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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 40, ISSUE 21 THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2017 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

WEird CHICO PAGE

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FREAKY FRIDAY 9 MEMPHIS SOUL 22 OMG FOODS 29


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january 19, 2017

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CN&R

INSIDE

Birds, Wildlife, Art, Books, food… experience it All At the 18th AnnuAl

Vol. 40, Issue 21 • January 19, 2017 4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS 

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Asst. News/Healthlines Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Calendar Editor Daniel Taylor

Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandy Peters Design Manager Lindsay Trop Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Designer Kyle Shine Marketing/Publications Manager Serene Lusano Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultant Faith de Leon Office Assistant Sara Wilcox Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Lisa Torres, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen

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ARTS & CULTURE 

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

CLASSIFIEDS  

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REAL ESTATE  

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Snow Goose Festival

WednesdAy – sundAy JAnuAry 25 – 29 chico, cAliforniA snowgoosefestival.org 530-345-1865 info@snowgoosefestival.org

Snow GooSe FeStival oF the paciFic Flyway wildliFe art exhibit & openinG reception Snow GooSe FeStival wildliFe art exhibit January 27 to February 3, 2017 noon – 5:00pm “Downtown” ChiCo 325 main Street (ChiCo ChilDren’S muSeum) publiC parking lot at w 2nD & wall StreetS feast your eyes on wonderful art by artists whose subjects include wildlife and habitat along the pacific flyway and beyond. this impressive one-week exhibit located at 325 Main street in downtown chico, will feature the work of many artists in a variety of media, which may include sculpture, clay, oils, fiber arts, watercolor, acrylics, mixed media, glass, and photography.

art openinG & welcome reception FriDay, January 27, 2017 5:00pm - 8:00pm, Free to the publiC “Downtown ChiCo” 325 main Street, ChiCo (ChiCo ChilDren’S muSeum) publiC parking lot at w 2nD & wall StreetS

On THE COVEr: “BalanCEd lEarning CurVE ii,” PHOTO By naTasHa rOOT (www.nrOOTPHOTOgraPHy.COm) dEsign By Tina Flynn

by Kathleen O’Hara

President/CEO Jeff von Kaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Executive Coordinator Carlyn Asuncion Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Dargitz Sweetdeals Coordinator Courtney DeShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Project Coordinator Natasha VonKaenel Developers John Bisignano, Jonathan Schultz System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Kate Gonzales N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes

SaturDay, January 28, 2017 5:30pm - 10pm bell memorial union auDitorium CSu, ChiCo Corner oF 2nD Street anD CheStnut Street, ChiCo, Ca CoSt per perSon: $39 aDult, $25 youth (17 yearS anD younger) anD StuDentS with iD beer & wine (no hoSt)

353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website www .newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2225 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at Bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 41,000 copies distributed free weekly.

you are invited to attend the snow Goose festival Wildlife Art opening & Welcome reception, friday, January 27, 5:00pm – 8:00pm. View the inspiring collection of artwork, enjoy refreshments, splendid conversations, and a no-host bar. Bring a friend and meet the artists, along with fellow festival participants, presenters, and field trip leaders. this is a truly special evening you won’t want to miss!

“GatherinG oF winGS” banquet & Silent auction

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Bob Grimm, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Ryan J . Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Saunthy Singh, Robert Speer, Brian Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Interns Mason Masis, Gabriel Sandoval

COVER STORY  

This guy saves you money.

OPINION 

don’t miss the biggest event of the snow Goose festival, our “Gathering of Wings” Banquet featuring keynote speaker, Alvaro Jaramillo, international Bird Guide and Author. this treasured evening is a mix of great food, great company and great entertainment and is anticipated by many as the one chance per year they have to visit and catch up with fellow birders and friends in the community. Join field trip leaders, workshop presenters and all our hard-working committee members and volunteers in celebrating this special evening.

SpeCial book Signing Alvaro Jaramillo is also the author of many books, including Birds of Chile, American Birding Association Field Guide to Birds of California, and New World Blackbirds, The Icterids. Alvaro Jaramillo will be available for book signings after his keynote address.

Silent auCtion silent auction begins at 5:30pm the vibrant silent Auction tables will accompany us while we dine at the BMu and will include a variety of exquisite items including works of art, wine, and services. your financial participation directly affects our ability to ensure that the snow Goose festival remains the north state’s premier birding event, so enjoy the evening bidding for an event or item that you love. you won’t be disappointed!

january 19, 2017

CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, Ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

The power of protest On Friday (Jan. 20), Donald Trump will be inaugurated with the lowest

GUEST COMMENT

Live from D.C. E

xtreme Makeover: Government Edition (or how reality check became reality show). Let’s start with the so-called “father of public relations”—Edward Bernays, nephew of Sigmund Freud. Beginning in the 1920s, Bernays began to influence consumer purchasing by using the psychoanalytical ideas that his uncle and his uncle’s contemporaries formulated for treating their patients. These psychoanalytical techniques, promulgated in subterfuge form by Bernays, in time became increasingly sophisticated while the basic underlying by principle remained the same: Rick Vagts “I don’t need this item, but it The author, a Chico will make me feel better about resident, is a general myself.” This occurred in an age contractor, father, when broadcasting information musician and retired en masse occurred via periodicals stagehand. and soapbox platforming. Now enter 1930s radio: wireless vaudeville, sponsored soap opera serials, subscription-free minus the cost of the device, deus ex machina. Welcome to the dawning of celebrity worship! The FDR Fireside Chat broadcasts helped influence mutual development 4

CN&R

January 19, 2017

of anxious listeners for a reality check with the acquired confidence from a source that earned the public’s trust. Picture this 1940s to present: deus ex machina meets camera obscura meets the internet.com. What the radio did for television, the television did for the Internet. Interacting social media outlets allow anyone the star-power illusion to be a cloakand-blogger network correspondent, this-just-in programmer or show host—brought to you by personalized pop-up sponsors; the circus is in the building. Imagine repurposing This Old House for a television special: Spectacular remodel of public property (the White House) under the working title Make America Great Again! We will use the Constitution as a blueprint; mitigate challenging building components and specifications in the name of national security; hire subcontractors (cabinet appointments) to dazzle the common man with lawful structural interpretations, identified in the Bill of Rights, as perversions of justice made respectable and a press secretary parroting scripted reportage briefings to tell the public, “love it, learn to love it—absolutely love it!” (Insert commercial break here: “Doubletalk got you down? Take a little advice, like Alice, from the Queen of Hearts, ‘It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backward.’”) □

approval rating of any incoming president in at least the last 40 years during a ceremony that more than 50 House Democrats have pledged to boycott following the president-elect’s controversial comments about civil rights hero Rep. John Lewis—and pretty much everything he’s said and done on his journey to the White House. Meanwhile, throughout the country, from the West Coast to the Eastern seaboard, protests are planned for the day of and day after his swearing-in outside of the U.S. Capitol. In Washington, D.C., alone, officials from the National Park Service, the agency that grants protest permits, say the response is unprecedented. Unsurprisingly, most of those headed to our nation’s capital are there in opposition to a Trump presidency. Then there’s the international discord. Demonstrations planned in 32 other countries bring the grand total of Trump inauguration protesters to an estimated million-plus. The North State’s favorite college town is ahead of the curve when it comes to opposing a Trump administration. By Saturday, in Chico alone, there will have been five anti-Trump protests since the general election. Well done, Chicoans. It’s safe to say that Donald Trump is the most polarizing president-elect in modern American history. There’s a lot to protest, of course. This is a man who likes to talk out of both sides of his mouth, so nobody knows what he’s planning to do about health care for the nation’s poor and middle class—those who have to worry about the consequences of losing insurance when Congress repeals Obamacare. Social Security is at stake, too. On the campaign trail, Trump said point blank that he wouldn’t cut it, nor would he cut Medicaid or Medicare. We haven’t heard him echoing that pledge since the election, though, so we don’t know whether he’ll stand by senior citizens, the poor and disabled people or if he’s going to side with the high-ranking Republicans who want to dismantle those safety nets through privatization and voucher schemes. We also must prepare to protest cuts to public-school funding. Trump’s pick for education secretary, multibillionaire Betsy DeVos, is not only wholly unqualified for the post, as was demonstrated earlier this week during her Senate confirmation hearing, but she is also a corporatist who has spent more than a decade attempting to undermine public education by, among other things, lobbying for taxpayer funding of private schools, including religious institutions, under the moniker of “school choice.” Get ready for that term to resurface in a big way. Of course, we know how Trump feels about addressing global warming. He’s said it’s a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese. Trump’s already assured the fossil-fuel industries that he plans to dismantle Environmental Protection Agency regulations. That message came through loud and clear when he announced climate change contrarian Scott Pruitt as his pick for EPA administrator. Pruitt has a history of joining some of the biggest polluters in the world in efforts to block clean air and water rules. Speaking of polluters, Exxon Mobile CEO Rex Tillerson, a man with no military or government experience, is Trump’s pick for secretary of state, the person who’s fourth in line to the presidency. Tillerson has strong ties to Russia and Vladimir Putin through his business interests. His potential conflicts of interest are many and, like most of Trump’s other nominees, Tillerson has not been fully vetted by the Office of Government Ethics. Trump’s forthcoming presidency is a plutocratic dream and American nightmare. The best way to combat what it represents is to protest, organize and prepare for an inevitable revolution, whatever form that takes. Don’t underestimate the power of protest. Think of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Betty Friedan, Harvey Milk and other civil liberties activists who got their hands dirty. So, on Friday or Saturday—or any day, for that matter—join a demonstration and speak truth to power. The real work begins now. □


LETTERS Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

talkin’ cops I’ve been accused a few times of being a cop hater by people who have confused my criticism of the unprofessional behavior of certain leaders of the Chico Police Officers’ Association (and instances of excessive force by individual officers) a few years back with disdain for law enforcement in general. One of my relatives is a retired Chico officer. He and several of his old-school colleagues whom I’ve interviewed over the 17 years I’ve been a reporter in this town know me better than that. In fact, I ran into one such retiree a few years ago, and he told me that 1) he agreed that the police union’s new spokesmen were attempting to hold the city hostage during contract negotiations by getting the public riled up about how Chico was going to hell in a handbasket, and 2) some of the younger officers were of the instant-gratification mentality. “They want their toys,” he told me. It infuriated many CN&R readers that, while Chico was deep in the red and had just avoided bankruptcy during the Great Recession, the CPOA’s leaders were more concerned about shaking down the city. It further infuriated them that five of the seven City Council members voted shortly thereafter to approve a three-year contract that cost the city an additional $1.5 million yet did not put any additional officers on the streets. The department was sorely understaffed at that time, with 64 sworn officers. Then-Chief Kirk Trostle said the CPD needed at least 83 to adequately service the city. It’s been roughly two years since then, and the economy has improved greatly, which has allowed the department to do a lot of hiring. According to Chief Mike O’Brien’s recent staff report on CPD, the agency has an allocation to pay for 92 sworn officers. That number currently includes six who are in training, one in the academy, one who’s injured and nearing retirement, and two open positions. By mid-year, all posts should be filled, O’Brien estimated. In short, the department is in much better shape today. That’s great for the community. Now there’s talk about bumping the staffing up incrementally to 105 officers, as per the suggestion of the nonbinding Police Staffing Plan that community members, business leaders and city personnel crafted a few years ago. My question: Can the city afford it? O’Brien’s report notes that each entry-level officer costs the city just under $100,000 in salary and benefits. Keep in mind that the Chico Fire Department is asking for money to preserve some of its formerly grant-funded positions. Where’s that discussion? With employee costs rising 7 percent to 8 percent each year, and lacking pension reform or a miraculous surge in local retail spending (neither will happen), the city cannot sustain significantly higher staffing levels. Don’t be surprised when talk of a sales tax devoted to public safety resurfaces. More on that in the future, I’m certain. In closing, I want to give a shout out to CPD Officers Cameron Kovacs and Winston Capucion—along with the other officers I didn’t speak with—who responded to CN&R last week when I called 911 after hearing a belligerent and unstable man who’d hidden himself overnight in a suite in our building. We were impressed with their response time (a few minutes at most) and ability to remove the man peacefully. Thank you, officers.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

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Two on the cover Re “House of cards” (cover story, by Evan Tuchinsky, Jan. 12): Dear Republicans: Instead of criticizing the intent of [the Affordable Care Act], refine the vision. If it’s too expensive, figure out how to make it more affordable. If there’s too much red tape slowing things down, cut through it. Hire eager millenials to speed up the pace. Let’s not go backward to a more ruthless Darwinian approach to the health of our people. Rather, embrace an earnest attempt to mend what needs fixing. And give us concrete, practical alternatives to achieve this honorable goal: saving American lives against the ravages of disease right here on our own soil.

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You completely failed to mention the reason for repeal of the Affordable Care Act—the simple fact that it would profit the very rich to the tune of billions and billions of dollars. It’s true that the exceedingly rich pay a large amount into ACA. It’s also true that they’re still exceedingly rich—with people like Rep. Doug LaMalfa to do their work. The rich want that money back. Health care be damned. The nation be damned. Republicans want to repeal a Republican-originated plan—first presented by Bob Dole, implemented by Mitt Romney, and market-based— which only became objectionable when it was presented by a Democratic black man. Another glaringly simple fact is that Butte County residents will be robbed of what citizens of every advanced nation now enjoy—the simple presence of affordable health care, free of preconditions. The real story is that none of our local elected leaders are doing anything to protect us from this impending disaster. LaMalfa publicly supports repeal. Back to wondering if illness means death or bankruptcy for 32,000 souls LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 in Butte County alone, in the richest nation on Earth. That’s the story. Tell it in proper context. Paul Switzer Chico

Editor’s note: That repealing the law would provide a tax cut to the nation’s wealthiest residents was the topic of last week’s Second & Flume column (see “High stakes,” Jan. 12).

A little history Re “Shelter from the storm” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper, Jan. 14): Ostensibly lending heft to Councilman Randall Stone’s opinion of a new homeless camp, the CN&R notes that Stone “chairs the Greater Chico Homeless Task Force ….” Lest we misapprehend the nature of the task force: A little over a year ago, the former chair, Pastor Ted Sandberg (presumably a follower of the homeless Jesus of the Gospels) spoke in favor of homeless criminalization laws. That was the same night Stone delivered one of his screwball soliloquies and voted for a crazy quilt of anti-homeless statutes known as the Offenses Against Waterways Ordinance. Stone has a decidedly patchy record, going back to his 2013 recommendation that we turn sprinklers on the homeless. In view of Stone’s history, I’m not surprised by his characterization of Joel Castle’s heroic attempt to establish a homeless camp as: “Flagrantly disregarding the law, appearing to deviate from lease terms, and straining efforts to find solutions doesn’t do anybody any good.” Grossly underappreciated is Castle’s kinship with Thoreau, Gandhi, King and anyone who practices civil disobedience in response to injustice. Lastly, there is some irony in the fact that Stone, now chair of the task force, made federal homeless “dollars disappear” [see that story by Howard Hardee in the Jan. 12 issue] by voting for homeless criminalization. Patrick Newman Chico

Editor’s note: Councilman Stone did originally vote in favor of the ordinance. However, he dissented when the law came back for an expansion. 6 

CN&R 

january 19, 2017

All about the EC Re “Millions of meaningless votes” (Guest comment, by Dan Johnson, Jan. 12): Dan Johnson’s guest comment displays a complete ignorance of the need for the Electoral College unless he believes in rule by selfishness and bribery and that every state deserves to live by his liberal beliefs. If we did not use the Electoral College and went by popular vote, just five cities would dictate who our president would be due to their massive populations. Every state, including those very conservative ones in the Bible Belt, would have to live under liberal rule imposed on them by New York, LA, Chicago, Dallas and Miami. Why not, they have the popular vote! California alone has as many in population as nearly half the other states in our country and with Texas, New York and Florida own the controlling number of votes. Why not just poll those states and tell the rest to go pound sand as Johnson suggests because he wanted Hillary Clinton to win like every other liberal on the government dole! How about promise the half of Americans who already don’t pay taxes $100,000 each and get the popular vote that way? Or maybe just promise those five states huge pork projects to enrich those people to get votes! Make any sense? Garry Cooper Durham

I agree with Dan Johnson that the Electoral College “is antithetical to the ‘one person, one vote’ vision of democracy.” But, I would not encourage folks to hold their breath if they expect the Electoral College (EC) to disappear. It remains a key part of the Founding Fathers’ structural design to protect their plutocratic system (rule by and for the rich). As Michael Parenti writes in his classic Democracy for the Few: “For the founders, liberty meant something different from democracy. It meant liberty to invest, speculate, trade, and accumulate wealth without encroachment by the common populace.” Despite being democratic in form (Electoral College an exception), the U.S. government remains

plutocratic in substance. This means absent a pro-democracy revolution from the bottom, plutocratic interests are the only people with the power to reform the system (i.e., eliminate the EC). As the propertied class, it is not in their interest to “reform” a system in either form or substance that promotes and protects their capitalist interests so well from what the Founding Fathers feared most: the popular passions and misjudgments of the “have-not” majority. Beau Grosscup Cohasset

I know who rigged the election. And I have their names, too. It was the Founding Fathers, those scalawags of the Enlightenment. The Electoral College was constructed as a safeguard. The president was never meant to be elected by the popular vote. (We’ve all seen dictators elected by “popular vote.”) At first, the framers proposed at the Constitutional Convention that Congress should elect the president, but it was deemed that this would lead to cabals and intrigues. So it was decided that the states should elect the president. The Electoral College was formed to dilute influence among the states to prevent dictatorships. And it seems to have worked since 1776. Mike Peters Chico

That’s no moon Re “‘Don’t vilify peacemakers’” (Letters, by Linda Furr. Jan. 12): I was initially motivated to write a detailed retort to Linda Furr’s praise of Vladmir Putin as a peacemaker in the Syrian conflict. I would have pointed out that the rebels were obviously convinced to “lay down their arms and go home” (wherever “home” might be since Aleppo was destroyed), but that the “convincing” was not so much by Putin’s altruism as it was by the continued bombing of schools, hospitals and sanctuaries for women and children who no longer had homes anymore. But then I recalled a discussion many years ago with a woman who firmly believed the moon was a coin suspended in the sky and not a globe. She told me, “It looks just like a big penny hanging up there,

and I will always believe that is what it is.” Case closed! Dean Carrier Paradise

