy also dabbles in other media, and a new show of her painted and silk-screened works is on display at the downtown cafe. My fave is probably “Amaraok Wolf” (No. 2 in a series of four), a print on wood of a striking woman-and-wolf portrait. Exhibit shows through May. • Art at the Municipal Building: A new César Chavez painting just went up in the lobby of the third floor of City Hall. “Si, Se Puede” (“Yes, you can”), by Will Mobley and Shannon “Shay” Taylor—was painted as part of J. Pouwels’ public mural course “Amarok Wolf,” by Michelle Camy at Chico State and features the labor leader’s portrait against a backdrop of farm fields, the university campus and the black eagle of the United Farm Workers flag. • Art at the Matador: Once again, Mrs. DEVO and I found more amazing art than we could afford at the annual art expo. The best were the incredible, magical woodprints of local artist David Plant. We settled on only one— “The Tree of Life” (other versions were titled “The Secret Garden”) with birds and butterflies and a dignified owl enjoying the fruits of a big tree— but I need more. I have my eye on a big Noah’s Ark piece with a spouting white whale swimming alongside. Find “David Plant Art” on Facebook.

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“The Tree of Life,” by David Plant

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF May 17, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my assessment of the astrological omens, your duty right now is to be a brave observer and fair-minded intermediary and honest storyteller. Your people need you to help them do the right thing. They require your influence in order to make good decisions. So if you encounter lazy communication, dispel it with your clear and concise speech. If you find that foggy thinking has started to infect important discussions, inject your clear and concise insights.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A chem-

ist named Marcellus Gilmore Edson got a patent on peanut butter in 1894. A businessperson named George Bayle started selling peanut butter as a snack in 1894. In 1901, a genius named Julia David Chandler published the first recipe for a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. In 1922, another pioneer came up with a new process for producing peanut butter that made it taste better and last longer. In 1928, two trailblazers invented loaves of sliced bread, setting the stage for the ascension of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich to its full glory. According to my analysis, Taurus, you’re partway through your own process of generating a very practical marvel. I suspect you’re now at a phase equivalent to Julia David Chandler’s original recipe. Onward! Keep going!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of the

most popular brands of candy in North America is Milk Duds. They’re irregularly shaped globs of chocolate caramel. When they were first invented in 1926, the manufacturer’s plan was to make them perfect little spheres. But with the rather primitive technology available at that time, this proved impossible. The finished products were blobs, not globes. They tasted good, though. Workers jokingly suggested that the new confection’s name include “dud,” a word meaning “failure” or “flop.” Having sold well now for more than 90 years, Milk Duds have proved that success doesn’t necessarily require perfection. Who knows? Maybe their dud-ness has been an essential part of their charm. I suspect there’s a metaphorical version of Milk Duds in your future, Gemini.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my

vision of your life in the coming weeks, you’re hunting for the intimate power that you lost a while back. After many twists and trials, you find it almost by accident in a seemingly unimportant location, a place you have paid little attention to for a long time. When you recognize it, and realize you can reclaim it, your demeanor transforms. Your eyes brighten, your skin glows, your body language galvanizes. A vivid hope arises in your imagination: how to make that once-lost, now-rediscovered power come alive again and be of use to you in the present time.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The etymological

dictionary says that the English slang word “cool” meant “calmly audacious” as far back as 1825. The term “groovy” was first used by jazz musicians in the 1930s to signify “performing well without grandstanding.” “Hip,” which was originally “hep,” was also popularized by the jazz community. It meant, “informed, aware, up-to-date.” I’m bringing these words to your attention because I regard them as your words of power in the coming weeks. You can be and should be as hip, cool, and groovy as you have been in a long time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hope you will seek out influences that give you grinning power over your worries. I hope you’ll be daring enough to risk a breakthrough in service to your most demanding dream. I hope you will make an effort to understand yourself as your best teacher might understand you. I hope you will find out how to summon more faith in yourself—a faith not rooted in lazy wishes but in a rigorous self-assessment. Now here’s my prediction: You will fulfill at least one of my hopes, and probably more.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Polish

pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski once per-

by rob brezsny formed for England’s Queen Victoria. Since she possessed that bygone era’s equivalent of a backstage pass, she was able to converse with him after the show. “You’re a genius,” she told him, having been impressed with his artistry. “Perhaps, Your Majesty,” Paderewski said. “But before that I was a drudge.” He meant that he had labored long and hard before reaching the mastery the Queen attributed to him. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Libras are currently in an extended “drudge” phase of your own. That’s a good thing! Take maximum advantage of this opportunity to slowly and surely improve your skills.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The an-

cient Greek poet Simonides was among the first of his profession to charge a fee for his services. He made money by composing verses on demand. On one occasion, he was asked to write a stirring tribute to the victor of a mule race. He declined, declaring that his sensibilities were too fine to create art for such a vulgar activity. In response, his potential patron dramatically boosted the proposed price. Soon thereafter, Simonides produced a rousing ode that included the phrase “wind-swift steeds.” I offer the poet as a role model for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Be more flexible than usual about what you’ll do to get the reward you’d like.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Here’s the operative metaphor for you these days: You’re like a painter who has had a vision of an interesting work of art you could create—but who lacks some of the paint colors you would require to actualize this art. You may also need new types of brushes you haven’t used before. So here’s how I suggest you proceed: Be aggressive in tracking down the missing ingredients or tools that will enable you to accomplish your as-yet imaginary masterpiece.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One

of the saddest aspects of our lives as humans is the disparity between love and romance. Real love is hard work. It’s unselfish, unwavering, and rooted in generous empathy. Romance, on the other hand, tends to be capricious and inconstant, often dependent on the fluctuations of mood and chemistry. Is there anything you could do about this crazy-making problem, Aquarius? Like could you maybe arrange for your romantic experiences to be more thoroughly suffused with the primal power of unconditional love? I think this is a realistic request, especially in the coming weeks. You will have exceptional potential to bring more compassion and spiritual affection into your practice of intimacy.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In accor-

dance with astrological omens, I invite you to dream up new rituals. The traditional observances and ceremonies bequeathed to you by your family and culture may satisfy your need for comfort and nostalgia, but not your need for renewal and reinvention. Imagine celebrating homemade rites of passage designed not for who you once were but for the new person you’ve become. You may be delighted to discover how much power they provide you to shape your life’s long-term cycles. Ready to conjure up a new ritual right now? Take a piece of paper and write down two fears that inhibit your drive to create a totally interesting kind of success for yourself. Then burn that paper and those fears in the kitchen sink while chanting “I am a swashbuckling incinerator of fears!”

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Use-

ful revelations and provocative epiphanies are headed your way. But they probably won’t arrive sheathed in sweetness and light, accompanied by tinkling swells of celestial music. It’s more likely they’ll come barging in with a clatter, bringing bristly marvels and rough hope. In a related matter: At least one breakthrough is in your imminent future. But this blessing is more likely to resemble a wrestle in the mud than a dance on a mountaintop. None of this should be a problem, however! I suggest you enjoy the rugged but interesting fun.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as F.E.W. PRODUCTS at 5050 Cohasset Rd. Unit 50 Chico, CA 95973. LANCE A WALDSMITH 14064 Limousin Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LANCE WALDSMITH Dated: March 27, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000418 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELEVATE at 180 Erma Ct, Suite #130 Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT L NORMAN 2780 Pillsbury Rd 202 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT L. NORMAN JR. Dated: April 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000541 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GREEN BELT MANUFACTURING at 21 Valley Ct Chico, CA 95973. TIMOTHY VANDERHEIDEN 21 Valley Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIMOTHY VANDERHEIDEN Dated: April 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000498 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEYOND FITNESS at 7224 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BEYOND FITNESS CLUB, LLC 7224 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: STEVE GIBSON, MANAGING PARTNER Dated: April 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000500 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 3 DOWNTOWN BARS, 3-DB at 175 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. 3 DOWNTOWN BARS, INC. 177 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSHUA COKER, CFO Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000474 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO EVENT CENTER at 191 E. 2nd St. Suite 3 Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000473 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as UNIVERSITY BAR at 200 Wall St. Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000471 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE BEACH, THE BEACH IN CHICO at 191 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER

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Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000472 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PANAMA BAR CAFE at 177 E. 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MOWRY 3 Crusader Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSHUA COKER Dated: April 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000470 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JP CONSTRUCTION at 6603 Woodward Dr Magalia, CA 95954. JOEL PRENTISS 6603 Woodward Dr Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOEL PRENTISS Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000515 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TWIN DRAGON SERVICES at 999 East Ave Apt C Chico, CA 95926. VICTOR SCOTT RUTTMAN 999 East Ave Apt C Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VICTOR RUTTMAN Dated: April 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000535 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name SALON CONCEPTS at 6607 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BARBARA J RYAN 4333 Pentz Rd 4B Paradise, CA 95969. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: BARBARA RYAN Dated: April 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2016-0001236 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WOOD, WATER AND STONE at 6408 Crossroads Rd Magalia, CA 95954. BRIAN TIMOTHY MARSHALL 6408 Crossroads Rd Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIAN T. MARSHALL Dated: April 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000494 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELITE EXPOSITIONS, EXOTIC BIRD AND ANIMAL MART at 1045 Hazel St Gridley, CA 95948. VAN THI THU NGUYEN 1045 Hazel St Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VAN NGUYEN Dated: March 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000312 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JP ROOFING at 4 Woodrose Ln Chico, CA 95973. JEREMY ALAN PETTERSEN 4 Woodrose Ln Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEREMY PETTERSEN Dated: March 28, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000432 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as J & S OFFICE MAINTENANCE at 2817 Dolphin Bend Chico, CA 95973. JAMES PATRICK RICHARDS 2817 Dolphin Bend Chico, CA 95973. SHAWNA RICHARDS 2817 Dolphin Bend Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JIM RICHARDS Dated: April 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000490 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BAJA BONSAI at 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. JOHN E. MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN MCDONALD Dated: April 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000597 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AFFORDABLE DRONE SERVICES at PO Box 2896 Paradise, CA 95967. SCOTT S PETERSEN 4842 Media Way Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT PETERSEN Dated: April 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000595 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANDERSON TILE at 165 Mission Olive Rd Oroville, CA 95966. MATTHEW DAVID ANDERSON 165 Mission Olive Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT ANDERSON Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000574 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AMERICAN TOTEM, THE REAL ISSUE PRODUCTIONS at 2314 Estes Road Chico, CA 95928. SUZANNE HILDERBRAND 2314 Estes Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SUE HILDERBRAND Dated: April 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000457 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADRIANE ESTHETICS at 568 Manzanita Ave Suite 9 Chico, CA 95926. ADRIANE WESTERDAHL 1648 Normal Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ADRIANE WESTERDAHL Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000568 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GRIDLEY TRAILER PARK at 260 Ohio Street Gridley, CA 95948. JANICE SALL 2195 Robailey Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANICE SALL Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000565 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TRYON VANCOTT AND ASSOCIATES at 257 Tranquil Drive Paradise, CA 95969. ROSE MARIE TRYON 257 Tranquil Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROSE M. TRYON Dated: April 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000548 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEARTSONG WELLNESS STUDIO AND BOUTIQUE at 6311 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. CARMI ELISSA HOOKS 759 Red Hill Way Paradise, CA 95969. KRISTEN NICOLE HORST 701 Kinsey Way Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by

