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FRESH

MADNESS See SCENE, page 25

SHOW US THE $$$ See NEWSLINES, page 8

A PIRATE’S LIFE

by KEN SMITH page

18

See 15 MINUTES, page 15

NO MORE

PLINY? See CHOW, page 26

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 37, Issue 43

Thursday, June 19, 2014


Oroville Clinic

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2 CN&R June 19, 2014


1 in 4

CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 37, Issue 43 • June 19, 2014

OPINION Editorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment. . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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people live with Mental Illness. Iversen Wellness & Recovery Center and Northern Valley TalkLine are here to help.

NEWSLINES  Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

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10 Confidential • Non-crisis Peer-to-peer support Empathetic listening Country-wide resource referral TalkLine does not accept blocked calls. The Warm Line and Iversen Center are supported by Butte County Department of Behavioral Health and MHSA funding.

HEALTHLINES  Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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GREENWAYS  Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

THE GOODS  15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Homegrown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

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COVER STORY  

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Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . 23 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . .31

CLASSIFIEDS  

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REAL ESTATE  

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Distribution Director greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken gates, bob Meads, lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara schultz, larry smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, bill Unger, lisa Van Der Maelen

Associate Editor Meredith J. graham Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Healthlines Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Catherine beeghly, Craig blamer, alastair bland, Henri bourride, Rachel bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Miles Jordan, Karen laslo, leslie layton, Mark lore, Melanie MacTavish, Jesse Mills, sean Murphy, Mazi Noble, shannon Rooney, Toni scott, Claire Hutkins seda, Juan-Carlos selznick, Robert speer, allan stellar, Daniel Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Katherine green, Jonathan line, ashiah scharaga Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla garcia Design Melissa bernard, Mary Key, serene lusano, Kyle shine, skyler smith Advertising Manager Jamie Degarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth alderson Advertising Consultants alex beehner, brian Corbit, Krystal godfrey, laura golino

M-F, 9am - 4:30pm, Saturday 11am - 3pm Iversen Center (530) 879-3311 Med Clinic (530) 879-3974 492 Rio Lindo Ave. 09 09

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President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialist Tami sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 353 E. second street, Chico, Ca 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2240 Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. all letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them.

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ON THE COVER: DEsigN by TiNa FlyNN

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

Council did right by market Kudos to the Chico City Council for approving the Friends of

Cars are death traps in the heat Imom or another family member hands you a big, anklelength fur coat. You put it on. After breakfast, your family

magine you get up one summer morning and your

member takes you for a ride in the car, and you love feeling the wind in your hair. But then your family member parks, cracks the windows, gets out, and walks away. It’s late morning, already hot in Chico, and within just a few minutes, the interior of the car is well over 90 degrees. You start feeling uncomfortable— and thirsty—but your hands won’t work on the door handles, you can’t get out of the car, and by hardly any air comes in through Shannon the windows. You cry a little bit, Rooney but nobody passing by notices. After a while, you’re so hot you The author teaches start to feel sick. You can hardly breathe. writing at Butte This is what your dog experiences College and is a when you lock it in your car while you freelance writer, run off to do errands. People won’t subeditor, tutor and ject themselves to that kind of experisocial-media consultant. ence; why do they subject a member of their family, their dog, to such torture, which can easily become a death sentence? Advocating on behalf of dogs locked in cars with windows only slightly cracked has become one of my projects, because I’ve noticed way too many dogs

in Chico suffering this plight. Apparently, ignorance prevails about what dogs experience when locked in cars. Please, be educated, and help me educate others, and please don’t leave your dog locked in your car! Cars are like furnaces for dogs. In fact, the temperature inside can reach 100 degrees in 25 minutes when the outside temperature is only 75 degrees. Consider these words from weather.com: “Humidity interferes with animals’ ability to rid themselves of excess body heat. ... Our four-legged friends only perspire around their paws, which is not enough to cool the body. To rid themselves of excess heat, animals pant. Air moves through the nasal passages, which picks up excess heat from the body. As it is expelled through the mouth, the extra heat leaves along with it. Although this is a very efficient way to control body heat, it is severely limited in areas of high humidity or when the animal is in close quarters.” If you encounter a dog in a car that’s showing obvious signs of duress and imminent heatstroke, please call Chico Animal Control or, after hours, the Chico Police Department. Save a dog’s life; don’t walk away in apathy. Ω

Cars are like furnaces for dogs.

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CN&R

June 19, 2014

the Farmers’ Market initiative to allow the Saturday market to remain where it is through 2020, despite some of the negativity surrounding the issue. Adopting the initiative not only saves the city around $10,000—the amount it would cost to put the item on the November election ballot—it also avoids a potential lawsuit, considering two city attorneys have questioned the legality of a voter-approved initiative. We generally agree with the market supporters that after 21 years on the parking lot at Second and Wall streets, the market should get a long-term franchise agreement for use of the space. And we disagree with some of the downtown businesses that argue the market negatively affects them. Many of us at the CN&R are regular market-goers and we see first-hand the availability of parking—for instance, across the street in the municipal lot adjacent to the creek—and the waves of market shoppers walking to and from downtown. So we applaud the City Council for listening to the thousands of Chicoans who signed the petition. We also, however, agree with Councilwoman Tami Ritter, who pointed out that the way in which some of those signatures were collected was dishonest. “Save the market” certainly sounds sensational, and it was not an accurate portrayal of the issue at hand. The council appears to be entering into this with good faith, and we urge the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market and its Friends to do the same. The initiative calls for the expansion of the market, and we hope that both parties approach the impending changes with open minds and an eye toward flexibility. After more than 20 years, the farmers’ market has become a true community event, and that community—including downtown businesses—should be taken into account as we move forward. Ω

Iraq’s not our fight If there’s anything the current situation in Iraq tells us, it’s

that the U.S. invasion of that country in 2003 set loose sectarian and ethnic conflicts that continue to threaten the country’s stability. That’s because Iraq is a country in name only. When the victorious Europeans drew its borders shortly after World War I, they disregarded 2,000 years of tribal and sectarian differences. Kurds, Armenians, Turks, Shiites and Sunnis, all with their own territories and historic grievances, were suddenly expected to get along. It was a pressure cooker of a country, one that Saddam Hussein kept from exploding only by creating a brutal climate of fear. When the United States invaded and disbanded the Iraqi state, including the military, the lid came off, and more than 100,000 Iraqis and nearly 5,000 American troops died trying to put it back on. The underlying sectarian divide became abundantly evident in 2006, when civil war broke out between Shiites and Sunnis. By the time American troops left in 2012, the conflict had been brought under control, but the division remained. The current insurgency is a mixed bag of fundamentalist jihadis, angry Sunnis and unemployed ex-Baathists. Theirs is an alliance of convenience. As the Iraqi army begins to fight back—as it now seems to be doing—the alliance is likely to come undone. At this point the best thing the U.S. can do is nothing. Bombing the insurgents, as some have urged, would just drive more men to join them. Gen. Colin Powell once famously said, warning of the possible consequences of invading Iraq, “If you break it, you own it.” Well, we broke it, we owned it for a while, but then the Iraqis took it back. Now it’s up to them. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