About that wall The only wall I know of that has largely achieved its purpose is the one around San Quentin prison. Even that wall has been climbed over. The Great Wall of China was certainly an engineering feat, but it did not keep anyone in or out. The Berlin Wall was a catastrophe. After World War I, the French spent millions on an “impenetrable wall” called the Maginot Line, which was supposed to keep the Germans out. Hitler laughed and sent his army around the wall. I have lived near the Mexican border and saw how useless the walls and fences were. There were so many tunnels under it, the roads nearby were caving in. Trump doesn’t have a clue of what he’s doing. I’m glad I no longer fly airplanes for Uncle Sam, because this man is going to get us in another stupid war. One of the greatest things that President Obama did was to get us out of the war in the Middle East and stop the daily flights of planes full of caskets of our deceased soldiers. I’m sure Trump, who was a 4-F draft dodger (four times), will not volunteer his two sons to lead the charge for his “secret plan” to eliminate Isis. Don Rogers Chico

Proper perspective Re “Pooh-pooh parade” (Letters, by Kathie Mononey, Jan. 12): Like Vinny Barbarino used to say on Welcome Back, Kotter: “I’m so confused.” De La Salle High School in Concord has long been a football powerhouse. None of the northern athletic league teams would dare step on the field with them, even with Aaron Rodgers at the helm. Guess what, folks? De La Salle got trounced in the state championship game against St. John Bosco of Bellflower, 56-33. Not to lessen the great accomplishment of Pleasant Valley High, but let’s put things in their proper perspective rather than jumping all over the editor, similar to how Electoral

College/Vladimir Putin designate Trump did when he made a complete ass of himself by jumping down the throat of civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis. De La Salle plays in Division I; our local yokels are in Division IV. Like the obsolete Electoral College, some zealous fans need to do like the late Paul Harvey, and tell the rest of the story. That’s also good advice for their standard bearer, grab-happy Don. Ray Estes Chico

Thanks, Barack and Joe Obama and Biden: Thank you! Your lives reflect pure class for almost all earthlings. After 2008, we were joyfully rescued. Without strategic disloyalty from the obstructionist “Party of No”—the faithless, deceitful Republicans who orchestrated in advance to smother every single progressive breath—our nation’s arduous ascent would have been more expedient and profound. Your character, humanity and brilliance are lightyears beyond what is now defacing America. This overwhelming disillusionment manifests not from political affiliation or ideology but simply a personal distaste for such “deplorable” figures being entrusted to any leadership role whatsoever. Citizens will now recompense the troubled tycoon’s trillions in arrears while sanctions lifted against Russia allow resumption of Exxon’s unbridled and reinvigorated exploitation. Therein pinpoints the precise source as to what this entire looming national nightmare is actually all about! The noticeable surge at the gas pumps lately has folks missing you both already. Perhaps we normal humans might consider firmly securing our safety harness and breathing apparatus in preparation for another thrilling descent. Kenneth B. Keith Los Molinos

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE

A Chico police officer issues a ticket to a homeless man.

DEATH IN CUSTODY

An Oroville man died inside a patrol car after a struggle with Butte County Sheriff’s deputies who had been performing a welfare check on him the morning of Jan. 12. Around 5 a.m., a caller reported that his father, Marc Chiasson, 65, had stopped taking his medication for physical and mental health issues, according to a BCSO press release. Two deputies responded to the home on Cox Lane and learned that Chiasson had attempted to take a shotgun from a safe and said he wanted to kill himself. After a brief struggle, the deputies reportedly handcuffed Chiasson to take him for a psychological evaluation. Chiasson laid down in the back seat of the patrol car and became unresponsive, according to the release. The deputies removed the handcuffs and attempted CPR for 12 minutes. Medical personnel arrived and pronounced him dead on the scene. The incident is under investigation by the District Attorney’s Office. The press release notes that Chiasson had pre-existing medical issues that will be examined during an autopsy conducted by the Sacramento County Coroner’s Office.

ALLEGED MOLESTER ARRESTED

An Oroville man is charged with sexually abusing a 2-year-old child, according to a press release from the Oroville Police Department. Kenneth James Baker, 27, was allegedly watching the girl while her mother was preparing to give birth at an area hospital. The release says the girl showed bruising and other signs of physical abuse when she was picked up from Baker’s care. Further medical examination revealed she had also been sexually abused. Baker was arrested last week (Jan. 13) at his mother’s residence in Oroville and is being held in Butte County Jail with bail set at $1.15 million. The OPD is asking anyone with information about the crime or knowledge of other possible victims to call 538-2448.

STORM EMERGENCY DECLARED

Butte County has declared a local emergency in response to the winter storms that have recently pounded the North State. The proclamation was made by the county’s chief administrative officer, Paul Hahn (pictured), but must be ratified by the Board of Supervisors to become official, according to a press release. The declaration allows the county to access state funds to fix public rights-of-way damaged by heavy rain, flooding and falling trees— including Centerville Road and Oro-Quincy Highway—and help affected residents. “Basically, what we’re saying is that we can’t cover this at the local level,” spokeswoman Casey Hatcher said by phone. “We’ve exceeded our local ability to address this, and we’d like access to disaster-relief funding.” 8

CN&R

JANUARY 19, 2017

CN&R FILE PHOTO

Cops, poverty and appointments After early drama, Council discusses homelessness, police staffing

Tof Tuesday (Jan. 17) included discussions homelessness and police staffing, issues he Chico City Council’s agenda on

almost guaranteed to get community members worked up. The council, however, was by Howard first thrown into a Hardee tizzy over a new procedure for appointing h owa rd h @ n ew srev i ew. c o m members of city commissions. The panel started by voting via anonyNew commissioners mous ballots to • Bidwell Park & appoint both B.T. Playground Commission: Chapman and Steve Jeff Glatz, Aaron Harr, Tom Nickell and Elaina Breedlove to the McReynolds Airport Commission. • Arts Commission: That used to be the Todd Hall, Andy Holcombe, process for appointMonica McDaniel and ing members of all Tammie McKinzie city commissions, but • Planning Commission: under a new policy, John Howlett, Lupe Arim-Law, Toni Scott and council members Evan Tuchinsky made individual appointments to round out the parks, arts and planning commissions. Appointees for all 12 vacant seats would be approved en masse by a vote of the council (see infobox). Councilman Mark Sorensen made a motion to accept the appointments, minus Councilman Karl Ory’s pick for the Bidwell Park & Playground Commission: Tom Barrett. Sorensen characterized

Barrett, a former park commissioner, as a vitriolic environmentalist. “He’s one of two members of a city commission in the last 100 years, that I can think of, to receive a letter of censure from the council,” he said. The motion threw the entire process into question and exposed the council’s political divide. “When we made this change to how boards and commissions were appointed, I understood that it was the responsibility of each council member to pick someone they thought would best represent the community,” said Councilwoman Ann Schwab. “If Tom Barrett is out of line, the onus is greater on Councilmember Ory to ensure that Mr. Barrett is a good representative.” Fellow progressive Councilman Randall Stone also rallied behind Ory, calling the new process “a prostitution of the system.” Ory then asked Sorensen to “respect my appointment.” The council’s conservative majority was unmoved. “My question,” said Vice Mayor Reanette Fillmer, “is why do we even vote, if we have to vote ‘yes’ on everybody presented?” The squabbling subsided and the council voted 4-3 down party lines to accept Sorensen’s motion and reject Barrett as a park commissioner. In his place, Ory nominated Aaron Harr, who was appointed unanimously. The issue didn’t die there, however.

Ory made a motion to agendize a discussion of the commission appointment process for a future meeting. That passed by a 5-to-2 vote, with Mayor Sean Morgan and Councilman Andrew Coolidge dissenting. After that icy exchange, it fell on Laura

Cootsona, executive director of the Jesus Center, to warm up the room. She made a presentation as part of an ongoing discussion of homelessness requested by Fillmer. Cootsona urged the council to consider homelessness as a “human, economic and community crisis” and identified how the city’s elected leaders can help. Collecting comprehensive data on Chico’s homeless population is the starting point, she said. The council can support that effort by helping pay for a full-time coordinator for the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care, the agency responsible for allocating federal housing funding to local service providers and maintaining the county’s homeless management information system. “Helping fund that position over three years would leverage city dollars so we could get state and federal funding,” Cootsona said. “We can’t get that money without staff energy and focus. In addition, that person would be charged with full integration of the data collection we [service providers] do day-to-day.” Accurate data would “bust myths that continue to drive poor decision-making,”


she added. “One of the questions we don’t agree on is: Are homeless people coming to Chico for services, or are they homegrown? The police have one perspective, and the service providers have another.” The floor was opened for public comment, and 18 speakers suggested solutions ranging from tent cities to inclusionary zoning—i.e., mandating or encouraging new housing developments to make a certain percentage of units affordable for low-income residents. Brad Montgomery, executive director of the Torres Community Shelter, provided the council with an update on the shelter’s new low-barrier program, Come as You Are. Historically, the shelter had been entirely dry, but in June it began offering a wet shelter program for homeless people who don’t meet the sobriety requirement. So far, the program has served 123 guests, 83 percent of whom have tested clean and moved to the sober side of the shelter. “Regardless of political ideology, what we all want is people to move forward and lead self-sustaining lives,” he said. “That’s what we’re doing every day.” Cootsona’s presentation was for educational purposes only, so the council wasn’t asked to take action, though it agreed to accept quarterly updates from local experts on homelessness. Finally, the council was presented with

a long-term staffing plan from Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien. His department currently has allocated positions for 92 sworn officers, but he’d like to have 105. There’s an increasing demand for police services, he said. Last year, Chico PD responded to about 73,000 calls, roughly 5,000 more than the year before. And, aside from the partially staffed Target Team, the department doesn’t deploy proactive units to the streets, parks and schools. “I’d much prefer, as your chief, to prevent and intercept crime before it happens,” he said. “That’s the best way to police.” O’Brien emphasized that the plan would add officers incrementally as funds become available. His first priority is staffing a four-officer traffic unit, he said, adding that he’ll request money for those positions during the next budget cycle. In a mostly symbolic move—they didn’t make a binding agreement— council members voted unanimously to support O’Brien’s staffing plan. □

Trump’s unwelcoming party Multiple protests planned for inaugural weekend s a female-born, transgender Native American and member of the LGBT comAmunity, Nicolette Three Moons Richards is

no stranger to feeling marginalized by society, a condition the Chico State student feels is bound to worsen as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday (Jan. 20). “[Trump’s inauguration] is something I felt the need to acknowledge,” said Richards, one of the planners behind the Women’s March on Chico this Saturday (Jan. 21). “Every single one of the identities that make me who I am is being harmed and in danger by the current political climate and social environment. “It’s something you can’t ignore when you realize your life and rights, and those of the people you love, are Get in on the actions: For more information on Friday’s in danger. You events, search for Inaugurate start to realize Resistance: January 20 Nor Cal Day that if you don’t of Response on Facebook. do something, For information about Saturday’s you might lose event, find Women’s March on Chico on Facebook. everything.” Saturday’s march and rally at the Chico City Plaza is one of more than 300 such actions across the country planned to coincide with the massive Women’s March on Washington. The main event at the nation’s capital and its “sister marches” are meant to protest Trump’s professed views and threatened policies on race, ethnicity, gender, religion, immigration, health care and

other issues. “It’s really a huge collaborative effort that a lot of people have been contributing to, and that’s what makes it a really powerful experience,” Richards, who noted inclusion was one of the organizers’ main goals, said of the local action. The Chico march is scheduled for 10:30 a.m., followed by a series of guest speakers beginning at noon. Speakers include members of local Native American and other communities of color, health care workers, educators, undocumented college students and representatives from local service agencies and faith groups. Mary Wallmark, a coordinator at Chico State’s

Student Life and Leadership Center, was also moved to take action by the Women’s Marches. In December, when she heard about the events being planned, she began organizing transportation to the Sacramento march for faculty, staff, students and community members. “The march in Sacramento is a chance for people to experience large-scale activism,” she said. “It’s going to be a huge, historic event, and we wanted to give our students the opportunity to be a part of it.” Wallmark said the SLLC is “always looking for interesting life and leadership experiences for students” but lacks the bud-

SIFT ER History will be kind

Future generations looking back on Barack Obama’s tenure in the White House will judge him as a good president, according to results of a recent Gallup poll. About half of those polled—47 percent—said Obama’s presidency will be remembered as “outstanding” or “above average,” compared with 35 percent who said it will be viewed as “below average” or “poor.” Those numbers improved significantly from results at the end of his first term and early in his second term, when only 38 percent (February 2012) and 28 percent (November 2013) of respondents said he’d be remembered as above average. Obama’s predicted positive legacy ranked fourth highest of the last 11 presidents, surpassed only by John F. Kennedy (79 percent), Ronald Reagan (63 percent) and Dwight D. Eisenhower (50 percent). A separate Gallup poll reported President-elect Donald Trump’s pre-inauguration approval rating at 40 percent, roughly half of Obama’s 78 percent approval rate in 2009.

There have been three major local marches against Trump since his election Nov. 8, including this one on Dec. 19. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

get to organize field trips. So, she contacted local transportation companies and began soliciting donations through social media and other communications with the campus community herself, eventually raising more than $2,300 to charter a 56-person bus and 15-passenger shuttle. Staff and faculty can book a seat on the bus for $30, and students ride free. Interested parties should sign up at the school’s Student Life and Leadership or Cross-Cultural Leadership centers. “We don’t care why people choose to go,” Wallmark said. “The march is about women’s rights, but people are welcome to ride even if they want to go tell all the marchers that they’re wrong. We just want our students to have the chance to be there.” Saturday’s Women’s March will mark the

second day of demonstrations in response to Trump’s inauguration. A day-long series of actions collectively called “Inaugurate Resistance” are also scheduled for Friday. The events are being organized by several separate activist and community groups under the banner of the Nor Cal January 20th Solidarity Coalition. Morning and evening “visibility actions” are planned at 7:15 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. at two locations, Raley’s Plaza on Skyway at Notre Dame Boulevard and at the corner of The Esplanade and East Avenue. Participants are invited to bring signs. A community viewing of Democracy Now! and other alternative media sources’ coverage of the inauguration is set from 8 to 10:30 a.m. at the Pageant Theatre, followed immediately by a march through downtown Chico. At noon, Chico State’s Selvester’s Cafe is hosting a youth-centered poetry, spoken word and open-mic event. Another rally and march will be held at Chico City Plaza Friday night, beginning at 7. —KEN SMITH kens@ newsr ev iew.c o m

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D JANUARY 19, 2017

O N PA G E 1 0

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hen it comes to housing the homeless, a tent city might be what Chico needs, says Charles Withuhn, an avid local advocate for all things related to trees and homelessness. A regular volunteer for Safe Space, Chico’s rotating winter shelter, he sees people on a daily basis who just need respite from the freezing temperatures and potential for police entanglements. And, unfortunately, there just aren’t enough beds to go ’round. For that reason, he supports the idea of an organized campground for people without homes. In fact, he’s gone so far as to begin the process of getting one approved in Chico. It’s still in its infancy, but he has a name—A OK Chico Campground—and a general schematic, with tent spaces to accommodate 22 adults and 12 children, barbecue areas, portable toilets, showers, laundry facilities and trash bins. “This proposal, A OK Chico Campground, is a temporary and transitional housing project that could get 34 homeless people off the street in the shortest period of

“To see the look in their eyes, time for the smallest investment,” the realization that they would not reads Withuhn’s proposal, which he presented informationally to the get rousted by police in the night for the first time in months ...” city’s Internal Affairs Committee he said, trailing off. That got him last week (Jan. 11). started. He was inspired by The Farm, With the backing of CHAT Joel Castle’s unsanctioned but (Chico Housing Action Team), burgeoning homeless camp on which runs Safe the south Space, his plan side of emerged. Withuhn town along “We cannot took stats and ideas Comanche from other cities Creek. cite or arrest where homeless As of last our way out campgrounds have weekend, of vagrancy succeeded—such with Safe Portland, Ore., Space full issues. It is not as whose 10-year-old and turnpossible.” Dignity Village has ing people away, and —Randall Stone, city councilman become a model for other communiTorres ties. Dignity Village Community started as a tent Shelter near city and evolved into a tiny house capacity, there were 55 people village. As Withuhn pointed out, seeking refuge at The Farm. several studies indicate reduction Withuhn pointed to a specific in crime and significant cost savmoment, while visiting the site, ings associated with housing indithat got him moving on A OK. viduals (even in tents) vs. leaving Two young homeless people he them to fend for themselves on the knew arrived at The Farm and he streets. watched their initial reaction.

