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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 41, ISSUE 24 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Stories from Chico’s Iversen Center

Hope

for mental wellness BY KEN SMITH PAGE

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TRASH TALK

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TUNE-YARDS

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February 8, 2018


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 41, Issue 24 • February 8, 2018 OPINION 

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES  Appointment . Weekly Dose .

12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE 

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Arts feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

CLASSIFIEDS  

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REAL ESTATE  

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ON THe COVer: COllage by ausTiN JOHNsON COurTesy Of THe iVerseN WellNess aNd reCOVery CeNTer

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Ashiah Scharaga, Ken Smith Calendar Editor Nate Daly Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Conrad Nystrom, Ryan J . Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Robert Speer, Brian Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandy Peters Design Manager Christopher Terrazas Designers Kyle Shine, Maria Ratinova Creative Director Serene Lusano Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Web Design & Strategy Intern Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Chris Pollok, Autumn Slone Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Nuts & Bolts Ninja Leslie Giovanini Executive Coordinator Carlyn Asuncion Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Sweetdeals Coordinator Hannah Williams Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultants Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Traci Hukill, Elizabeth Morabito 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www .newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 41,000 copies distributed free weekly.

february 8, 2018

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Trickle-down tax Four years ago, when the Chico City Council started getting serious about

GUEST COMMENT

The Crusades come to america T

here’s a crusade in this country and it’s the

assault on the separation of church and state. During his campaign, President Trump promised he would work to repeal the Johnson Amendment, which bans tax-exempt churches from engaging in political campaigning. Encouraged by the president’s vow, House Republicans inserted a provision into the GOP tax bill to allow churches with a nonprofit status to engage in political endorsements from their own “bully pulpit” without jeopardizing their by tax-free status. Fortunately, the Roger S. Beadle Senate removed it. The author is a Chico Undeterred, the crusade State alum and former continues as the Department small-business owner. of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced a new rule that will allow any medical professional to refuse to treat a patient on “religious or moral” grounds— legalizing discrimination against women and the LGBTQ community. HHS’s mission is to implement draconian measures in the rights of women for self-determination, in particular their right to determine healthy and

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February 8, 2018

intelligent decisions regarding their own pregnancy. Such discrimination is not unheard of in the U.S. Take, for example, a same-sex Texas couple whose daughter was denied dental care because she had two mommies. Then there’s the Oklahoma case in which an emergency room doctor, citing religious beliefs, refused emergency contraception to a rape victim. Many Catholic hospitals routinely turn away women suffering from miscarriage, subjecting them to infection or severe hemorrhage. This thoughtless religious doctrine, which harms tens of thousands of women, is being championed by HHS, which wants this practice to be legal in all hospitals. HHS is proposing legalized discrimination: women denied birth control simply because their provider or pharmacist believes only in the “rhythm method”; a hospital administrator cancels a woman’s decision to have life-saving cancer treatment because it might harm her pregnancy; a child with same-sex parents is refused urgent treatment by a pediatrician or dentist; a mental health clinic refuses to see a woman in a same-sex relationship. The Trump administration is sponsoring a dangerous evangelical doctrine that is immoral, unethical, and flies in the face of decency. The religious right has sold its soul to the devil, and the devil is in the White House. Jesus is weeping. □

implementing a waste-hauling franchise agreement, this newspaper sounded an alarm. We acknowledged that there would be benefits from such an arrangement. That’s because the two contracted companies, Waste Management and Recology, traversed the same residential streets, creating extra wear on the roadways. Under a franchise agreement that included routes—zones that would keep the two companies confined to particular regions—that inefficiency would be eliminated. Another effect of such an agreement: less smog production. In other words, a franchise agreement benefits our streets and the air. Those efficiencies would also benefit the companies’ bottom lines. Sounds great. So, what’s the rub? Our main concern: The brunt of the cost of the agreement—about $800,000 per year paid by the haulers to the city—wasn’t something Recology and Waste Management would part with out of generosity. No, that nearly million-dollar price tag would be passed along to customers in the form of rate increases (see “Take caution on franchising,” Editorial, Dec. 26, 2013). Fast-forward to 2018 and that appears to be precisely what’s happened, mainly for owners of commercial properties, whose rates had previously been unregulated. Those are the folks who have been hardest hit in the short time since the agreement went into effect, but keep in mind that they will eventually pass those increases on to their tenants, including low-income residents and those on fixed incomes (see “Trash talk,” by Ashiah Scharaga, page 8). Right now, customers are in a transition period, and many are experiencing sticker shock with their new bills. The city wants to justify the franchise agreement based on its benefits, but this is still a public money grab, one that came without approval of the voters. Fair or not, it’s perfectly legal. The lesson here: Watch-dogging local government is more important than ever. □

Praiseworthy progress After years of hand-wringing about the local homeless community, the city

of Chico is taking real steps to address some of the root issues associated with that population, thanks to collaboration between the municipality, the county and several nonprofit organizations. This includes a partnership between the county Department of Behavioral Health and the Chico Police Department that will result in a team of mental health professionals assisting officers during responses to those with psychiatric issues. That partnership, which very well could be a life-saving effort, was one of several initiatives that moved forward Tuesday evening during the City Council’s regular meeting (see “Hitting streets, building roofs,” page 9). Another step in the right direction is a plan of the Community Housing Improvement Program and Housing Authority of Butte County to construct an 80-unit affordable housing complex on city-owned land—a move that was approved unanimously by the council. Such housing is scarce in Chico, a city in which a quarter of the population is classified as impoverished, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. At the same meeting, the city entered into a memorandum of understanding with the Jesus Center on its proposed move out of the downtown sphere to city-owned property near the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds. It’s an effort that would include an expansion of services, but because the proposal has been vetted largely behind the scenes at City Hall, we need more info. Still, credit where credit is due. For years, we’ve been asking for the city to put up or shut up when it comes to addressing homelessness. That the former is happening stands to benefit us all. □


LETTERS Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

thomas On Thursdays, when I get into the office in the morning, one of the first things I do is grab the latest issue of the CN&R. That’s the day it hits the newsstands. Sometimes I don’t open it right away. After all, aside from the ads, I’ve already seen everything during the editing process. Still, at some point, I flip through the pages to check out the print job and pause to reread a story or two. Last week, when I turned Meredith J. Cooper’s news piece, my heart sank. It was only then, seeing the photo of the bushy-bearded man in color for the first time, that I recognized Thomas Avakian, a homeless man she’d written about who, sadly, died on West Sacramento Avenue, where he’d lived for several months. He was just 51 years old. (See “Death on the streets,” Newslines, Feb. 1.) I’d met Tom two years ago at a local church that had opened its doors for the Safe Space Winter Shelter. My CN&R colleagues and I (and some of our spouses) for the past couple of years have volunteered for one evening at the low-barrier seasonal shelter. Our job: provide a meal for the 60ish people who would otherwise spend the night in the cold, along with the volunteers who regularly donate their time for that cause. It was while serving food that evening that Tom and I were introduced. He recognized Cooper from her photo in her business column, The Goods, and struck up a conversation. I was standing next to her, wearing my typical winter-weather attire of jeans, sweater and—as I do quite regularly—a beanie to warm my alwayscold ears. Tom then turned to me—his eyes grew wide, and he said, “You’re Melissa, the editor.” He went on to tell us that he read the CN&R faithfully, and it was true. When I introduced another staffer, Ken, by only his first name, Tom said, “Ken Smith.” Ditto for the others in the editorial department: Jason Cassidy and Howard Hardee. Later that night, after dinner, Tom and I chatted about the newspaper business and current affairs. He was sharp as a tack, charming and well-informed (you can read more about him in Patrick Newman’s letter to the editor on the next page). Tom, who was then fairly clean-shaven, made a point to tell me that he didn’t have to remain homeless and that he wasn’t mentally ill. I held back the urge to pry into that decision, though I wondered how someone so seemingly put-together would choose that path. Life for those who are unsheltered—especially in the winter—has to be bleak. Indeed, at that time, I would’ve pegged Tom at several years older than his then-49 years. I’m ashamed that I didn’t immediately recognize him when I saw his photo in black and white while proofreading Cooper’s story. I’m also ashamed that in 2018 people are dying on the streets. According to county records, three homeless people, ranging in ages from 30 to 63, have perished since November. When I said goodbye to Tom that evening two years ago, I always figured I’d see him around—either at City Plaza or during my regular jaunts elsewhere downtown. But our paths never again crossed, and now here I sit trying to wrap my head around the fact that he’s gone. I’m not sure I ever will.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

Pay to park? Re “Opening arguments” (Newslines, by Ken Smith, Feb. 1): While serving on the Park Commission in 2011, we prepared a study identifying approximately 1 million visits to Bidwell Park every year. This number, while huge, was not surprising. We know Bidwell Park is the heart and lungs of Chico. One million visits means it’s also a regional treasure. Our Public Works Department has now reported that—in 2017—413,756 vehicles entered Upper Park. Again, we shouldn’t be surprised. What we should be, though, is ready to engage in a collaborative discussion about how to care for our parks, greenways and street trees. Doing so will take the continued passion of our community, scores of volunteers—and money. One proposal recently brought to the table is a $1-per-vehicle, per-day parking fee. So far, Public Works is just suggesting that the concept be considered and a community survey is in the works. I encourage all of us to provide input, and keep an open mind. When I was a park commissioner, I used to ask people: “What is Bidwell Park and our green space worth to you?” The answer was always, “It’s the best thing about Chico.” Let’s have a real conversation about reinvesting in the heart and lungs of our community.

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I can’t believe people at the city are even thinking about doing this— charging people to go to the park. The city of Chico is looking at getting a bike crossing over the freeway and needs a little over a million dollars to get the grant for the rest of the $13 million cost. You can bet where this tax will end up, right? Folks at the city claim to want to repair roadways, pay for more employees. Just think, if the city can get away with charging a dollar (gee, just one measly dollar), then a few years goes by and, gee, we need to raise the tax. Add another measly dollar, and now when do you think it will stop? Never. Don’t allow the city to tax people wanting to enjoy the park. If people at the city need money, they need to find ways to cut their thirst for the almighty dollar. Live within your means. Cut back on your outrageous LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 spending lifestyles. They have a lot of debts right now, the state is after them for a lot of money, too. Do you really think the taxes collected for this park fee will go to anything but fixing the roads and staffing public safety? No way. Zane Libert Palermo

‘Sharp observer’ Re “Death on the streets” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper, Feb. 1): Thomas Avakian was tenacious, generous and not one to brook an injustice, large or small. He was an erudite consumer of news and opinion. Also, being a sharp observer, Tom was a trove of information concerning life on the streets. Regrettably, I lost contact when Tom relocated to the West Sacramento Avenue area, a few months ago. I’d like to know why he left 16th and Park, where he lived for years. In that location, Tom experienced the usual mix of tolerance and intolerance, though, ironically, the worst intolerance was experienced from representatives of the Jesus Center—a place he avoided. (In particular, Tom was routinely rousted during the center’s armed guard “experiment.”) It’s not exactly true that Tom would not accept help. He gratefully accepted anything that helped him survive. And, I have little doubt Tom would have accepted public housing and assistance— assuming he was afforded respect and allowed autonomy. Since no such housing exists, we’ll never know. In any case, men and women continue to die, perhaps as much from the stress of harassment (being profiled, rousted and arrested) and inexcusable deprivation (lack of tarps, blankets, winter clothing and restroom access), as any “drug of choice.” Patrick Newman Chico

Scrap metal musings Re “Broken trust” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Feb. 1): As a two-term Chico planning commissioner, from 2011 through 2016, I voted on Chico Scrap Metal (CSM) three times. After 6 

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february 8, 2018

conducting many interviews, much research and listening to speakers, my determination was amortization of CSM was in the best interest of the neighborhood and the city, and that the city should help financially. In 2004, the City Council adopted the Chapman-Mulberry Neighborhood Plan, including the amortization of several businesses. Later, Habitat for Humanity began building homes in the area. In the next five years, all businesses except CSM moved. In 2011, the 2030 Chico General Plan was reviewed and sent to the council. I believe the general plan, the neighborhood plan, the sitting council at that time, the Planning Commission and Butte County Board of Supervisors were all in agreement with amortization. In 2016, after another extension, a new council on a 4-3 party-line vote said, “Forget about 12 years of multiagency plans, you can stay.” Hence, community outrage. Were the other businesses who obeyed the city chumps? What about those who invested in Habitat homes built near CSM? Government agencies consistently told Chicoans for over a decade that CSM was moving. Once moved, I seriously doubt we’ll see a community effort to “Move ’em back.” Ken Rensink Chico

About Chico Scrap Metal: 1. If people would stop using their “services,” their business would close. 2. Wonder how the location was chosen for the new Habitat for Humanity houses next door? 3. And now the news that they put up the money for the court case. Strange stuff! Suzie Garrett Chico

What about Eastin? Re “Hot topics” (Cover story, by Ben Christopher, Jan. 25): The cover story was interesting and informative. Is Christopher a local regular CN&R reporter? I ask because he didn’t mention in the article that Eastin has been up and down Northern California to meet and hear public concerns. She was in Chico last year and in Paradise recently. The crowds in both locations packed the library

Were the other businesses who obeyed the city chumps? —Ken rensink

conference rooms. Eastin shared personal and political experiences. I checked her online. Her past checked out better than she personally related. One concern with Christopher’s article is that it displayed pictures of three democratic candidates only. Oddly, Eastin’s photo was absent. I hope this is not an example of gender bias. We don’t need that practice from the Chico News & Review. I watched the candidates debate on Univision moderated by Jorge Ramos at UCLA on Jan. 25. I was again impressed by Eastin’s solutions for some of the issues mentioned in Christopher’s article and other debate issues discussed there. She drew more loud applause than the other gubernatorial candidates. Gavin Newsom and Antonio Villaraigosa seemed more concerned with mudslinging at each other. The Republican candidates simply showed strong Trump loyalty. Voters, do yourself a favor: Learn about Delaine Eastin! John P. Martinez Chico

Editor’s note: The CN&R profiled Delaine Eastin when she came to Chico last May (see “Grassroots governor?” Newslines, May 4, 2017).

Regarding Mr. LaMalfa Doug LaMalfa’s central purpose as a House representative is the protection of the USDA program of farm subsidies for the rice farmers in the North State. The program is heavily tilted toward the giant farms. Rice subsidies from farms in the U.S. totaled $15.3 billion from 1995-2016. Rice farmer subsidies in the entire U.S. concentrated in the following counties: 1) Colusa, 2) Sutter, 3) Butte and 5) Glenn. Such subsidies are a “welfare system.” We pay even for giant rice farmers’ insurance, although farming is no more risky than

many other enterprises. The system is riddled with fraud. For example, the giant rice farmers establish other legal entities, or divide their land among close family members, to get around limits on rice subsidies. LaMalfa and his family are big-time rice subsidy recipients. Giant rice farmers are among the wealthiest of the upper 1 percent of our population. They don’t need subsidies. U.S. producers of other crops, such as fruits and vegetables, receive almost nothing and do well. LaMalfa voted many times to repeal the Affordable Care Act without a replacement. Such Republican elite are never done with crippling the ACA. They believe in their hardened hearts, “If you can’t afford it, you don’t get it.” Ralph Slater Chico

Editor’s note: Poinsett County, Ark., was rated fourth among the top U.S. counties receiving rice subsidies between 1995-2016, according to the Environmental Working Group.

Just saw Doug “He’s one of us” doing a quick interview this weekend on the local TV news. What a nothing burger. When was Doug “He’s one of us” in the service? Or immediate family members? I spent nine years in the U.S. Army. Perhaps you could learn something from your California colleague in the House of Representatives, Adam Schiff, about what it means to work for your constituents, not some, but all, not only in District 1 but the entire nation. Wearing cowboy boots don’t make you a man. Oh, by the way, my lovely wife just finished knitting a pink pussy hat for me. Ed Pitman Chico

BHS has a proposal The city of Chico is spending more money and resources on the state mandated animal services than the City Council originally intended. While this increase in cost and resources is detrimental for a city focused on repairing a budget deficit, an equally damaging problem has resulted in splitting animal services between the city and Butte Humane Society (BHS). The public does not understand why there are two “shelters.” The

continuing confusion and frustration around companion animal care in Chico diminish the public’s trust in both institutions; impacting credibility, public engagement and support. While the city is mandated to provide certain animal-related services to the public, it should not serve as animal rescue, adoption agency and humane education outreach at the taxpayers’ expense. It is time to provide the city of Chico an affordable and efficient option for animal control and sheltering services. On behalf of the BHS board of directors, we would be honored to provide these services for the city of Chico and will perform to the highest standards to meet and exceed the requirements of the contract. Christy Norton Chico

Editor’s note: The author is president of the BHS board of directors.

‘Hardly reliable’ Re “More on a free press” (Letters, by Loretta Ann Torres, Feb. 1): A recent letter to the editor complained that people rely on one source for their news. Instead, in an inexplicable twist of logic, this writer suggests relying on One America News (OAN), owned by Herring Networks Inc. Hardly reliable. One example: OAN endorsed Roy Moore, the alleged pedophile who stalked teenage girls. According to Wikipedia, OAN “became a source of both positive coverage [of Moore] and [of] stories that could cast doubt on his accusers.” OAN quoted a noted conspiracy-theory Twitter account claiming these teenage girls made false claims against Moore for money—lies never retracted by OAN. On the night of the Alabama election, OAN announced Moore defeated his democratic rival “by a large margin.” Not so. Doug Jones overcame Moore in the Alabama Senate race. And this reader wants me to forsake checking multiple sources in my search for the truth and rely on OAN? Sorry, “wouldn’t be prudent.” Lynn Elliott Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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So far it’s going well. I make intentions for the year. One is living more in the moment. I just had a little baby, and I want to take every second with him and really be in it without being distracted with a phone or technology. It’s tough but it’s wonderful.