New ride I really wanted an electric car, and at some point years ago, after watching the documentary Who Killed the Electric Car?, I vowed to make my next vehicle a zero-emissions one. I didn’t want to give money to Big Oil anymore and I was willing to pay a little more to a car company to make that happen. I figured that day would come a few years from now, when my vehicle, a mid-size SUV, pooped out, and there were plenty of affordable and practical Earth-friendly models on the market. But my ride died last month— much sooner than expected—after the transmission went out. The price tag to fix it? More than the old SUV was worth. So, my research began. I settled on a Prius Plug-in. The model is a hybrid so it can travel long distances, but it can also run on electricity alone for about 11 miles —enough for me to do my daily driving. I was excited about the prospect of rarely filling the tank. And Toyota happened to be offering a $4,000 rebate. I was sold. All I had to do was go to the dealer and hammer out the details. First, though, I needed to take a test drive. I did and the ride was great. Then my husband took it for a spin. Big problem: He’s too tall. Or, rather, the car is too small for his 6-foot-4-inch frame. His knees very nearly touched the steering wheel with the seat pushed all the way back. It was a deal breaker. We took a few other Toyotas for a spin and settled on a regular hybrid, but a larger, wagon-like model that gets 40-plus miles per gallon. We’re happy with it, but I can’t help but be a little irritated that Toyota isn’t offering an all-electric or even a plug-in hybrid version of the model we purchased. Years ago, I talked to a Chico man who owns a 2002 Toyota RAV4-EV—one of just a few hundred all-electric models the manufacturer had ever sold. Toyota brought back an all-electric RAV4 in 2012, but its price tag, this year starting at $49,800, is steep. And other, more affordable models I’ve researched don’t have the distance of the RAV, which can travel about 100 miles per charge. We need more options in this market and that’s not going to happen until zero-emissions vehicles are reasonably priced. Elon Musk, CEO of electric-car manufacturer Tesla Motors, announced a decision last week that’s going to aid that effort. The billionaire entrepreneur opened the company’s patents up for use by competitors. In a statement, Musk says he wants to advance electronic technology, and that Tesla alone cannot address the carbon crisis. Musk’s right. He also stands to gain financially, as he also is planning to build a so-called “gigafactory” to produce batteries—the most expensive component of an electric car. Once that plant is up and running and other car manufacturers are using Tesla’s technology, Musk can sell them the batteries. What will that make him? A gazillionaire? I’m not sure, but at this point, I don’t care where his motivations lie. I just want to see more affordable electric options on car lots. Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

Supporting the market Re “The drama continues” (Downstroke, June 12): The downtown Saturday farmers’ market is a Chico landmark and helps to support our many local farmers and friends. Since we are such a large agriculture community it goes to common sense to continue with this support. This activity also brings many people into the area to shop and visit the rest of our wonderful city. Any decision other than full support from the City Council for continuation would be a terrible injustice.

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I live in Los Molinos and one of the tipping points to get me into Chico is the Saturday farmers’ market. I buy all of my organic produce at the market and I enjoy strolling around with the other shoppers and visiting with the vendors. It is what makes me get up early on Saturday mornings and make the half-hour drive into Chico. Afterward, I always stroll right downtown for lunch and then for a mocha. If there are errands I need to take care of downtown, I do it then. I wouldn’t drive into Chico and visit the various stores on a Saturday if it weren’t for the market and the location where it is held. The market brings business to the downtown. A city needs to be about more than parking garages and multiple levels of retail stores. It needs charm and a place for people to find healthy, affordable food. The market and its proximity to strolling downtown afterward is a joyous occasion that I share with the other thousands who signed the petition. Let it be put to a vote of the people. That is all we are asking.

(the Junction)

SUKI HASEMAN Los Molinos

Editor’s note: For more on this issue, see Newslines, page 9.

’Merica! I recently went out with Sacramento River Partners and picked up trash alongside Chico River Road. It wasn’t as nasty as you might imagine; I learned that at least one area couple practiced safe sex at least once. One element of the debris was worthy of notice and comment: America’s favorite beverage manufacturer, Anheuser-Busch, puts their flagship product, Budweiser, into Fourth-of-July-themed red, white and blue cans. Thirsty patriotic Americans suck these things down like cheap lies, then they throw Old Glory out the window of their vehicle (whadyoubet it’s a truck), and no doubt some of these guys will set cans up on a log and use them for target practice. Makes me proud of my fellow Americans. JAMES B. MIELKE Corning

LETTERS continued on page 6 June 19, 2014

CN&R

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I was very disappointed to see an advertisement in the paper listing 9 mm pistols. I know I am part of old history, but due to my and others’ efforts in the mid-1970s, the CN&R was brought about by the transformation of the Chico State college newspaper, The Wildcat. Does your newspaper have a clear-cut advertising policy or do you just take money from any corporation that has it? Who at the newspaper makes the overall advertising decisions? Is it by an advisory board or is this an executive editor’s decision? Finally, if someone polled your employees, how would they have voted on this decision? Or was there even a decision at all? SETH DERISH Chico

Editor’s note: Certain kinds of advertising are prohibited by the CN&R. Ads are vetted on a caseby-case basis by CN&R Advertising Manager Jamie DeGarmo. CN&R’s editors do not know in advance who is advertising in the paper, as there is a separation between the advertising and editorial departments.

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Re “Obama’s cruel program” (Editorial, June 12): In the above-named editorial, it was stated, “Critics have held that the policy has resulted in needless expulsion on the basis of nothing more than minor offenses such as driving without a license.” That’s a minor offense? And you don’t think the policy is fair? OK, let’s break this down a little. A person is stopped for an offense such as a cracked windshield and it is found they have no driver’s license. Having no license means they don’t have insurance either, as it is necessary to produce a license to get insurance, isn’t it? So, no license, no insurance. Does the car belong to the driver? If not, who does it belong to? Did they give permission for that person to drive it? I bet you money that if you or a member of your family was hit and injured by an unlicensed, illegal immigrant, you would pitch a fit. You claim that this is an insensitive and cruel process for illegal immigrants to go through. Well, you help them get here legally

“I think it’s wonderful that every election day we can visit places of worship that remind us of one of the main reasons this great republic was founded—that of freedom of religious expression.” –Paul Weber

then and go from there. I sure don’t appreciate the thought of being damaged by someone who doesn’t care a whit about me by driving without a license. CHRIS MEYER Orland