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JANUARY 19, 2017

REMEMBERING THE DREAM

Young people led a procession of more than 250 people who marched from the Chico City Plaza to Trinity United Methodist Church in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. last Sunday (Jan. 15). At the church, participants listened to speakers, sang songs and enjoyed a community meal. PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY


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“We know what doing what we’re doing gets us, and we can do better,” Withuhn said. Most people in the community agree

that something needs to be done, but nobody seems to know exactly what to do. City Councilman Randall Stone, who chairs the Greater Chico Homeless Task Force, says that’s partly because of differing takes on the issue. Some people argue that providing services and housing for those in need invites more like them to town, so they choose law enforcement measures over providing more services. That approach has been widely debunked, Stone argued by phone. In fact, Butte County recently was found to have lost some funding for services because of laws in Chico criminalizing homelessness. Stone acknowledged that he did initially vote to approve one such law, the Offenses Against Waterways and Public Property ordinance, but, after realizing he’d made a mistake, voted against it when it came back for expansion. “We cannot cite or arrest our way out of vagrancy issues. It is not possible,” he said. “To assume we can come even close with law enforcement is wasting our time.” Stone said he’s spoken with Withuhn about A OK, which Withuhn will present to the task force next month, but is not familiar with the details. On the surface, he said, he supports the idea but perhaps not in its current form. He’d prefer to see something more like a tiny house village, a mobile home park or, pointing to San Diego as an example, turning an industrial building into a shelter. Those options would provide better shelter and be easier to implement from a zoning perspective, he said. Mark Wolfe, the city’s community development director, confirmed that camping in any other than a recreational form is not allowed within city limits and would require an amendment to the municipal code. Whatever happens, Stone is hopeful that Withuhn’s proposal will spark action on a meaningful level. “The discussion is being had, and I’m thankful for that,” he said. —Meredith J. Cooper mere d i thc @ n ew sr ev i ew. com

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11


HEALTHLINES Medical marijuana dispensaries in California are beginning to see more branded pot products. photo By Beverly yuen thompson via flickr

Branding bud Marijuana companies want California to issue trademarks, ensure quality of products

by

Laurel Rosenhall

becoming a thing of the past Tin gradually California. In its place, an era of name-

he sandwich baggie brimming with buds is

brand marijuana is emerging. Celebrities—including actress Whoopi Goldberg, rapper Snoop Dogg, rocker Melissa Etheridge and the family of reggae legend Bob Marley—are branding their own herb. Law firms have sprouted to help people brand their goods. Pretty packages of cannabis-infused products bear labels like “Highland Pantry” (almond butter), “Madame Munchie” (cookies) and “Sweet ReLeaf” (skin cream). Branded pot products gained footing in recent years as California sanctioned medical use of marijuana, and other states began permitting recreational use. Now that California voters have approved a ballot measure allowing all adults to use the drug, cannabis businesses want more authority to brand their products. But officially trademarking marijuana is a tricky legal task. The federal government still considers it an illegal drug, and won’t grant patents or trademarks for pot or anything made from it. Cannabis brands fear they are at risk of being copied. So marijuana businesses in California—eyeing what could become a $6.4 billion industry—have turned to the state government for help.

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january 19, 2017

“Not being able to trademark your brand is a huge setback if you’re trying to get capital investment,” said Nate Bradley, who lobbies for marijuana sellers as the executive director of the California Cannabis Industry Association. “If you’re not able to protect what you’re asking people to invest in, you’re not likely to get investments.” A bill recently introduced in the Legislature would create a state-level trademark for California cannabis products, providing marijuana businesses new legal protections and greater access to cash from investors as the state ushers in a sanctioned commercial marketplace. The California secretary of state already has the power to register state-level trademarks, but only for items recognized by federal trademark law. Assembly Bill 64 would change that by allowing the secretary of state to register trademarks for cannabis goods and services. “Cannabis businesses are like other businesses, lawful and regulated. They should be able to protect their intellectual property,” said bill author Assemblyman Rob Bonta, a

Democrat from Alameda. Trademarks will help bring marijuana vendors “out of the shadows,” he said, and also help consumers by assuring that “you’re going to get a certain quality or product when you purchase these goods.” So far, law enforcement groups, many

appointment BEAUTY IN PAIN The Celebration of Healing Arts is an evening of poetry, music and artwork at Enloe Regional Cancer Center (265 Cohasset Road) on Thursday (Jan. 26) starting at 4:30 p.m. Artists who were featured in Enloe’s Healing Art Gallery last year will give brief talks; cancer survivors Joan Goodreau and Patricia WellinghamJones will share their poetry; and local group Jazz Rescue will play music. The event is free; call 3323856 for more information.

of which opposed the ballot measure to legalize marijuana, are not speaking out against the move toward branding. Lauren Michaels, a lobbyist for the California Police Chiefs Association, said her group is focused on making sure that branded products aren’t advertised in a way that appeals to children. Police chiefs are supporting Bonta’s bill because it would restrict marijuana billboards near freeways. (AB 64 also would speed up funding to establish standards for impaired driving and allow recreational marijuana to be sold through Web-based delivery services—both contentious points in the initiative campaign.) The bill already has some bipartisan support, including a Republican co-author. Still, some GOP lawmakers are wary. Senate Republican leader Jean Fuller of Bakersfield said she doesn’t yet have a position on the bill, but cautioned that “it’s always precarious for a state to take on the federal government and make laws that are in conflict.” The policy is being considered in Sacramento as the nation prepares for a new federal government that could be more hostile to states that have permitted marijuana. U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama, who is Republican President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general, has criticized the Obama Administration for its hands-off approach. In a confirmation hearing this month, Sessions stopped short of saying he would go after states that have regulated pot, leaving marijuana advocates and state officials unsure of his plans. Asked how Sessions as U.S. attorney general could impact marijuana policy in California, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown


About this story:

CaLmatters.org is a nonprofit news venture devoted to covering California state policy and politics.

the medical uses of marijuana, or the rechargeable batteries used with vaping pipes. Sleek cases holding such pipes and batteries were on display at a Sacramento dispensary, where bottles of “Cannabis Quencher” juices and packages of “Heavenly Sweet” cookies stood near aromatic jars of indica and sativa. Most patients ask for products based on the desired effect—a sleep aid, or something to relieve pain—said Kimberly Cargile, who runs the dispensary called A Therapeutic Alternative. But, she said, “they’re starting to more and more ask for brand names.” Cargile said she expects to see more of that as the shop prepares for newly required state packaging rules. Plastic zip-locks will be phased out. “In the future,” she said, “it will all be packaged and branded.” □

This guy saves you money.

said he had “no idea.” “Sometimes you take a step forward and then a step back,” Brown said during a Capitol budget press conference. “I think people will continue to be able to satisfy this particular need.” Colorado and Washington— two states that legalized recreational marijuana a few years ago—already offer state-level trademarks for pot products, said attorney Amanda Conley, a founder of the National Cannabis Bar Association. Her Brand and Branch law firm in Oakland helps cannabis businesses navigate legal issues related to branding and trademarks. Without a state-level trademark in California, businesses that want to sell cannabis under a brand name here must find a legal hack around the federal ban on trademarking pot. Conley said she advises companies to seek a federal trademark for the federally lawful goods and services they offer that do not themselves include marijuana. For instance, an entrepreneur could seek to trademark an informative website about

WEEKLY DOSE Know when to ask

Source: berkeley wellness.com

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

For someone struggling with a mental health problem, it’s hard to know when to ask for help. Telling a primary care doctor about your symptoms—maybe you can’t sleep, or you’re persistently sad—is a good start, because he or she can help determine whether they’re caused by a physical problem. If not, they can direct you to a mental health professional for an evaluation. Here are signs that you should take that first step: • Anxiety or depression that seems to have no cause • Compulsive behavior • Difficulty communicating • An eating disorder • Fits of weeping • Drug or alcohol abuse • Sudden or unexplained aggressive behavior • Thoughts of suicide • Unreasonable fears or overwhelming panic

january 19, 2017

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13


GREENWAYS Lighting a match. IllusTraTIon by roxanne PasIbe

Trump’d science When it comes to climate change, California experts foresee a perilous future under president-elect by

nick Miller

I

f you conduct an online search of news sto-

ries with the keywords “Trump” and “climate change,” the results might give reason, at least for those who give a damn about this planet’s ecological future, to bury your head in the (tar) sand during the next four years: “How the Trump Administration Could Gut NASA’s Climate Change Research,” reads one Newsweek headline. “What Does Trump Think About Climate Change? He Doesn’t Know Either,” announces The Atlantic. And, “Without action on climate change, say goodbye to polar bears”—a Washington Post tearjerker. According to reports like these over the past year, Trump is preparing for everything from a witch hunt against our government’s foremost climate scientists to defunding the Environmental Protection Agency. Indeed, the president-elect’s own words make these sky-is-falling headlines seem less like reading tea leaves and more a hard-and-fast roadmap. But, in the world of academia, where facts don’t bow to the short attention spans that dominate in the media, do our most level-headed researchers and earth-science experts respond to Trump’s ascension with similarly grabby quips? Are they as terrified by the nominations of former Texas Gov. Rick Perry (for Department of Energy) and Scott Pruitt (for EPA head, even though the former Oklahoma attorney general is suing the agency)? We asked David M. Romps, an associate professor of of earth and planetary sciences at UC Berkeley and director of the school’s Atmospheric Sciences Center, if he thought there are grounds for this bevy of doomsday news flashes. His response? “In a sense, yes. I’m certainly frightened.” The reason? “There’s just not that much time to bend down that curve of emissions,” he explained, referring to the level of CO2 humans are spewing into the atmosphere. Trump, of course, hasn’t implemented a lick of policy yet. And every expert interviewed for this story reiterated that they don’t want to guess how his administra-

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January 19, 2017

tion will approach climate change. In the words of environmental and energy policy expert Hal Harvey, the CEO of Energy Innovation, a Bay Area energy and environmental policy firm, “one shouldn’t either be sanguine or suicidal” just yet. That said, many Trump advisers hail from various outposts of the fossil-fuel industry and its policy shops. “All of these people share a common thread,” explained professor Romps. Namely, they are employed by, work for, or operate a front organization at the behest of major oil and energy corporations. “And, of course, the fossil-fuel industry has a strong agenda, that’s no longer a secret,” he added. Read: They’re about profits, not mitigation. Their game plan is to demolish Obama’s climatechange policy and profit off what remaining dead dinosaurs lay beneath the Earth’s surface. So goes the collision course: Two opposing forces—one for saving the planet, the other for digging up and burning every last drop of oil and coal—with a scheduled faceoff Friday (Jan. 20) at the White House. And the clock is ticking. “Time is of the essence,” emphasized Harvey, who said he’s not one for fearmongering, but didn’t want to underestimate how costly it would be to stall out, or go in reverse, when it comes to climate and energy policy during the next four years. The positive news for environmentalists is

that climate policy is complicated, often dictated by market forces beyond the Trump administration’s influence, and in many ways insulated by state’s rights and world movements.

There are climate-action strategies and pacts scarily within the realm of Trump’s authority such as the Paris Agreement, which was settled upon by nearly 200 nations. It went into effect just days before Trump’s election last November. The goals of the accord include limiting the rise of the average global temperature to less

than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels (right now, the world is nearing 1 degree), and focusing development on green industries and practices. The Paris Agreement isn’t binding—it’s a name and shame type deal, sources explain—and Trump has hinted at abandoning the pact. This would mean that, while the rest of the world is adopting smarter climate policies, we’ll be discredited as an outlier nation. Trump also carries influence over the EPA’s Clean Power Initiative, which is stuck in the courts, and fuel-efficiency efforts, an area where the nation has seen significant progress. And he can revive and approve contentious pipeline infrastructure, such as the Keystone XL project, and deregulate oil-drilling and -transport industries, as well. All of this will invariably grow carbon-dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere, even while the rest of the world implements policy to keep CO2 levels at below 400 parts-permillion. There’s also the concern that the Trump administration might slash already meager climate-science research dollars. For instance, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory falls under the purview of the Department of Energy—so if Gov. Perry nixes research-and-development funding for California … “We spend more on potato chips in America than we do on energy R&D,” Harvey explained of science’s currently limited coffers. Regardless of how well, or poorly, it’s funded, Paul Alivisatos, the vice chancellor of research at UC Berkeley, says that “historically, science has been strongly sup-

ECO EVENT Take a gander The Pacific Flyway is one of the world’s busiest thoroughfares for migrating birds, stretching from Alaska to Patagonia and passing directly through the Northern Sacramento Valley. The Snow goose Festival of the Pacific Flyway, which runs Jan. 25-29, is named after one of the more abundant (and vocal) of the many species of birds that use the flyway and includes a lineup of events in and around Chico—workshops, field trips, an art exhibit and a keynote address by author Alvaro Jaramillo—providing an excellent opportunity to learn all about this ecological treasure right in our backyard. Find out more at www.snowgoosefestival.org.


presents

About the author:

nick Miller is editor of the East Bay Express. He previously was co-editor of the Sacramento news & review.

ported by both parties.” He said he hopes to have “very productive discussions” with the new leadership in Washington, and he pointed out that this is a unique moment in time when “the science community is generating dramatic advances that do have an advantage of benefiting society at large,” such as electric cars, energy storage and affordable solar cells. Romps agreed. “California potentially could step up to a new role here, and now it could really be the bastion of hope,” he said. The experts interviewed for this story agreed that an uphill battle is education—something Trump can very easily stump, often with just 140 characters. “The scientific understanding about what’s happening with climate and environment, and human activity, arises from a very deep level of understanding of climate, physics, earth science,” Alivisatos explained. “But clearly we have a lot of work to do, because so many citizens really don’t understand that science.” Romps, who will teach the firstever undergraduate introductory course on climate change at UC Berkeley next fall, said that he’s “fascinated” by the question as to why so few Americans relate to and comprehend the threat of climate change. “But I would not pin this on a failure of the American people,” he added. “The American people are not dumb. They’re smart. But they get swayed by very intentional and deliberate campaigns to confuse people, and the scientists are naturally more reserved than that.” Meanwhile, the frightening headlines keep appearing in our news feeds, and that climatechange clock keeps ticking. “It will scare the bejesus out of you,” Harvey said of the possibility of not progressing during the next four years. He argued that, to have a chance at achieving any meaningful emission-reduction mitigation, “you have to do pretty much everything pretty much right away.” And, right now, we’re just waiting for Jan. 20. □

Keep ChiCo Weird 2017

talent shoW saturday, january 28 7:30 pm doors 6:30 pm

el rey theatre 230 W. 2nd st. featured performanCes by: smoKey the Groove dream shoW

prize for

Weirdest audienCe Costume!

Celebrity judGes: amanda detmer mad bob hoWard moniCa mCdaniel sea monster hosted by arts devo

A showcase of weird, creative, fun and funky local performers. Join the CN&R as we celebrate the diversity of our community!

tiCKets: $16 advanCe $20 door available at: diamond W, blaze n’ j’s, and Cn&r 353 E. 2nd st.

don’t miss!

Keep ChiCo Weird

Art Show january 26-28

1078 Gallery 820 broadWay rEcEption: january 26, 6-8 pm

Sponsored by Visit us on Facebook at www.FACebook.Com/keepChiCoweiRd

January 19, 2017

CN&R

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CHICO PERFORMANCES

2017 Spring Events JANUARY

21 Booker T Jones: Stax Revue FEBRUARY

3 -4 Abbey Road: UDAC 9 Las Cafeteras: L.A. Latin Mix 12 Elixir of Love:

APRIL

1 2 13-14 30

SF Opera Cinema Series

17 BiRDMAN LiVE: Antonio Sanchez 19 The Nile Project: World Music 26 Poemjazz

Robert Pinsky & Laurence Hobgood

MARCH

1 5 18 22 25 28 30

Rhythmic Circus: Dance Chico! Broadway Boogie: Dance Chico! Banff Film Festival Tosca: SF Opera Cinema Series

MAY

25 Annie Jr.

JUST ADDED:

1/28 Kevin Spencer: Hocus Focus

2/11 Bobby Bones Comedian

4/5 Naked Magicians

Nothing Up Their Sleeves! TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE!

Gloria Steinem Enso String Quartet Dervish: Celtic Music

3/22 Graham Nash

Iconic Singer/Songwriter

Graham Nash Lucky Plush: Dance Chico! Dirty Dancing: Dance Chico! Spotlight Performances: Dance Chico!

Buy Tickets at: www.ChicoPerformances.com | 530-898-6333 16  

CN&R 

january 19, 2017


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS phOtO by MaSOn MaSiS

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Olive oil to potted soil

aerial maneuvers Local massage therapist and yoga instructor Brittan Scott thinks adults need to spend more time upside down. To help make that a reality, she opened Freebird Aerial Yoga last November inside Upper Park Crossfit. Scott has been practicing yoga since she was a teenager, and said she fell in love with the aerial form after a friend opened up a studio in Paradise, Positive-I. Aerial yoga incorporates long, flexible hammocks that practitioners use to achieve poses and borrows elements from both dance and traditional yoga. Scott says many adults no longer find certain actions they performed as kids—like climbing and hanging upside down—natural. Overcoming these anxieties is usually a new student’s first hurdle when starting aerial yoga, she said, explaining that these actions are not only fun, but also great for spinal decompression. At Freebird, Scott also offers ashiatsu massage, a deep-tissue massage where the masseuse stands on top of the client—with support from beams—and uses his or her feet instead of hands to deliver the massage. Stop by 1 Commerce Court or log onto www.freebird aerialyoga.com to learn more.

How’s business? It’s been really awesome. The holidays were a little quiet,

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

A few years ago, I took an opportunity to visit local wineries located along the North Sierra Wine Trail (an annual event held at the end of April). One of the most fascinating stops during that trip was the Renaissance Vineyard and Winery in Oregon House. Run by the Fellowship of Friends church, the grounds are immense and contain everything from gilded Roman-esque statues to exotic animals (French donkeys, camels) to vineyards and olive trees. The wine was fine, but the olive oil and, in particular, the balsamic vinegar, were devine. I mention this because I recently received an email from Apollo Olive Oil, the company that made those divine indulgences, announcing one of its oils had been featured on a cooking show on the Hallmark channel. Naturally, I checked it out. The segment features the head chef from Southern California’s only AAA fivediamond restaurant making a potted salmon dish (yum). He tells the show’s host that, in serving said dish, he slices up fresh bread, drizzles it with olive oil— specifically Apollo’s Sierra blend, which “actually tastes like olives.” If you can’t get out to Renaissance, where Apollo is headquartered, I’ve seen their products at stores around town, so keep your eyes peeled. which was expected. But it was nice because it gave me time to settle and flow, kinda work out some kinks. Since January, things have been picking up.

Other than being in the air, what separates aerial yoga from traditional yoga? We use the hammocks to assist us in poses, but it’s a little more silly and fun and playful—we do a lot of playing around, tricks and hanging upside down. So it’s definitely an exercise where you come in and you have a lot of fun and don’t realize you’re working really hard. Then you leave and you’re sore the next day.