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Staying healthy with exercise is hard since I’ve been lazy for a few years. I’m also working on eating less meat. To stay involved politically and to educate younger people, I’ve been doing clinics for citizenship and immigration documentation.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE LocaL agency Faces scrutiny

The Community Action Agency (CAA) of Butte County is under scrutiny from the state after the founders of the Esplanade House, a transitional housing program in Chico for homeless adults with children, alleged wrongdoing by the board and CEO. The board severed ties with the founders late last year. Brian Dougherty, deputy director for the Administrative Services division of the state Department of Community Services and Development (CSD) confirms in a letter that “CSD has opened an investigation into the Community Action Agency of Butte County for its alleged mismanagement of funds and noncompliance with Community Services Bloc Grant tripartite Board requirements.” A “desk review” performed by Candace Wong, a field representative for CSD, in November 2017 and addressed to Tom Tenorio, CEO of CAA of Butte County, indicates that “your agency is not in compliance with the contractual requirements and applicable federal and state laws.” It additionally says that the issue has been ongoing, having been noted in the last three monitoring reports.

stonewaLL oFFers schoLarships

Stonewall Alliance Center has created its first scholarship. The Youth Empowerment program is designed to help high school seniors who identify as LGBTQ and are interested in pursuing their education in an academic or vocational capacity. The goal is to award four students who are active and positive forces in their community with scholarships of $500, $1,000, $2,500 and $3,000. The deadline to apply is March 1. Applications can be found at stonewallchico.org under the “Programs” tab. The scholarships are not necessarily need-based, but those with a financial need can fill out a form for additional consideration. Awardees will be announced by May 15.

Da sues Dwr over Dam

Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey (pictured) announced Wednesday (Feb. 7) that he is invoking a state Fish and Game law dating back to 1870 to sue the state Department of Water Resources for environmental damage due to the Oroville Dam spillway disaster last year. He is doing so on behalf of the state of California. “Civil penalties can range upwards of $51 billion for the 1,700,000 cubic yards of soil, concrete and other material dumped into the Feather River,” according to a press release from the DA’s office. The suit alleges degradation of the river and loss of public resources including fish, noting that the spillway failure prompted the evacuation of the Feather River Fish Hatchery. 8

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February 8, 2018

trash talk Franchise agreement comes with higher rates, rough transition

Lbyfound himself bewildered and frustrated garbage.

ocal property owner William Sheridan has

The waste bills for the two apartment complexes he manages in Chico will eventually increase by $21,895.92 per year story and under the city’s new photo by franchise agreement with Ashiah Recology and Waste Scharaga Management, he said. as h i a h s @ Though his bills, n ew srev i ew. c o m administered by both companies, have already started to climb, his service hasn’t improved during the transition. Sheridan is perplexed as to why the city pursued the agreement: All he has seen is a degradation of service and massive fee increases. “Ultimately, all of our expenses are borne by the people who rent properties from us,” he said. “The people who can afford to pay rent the least are the renters of apartments. I do apartments because I can give people more reasonable rent and I have economies of scale.” Sheridan isn’t the only one beleaguered by the change—about 25 prop-

erty and business owners jumped at the chance to sound off at a two-hour meeting hosted by the North Valley Property Owners Association on Jan. 30 at the Old Municipal Building. Their biggest grievances? What they see as astronomical fee increases and service issues. Richard Stewart, manager of Westpark Plaza, said his bill initially increased by $300 per month for the same service. “That almost sounds criminal to me,” he said. From the city’s perspective, many commercial customers are experiencing increases because that market was previously unregulated, allowing the businesses to negotiate individually with customers, some of whom paid much less than others. Under the franchise agreement, those rates were averaged to create new maximums, which means some customers are seeing significant bill increases and others decreases. “There were a lot of people getting sweetheart deals before,” said Waste Management District Manager Dave Adler. “Now everybody is being treated fairly and paying the same rate.”

The franchise agreement comes after years

of city staff conversations, private negotiations and committee and council meetings. As of Oct. 1, 2017, Waste Management took over all residential accounts, and commercial customers, including dwellings of five units or more, were split into two districts, one for Recology and one for Waste Management, eliminating the competitive market. It’ll be like this for the next 12 years, and the city will bring in $800,000 annually in franchise fees. For at least the first five years of the agreement, those funds will be directed to major road repairs. Sheridan sees it as a tax that wasn’t approved by the voters. “I believe strongly that the City Council sold out the entire business community with no need to do so, because the onus for compliance of the [state] regulations is on the property owner, not the city of Chico,” he said. “They want the tax revenue.” City Manager Mark Orme disputed that claim, stating it was not a cash grab, but a decision made in “good faith.” He thinks the strongest evidence of that is the City Council decision to inject all the cash


William Sheridan discusses issues he’s had since  the city’s waste-hauling franchise took effect in  October. All he has seen is a degradation of   service and massive fee increases, he says.

received from the haulers into repairing city streets, which have been directly impacted by refuse-collecting trucks. “From the city’s perspective, we went through the public process and had a vast number of conversations in a public forum to make sure the public was aware of this coming. Years,” he said. “This is something the city needed to do to ensure compliance with state regulations and to get more trucks off the streets.” Several state Assembly bills passed in the last 10 years have set statewide recycling goals and mandated recycling and yard waste programs. Richard Tagore-Erwin, a consultant with R3 Consulting Group Inc., which drafted the agreement, said state mandates are easier to enforce within a franchise system because the city can pursue liquidated damages, fining the companies for providing inadequate service. There was also concern from the city that one of the vendors might stop providing services in Chico, leaving the city with a nonregulated monopoly that could charge whatever it wanted. Tagore-Erwin said the city can request a detailed cost of service report in a year to make sure the companies are not overcharging, but he could not speak to whether costs are being passed on to customers. So, what can citizens expect moving

forward? The city establishes maximum fee rates and reviews them annually. Those are anticipated to increase this summer based upon the Consumer Price Index for urban consumers, never to exceed a 5 percent increase in one year. Either way, there are still a lot of disgruntled customers. Take Danielle Ius, owner of Sin of Cortez, as an example. She said her rate has gone from $345.53 to $446.11 per month, an additional $1,206.96 per year. Ius says the fact that the agreement is generating only $800,000 a year for the city doesn’t seem like enough considering the disturbance it has made. She’s trying to avoid spending more energy on it because there’s nothing she feels she can do. “You want to fight the battles worth fighting,” she said. “The end result isn’t going to change, in my opinion. I hope it does, but I don’t see it happening. The city’s already done it, the deal’s been made.” □

tackling trees Committee says city— not property owners— should pay for damage to sidewalks Gustafson’s office at the city of Chico several calls a week about sideEwalkrikreceives problems. That’s hundreds of calls in

a year. And he’s only seeing that number increase. Ninety percent of those calls, he says, are related to street trees. “Sidewalk repair hasn’t been a priority from a budget or funding perspective,” Gustafson, Public Works director-operations and maintenance, told the CN&R. “Now we need to shift priorities. The frequency of calls is getting to a point where we need to do something long-term.” The biggest issue? Money. But therein lies a conundrum. In most circumstances, property owners are responsible for repairing adjacent sidewalks. When the damage is caused by a city street tree, however, the responsibility is cloudy. “That’s kind of the root of the problem, if you will,” Gustafson said. That’s why he presented the Internal Affairs Committee with three options at Monday’s meeting (Feb. 5). Option 1: Fund a program to fix sidewalks damaged by city trees, to the tune of $300,000 per year; Option 2: Implement a cost-share program in which the city and property owner would each pay half the cost; Option 3: Pin it all on the property owner. As things are now, the Public Works Department has $12,000 in its budget to address sidewalk issues. That just won’t cut

it, Gustafson said. Essentially, that will pay for five to eight proper repairs. To stretch resources, the city has been doing patchwork fixes, many of which will resurface in three to five years, he said. “We only have the resources to do temporary repairs,” he said. When they recognize a tripping hazard—typically when a sidewalk is raised 1 inch or more—they head out with the cement grinder and grind it down. “When a tree root is causing that, it’s only a temporary fix.” Gustafson emphasized that his department is trying to shift to more permanent solutions. In addition to seeking funding options, it’s looking into improved technology to help save time and money. “Our tree inventory is growing and there are going to be impacts on infrastructure,” he said. “We’re trying to be proactive, looking at impacts that are going to affect the city and citizens 10 to 15 years down the road.”

SIFT ER Snowlack Thanks to a handful of January storms, California at least has a snowpack now. Readings by the Department of Water Resources on Jan. 1 were almost nonexistent—just 1.3 inches of snow on average in the Sierras, holding a mere 0.4 inches of water content. That was just 3 percent of the norm for that time of year. Last week, on Feb. 1, DWR’s measurement in the Sierras was up by a foot, to 13.6 inches of snow, but that’s still only 14 percent of the historical average for that area (statewide snowpack is 27 percent of normal). Precipitation numbers in the Sierras—particularly the northern section—this winter haven’t been terrible, they’ve just come along with warmer temperatures, meaning less snow. And with clearer skies and warmer than average weather in the forecast for the next couple of weeks for much of California, fears of a return to drought status are rising.

In 2014, the city took out 25 trees in the Mission Santa Fe  neighborhood because their roots were damaging sidewalks. CN&r File photo

Before opening the issue up to public com-

ment, the committee members posed a few questions. For instance, Vice Mayor Reanette Fillmer asked, if property owners are asked to foot the bill, how will the city ensure compliance? And, if they can’t afford to fix the sidewalk, what then? Gustafson explained that it would be up to Public Works to ensure property owner compliance and that the city likely would make the repairs and then seek payment via liens if necessary. A handful of citizens attended Monday’s meeting to speak on the subject, including Mike Campos, owner of Campos Properties. He told the committee that he’s had several problems regarding street trees damaging sidewalks adjacent to his property, and he’s had trouble dealing with the city to fix them. Rather than deal with a temporary fix, he’d prefer to just take down a tree—but that’s been a tough sell, he said. Ken Fleming alternately spoke to the value of allowing the urban canopy to grow. After an old-growth tree was taken down near his home, he said, his PG&E bill went up significantly. Mary Ellen Young expressed frustration that the city is considering passing the cost onto property owners. “How much can you take from a homeowner?” she said. “We’re older, we cannot afford these things.” Ultimately, the committee members agreed that the city should foot the bill. They voted 3-0 in favor of recommending Option 1—the city-funded program—to the City Council. Expect this to head to that panel in early March. —Meredith J. Cooper me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Hitting streets, building roofs

CN&R

February 8, 2018

a short but productive meeting on Tuesday (Feb. 6), Dtheuring Chico City Council progressed

on multiple fronts related to homelessness. For starters, the panel approved a memorandum of understanding between the Chico Police Department and the Butte County Department of Behavioral Health establishing a two-person mobile crisis intervention team serving Chico. During a phone conversation with the CN&R, Behavioral Health Director Dorian Kittrell said that, under the pilot program, the counselors will be deployed into the community on a daily basis, from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., with the chief goal of helping police officers who request assistance while responding to psychiatric crises. “It will be 100 percent field work,” Kittrell said. “When they’re not out on calls, they’ll be doing outreach activities such as welfare checks with our clients living in the community and liaisoning with service organizations like the Torres Shelter, Jesus Center and Chico PD’s Target Team.” The two counselors have been going on ride-alongs with Chico PD and learning the ins and outs of dispatch for the past six weeks, Kittrel said. He expects the team to hit the streets sometime in March, and if they are successful during the one-year term outlined in the MOU, it’s possible the program will expand countywide. “It really will depend on funding,” he said. “Ideally, we’d love to have a team on the street seven days a week up until midnight, but those are lofty goals.” The council also approved a separate MOU between the city and the Jesus Center regarding the proposal to move the center to city-owned property on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway and consolidate homeless services. According to a report presented by City Manager Mark Orme, the MOU is “an expression of the parties’ good faith intent to enter into an agreement regarding the Jesus

Center’s use of the property if the concept is found feasible.” On another front related to home-

lessness, the council approved a proposal to use 5 undeveloped acres of city-owned land at Notre Dame Boulevard and Humboldt Road to build an 80-unit affordable housing complex for very low-income seniors and/or special needs tenants. Marie Demers, the city’s housing manager, told the council that Chico’s apartment vacancy rate—a statistic published quarterly by the North Valley Property Owners Association—has been hovering around 1.5 percent for months. Many local homeless advocates, housing experts and policymakers say the lack of affordable housing is a root cause of homelessness in the community. “There’s a shortage of housing in general and, more specifically, smaller units—one- and two-bedroom apartments,” Demers said. However, city staff needed the council to OK several actions before moving forward on the project, including amending the

general plan to rezone the parcel. Staff also needed approval to use the city’s Affordable Housing Fund to “purchase” the property— basically, transferring money internally to the Community Park Fund, which was used for the original purchase—at a cost of $92,881 per acre. And finally, the council was asked to approve the Community Housing Improvement Program (CHIP) and the Housing Authority of Butte County as partners in a long-term lease of the land. Kris Zappettini, interim president of CHIP, said using city-owned land to build affordable housing is a successful model. “Through similar partnerships in the past, we’ve been able to add 142 affordable units to the housing stock in Chico,” she said. “I think the real point here is talking about the situation. I’m here to be a part of the housing solution.” Councilwoman Ann Schwab was concerned because the parcel in question is home to the Butte Environmental Council’s Humboldt Community Garden, which would have to move. As such, Schwab made a motion to

The Chico City Council on Tuesday (Feb. 6) voted to sign a memorandum of understanding with the Jesus Center outlining intentions to move the center to city-owned property near the Torres Community Shelter. cn&r File photo

accept the proposal with an amendment directing the city to help relocate the garden, if possible, which passed unanimously. Moving forward, the project will be reviewed by the Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board as well as the Finance Committee, and then come back to the council for final approval of the land lease. In other housing-related news, city staff has been working with the Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT) to find a suitable location for Simplicity Village, a proposed tiny house community for homeless people. Charles Withuhn, a board member for CHAT, told the CN&R by phone that he is optimistic that the concept will go before the council “as soon as we can reach an agreement on an acre and a half of unused property.” —HOward Hardee


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HEALTHLINES Pam Montana, 62, was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s in 2016. She is now an advocate for research and early detection.

‘Looks like me, looks like you’

confided that her disease has done nothing to keep her away from Nordstrom. “Alzheimer’s looks like me, it looks like you, it looks like everyone,” the Danville resident said. She acknowledged some hard times. She cries and becomes frustrated easily. She no longer drives at night, and during the day she goes only to places she knows, because navigation apps are too confusing, she said. Between visits to the neurologist and numerous cognitive tests, it took about two years for Montana to get a proper diagnosis. “It was so stressful waiting to hear the diagnosis, [but] as hard as it was to hear the words, I was grateful to have an answer,” she said. A day afterward, she decided to join the advocacy team at the Alzheimer’s Association and share her story—while she still could. “I’ve never been more powerful than now,” Montana said. Inspired by the #MeToo movement that encourages women to speak out about sexual harassment, Montana wants to start a social media HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

Panelists with connection to Alzheimer’s talk about the disease and its higher prevalence in women story and photo by

Ana B. Ibarra

Uability rights lawyer—a good one, too. “I was an excellent attorney,” recalled

ntil last year, Jackie Coleman was a dis-

the 63-year-old Rancho Cordova resident who loved her job and was proud of the work she did. But a little over a year ago, she started to forget appointments and details from meetings, and began to depend heavily on her secretary. Then she started making mistakes. Ultimately, one got her fired. Two weeks later, she got a diagnosis: early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Coleman, dressed in purple—the official color of the Alzheimer’s advo-

12

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FEBRUARY 8, 2018

cacy movement—recounted those awful days while attending a recent Alzheimer’s panel discussion at the California Museum, near the state Capitol. A small, soft-spoken woman with shoulder-length hair and round glasses, she attended with her more talkative friend and roommate, Joyce Irwin, 60. The women said they’d cared for each other for the past three years. Irwin, a threetime cancer survivor, said her late husband had dementia and mother likely did, too, though she wasn’t diagnosed back then. Sponsored by the Northern California and Northern Nevada Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, the event was part of an initiative to highlight the disease’s impact on women, who account for two-thirds of people living with Alzheimer’s and two-thirds of those caring for them. About 630,000 people have Alzheimer’s

disease in California, and women in their 60s have a 1 in 6 chance of developing the disease—almost twice as high as the risk of developing breast cancer. Before the formal discussion got started, one

of the speakers, Pam Montana, told a reporter a story not unlike Coleman’s: She had been a sales director at Intel Corp. before being forced to retire early because she couldn’t keep up with workplace demands. Despite her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2016, she’s upbeat and funny—not “your grandma in a wheelchair” that some people associate with the disease, she said. The lively 62-year-old sometimes introduces herself by joking that she’s not Hannah’s mom—a reference to the once-popular Disney show Hannah Montana. Sporting a stylish bob and an elegant black dress with white stripes, she

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Date: March 1, 2018 Place: Chico State BMU 203 Time: 12:30 P.M. - 4:00 P.M. Cost: FREE For more information please call BIC: 530-342-3118 CEU’s TBA Change –even good change– can overwhelm. Take a moment to think about what you’d like to do differently: How many minutes per day or per week will you dedicate to creating a sense of calm? What will you do less of to open up space in your schedule? Once you can really visualize how a change will integrate into your daily life, your odds of success will increase. Connie Massie, LCSW, will present a series of 4 classes on learning to be in the moment and just being. Connie is certified in Hatha Yoga as well as advanced training in Restorative Yoga and Mindfulness Techniques.