A letter’s leap Re “On the primary” (by Chuck Samuels, Letters, June 12): Mr. Samuels writes a letter to the editor regarding his polling place identified as being at one of the local Catholic church parish halls. He states that the presence of a few religious icons was “offensive” and a forcible attempt to “indoctrinate” him with other people’s beliefs. Setting aside his rather large leap in logical causality that supposes viewing a crucifix as an overt attempt at conversion, I also am amazed at his lack of faith in human nature—that we as adults would knowingly walk onto religious property, yet be overwhelmed by the iconology such that we start praising the Lord, and howling that we are saved. Frankly, I think it’s wonderful that every election day we can visit places of worship that remind us of one of the main reasons this great republic was founded—that of freedom of religious expression. I think it would even be cool to vote at a Wiccan temple! PAUL WEBER Chico

Focus on good stuff We have focused in the past on what is wrong in our political and economic systems and have created fear. What you focus on expands. Today I would like to focus on what’s right. We live in a beautiful place [with] wonderful parks, rivers and lakes where we can walk, read and enjoy our wonderful life; loving, giving, joyous people we can attract with just a smile and a friendly word; a fine library, where we can learn about anything; loads of live entertainment both in music and theater; access to fine medical care and fine food;

healthy lifestyle farmers’ markets and health food stores and caregivers; churches, where love and friends can be found; good people in local government. We have a warm place to live, cars to drive, and the ability to travel freely and express ourselves freely. [We also have the] ability to be creative in whatever we do; a mind with thoughts that we can change to make our lives better—a free message on your computer to start your day on a positive note at www.tut.com or www.abrahamhicks.com. Live it and love it. Enjoy. NORM DILLINGER Chico

Where heroin comes from Heroin has made a comeback— oddly enough that has happened since we have been in Afghanistan. Why? Is our law enforcement that ineffective? Are our legislators paying more attention to re-elections, pay raises and lobbyists? Is there no enforceable plan to stop the terrible destruction caused by the use of this drug? Where is the “War on Drugs”? Do more “people in power” need to lose loved ones to this? Where does heroin come from? How is it that the media never tells us that 90 percent or more of the heroin found on our streets and in the arms of our dead young people comes from Afghanistan! The very place where our soldiers are dying to keep Afghans free! No wonder the tribal leaders of Afghanistan want us to stay there and die there while they continue to profit from the export of this deadly drug. To believe the federal government doesn’t know about heroin coming from Afghanistan is ludicrous. They’ve had boots on the ground and eyes in the sky for over 10 years. This tells me that the American people—soldiers and civilians—are collateral damage, again, to a foreign policy gone astray. KAY HOSKIN Bellevue, Penn.


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Jovanni Tricerri, who has long championed fully staffing the police department, appeared before the Chico City Council on Tuesday, June 17, to make his case.

DIVESTMENT CONSIDERATION

Chico State President Paul Zingg has told students behind an effort to get the school to divest itself from fossil fuel companies that the matter will be brought up at the June 26 University Foundation Board meeting. “I will request that the University Foundation Board of Governors take up the discussion about divestment at its upcoming meetings,” Zingg wrote. “The University Foundation Board’s consideration of this measure typifies the importance of sustainability on campus.” The advisory measure asking the University Foundation to withdraw investments in fossil fuel companies was resoundingly approved in the spring student elections, with 80 percent in favor of the measure, though only 24 percent of the entire student body voted. Professor Mark Stemen said each of the students in his Geography 440 class, which was behind the measure, wrote a letter to Zingg and he responded to each. Also, 60 faculty members have signed a petition supporting divestment.

LIBRARY TIGHTENS BELT

The Chico City Council voted 4-3 to reduce general fund support for the Chico branch of the Butte County Library during its meeting on Tuesday (June 17). Last year, the Chico library received $100,000 from the city, but the council reduced that amount to $75,000, diverting the remainder to the North Valley Community Foundation for disbursement among 10 community organizations. Leading up to the decision, Councilwomen Tami Ritter and Mary Goloff questioned why, in light of the sweeping budget cuts that have affected all city departments and employees, the city continues to provide funding for the countyrun library. Diane Friedman, who was named president of Chico Friends of the Library just last month, explained that the funding is used to keep the library open on mornings and evenings, which amounted to about 900 extra hours last year. Library hours likely will be reduced as a result of the funding cut.

PUBLIC (RE)WORKS

Chico may soon have an urban forest manager again … well, kind of. The City Council voted 5-2 Tuesday (June 17) to proceed with reorganizing the Public Works Department, including filling three positions left vacant last year. The council approved the hiring of a new facilities manager and parks services coordinator, but specified the salary offered for recruitment of the latter position be lowered. As for the urban forest manager, the city authorized roughly $40,000 to contract the services with an outside organization. Councilwoman Ann Schwab (pictured) expressed concern over the contracting out of city positions to companies outside of the area, suggesting it could lead to inferior service and hurt the local economy. The council agreed to limit the geographical radius in its search. 8

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June 19, 2014

An immodest proposal Aggressive plan to fully staff police department moves forward as council outlines budget

Cduring a budget session in which the city’s financial hardship was analyzed from all angles,

onsidering that the pitch was made

one would think an aggressive plan to fully staff the police department in four years—at a cost of $3.6 milstory and lion—would be a tough sell. photo by Howard Hardee But public-safety advocate Jovanni Tricerri successfully howardh@ argued for just that during Chico newsreview.com City Council’s budget session on Tuesday (June 17), as the panel voted unanimously to adopt a plan—albeit a nonbinding one—outlined by Clean and Safe Chico, an outreach campaign involving multiple local organizations, including the Chico Police Department. There are currently 64 police officers on staff, well short of the 83 officers Police Chief Kirk Trostle maintains are necessary to adequately protect and serve the city. And as crime and transience issues remain at the forefront of public consciousness—public safety is the council’s No. 1 priority—pressure has been mounting for the city to follow Trostle’s recommendation. Tricerri, executive director of the Chico Stewardship Network, has long championed the cause, first appearing before the council on behalf of Clean and Safe in March 2013. The proposal would allow police to revive the traffic-enforcement unit, the TARGET team (the department’s gang unit that was eliminated last February due to budget cuts) and the currently defunct Street Crimes Unit, which focused on street-level drug sales and took a proactive

approach by keeping up with individuals on probation or parole. The issue, of course, is funding. Tricerri suggested exploring grants as well as a public-safety tax. “That’s what we’re asking of the city to continue to do—take proactive steps to present new revenue ideas,” he said. While the entire council shared Tricerri’s concern for public safety, several council members balked at committing to such a plan with no clear funding sources. “I am reticent of spending money before we have it,” said Councilwoman Ann Schwab. Administrative Services Director Chris Constantin also offered reason for pause. In the four-year period between fiscal years 2009-10 and 2013-14, he said, the city’s general fund revenue grew by a total of $3.4 million, and the Clean and Safe proposal would direct more than $3.6 million to police staffing alone. “I’m a little concerned,” he said. “If you say you want it done in four years, you’re talking about a half-cent sales tax in the community. That may not be something that many people want to see.” However, Tricerri argued that the Clean and Safe Chico proposal will serve as a roadmap rather than a binding agreement for restaffing the police department. Getting wheels turning in that direction is most important, he said,