When did you start doing ashiatsu massage? I’ve been a massage therapist for 10-11 years. I was getting to the point where my wrist,

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elbows and fingers were wearing out and I thought I’d have to quit massaging. It was my sister who told me about ashiatsu … and I went and trained, about four years ago now, up in Portland.

What do you hope to offer people who come to your studio? I want them to feel refreshed and rejuvenated. I want them to feel like they’ve been nurtured and been in a safe space. The most important thing to me when they step through this door is that they feel comfortable, get comfortable in the hammock and they leave feeling a little bit stronger, feeling a little bit more confident in themselves and I think that’s a huge part of doing this. You have to let go and trust. —MASON MASIS

ew.Com Cnrsweetdeals.newsrevi

Diggin’ it Back in September, I mentioned that Tractor Supply was expanding its Dig-It program, popular in New York and Tennessee, to California (as well as Pennsylvania and Utah). The program offers grants to elementary schools for starting or sustaining a school garden. Well, here’s an update, with some good news! Chico Country Day School in Chico and Berry Creek School in Oroville are among 44 campuses in California chosen to receive the $500 grants. In addition, at the end of the school year, each student who participates will get his or her own gardening tool set and a Master Gardener certificate from Tractor Supply. That’s pretty cool! new One-StOp For Ridge residents looking for a job, help writing a resume or to sign up for programs like CalFresh, they now need to look no further than the local library. The Paradise branch of the Butte County Library recently underwent a remodel and on Tuesday (Jan. 16) held a grand opening celebration for the county’s newest One-Stop satellite location. There, people can find job listings, set up interviews and get help writing resumes and cover letters. Run jointly by the Butte County Department of Employment & Social Services and the Alliance for Workforce Development, other services also are available, such as applying for public assistance programs, including Medi-Cal and CalFresh. well-DeServeD recOgnitiOn Every year, CHIP (Community Housing Improvement Project) honors those who’ve helped it toward its mission of providing affordable housing to local residents. This year, it’s chosen to name Tri-Counties Bank as Outstanding Partner of the Year, and to present Orland resident Joy Murphy with the Outstanding Service Award. CN&R highlighted “Grandma Joy’s” commitment to volunteerism, particularly when it comes to children living in CHIP housing, in our annual Local Heroes issue in November. Well done!

Healthy Choices for the New Year Check out the low calorie round-up!

Ike’s place

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Drive Thru • Open @ 6am weekdays • Dog-friendly patio 1288 E. 1st Ave • Chico • 530.809.9338 • coffeeranchchico.com january 19, 2017

CN&R

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Weird

C

hico has always been weird, from the days of John Bidwell  and the eccentric characters with whom he associated  (look up Stuttering Zeke Merritt) to the hippies and   by Jason Cassidy, hipsters who currently groove and chill downtown. And it’s the  Meredith J. Cooper, colorful folklore of old and fantastic freaks of the present that  Melissa daugherty, give our little Nor Cal oasis its quirky personality. In an effort  howard hardee, Ken sMith to wrangle as much fun as we could into one feature,  we’ve created this handy A-to-Z guide to Weird  Chico. There are, of course, many more examples  of people and places and stories that make up the  The Butcher Shop 2016 colorful stripes of Chico, but we think we managed to  Photo by Sharon DeMeyer pack these pages with enough to paint a nice picture  of our unabashedly weird little city. 

A

Amins, not al-monds

Chico has always been a hotbed for almond growers. In fact, our crops are so plentiful they’re shipped all over the world. But don’t go mispronouncing the name of our most famous nut. ’Round these parts, they’re called “amins.” Even “a-mends” is acceptable. But leave out that “L”! As the lore goes, to harvest the nuts, they have to shake the “L” right out of them. In a little unrelated pronunciation weirdness, Chicoans also pronounce “esplanade” differently than everyone else. In any other town, our beloved boulevard would be called The Es-plahnah-d. Here, it’s the Es-plahnay-d. Go figure.

Photo by erneSto bonetti

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January 19, 2017

sional and amateur, of all sizes— who strut down the catwalk with more attitude than a Kardashian in New York during Fashion Week. The event is like no other in Chico—think acrobatics, dancing, music and comedy all performed with an eccentric bent. It helps that its female producers are more than seamstresses—they’re artists, mothers, poets, writers and savvy businesswomen who have kept Chikoko relevant and connected to the greater community.

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Blue Room Theatre and Butcher Shop theater festival The stories of The Butcher Shop are etched in Chico folklore. Born in the backyard of the Latimer home in the early 1990s, the legend goes that brothers Dylan and Denver cut a hole in the wall of their parents’ garage (without permission) to accommodate the puppet show portion of their avant garde happenings. These days, every Labor Day weekend, the brothers and their extended family of arts pranksters gather in an orchard in south Chico to put on the wildly popular Butcher Shop festival of original one acts of varying degrees of absurdity. And thanks to the Butcher Shop, there is also the Blue Room Theatre. The instigators of those

early days of theatrical rebellion are the same ones who started the downtown black box that has upheld its mission of “challenging artists and audiences with plays of depth and vibrancy in an intimate environment” since 1994.

Chikoko

Ay Z

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Chikoko

In some respects, the five women who unite under the moniker Chikoko could be described as the fairy godmothers

of Chico weirdness. The fashiondesign/art cooperative was started more than a decade ago, and today its core group—Nel Adams, Sara Rose Bonetti, Muir Hughes, Michalyn Renwick and Christina Seashore—are known for putting on one of the most popular locally produced events in town. Their annual experimental fashion show draws more than 1,000 spectators to bear witness to the group’s imaginative and racy original creations worn by local models—profes-

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Dragopolis

E

Echo chambers

The “future of drag” is now. Dragopolis, the monthly (usually third Saturdays) drag revue at the Maltese Bar & Tap Room, is drag central. Hosted by Chico’s grande dame queen, Claudette de Versailles, the series is the anchor for local (and visiting) drag performers and the enthusiastic—and often wild—audiences cheer kings and queens strutting their stuff against the red-curtain backdrop. Dragopolis is just one of the colorful cornerstones of the Maltese, the south Chico dive bar that’s made itself a safe haven for weirdness of all stripes—from the full range of the musical underground to the inclusive Malteazers burlesque troupe.

Two big concrete discs of magic—one atop the Roth Planetarium at Chico State (behind Meriam Library) and one in the courtyard of Tri-Counties Bank at Fifth and Salem streets. Stand in the center, talk, and blow your tiny mind.


CHICO:

A catalog of the icons, oddities and strange history that give color to our funky little city

Keep Chico Weird Art Show Jan. 26-28 (reception Jan. 26, 6-8 p.m.), at 1078 Gallery (820 Broadway) Keep Chico Weird Talent Show Jan. 28, 7:30 p.m., at El Rey Theatre (230 W. Second St.) Tickets: $16, available at JMax outlets and Chico News & Review

Funky local characters: Mike G and Li’l G

Funky local characters

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In many ways, Chico is defined by its iconic local characters, funky “celebrities” who add color to our little city. Without them, Chico would be a boring place indeed. Among the most beloved are our local arts scenemakers, like Sea Monster and Dragonboy, who turn heads with their eclectic wardrobes as well as their fanciful creations. Then there’s Mike G, the rock ’n’ roll pedicab driver, and his dog, Lil’ G. Try and not smile and tap your foot when they cruise by bumping their booming sound system.

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GravyBrain

✺ G

Dragopolis

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Echo chamber

The future is weird, too:

GravyBrain

To claim the title of weirdest Chico band, it would probably be enough to build a giant pink elephant named Beau Le’Phant and rock out on its back as it’s driven around Burning Man. But the Playa-loving freaks of local four-piece GravyBrain—Captain Danger, Guitar Gravy, The Scorpion and Dr. Galaxo Magic—take their exploratory brand of funk/fusion on an even wilder ride with their musical Web series, The Nibiru Chronicles, in which they embark on a “space adventure to seek and claim the planet Nibiru for GravyBrain and all the folks on Earth that love to party.” Turn off your mind and surrender to the void at the band’s YouTube channel: www.goo.gl/pyqala

Haunted downtown

Every town has its haunts, and its purportedly haunted locales, and Chico is no different. Point to any one of our historical buildings and there’s likely a ghost story associated with it. Take, for instance, the most famous of our so-called haunted buildings: the Senator Theatre. Legend has it that the second floor is inhabited by the ghost of a Native American child, but experiences vary. Some have reported seeing a woman after hours, seated in the bleachers; others a bucket hovering by itself in mid-air. Additional noted haunted local haunts include the Blue Room Theatre, Goodman House Bed & Breakfast and even Bidwell Mansion. (Maybe that impressively bearded dude you saw sneaking a drink on our founders’ front porch wasn’t a modern-day hipster after all?)

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Idea Fab Labs

Idea Fabrication Labs isn’t your average ragtag artist collective. In fact, there’s nothing ragtag about the 6,900-square-foot “digital fabrication facility” by the railroad tracks. Boasting an impressive collection of high-tech art-making tools—3-D printer; CNC Shopbot (computer-controlled woodcutting machine); fully equipped audio, electronics and textile zones; etc.—the maker space and its subscribers put out serious art and put on serious all-night EDM parties to celebrate.

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Jewel of Lower Park: Caper Acres

Kozmic Kev

When Chico needs mystic crystal revelations, we turn to Kozmic Kev, our astrological hippie with the soothing Cali-dude lilt. Since 1984, Kevin Durkin has given horoscope readings as Kozmic Kev, appearing over the years in various publications as well as on radio and television to share his loving and peace-filled encouragements, advice and premonitions. Currently, his horoscopes are shared on his Kozmickev100 YouTube channel as well as the Planetary Persuader show on Citizen’s Television, and at 7:25 p.m. during his weekly “Bohemian Express” radio show, Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m., on KZFR 90.1 FM.

Kozmic Kev

At Caper Acres, kiddos can play in an oversized block of Swiss cheese, hang out with Humpty Dumpty and ride a giant sea serpent. The fairytale-themed children’s playground in Lower Bidwell Park has stirred the imaginations of generations of Chicoans over its nearly 50-year life, and with community donations and a good plan for a much-needed makeover, it will remain one of Chico’s wonderfully weird and iconic attractions.

WEIRD C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 0 JANUARY 19, 2017

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WEIRD C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 9

Lumina

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Robin Hood

Lumina

N ▼

Nukes!

Norm Dillinger has been a house Though you wouldn’t know it painter for roughly 30 years, but to look at it today, up on the he’s only painted one house. And he’s not north end of town, by the Chico Municipal even finished. For the better part of the last Airport, lies an old Titan I missile facility. three decades, Dillinger has been covering Though the missiles are long since gone his house—aka “Lumina”—at 821 Orient (no, not shot off toward Cold War enemies, St. with dots. Both the outside and inside though one did explode underground durare covered in whimsical pointillist murals. ing its final inspection in 1962), the silos There are racremain. They’re underground, coons peaking now relics whose existence Nuclear missile silo tunnel PHOTO BY ERIC NORLIE from the eves falls more and more out of and tigers guardlocal memory. There is one ing the garage, reminder, however, that many and even the cars a chuckling visitor likes to in the driveway point out: Chico’s municipal are overtaken code still includes a law—put by dots of paint. in place after years of peaceVisitors are welful protests—proclaiming come. Just knock that, “No person shall proon the door and duce, test, maintain, or store say, “Hi.” within the city a nuclear weapon, component of a nuclear weapon, nuclear weapon delivery system, or component of a nuclear weapon delivMonoliths ery system.” Phew! In the right light, the 19 monoliths standing outside of Chico State’s Ayres Hall look One-day clubs ominous; to passersby with active imaginations, perhaps even prehistoric. They Thanks to the 1 Day actually were constructed in 1990, when Song Club (started in visiting professor Deborah Masters, an artApril 2015) and its subsequent sisist from New York, supervised art students ter clubs launched last summer—1 Day as they designed and constructed the stone Art Club and 1 Day Poetry Club—hunmonuments in one semester. The class dreds of new songs, poems and pieces of filled plaster casts with concrete, a giant visual art have been born into the Chico crane set them in place, and then the stuworld. The concept—wherein a one-word dents carefully chipped away to reveal the prompt (“magic,” “drugs,” “fear,” etc.) is surreal behemoths—each weighs between announced every two weeks and anyone 4,000 and 8,000 pounds—underneath. willing to create something matching the

M

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CN&R

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Public access television has long been a haven for strangeness, a place where amateur ventriloquists, preachers and astrologers could go to set up shop between potted ferns and be left to their own devices to produce original content rich with unintentional comedy. Now, with the re-emergence of Chico’s own public access station, BCAC.TV, there’s a fresh batch of community programming filled with trippy/ cheesy green-screen scenes and hilariously dry interviews—see the That’s That and Dream Show variety programs—only now the comedy is intentional … we’re pretty sure.

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JANUARY 19, 2017

Public access TV weirdos

1 Day Art Club: “Water Collection Device,” by Braden Young

theme in 24 hours or less gets their work featured on the site (www.1dayclub.com)—has inspired many local artists to work on art and in turn made Chico a more colorful place.

Public Access TV: That’s That


Q

Quick Stop Market

Plane, meet convenience store.

R

Robin Hood and his merry men

In 1938, well before live-action role players began to dress like knights and duel with foam swords in Bidwell Park, men in equally funny costumes went on fictional quests in the same woods, only for a major Hollywood film. The Adventures of Robin Hood starred a swashbuckling Errol Flynn (in Technicolor!) and used the riparian areas along Big Chico Creek in Lower Bidwell Park as Sherwood Forest. The film became a classic and thanks to the local scenes—not to mention the street named for the Warner Bros. studio that filmed them—Robin Hood lives on in local lore.

S

Stansbury Home

V

in a CN&R story in 2001, with Nopel adding, “I don’t know where that ever got started.” Well, it persists, perhaps because some downtown businesses do share connected basements.

Vertebrate museum

A zoo’s worth of fantastic, taxidermied creatures—including a polar bear, hundreds of birds and a crocodile suspended from the ceiling—lurk behind an inconspicuous door in the maze-like corridors of Chico State’s Holt Hall. The Vertebrate Museum includes more than 10,000 specimens and, though primarily used by the school’s biology students, it’s open to the public. Group and private tours can be arranged through the Department of Biological Sciences office (898-5356) and curator/biology professor Jay Bogiatto encourages drop-in visitors during school hours as long as the door to room 237 is open and visitors promise not to touch the specimens.

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Weird File at Chico Museum

Chico’s weirdness isn’t a new development; it’s always been a strange place. Ample evidence of this can be found in a pair of black, three-ring binders labeled “Chico Trivia” held behind the desk at the Chico Museum and available for public review upon request. The folders are a veritable treasure trove of local lore, containing files filled with newspaper clippings, hand-written notes, pictures and information printed from websites about some of the stranger personalities and events to have colored local history. Examples include episodes of falling rocks that allegedly rained from the sky in the early 20th century, a frog hunt and subsequent feast featured in Life Magazine in 1937 and water carnivals hosted at Sycamore Pool in the 1940s and ’50s (yup, they really water-skied on it). There are also accounts of famous visitors like Buffalo Bill, Bigfoot and a mysterious “airship” seen by hundreds of Chicoans—and even mentioned in John Bidwell’s journals—in 1896.

The Bidwell Mansion may be the proverbial big house on the block when it comes to Chico’s historic residences, but the Stansbury Home—an 1883 Italianate Victorian house at the corner of Fifth and Salem streets—is also impressive. Built by Dr. Oscar Stansbury, it was occupied by his family until the death of his daughter Angeline on Christmas day 1974. The Stansbury Home Preservation Association gives tours on weekends ($5 adults, $3 children), offering a good look both inside the house and into the lives of its denizens—including the independent, protofeminist Angeline and a Chinese cook who hanged himself there. Artifacts on display include antique medical equipment (including a human skeleton) and the doc’s Masonic gear. The home also hosts a few strange and wonderful annual events, like ice cream socials and a Victorian Christmas party popular with the local steampunk crowd.

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Y

Yo-yos

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Zippy and the catfish

Chico’s equivalent to the largest ball of twine (20,000 pounds, Cawker City, Kansas) is a giant yo-yo weighing in at 256 pounds. The Big-Yo is modeled after a variety created by famous San Francisco yo-yo designer Tom Kuhn, inventor of the “No-Jive.” Kuhn built the oversized toy in the late 1970s. During an event at Pier 39, the working toy was dropped by a crane over the bay. It didn’t climb back up, and instead spun in place and burned through the rope, dropping into the water below. A diver recovered the wooden creation, which was featured in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest functioning yo-yo. For years, the iconic giant toy has been housed at none other than the National Yo-Yo Museum in downtown Chico’s Bird in Hand, the beloved local gift shop owned by yo-yo impresario Bob Malowney.

Are we having fun yet? We end this alphabetical rundown of Chico’s freaky fun with a shout-out from Zippy the Pinhead, the comic strip known for documenting the weirdness of America with its cast of strange characters and free-associated philosophical musings. The strip debuted in underground comics during the 1970s and eventually became a staple at newspapers such as the San Francisco Chronicle. The Chronicle dumped it for good in 2004 (though it remains in daily syndication), the same year that artist/writer Bill Griffith included a Chico oddity—the large metal catfish sitting atop a pole in an orchard on Highway 32 west of town—in one of his strips, asking about the creature (and all other things as well): “What is that thing?” Ω

Tweed rides

An excuse to dress all old-timey, ride around on a bicycle, preferably vintage, and then head to the brewery for some suds with other lovers of the two-wheeled life? Yes, please! Check out the kid-friendly Chico Tweed Ride in November and the Seerksucker Ride in the spring.

U

the enormous wind chime/tetrahedron structure in Humboldt Park. The xylophone sits near Wildwood’s playground equipment, just waiting for someone to bust out a crude tune. Maybe “Funky Town”?

Underground tunnels?