Save the date

Who Am I To Stop It March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. The Brain Injury Coalition is excited to bring the documentary film “Who Am I to Stop It”, coupled with a presentation by Cheryl Green co-producer of the film. The film addresses isolation, art, and transformation after brain injury.

Date: March 1, 2018 | place: Chico state BMU 203 Time: 12:30 am - 4:00 pm | Cost: FREE | CEUs TBA

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Passages Caregiver Resource Center is funded by the California Department of Healthcare Services, the Area Agency on Aging (PSA2, PSA3), and the California Department of Aging. FEBRUARY 8, 2018

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HEALTHLINES

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 1 2

movement with the hashtag #IHaveAlz, to help eliminate the shame that sometimes comes with the disease, she said. Once the event started, panelist Kaci Fairchild,

a psychologist and professor at Stanford University, told the audience of about 50 about the importance of exercise—for the body and the brain. She also urged everyone to become familiar with the 10 early warning signs of Alzheimer’s, which include poor judgment, personality changes and withdrawal from social activities. Knowing these symptoms and getting an early diagnosis can buy families some time, Fairchild said. Panel moderator Liz Hernandez, a former correspondent for NBC’s Access Hollywood, said that had she recognized the signs of Alzheimer’s sooner in her mom, she could have received care and resources earlier. Hernandez urged the mixed-age audience to have conversations with their loved ones about the type of care they

About this story:

this story was produced by Kaiser Health news, which publishes california Healthline, an editorially independent service of the california Health care foundation. Learn more at californiahealthline.org.

would want if they were to be diagnosed. “These conversations are heartbreaking but they have to be had,” Hernandez said. In Latino culture, for example, “it is really hard to talk about money, but we have to ask our parents if they’ve set aside money for care because it is very expensive,” she said. Montana and Coleman are still independent, and they have made lifestyle changes. They eat healthier, exercise more frequently and engage in activities that stimulate their brains. Coleman said she has gradually become more involved with the Alzheimer’s Association, participating in volunteer activities. That’s how she learned about the panel. To stay sharp, she works on puzzles and sticks reminder notes in spots around the house. She still is able to drive—a good thing, because one of Irwin’s arms is in a sling right now. Irwin pitches in by handling the driving directions. Montana keeps a journal and writes a blog. Her doctor had so many suggestions—practice yoga, hit the gym, learn a new language—that it was almost overwhelming. Montana finally asked her which was the most important. “My doctor told me, ‘Do what makes you happy,’” she recalled during the panel, her eyes tearing up. “And that’s what I would tell others. Don’t look at a list. Do what works for you.” □

WEEKLY DOSE Happy hearts There’s more than one reason to think about your heart this month: Aside from Valentine’s Day on the 14th, February is American Heart Month. It’s a reminder to assess your health and make heart disease prevention a priority. Even small steps can make a huge difference. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends: • Visit your doctor: Schedule regular check-ups to set goals and monitor heart health. • Exercise: If it’s not already a routine, start small and work up to 30 minutes a day, three times each week. Even regular walks through the park will help. • Quit smoking: Cutting smoking can drastically lower your risk for heart disease. • Cut salt: When cooking, lower your sodium intake by replacing salt with herbs and spices. • Don’t drink your calories: Replace sugary sodas and soft drinks with water.

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GREENWAYS Gateway Science Museum’s new executive  director, Adrienne McGraw, showcases the  latest exhibit on display, “Brain: The World  Inside Your Head.” 

Gateway to success New museum director has passion for science, education story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

Aattended torical society in her mid-20s when she a museum conference of about drienne McGraw was working for a his-

5,000 young professionals. They surrounded her with an enthusiasm that was contagious. That marked a turning point for McGraw, a recent graduate of environmental studies whose career path subsequently headed in another direction. She enrolled at John F. Kennedy University, where she received her master’s in museum studies, then to California State University East Bay, where she earned a second master’s in environmental education. She soon returned to the classroom at JFK, teaching young people about museum education. “I mean, you couldn’t get much more geeky than the museum geek, and then teaching the other museum geeks. It’s a very specialized little niche,” McGraw said from her new office at Chico State’s Gateway Science Museum. “I just found it to be a way to continue to promote the power of museums with my students and the power of the community engagement that museums can have.” She was named Gateway’s executive director about a month ago, replacing Renee Renner, who is now teaching in the university’s computer science department. McGraw, 48, practically grew up outside, exploring the national parks her family called home during the summers, like Kings Canyon National Park in the Sierra Nevada while her professor/ranger father offered guided tours. “There was a lot of outside time with nature, with trees and identifying things ... I just never came inside as a kid,” McGraw said, smiling. “I was filthy at the end of the

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day and came in and got my bath and went to bed and woke up and went right back outside again.” McGraw said she grew up knowing science was an important part of life and the way humans understand the world and themselves. She developed a protective sense of ownership of the natural world. “As you’re growing up, you feel kind of special, because you’re [living] in this place that’s been set aside,” she said, referring to national parks. “We value this as a society and we’re going to protect it.” Before she landed her new gig, she was the director of the traveling nonprofit Exhibit Envoy, which actually has an exhibit, “Delta Grandeur,” at the Gateway right now. McGraw hopes that her role will allow her to help manage exhibit development and encourage more locally curated, in-house experiences for Chicoans. She’ll also manage the museum budget and staff, and serve as liaison to the campus and community. “I see [the museum] as a place for families to come and interact, a place to learn about some cool thing in science that [students] wouldn’t necessarily learn in class,” she said. “I think it’s a great place for faculty and students at CSU Chico to show their research, show what they’re working on, and Latest exhibit:

“brain: The World Inside your Head” explores how the brain functions and allows humans to learn, think, sleep and dream, along with the dangers, causes and cures of disorders, diseases and mental illnesses. It is open through May 6. Gateway is also exhibiting “Delta Grandeur,” which showcases the diversity of California’s delta, an endangered ecosystem. Gateway Science Museum Hours: noon-5 p.m., Weds.-Sun. 625 esplanade, 898-5130, csuchico.edu/gateway

just to be a place to come and have fun.” Dave Hassenzahl, dean of the College of Natural Sciences, said the university was very fortunate in hiring McGraw because “she’s got everything,” including a broad background in museum management and exhibit development. “We are relying on her and confident she’s going to do really great things at what’s already a really great museum,” he said. “We’ve got a vision of her taking the museum from being a physical museum on the edge of campus to something that is the outreach arm for the College of Natural Sciences … so we can reach even more people around the North State with it.” McGraw has a goal of forging stronger connections with faculty and students on campus, and perhaps creating events geared toward them. Content-wise, she’s looking forward to this summer’s exhibit on climate change, which she said is an important topic to “not ignore” or “shy away from.” “I think it’s a conversation we need to be having all the time, and being a science museum, we can help people understand what climate change is and how it’s going to impact them and how they can help to curb it.” McGraw co-founded the Green Museums Initiative, a committee within the California Association of Museums that promotes environmental sustainability in operations and programming at museums across the state. She hopes to bring that kind of work to the Gateway as well. She hasn’t had a chance to really explore Chico yet, but McGraw said she’s a rural, country girl at heart, so chances are, she’ll be right at home. This week, she’s headed to a statewide conference where she’ll give a presentation about how to nurture staff and promote

healthy jobs at museums, which involves fostering equity and diversity. “We have to be people first,” she said, not workers. “I really think that encouraging women and underserved populations and underserved communities in science is a really important thing. It can’t just all be white men,” she added. “I think looking for the equity in what we do, the representation in who we are and who we serve and what are the stories that we’re telling through exhibits need to be done in a way that they’re really open to everyone, and they’re not being told from perspectives that may be alienating, that may reinforce bias, that may reinforce racism, that may reinforce sexism,” McGraw said. “We have to be mindful of that in everything we do.” □

ECO EVENT Got your GoAt? Future ranchers assemble! Saturday, Feb. 10, is Chico State’s university Farm Sheep unit’s (311 Nicholas C. Schouten Lane) annual educational day, teaching budding young livestock farmers the skills they’ll need to successfully raise and show lambs and meat goats. The event opens up with speakers Dr. Allen Pettey from UC Davis and Dr. Melissa Van Laningham, director of food science at Superior Farms in Sacramento, before Chico State students demonstrate how to care for these animals, what to feed them and how to contribute to a future in sustainable agriculture and responsible domestic resource management. Runs 8 a.m.-1 p.m., contact 898-6024 for details.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo by aShiah Scharaga

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She’s got the beat

billboards and beethoven

Fitness coach Lindsay Canales has always loved getting people moving and the power that physical activity and strength can provide not just on the outside, but on the inside. “I love helping people reach goals or do things that they never thought possible,” she says. Take rhythmic exercising with weighted drum sticks as an example. Canales, 37, is not a drummer, but was immediately intrigued by Pound, a program created seven years ago by two female recreational drummers and athletes in L.A. It’s now taught by more than 10,000 instructors across the globe. It’s essentially a jam session inspired by the drum sticks, Canales says, allowing people to “rock out” while they work out. The San Diego native and Chico State alumna also teaches adaptive physical education classes to children with developmental disabilities at Chico Unified School District, and runs cross training and dance toning classes at Kaia Fit, where she’s a coach. Her Pound courses are separate and do not require a Kaia Fit membership. Canales teaches Pound on Saturdays at 9 a.m. at Kaia Fit, 2700 Hegan Lane, Ste. 108, but she is also available for private events. Classes are $10 each, and everyone is welcome, including supervised children. She can be reached on Facebook, at coach lindsay.lindsay@gmail.com or (619) 933-6507.

What happens at a Pound class? It’s kind of an experience within the hour that you get a little bit of everything. It’s really a combination of strength and balance—there are some Pilates moves. We also go down to the ground. We have core tracks, so songs that target your core. We have songs that target your glutes. A big component is squats and lunges. [During] everything, you’re drumming.

What made you interested in bringing Pound to Chico? [There’s] nothing like it in Chico. It’s not just for a dancer—it’s kind of for anyone that just likes music and cardio and all that mashed up in one. The biggest part of fitness for me is to show people it can be fun. And when people are smiling and coming out of class with good energy

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and saying, “That was fun,” I feel like I’ve done my job. I also like it because I feel like it is something you could just do once or twice, just jump into a class, and catch on because a lot of it is repetitive. The founder says, “If you can clap to the beat, you can pound.”

Why is this a good workout option? I like it because it’s not highimpact, which can be a real positive for a lot of people who have to take impact out for injuries or whatever reason. I think it’s nice that it is a whole body workout. I have people that are like, “I’m sore everywhere.” It doesn’t just isolate one part of the body; it targets everything. To walk in and out and get that full body burn in an hour, I think is really great. —ASHiAH SCHARAgA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

It’s been a rough year for Nicholle Haber-Lewis. I remember the first day I met her, in her new shop, Rouse & Revolt, in the Garden Walk mall. It was Nov. 9, 2016, and we were both in shock over the previous day’s events. Fast-forward a bit and the resale clothing shop was succeeding, even taking over an anchor position in the mall facing Main Street. Then Haber-Lewis got political—she rented a billboard in her store’s name featuring Donald Trump dressed in Nazi garb. It was meant to spark discussion; instead, it sparked anger, directed at Rouse & Revolt and Haber-Lewis personally. She received death threats. The police came into the store to investigate after getting calls that she was dealing drugs and selling stolen goods. Ultimately, it got to be too much. She’d racked up a $2,000 legal bill and, as she put it, her “heart hurt.” Last month she decided to throw in the towel. Sort of. The store isn’t going anywhere. In fact, Haber-Lewis decided to turn it into a franchise. Alicia Parsons and Stacy Short, who are still learning the ropes as Haber-Lewis drafts a full business outline, took over last month and plan to open a second Rouse & Revolt in Austin, Texas, in the near future. “It’s got a great name, and it’s a great brand,” Haber-Lewis said, lamenting: “This was not what I wanted to do. But I wanted the store to succeed. I believe in sustainable fashion and activism and teaching the younger generation that by shopping at Rue 21 and Forever 21, they’re [just] contributing to this culture of waste and excess.” For her part, Haber-Lewis plans to concentrate on getting her master’s in public administration at Chico State and her activism—she’s on the board of the local chapter of the ACLU, president of the Chico State chapter, and an active member of Legal Services of Northern California. And she’s not giving up the fight. Her lawyer recently penned a settlement agreement with Stott Advertising and she says if they don’t sign it—it calls for the billboard to be put back up, among other things—she’ll sue. She also recently filed a cease-and-desist order against the Chico Rants & Raves Facebook page over civil rights violations. That site recently featured a post with hundreds of comments disparaging Haber-Lewis and calling her a thief. “They’re doing a disservice to the community,” she said.

bach away I was told last week that I should swing by 7-Eleven downtown. Turns out the store recently installed outdoor speakers and is now blaring classical music as a way to deter homeless people from congregating out front. Seemed to be working the first time I stopped by. Then, a few days ago, while walking along First Street on my way to the CN&R office, I noticed that the group of people and their dogs and belongings—there are typically five or six of ’em camped out—had merely relocated around the corner. I had to leave the sidewalk to get past them. So, the jury is still out on this one.

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Ken Smith kens@ n ew sr ev i ew. com

The way to

Hope is the operative word at the Iversen Wellness and Recovery Center

T

he guitar at the Iversen Wellness and Recovery Center and Med Clinic rarely remains slung in its wallmounted saddle for very long. By 10:30 a.m. on a recent Thursday morning, it had already changed hands several times before landing in the arms of a young man in a hooded sweatshirt who, for the next half-hour, alternately strummed and tapped the soundboard as he strolled about the bustling building on Rio Lindo Avenue, providing a pulse-like rhythm to drive the energy coursing through the room. It was warm inside the center, in more ways than one. Newly arrived regular attendees—known as “members” of this very unique community, all of whom have experienced mental health challenges—exchanged handshakes and “Howdo-ya-dos?”

After signing in with volunteer staff members, most made a beeline to the kitchen for a hot cup of coffee before settling into the heart of the center, a livingroom-like space appointed with comfortable couches and chairs. There, amid laughter and conversation ringing from every corner, Andrea Wagner and Davy Andrek brainstormed screenplay ideas for the center’s next Diverse Minds event, a showcase of members’ artistic works aimed at celebrating mental diversity and combating stigma against mental illness. They stopped spit-balling to greet Jack Chaney, an elder member wearing sunglasses and a ball cap proudly proclaiming his status as a military veteran. “Every day is a good day; it’s what ya make of it … I’m just glad I’m not on a damned airplane,” Chaney said. Several people laughed at the nonsequitur—a staple of his characteristic comedic styl-

ings—and more laughter erupted as he followed up with, “I don’t like staring down the barrels of machine guns.” Chaney took a seat and continued to roll out one-liners as a beaming, curly haired woman named Judy looked on, loosing frequent, vociferous giggles. Silver-haired Sue Waterreus momentarily set aside her knitting to add a few riddles and punny jokes to the mix. “I just love words—sometimes they can be funny and other times they can be very powerful,” said Waterreus, smiling sweetly. “Our main word here is ‘hope.’” Indeed, hope tops the list of guiding principles—collectively known as the Five Key Concepts of Wellness and Recovery—upon which the Iversen Center is based. The center—which is run by Northern Valley Catholic Social Service (NVCSS), with support from the Butte County Behavioral Health

Department—offers group activities, social opportunities, organized outings and support for individuals experiencing mental illness. The Iversen Center stands as a shining example of shifting paradigms regarding how mental health conditions like depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and addiction are treated. With the exception of the Med Clinic (which is operated solely by Behavioral Health and provides psychiatric care for that agency’s clients on select days), all of the services are free and open to anyone over the age of 18. Though many members come by way of referral from Behavioral Health, no “doctor’s note,” or even an official diagnosis, is required to attend. The center is open to all, but to fully avail of its services, clients must become members. That process is low-barrier, requiring only that newcomers attend an orientation meeting and agree to a simple code of conduct based on mutual respect and safety. Jason Tate, the center’s director, explained that the wellness and recovery model embraced at Iversen is focused on peer support and taps into the wealth of knowledge gathered by those who’ve experienced mental illness. It’s an alternative to what’s known as the traditional “medical model” of mental health care, where treatment is dictated by presumed experts (doctors, therapists) and is focused largely on medication. The wellness model is more holistic, he said, accounting for the mental, spiritual, physical, social and other needs of each individual. “For a long time, people who were living with mental illness were told, ‘This is a chronic condition that’s only Corla Bertrand and Jason Tate serve as the supervisor and director, respectively, of the Iversen Center, which provides activities, support and resources for those challenged by mental health issues. The center’s regular visitors are known as members. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

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FEBRUARY 8, 2018


wellness going to get worse over your lifetime, so you need to take these pills, follow this prescripted expert advice and lower your expectations regarding what sort of quality of life or experiences you can have.’” he said. “The basic idea was, ‘You’re not going to get any better, so let’s try to mask the symptoms.’ Tate said medical treatment is still an important piece of the puzzle, but that “the wellness model says mental health ‘consumers,’ or patients, have valuable insight and should be able to have some say in their treatment. People can learn to live with their symptoms, hang on to hope that recovery is possible, and succeed in society. “Success means something different for every individual … for some people, it may mean being a CEO, and for others it might just mean getting out of bed every morning.” Six days a week (the center is closed Sundays), the building is filled with dozens of people at various points along their personal paths to wellness. The CN&R spent several days at the center last month speaking to staff, volunteers and members about their experiences with mental illness, their struggles, and their successes. Here are just a few of their stories.