and the community will identify sources of revenue in the future. Many citizens spoke in favor of the proposal once the floor was opened for public comment. “We’ve been talking about this for a really, really long time,” said Peggy Mead. “Can we sit down and make something happen? We have to do this—we have to find the money.” After the council’s 7-0 vote, the panel agreed to revisit the issue in six months. As the council’s marathon budget

session began around 11 a.m., Interim City Manager Mark Orme acknowledged that “it’s a surprise I’m the one kicking things off.” Indeed, since former City Manager Brian Nakamura’s announcement on May 26 that he was leaving Chico in favor of Rancho Cordova, Orme has been tasked with moving the city forward in the aftermath of the reorganization overseen by Nakamura, which included reducing 11 departments to five and laying off dozens of employees. Though the process was painful for the individuals involved, several city officials have credited Nakamura with revealing the true extent of the city’s $15 million debt. Orme clearly wanted to turn the page on his predecessor’s tumultuous tenure, outlining a future in which Chico overcomes its financial deficit, replenishes


reserves and establishes “checks and balances to make it impossible to fall into that same situation again,” he said. “Let’s move forward, put the past behind, and let our past failures strengthen our resolve.” While Orme painted a rosy picture, any such future is distant, according to Constantin. Beginning with an $800,000 debt payment in 2015-16, the city plans to increase payments by $100,000 every year until they reach $1.5 million, continuing until reserves reach $13.4 million in 2030. “I know it’s a long time, but since we’re ramping up slowly, I think we can do that and balance an increase in operations without breaking the bank,” he said. The $120.6 million budget for 2014-15, approved in a unanimous vote by the council, is mostly devoid of significant reductions, as Constantin said the upcoming year would be one of tweaks and adjustments as opposed to the “wholesale changes of entire departments” made last year. City employees will increase from 342 to 349 full-timers, while this year’s $42.6 million general fund—its operating budget—is comparable to last year’s total of $43.4 million. However, as department heads reported to the council, each described varying degrees of hardship over the past year. Mark Wolfe, director of Planning Services, made his case for hiring one fulltime community development technician, explaining how his staff of 20 employees has been doing the work of 36 people, scrambling to meet an everincreasing demand for services. “It’s been pretty tough,” he said. “We don’t have any slack. When we have someone out or sick, the wheels fall off.” Even Interim Fire Chief Shane Lauderdale, whose department received a substantial grant in February that allowed the addition of 14 new firefighters, said financial constraints have forced his department to creatively address inefficiencies. For example, it is launching a pilot program in which a “mini fire engine” on a pickup-truck frame will respond to medical emergencies in the downtown area, rather than sending out a full-sized fire engine. “I think it’s fairly obvious that a giant fire truck designed for putting out fires is the wrong piece of apparatus to send to a medical emergency,” he said. In addition to the challenges confronting each department, Constantin noted several overarching problems the city must address in coming years, including lack of funding for street and building maintenance and an unsustainable work force. He pointed to the future cost of mandatory raises, CalPERS and other employee benefits and asked a troubling question: “How do we sustain ourselves when the cost of benefits increases faster than revenues?” Ω

Market support City Council adopts farmers’ market initiative fight over the future of the Saturday Tbehefarmers’ market in downtown Chico may over, at least for the next 6 1/2 years. Tues-

day (June 17) the Chico City Council voted 6-0 to adopt an initiative that grants the market an initial six-year franchise agreement, beginning Jan. 1, 2015; allows it to expand on site; and calls for the market to pay the city a $5,000 per year fee. After that deal expires, a new eight-year contract will be put before the voters in the general election. City Clerk Deborah Presson told the council that the Friends of the Farmers’ Market had collected enough signatures— 5,654 as validated by the County Elections Office in a sampling—to qualify the initiative. More than 9,000 signatures were gathered altogether. Adding the matter to the November ballot would cost the city between $5,000 and $10,000, Presson said. After hearing 12 speakers, most in favor of the market, the council had three options before it—put the matter on the November election ballot, adopt the initiative as is, or order a report on how the market affects downtown businesses. Interim City Manager Mark Orme had recently presented the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market (CCFM) four options that included moving the market to Sundays and moving the market to the City Hall parking lot at Fourth and Flume streets. The CCFM rejected those options and asked that the initiative either be adopted by council or put to a vote. Karl Ory, a former Chico mayor and member of the Friends of the Farmers’ Market, told the council that the initiative “wasn’t written on the back of a napkin.” He said

there was an open process behind the effort in which the farmers were asked what they needed to keep the market going. “Honor the petition of 9,200 residents and put it on the ballot or adopt it,” he said. “Don’t wait too long. The initiative doesn’t go away.” Ory was followed by regular council meeting commenter and dentist Michael Jones, who said he knows of no one who wants to close the market, but that the initiative process was misleading in that it “doubles the market in size, which was not clear when people signed” the petition. The discussion on the future of the market came on the heels of an all-day meeting that detailed many of the problems facing the city and that was not lost on those addressing the council. Market supporter Mark Stemen made note of that. “As I listened today, I learned we have a lot of problems in Chico,” he said. “The farmers’ market is not one of them.” Former Councilman Tom Nickell said what is at hand “is not a war. It’s just two groups trying to get together. Put this on the

SIFT|ER Our weekly shootings In the year and a half since the mass-murder shooting spree at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 14, 2012, there have been another 74 school shootings in the United States. That’s an average of at least one shooting every week. The most recent was the June 10 shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Ore., which left one student, as well as the shooter, dead.

Since Sandy Hook: Number of school shootings.............................................74 Number of people killed in school shootings ..................45 Number of shootings at colleges ...........................................35 Number of shootings at K-12 schools........................................39 Number of school shootings in 2013 ............................................37 Number of school shootings so far in 2014 (through June 10)......37

Farmers’ market shoppers check out the goods on a recent Saturday morning in downtown Chico. PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

ballot. If the voters say no, it’s done. You have other problems to deal with.” Mike Trolinder, a regular at public meetings who advocates for expanded parking, said the 9,000-plus citizens who signed the petition all have something in common. “They come downtown for the farmers’ market,” he said. “How do we get people to come downtown for the downtown?” When the speakers were finished, Vice Mayor Mark Sorensen said that, based on the number of signatures gathered, it was “clear that the initiative would be successful on the ballot.” Sorensen, who’s criticized the market and its impacts on the downtown, made a motion to adopt the initiative and it went unopposed, with Councilwoman Ann Schwab abstaining due to her owning downtown property. Sorensen also made a motion to direct the city manager to look into Saturday parking meter enforcement. Mayor Scott Gruendl questioned whether the issues should be separated, and based on advice from the assistant city attorney via phone, the items were split. Ory then pointed out that since the move to study an expansion of parking fees was not agendized, the council couldn’t vote on the matter. Sorensen then moved to place the issue on the next council agenda. Moving forward, Natalie Carter, the CCFM office manager, said the farmers’ market initiative includes wording that allows the market and the city to make changes that are mutually agreed upon. For his part, Orme said he is not sure what is left to negotiate. “That’s a great question,” he said by phone. “We will find out when we schedule a meeting to determine what issues need to be addressed. We have to find out how this rolls out legally.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