The myth just won’t go away: Locals have long spread a rumor that, early in Chico’s history, Chinese workers built and used tunnels underneath downtown Chico, and even set up opium dens. Local historians John Nopel and Michele Shover helped debunk the myth

Vertebrate Museum

Xylophone

X

Xylophone at Wildwood Park

There are lot of options for outdoor fun at the playground and playing fields at Wildwood Park at the entrance to Upper Bidwell Park. But music? Yes, just bring a mallet or a tennis ball and tap the resonators on the giant “Xylophone” sculpture created by one-time local artist Gregg Payne, who’s also responsible for “Resonance,” JANUARY 19, 2017

CN&R

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Arts &Culture Booker T. Jones PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICO PERFORMANCES

THIS WEEK

Godfather of Memphis soul

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Booker T. Jones takes history of Stax on the road States after a sold-out week-long gig Dat Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in London, espite having just returned to the

Booker T. Jones’ voice didn’t carry even a hint of jet lag during a recent telephone by interview. The 72-yearSaunthy old musician started Singh playing professionally when he was 16 years old, and his stamina is Preview: perhaps derived from Chico Performances the fact that he hasn’t presents Booker T. stopped—from his time Jones: Stax Revue, Saturday, Jan. 21, anchoring the legend7:30 p.m., at Laxson ary Stax/Volt Records Auditorium. house band, Booker T. Tickets: $10-$48 & The M.G.’s, in the Laxson Auditorium 1960s, through his mulChico State tiple Grammy-winning 898-6333 endeavors of the past www.chico decade. performances.com “I’m pretty much touring all the time,� Jones said, “but my favorite place to be is on stage.� On this current tour, Jones is behind his familiar Hammond B3 organ and alternating between two formats, a quartet (which he played with in London) and a big band, featuring a dozen or more musicians. “The quartet’s my outlet—more reflective of jazz and a melting pot of music that influenced me to be a musician: The Beatles, Muddy Waters, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan,� he said. When he stops in Chico on Saturday

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CN&R

JANUARY 19, 2017

THURS

Theater HIR: Sly, subversive comedy directed by Joyce Henderson

(Jan. 21), Jones will be with the big band to perform A Stax Revue & Journey Through Soul, Blues and R&B. During the 1960s and early 1970s, the Stax studio churned out some of the greatest records in American music history, featuring such artists as Otis Redding, Sam and Dave, and The Staple Singers. And Booker T. & The M.G.’s served as the house band that provided the foundation for what would become the Southern/Memphis soul sound. And it’s those Stax classics—from Redding’s “Tenderness� to The M.G.’s instrumental standard (featuring Jones’ unmistakable organ groove) “Green Onions�—that Jones and his big band are navigating for the revue. “I love working with a full ensemble: four horns, four singers and four guitars,� Jones said. “It enables me to do Otis Redding, Carla Thomas, Eddie Floyd, [etc.].� Born and raised in Memphis, Jones was a

musical wunderkind, playing oboe, sax, trombone, bass and piano at school, and organ at church. And his musicianship and environment conspired to form a very fertile creative period. “When I was a young boy throwing papers, I had a route in Memphis. At Mason and Temple, I walked by a church and inside, there stood The Staple Singers. I just stopped and listened from the streets,� he said. In high school, Jones hooked up with

Earth, Wind & Fire frontman/songwriter Maurice White. “He was my first musical friend,â€? Jones recalled. His career for Stax started in 1960 (when it was still Satellite Records), recording the baritone sax part for “‘Cause I Love Youâ€? by Rufus and Carla. After 10 years at the label, Jones left for California. “Stax only did soul and R&B, not jazz, not rock ‘n’ roll. They were pretty strict,â€? he said. Over the following decades, Jones played with a variety of artists—Stephen Stills, Ray Charles, Willie Nelson, Rancid, Elton John—as well as on and off again with The M.G.’s. The band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992 and honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammys in 2007. Jones also picked up a couple of Grammys for his more recent solo work—2010 Best Instrumental Album for Potato Hole and 2012 Best Pop Instrumental Album for The Road from Memphis. “I’ve been out of the scene, not on Top 40 radio, but folks have stuck with me as I changed through rock, neo soul and jazz, evolving musically, trying to come up with new styles,â€? Jones said, adding that no matter what the generation of fan, they all share an affinity—just as he does—for the early stuff. “They still love the ’60s music—Marvin Gaye; Earth, Wind & Fire; and the large range of music that I feed myself—gospel to FODVVLFDOEOXHVDQGURFNÂľQÂľUROOÂł Ć?

about a soldier who returns home to his suburban California family to help take care of his ailing father, only to discover that his mother and newly out transgender sibling are on a crusade to dismantle the patriarchy. Th-Sa, 7:30pm. Opens 1/19. $14.99. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blue roomtheatre.com.

OF KITES AND KINGS: Northern California playwright Gary Wright’s account of America’s revolution through the eyes of Benjamin Franklin’s landlady and confidante, Polly Stevenson. Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm. $16-$22 champagne opening night/$12-$18 regular performances/$10 discount night (at the door only). Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Road in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Poetry/Literature POETRY READING: Shared words and refreshments with local readers. Third Th of every month, 6:30pm. Free. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

WOMEN’S MARCH ON CHICO Saturday, Jan. 21 Chico City Plaza

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS

ON NEXT PAGE

HIR

Opens Thursday, Jan. 20 Blue Room Theatre SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, THEATER

20

FRI

Special Events FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Free showing of The Jungle Book outside of Dick’s Sporting Goods. Bring low-back chairs and blankets. F, 1/20, 7-9pm. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St., (530) 343-0706, www.chicomall.com.

HAPPY TAILS MOVIE NIGHT: Drop the kids off for a couple hours of fun, pizza and an animalthemed movie. Pillows/bean bag chairs encouraged but not required. Third F of every month, 6:30pm. $10/first child, $6/additional children (same family). Butte Humane Society Education Center, 2156 Pillsbury Road Ste. 160, (530) 343-7917.

PARADISE DANCEFEST: A NIGHT AT THE RED CARPET: Positive-i Dance & Circus Center’s dance, aerial, juggling, poi spinning and hula hooping classes will be showcasing moviethemed routines, with local vendors, photo booth and more. Audience members are encouraged to wear formal attire. F, 1/20, 6:30pm. $12-$15. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.paradiseperformingarts.com.

Music FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with local experimental troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

HIR: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

PARADISE DANCEFEST Friday, Jan. 20 Paradise Performing Arts Center SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Music

BOOKER T. JONES: STAX REVUE: One of the

AFTERNOON WINTER CONCERT: An afternoon of

fathers of modern soul, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient and four-time Grammy winner plays the audience through the history that is Stax Records. Sa, 1/21, 7:3010pm. $10-$48. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperformances.com.

MY FAIR LADY: Classic Lerner and Loewe musical in which pompous phonetics professor Henry Higgins takes it upon himself to transform a Cockney working girl into one who can pass for a cultured member of high society. F, Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Road, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

OF KITES AND KINGS: See Thurday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Road in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

SISTER ACT: Feel-good musical comedy based on the hit movie of the same name telling the story of a disco diva who witnesses a murder and disguises herself as a nun. F, Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm. $15-$20. California Regional Theatre, 475 East Ave., (800) 722-4522, www.crtshows.com.

Poetry/Literature INAUGURATE RESISTANCE: Poetry, spoken word and open mic event to take a stand for inclusiveness and movement building in solidarity with other events throughout California. F, 1/20, noon. Selvester’s Café, Chico State, (530) 898-5817.

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SAT

Special Events WOMEN’S MARCH ON CHICO: Local march in soli-

Theater

Music

darity with the Women’s March on Washington, DC, providing a chance for all people to show their support for those who face uncertainty and fear of the incoming presidential administration. Following the march, there will be a rally that will include a variety of speakers and performers. Sa, 1/21, 10am-3:30pm. Free. Downtown City Plaza, (530) 896-7800.

Theater DRACULA YOUTH AUDITIONS: Kids and teens, age 6 to 17 are invited to audition for this production based on Bram Stoker’s original tale. RSVP via email to reserve a spot. Sa, 1/21, 12-2pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

HIR: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

MY FAIR LADY: See Friday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Road, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

OF KITES AND KINGS: See Thurday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Road in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

SISTER ACT: See Friday. California Regional Theatre, 475 East Ave., (800) 722-4522, www.crtshows.com.

Poetry/Literature MARIE SUTRO BOOK SIGNING: San Francisco author Marie Sutro will be signing copies of her new book, Dark Associations. Sa, 1/21, 24pm. Free. Barnes & Noble, 2031 Martin Luther King Jr Pkwy., (530) 894-1494.

Art Receptions FORTIFYING THE AMERICAN DREAM: Closing reception for this exhibit of works created by artist Kyle Campbell during a three-month internship at the Kohler cast iron plant in Kohler, Wis. Artist talk at 6pm. Sa, 1/21, 5-7pm. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway St., (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

22

SUN

Special Events DEATH CAFE: Part of an international movement to bring our common mortality out of the closet. Bring your curiosity and stories to this open, respectful and confidential space. Su, 1/22, 5:30pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 588-6175, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar assistant at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

student performances, small ensemble & solo music sponsored by the Butte County Music Teachers’ Association. Su, 1/22, 4-6pm. St. John’s Episcopal Church, 2341 Floral Ave., (530) 894-1971.

LADIES IN BLACK: Works for trumpet, soprano and harpsichord by Scarlatti and Melani, French melodies for soprano with harp, and a contemporary duet for harp and trumpet. A unique presentation by Chico State’s Department of Music and Theatre. Su, 1/22, 2pm. Free. Zingg Recital Hall, 400 W First St., (530) 898-5152, www.csuchico.edu/muta.

MARTIN SEXTON: Singer-songwriter and producer who has released nine studio albums blending soul, gospel, country, rock, blues and R&B; collabrated with John Mayer and Peter Frampton; and played everywhere from Bonnaroo to Carnegie Hall. Su, 1/22, 7:30pm. $25. The Rendezvous, 3269 Esplanade 142.

Theater MY FAIR LADY: See Friday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Road, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

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WED

Special Events SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL: Five-day event celebrating the remarkable journey of millions of waterfowl and raptors along the Pacific Flyway. Includes bird-watching field trips for waterfowl, raptors and songbirds, workshops on nature photography, bird carving, how to record nature sounds, how to identify backyard birds and much more, and a keynote address from bird guide and author, Alvaro Jaramillo. W, 1/25-Su, 1/29. Fees vary. Many free events. Call or visit website for details, Chico, (530) 345-1865, www.snowgoose festival.org.

Music ROBERT EARL KEEN: Houston-based folk, country, blues and Americana artist and member of Texas Heritage Songwriters Hall of Fame backed by his longtime band. W, 1/25, 7:30pm. $30. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 892-4647, www.sierra nevada.com.

OF KITES AND KINGS: See Thurday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Road in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

SISTER ACT: See Friday. California Regional Theatre, 475 East Ave., (800) 722-4522, www.crtshows.com.

F O R M O R E M U S I C , SEE

NIGHTLIFE O N

PAG E 2 6

EDITOR’S PICK

ALL ABOUT THE BENJAMIN Following a successful debut last year in Sacramento, Grass Valley playwright Gary Wright’s latest work, Of Kites and Kings, is making its way to Paradise for a run at Theatre on the Ridge, Thursday, Jan. 19 through Sunday, Feb. 12. The play, directed by Jerry Miller, gives an account of the years surrounding the American revolution through the eyes of Polly Stevenson, landlady and confidante of founding father Benjamin Franklin. Befitting the legendary intellect of Franklin, Wright’s script is equal parts witty and wise, telling the story of the increasingly atodds relationship of Franklin with his son William as the two find themselves on opposite sides of the war.

JA N U A R Y 1 9 , 2 0 1 7

CN&R

23


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B-SO SPACE: Visual Resource Center Exhibition, art from the collection of Chico State’s Ira Latour Visual Resource Center. Through 2/3. Ayres 107, Chico State, (530) 898-5331.

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Elizabeth Shepherd, photographs by Elizabeth Shepherd combining her love of cartooning with her photography and featuring interesting and often recognizable locations in Chico and San Francisco. Through 1/31. 789 Bille Road in Paradise, (530) 877-5673.

CHICO ART CENTER: Member Showcase, annual non-juried exhibition original artwork by Chico Art Center members. Through 1/27. 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

HAS BEANS: Paper Art by Molly Amick, works from a local artist whose chosen medium is the cocktail napkin. Through 1/31. 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Artwork by Daphnye

Altman, acrylic paintings and handmade dolls will be featured. The Healing Art Gallery features Northern California artists touched by cancer. Through 1/26. 265 Cohasset Road inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

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CN&R

JA N U A R Y 1 9 , 2 0 1 7

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Snidle, oil paintings and mono prints created by James Snidle, over the years. Many are recognizable plein-air paintings of the Butte County scenes and locals. Through 2/25. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930.

NAKED LOUNGE TEA & COFFEEHOUSE: Solivagant, exhibition of photos by Emily Teague. Through

1/31. 118 W Second St., (530) 895-0676.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Ongoing exhibits, rotating exhibits featuring local artists. Ongoing. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

Museums CHICO AIR MUSEUM: Ongoing display highlighting local aviation history. Ongoing. 165 Ryan Ave., (530) 345-6468.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day

and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. $2-$4. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Chico Through Time, a permanent exhibit, featuring a variety of displays depicting Chico’s history—from John Bidwell and the Mechoopda Indians to Robin Hood and Hmong life in Chico. Ongoing. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Chico’s science museum features rotating special exhibits, plus a range of permanent displays on local farming, water, famous regional oak trees and a couple of ice-age skeletons. Check site for current special exhibition. Ongoing. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

PARADISE DEPOT MUSEUM: A railroad and logging museum in Paradise. Ongoing, 7-9pm. 5570 Black Olive Drive in Paradise, (530) 877-1919.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY:

Hmong Reflections: Stories of Our Own, Hmong history, culture and identity as told by students from the local Hmong community. Through 7/27. Meriam Library Complex At Chico State.


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Melody Lo, Jessie Xiong and Melydia Lo give dance lessons at the opening reception for Chico Museum’s new Hmong exhibit. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICO MUSEUM

‘We are your neighbors’ Museum exhibit celebrates Hmong life in Chico

Tmural Hmong movements in front of a brightly colored depicting a jungle replete with lush green foliage, hree young dancers demonstrated traditional

cheerfully clambering monkeys, bright flowers and butterflies. The dancers looked festive and graceful in traditional attire: shiny by black silk blouses with cobalt blue Carey Wilson sleeve accents, scarlet waist sashes and, for the young women, white panels in their black skirts. Review: A break between storms provided Peb Yog Hmoob, some respite for Chicoans last weekWe Are Your Neighbors, new addition to Chico end, and on a lovely midwinter Sunday Through Time exhibit. afternoon, the young dancers and the rest of the opening festivities for the Chico Museum dedication of Peb Yog Hmoob, We Are 141 Salem St. Your Neighbors (“We Are Hmong, 891-4336 www.chico We Are Your Neighbors”)—the new museum.org addition to Chico Museum’s ongo ing Chico Through Time exhibit— brought welcome color to the season. The reception and exhibit were curated by Leaders for a Lifetime, a Chico State Hmong youth outreach program made up of local high school and college age students. It operates under the guidance of Professor Emeritus Mary Portis, who has mentored the group since its inception in 1997. As Portis explained via email, “The Chico Museum wanted a Hmong exhibit that focused on the experience of the Hmong population in Chico. Who better to do it than Hmong youth who had grown up in Chico? While the exhibit does share some Hmong history, the focus of the exhibit is life here in Chico.” And a very lively and positive life it is, if the exhibitions of dance, art and food preparation on display and being demonstrated (and eaten) at Sunday’s event are any indication. On the front porch of the museum, “Mrs. Vang”

(who, according to Hmong customs, doesn’t use a first name) sat with matriarchal presence, stirring and dishing out endless samples of delicious pho on the museum porch. Vang, who has had seven children in Leaders for a Lifetime, did all the food preparation for the event, Portis said. Inside, joining the three dance instructors for some numbers was Quinn Lee, clad in a plush tiger costume. Lee’s cheerfully bespectacled face peered out of her costume’s throat as she danced with the group and served as a kind of roving greeter and general entertainer to the delight of children in attendance. The exhibition of cultural artifacts on the walls and in display cases includes many examples of Hmong embroidery, weaving and tapestry work as well as exquisite ornamental silver jewelry, and intricately costumed dolls. Along with the decorative pieces, family photographs depicting life both before and after immigrating to the United States give perspective to an ethnic group with origins in the mountain regions of China and Southeast Asia that made its way to Chico. One item on display that I found particularly beautiful was a story cloth titled “Melon and Crops,” sewn by Mai Xiong Cha, a mother whose children are members of Leaders for a Lifetime. The piece is about 2 square feet and depicts a man and woman in a repeated motif that includes a house and plant figures over a blue background embellished with geometric stars in varying colors and shapes, the whole conveying a sense of harmonious serenity. A popular table manned by artist Thue Xiong offered designs of traditional Hmong geometrical motifs that could be stenciled via airbrush onto arms, hands, legs or even cheeks. This reviewer chose a design that used English letters combined with a stylized flower to gracefully produce the word “Hmong,” a temporary souvenir from the opening for the new and much deserved addition to the permanent exhibit on Chico’s history. □

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 1/19—WEDNESDAY 1/25

20FRIDAY

ROOMMATE

AMAROK: Chico’s heaviest band heads up

Saturday, Jan. 21 Lost on Main

an eclectic bill of local rock that includes The Primers, West By Swan and Redding’s Arcane. F, 1/20, 8pm. $7. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 345-7672.

SEE SATURDAY

ATOMIKA: Reno-based cover band playing Top 40, rock, R&B, country and more.

F, 1/20, 8:30pm, Sa, 1/21, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.gold countrycasino.com.

BASSMINT: A weekly bass music party

19THURSDAY

AARON RICH AND FRIENDS: Country music round-robin. First and Third Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408, www.facebook.com/crazyhorsesaloon.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday night jazz featuring local musicians. Th, 811pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

JOHN SEID AND FRIENDS: John Seid and Larry Peterson play an eclectic set of dinner music on the patio, weather permitting. Th, 1/19, 6-9pm. No cover. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 8092304.