A dangerous gift Tate’s own life has been profoundly impacted by mental illness. His father, who he described as “brilliant, accomplished and talented,” was diagnosed with schizophrenia, and ultimately took his own life when Tate was just 3 years old. His father’s illness, as well as experiences with other loved ones who’ve struggled with mental health challenges, provided the impetus for Tate’s involvement in the mental wellness field. He previously worked with family- and youth-oriented programs for NVCSS and Youth for Change, started at the Iversen Center in 2011 as a case manager, and became program manager there in 2015. For much of its existence, the center functioned as a drop-in facility, offering varying levels of support and services over the years. It was founded by Behavioral Health in 2009 with funding from the Mental Health Services Act. Approved by California voters in 2004, the MHSA, or Proposition 63, established a

Andrea Wagner has experienced her own personal difficulties on her way to becoming a mental health professional. She edits and contributes to the Diverse Minds journal, which features art and writing created by members of the Iversen Center and other centers in Northern California. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

tax of 1 percent on private incomes exceeding $1 million annually, with funds earmarked for community-based mental health services. MHSA funding remains integral to the center’s ongoing operation, Tate said. Activity has incrementally increased since NVCSS assumed oversight of the center in 2013. That’s due in part to Tate’s tireless efforts, though he’s quick to credit the success to its members. He noted the center is largely governed by an advisory board made up of seven elected members from the center’s community, and that most of the activity and support groups—the core of the Iversen Center’s services—are likewise determined by members. “Over half of our groups are run by members that we train and support to run them. Every group is grassroots … like, if someone

says they wish we had an anxiety support group, we say, ‘Great, why don’t you run one?’” Tate’s early and ongoing experiences with mental health have helped him develop a unique view of those with mental disorders: that they are the recipients of a “dangerous gift.” “Many people find some aspects of their mental illness give them insights that allow them to see a different part of the human experience than people who don’t have those symptoms,” he said. “It can be beautiful, but of course it’s dangerous. Suicide and selfharm are huge risks for people with mental health issues, and there’s dangers to livelihood and difficulties engaging with culture and society. “The wellness model says that’s all true, but there’s also some insight, beauty, grace and creativity that comes from this.” To foster those positive aspects, the center offers arts-oriented groups of all kinds—music, writing, sewing and arts and crafts—alongside more traditional therapy and support groups. The center also orga-

nizes regular public events, like an annual Wellness and Recovery Fair and Diverse Minds showcases. For those who doubt the positive contributions of those with mental illness, Tate sometimes presents a challenge: “Name a great artist who hasn’t been affected by mental illness.”

Building community, sharing stories Andrea Wagner works as an outreach coordinator and peer assistant for NVCSS and a behavioral health counselor for Butte County, having recently transferred from the latter agency’s Psychiatric Health Facility (PHF, or “Puff Unit,” as it’s colloquially known) to Crisis Services. She’s also facilitated the Iversen Center’s weekly writing group and served as editor of three published collections of writing and art created by that community. She is well-versed in the effects of mental illness, having herself endured a HOPE C O N T I N U E D FEBRUARY 8, 2018

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HOPE C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 1 9

Davy Andrek, a musician and animator who frequents the Iversen Center, created the character Sir Scotty McRockstar, a moon-obsessed Scottish caveman musician and “advocate for strength through mental diversity.” PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVY ANDREK

difficult journey. “I didn’t find working with people with mental health as a cause, it found me,” she said. “It’s who I am, and I feel for people who’ve gone through it because I’ve gone through it.” Wagner said she struggled with depression that led to hospitalization at the PHF in 2005. Still, she got off medication, worked as an intern at the CN&R, graduated from Chico State, became a reporter at the Red Bluff Daily News, and moved to New York with her two children for another journalism job before tragedy triggered another episode. “My oldest son got sick; he had brain cancer and passed away,” she said. “We moved back to Chico because this is where he wanted to spend his last days, and his passing sent me into a downward spiral.” During that time, Wagner said that—like many of the center’s other members—she experienced homelessness, and lived for several months at the Torres Community Shelter. Wagner was introduced to the Iversen Center through her treatment at Behavioral Health, and started organizing the first edition of the Iversen Journal in 2015. She said she was inspired to do so by a poetry book put out by clients of a wellness center she visited in New York, and expanded on the concept to include both writing and artwork created by members. Another journal followed in 2016. The most recent publication—in keeping with a Diverse Minds Film Festival spearheaded by Tate last year—is titled the Diverse Minds North State Journal, and includes contributions from other wellness centers and mental health facilities throughout the region. 22

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FEBRUARY 8, 2018

John McMackin, known to some as the “artist laureate” of the Iversen Center, sketches roughly 100 of his signature “linescapes” monthly, and gives most away for free. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

Each publication is accompanied by a release party, and Wagner said the number of contributions and size of the gatherings has increased exponentially year-by-year. Previous events have featured visual artworks projected on a large screen, readings by contributors and live music by Iversen Center musicians including The Symptomatics, a band born from the center’s weekly music group. Wagner recently started soliciting contributions for the next installment and reached out to the Museum of Northern California Art, which will host a Diverse Minds Art Show and Journal Release event during the first week of November. Wagner and other Iversen staff and members are anticipating it will be their biggest event yet. As for the goals of the Diverse Minds initiatives, Wagner said, “We want to reduce stigma by showing that people with mental health challenges can still create beautiful, amazing and awe-inspiring things, and that we’re not limited by our challenges.” Wagner said the events—the last of which was attended by contributors from as far away as Humboldt County and Yreka—also help build a sense of community, noting that isolation can exacerbate, or even cause, mental turmoil, a situation she sees often. “It also gives the people who submit so much self-esteem and validation. During those parties, when people get up and read their poems and stories, talk about their art … it gives me chills. It’s therapy, and it’s community.”

Self-determination The Iversen Center’s seven-member board meets every Monday morning, and discussions at a recent gathering included planning events: a March outing to the bowling alley, a members-only Valentine’s Day celebration, and the center’s first-ever family night. For the latter, the board decided to temporarily lift the center’s 18-and-up policy to allow members’ children to visit. Presiding over the meeting was Robert Carver, a polite and soft-spoken man who was elected to his position of chairman of the advisory board last year. After adjourning the board meeting, then attending a lively members’ meeting and social with about 40 attendees in the Iversen Center’s main room—a regular Monday event—Carver took a moment to discuss his own journey toward wellness. Carver said he’s been affected by depression, schizoaffective disorder and learning disabilities for most of his life; he also has post-traumatic stress disorder resulting from childhood abuse. He said his condition worsened and he started having suicidal thoughts following the deaths of several family members. He first started visiting the Iversen Center

Robert Carver chairs the Iversen Center’s advisory board, a group of seven elected members who help plan events and set policy. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

five years ago, but—like many people who eventually become active members—it took him several months to start attending groups and become more involved. “I came because I needed guidance as I was working on my recovery,” he said. “I’m still working on it, but that’s when I started reaching out.” He said he initially found some solace in the center’s grief and loss and WRAP (Wellness and Recovery Action Plan) groups, then started attending others. He eventually completed an eight-week facilitator’s training and now runs two groups himself—weekly meetings for stress awareness every Tuesday, and a men’s group on Fridays. His experiences have also helped him branch out in other directions; though he’s never been homeless, he said he’s very concerned about the plight of those who are, and that he regularly volunteers at Vectors, a local program that provides transitional housing for veterans. “I have a big heart,” Carver said. The trait was evident in speaking with him. In fact, he was the first to submit a piece for the next Diverse Minds journal, appropriately titled


“My Big Heart.” “I enjoy coming here,” he said. “The staff and other members have really helped me through my trials and tribulations, and they’ve been there for the good things, too. I think it’s a wonderful place, and I don’t know where I’d be without it.”

Animation auteur

Find the center:

Medical Center’s Infusion Therapy Clinic, where he sketches patients as they receive treatment. He also has seven grandchildren and can regularly be found doing oneline drawings at local events. He completes these intricate works in a matter of minutes without raising pen from paper, and estimates he’s done at least 25,000 of them in the last 40 years, giving the vast majority away for free. At the Iversen Center, McMackin has overseen a number of large-scale group art projects, each of which took several months to complete. One of these cooperative pieces hangs on the most prominent wall there and graces the cover of the 2016 Iversen Journal. He said collaborating with other center members is not much different from what he’s experienced working alongside professional artists during his long career. “I don’t think of what people’s issues are … I just keep them on track, keep them peaceful and related to each other,” he said. “When you care about the work, you move beyond and you move through, you’re able to extend creatively because you’re fully engaged in the thought and the process. You experience the joy of what’s happening.” McMackin is also a lifelong game enthusiast who said he started water-coloring $500 Monopoly bills before the age of 10. He is currently developing Iversen Center Monopoly, an experiential game in which one earns game dollars by completing tasks at the center, like attending particular groups or serving coffee or food. As for his challenges, McMackin said: “My main issue was the loss of my wife in 2002. I got stuck in grief, and wasn’t able to function with the sorrow and despair I felt about her loss. I had to get through a period of not wanting to survive or be where I was. “I eventually became able to deal with some of that and commit myself to living once again,” he said. “It’s still difficult at times, but coming here helps a great deal. “There are a lot of amazing people in this place; we have fantastic image artists, cratftsmen, makers and sewers of all kinds,” he said. “Since I became aware of this community, I have been amused and amazed constantly by the people who come here.”

• The Iversen Wellness and Recovery Center and Med Clinic is located at 492 Rio Lindo Ave. in Chico. It is open 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. weekdays and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. For more information, call 879-3311. • The Northern Valley Talk Line is also operated by Northern Valley Catholic Social Service and is closely tied to the Iversen Center. Peer support can be found by calling the talk line at (855) 582-5554. • The Diverse Minds North State Journal is available at Amazon.com. For more information, contact Andrea Wagner at awagner@nvcss.org.

In the animated music video for the song “I Found a Hope,” a fuzzy-faced character dressed in a red plaid kilt and matching cap is pictured dancing in front of beautifully rendered representations of Chico landmarks like the Senator Theatre and downtown’s City Plaza. The character, Sir Scotty McRockstar, is sometimes accompanied by a gaggle of dancing spirits resembling blue teardrops. “He’s a Scottish caveman musician struggling to be an artist, and he was knighted by the moonlight in a dream,” said Davy Andrek, who writes, performs, records music for and animates a whole series of McRockstar videos. “He wants to sing about his love of the moonlight, but he’s got these little blue ghosties who kinda harass him … but Scotty realizes that when he sings and plays his music, the ghosties dance. “He finds that his challenges help him grow when he’s productive,” Andrek continued. “The ghosties actually make him a better person.” Andrek’s character sketch and another detail he shared—that McRockstar is “an advocate for strength through mental diversity”—prompted the question: Is the character a representation of Andrek himself? “Yeah, a bit … my heritage is Scottish and I’ve faced some challenges. When I was a kid I had a really hard time with life, and ended up in the hospital when I was 19,” said Andrek, who is now 41. “I’ve had to learn to quiet my mind and treat myself better, and I’ve found that being creative and having an artistic outlet really helps. “And this place, it also helps,” he said of the Iversen Center. “If I spend too much time by myself, I’m in my head too much, and that can be bad. So I come here to socialize and there’s a lot of support.”

The Renaissance man When describing John McMackin, Iversen Center members often use the term “master artist,” a title of which the sprightly septuagenarian is unquestionably deserving. “I’m getting old,” he said on a quieter than usual recent afternoon at the center, a sketchbook resting in his lap and a smile on his face. “But I’m young in thought and I don’t like doing nothing, so I’m way too engaged in way too many things.” In addition to visiting the center most days (he rides his bike from his home on Chico’s south side), McMackin is also involved in Toastmasters as well as several senior citizen and church groups; he serves as a Boy Scout leader and commissioner; works as a caregiver for In Home Supportive Services; and is an artist-in-residence at Enloe

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more personal accounts of tragedy and triumph from the center’s members. Nearly all said that the Iversen Center—and the wellness and recovery model— have contributed to significant positive changes in their lives. “We want to bring honor and joy to people who’ve been through a lot … through tough life experiences, through trauma, setbacks, and the difficulties that come along with diagnosis and treatment,” Wagner said. “We strive to create a place where people are accepted for who they are and what they can accomplish, for their thoughts and creativity and tremendous contributions. Ω

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CN&R

23


Arts &Culture Former Tule Lake camp internee Jim Tamimoto talks to Chicoan Diane Suzuki.

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Dclassmate the San Fernando Valley when a threw a ball at her. Hard.

iane Suzuki was in third grade in

“That’s what you get for bombing Pearl Harbor!” he yelled. story and Suzuki didn’t know photo by what he was talking Robert Speer about. It was the 1950s, and Pearl Harbor was rober tspe er@ newsrev iew.c om fading from memory. “I thought he was talking about some kind of Review: flower,” she said during Imprisoned at Home shows through a recent interview. “It aug. 2. sounded pretty.” a series of five In time, she learned lectures and films in about Pearl Harbor conjunction with the exhibit are scheduled and how war hystefor february and ria caused 120,000 March. Visit website people of Japanese for info. descent—80,000 of them American Valene L. Smith Museum of citizens—to be deemed Anthropology potential “enemy aliens” Chico State and, in 1942, forced to 898-5397 surrender their property www.csuchico.edu/ anthmuseum/ and leave their homes to live in one of 10 isolated internment camps behind barbed-wire fences overseen by guards in towers with machine guns. The government called it relocation, but it was really mass incarceration based on race. This shameful violation of Americans’ civil rights is the subject of a compelling and timely new exhibit, titled Imprisoned at Home, at the Valene

24

CN&R

february 8, 2018

L. Smith Anthropology Museum on the Chico State campus. Put together by students in professor William Nitzky’s anthropology exhibition-installation class, it is a stunning collection of photos, videos, government documents, letters, clothing, artwork, posters, even a life-size reproduction of one of the uninsulated cabins the internees lived in. It’s one of the best exhibits of its kind I’ve seen in Chico. As Adrienne Scott, the museum’s curator, expressed it, “We wanted to knock people’s socks off.” They’ve succeeded. For Suzuki, a longtime Chico resident and Peace and Justice Center activist, it was a milestone in her personal journey to understanding the history of her Japanese ancestors. Most of all, she hoped the exhibit would answer a question she’d been asking for years: Why didn’t they resist? She was especially looking forward to meeting Jim Tamimoto, a Gridleyarea farmer and former internee at the Tule Lake Relocation Center who, at the age of 94, is as trim as a fit 70-yearold. He was one of dozens of JapaneseAmericans who attended the exhibit’s opening reception on Tuesday, Jan. 30 (which coincided with Fred Korematsu Day, a day of recognition in California to honor civil liberties in the name of a man who went to jail rather than submit to relocation and whose dogged legal pursuit of justice ultimately prevailed). For the past seven years, Tamimoto

has been giving lectures, titled Tales from Tule Lake, based on his experiences there. He also is featured in an excellent video documentary by Jesse Dizard titled Mr. Tamimoto’s Journey that is included in this exhibit. When war broke out, Tamimoto tried to enlist in the Army but was denied because he supposedly was an “enemy alien,” to which he angrily responded, “I’m not an ‘enemy alien.’ I was born in this country.” Like many internees, however, he refused to sign a pair of loyalty oaths, insisting that the government had no right to question his loyalty. For that he was sent to a special “segregation center” in the vicinity of the massive (19,000 residents) Tule Lake camp just south of the Oregon-California border. There were 36 men in Tamimoto’s block who had refused to sign the loyalty oaths; he is the only one still alive. For Suzuki, he is living testimony that some internees resisted. When Suzuki was growing up, nobody in her family talked about the camps, she said. As Tamimoto told Suzuki when they met at the exhibit reception, “It took me 50 years to talk about this.” In a corner of the exhibit are a couple of panels depicting current exclusionary practices such as the rescission of DACA and President Trump’s Muslim ban. The message seems to be: Don’t let what happened in 1942 happen again. □

by Jerry Miller follows a demanding diva who discovers that her husband, a maestro, has become enamored with another. Thu, 2/8, 7:30pm. $16. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

9

frI

Special Events GOLDEN GRILL: Lunch followed by bingo by the Cal Park lake. Fri, 2/9, 11:30am. $4. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Drive. chicorec.com

Theater A CHORUS LINE: See Thursday. Fri, 2/9, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road. chicotheatercompany.com

LIVING ON LOVE: See Thursday. Fri, 2/9, 7:30pm. $16. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

SLeePING beauTy Friday, Feb. 9 Laxson Auditorium

See frIDay, THEATER


FINE ARTS oN NeXT pAGe

Music THE HANGING OF PINOCCHIO: Chico State music

JUrASSIC ToUr

Saturday & Sunday, Feb. 10-11 Silver Dollar Fairgrounds See SATUrDAy, SPECIAL EVENTS

professor David Dvorin (guitars/electronics) performs a program of original new works with guest musicians Matej Seda (violin), Randy McKean (clarinets), and Clifford Childers (trombone/bass trumpet/harmonica). Sun, 2/11, 2pm. Free. Zingg Recital Hall, Arts & Humanities Building, Chico State, 530-898-5152.