Source: Everytown for Gun Safety, www.everytown.org

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 June 19, 2014

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Chico’s AquAlliance, sport fishers’ organization file water-transfer lawsuit or water-thirsty farmers and FJoaquin municipalities in the San Valley, the Delta smelt is

an easy victim to blame. For years, right-wing media pundits and water district spokespeople have expressed outrage that farmers must, at times, sacrifice their irrigation privileges to protect the finger-sized fish, a resident of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The Delta smelt is an endangered species just barely clinging to existence in a habitat that has deteriorated badly in the past four decades, largely, scientists say, because of increasing volumes of water getting pumped into the San Joaquin Valley for agricultural use. But a lawsuit filed last week aimed at stopping overuse of river water for farming is not focused on saving the Delta smelt. It is an effort to save the entire ecosystem, including chinook salmon, striped bass and sturgeon. “The Delta smelt is just an indicator species for what is happening to all the species in this estuary,” said Bill Jennings, executive director of the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance, one of two plaintiffs in the lawsuit. “Whether you’re talking about striped bass, or sturgeon, or splittail, or Delta smelt, they’re all down to historic low numbers.” The lawsuit, filed June 10 in federal district court, alleges that the Bureau of Reclamation has failed to adequately assess the environmental impacts of delivering water from the Delta to farms in the San Joaquin Valley, where irrigation canals transport millions of acre-feet of Sacramento River water every year.

Barbara Vlamis of AquAlliance, the other plaintiff in the suit, said the huge demand for water in the orchards and vineyards south of Stockton does not just impact the Sacramento Valley, but also has indirect effects on Northern California groundwater supplies. That’s because farmers who sell their own river water allotments to buyers in the San Joaquin Valley, which lacks its own reliable source, frequently continue watering their fields using groundwater pumped to the surface via wells. This process, called groundwater transferring, has serious environmental consequences—like the dewatering of surface streams—which the Bureau of Reclamation has failed to adequately assess, the lawsuit alleges. “When you overpump a groundwater basin, you lower your surface waters,” Vlamis explained. That means tributary creeks may vanish and the overall flow of the Sacramento River will decline, harming the fish that live in the river and the Delta. This summer, the Bureau of

Reclamation plans to sell more than 175,000 acre-feet of water to an agricultural district in the San Joaquin Valley, according to the lawsuit. Two thirds of this volume could be met via groundwater transfers. Vlamis says that the bureau failed to undertake an environmen-

Central Valley farmers, politicians and others resent efforts to protect the imperiled Delta smelt—a small species pictured here whose rapid decline also signals an overall decline in the quality of Delta habitat and its viability supporting other wildlife. This spells Pre-Registration is required at cultivatingcommunitynv.org. trouble for the fishing $10. Free if income eligible. industry n einw general, s & r eespev i e w b u s i n e s s u s e o n ly CCNV is supported by a 2011 Specialty Crop Block Grant from thee California Department of Food & Agriculture awarded to the California State Universtiy Chico Research Foundation, Directed by Dr. Lee Altier cially the salmon fishery. designer ss issUe ACCT eXeC amb PHOTO COURTESY OF dATe 03.03.11 U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE FiLe nAMe lawofficesofbh030311r2 reV dATe new 10

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June 19, 2014

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tal impact review of its water-use plans and, instead, took a lesscostly, less-time-consuming route by declaring its actions to have no significant impacts on the environment—a conclusion the plaintiffs allege “was arbitrary and capricious.” The plaintiffs’ objective is to force a closer look at the impacts caused by chronic exporting of water from north to south and limit the volume to a sustainable amount. The Bureau of Reclamation would not offer comment while the case is underway. The case will be heard by a judge in early January. Jennings says the Sacramento Delta ecosystem can probably sustain an annual diversion rate of about 3 million acre-feet. Normally, between 4 million and 6 million acre-feet of water are pumped from the Delta, and environmentalists worry that the Delta’s fisheries are on a path toward inevitable collapse unless water-use patterns change. The lawsuit from AquAlliance and the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance is likely to arouse scorn against the Delta smelt. But Steve Martarano, a public affairs specialist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, says criticism of the smelt amounts to a failure to look at the bigger ecological picture. “These people don’t mention salmon, because the Delta smelt is an easy victim, whereas people care about salmon,” he said. “The Delta smelt was once one of the most abundant species in the Delta, and we like to say that if you could figure out how to bring the smelt back, you could figure out how to save the entire Delta.” —ALASTAIR BLAND


Oroville library’s new vibe Major improvements in book-lending building

Oroville branch of the Butte County ToverheLibrary has undergone a transformation the past nine months that has resulted in

a drastic difference in the environment. The once rather dreary, dimly lit, claustrophobic room has been replaced by a bright, inviting space with new carpeting, shelves and a living-room-like hangout area. It began with a special 55-inch, multitouch informational screen that was purchased last September. The educational tool was bought with funds from a Proposition 50 CALFED Watershed Program grant to facilitate public education about the water system, climate and geology of the See the transformation: North State. There is a grand reopening slated for today (June 19) Several people and the library will stay can use the open late—10 a.m.-8 p.m. touch screen at for the celebration. one time to disRefreshments will be cover facts about served, and the Oroville Community Band will our local waterprovide entertainment. The ways, including library is located at 1820 current water Mitchell Ave. in Oroville. To levels, the status learn more about the new of the seven computer system, go to www.buttecounty.net/ local watersheds, bclibrary/EResources.aspx. and how those watersheds can be protected. The information is kept up-todate by the Butte County Water and Resource Conservation Department. “The screen has become a great resource for class projects and library tours,” said branch librarian Sarah Vantrease. Then, about three months ago, the library received a special donation of two microfilm readers after its machine broke down and was deemed unfixable. The majority of the funds for the new readers came from three longtime community members, Nick and Gina Ellena and Nancy Brower. The newer machines are a far cry from the antiquated one library-goers were accustomed to using, which could take hours, requiring the user to scan through each page. The new machines are still compatible with microfilms featuring documents dating back to the 1850s, but are linked to the Internet and offer key-word searches. “Users can find the articles they want and email them to themselves via the Inter-