LEANN COOLEY AND FRIENDS: Vintage

blues and swing. Every other Th. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 3432056, www.farmstarpizza.com.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7pm. Has Beans Cafe, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.has beans.com.

ROBERT KARCH AND FRIENDS: Jazz, Latin jazz, blues and more from Shigemi Minetaka, Ethan Swett, Komoki Bunting and Robert Karch. Th, 1/19, 6-8:30pm. No Cover. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farmstarpizza.com.

with a rotating cast of local and regional producers and DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St., (530) 895-3888.

BELLA DONNA: Tribute to Stevie Nicks drawing from her time with Fleetwood Mac and her solo career. F, 1/20, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Drive in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com/brewing-co.

GRINGO: Redding surf rockers make the trip south for a night of groovy garage rock with locals Bad Mana and The Feisties. F, 1/20, 9pm. $7. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 3434915.

Wine

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IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with traditional Irish music by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

JOHN SEID AND FRIENDS: John Seid and Larry Peterson provide live music in the lounge. F, 1/20, 6-9pm. No cover. Two-Twenty Restaurant/Lounge, 220 W. Fourth St., (530) 895-1515, www.twotwentyrestaurant.com.

OPEN MIC: All-ages open mic hosted by Jodi Foster and Julie Bos. F, 7pm. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

UNPLUGGED OPEN MIC/JAM: Happy hour and music hosted by singer/songwriter Jeb Draper. F, 5-8pm through 11/23. Donations accepted. Rock House, 11865 Highway 70 in Yankee Hill, (530) 532-1889.

21SATURDAY

ATOMIKA: See Friday. Gold Country

Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.goldcountry casino.com.

BOOKER T. JONES: STAX REVUE: One of the fathers of modern soul, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient and four-time Grammy winner plays the audience through the history that

Although Houston-born singer/songwriter Robert Earl Keen’s path to commercial success was a bit more winding than that of his Texas A&M classmate and early collaborator Lyle Lovett, 30-plus years of touring and more than a dozen albums later, Keen is no less the Texas legend. The 2012 Texas Heritage Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee brings his full catalog of material and a killer live band to the Sierra Nevada Big Room on Wednesday, Jan. 25.

is Stax Records. Sa, 1/21, 7:30-10pm. $10-$48. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chico performances.com.

DRIVER AT STUDIO INN LOUNGE: Live

music by the Paradise guys! Sa, 1/21, 9pm. $3.00. Studio Inn Cocktail Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (530) 343-0662.

DRAGOPOLIS: Monthly “future of drag” show hosted by Claudette de Versailles. All entertainers welcome to

perform. Third Sa of every month, 10pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

HOUSE CATURDAY NIGHT AT SMOKIES:

Classic jazz favorites. Sa, 6:30-9:30pm through 9/24. Smokie Mountain Steakhouse and Lounge, 7039 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-3323.

JOHN SEID AND FRIENDS: John Seid, Larry Peterson and Stevie Cook play an eclectic range of live music in the

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CN&R

JA N U A R Y 1 9 , 2 0 1 7

Think you’ve got an eye for news? Well, you’re in luck!

Hey there, students!

The Chico News & Review is seeking a talented photographer to join our crew as a photojournalism intern. Must be enthusiastic, be able to photograph live events as well as portraits and planned photo shoots. Your goal: Tell a story through your lens. Interested candidates should email Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper at meredithc@newsreview.com with a résumé, cover letter explaining your goals for an internship at the CN&R and a link to your portfolio.


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22

EMAIL YOUR LISTINGS TO

cnrcalendar@newsre

BASSMINT

Friday, Jan. 20 Peking Chinese Restaurant

22SUNDAY 25WEDNESDAY

MARTIN SEXTON: Singer-songwriter and

producer who has released nine studio albums blending soul, gospel, country, rock, blues and R&B; collabrated with John Mayer and Peter Frampton; and played everywhere from Bonnaroo to Carnegie Hall. Su, 1/22, 7:30pm. $25. The Rendezvous, 3269 Esplanade 142.

SEE FRIDAY

THE POSEYS: Husband-and-wife duo playing a wide assortment of swing, jazz and blues. Every other Su, 4:306:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farm starpizza.com.

TIM MCKEE & LARRY PETERSON: Live

lounge. Sa, 1/21, 6-9pm. No cover. Two-Twenty Restaurant/Lounge, 220 W. Fourth St., (530) 895-1515, www.twotwentyrestaurant.com.

MICHAEL BECK BAND: High-energy country singer backed by a solid live band. Sa, 1/21, 9pm. The Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 379 E. Park Ave., (530) 345-7499, www.tackleboxchico.com.

ROOMMATE: Original dubstep DJ, producer and co-owner of Hollow Point Recordings joins TripleTree & Conquering Lion, Stay Positive Sound DJ and Wagon Burna for an evening of

blues music with locals Tim McKee and Larry Peterson. Su, 1/22, 4-8pm. Studio Inn Cocktail Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (530) 343-0662. good bass music and great positive vibes. Sa, 1/21, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

SEMI-ACOUSTIC MUSIC SHOWCASE: A benefit for Chico schools, hosted by Keith Kendall and friends. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road, (530) 710-2020.

TRIBUTE TO TOM PETTY: An equal parts fun and moving tribute to the rock ’n’ roll icon. Sa, 1/21, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Drive in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

Gift Certificate $

10

Pita Pit

view.com

24TUESDAY

POOL WORKSHOP: Free pool workshop

during happy hour with Cathy Wagner. Tu, 4-6pm. Opens 1/17. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

JOHN SEID AND FRIENDS: John Seid,

Larry Peterson and Stevie Cook play a tasteful selection of dinner music. W, 1/25, 6-9pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd., (530) 342-8500.

LIVE JAZZ: Eat pizza and enjoy live jazz

by Carey Robinson and friends. W. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farmstarpizza.com.

LOW FLYING BIRDS: Live bluegrass featuring members of Swamp Zen and Electric Circus. W, 7-10pm. No cover. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 8922473.

THE JOURNEY CONTINUES

As a street musician in Boston during the late 1980s, Martin Sexton eventually scraped together enough selfproduced recordings to release a demo on 8-track called In the Journey. Sexton would go on to sell 20,000 copies of the album on his own, kick-starting a career that has taken him from busking at Harvard Square to performing at Carnegie Hall and collaborating with John Mayer, who called Sexton “the best live performer I’ve ever seen.” Sexton plays The Rendezvous on Sunday, Jan. 22.

OPEN MIC MUSIC NIGHTS: Local musicians Jeff Coleman and Jimmy Reno host this open mic night. Bring your instrument of choice. W, 6-10pm. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

ROBERT EARL KEEN: Houston-based folk, country, blues and Americana artist and member of Texas Heritage Songwriters Hall of Fame backed by his longtime band. W, 1/25, 7:30pm. $30. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 892-4647, www.sierranevada.com.

BLUES NIGHT: Live weekly blues music

from local musicians. Tu. Italian Garden, 6929 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 876-9988.

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CN&R

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REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Founder

Michael Keaton stars as Ray Kroc, the former salesman who partnered with the McDonald brothers and eventually turned their burger-joint chain into a worldwide franchise. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Split

The latest from M. Night Shyamalan stars James McAvoy as a troubled (and super creepy) man with 24 different personalities who kidnaps three teens and locks them in a windowless room. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

XXX: The Return of Xander Cage

More hardcore man action with Vin Diesel in this third installment of the XXX franchise, featuring the muscleman reprising his role of Xander Cage, the eXtreme athlete-turnedCIA operative trying to save the world from something or other. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Reopening this week

5

Moonlight

Clash of the spirit An impressive yet understuffed epic from Scorsese

S

ilence, Martin Scorsese’s film version of the novel by Shûsaku Endô, is an impressive accomplishment, but—quite necessarily, perhaps—not a particularly entertaining one. It’s artful and admirable, but also rather laborious. Novel and film alike tell by the story of Catholic priests Juan-Carlos encountering persecution in Selznick 17th century Japan. Two young Portuguese priests (Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver in the film) get themselves smuggled into Japan in a time (circa 1635) when European priests and their Japanese converts are suffering Silence violent repressions at the hands Starring andrew of the shogunate. Rodrigues Garfield, adam Driver (Garfield) and Garupe (Driver) and Liam neeson. Directed by Martin are on a mission to find their Scorsese. Cinemark one-time mentor, Father Ferreira 14. rated r. (Liam Neeson), who has disappeared amid rumors that he has publicly renounced his faith. The on-screen Silence is partly a low-key adventure tale, a dark and dangerous journey, and partly an austere drama of character and faith, a spiritual journey with a harsh, near-mystical twist. The two kinds of journey begin to merge well before they reach more conclusive form by way of Rodrigues’ unexpected discoveries concerning Father Ferreira. In the meantime, both of the young priests have increasingly stark interactions with a smiling samu-

3

rai/inquisitor (Issei Ogata), who is both nemesis and guide to Rodrigues in particular. There are also encounters with the groups of beleaguered peasants, themselves Christians in hiding, who protect the two priests but also need protecting. The roguishly fallible Kichijiro (Yôsuke Kubozuka) and a lordly interpreter (Tadanobu Asano) are special standouts among the Japanese characters. The film is probably at its best when its priestly characters, especially Rodrigues, are wrestling with questions of faith and moral action. And that includes the final sections of the film where the multiple meanings of “silence” get their ultimate workout in the choices for action that Rodrigues and others embrace. But the meandering narrative path of this longish film (161 minutes) seems to diminish the impact of its most resounding themes. Ultimately, the film takes its soul-searching to a rewarding finish, but much of its bulky midsection seems to wander in terms of drama and thematic focus. The odd mixture of morality play, parable and epic adventure seems almost pointless here, and plainly topical issues—torture, intolerance, nationalist tyranny—come into view but only in passing, only for show. The spiritual journey part of the story has great interest, but I found myself somewhat distracted by questions about those peasant converts who lead a clandestine existence rather than renounce their newfound faith. They’re key players at every level in the priests’ story, but the nature of their spiritual lives goes unexamined. □

Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight really is something special. Its subject matter (a kid growing up black and gay in rough parts of Miami and environs) sounds provocative at first, but what’s most extraordinary about this small, sharp, emotionally evocative movie is less a matter of social provocations than of the quiet, empathetic attention paid to emotional lives persisting, just barely, against a tide of grim circumstances. The central figure in all this is a boy named Chiron, and his story is a matter of episodes from three different phases of his young life—elementary school, when he’s known as “Little” (played by Alex Hibbert); high school, when he goes by his given name (and is played by Ashton Sanders); and young adulthood, when, after a stretch in prison, he calls himself “Black” (played by Trevante Rhodes). Part of the film’s sidelong emotional power comes from its seamless blend of performances by a cast that mixes seasoned pros with youngsters and fledglings. Jenkins and company make the whole thing feel like everyday reality caught on the unhurried fly. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

CN&R

January 19, 2017

4

Hidden Figures

Katherine Johnson, one of the most brilliant mathematicians of the last century, gets the movie her life’s story deserves with Hidden Figures, an entertaining and enlightening look at her—and her cohorts’—decades of contributions to NASA and space flight starting in the late-1950s. Johnson was part of a segregated wing of mathematicians who did the work that actual computers do today. The movie depicts the humiliation she and two other historical black figures (Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson) went through while solving equations that helped put men safely into space and return them to their families. Taraji P. Henson plays Johnson, the “smart one” who astronaut John Glenn personally demanded check the coordinates before his historical 1962 flight around the Earth launched. Henson is perfection in the role, depicting Johnson as the awesome nerd she is. The film only scratches surface of what Johnson, Vaughan and Jackson accomplished and endured, but it does bring their historical significance to light. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG —B.G.

Live by Night

Another book by Dennis Lehane (Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone) gets cinematic treatment with Ben Affleck producing, directing, screenwriting and starring as a police chief’s son who gets tangled up in the world of organized crime. Also starring Chris Cooper, Elle Fanning and Brendan GLEEson. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Patriots Day

Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights) directs this drama based on the events surrounding the terrorist bombing at the 2013 Boston Marathon. Starring Mark Wahlberg, John Goodman and J.K. Simmons. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Still here Jackie

Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Now playing

La La Land

The Bye Bye Man

Three college students, a spooky old house, and a supernatural entity out to get them. Rinse, repeat. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Lion

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Monster Trucks

4

Elle

This unexpected comeback movie from European auteur Paul Verhoeven has gotten a lot of advance attention, both for its controversial subject matter (a rape victim who refuses to accept victimhood) and for its star player, Isabelle Huppert, who has brought offbeat brilliance to an ongoing string of recent acting challenges and just won the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress—Drama. Huppert is superb here in a role that many feel only she, with her unique combinations of sangfroid and fiery intensity, could credibly play. Her character, a feisty executive at a video-game company named Michèle Leblanc, is the perhaps perverse heart of the matter here. But Elle is also a paradoxical gallery of portraits, erotic and otherwise.

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Passengers

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

4

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Cinemark 14 and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Sing

Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Sleepless

Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

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The noteworthy characters therein include Michèle’s business partner (Anne Consigny) whose husband (Christian Berkel) is Michèle’s sometime lover; the novelist (Charles Berling) who is Michèle’s still-devoted ex-husband; their persistently feckless adult son Vincent (Jonas Bloquet); Michèle’s weirdly girlish mother (Vimala Pons); and an awkwardly handsome next-door neighbor named Patrick (Laurent Lafitte). Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


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OMendocino, kingdom by the sea named there was a perfect nce upon a time, in a faery

little one-woman operation called Lu’s Kitchen. Lu dished out by a short list of Tuck Coop unique, superhealthy organic dishes from a OM Foods tiny shed in an 1008 W. Sacramento undeveloped lot Ave., Ste. 1 in downtown 566-9880 www.iloveomfoods.com Mendo. It was unique, personal, quirky (the hours were improvisational, Lu’s temperament was variable). It was Fourth Wave economy at its best, and it was a highlight of my coastal visits. When Lu’s died, a part of me died with it. Fast forward to Chico, 2017: Now we’ve got our own version of Lu’s. OM Foods (the OM stands for Organic Mama) is a gift from one person, Amanda Bosschart (pronounced “Bo-shart”), to the Chico community. Like Lu’s, it’s in a tiny “food hut” in the midst of urban busyness, in the Nord Safeway parking lot. The place is so small you could almost touch the opposing walls with outstretched arms. And, as with Lu’s, the food is idiosyncratic, limited in scope, super-healthy and delicious. The Food Police can be a humorless and judgmental lot. I remember once eating from one of the trailers at the Saturday farmers’ market and thinking what a model of political correctness the trailer was—run by women, staffed by the two owners, serving organic, locally sourced underrepresentedethnicity food, with no overhead

authentic healthy delicious We also offer Vegetarian & Vegan Dishes!

Vegan nachos PHOTO COURTESY OF OM FOODS

and using recyclable plates and utensils. A friend saw me eating and said, “How can you support that place?” I asked what had her dander up. “Look at that generator! Can you imagine the damage to the ozone layer that place is causing?” So, being health-conscious and spiritual about food can easily get grim and preachy. But OM is never that, while doing all the right things: local sourcing, using nonGMO ingredients, avoiding meat (fish tacos are the only carnage), being vegan most of the time. There is even free lavender spritzer by the counter, to elevate your mood. I bet Bosschart would even burn you a little sage if you asked. But she keeps it joyful and warm. She’ll call you by name and encourage you to do the same with her. The food is all of a piece, built from a short list of ingredients— tempeh, avocado, cashew sauce, cilantro, dill, cacao, coconut, maté, cabbage slaw, rice, beans—and all absolutely delicious. The most popular items are the fish tacos (divine) and the nachos, but you can close your eyes and point and be pleased with the result. They used to have a “cesar salad,” which I assumed was a tribute to the great union organizer, but it’s since been

normalized to “Caesar” on the menu. All the drinks are worth ordering, among them smoothies (right up there with Fresh Twisted Café), “omade” (half lemonade, half maté), and hot cacao with coconut creamer (think milder, less sweet hot cocoa). Prices are a small step up from taco trucks—$10.50 buys you two fish tacos (you’ll need both for a meal) or a nacho plate that will feed you twice. OM does a number of things I really like. It uses tempeh instead of tofu (Bosschart and I both think tofu, despite its objective virtues, doesn’t taste very good), and it doesn’t follow the vegetarian regimen of burying everything under a layer of cheese. To me, cheese is a luxury item whose complex flavors are to be savored on the tongue like a liqueur, not a cheap rubbery bedspread used to obliterate everything under it. OM agrees. Bosschart’s nachos are covered not in cheap cheese, but in a nice little cashew cream sauce. Lovely. Valentine’s Day marks OM’s first anniversary. Mark your calendar—Bosschart hints at live music, free samples and other celebratory stuff. □

1312 Solano St • Corning • (530) 838-9089 www.condormarkaperuvianrestaurant.com

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j a n u a rDy AT 1 9E,, 22001177

29 29


North valley productioNs presents:

INFO: (530) 345–8136 www.chIcOTIcKETS.com

this sunday, january 22: martin sexton

MARTIN SEXTON wITh lEE cOulTER

“the best live performer I’ve ever seen. I may just quit my job and go follow Martin and make a fuss everywhere I go.” - John Mayer

the rendezvous 3269 esplanade suite 142 – Next to Sol reStauraNt show 7:30 pm (door 6:30) Tickets: campus Bicycles, diamond W Western Wear, herried Music, the Music connection all ageS/geN adm.

saturday, february 4

DAVID lINDlEY

the rendezvous 3269 esplanade suite 142 – Next to Sol reStauraNt

Multi-instrumentalist David Lindley performs music that redefines the show 7:30 pm (door 6:30) word “eclectic.” Lindley, well known for his many years as the featured accompanist with Jackson Browne, and leader of his own band el rayo-X, has Tickets: campus Bicycles, diamond W Western Wear, herried Music, the Music connection long championed the concept of world music. all ageS/geN adm.