Theater A CHORUS LINE: See Thursday. Sun, 2/11, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road. chicotheatercompany.com

SLEEPING BEAUTY: Direct from Russia, Moscow Festival Ballet performs the classic fairy tale complete with detailed sets and Tchaikovsky’s timeless score. Fri, 2/9, 7:30pm. $10-$45. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 530-898-6333. csuchico.edu

10

SAT

Special Events ART FROM THE HEART: This fundraising event benefits art programs at Blue Oak Charter School and features music, other live performances, hors d’oeuvres, refreshments and a no-host bar with mixologist Scott Barwick. Sat 2/10, 6pm. $30-$50. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: A communitysupported cleanup designed to bring neighbors together and make a positive difference in the community and our waterways. Sat 2/10, 9am. Corner of Pine Street & Humboldt Avenue, Chico. 530-891-6424. becnet.org

BOOK SIGNING: Rachel Middleman of the Art & Art History Department and Sarah M. Pike of the Comparative Religion and Humanities Department discuss their new books. Sat 2/10, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. 530-898-5331.

CASAbLANCA

Wednesday, Feb. 14 Oroville State Theatre See WeDNeSDAy, SPECIAL EVENTS

BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF THE NORTH VALLEY VALENTINE’S GALA: A black-tie-optional evening with music by Holly Taylor and Eric Peter, a champagne reception, hors d’oeuvres, wine and catered dinner, plus live and silent auctions. Sat 2/10, 5:30pm. $125. Boys & Girls Clubs of the North Valley, 601 Wall St. 530899-0335. bgcnv.org

CHICO COLLECTORS TOY & LEGO SHOW: Build, explore and let your imagination run wild with Lego activities, a play area and amazingly detailed displays. Includes a free comic book from Collectors Ink with admission. Sat 2/10, 10am. $2. East Ave Church, 1184 East Ave.

JURASSIC TOUR: The Ultimate Family Dinosaur Adventure includes over 50 full-size dinosaurs, rides, activities and a T. Rex wandering the exhibit. Dig fossils, scale a jungle wall, time travel with virtual reality and more. Sat 2/10, 10am. $23-$28. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. 313-384-8844. jurassictour.com

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA BALLET: Dance revue featuring repertory pieces from Nutcracker, Paquita and a preview of their spring production Giselle. Plus student choreography set to Rachmaninoff, Linke and Mozart. Sat 2/10, 7pm. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

WORLD FOOD FEST: Ali Sarsour’s 10th annual birthday/retirement party with food from around the globe, plus Ali’s legendary baklava. Donations benefit CHAT and the Shalom Free Clinic. Sat 2/10, 5:30pm. Trinity Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St. 530-518-9992.

Music EL REY GRAND OPENING FUNDRAISER: New owners officially reopen the venue with a community fundraiser to benefit preserving and

improving the theater. Includes music from Mystic Roots, Northern Traditionz, Swamp Zen and Low Flying Birds, plus a silent auction. Sat, 2/10, 7pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St. 530-570-8575. elreychicoca.com

Theater A CHORUS LINE: See Thursday. Sat, 2/10, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road. chicotheatercompany.com

LIVING ON LOVE: See Thursday. Sat, 2/10, 7:30pm. $16. Theatre On The Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

11

SUN

Special Events CLASSIC MOVIE DAY: The long-dormant movie series is revived with Chico’s own The

Adventures of Robin Hood. Sun, 2/11, 3pm. $3-$5. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St.

JURASSIC TOUR: See Saturday. Sun, 2/11, 10am. $23-$28. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. 313-384-8844.

LIVING ON LOVE: See Thursday. Sun, 2/11, 2pm. $16. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

13

TUe

acrobatics is a “Cirque Du Soleil-esque” performance—animals not included. Tue, 2/13, 7:30pm. $30-$48. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 530-898-6333. csuchico.edu

14

WeD

Special Events CASABLANCA: Of all the gin joints in Oroville... Enjoy a Valentine’s Day screening of the 1942 Bergman-Bogart classic with chocolates, roses and champagne available for purchase at the theater. Wed, 2/14, 6:30pm. $12-$15. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers Street. orovillestatetheatre.com

WINE & CHEESE PARTY: Celebrate Valentine’s Day with a wine and cheese art reception while benefiting breast cancer support through Project Hope. Wed, 2/14, 6pm. $20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. 530-433-4131. monca.org

Music

Music

FRONT COUNTRY: They’ve played RockyGrass,

DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: “Turn on Your Love Light”

MerleFest and Telluride festivals. Now the San Francisco-based Americana/rock band returns to the Big Room with a rollicking stage show and impressive vocal harmonies. Tue, 2/13, 7:30pm. $17.50. Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

TERRAPIN FLYER WITH MELVIN SEALS: A touring Grateful Dead cover band featuring Seals, a longtime member of the Jerry Garcia band. Tue, 2/13, 7:30pm. $25. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

with one of the world’s premier Grateful Dead tribute bands. The septet’s extensive catalog will stagger even the most die-hard deadhead. Wed, 2/14, 7pm. $30. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. chicotickets.com

SING IT, YOU SAD BASTARD!: Drown your Valentine’s sorrows with music and stories from a jaded crew of single sad saps. Wed, 2/14, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

Theater CIRQUE ELOIZE - SALOON: Acrobats. Giant props. Campy Western music. Trapeze, juggling and comedy. This circus blended with

for more MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE oN pAGe 28

PARADISE BIG BAND VALENTINE’S DANCE: The Paradise Big Band performs a swinging set of jazzy favorites. Sun, 2/11, 7pm. $10. Paradise Ridge Senior Center, 877 Nunneley Road, Paradise. 530-877-6913.

SCRIBES IN LOVE: Using old typewriters, local poets make customized Valentine’s Day poems. Includes refreshments. Sun, 2/11, 1pm. $5. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

VELO-LOVE RIDE: Grab your whip and your honey for a cycling adventure. Mostly flat ride features views of the Grey Lodge Wildlife Sanctuary, blossoming orchards and the mighty Sutter Buttes. Includes lunch, dinner and pre-ride coffee. Sun, 2/11, 8am. $50-$65. Butte County Fairgrounds, 199 E. Hazel St., Gridley. 530-343-8356. chicovelo.org

free LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

EDITOR’S PICK

reTUrN of THe KING After plans were scrapped to turn the historic venue into various other commercial enterprises, El Rey Theatre will celebrate its grand reopening with a benefit to fund restorations and renovation improvements. Bid on silent auction items and get down to the sounds of Mystic Roots, Northern Traditionz, Swamp Zen and Low Flying Birds on Saturday, Feb. 10. Then come back Sunday, Feb. 11, for the revival of the theater’s popular movie series with a screening of The Adventures of Robin Hood, some of which was filmed in our own Bidwell Park. Stay tuned for a slew of concerts, movies and more in the very near future.

febrUAry 8, 2018

CN&R

25


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SLaP THaT CaNVaS Through Feb. 22 Butte College Art Gallery See ART

Art B-SO GALLERY: Print Club, works on display. Through 2/16. Ayres Hall, Room 105.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Slap That Canvas, step up, grab a brush and participate in a collaborative art project. Materials and giant canvases provided—you bring the inspiration. Through 2/22. Free. ARTS Building, 3536 Butte Campus Dr., Oroville, 530-895-2404.

by Tony Natsoulas, Paul DiPasqua and Michael Stevens. Through 3/31. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PARADISE ART CENTER: Inspired by..., artists provide statements explaining how they were inspired to create each piece on display, allowing a peak into each artist’s creative process. Through 2/8. 5564 Almond St., Paradise, 530-877-7402. paradise-artcenter.com

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING: Watercolors of Jim Lawrence, new works on display. Through 2/28. 789 Bille Road, Paradise, 530-877-5673. paradisecsl.org

CHICO ART CENTER: Discovery Series Group

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Show, exhibition featuring the work of artists who have had limited exposure in Butte County. Opening reception February 9 at 5:00pm. Through 3/2. Also, Call for Art, accepting submissions for the center’s upcoming collaborative exhibition with Butte Environmental Council, Livable Planet. Seeking work responding to local, national and global environmental issues. Through 2/11. $25-$35. 450 Orange St. cac.chico arts.org

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Revolutionizing the World, exploring the visual history of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and evaluating the global impact of this historical event. Through 3/16. Chico State, 530-898-5864. universityartgallery.word press.com

BUTTE COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: WWI Exhibition, recently renovated exhibits demonstrating the profound changes in American society caused by The Great War. Through 7/29. 1749 Spencer Ave., Oroville. buttecountyhistoricalsociety.org

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Permanent Exhibits, including the The Janeece Webb Living Animal Museum and the Nature Play Room. Through 12/15. 1968 E. Eighth St. ccnaturecenter.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Brain - The World

artist Jerry Frost. Through 2/28. 254 E. Fourth St. jamessnidlefinearts.com

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: Outdoor Life on the Ridge

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: What, Us Worry?, an exhibition featuring sculptures

february 8, 2018

ing displays of more than 12,000 kinds of tools. Through 6/2. $3. 1650 Broderick St., Oroville, 530-538-2528. boltsantiquetools.com

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS: Paintings, by local

Acquisitions, an exhibition of new works recently added to the Turner collection. Through 2/9. Special talk from Crocker Art Museum curator William Breazeale on 2/8 at 5:30 p.m. in Zingg Recital Hall. Reception to follow in the museum. Chico State, 530-8984476. janetturner.org

CN&R

BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Hand Tools, rotat-

Inside Your Head, an exhibit exploring the inner workings of the brain—neurons and synapses, electricity and chemistry. Through 5/6. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Surprise - New

26

Museums

- Then & Now, presenting a local perspective on the great outdoors and activities such as fishing, hunting, camping, horseback riding, swimming and winter sports. Through 2/25. 502 Pearson Road, Paradise, 530-872-8722. goldnuggetmuseum.com

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Imprisoned at Home, an exhibit on Japanese Americans held at the Tule Lake Incarceration Camp during WWII. Through 5/18. Chico State, 530-898-5397.


MUSIC

Happy new year

2018

Musical ritual

Happy Valentines Day!

year of tHe doG

$5 OFF yOur purchase OF $30 Or mOre Offer good through 2/26/18

OPEN DAILY! FOOD TO GO!

Songwriting is a disciplined practice for Tune-Yards’ Merrill Garbus

Happy Garden CHinese restaurant

180 Cohasset Road • (Near the Esplanade) 893-2574 • www.HappyGardenChico.com

2002-2017

Garbus hated practicAingMerrill music when she was a kid. But

s the daughter of a piano teacher,

looking back on that time is funny to her now, because she’s become devoted to songwriting the same way some are to yoga or meditation. It’s become a fundamental part of her life—a ritual, a daily practice. “It’s taken a long time for me to respect practice in that way, understanding that it’s the only way to get better at anything,” she said. “It is like yoga because you’re forming these by Howard habits; you have Hardee this sort of pact to meet music headon every day, and Preview: that feels really JMaX Productions great.” presents tune-yards Garbus Saturday, Feb. 17, is the force 7 p.m. at the Senator theatre. Sudan behind the critiarchives opens. cally acclaimed Cost: $25 Oakland-based art-pop project Senator Theatre 517 Main St. Tune-Yards, www.jmax an innovative productions.net merger of world music rhythms, indie song craft and socially engaged lyricism. Speaking with the CN&R ahead of Tune-Yards’ show with Sudan Archives at the Senator Theatre on Feb. 17, Garbus described the melange of influences on her new studio album, I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life, and how her musical practice brought them together. Leading up to creating the new album, Garbus was making music for a TV pilot as well as The New Yorker Radio Hour podcast—projects unrelated to her band. “I just wanted to become a better writer,”

she said. On the side, she was also DJing at a bar in Oakland, an experience that served as a lesson on how to make people move on the dance floor. “Dance rhythms have always been a focus of mine,” she said, “but to come at it from a DJ perspective was different for me.” Around the same time, she joined various activist groups, including Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ), a national network organizing white people to act as part of a multiracial majority for equality. She also enrolled in a course at East Bay Meditation Center focused specifically on what it means to be white in America. “So much of my experience with race is based around shame and guilt, which don’t feel particularly useful, most of the time,” she said. “Having a Buddhist framework, which helps people work through those types of feelings, felt like a very productive context for me to address whiteness.” With the subject of white guilt in mind, Garbus set about creating a dance-forward Tune-Yards album with longtime collaborator Nate Brenner. Thanks to a newfound discipline cultivated through meditation, she went into the rehearsal studio on a daily basis and produced an enormous amount of material. “We just made sure I showed up for work every day, which seems

Merrill Garbus (foreground) and Nate Brenner of Tune-Yards. Photo by eliot lee hazel

like an adult way to make music,” she said. “And that was despite all of my doubts about music, too— with everything going on in the world today, it was like, ‘What’s the point of this?’” Garbus says she resolved that sense of futility by dedicating her music to what she cares about— social justice, spirituality and the environment. “Obviously, it’s been a trying time in this country,” she said. “My head was also in the state of our country and the state of the world, and all of those themes made their way into the music as well.” For example, the album’s lead single, “Look at Your Hands,” is a statement on ownership and the injustice of, say, Nestlé profiting off bottling water from a creek in the San Bernardino National Forest. Garbus sings: “Ooh I wanna taste that, waste that/Sell me my own water off of my own land.” Garbus’ recent experiences fed into the themes of I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life, and her relentless ritual of writing songs brought the album to life. Such a working-class approach to making music hasn’t taken the magic out of it for her, though. “It’s done the opposite,” she said. “It feels even more like a devotional practice.” □

DARLINGSIDE LIVE AT

THE BIG ROOM

MONDAY, MARCH 12, 2018 I suggest you see them before they stop playing smaller venues. Amazing four part harmonies. Fantastic, humorous banter between tunes, punctuated by stellar songwriting and music arrangement. One of the best acts I’ve seen in the last few years. Opening the show will be Henry Jamison.

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27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 2/8—WEDNESDAY 2/14 FOREVER ALONE DAY

10SATURDAY

BELLA DONNA

Dateless and alone on Valentine’s Day? Leave your heart at home and head down to The Maltese to wallow in your misery with a group of piteous performers poised to plummet you deeper into despair with Sing It, You Sad Bastard! The sorrowful show features songwriters, storytellers and comedians sharing sadness from the stage, including Don Ashby, Dream Show, Annie Fischer, Alex, J. Brown, Katrina Rodriguez and many more. The silver lining? Proceeds from the Wednesday, Feb. 14, event benefit Catalyst Domestic Violence Services in Chico.

DEFCATS: Classic-rock covers. Sat,

Friday, Feb. 9 Feather Falls Casino & Lodge

2/10, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwined chico.com

SEE FRIDAY

EL REY GRAND OPENING FUNDRAISER:

LONE STAR JUNCTION: Outlaw country classics and original songs at the Box. Fri, 2/9, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

NEVER TOO LATE: Dance and Top 40 hits

08THURSDAY 09FRIDAY

AMERICANA & CLASSIC COUNTRY: The

BELLA DONNA: Spot-on Stevie Nicks and Fleetwood Mac tribute recreates the look, sound and concert experience of the legendary singer. Fri, 2/9, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Dr., Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Last Known Photographs, the Greg Johnson Band and Robert Karch. Thu, 2/8, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 530-521-6473. farmstarpizza.com

CHICO UNPLUGGED: Acoustic music from local singers and songwriters. Thu, 2/8, 7pm. Madison Bear Garden, 916-873-3194. madison beargarden.com

JESUS & THE DINOSAURS: Straight out

PRESENTS:

of Fairfield, landlocked surf punks Jesus & the Dinosaurs join local rippers Bad Mana and Los New Huevos. Fri, 2/9, 9pm. $7. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

in the lounge. Fri, 2/9, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountry casino.com

OPEN MIC: Tito hosts music, comedy,

poetry and more. Fri, 2/9, 6pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main Street. loston mainchico.com

PUB SCOUTS: A Chico tradition: Irish music for happy hour. Fri, 2/9, 3:30pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SURROGATE: The local melodic indierockers are joined by Eager Seas, a pop-rock band out of San Luis Obispo. Fri, 2/9, 9:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

Keep Chico

New owners reopen the venue with a community fundraiser to benefit preserving and improving the theater. Includes music from Mystic Roots, Northern Traditionz, Swamp Zen and Low Flying Birds, plus a silent auction. Sat, 2/10, 7pm. $15$20. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St., 530-570-8575. elreychicoca.com

HANK’S GOOD TIME VARIETY HOUR: Skits, burlesque, comedy and a special V-Day-inspired couples slow danceoff, plus music from Legit Supreme, Scouty Pants & The Dirty Britches and more. Sat, 2/10, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

HOLLYWOOD KNOCKOUTS FEMALE WRESTLING: Check your morals at the door for a night of all-female oil and whipped cream wrestling. Sat, 2/10, 9pm. $10-$20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. tackleboxchico.com

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Dr., Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

THE LOKI MILLER BAND: Superior showman and ripping guitarist Miller leads his band through a night of rock ’n’ roll covers and original tunes. Sat, 2/10, 9pm. White Water Saloon, 5771 Clark Road, Paradise.