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a General Partnership. Signed: KRISTEN HORST Dated: April 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000587 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE MOBILE VETERINARY PRACTICE at 5610 Feather River Place Paradise, CA 95969. MICHAEL LANE SEELY 5610 Feather River Place Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL L. SEELY Dated: April 10. 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000502 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOCALE COMMERCIAL, LOCALE MANAGEMENT, LOCALE RESIDENTIAL at 242 Broadway Ste 12 Chico, CA 95928. VAUGHT, INC 242 Broadway Ste 12 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN VAUGHT, VAUGHT INC PRESIDENT Dated: April 20, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000552 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as INTERNATIONAL FARM MANAGEMENT at 2233 Nord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JOE T CAMARENA JR. 25725 Moller Ave. Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE CAMARENA Dated: May 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000602 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE at 1815 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. OLIVIA STARR PETERS-LAZARO 11802 Meridian Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: OLIVIA PETERS-LAZARO Dated: April 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000463 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTHERN BITES at 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. RACHEL BALMER 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. DYLAN ROWE 185 Cohasset Lane Apt F Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DYLAN ROWE Dated: April 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000532 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO ART GALLERY, CHICO ART SCHOOL, CHICO ART SCHOOL AND GALLERY, LOMBARDI BLIXT DESIGN at 261 E. 3rd Street Chico, CA 95926. JANET LOMBARDI BLIXT 290 E. Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. THOMAS BLIXT 290 E. Sacramento Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JANET LOMBARDI BLIXT Dated: May 3, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000607 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SISTERS EVENTZ at 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. AMY BLAIR 553 Barbara Paradise, CA 95969. MEGAN LATTA 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: AMY BLAIR Dated: April 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000584 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE BAHAMA HUT at 1008 W Sacramento Ave Suite I Chico, CA 95926. MATTHEW DAVE VERESCHAGIN 6798 State Hwy 32 Orland, CA 95963. DONNA LYNN WETZEL 6798 State Highway 32 Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: DONNA WETZEL Dated: May 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000619 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEAUTY ETERNAL at 1260 East Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95926. NORTHSTATE PLASTIC SURGERY ASSOCIATES INC 1260 East Avenue, Suite 100 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: EMILY HARTMANN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000519 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LATIMER AND KENKEL at 330 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928. DENNIS M LATIMER 320 West Legion Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DENNIS M. LATIMER Dated: April 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000577 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as STICKY ICKY INDUSTRIES at 1518 Broadway Street Basement Chico, CA 95928. PRANA VAJRA JOHNSTON 702 Mangrove Ave #287 Chico, CA 95926. RYAN MCDOUGAL 1474 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PRANA JOHNSTON Dated: May 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000636 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PIPEVINE PLAYHOUSE at 1051 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. KATHLEEN LEE MACHEK 1051 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN L. MACHEK Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000640 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL H2O, BIDWELL WATER, SACRAMENTO VALLEY BOTTLED WATER at 2704 Hegan Ln Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT LEE SMITH 1256 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT SMITH Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000644 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LARABEE ENTERPRISES, MAC TOOLS at 81 Hollis Lane Gridley, CA 95948. DAVID LARABEE 81 Hollis Lane Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID LARABEE Dated: May 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000645 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GOOD EARTH COFFEE AND TEA HOUSE at 980 Oro Dam Blvd E Oroville, CA 95965. RAI TAJ FAMILY LLC 19 Marci Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: RAY TARIQ SAEED AHMAD, MANAGER Dated: May 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000632 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE MEADOWS MHP at 3541 Calle Principal Chico, CA 95973. RANCHO CHICO MHP, LP 3050 Fite Circle, Suite 210 Sacramento, CA 95827.

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This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: ANDY CAREY Dated: April 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000567 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL LOCK AND KEY at 559 Crestwood Drive Paradise, CA 95969. JAMES JOSEPH HAFER 559 Crestwood Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JIM HAFER Dated: April 13, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000516 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. DOLORES DAVENPORT (5X10) #072cc (boxes, furniture) JANET MOON (5X10) #487cc (boxes) JANET MOON (6X10) #506cc (furniture) JAMES FLUD (12x15) #030ss (furniture, boxes, misc. items) DAVID DUNCAN (6X12) #504cc (misc items) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: May 26, 2018 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: May 10,17, 2018

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE IS HEARBY GIVEN that a mobile home, registered to DOUGLAS RAYBURN, interested party DOUGLAS RAYBURN, as described as a 1968 Champion mobile home, Decal Number LAN5447, Serial Number S3325, Label/Insignia number A268773, and stored on property within the Golden Feather MHP, at 703 Oro Dam Blvd. W. Oroville, CA 95965, County of Butte (specifically the space designated as space #106 within the park), May 25, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. and such succeeding sales days as may be necessary, and the proceeds of the sales will be applied to satisfaction of the lien, including the reasonable charges of notice, advertisement, and sale. This sale is conducted on a cash or certified fund basis only (cash, cashier’s check, or traveler’s check only). Personal checks and/or business checks are not acceptable. Payment is due and payable immediately following the sale. No exceptions. The mobile home and/or contents are sold as is, where is, no guarantees. The sale is conducted under the authority of California Civil Code 798.56a and Commercial code 7210. Dated: May 7, 2018 Signed: KIMM HARRIS Golden Feather MHP 703 Oro Dam Blvd. W #208 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-8679 Published: May 17,24, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CAROLYN ROSE LEBOEUF