tuesday, february 14

DARK STAR ORchESTRA

paradise performing arts center 777 nunneley rd. paradise

“DsO recreates the Dead concert experience with uncanny verisimilitude. In fact, Dark star Orchestra often sounds more like the Dead than the Dead sometimes did…” –Chicago Tribune

show 7 pm (doors 6:00) Tickets Chico: campus Bicycles, diamond W Western Wear, herried Music,the Music connection Tickets Paradise: Wilson’s printing, postnet, steve’s Music all ageS/geN adm.

saturday, march 4

cAlIFORNIA hONEYDROPS

chico grange hall 2775 old nord ave show 7:30 pm (door 6:30)

the California Honeydrops don’t just play music—they throw parties. Led Tickets: campus Bicycles, diamond W Western Wear, herried Music, by dynamic vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Lech Wierzynski, and drawing the Music connection on diverse musical influences from Bay Area r&B, funk, southern soul, Delta all ageS/geN adm. blues, and new Orleans second-line, the Honeydrops bring vibrant energy and infectious dance-party vibes to their shows.

monday, march 20

DONNAVON FRANKENREITER wITh GRANT-lEE PhIllIPS

Donavon Frankenreiter’s new album, “The Heart,” officially marks the start of the singer-songwriter’s second decade as a solo recording artist. It’s been over ten years since the release of his self-titled debut, and in that time he has grown, not only as a musician, but also as a man.

the rendezvous 3269 esplanade suite 142 – Next to Sol reStauraNt show 7:30 pm (door 6:30) Tickets: campus Bicycles, diamond W Western Wear, herried Music, the Music connection all ageS/geN adm.

thursday, may 11

ART GARFuNKEl Blessed with what the new York times described as a “beautiful countertenor,” singer Art GArFUnKeL has made an indelible mark on the music world as both a solo artist and half of the unrivaled simon & Garfunkel. He has also enjoyed a successful film career, published a book of poetry and released 12 solo albums, the most recent being sOMe enCHAnteD eVenInG in 2007. 30  

CN&R 

january 19, 2017

paradise performing arts center 777 nunneley rd. paradise show 7:30 pm (doors 6:30) oN Sale Now! oNliNe oNly reServed SeatiNg


IN THE MIX Bright, Precious Days Jay McInerney alfred a. Knopf Bright, Precious Days is Jay McInerney’s third novel featuring Russell and Corrine Calloway. The first, Brightness Falls, introduced them as young marrieds newly arrived in New York City in the 1980s; the second, The Good Life, picked them up during the 9/11 crisis; and this one finds them in early middle age, when the crises are personal, not social. Russell, an independent book publisher, is struggling to keep his young business alive and maintain the family’s lifestyle, while Corrine, the director of a nonprofit that serves the hungry poor, is having an affair with a former lover. As always in McInerney’s novels, the city is itself a major character, full of witty and creative but often unreliable and addicted people. It’s also expensive. The Calloways aren’t nearly as wealthy as most of their friends, and they are about to lose their TriBeCa loft—even as Russell stakes the future of his business on a talented but erratic young author and Corrine decides whether to leave the marriage.

BOOK

—Robert Speer

Who You Selling For The Pretty Reckless razor & Tie records On its third album, Who You Selling For, NYC’s The Pretty Reckless combines a great Americana LP with a decent heavy rock EP, making the jarring choice to pivot back and forth a few times between approaches. On the openers (“The Walls Are Closing In/Hangman” and “Oh My God”), the quartet sounds like a Soundgarden-Evanescence combo—fine if you like that. Then, “Take Me Down” kicks in; that song, the first single, is a bluesy rocker on which singer Taylor Momsen really hits her groove. The next seven songs mesh à la Joan Osborne’s Relish, sliding through the backcountry and bayous with such authenticity that the guest guitar licks of Warren Haynes (Allman Brothers Band, Gov’t Mule) sound right at home. The final four tracks bounce around sonically, but that’s OK: Here, parts exceed the whole.

MUSIC

—Evan Tuchinsky

The Black Widow Daniel Silva HarperCollins The Black Widow is the 16th of Daniel Silva’s spy thrillers built around Gabriel Allon, a clandestine Israeli operative, former assassin and soon-to-become chief of the Israeli secret intelligence services. As a series it’s at the apex of the genre, where Silva keeps company with such greats as Alan Furst and Joseph Kanon. As usual, this novel is sharply written, densely plotted and up to the historical moment—a vicious Islamic State terrorist named Saladin is wreaking bloody havoc in Europe, and Allon is drafted to stop him. Key to that effort is a young female Israeli doctor, trained by Allon, who has infiltrated the terrorists’ inner circle and thus is in great danger. Allon and his team of Israeli specialists must find the elusive (and well-guarded) Saladin before he commits another horrific terrorist act and kills her. I enjoyed the novel, but Silva’s tales are starting to seem formulaic to me. I’m ready for him to start his new job.

BOOK

LET’S

CELEBRATE! Invite party organizers to your door with the Chico News & Review’s party guide, which covers a full range of parties and what our readers need to make them happen. Let’s Celebrate! is inserted into the Chico distribution of the CN&R and distributed at select businesses and events around town throughout the year.

LOOK FOR LET’S CELEBRATE! ON STANDS FEBRUARY 9. CONTACT YOUR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TO BE PART OF THE GUIDE (530) 894-2300.

—Robert Speer January 19, 2017

CN&R

31


Floral collective health

floral collective

Floral Collective is Chico’s oldest delivery service to qualified holders of 215 recommendations. They are a boutique cannabis collective, offering excellent quality, naturally sun grown medicine. Non-organic fertilizers or sprays are not allowed in the garden. Floral Collective has only one grow location in Butte County. They are not a middleman for other growers because there cannot be verification of growing conditions. The quality control prevents growing under lights. Indoor grows pollute the earth by using large amounts of electricity. Here in Northern California the soil is excellent for growing and more than enough sun to produce what is some of the highest quality cannabis in the world. No need to

burn electricity needlessly. The majority of our members are senior citizens, many who suffer from joint pain or soft tissue damage that comes with being older. If you are tired of high prices for your medications, please consider Floral Collective where the cannabis is guaranteed! If you are not satisfied you can get money back or exchange. Senior operated as a non profit. Best wishes to all in the new year.

by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

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new weird worlds The Cn&R got really lucky when we were looking for

art for the cover of the Weird Chico issue. We stumbled upon the fantasy creations of Red Bluff photographer natasha Root and found a wonderful world of strange characters that is at turns colorful and whimsical and dark and creepy. Root shoots her local subjects—including many belly and burlesque dancers from Chico’s weird-performer sphere—in natural settings and then transforms the scenes into fantastical ones by digitally manipulating the environment or the subject or both, with the purpose of creating a shot that “questions reality and brings imagina“Unfortunate Reality,” by Natasha Root tion to life.” There are moon goddesses, mermaids, red-haired faeries, sirens in Big Chico Creek and even a baby nursing from mama vampire (who shows the bloody signs of having just nursed herself). If you want to make some truly scary family portraits or place your wedding party in a Tolkein-esque fantasyland, drop Root a line at wild_roots@ rocketmail.com and schedule a consultation. And check out a gallery of her work at www.nrootphotography.com

speaking of vamping There’s a most unfortunate (but not uncommon for Chico) conflict on the upcoming schedule of wonderful local weirdness. The CN&R’s Keep Chico Weird Talent show is happening the same night as the centerpiece of the Vampires of Versailles Chico Coronation 2017, Saturday, Jan. 28 (7:30 p.m. at the El Rey Theatre for KCW; 6 p.m. at Chico Women’s Club for VOV). The coronation is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the Chico chapter of the Imperial Court System, the worldwide LGBT charity organization. And the centerpiece of the event is the crowing of a new monarch, who this year will replace outgoing Queen Claudette de Versailles (search “Chico Coronation” on Facebook for the many details). We at the newspaper of course want you to come get your freak on at our Chico coronation time! event, but if you were to choose something else, we fully support the good work (and the extravagant parties) of the ICS. Here’s to two fabulous productions making for a most colorful night in Chico. rip to ChiCo arts giant Just got word that longtime Chico painter Peter Jodaitis died on Jan. 5. He was 80 years

RIP Peter Jodaitis file photo by John domogma

32295359_4.9_x_5.4.indd   CN&R  J a n1u a r y 1 9 , 2 0 1 7

1/12/17 9:37 AM

old. Jodaitis moved to Chico in 1993 and has been one of the more prolific and respected artists in town over the last couple of decades. In February of last year, 1078 Gallery hosted Taking stock, an impressive 50-year retrospective of the self-taught artist’s expressive, mostly figurative works, featuring 165 paintings and drawings in all. The NewtonBracewell Funeral Home website has the most economical of obituaries: “Painter, sculptor, lover, husband, father, brother, friend.” As of press time there was no public memorial planned.


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF january 19, 2017 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Are you more

attracted to honing group dynamics or liberating group dynamics? Do you have more aptitude as a director who organizes people or as a sparkplug who inspires people? Would you rather be a Chief Executive officer or a Chief Imagination Officer? Questions like these will be fertile for you to meditate on in the coming weeks. The astrological omens suggest it’s time to explore and activate more of your potential as a leader or catalyst.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): An ec-

centric Frenchman named Laurent Aigon grew up near an airport, and always daydreamed of becoming a commercial pilot. Sadly, he didn’t do well enough in school to fulfill his wish. Yet he was smart and ambitious enough to accomplish the next best thing: assembling a realistic version of a Boeing 737 cockpit in his home. With the help of Google, he gathered the information he needed, and ordered most of the necessary parts over the internet. The resulting masterpiece has enabled him to replicate the experiences of being a pilot. It’s such a convincing copy that he has been sought as a consultant by organizations that specialize in aircraft maintenance. I suggest you attempt a comparable feat, Taurus: creating a simulated version of what you want. I bet it will eventually lead you to the real thing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The weather may be inclement where you live, so you may be resistant to my counsel. But I must tell you the meanings of the planetary omens as I understand them, and not fret about whether you’ll act on them. Here’s my prescription, lifted from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden: “We need the tonic of wildness, to wade sometimes in marshes where the bittern and the meadow-hen lurk, and hear the booming of the snipe; to smell the whispering sedge where only some wilder and more solitary fowl builds her nest, and the mink crawls with its belly close to the ground.” And why does Thoreau say we need such experiences? “We must be refreshed by the sight of inexhaustible vigor, to witness our own limits transgressed.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Welcome to

the most deliciously enigmatic, sensually mysterious phase of your astrological cycle. To provide you with the proper nonrational guidance, I have stolen scraps of dusky advice from the poet Dansk Javlarna (http://danskjavlarna.tumblr.com). Please read between the lines: (1) Navigate the ocean that roars within the seashell. (2) Carry the key, even if the lock has been temporarily lost. (3) Search through the deepest shadows for the bright light that cast them. (4) Delve into the unfathomable in wordless awe of the inexplicable.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What exactly would

a bolt of lightning taste like? I mean, if you could somehow manage to roll it around in your mouth without having to endure the white-hot shock. There’s a booze manufacturer that claims to provide this sensation. The company known as Oddka has created “Electricity Vodka,” hard liquor with an extra fizzy jolt. But if any sign of the zodiac could safely approximate eating a streak of lightning without the help of Electricity Vodka, it would be you Leos. These days you have a special talent for absorbing and enjoying and integrating fiery inspiration.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Eighteenth-

century painter Joshua Reynolds said that a “disposition to abstractions, to generalizing and classification, is the great glory of the human mind.” To that lofty sentiment, his fellow artist William Blake responded, “To generalize is to be an idiot; to particularize is the alone distinction of merit.” So I may be an idiot when I make the following generalization, but I think I’m right: In the coming weeks, it will be in your best interests to rely on crafty generalizations to guide your decisions. Getting bogged down in details at the expense of the big picture—missing the forest for the trees—is a potential pitfall that you can and should avoid.

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Czech writer

Bohumil Hrabal penned the novel Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age. It consists of one sentence. But it’s a long, rambling sentence—117 pages’ worth. It streams from the mouth of the narrator, who is an older man bent on telling all the big stories of his life. If there were ever to come a time when you, too, would have cosmic permission and a poetic license to deliver a one-sentence, 117-page soliloquy, Libra, it would be in the coming weeks. Reveal your truths! Break through your inhibitions! Celebrate your epic tales! (P.S. Show this horoscope to the people you’d like as your listeners.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When Pluto

was discovered in 1930, astronomers called it the ninth planet. But 76 years later, they changed their mind. In accordance with shifting definitions, they demoted Pluto to the status of a mere “dwarf planet.” But in recent years, two renowned astronomers at Caltech have found convincing evidence for a new ninth planet. Konstantin Batygin and Michael E. Brown are tracking an object that is much larger than Earth. Its orbit is so far beyond Neptune’s that it takes 15,000 years to circle the sun. As yet it doesn’t have an official name, but Batygin and Brown informally refer to it as “Phattie.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I suspect that you, too, are on the verge of locating a monumental new addition to your universe.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

The tomato and potato are both nightshades, a family of flowering plants. Taking advantage of this commonality, botanists have used the technique of grafting to produce a pomato plant. Its roots yield potatoes, while its vines grow cherry tomatoes. Now would be a good time for you to experiment with a metaphorically similar creation, Sagittarius. Can you think of how you might generate two useful influences from a single source?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Some

guy I don’t know keeps sending me emails about great job opportunities he thinks I’d like to apply for: a technical writer for a solar energy company, for example, and a social media intern for a business that offers travel programs. His messages are not spam. The gigs are legitimate. And yet I’m not in the least interested. I already have several jobs I enjoy, like writing these horoscopes. I suspect that you, too, may receive worthy but ultimately irrelevant invitations in the coming days, Capricorn. My advice: If you remain faithful to your true needs and desires, more apropos offers will eventually flow your way.

CN&R 

january 19, 2017

Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

word “naysayer” describes a person who’s addicted to expressing negativity. A “yeasayer,” on the other hand, is a person who is prone to expressing optimism. According to my assessment of the astrological omens, you can and should be a creative yeasayer in the coming days—both for the sake of your own well-being and that of everyone whose life you touch. For inspiration, study Upton Sinclair’s passage about Beethoven: He was “the defier of fate, the great yea-sayer.” His music is “like the wind running over a meadow of flowers, superlative happiness infinitely multiplied.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If I’m

feeling prosaic, I might refer to a group of flamingos as a flock. But one of the more colorful and equally correct terms is a “flamboyance” of flamingos. Similarly, a bunch of pretty insects with clubbed antennae and big fluttery wings may be called a kaleidoscope of butterflies. The collective noun for zebras can be a dazzle, for pheasants a bouquet, for larks an exaltation and for finches a charm. In accordance with current astrological omens, I’m borrowing these nouns to describe members of your tribe. A flamboyance or kaleidoscope of Pisceans? Yes! A dazzle or bouquet or exaltation or charm of Pisceans? Yes! All of the above.

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*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. 225 Main Street, Suite S Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTINE HABER 3281 Rockin M Drive Chico, CA 95973. NICHOLLE HABER 3281 Rockin M Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: NICHOLLE HABER Dated: November 21, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001436 Published: December 29, 2016, January 5,12,19, 2017

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROUSE AND REVOLT at

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SENTIENT CIRCLE at 277 Tranquil Dr. Paradise, CA 95969. SENTIENT CIRCLE 277 Tranquil Dr. Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted as A Limited Liability Company. Signed: ELENA TONETTI, SECRETARY Dated: December 9, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001503 Published: December 29, 2016, January 5,12,19, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following perons are doing business as EL GUAYACAN MEXICAN RESTAURANT at 2201 Pillsbury Rd Ste 124 Chico, CA 95926. JESUS J. GOMEZ-CASTELLON 120 Menlo Way Apt 55 Chico, CA 95926. ANA E RODRIGUEZ-MEJORADO 120 Menlo Way Apt. 55 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: ANA RODRIGUEZ Dated: November 16, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001411 Published: December 29, 2016, January 5,12,19, 2017

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ABC MARKET at 715 W 9th St Chico, CA 95928. CSU LIQUOR INCORPORATED 715 W 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BASHIR ABDUL MASSIH, SECRETARY Dated: December 21, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001562 Published: December 29, 2016, January 5,12,19, 2017

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as

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SMITH-LOWEN GP at 144 Meyers Street Suite 160 Chico, CA 95928. ALLISON LOWEN 222 Broadway 1312 Oakland, CA 94607. SPENCER LOWEN 1856 Bidwell Ave Chico, CA 95926. PETER KERRY 3603 Garrison Street San Diego, CA 92106. KHRISTINE RAMIREZ 606 Harvard Court Woodland, CA 95695. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ALLISON LOWEN Dated: December 13, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001510 Published: December 29, 2016, January 5,12,19, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SPEECH-THERAPY OF BUTTE COUNTY at 3111 Hidden Creek Dr. Chico, CA 95973. ELIZABETH KYSAR 403 Ash Street Chico, CA 95928. ELIZABETH VICHI 3111 Hidden Creek Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: ELIZABETH VICHI, ELIZABETH KYSAR Dated: December 22, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001570 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MOUNTAIN MIKES PIZZA at 1105 W. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. HIMMELSPACH PIZZA INC 9 Dean Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: LISA HIMMELSPACH, SECRETARY Dated: December 27, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001584 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MOUNTAIN MIKES PIZZA at 1901 Oro Dam Blvd E Oroville, CA 95966. HIMMELSPACH PIZZA INC 9 Dean Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: LISA HIMMELSPACH, SECRETARY Dated: December 27, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001583 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MOUNTAIN MIKES PIZZA at 1722 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. HIMMELSPACH PIZZA INC 9 Dean Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: LISA HIMMELSPACH, SECRETARY Dated: December 27, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001582 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as