HOUSE OF FLOYD: Pink Floyd tribute act plays songs from Barrett through Waters, complete with a professional light and laser show. Sat, 2/10, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls

LONE STAR JUNCTION: Outlaw country from Humboldt County Outlaw

7:30 p.m. (doors at 6:30) Senator Theatre 517 Main St. CELEBRITY JUDGES!

FEATURED PERFORMANCES BY: • Chikoko • XDS

• Muir Hughes, artist, writer and

2018

• Cecile Juliette, Action News Now

board president

HOSTED BY: • Arts DEVO

TICKETS:

CN&R

FEBRUARY 8, 2018

P LU S

!

KEEP CHICO WEIRD

ART SHOW Museum of Northern California Art 900 Esplanade

• Erin Wade, artist and 1078 Gallery

WEIRD C

OSTUME CONTEST

RECEPTION:

Thursday, March 1 6-8 p.m.

$16 in advance

at Chico News & Review office ($16.50 at cnrsweetdeals.com); Blaze N’ J’s, Diamond W, ticketweb.com

$20 at the door

28

tour from Seattle, hardcore band Convictions and garage punks Minority Whip play with local punk bands Criminal Wave and Rogue Squadron. Sat, 2/10, 9pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

MARCH 1-4

founding member of Chikoko

Smokey the Groove

SPONSOR:

MINORITY WHIP & CONVICTIONS: On

TALENT SHOW SATURDAY, MARCH 3

• Kevin Killion,

WEIRD

Country in the lounge. Sat, 2/10, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Visit us on FACEBOOK at

www.facebook.com/keepchicoweird

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THIS WEEK: fIND MOre eNTerTaINMeNT aND SPeCIaL eVeNTS ON PaGe 24 TERRAPIN FLYER WITH MELVIN SEALS: A

JeSuS & THe DINOSaurS Friday, Feb. 9 Maltese Bar & Tap Room See frIDay

touring Grateful Dead cover band featuring Seals, a longtime member of the Jerry Garcia band. Tue, 2/13, 7:30pm. $25. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

14WeDNeSDay

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Stand-up come-

dians test their material in front of a live Studio Inn audience. Wed, 2/14, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

12MONDay

MISFITS: Rockabilly and Americana

music. Jerry Only not included. Sat, 2/10, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade. farmstarpizza.com

250 Cohasset Road. endzone chico.com

SAPPHIRE SOUL: Original blues and dance music with a touch of R&B and soul from veteran Chico fivepiece. Pre-show happy hour from 5-7pm. Sat, 2/10, 8:30pm. Ramada Plaza Chico, 685 Manzanita Court.

MIXTAPE: Cover tunes from the ’60s to today, plus singer Stephanie’s 30th birthday bash. Sat, 2/10, 8pm. Sol Mexican Grill, 3269 Esplanade. solmexicangrill.com

NEVER TOO LATE: Dance and Top 40 hits

TEMPO REGGAE NIGHT: Reggae,

in the lounge. Sat, 2/10, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountry casino.com

dancehall, dub and roots music. This month: Goldy, Bobo Smith, Honey B and DJ Coast. Sat, 2/10, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road. siphosjamaica.com

OPEN MIC: For musicians of all

ages. Sat, 2/10, 7pm. The End Zone,

OPEN MIC MADNESS: A music/

comedy open mic hosted by the notorious Jimmy Reno. Mon, 2/12, 6pm. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

13TueSDay

FRONT COUNTRY: They’ve played

RockyGrass, MerleFest and Telluride festivals. Now the San Franciscobased Americana/rock band returns to the Big Room with a rollicking stage show and impressive vocal harmonies. Tue, 2/13, 7:30pm. $17.50. Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

uNDer THe raDar

Lying somewhere between bluegrass and indie rock, acoustic San Francisco quintet Front Country has been taking the Americana festival circuit by storm, led by gritty and soulful singer Melody Walker. Backed by talented mandolin, bass, guitar and violin players, Walker can stretch from belting out gospel-inspired tunes to restrained melodies. See them live at the Big Room on Tuesday, Feb. 13, when you can hear tracks from their 2017 album Other Love Songs and more.

OPEN MIKEFULL: At Paradise’s only open mic, all musicians get two

songs or 10 minutes onstage. Wed, 2/14, 7pm. $1-$2. Norton Buffalo Hall, 5704 Chapel Drive, Paradise, (530)877-4995.

SING IT, YOU SAD BASTARD!: Drown your Valentine’s sorrows with music and stories from a jaded crew of single sad saps. Wed, 2/14, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.

UPPER RIVER BLUES SOCIETY JAM: A blues jam by the river to benefit Inspire School of Arts and Sciences. Wed, 2/14, 6pm. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road.

Submit your poems— 99 words or less—today!

319 Main St. • Downtown Chico Feb 13 Terrapin Flyer featuring Melvin Seals Feb 17 Low Flying Birds with The Sweet Lillies Feb 23- The HOOLIGANS return to Chico Feb 24 Jelly Bread w/ Midtown Social

Poetry99 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, AT 11:59 P.M.

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March 1 Hirie, Indubious, For Peace Band March 2 Scott Pemberton, Bamboozle March 10 Noche Latina March 17 Mojo Green with Lo & Behold

Make the most out of your Valentines Day gift giving AND receiving this year.

Mar 28 TURKUAZ Mar 30 Cesar Chavez Day- Noche Latina Mar 31 5 Alarm Funk w/ Amburgers

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www.playtime4you.com Sun – Thurs 11a-10p • Fri/Sat 11a-11p • 2961 Hwy 32, #29 895-8463 february 8, 2018

CN&R

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REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The 15:17 to Paris

Clint Eastwood re-creates the 2015 Thalys train attack, during which three American friends (Alek Skarlatos, Anthony Sadler and Spencer Stone—also starring in the film as themselves) were among those who confronted a gun-wielding terrorist aboard a train traveling to Paris from Amsterdam. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Fifty Shades Freed

Sex games for the super rich get even more dangerous thanks to a stalker from the past. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Peter Rabbit

A live-action/CGI update of the classic children’s story with James Cordon starring as the voice of the titular bunny. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Now playing 12 Strong

A modern war drama based on journalist Doug Stanton’s nonfiction book Horse Soldiers, about a team of U.S. Special Forces and CIA paramilitary deployed to Afghanistan following 9/11 to fight the Taliban on horseback. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Darkest Hour

Firing blanks No mystery, no scares in Winchester ghost story

Joe Wright (Pride & Prejudice, Atonement) directs Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in this biopic set during the early days of World War II, when the British prime minister was faced with the difficult decisions in the face of Hitler’s advancing troops. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

4

Hostiles

Tstarring the new haunted house movie Helen Mirren and Jason oward the end of Winchester,

Clarke, a character has a moment in which she by repeats the words, Bob Grimm “I am not afraid.” My sentiments bg rimm@ newsrev iew.c om exactly. Mirren and Clarke head a decent cast in what proves to be a ghost movie void Winchester of any real scares, Starring Helen Mirren personality, or and Jason Clarke. Directed by Michael particular reason and Peter Spierig. to sit and watch it. Cinemark 14, Feather The acting is terriver Cinemas, rible, the editing Paradise Cinema 7. rated PG-13. is sloppy and the special effects are third-rate. It’s all very surprising considering it was written and directed by Michael and Peter Spierig, the brothers who put together the inventive sci-fi thriller Predestination. Clarke plays Eric Price, a doctor addicted to drugs and

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February 8, 2018

alcohol. His wife died due to a self-inflicted gunshot wound via a Winchester rifle, a rifle he also took a bullet from but survived (the script alludes to the notion that he was dead for three minutes before being brought back to life, so he might be able to see dead people). Members of “the board” at the Winchester Repeating Arms Company hire Eric to evaluate the mental health of company owner Sarah Winchester (Mirren), hoping that the disgraced doctor will take their bribe and declare the widow unfit to run her company so they can strip her of control. Eric takes the gig and travels to the infamous house, the admittedly cool-looking, giant abode in San Jose that makes an actual appearance in the film. The real Sarah Winchester and her mysterious house have an impressive ghost story behind them, one that could make for a snappy movie. But this one is just a bunch of nonsense involving Mirren’s Sarah nailing all the rooms shut and trying to avoid

being killed by her possessed (and super annoying) grandson. There’s also the spectacle of Clarke’s embarrassingly bad drunk/stoned acting. Winchester is a ghost movie that trots out the same old tricks from countless ghost movies before it. Ghosts suddenly appearing accompanied by loud soundtrack sting? Check. Ghosts appearing in a mirror after its user adjusts it? Check. Little possessed kids singing a well-known song in that oh-so-creepy possessed-kid kind of way? Check. And the special-effect ghosts are laughable. Dr. Price has a scene with his deceased wife where she looks more like somebody who tried to put her makeup on with the lights off rather than a ghost. The film is one long scene after another of Mirren and Clarke trying to make sense out of the mess. I suspect we’ll be talking about this one again in about 10 months when compiling the year’s worst lists. □

An uncompromisingly brutal western from Scott Cooper, with a spellbinding performance from Christian Bale as Capt. Joseph J. Blocker, a quiet, tired, jaded soldier spending the closing days of his military career in 1892 capturing and imprisoning Native Americans. He has fought many battles, seen many atrocities and committed many of his own. When aging and terminally ill Cheyenne Chief Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi) is granted freedom by the president of the United States, somebody who knows his dialect must escort him and his family back to Montana. Joe is the best candidate for the job, but it’s one he doesn’t want. Cooper, who also wrote the screenplay, avoids sermonizing and takes his sweet time—bringing in a wide cast of compelling characters along the way—for a film that is far from predictable in which nobody is safe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —B.G.

I, Tonya

4

The Shape of Water

The film, set in the 1960s, is in some strange way director/screenwriter Guillermo del Toro’s version of a Disney flick. In addition to violence, nudity, interspecies sex and cuss words, it has a sweetness to it. In an awesome performance, Sally Hawkins plays Elisa Esposito, a mute cleaning woman at a freaky research facility that gets a new arrival: an Amphibian Man (Doug Jones, wonderfully obscured in practical and CGI makeup). The Amphibian Man is accompanied by its keeper, Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon), a menacing man brandishing a cattle prod. A mishap leads to Richard losing a couple of fingers, and Elisa then gets some alone time with the Amphibian Man. She gives him some hard-boiled eggs and plays music for him, which leads to the two gradually falling in love (yep!) and an escape from the lab. The film is perhaps del Toro’s greatest visual accomplishment. Equally beautiful and fierce, not a second goes by when it isn’t one of the best things put on a screen this past year. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

1

Winchester

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Still here Den of Thieves

Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Forever My Girl

Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Greatest Showman Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

4

Lady Bird

Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Maze Runner: The Death Cure

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Paddington 2

Margot Robie takes on the title role in this biopic on the tumultuous life of one-time U.S. Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

4

based on the Pentagon Papers, a leaked government study on the history of U.S. involvement Vietnam. It was a move that raised the ire of then-President Richard Nixon, and put the careers of people like publisher Kay Graham (Streep) and Editor Ben Bradlee (Hanks) in major jeopardy. Spielberg not only takes this opportunity to put great actors in play, but also makes the film a grand testament to the golden age of print journalism. The Post is an impressively staged account of a pivotal moment in our history and, at a time when freedom of the press is actively being challenged by a sitting president, an important movie for the present and future. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

3 5

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

The Post

Perhaps the most important journalistic battle in American history gets the Spielberg treatment in The Post, starring a stellar cast that includes Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks. The film explores The Washington Post’s decision in 1971 to print articles

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

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Maltese Bar & Tap Room, the Gnarly grill was out back loaded with a batch of sizzling onions story and luring me to photo by the patio. In the Jason Cassidy parking lot of the new Secret Trail j ason c @ Brewing Co., newsrev iew.c om Gnarly owner Nick Stiles and Gnarly Deli his partner in www.facebook.com/ sammiches, Eve gnarlydeli gnarlydeli@gmail.com Hamilton, were posted up behind the gleaming silver cart ready to serve up a tasty pun—like the “Ooo Mommy” dog—to go along with my brew. And, most recently, at United Healthcare, where I just happened to be cruising by on my bike and ran into the Gnarly pop-up tent out front. OK, that last encounter wasn’t really by chance. Even though Gnarly Deli and I seem to run in the same circles, I was craving one of their meat-and-bread concoctions last week and couldn’t just wait for our paths to cross again. So, I looked up the week’s schedule posted on Facebook and rode my Schwinn out to 20th Street. Stiles (aka Hank Duke, local comedian, musician and host of the Maltese’s Good Time Variety Show) opened Gnarly Deli a little over a year ago with the goal of making “the very best sammiches in the world.” Sammiches, of course, include hot dogs—a point

The Juan Popper from Gnarly Deli.

that’s hilariously argued by Stiles on social media and reflected on his straightforward menu. He normally features three to four cleverly titled offerings, with one or two standard sandwiches and a couple of dogs. Among the many rotating choices, there’s the Meat Slut, a sloppy Joe with ’Merican cheese and crispy fried onions on a brioche bun; the Lucille, with prosciutto, blue cheese, green apple slices, candied walnuts and honey drizzle on a baguette; and my personal favorite, the Ooo Mommy Dog ($6), a quarter-pound all-beef dog with teriyaki, nori, green onions and wasabi mayo on a sesame bun. It’s a gorgeous creation, with a generous topping of green onions and slivers of nori sticking to the wasabi mayo zig-zagging atop the dog. The nori is the kicker, and its earthy/briny flavor makes the Ooo Mommy live up to its name. The appeal for me with Gnarly Deli is that all the creations I’ve tried are fun, unique and wellcomposed. Unlike many modernday comfort-food purveyors, Stiles isn’t merely piling a bunch of crazy ingredients on top of one another for the sake of being over the top. The flavor combinations are as well conceived as they are varied. For my recent sammich trek, I ordered two of the day’s

selections—Reggie Alert ($8) and Juan Popper ($6)—with the plan of eating just half of each. However, I didn’t consider how it might look with me sitting down and tucking two lunches, so I pedaled out of sight and into a corner of the WinCo parking lot to eat. The Juan Popper is a Gnarly standby, a quarter-pound beef dog topped with shredded cheese, barbecue sauce, sour cream and crispy (and freakin’ amazing) fried jalepeños. It’s a beautiful creation, with my only complaint being that the cheese was cold on top when it would’ve worked better melted to the dog. The Reggie Alert featured about the most flavorful and juicy sausage I’ve ever had (and I have the grease stains on my pants to prove it). The sausage is placed on a bun with red sauce, then topped with pepperoni slices and cheese and flipped over to grill the toppings in place. Perfect and exactly as described: “pepperoni pizza meets Italian sausage with mozzarella and Parmesan.” I wish I could say that I stuck to the plan and finished only half of each generously portioned creation, but ... maybe that’s what’s meant by “gnarly.” Just a dude alone, shredding a couple of sammiches, devouring the tasty gnar while sitting on a curb in a grocery parking lot. □ FEBRUARY 8, 2018

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ARTS DEVO

IN THE MIX

by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

Teeming 2 New Fumes rad Cult

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On this sophomore effort, Texan Daniel Huffman—the noise musician and visual artist who goes by the moniker New Fumes—shows off his skills in creating sonic collages, finding a sweet spot where lo-fi weirdness meets pop sensibilities. Huffman pushes the boundaries of his melodies, as on “Goodbye Planet,” layering howling crystalline high tones with more abrupt intrusions of sawing noises in a kind of tornado effect, with his voice low and hazy on the sonic horizon. On “Billy, I’m a Living Animal,” Huffman combines chant-like hooks with staccato beats and a smattering of synth sound-effects. The sound is a mix of buoyant 1990s guitar-driven rock and outer-space synth atmosphere that harkens to The Flaming Lips (in fact, the Lips’ Wayne Coyne makes an appearance on the single “Rioter’s Milk”). At times, these feel less like songs and more like brief glimpses through passing windows—a product, perhaps, of Huffman’s visual background. Go into it with an open mind; it’s worth it.

MUSIC

—Robin Bacior

WhitmanWeb iwp.uiowa.edu/whitmanweb/en An epic, century-and-a-half-old free-verse poem might not seem the most inviting material for someone scrolling a smartphone over coffee, but thanks to the University of Iowa (UI), the world of Walt Whitman is now as accessible as your Facebook feed. WhitmanWeb is a collaboration between UI’s International Writing Program and the long-established online Walt Whitman Archive (whitmanarchive.org), and its centerpiece is “Song of Myself,” the most famous work from Whitman’s Leaves of Grass collection. Initially a 52-week online course, the site now hosts all 52 sections of the poem on individual pages, with each featuring a forward written by Whitman scholar Ed Folsom and an afterward written by the director of UI’s International Writing Program, Christopher Merrill. Additionally, there’s an audio reading of each section, plus a different vintage photo—most of Whitman—on each page. “Song of Myself” was Whitman’s break from the old world in favor of establishing a unique American voice born of this country’s experiment in democracy, and this highly digestible format with expert guidance is a very gratifying way to revisit the seminal work at a time when our divided country could greatly benefit from its egalitarian idealism.