Renovations to the Oroville branch of the Butte County Library included new carpet, bookshelves and the rearrangement of furniture to open up the space. PHOTO BY COOKIE J. ARNETT

net,” Vantrease said. On April 1, bigger changes began to take place at the library. A portion of the carpet had inadvertently been kicked up, and upon investigation it was discovered that there was asbestos in the carpet glue. The decision was made to temporarily close the building to eradicate the asbestos and at the same time make improvements to the facility. The library was closed for about six weeks while remodeling work was completed. New flooring and carpeting were installed, and the tall metal bookshelves were replaced with shorter, wooden, earthquakesecure ones. The aisles between the shelves were widened, leaving room for patrons to more comfortably peruse selections. Regular patrons will notice a few other changes as well, including the children’s area, which has been updated and expanded and swapped spots with the media section. The public computers have been rearranged so library visitors can work individually or in small groups. There are also “cubby” tables available for study. Additional computers, study tables and bookshelves are expected to be installed in July. Vantrease said she’s pleased with the library’s new setup and referred to a seating area near the shelves of newly arrived books as the “living room.” In addition to the new equipment due in July, the library also is planning to replace the blinds in the front window with window tinting. This is expected to improve the appearance of the library while making the environment more pleasant by reducing glare and protecting the books from the sun, Vantrease said. For those who do not have time to spend in the library, an updated computer system has been implemented that is more userfriendly and even allows members to go online to request specific books be purchased for the library. The books will be reviewed and a decision will be made within a week of the request. —COOKIE J. ARNETT June 19, 2014

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THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES

ENLOE’S TRAUMA TEAM GETS NOD

Enloe Medical Center recently became the only hospital between Sacramento and Portland, Ore., designated by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) as a Level II trauma center. The state has recognized the hospital as a Level II trauma center since 1988, according to an Enloe press release, but this most recent distinction “is the gold standard for trauma care in the United States,” said Enloe CEO Mike Wiltermood. “Achieving this status requires a higher standard and verifies the presence of specific resources available for patient care.” The ACS verification program is designed to promote the development of trauma centers that address the needs of all injured patients, the release said, from the pre-hospital phase through the rehabilitation process.

Cost of care, considered

NORTH STATE PHARMACIES DENIED

After a ruling last year by the First District Court of Appeal of California that managed health care plans don’t have to consider how much pharmacies pay for prescription medication when setting Medi-Cal reimbursement rates, pharmacies across the North State revolted. They challenged the rates set by their managed care network, Partnership HealthPlan of California, arguing that Medi-Cal reimbursement rates have driven pharmacies out of business and discouraged others from serving the program’s beneficiaries. They also challenged the ruling. In 1997, a federal court ruled that states must consider cost to health care providers when setting Medi-Cal reimbursement rates, according to California Healthline. But the First District Court of Appeal of California overturned that ruling last year, maintaining that regulators can ensure access to care through various means and don’t have to take cost to providers into account. The California Supreme Court unanimously denied review of the case on June 11, setting a binding precedent for future trial court cases in the state.

MUCH ADO ABOUT CHEESE

The American artisanal cheese industry has been in a furor over a statement made by Monica Metz, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration official, about the equipment they use. In a response to a query made by New York’s Department of Agriculture and Markets, Metz wrote that the porous composition of wooden racks on which cheese ages “cannot be adequately cleaned and sanitized,” according to The Washington Post. Therefore, she maintained that using wooden boards during the aging process does not conform to good manufacturing practices and could spread harmful pathogens. The news caused an uproar among artisanal cheese-makers, fearing for their livelihoods, while major media outlets have run headlines like Forbes’ “FDA may destroy American artisan cheese industry.” The FDA has since clarified that Metz’s response was not a declaration of a policy change. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

12

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June 19, 2014

Docs increasingly weigh expense to patients when considering treatment by

Evan Tuchinsky

Wcourse of treatment for a patient, doctors have long assessed medical metrics hen considering the best

for gauging effectiveness. But when physicians look after their patients’ best interests, couldn’t financial well-being have a place, too? After all, medical bills are the leading cause of personal bankruptcy filings, according to the analysis site NerdWallet, and health expenses cripple the finances of 1 in 5 American adults. As a result, some major physician associations now want to insert cost as a consideration. For instance, the American Society of Clinical Oncology recently established a task force that the organization of cancer doctors says will “determine the relative value of drugs” by considering “efficacy, side effects and price.” Meanwhile, the American College of Cardiology also intends to factor in expense when ranking treatments for heart conditions. The notion has generated controversy. The New York Times notes that such guidelines “could result in doctors choosing one drug over another for cost reasons or even deciding that a particular treatment—at the end of life, for example—is too expensive. In the extreme, some critics have said that making treatment decisions based on cost is a form of rationing.” However, as the Times also points out, guidelines are voluntary. Doctors have latitude in making their decision.

“It’s important for me to think about the economics of prescriptions and tests that I’m ordering because it’s important to my patients,” said Dr. Marcia Nelson, a family practice physician at Mission Ranch Primary Care in Chico. “It’s no use to anybody to prescribe a medication that a patient won’t be able to fill because it’s too expensive for them; it does my patients a disservice.” She takes the same approach to diagnostic procedures, though those involve another layer of deliberation. “Sometimes people come in thinking they want a certain kind of test done and I know their insurance won’t cover it,” she said, “and I know it’s appropriate to go through these other treatments and investigations [first]. It may be inappropriate to jump to the most expensive test right out of the gate.” Cost consciousness isn’t new—Dr. Marcia Moore, a Chico cardiologist, says that “it’s been a part of the process for

almost two decades.” She has patients, particularly those too young to qualify for Medicare, with no insurance, so once they get past their emergency condition, her office needs to “shepherd” them through the particulars for follow-up care. Dr. Roy Bishop, the family medicine physician who runs Argyll Medical Group in Chico, notes that this degree of effort can tax a doctor’s office, particularly a primary care practice that sees hundreds of patients a day. As a result, patients share some of the burden. “Getting health care is not a passive activity,” Bishop said. “We give the patient homework; we ask them to find out what is covered or where they can find a particular specialist. Quite often, to be honest, in primary care we do not have the staff to handle patients and do this [fact-finding as well].” HEALTHLINES continued on page 15

APPOINTMENT KIDS’ COOKIN’ CAMP The first of four healthy cooking and physical activity camps for kids, titled LEAP Into Summer and sponsored by Chico State’s Center for Nutrition & Activity Promotion, will run June 23-27 at the CARD Community Center (545 Vallombrosa Ave.). The camps will include swimming, a nutrition decathlon, a team-based cooking competition and more. The fee is $100 per child; call 895-4711 or go to www.chicorec.com for a complete schedule or to make a reservation.