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BELLA DAY SPA SALON AND BOUTIQUE LLC at 15 C Williamsburg Lane Chico, CA 95926. BELLA DAY SPA SALON AND BOUTIQUE LLC 15 C Williamsburg Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: NORA PAIVA, PARTNER Dated: November 29, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001465 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AUTO-METRICS at 703 Cedar St Chico, CA 95928. JEFFREY DAMON 703 Cedar St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEFFREY DAMON Dated: December 16, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001541 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. MICHAEL SCOTT ENGLUND 3819 Grizzly Creek Rd Yankee Hill, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL ENGLUND Dated: December 9, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001506 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name SCOOTERS CAFE at 11975 Highway 70 Oroville, CA 95965. DANIEL R SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAN SALMON Dated: December 9, 2016 FBN Number: 2014-0001495 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DA FISH ENTERPRISE at 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. BONNIE D SALMON 4132 Deadwood Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BONNIE D. SALMON Dated: December 27, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001580 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO ALOHA DANCERS at 476 Hoopa Circle Chico, CA 95926. JUDY AKEMI HAMAMOTO 476 Hoopa Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JUDY A HAMAMOTO Dated: January 3, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000010 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as IRON CANYON CONSTRUCTION at 1199 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. ALEC MARTIN BINYON 1030 Clotilde Way Chico, CA 95926. KYLE JORDEN PRICE 1199 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: ALEC BINYON Dated: January 3, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000024 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AHIMSA.XYZ at 385 E 10th Ave Unit B Chico, CA 95926. SALINA STEPHNIA MARIE MITCHELL 385 E 10th Ave Unit B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SALINA MITCHELL Dated: January 3, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000013 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THOROUGH SEARCH at 1934 Bird Street Oroville, CA 95965. RICK COOK 76 Tuscan Villa Drive 104 Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICK COOK Dated: December 19, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001552 Published: January 12,19,26, Febuary 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADVANCED COMPUTER SOLUTIONS at 28 Jordans Place Number 600 Chico, CA 95973. ALEXANDER AUVINEN 28 Jordans Place Number 600 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALEXANDER AUVINEN Dated: January 4, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000029 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO REAL ESTATE, CHICO REAL ESTATE INC, CHICOREALESTATE.NET at 1250 East Ave #20 Chico, CA 95926. CHICO REAL ESTATE INC 1250 East Ave #20 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: DARREL E. STEPHENS, OWNER Dated: January 3, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000018 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2017

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The following persons are doing business as HAVEN HOME SERVICES at 1044 Greenwhich Drive Chico, CA 95926. KASSANDRA GREULE 677 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. JESSICA SORENSON 1044 Greenwhich Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: KASSANDRA GREULE Dated: January 6, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000042 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TRIAGE ENTERPRISES at 5475 Skyway Unit B Paradise, CA 95969. TROY DUANE BEACH PO Box 983 Magalia, CA 95954. BRIAN MICHAEL KOPKA 386 Valley View Dr Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A General Partnership. Signed: TROY D. BEACH Dated: January 11, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000065 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LD MARINE at 18 Alyssum Way Chico, CA 95928. LARRY DAVID DE LEGE 18 Alyssum Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LARRY DE LEGE Dated: January 4, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000030 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TRU GANICS at 25 Foreman Creek Road Berry Creek, CA 95916. CERTAPHYD, LLC 25 Foreman Creek Road Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: SHAWN MORRIS, OWNER Dated: December 21, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001546 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE VIDEO STORE at 1900 Oro Dam Blvd Ste 10 Oroville, CA 95965. CRYSTAL COX 160 Rutherford Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRYSTAL COX Dated: December 14, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001531 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DINO 8 FOOD AND FUEL at 2036 Forest Ave Chico, CA 95928. MRAS ENTERPRISES, INC 2036 Forest Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed: MONTY BHOGAL,

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PRESIDENT Dated: December 13, 2016 FBN Number: 2016-0001528 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUNSET AUTO WHOLESALE at 954 Royal Dr Chico, CA 95973. WILLIAM J HOLESTINE 954 Royal Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WILLIAM J HOLESTINE Dated: January 13, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000080 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CACTUS AFFINITY at 37 Terrace Dr Chico, CA 95926. LAWRENCE SMITH 37 Terrace Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LAWRENCE SMITH Dated: January 13, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000079 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE CABLE COMPANY at 121 Wine Blossom Dr Chico, CA 95973. THE CABLE COMPANY 121 Wine Blossom Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. Signed: MICHAEL MCEVOY, OFFICER Dated: January 13, 2017 FBN Number: 2017-0000082 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2017

NOTICES CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): NICOLE L. GILLEY and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): M.V. born on (date): December 23, 2013 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): OROVILLE HOSPITAL OROVILLE, CA A hearing will be held on Date: March 2, 2017 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, 95928. At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an

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attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminated your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: December 20, 2016 Case Number: J-37003 Published: January 5, 12,19,26, 2017

CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): SARA I. LEE and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): Z.L. born on (date): December 4, 2012 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER CHICO, CA A hearing will be held on Date: March 8, 2017 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, 95928. At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminated your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: December 27, 2016 Case Number: 16DP00036 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): ANTHONY JIMINEZ and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): L.E.J. born on (date): April 27, 2016 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER CHICO, CA A hearing will be held on Date: March 30, 2017 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, 95928. At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may

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be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminated your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: December 22, 2016 Case Number: 16DP00094 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

NOTICE KZFR follows Open Meeting policy as defined by State and Federal law; for more information about KZFR meetings go to kzfr.org Published: January 19, 2017

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. TIMARIE BELL (10X12) #306ss (kitchen table, wood crib, other misc. furniture) DAVID & LEDON BRANTLY (5X15) #229ss (Kitchen ware, glasses, misc boxes) CANDANCE CARBY (6X15) #219ss (snowboard, tools, clothes) RACHEL HALL (5X10) #300ss (clothes, toys, misc boxes) JEREMY OCAMPO (5X6) #256ss (tools, boxes, clothes) TIFFANY RODRIGUEZ (6X10) #228ss (kids toys, clothes, boxes, bike) ANGELA SHWARZE (12X10) #209ss (toys, furniture, clothes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: January 28, 2017 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage 65 Heritage Lane Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: January 12,19, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NIKKI RAE IRMER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NIKKI RAE IRMER Proposed name: KHEMISTREE RAE OLIVIA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 17, 2017 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: December 16, 2016 Case Number: 16CV00310 Published: December 29, 2016, January 5,12,19, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOHN MARQUEZ, DIANA MARQUEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANGEL LOVE MARQUEZ Proposed name: ANGEL LOVE LEE MARQUEZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 3, 2017 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: December 16, 2016 Case Number: 16CV03024 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RT FOUR SUNGHE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RT FOUR SUNGHE Proposed name: HELEN SUNGHE KIM THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 10, 2017 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: December 22, 2016 Case Number: 16CV03074 Published: January 5,12,19,26, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BROOKE KERHOULAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KYLEIGH JADE LUERA Proposed name: KYLEIGH JADE KERHOULAS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name

this Legal Notice continues

should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 10, 2017 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: December 27, 2016 Case Number: 16CV03120 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2017

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE PHYLLIS JUNE ALEXANDER, ALSO KNOWN AS PHYLLIS ALEXANDER To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PHYLLIS JUNE ALEXANDER, ALSO KNOWN AS PHYLLIS ALEXANDER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: STACEY A. BLEVINS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: STACEY A. BLEVINS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless as interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 14, 2017 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or

this Legal Notice continues

personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: KELLY ALBRECHT, ESQ. 1440 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 534-9900 Case Number: 16PR00406 Dated: January 4, 2017 Published: January 12,19,26, 2017

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RICHARD W. JONES, ALSO KNOWN AS RICHARD WILLIAM JONES To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RICHARD W. JONES, ALSO KNOWN AS RICHARD WILLIAM JONES A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RANDALL W. JONES in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RANDALL W. JONES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless as interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 14, 2017 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in

this Legal Notice continues

section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 3120 Cohasset Rd., Ste. 10 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 893-2882 Case Number: 17PR00006 Dated: January 9, 2017 Published: January 19,26, February 2, 2017

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ADDRESS

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Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Homes Sold Last Week 4328 Woodrose Dr

SMILES ALWAYS!

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902

you don’t have to spell it out for me to sell it!

570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Butte Valley

$425,000

2/2

2,215

2118 Kennedy Ave

Chico

$240,000

3/2

1,464

Chico

$339,000

3/2

1,600

1025 W Lindo Ave

Chico

$215,000

3/2

1,228

1 Morning Rose Way

SQ. FT.

Are you thinking of buying or selling? Let’s work together to position your property for a speedy sale at top $!

SQ. FT.

3555 Shadowtree Ln

Chico

$339,000

3/3

2,795

1 Verde Ct

Chico

$177,273

4/2

2,263

287 E 9Th Ave

Chico

$330,000

3/1

1,340

796 E 19Th St

Chico

$172,000

2/1

1,056

277 Saint Augustinedr

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1,739

2938 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico

$168,500

2/2

1,103

1241 Honey Run Rd

Chico

$291,000

3/2

1,320

1324 Bruce St

Chico

$150,182

2/1

899

4 Tioga Way

Chico

$265,000

3/2

1,440

4 Watson Ln

Cohasset

$112,500

2/1

884

1009 Regency Dr

Chico

$264,000

3/2

1,357

9184 Stanford Ln

Durham

$459,000

2/1

1,192

1048 Southampton Dr

Chico

$255,000

3/2

1,407

795 Ohio St

Gridley

$122,000

2/1

884

36  

CN&R 

january 19, 2017


WE ARE

TRUE BLUE

More Home for Your Money, in PARADISE

We live here... We work here... We know Paradise... Buy or sell from us! Starter Home/ InveStment opportunIty! 1991 2bd/2ba. Open flr pln w/ tile flrs. Lrg Mstr, Off/Bon Rm & Gst ba. Att gar & fncd frnt & bck yrds. Only $149,900! Ad #925 Doriane Regalia 530-872-6829

Dori Regalia • CalBRE#01892653 • (530) 872-6829

footHIllS log Home! Private setting for spacious log home. 2.3 acres. Master bd/ ba upstairs. Main floor; living & dining room, Kitchen, bath & guest bedroom. Patty McKee 530-518-5155

Patty G. McKee • CalBRE#01428643 • (530) 518-5155 mInuteS from lake orovIlle for camping, boating, fishing, swimming. 2bd/2ba. Bright updated kitchen. Spacious lvng rm with valtd clings. $136,999 PA16090476 Sharon McKee 530-864-1745

If you are lookIng for a place to buIld your dream home, or cabin in the woods, this beautiful 11.46 acreage is for you! $140,000 Ad# 685. Susan G. Thomas 530-518-8041

Sharon McKee • CalBRE#01437897 • (530) 872-6838

We’ve served the Ridge and the North Valley for 66 years. We work harder for you and get the job done.

If you’re thinking of buying or selling a home, contact us today.

(530) 877-6244

Susan G. Thomas • CalBRE#01049969 • (530) 518-8041

NorthStateHomes.com

5350 Skyway, Paradise

Amazing valley view, new pool in this custom home. $599,000 3/2 large lot, over 1,800 sq ft. custom home harden, fruit trees $325,000 Lots for sale starting at $67,500

STUNNING CUSTOM MICheal GallI hOMe, 1 block from Bidwell Park, 4 bedrooms. g on a inlocated en pplus 2 card garage, 3 baths, charming cul-de-sac, 2100 sq ft $395,000 KIMBERLEY TONGE | (530) 518-5508

Located at 7020 Skyway in Paradise

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Cal Park, 3 bed/plus den, 2.5 bath, very nice home, 2,118 sq ft, cul de sac! ................................................... $385,000 longfellow area, Lovely 4 bed/2 bth, 1,824 sq ft with large yard ................................................................ $274,900 Teresa Larson (530)899-5925 www.Chicolistings.com chiconativ@aol.com

ft opennd floor in plan,g garden spaces galore, covered carport!.................. $178,500 Darling Charmer! 2 bed/1 bth, 816 sq pe Senior Condo, 2 bed/2 bath, 1,300 sq ft, 1-car garage, nice unit w/updated kitchen ..................................... $195,000

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of january 2, 2017 – january 6, 2017. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

14161 Racine Cir

ADDRESS

Magalia

$262,000

3/4

SQ. FT. 2,064

26 Canyon Dr

ADDRESS

Oroville

$150,000

3/1

1,621

13775 S Park Dr

Magalia

$199,500

3/2

1,307

3427 Oro Bangor Hwy

Oroville

$143,000

3/2

1,156

149 Apache Hill Rd

Oroville

$430,000

3/3

2,587

61 Nelson Rd

Oroville

$310,000

3/2

1,517

2438 Oro Quincy Hwy

Oroville

$60,000

2/1

1,144

111 Pierpont Dr

Oroville

$300,000

3/2

1,870

4523 Sunset Oaks Dr

Paradise

$539,999

4/3

2,783

1130 Brereton Way

Oroville

$259,000

2/2

1,761

771 Camellia Dr

Paradise

$319,409

2/2

1,746

1835 6Th St

Oroville

$174,091

3/2

1,116

5585 Scottwood Rd

Paradise

$174,000

3/1

856

2567 Yard St

Oroville

$159,000

2/1

1,068

1545 Bille Rd

Paradise

$152,000

2/1

1,221

554 Lake Ave

Oroville

$159,000

4/1

1,508

967 Thomasson Ln

Paradise

$150,000

2/2

1,240

january 19, 2017

  CN&R 

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january 19, 2017

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Of Paradise

Of Chico

530-872-5880

530-896-9300

6635 clark rD

1834 mangrove

serving all of Butte county paraDise–magalia chico aDDress

city

BD/Ba sq. ft

price

agent

phone

aDDress

city

BD/Ba sq. ft

price

agent

phone

14848 Magalia DR

MAGA

2/2

1540

$114,900

Julie Rolls

872-5880

5627 Sawmill Rd

PARA

2/2

1,244

$174,900

Tim Marble

864-5552

4025 Windermere LN

CNCW

1/1

744

$119,900

Nikki Sanders

872-5889

1761 Drayer Dr

PARA

2/2

1,053

$185,000

Shane Collins

518-1413

14737 Carnegie RD

MAGA

2/2

1680

$144,000

Kandice Rickson

872-5892

130 W 20th St

CHIC

2units

2,280

$425,000

Steve Depa

520-8672

3475 Charlene AV

OROV

5/2

1924

$150,100

Julie Rolls

872-5880

18 Josie Ct

CHIC

3/2

1,368

$297,900

Marty Luger

624-3377

6278 Pueblo DR

MAGA

2/2

1600

$155,500

Rhonda Maehl

873-7640

6 Josie Ct

CHIC

3/2

1,286

$279,900

Marty Luger

624-3377

5709 Copeland RD

PARA

2/1

1105

$169,000

Rhonda Maehl

873-7640

910 Dewsnup Av

GRID

3/2

1,633

$359,500

Julie Rolls

520-8545

555 Vallombrosa AV #66

CHIC

2/1.5

902

$178,000

Kandice Rickson

872-5892

15 Josie Ct

CHIC

3/2

1,382

$301,000

Marty Luger

624-3377

6133Skyway

PARA

COMM

1258

$189,000

Jamie McDaniel

872-5891

14 Josie Ct

CHIC

3/2

1,382

$302,900

Marty Luger

624-3377

13660 S Park DR

MAGA

3/2

1540

$189,500

Brian Voigt

514-2901

1125 Sheridan #21

CHIC

1/1

640

$139,900

Craig Brandol

941-8800

9 Sierra Lakeside LN

CHIC

2/2

1300

$210,000

Julie Rolls

872-5880

1094 Manzanita Av

CHIC

3/2

1,740

$299,000

Tara Taylor

518-2012

438 Plantation DR

PARA

2/2

1308

$219,000

Annette Gale

872-5886

613 Rancheria Dr

CHIC

4units

2,890

$379,500

Dan Bosch

321-8330

15188 Heavenly Glen DR

FORA

3/2.5

1983

$224,900

Julie Rolls

872-5880

220 Mission Serra

CHIC

3/2

1,447

$289,000

Brandi Laffins

321-9562

14309 Sinclair CR

MAGA

3/2

1639

$239,500

Rhonda Maehl

873-7640

115 W 15th St

CHIC

3/1

1,012

$179,500

Dan Bosch

321-8330

1222 Snowflake LN

PARA

RINC

1950

$249,500

Annette Gale

872-5886

1 Carson St

CHIC

2units

2,100

$369,000

Matt Depa

514-6288

5776 Kenglo DR

PARA

3/2

1302

$259,000

Nikki Sanders

872-5889

6390 Steiffer Rd

MAGA

3/2

2,115

$380,000

Blake Anderson

864-0151

5009 Big Bend RD

YANK

3/2.5

1952

$329,000

Rhonda Maehl

873-7640

711 W Cedar St

WILL

2/2

2,478

$225,000

Vickie Miller

864-1199

192 Valley View DR

PARA

3/2.5

2040

$354,500

Brian Voigt

514-2901

1105 Kentfield Rd

CHIC

3/3

2,063

$389,000

Dan Bosch

321-8330

612 W Burnt Cedar RD

LAKA

3/2

2746

$355,500

Julie Rolls

872-5880

3547 Shadowtree Ln

CHIC

4/3

2,795

$485,000

Shane Collins

518-1413

1285 Elliott RD

PARA

4/2

2289

$439,000

Julie Rolls

872-5880

374 Honey Run Rd

CHIC

4/3

3,315

$969,000

Brandi Laffins

321-9562

6217 Mountain View DR

PARA

4/3

3190

$645,000

Heidi Wright

872-5890

1477 Flag Creek Rd

OROV

3/2

1,250

$550,000

Steve Depa

520-8672

13670 Bader Mine RDd

PARA

4/3.5

4800

$749,900

Brian Voigt

514-2901

514 2nd Av

WILL

LAND

1.14acr

$90,000

Debbie Ziemke

519-1954

calBre # 01991235

Dream with your eyes open

“ outstanDing agents. outstanDing results! ”

calBre # 01996441

january 19, 2017

  CN&R 

39


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