Felt Suuns

Folkie From Old Chico (to the tune of “Okie from Muskogee,” with apologies to

—Jason Cassidy

Secretly Canadian An album that elicits Radiohead and Yo La Tengo comparisons? While that would normally qualify as blasphemy, in the case of Montreal’s Suuns, it holds up. The four-piece’s fourth full-length album for Secretly Canadian, Felts, grabs hold immediately with soft church bells that cut to heavy-footed drums and an electric hook that feels reminiscent of traditional Arabic melodies. The song “Baseline” has the sort of somber appeal of a Yo La Tengo tune mixed with a gripping, quick pulse and blooming synth interludes. Meanwhile, “Make It Real” lilts by with a minimal, perfectly paced verse over a soft groove. These aren’t just easy pop tunes; there’s a strong, dark thread running throughout, with crunchy layers in places (“Daydream”) and a tension that never breaks but instead keeps the listener alert—kind of like a Radiohead tune. I told you, it’s really good.

MUSIC

—Robin Bacior

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CN&R

FEBRUARY 8, 2018

his bike through Lower Bidwell Park on the way to the CN&R office. It takes one song to get to work, and the selection for today was a Bob Dylan cover of “This Land Is Your Land.” The halting phrasing of his intimate rendition was the ideal soundtrack for the perfect sunny winter scene: bare trees against blue skies, and Woody Guthrie’s enduring words talking me down the path winding alongside a rushing Big Chico Creek. It was all I could do to not keep riding out in search of some ribbon of highway to wherever it might take me. As I sit in the office, my reflective mood is undoubtedly the product of staring at a couple of empty desks where two of my best friends—both of whom would’ve deeply appreciated the vibe of my morning commute—normally would be sitting. Howard Hardee, man of action and nature, Ken Swagger whose adventurous spirit keeps him outdoors always; and Ken Smith, musician and warrior poet, who is the reason why I (and many others, I suspect) seek out the words of Woody, have left the building. Both worked here for more than six years, and thankfully, they will continue to write for the CN&R as freelancers while simultaneously seeking out writing opportunities beyond the boundaries of this publication. So, my dudes are still in town. Two of the great traits Ken and Howard share are an insatiable curiosity about the world around them, and a sensitivity to the individual circumstances of people they encounHoward “Man Guy” Hardee ter. This not only contributes to them being great writers, but also makes them pretty great people to party with, and I look forward to many years of sharing beers and hearing all about what they find in all their rambling and roaming. Excelsior, my friends!

OTHER FOLK Since I’m in the music spirit, I want to give a shout out to a local musician, Michael Bone, who a few months ago, via his 1day Song Club, posted a fantastic bit of protest pop (written in one day!) on the topic of Donald Trump, called “My Peace Will Outlive You” (“Why are you ripping our hearts out?/Breaking our love down?”), that was included in a story on anti-Trump music published in a handful of weekly newspapers across the country in November. Hear the song and a few other local Trump-inspired tunes Bone compiled at 1dayclub.com/song-64-trump. And while I’m at it, here are some folk/country song lyrics sent to me a couple of weeks ago by local musician/writer Steve Metzger, a tribute to Chico’s musical nature:

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MY TWO DUDES This morning, as he does every morning, Arts DEVO rode

Merle Haggard) We love playing music here in Chico/We love when friends and neighbors sing along/There’s nothing else that makes us quite as happy/We like livin’ free and singin’ songs We still make a party out of singin’/We love guitars, fiddles, mandolins/And, yes, sometimes our hair gets long and shaggy/Like it did in San Francisco way back when I’m proud to be a folkie from old Chico/A place where music changes me and you/We still swap our songs around the fire/Singin’ Cohen, Dylan, Prine, and Guthrie too We still go to the protests down on Main Street/But you know an angry mob just won’t be seen/We’d rather wave our peace signs than Old Glory/And do our best to keep the planet green I’m proud to be a folkie from old Chico/A place where music changes me and you/We still swap our songs around the fire/Singin’ Willie, Towns and Merle and Emmylou/We still swap our songs around the fire/In Chico, California, USA


February 8, 2018

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF February 8, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): British

athlete Liam Collins is an accomplished hurdler. In 2017, he won two medals at the World Masters Athletics Indoor Championships in South Korea. Collins is also a stuntman and street performer who does shows in which he hurdles over barriers made of chainsaws and leaps blindfolded through flaming hoops. For the foreseeable future, you may have a dual capacity with some resemblances to his. You could reach a high point in expressing your skills in your chosen field, and also branch out into extraordinary or flamboyant variations on your specialty.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When he

was 32, the man who would later be known as Dr. Seuss wrote his first kid’s book, And To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. His efforts to find a readership went badly at first. Twenty-seven publishers rejected his manuscript. On the verge of abandoning his quest, he ran into an old college classmate on the street. The friend, who had recently begun working at Vanguard Press, expressed interest in the book. Voila! Mulberry Street got published. Dr. Seuss later said that if, on that lucky day, he had been strolling on the other side of the street, his career as an author of children’s books might never have happened. I’m telling you this tale, Taurus, because I suspect your chances at experiencing a comparable stroke of luck in the coming weeks will be extra high. Be alert!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A survey

of British Christians found that most are loyal to just six of the Ten Commandments. While they still think it’s bad to, say, steal and kill and lie, they don’t regard it as a sin to revere idols, work on the Sabbath, worship other gods, or use the Lord’s name in a curse. In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to be inspired by their rebellion. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to re-evaluate your old traditions and belief systems, and then discard anything that no longer suits the new person you’ve become.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): While

serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Don Karkos lost the sight in his right eye after being hit by shrapnel. Sixty-four years later, he regained his vision when he got butted in the head by a horse he was grooming. Based on the upcoming astrological omens, I’m wondering if you’ll soon experience a metaphorically comparable restoration. My analysis suggests that you’ll undergo a healing in which something you lost will return or be returned.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The candy cap

mushroom, whose scientific name is Lactarius rubidus, is a burnt orange color. It’s small to medium-sized and has a convex cap. But there its resemblance to other mushrooms ends. When dried out, it tastes and smells like maple syrup. You can grind it into a powder and use it to sweeten cakes and cookies and custards. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, this unusual member of the fungus family can serve as an apt metaphor for you right now. You, too, have access to a resource or influence that is deceptive, but in a good way: offering a charm and good flavor different from what its outer appearance might indicate.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A grandfa-

ther from New Jersey decided to check the pockets of an old shirt he didn’t wear very often. There, Jimmie Smith found a lottery ticket he had stashed away months previously. When he realized it had a winning number, he cashed it in for $24.1 million—just two days before it was set to expire. I suspect there may be a comparable development in your near future, although the reward would be more modest. Is there any potential valuable that you have forgotten about or neglected? It’s not too late to claim it.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The U.S. Geo-

logical Survey recently announced that it had come up with improved maps of the planet’s agricultural regions. Better satellite imagery helped, as did more thorough

by rob brezsny analysis of the imagery. The new data show that the Earth is covered with 618 million more acres of croplands than had previously been thought. That’s 15 percent higher than earlier assessments! In the coming months, Libra, I’m predicting a comparable expansion in your awareness of how many resources you have available. I bet you will also discover that you’re more fertile than you have imagined.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1939,

Scorpio comic book writer Bob Kane co-created the fictional science-fiction superhero Batman. The “Caped Crusader” eventually went on to become an icon, appearing in blockbuster movies as well as TV shows and comic books. Kane said one of his inspirations for Batman was a flying machine envisioned by Leonard da Vinci in the early 16th century. The Italian artist and inventor drew an image of a winged glider that he proposed to build for a human being to wear. I bring this up, Scorpio, because I think you’re in a phase when you, like Kane, can draw inspiration from the past. Go scavenging through history for good ideas!

CN&R

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all advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of acceptance. further, the News & review eview specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&r is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&r assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): I was watching a four-player poker game on TV. The folksy commentator said that the assortment of cards belonging to the player named Mike was “like Anna Kournikova,” because “it looks great but it never wins.” He was referring to the fact that during her career as a professional tennis player, Anna Kournikova was feted for her physical beauty but never actually won a singles title. This remark happens to be a useful admonishment for you Sagittarians in the coming weeks. You should avoid relying on anything that looks good but never wins. Put your trust in influences that are a bit homely or unassuming but far more apt to contribute to your success.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A

Chinese man named Wang Kaiyu bought two black-furred puppies from a stranger and took them home to his farm. As the months passed by, Wang noticed that his pets seemed unusually hungry and aggressive. They would sometimes eat his chickens. When they were two years old, he finally figured out that they weren’t dogs, but rather Asian black bears. He turned them over to a local animal rescue center. I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because I suspect it may have a resemblance to your experience. A case of mistaken identity? A surprise revealed in the course of a ripening process? A misunderstanding about what you’re taking care of? Now is a good time to make adjustments and corrections.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According

to ancient Greek writer Herodotus, Persians didn’t hesitate to deliberate about important matters while drunk. However, they wouldn’t finalize any intoxicated decision until they had a chance to reevaluate it while sober. The reverse was also true. Choices they made while sober had to be reassessed while they were under the influence of alcohol. I bring this to your attention not because I think you should adhere to similar guidelines in the coming weeks. I would never give you an oracle that required you to be buzzed. But I do think you’ll be wise to consider key decisions from not just a coolly rational mindset, but also from a frisky intuitive perspective. To arrive at a wise verdict, you need both.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Charles

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CLASSIFIEDS

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DANSDEALS530, GOVEGAN2017 at 270 E. 9th Street Chico, CA 95928. RHYANNA JARRETT 270 E. 9th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RHYANNA JARRETT Dated: January 2, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000004 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAS PALO ALTO PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 18 Laguna Point Road Chico, CA 95928. JUNRU WANG 18 Laguna Point Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JUNRU WANG Dated: January 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000020 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADDISON MOUNTAIN PRODUCTS, KURTIS SALVAGNO at 18056 Deer Creek Highway Forest Ranch, CA 95942. KURTIS LON SALVAGNO 18171 Deer Creek Highway Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual.

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Signed: KURTIS SALVAGNO Dated: December 13, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001645 Published: January 18, 25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIBERTY TAX SERVICE at 2454 Notre Dame Blvd #110 Chico, CA 95928. LINDA NEWMAN 1901 Dayton Road #46 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDA NEWMAN Dated: January 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000049 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEARTBURN RECORDS at 520 Olive Street Chico, CA 95928. JOSHUA RENE GARCIA 520 Olive Street Chico, CA 95928. ALEXANDRA SUSAN KOKKINAKIS 520 Olive Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ALEXANDRA KOKKINAKIS Dated: December 19, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001660 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALLURE SALON at 2575 Ceanothus Ave Suite 168 Chico, CA 95973. ANGELA TAMAYO 3170 Caribou Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELA TAMAYO Dated: December 21, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001674 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DIXON ORCHARDS at 180 Marybill Ranch Road Chico, CA 95928. THOMAS V DIXON 180 Marybill Ranch Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THOMAS V. DIXON Dated: January 11, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000062 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as I FISH POKE BAR THAI KITCHEN at 1008 W. Sacramento Ave Ste A2 Chico, CA 95926. NAI LAWI CHAN MON 8522 Maple Hall Drive Sacramento, CA 95823. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NAI LAWI CHAN MON Dated: January 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000051 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MUSIC AND MONTESSORI at 99 Limpach Road Chico, CA 95973. KARA RENEE TUPY 99 Limpach Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KARA R. TUPY Dated: January 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000032 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DIVERSE CITY TEE at 6318 Glory Road Paradise, CA 95969. LOREE CLAIRE LAMPKE 6318 Glory Road Paradise, CA 95969. ASHLEY CARLENE LUNSFORD 6318 Glory Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: LOREE LAMPKE Dated: January 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000056 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WORTHINGTON MEDIA SERVICES at 270 E 18th Street, Unit A Chico, CA 95828. JEFFREY PAUL WORTHINGTON 270 E 18th Street, Unit A Chico, CA 95828. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEFFREY PAUL WORTHINGTON Dated: January 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000053 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE OF PARADISE, PARADISE THAI CUISINE, SOPHIA’S AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE at 7641 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. KHEK MANKHAMSENE 7639 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KHEK MANKHAMSENE Dated: December 27, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001689 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WHOLE HEALTH SUPPLY at 1975 Bruce Road #324 Chico, CA 95928. VEPRINITE, LLC 2485 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 370 PMB 8 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SAM KATZMAN, MANAGER Dated: January 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000019 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as POUND WITH LINDSAY at 1492 Elliott Road Paradise, CA 95969. LINDSAY CANALES 1492 Elliott Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDSAY CANALES Dated: January 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000045 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CHICO ANIMAL HOSPITAL at 3015 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. DR CRAIG CALLEN 21443 Biggers Lane Butte Meadows, CA 95942. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: DR CRAIG CALLEN Dated: December 28, 2017 FBN Number: 2016-0001102 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PITTS STOP CAFE at 15474 Forest Ranch Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. CHRISTY MARIE PITTS 12745 Nicolas Rd Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTY PITTS Dated: December 20, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001662 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUE DIAMOND AGGREGATE at 15539 Nameco Rd Forest Ranch, CA 95942. BRADFORD THOMAS REICHE 15539 Nameco Rd Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRADFORD THOMAS REICHE Dated: January 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000044 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COASTAL CONNECT LLC at 436 Maple Street Chico, CA 95928. COASTAL CONNECT LLC 436 Maple Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CONNOR NUTTALL, CHIEF EXECUTIVE Dated: January 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000041 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE 530 BRIDE at 25 Bellarmine Court Chico, CA 95928.

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VERONICA ENNS 9412 Corbett Court Durham, CA 95938. DELPHINE ANNE WINTER 1987 Belgium Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DELPHINE WINTER Dated: January 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000014 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KIZER LAND CARE at 660 High Street Oroville, CA 95965. CRAIG AARON KIZER JR 660 High Street Oroville, CA 95965. STEPHANIE MARIE KIZER 660 High Street Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CRAIG KIZER Dated: January 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000108 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as XTREME SCREEN CO at 1981 Bending Oak Way Chico, CA 95928. ALLAN SAMUEL THORNE III 1981 Bending Oak Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALLAN THORNE III Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000096 Published: January 25, February 1,8.15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DOWNTOWN LIQUOR AND MARKET at 598 E. 8th Street, Suite 140 Chico, CA 95928. SAYEGH BROTHERS, INC 598 E. 8th Street, Suite 140 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000086 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LIQUOR BANK #2 at 915 Main St. Chico, CA 95928. SAYEGH/BASEM, INC 598 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000087 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LIQUOR BANK #1 at 6026 Clark Rd Suite B Paradise, CA 95969. SAYEGH/SAMAAN, INC 598 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000088 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CITY LIQUOR AND MARKET at 3028 Esplanade Suite A Chico, CA 95973. CITY LIQUOR AND MARKET, INC 598 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000089 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CALIFORNIA PARK MARKET at 800 Bruce Rd, Suite 400 Chico, CA 95928. SAYEGH BROTHERS, INC 598 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000090 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RAY’S LIQUOR at 207 Walnut St Chico, CA 95928. SAYEGH BROTHERS, INC 598 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000091 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HWY 32 MINI MART at 1295 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. SAYEGH BROTHERS, INC 598 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000092 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WINE CELLAR at 958 East Ave Ste D Chico, CA 95926. SAYEGH BROTHERS, INC 598 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SAM SAYEGH, PRESIDENT/CEO Dated: January 17, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000093 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KATSKILL HILL, REDSTONE CELLARS, REDSTONE VINEYARDS at 94 Orange Ave Bangor, CA 95914. MARK RUSSELL HARRISON 1032 El Curtola Blvd Walnut Creek, CA 94595. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK R. HARRISON Dated: December 21, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001665 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PEACE OF MIND BILLING SERVICES at 1430 East Ave., Ste 4B Chico, CA 95973. JODIE HOLLAND 582 Morgan Dr #2 Chico, CA 95973. PAMELA SEID 1257 Warner St Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PAMELA SEID Dated: January 12, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000068 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MONALISA TOUCH CHICO at 1058 Mangrove Ave Suite 2 Chico, CA 95926. GREGORY LYNN DAVIS MD 6600 Gregory Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GREGORY L. DAVIS Dated: January 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000074 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JEEPTRAIL at 701 West 11th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. THOMAS ROBERT LITTLE JR. 701 West 11th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TOM R LITTLE Dated: January 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000060 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as APPLIANCE RESALE at 2205 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95926. DEBBI KAYE SLIGHTOM 810 W. 8th Ave Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL RAY SLIGHTOM 810 W. 8th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MIKE SLIGHTOM Dated: January 8, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000038 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PRESTIGE OILS WORLDWIDE at 1151 Marian Ave Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL METCALF 1151 Marian Ave Chico, CA 95928. LEVI RYAN 1151 Marian Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by Copartners. Signed: DANIEL METCALF Dated: January 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000103 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NUTRISHOP CHICO EAST AVE at 855 East Ave Chico, CA 95926.