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filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAXON ROBERT HORN-CAMPUSANO Proposed name: JAXON ROBERT LEBOEUF THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 8, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 11, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00946 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KERIN GENE CRANE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KERIN GENE CRANE Proposed name: KERI GENE CRANE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 15, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: April 17, 2018 Case Number: 18CV01152 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JESUS ESPINOSA, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-100, INCLUSIVE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC, A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information

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below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico CA 95928. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: MICHAEL H. RAICHELSON/SBN 174607 Persolve Legal Group, LLP (818) 534-3100 9301 Corbin Ave Ste 1600 Northridge CA 91324. Dated: August 31, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02537 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOSEPH ALLEN DOWNS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSEPH ALLEN DOWNS, JOE DOWNS, JOE A. DOWNS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: COOPER DOWNS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: COOPER DOWNS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested

this Legal Notice continues

persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: ROBERT L. HEWITT 3044 Olive Hwy Oroville, CA 95966 (530) 534-8393 Case Number: 18PR00177 Dated: April 30, 2018 Published: May 3,10,17, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN FREDERICK LOEWE, AKA JOHN F. LOEWE, AKA JOHN LOEWE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN FREDERICK LOEWE, AKA JOHN F. LOEWE, AKA JOHN LOEWE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: KEVIN SWEENEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: KEVIN SWEENEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions,

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this Legal Notice continues

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GEORGE T. DAVIS, AKA GEORGE TAYLOR DAVIS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GEORGE T. DAVIS, AKA GEORGE TAYLOR DAVIS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN DAVIS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN DAVIS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions,

however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 8 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: FRAYDA L. BRUTON, ATTORNEY AT LAW 3638 American River Drive Sacramento, CA 95864 (916) 444-8826 Case Number: 18PR00203 Published: May 17,24,31, 2018

’s Independent Journalism Fund at www.independentjournalismfund.org

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CINDTHIA LEE CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA L. CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA CHELLSON To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CINDTHIA LEE CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA L. CHELLSON, AKA CINDTHIA CHELLSON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SAMUEL W. BRINLEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SAMUEL W. BRINLEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested

persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 732 Fir Street Paradise, CA 95969 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 18PR00207 Dated: May 10, 2018 Published: May 17,24,31, 2018

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however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Case Number: 18PR00174 Dated: April 25, 2018 Published: May 10,17,24, 2018

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I visited a self-proclaimed real estate expert to get the story on the market. His quotes appear in magazines, newspapers and the blogosphere. “I understand you’re quite the prognosticator,” I said. “I simply assess the facts and data available to anyone,” he said. “I examine the information subjectively, thereby allowing me to analyze trends and market directions which might be overlooked or misunderstood by people who lack my skills and intelligence. You are welcome, however, to refer to my work as prognostication, if you must.”

CEnTURy 21 JEffRiEs-lyDon CAlBRE #: 01912741

“I am in alliance with my colleagues who predict the overall economy to continue to improve slowly but steadily,” he said. I noticed on the bookshelf behind him a crystal ball and a Magic 8-Ball. On his wall hung a dart-board with Yes, No, and Maybe printed on it rather than numbers. I asked if those were his tools of the trade.

“So, what’s the real story on the real estate market?”

“Novelty gifts from my more jocular associates,” he said.

He jutted his chin out, tilted his head back, raised his eyebrows, and prognosticated.

I asked if he thought interest rates will reach six percent in the next twelve months.

He told me some of his “constituents” are voicing concerns about the market entering a period of “plummeting” real estate prices.

“Ah,” he said, “the ultimate question.”

“Based upon my surveys and research,” he said, “rising interest rates will dampen conditions, but price movement will continue modestly upward.”

530-680-1900

“Cash buyers are involved in the market in great abundance. They are impervious to slight changes in rates.” He expects that trend to continue, which is bad news for buyers with loan financing, because the cash buyers tend to prevail in multiple-offer bidding wars.

He reached behind and handed me the Magic 8-Ball. I turned it over and saw words floating in the inky interior: “Reply hazy. Try again.”