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Hospital Based Midwifery Service “MIDWIFERY IS GROWING because women want to be in control of the medical support they receive. With Feather River Midwifery Service, the midwife attending the birth will already have spent a lot of time with the mother,” Lisa Catterall RN, CNM told us. Lisa is a provider with Feather River Midwifery Service, which has two clinics in Butte County: One in Paradise and one in Chico. Midwives get to know the woman on all levels – physically, emotionally, spiritually, and what her social support network is like. It doesn’t matter if she wants an epidural or an all natural birthing experience. Midwives are there through the whole process to support the woman,” Lisa said. Lisa has been a registered nurse and midwife for thirty years and has delivered well over 3000 babies in that time. “Feather River Hospital is the only hospital in Butte County with midwives. We can care for the woman at our clinics and then admit them to Feather River Hospital when it’s time to deliver. It is very important to put the mother in the center and provide care and support. It takes a lot of people to do this, but as long as the mother is at the center

then great things will happen. If you mother the mother, the mother will mother her children.” Feather River Midwifery Service is overseen by Dr. Deborah Anderson, an obstetrician, who is very supportive of midwifery. When a laboring woman is admitted to Feather River Hospital’s Birth Day Place, she can expect to be cared for by a cohesive team of professionals, including Nurse Midwives, Obstetricians, nurses, social services, nutrition services, and Pediatricians. Feather River Hospital’s Birth Day Place has spacious, private, LDRP (labor-delivery-recoverypostpartum) rooms with warm and comfortable features. They offer a number of services that can’t be found at other Butte County hospitals, including the option to have a water birth, and hydrotherapy for natural pain relief during labor. There are five Certified Nurse Midwives including Cheryl Struve, Ann Wright, Tomi Warren, and Tanya Nolan, and they also provide Well Woman Care and gynecological exams throughout a woman’s lifespan. They are currently accepting new patients.

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HEALTHLINES

MAKE YOUR HEALTH A PRIORITY!

continued from page 12

Of patients’ reaction, Bishop noted: “Most of them are so shell-shocked and worn out by the changes in health care that they accept with resignation that they have to do it.”

June 2014

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Choosing Wisely:

Visit www.choosingwisely.org and click on “Lists” to find discussion points for patients and physicians.

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The Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) has completed a Five–Year Review of the cleanup at the Pacifi c Gas & Electric (PG&E) Former Manufactured Gas Plant Site located at 825 West 2nd Street in Chico, California, 95928. The purpose of a Five-Year Review is to evaluate that the approved and implemented remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment. DTSC reviewed the annual inspection reports and groundwater reports and provided oversight in the development of the Five-Year Review Report.

Complicating the doctors’

WEEKLY DOSE Signs of unresolved grief After the loss of a loved one, embracing the grieving process is important for continued emotional and physical well-being. In fact, unresolved grief can lead to debilitating anxiety and depression. People express unresolved grief in a variety of ways, including: • Acting as though nothing has changed and refusing to talk about the loss. • Becoming overly preoccupied with the memory of the deceased. • Turning more to alcohol, tobacco or other drugs. • Becoming progressively more depressed, isolating themselves from other people. • Becoming overly concerned about their health in general or an existing health condition.

Source: WebMD

530.864.2249

DTSC’s approved remedy included soil removals in 2006, 2007, and 2010 of accessible soil. The remedy also includes use of an asphalt cap and a building as physical barriers, as well as land use restrictions, to limit human exposure to the residual inaccessible soil. This review concluded that this remedy remains protective. DTSC also concluded that the groundwater plume is stabilized and slowly decreasing through monitored natural attenuation. On March 6, 2014, DTSC placed an advertisement in the Chico News and Review to notify the public before conducting the Five-Year Review.

2201 Pillsbury Rd. Suite 138 www.TopTierChiropratic.com

WHERE DO I GET MORE INFORMATION? You can read the 5-Year Review Report and other project documents at our web-site, please visit www.envirostor.dtsc.ca.gov/public .

We’re moving!

Also, project documents including the 5-Year Review are available at the DTSC file room, 8800 Cal Center Drive, Sacramento CA 95826. Please contact Amy Ly at (916) 255-4159 to make an appointment. CONTACTS: Duane White, Project Manager, at (916) 255-3585 or Duane.White@dtsc.ca.gov Nathan Schumacher, Public Participation Specialist (916) 255-3650 or toll free at (866) 495-5651 or by e-mail at Nathan.Schumacher@dtsc.ca.gov If you are from the news media, please contact Sandy Nax, Public Information Officer at (916) 327-6114 or Sandy.Nax@dtsc.ca.gov . Notice to Hearing Impaired Individuals: TTY users may use the California Relay Service at 711 or 1 (877) 735-2929. Please ask to contact Nathan Schumacher at (916) 255-3650 regarding PG & E Chico.

Please take note of our new address beginning June 1st.

3120 Cohasset Rd, Ste 6 Chico, CA 95926 • 895-3572 www.ValleyOakChildren.org Serving All of Butte County

jewelry • radios • blankets • antiques knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls• knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls

ist, says she is in a better position than a general practitioner to know specific costs, but even she gets surprised. In any case, Bishop said, the onus is ultimately on the patient. “I’m a professional adviser,” he said. “I don’t sell anything to patients other than my time and advice. If your adviser suggests you do something, either do it or do further research.” In that regard, the medical staff at Enloe Medical Center has embraced Choosing Wisely (www.choosingwisely.org), a set of recommendations from physician academies. Nelson, Enloe’s vice president for medical affairs, said these discussion points also translate to hospital care. “This isn’t making an economic decision; it’s making an evidencebased decision about what medical care is best,” Nelson said. “It’s important to recognize that providing efficient care—giving care that’s mindful of the cost and resources spent—is good medical care. “It doesn’t mean you’re denying patients; it means you’re having your thinking cap on with every decision you’re making.” Ω

1/2 Off

SALE Monday June 23rd

Thursday June 26th

Furniture • Clothing Electronic Items and more!

Thrifty

Bargain

2432 Esplanade • Chico Store’s Hours: Mon. through Sat. 9 am to 8 pm Sunday 10 am to 6 pm

knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls • knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls

thought process—and their patients’ quest for information—is the sheer number of insurance plans. While a medical practice might work with just a handful of insurers, every insurer offers a variety of policies, each covering different medicines and procedures, with different co-pays. On top of that, insurers are prone to changing their formularies (the prescription drugs they cover) as well as approval processes. How can doctors keep it all straight? They can’t. Computer systems help, but in the absence of a centralized clearinghouse for insurance plans, physicians rely on past experience and patient feedback. For prescriptions, Nelson finds that drugs with generic options generally tend to be covered by patients’ insurance, with low copays. However, she added, “if they go pick up the medication and the cost is out of line with what they can afford, I encourage them to let me know and I’ll see if I can find an alternative for them.” When it comes to tests, Nelson says she tends to order from a common battery, based on the array of illnesses and injuries she encounters frequently. Moore, as a special-

You may Read the Five Year Review Report for the Chico PG & E Former Manufactured Gas Plant Site

Cal/EPA

State of California

Wine Tasting Last Thursday of the Month

Thursday, June 26 | 5–7pm The Crystal Room 968 East Ave (next to Quackers) Tickets $5 Wine supplied by Grocery Outlet – Chico 2012 Chardonnay - Indigo Eyes - Napa 2009 Sauvignon Blanc - Three Rivers Winery - Columbia Valley, WA. 2012 Lechuza Garnacha Rosado - Spain 2010 Pinot Noir – Echelon - Russian River 2012 Indigo Eyes – Zinfandel - Napa 2011 Riesling – Mercer Canyon - Yakima Valley, Wa. ALSO – Tasting Sonoma Cider! Great Summer Drink