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DENVER ALAN SWININGTON 3416 Marguerite Ave. Corning, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DENVER SWININGTON Dated: January 12, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000069 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DANCING DAISIES BOTANICALS at 1297 Parque Dr Chico, CA 95926. GEORGE BRIAN FREDSON 1297 Parque Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GEORGE BRIAN FREDSON Dated: January 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000048 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name DANCING DAISIES BOTANICALS at 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. MARIROSE DUNBAR 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. GEORGE FREDSON 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: GEORGE B. FREDSON Dated: January 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2013-0000798 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

FICTITITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NEW VIEW VENTURES at 5250 Country Club Drive Paradise, CA 95969. FAITH EVELYN SHELTON 5250 Country Club Drive Paradise, CA 95969. LARRY GENE SHELTON 5250 Country Club Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: LARRY G. SHELTON Dated: January 18, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000101 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AMIGOS DE ACAPULCO at 6145 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. RAMIRO DILLANES APARICIO 3549 Esplanade Spc 241 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAMIRO A DILLANES Dated: January 16, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000075 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as POOLS BY DREW at 1415 Sheridan Ave Apt #24 Chico, CA 95926. DREW W ALDEN 1415 Sheridan Ave Apt #24 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DREW ALDEN Dated: January 8, 2018

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FBN Number: 2018-0000035 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PLEASANT VALLEY MOBILE ESTATES at 1675 Manzanita Avenue Chico, CA 95926. EVERETT B. BEICH 77-105 Shasta Lane Indian Wells, CA 92260. TIMOTHY E BEICH 1 River Wood Loop Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TIMOTHY E BEICH Dated: January 23, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000117 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PHOENIX PROMOTIONS at 2960 Sandi Drive Chico, CA 95973. GREGORY CLARE VINSON 2960 Sandi Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GREGORY CLARE VINSON Dated: January 5, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000031 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLOSSOM YARD CARE at 1030 Eaton Road Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER DAVERN 1030 Eaton Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER DAVERN Dated: January 19, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000106 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORCAL WAREHOUSE at 3150 Hwy 32 Unit L Chico, CA 95973. KEITH HANKINS 3268 Hwy 32 Chico, CA 95973. CHRISTINA LOUISE POWELL 3268 Hwy 32 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: CHRISTINA POWELL Dated: January 25, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000131 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLAUDE THE DRAGON at 819 Justeson Road Gridley, CA 95948. TASHA ZANOTTO 819 Justeson Road Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TASHA ZANOTTO Dated: January 9, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000052 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AQUARIAN LEASING ENTERPRISES at

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2990 Hegan Ln Chico, CA 95928. SHANE DAVID SCOTT 2990 Hegan Ln Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHANE D. SCOTT Dated: January 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000140 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SCOTT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 121 W. 5th St Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD SCOTT 121 W. 5th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD SCOTT Dated: January 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000137 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CASINO CHICO at 968 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICHARD SCOTT 121 W 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD SCOTT Dated: January 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000138 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MARINEANDBOAT DIRECTORY, POWERSPORTS HUB, POWERSPORTS ONLINE at 121 W 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD SCOTT 121 W 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD SCOTT Dated: January 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000135 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as IBUX at 121 W. 5th St Chico, CA 95928. IBUX LLC 121 W. 5th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RICHARD SCOTT, PRESIDENT Dated: January 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000136 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BICYCLEDIRECTORY, CYCLEDATA, POWERSPORTSDIRECTORY at 121 W 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. INFORMATION AGENT, INC. 121 W 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RICHARD SCOTT, PRESIDENT Dated: January 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000134 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUE OCEAN MASSAGE at 389 Connors Court Suite B Chico, CA 95926. HONG BING YANG 2260 Apple Orchard Ct Rancho Cordova, CA 95670. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HONG BING YANG Dated: January 29, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000143 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 1230 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. JEANNE NEWTON CHICO REALTY, INC. 1230 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEANNE NEWTON, OWNER/BROKER Dated: January 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000127 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AMA BUSINESS CONSULTING at 180 Alvin Court Chico, CA 95928. AARON MICHAEL ANDERSON 180 Alvin Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON M. ANDERSON Dated: January 4, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000022 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PREWRATH CHART at 283 Idyllwild Circle Chico, CA 95928. ALLEN HADIDIAN 283 Idyllwild Circle Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALLEN HADIDIAN Dated: January 24, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000122 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO FLAX LLC at 853 Arbutus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. CHICO FLAX LLC 853 Arbutus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SANDRA FISHER 853 Arbutus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. WILLIAM D VAN ALSTYNE 853 Arbutus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SANDRA FISHER, CEO Dated: January 31, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000161 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MULTIFAMILY ASSET ADVISORS at 123 W 6th Street Ste. 130 Chico, CA 95928.

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APARTMENT EQUITIES INC 123 W 6th Street Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. TIM EDWARDS 670 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: WES HILL Dated: December 21, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001668 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LAS TAPATIAS #2 at 1148 W East Ave Ste H Chico, CA 95926. MA GUADALUPE CAZARES-DELGADO 75 Harvest Park #126 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MA GUADALUPE CAZARES Dated: October 2, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0001313 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE RUSTIC ROSE at 3029 The Esplanade Suite 9 Chico, CA 95973. NICOLE THOMAS 13081 Orchard Blossom Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NICOLE THOMAS Dated: January 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000155

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D2A NETWORKS at 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. WIRELESS WIZARD SOLUTIONS, LLC 1197 Ravenshoe Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DAVID GUADRON, MANAGER Dated: January 30, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000147 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DWYER LOGGING at 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DAKONA LEE DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DOMINIC SILAS DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DAKONA DWYER Dated: February 1, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000176 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TRIM BUDDIES at 939 Karen Drive Chico, CA 95926. ANDREW DESENA 882 East 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. JESSE WILLIAMS 939 Karen Drive Chico, CA

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95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ANDREW DE SENA Dated: January 26, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000139 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORCAL CLEANING PROS at 3569 E. Eaton Rd. Chico, CA 95951. PAOLOA GUZMAN 3569 E. Eaton Rd. Chico, CA 95951. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PAOLA GUZMAN Dated: January 10, 2018 FBN Number: 2018-0000058 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

NOTICES NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on February 22, 2018, personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Skyway Mini Storage, 8095/8097 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969 (530) 877-5000 Time: 10:00 am Stored by the following person(s): 25 - RONALD HOFFIE All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Agents reserve the right to halt sale if bid falls short of pre-determined fair market value on any given unit. Published: February 8,15, 2018

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. PRESTON AVILA #280ss and #282ss (misc. boxes) MICHAEL AZEVEDO #345cc1 (dresser, bike, boxes) DAVID AND LEDON BRANTLY #229ss (misc. boxes) DAVID DUNCAN #504cc (tools, posters, boxes) GARY GREER #424cc (misc. boxes) CHLOE HORTON #447cc (fishing gear, boxes) SUSAN JOHNSON #367ss (Dresser, table, boxes) MARY NELSON #255ss (misc. boxes, clothes) TYLER PILLIOD #500cc (misc. boxes) CARSON REEK #494cc (boxes, dresser, bookshelf) BRITTANY WHITING #272ss (boxes, clothes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: February 24, 2018 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage 65 Heritage Lane Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: February 8,15, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SAGAN SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SILAS ALLEN TROY DONALD Proposed name: SILAS ALLEN TROY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

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appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 16, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: December 28, 2017 Case Number: 17CV02752 Published: January 18,25, February 1,8, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CATRINA PACHECO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CATRINA ELLISSA PACHECO Proposed name: BELLAMAE ELLISSA PACHECO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 23, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 16, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00095 Published: January 25, February 1,8,15, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JEREMY FOSTER Proposed name: JEREMY FORBES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition

this Legal Notice continues

february 8, 2018

without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 23, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: December 15, 2017 Case Number: 17CV02833 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RYAN DANIEL WOOD Proposed name: RYAN DANIEL GRIFFIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 9, 2018 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 4, 2018 Case Number: 18CV00029 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DAVID D ECHEBERRY CHRISTINA J ECHEBERRY AKA CHRISTINA J COWLEY YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services

this Legal Notice continues

Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: May l7, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV01390 Published: February 1,8,15,22, 2018

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CHICO CONSOLIDATED GOLD MINING COMPANY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, AND ALL PERSONS UNKOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD ON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO AND DOES 1 THROUGH 100, INCLUSIVE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: DANIEL E. BAILEY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: TIMOTHY D. FERRIS 200981 Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 343-0100 Dated: August 14, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02433 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DAVID M DIAZ YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: September l5, 2017 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 17CV02761 Published: February 8,15,22, March 1, 2018

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE NELLIE FAYE MILLER To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NELLIE FAYE MILLER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BRENDA D. MILLER MCELFRESH in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: BRENDA D. MILLER MCELFRESH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 20, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of

this Legal Notice continues

either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: 5859 Old Olive Hwy. Oroville, CA 95966 Case Number: 18PR00017 Dated: January 16, 2018 Published: February 1,8,15, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JAMES D. GAINES ALSO KNOWN AS JAMES DOUGLAS GAINES To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JAMES D. GAINES ALSO KNOWN AS JAMES DOUGLAS GAINES AND JAMES GAINES A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHARLES R. GAINES, SR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHARLES R. GAINES, SR. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 27, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner:

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NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 18PR00033 Dated: January 24, 2018 Published: February 1,8,15, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE WILLIAM M. CHRISMAN AKA WILLIAM CHRISMAN To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM M. CHRISMAN AKA WILLIAM CHRISMAN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: ANGELLA MARIE WENTZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: ANGELLA MARIE WENTZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 20, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-18 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Case Number: 18PR00035 Dated: January 25, 2018 Published: February 1,8,15, 2018

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LEORA LOUISE ROSE To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LEORA LOUISE ROSE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CATHERINE COTA in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CATHERINE COTA be appointed as personal representative to administer the

this Legal Notice continues

estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or conseted to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 20, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: MICHAEL M. ROONEY/ RONALD T. MARQUEZ Rooney Law Firm 1361 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926 (530) 345-5678 Case Number: 18PR00030 Dated: January 23, 2018 Published: February 1,8,15, 2018

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There’s one guy I reach out to every year for his annual real estate market forecast. I generally refer to him as The Finance Guy. He has proved to be so reliably wrong in the last ten years or so, that we need only apply the opposite to whatever he says about the coming real estate market, and there you have it: the correct forecast! For instance, last year he said, “2017 is a wild card, my friend. Though I can appreciate the predictions of the so-called experts in your California Association of Realtors, I must point out that they are woefully lacking in the data necessary to analyze with any accuracy the complicated structure of real estate markets. In short, your forecasting colleagues are in over their heads. They are dangerously optimistic with their predictions this year.” In short, The Finance Guy’s 2017 prediction couldn’t have been more opposite than the eventual reality. He ran around the bases backwards. He dove headlong into the wrong end zone. He dunked at the wrong end of the

court. Score one for the other team. I told my friend Jack I was going to visit The Finance Guy to get his prediction for 2018. “You mean the guy whose head is so big he can barely walk through a door? Mr. Ego-on-a-Stick?” asked Jack. “Hey,” I said, “he has a full catalog of knowledge in that head of his.” “He’s full of it, all right,” said Jack. Anyway, I did meet with The Finance Guy to get his lowdown for 2018. “So where are we headed with interest rates and real rstate prices?” I asked. “Let’s just say we are setting sail into turbulent waters with storms looming on the horizon,” said The Finance Guy. In other words, smooth sailing and clear skies ahead.

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon. Email escrowgo@aol.com, or call 530-680-0817. See an archive of columns at douglovesrealestate.com.

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Great Value Newer 5 beds 3 baths home in Chico $389,000 3/3 blocks to park/ downtown $259,000

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EmmEtt Jacobi Kim Jacobi (530)519–6333 CalBRE#01896904 (530)518–8453 CalBRE#01963545

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

359 Aleut St 17 Pistachio Dr 13850 Comice Ct 7 Budlee Ct 2 Budlee Ct 2625 Amanecida Cmn 1228 Glenn Haven Dr 929 Saint Clair Dr 682 E 6th St 1610 Laburnum Ave

Biggs Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$201,000 $662,500 $535,000 $505,000 $495,000 $410,000 $375,000 $360,000 $345,000 $319,500

4/2 5/4 4/3 4/3 3/2 2/3 4/2 4/2 3/1 3/2

Vintage Avenues Home! 3/1.5 bath 1618 sq ft w/ updated kitchen, bonus rm, din&gdual nHVAC pe pane windows and Detached 2 car garage. $329K Don’t wait on this one!

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

1728 3416 2501 2613 2100 2103 2510 2086 1336 1628

2575 Mariposa Ave 1733 Mulberry St 175 E 5th Ave 1085 E Lindo Ave 2306 Mariposa Ave 1535 Salem St 2664 Fair St 601 Crister Ave 1414 Boucher St 1067 Diablo Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$300,000 $289,000 $260,000 $252,000 $250,000 $218,000 $205,000 $180,000 $140,000 $129,500

3/3 4/2 2/1 2/1 3/2 2/1 3/3 3/1 2/1 3/2

1633 1270 1255 1196 1260 784 2127 1219 704 1170

february 8, 2018

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2-Homes on .77 of an acre in town! Custom 3 bed/2 bth, 3,000 sqdftin + 3gbed 2 bth, 1,110 2nd home ...$575,000 pen

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manufactured Home in a Park, 55 years +, 2 bed, 2 bth, 1,512 sq ft, with lovely upgrades. .................$122,500

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beautiful california Park 3 bed/2.5 bath, 2,738 sq ft with views of the lake, hardwood floors, and more! ...........................................................................................................................................................$585,000 easy care yard, 4 bed/ 3 bath, 1,880 sq ft, tile flooring and redwood touches and a warm cozy feeling ...........................................................................................................................................................$340,000

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 22, 2018 – January 26, 2018 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 778 Brandonbury Ln 16299 Forest Ranch Rd 30 Lone Star Ct 1865 Sandhill Crane Ct 286 Obermeyer Ave 13670 Bader Mine Rd 6474 Boulder Dr 6241 Woodman Dr 52 Rocky Point Rd 408 Black Bart Rd 50 Deerwood Dr 38

CN&R

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Forest Ranch Gridley Gridley Gridley Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$121,500 $345,000 $555,000 $372,500 $252,518 $650,000 $271,000 $360,000 $355,000 $323,182 $245,000

3/3 3/4 6/4 4/3 3/2 2/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 2/2

FeBruary 8, 2018

SQ. FT. 1608 2207 1794 3468 1502 2945 1762 2232 1602 2360 1534

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

1340 High St

Oroville

$173,000

2/1

1589

2460 Monte Vista Ave

Oroville

$120,000

3/2

1350 1157

2310 Mesa Ave

Oroville

$90,500

3/2

4901 Zephyr Point Rd

Paradise

$1,386,500

4/4

5161

4601 York Rd

Paradise

$575,000

3/2

2308

5775 Fickett Ln

Paradise

$342,000

3/3

1849

1438 Stonehurst Dr

Paradise

$253,000

3/2

1147

6538 Clark Rd

Paradise

$169,000

2/1

1136

6007 Hazel Way

Paradise

$156,000

2/2

1079

1713 Bille Rd

Paradise

$120,000

3/2

1472


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Amber Blood | 530-570-4747 exCellent business & living opportunity! 1BD/1BA/den home, sits back off street, inside laundry room. 900 square foot shop wired for three-phase. $159,000 ad#42

Susan G. Thomas | 530-518-8041

greenbelt setting! 2BD/2BA home, open floor plan, kitchen/dining have luxury flooring, master bed w/ jetted tub in bathroom $188,000 ad#43

Donna Cass | 530-520-8156 stunning 3bd/3ba, private entranCe wood laminate flooring, fireplace, great for entertainment, separate unit on property, 2 car garage & RV parking, circular driveway $379,950 ad#51

Wendee Owens | 530-872-6809

iNCrease your reaCH To people iNTeresTed iN selliNg or buyiNg a New Home. Chico News & Review would like to help increase your reach to people interested in selling or buying a new home. We are creating a new page on our website, NorCal Homes, which offers several ways to keep you in touch with potential home buyers/sellers. We attract readers to this page with a new map showing the last four weeks’ of home sales in the Butte County area, including sale prices. If you are already active on social media, we can spotlight your social media posts on this page. If you have Open Houses, we can include them in a new Open Houses calendar. The CN&R website is the third most viewed website in Butte County, and therefore your presence on this page will greatly increase the number of people who see your social marketing. In addition to the nearly 118,000 readers you reach each week through the printed pages of the CN&R, you can now reach an additional 21,500 readers/month on the CN&R website.

To be part of the NorCal Homes page, contact your advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.

February 8, 2018

CN&R

39


stop

the cycle

start the healing

sexual violence is not a gender issue, but a human issue Fact: 9-10% of all rape survivors outside of a criminal institutions are male 16 years of age Fact: Many men experienced sexual abuse by the age of 18 Fact: The greatest age risk for males being sexual violated is age 4

we are here to listen

24hr crisis line: 530-342-raPe (7273) collect calls accepted

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 2889 Cohasset Rd., Ste 2, Chico • 725 Pine St., Red Bluff Business office: Monday-Friday 10am-6pm, excluding holidays

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