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon. Email escrowgo@aol.com, or call 530-680-0817. See an archive of columns at douglovesrealestate.com.

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com 3/2 2100 sq ft home, shop, studio apt New construction just blocks to Bidwell Park: 3/2 $349,000 20 acres with views $145,000

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Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

746 Churchill Dr 513 Rhapis Dr 127 Estates Dr 2766 Alamo Ave 3154 Mariposa Ave 63 Cade Ct 2210 Oak Park Ave 7 Avenida Brisa Ct 14 Blanqueta Ct 211 Legacy Ln 1089 Filbert Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$727,500 $595,000 $594,000 $480,000 $434,000 $424,500 $410,000 $370,000 $367,000 $362,500 $345,000

3/4 4/3 4/4 4/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2

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SQ. FT. 3132 2553 3201 2732 2049 1919 1984 1570 1667 1684 1904

NEW LISTING!! Super-Clean, Updated 3bd/2ba home in N. Chico On cul-de-sac $274,900

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Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1533 Ridgebrook Way 10 Hillsboro Cir 1813 Devonshire Dr 50 Terrace Dr 3 Hillsboro Cir 1097 Palmetto Ave 1455 Yosemite Dr 1471 Mountain View Ave 1296 Howard Dr 26 La Placita Way 521 Redwood Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$340,000 $335,000 $331,000 $320,000 $315,000 $310,000 $302,500 $302,000 $300,500 $300,000 $295,000

3/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 2/1 3/1 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 1544 1558 1842 1613 1288 1609 1596 900 1050 1488 1207


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Bigger and Better! 2 homes in town on .77 lot along with .20 of an ac adjoining vacant lot. ............. ........................................................................................................................................$575,000 Butte Valley 2-custom homes, private setting on 235 acs, horse or cattle ......................$1,999,000 2,270din sq ft,g.28 ac ............................................................................... $439,900 Stunning 4 bed/2 bth, pen 4 Bed/2 Bth, 1,819 sq ft pen with formal ding living/dining + family rooms! NICE ...........................$349,900 3 bed/2.5 bath, 2,738 sq ft with views of the lake, Beautiful California Park pen ding Teresa Larson hardwood floors, and more .............................................................................................$559,000 (530)899-5925 gueSt unit attaChed with this beautiful 4 bed/3 bth, updated 3,000 sq ft home ding BRE #01177950 located on 1.17 acres pen with pool, shop, and more! .........................................................$689,000 g sqdin ft, stainless steel appliances .............................................$290,000 pen chiconativ@aol. new roof, 3 Bed/2 Bth, 1,313

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of april 30, 2018 – May 4, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

125 W Tonea Way

Chico

$286,500

2/3

SQ. FT. 1693

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

30 Medley Ln

1915 Broadway St

Chico

$285,000

2/1

10352 Cohasset Rd

Chico

$259,000

1779 E 8th St

Chico

827 Alder St

ADDRESS

Oroville

$300,000

2/2

1804

990

5362 Fall River Ct

Oroville

$295,000

3/3

2184

2/1

960

3135 Orange Ave

Oroville

$285,000

2/2

2217

$232,500

3/1

898

835 Feather Ave

Oroville

$234,500

3/2

1429

Chico

$231,500

3/3

998

366 Canyon Highlands Dr

Oroville

$220,000

1/1

1104

370 Humboldt Ave

Chico

$195,000

2/2

1176

1782 Bille Rd #1

Paradise

$498,500

3/3

2067

2159 Elm St #1

Chico

$155,000

3/2

1344

5393 Breezewood Dr

Paradise

$400,000

3/2

1866

2159 Elm St #2

Chico

$155,000

3/2

1344

2358 Josephs Ct

Paradise

$305,000

3/3

1636

1063 Via Verona Dr

Chico

$135,000

3/3

1790

6310 Ruby Ln

Paradise

$245,000

2/2

1060

251 Lorene Ct

Oroville

$350,000

4/3

2752

514 Sunset Dr

Paradise

$233,500

2/1

1200

75 Apica Ave

Oroville

$345,000

3/2

1879

6154 Alamo Way

Paradise

$232,000

3/2

1558

M ay 1 7, 2 0 1 8

SQ. FT.

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A silent weApon

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