TM

jewelry • radios • blankets • antiques June 19, 2014

CN&R

15


GREENWAYS

Fading fog Scientists blame disappearance of Central Valley fog on climate change

by

Marianne Lavelle

F agers, research showing a decline in the Central Valley’s unique tule fog is no suror California’s highway man-

prise. The thick ground fog, an iconic weather feature that settles in the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys during colder months, historically has been a bane to motorists. The fog has been blamed for numerous large, multicar accidents. Twenty-, 50-, even 100-car pileups are not unheard of in the dense fog. The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) spent $12 million on a system to detect fog and warn motorists along a notoriously accident-prone 13-mile stretch of Highway 99 south of Fresno. But since its 2009 installation, the state hasn’t had an opportunity to assess whether such measures are worth the cost. The fog, once a reliable indicator of winter, has declined significantly over the past three decades, researchers report. “There has not really been a lot of fog for us to test the system,” said John Liu, maintenance and operations division deputy district director for Caltrans District 6 (which spans from Madera County south to Kern County). He noted that part of the reason is undoubtedly the fact that California is in the midst of one of the worst droughts on record. “All the locals know that the first day after it rains, when it’s very cool at night, that’s when the fog forms,” Liu said. “When we don’t have the rain, we don’t have the tule fog.”

16

CN&R

June 19, 2014

That should be welcome news for California motorists, since tule fog, named after the region’s tule grass, can reduce highway visibility to nearly zero. Among the worst accidents blamed on the fog was a 108-vehicle pile-up in November 2007. The chain-reaction collision, which took 10 minutes to unfold, killed two people and injured 40, shutting down Highway 99 for more than 12 hours. For now, Caltrans’ system on alerting and training drivers to slow down before hitting heavy fog is idle, with no forecast of whether it will be needed next year. About a year after 2007’s massive pileup, Caltrans began installation of what it hoped would be the latest technology for detecting fog hazard and warning drivers, using microwave sensors that pick up signals when vehicles slow down. The project also included a driver education program and a 511 phone line that motorists could call for information. “It does work, but we haven’t been able to do a rigorous before-and-after study to see if it’s really a cost-effective approach,” Liu said. “We haven’t had the really thick peasoup kind of fog.”

Back to the source:

This story originally ran on the website The Daily Climate, which is dedicated to increasing public understanding of climate change and its effects. Find the original story at www.dailyclimate.org/ tdc-newsroom/ 2014/05/tule-fog-decline.

While fog is hazardous, its disappearance is troublesome, Liu added. “The fog can be bad, but we desperately need the rain.” A recent study, published last month

by researchers at UC Berkeley, indicates a longer-term trend may be at work. They tracked a 46 percent drop in the number of fog days in the region over the past 32 winters. Pairing NASA and U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite records with data from a network of University of California weather stations, the researchers were able to show that despite great year-to-year variability, the overall trend in fog is downward. The paper was published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. The authors stress that the decline in winter tule fog raises a red flag for the state’s multibillion-dollar agricultural industry, since crops such as almonds, pistachios, cherries, apricots and peaches go through a necessary winter dormant period brought on and maintained by colder temperatures. The tule fog helps contribute to the winter chill. “The trees need this dormant time to rest so that they can later develop buds, flowers and fruit during the growing season,” said study co-author Dennis Baldocchi, professor in UC Berkeley’s Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management. “An insufficient rest period impairs the ability of farmers to achieve high-quality fruit yields,” said Baldocchi, whose own father grew almonds and walnuts in Antioch

and Oakley. California’s Central Valley provides 58 percent of the nation’s noncitrus fruit and nut crop, according to state agriculture statistics. The California almond crop alone is worth almost $4 billion a year, and Fresno County is the state’s top agricultural producer, with nearly $7 billion in agriculture alone in 2011. Other studies have marked the decline in the Central Valley of winter chill—when temperatures range between 32 and 45 degrees. The number of winter chill hours has dropped by several hundred since the 1950s, the study’s authors noted. But ambient air temperature alone may not adequately reflect the heat experienced by the crops, Baldocchi said. Direct sunlight can heat the buds so that they are warmer than the surrounding air temperature. As a result, fog is important in shielding the buds from the sun and helping them accumulate winter chill. Climate forecasts suggest that the accumulation of winter chill will continue to decrease in the Central Valley. Baldocchi said that fruit developers are already trying to develop cultivars that can tolerate less winter chill. “Farmers may also need to consider adjusting the location of orchards to follow the fog, so to speak,” Baldocchi said. “Some regions along the foothills of the Sierra are candidates, for instance. That type of change is a slow and difficult process, so we need to start thinking about this now.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Sun worshipers unite! The summer solstice (June 21) marks the first day of the season and the year’s longest day, a perfect time to honor the power of the sun. To that end, environmental group Roots and Wings is holding a day-long Golden Sun Festival this Saturday to promote a local move toward more solar energy and other forms of sustainable power. Activities at the festival, which lasts from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., include a “Battle for the Earth” break-dancing competition, live music and “Live Sustainability” shout. The event is free, and more details are available on Facebook (search for Golden Sun Festival).


THE GOODS PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEE GREEN

15 MINUTES

HOMEGROWN

Cheese freak

Pirate ahoy! Lee Green recently moved to Paradise from Southern California and opened his business as a pirate-for-hire. Green, 54, transforms into Pirate Captain Greybeard for parties and events. Around the holidays, he becomes Santa Claus. In addition to a diverse background in theater, Green has worked in network repair, printing and graphics, property preservation and management, insurance— “and a few other jobs, whatever came up,” he said. His next scheduled public appearance will be on July 17 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Growing Up Chico family fair at Chico City Plaza, coinciding with the Thursday Night Market. He will entertain and interact, and be available for photos and sharing pirate jokes. Green can be reached at 636-0706, fun@jollyfolly.net or online at www.jollyfolly.net.

How did you get into this business? As with most pirates, my profession grew from necessity. Having lost my job, and finding no viable options to replace it, I turned to the talents I have, in order to coerce an income out of those surrounding me—by cunning and wits—without having to create a product, or do any real work. I also became Santa—but that was inevitable, as I have a very gray beard. I was sitting in church one day and a small boy in front of me kept looking back at me. When his mother told him to sit still, he whispered, “But Mom, it’s Santa!”

Have you always been a theatrical person? On and off … I was always a weird sort of kid, but very shy. Humor became a defense mechanism. I came to learn that you could hide in plain sight by simply becoming someone else. I didn’t take drama in school. I took debate, which incorporated many of the same skills. I learned presentation, reflexes, thinking on your feet, and having a large store of material from which to choose. I worked in a number of small community productions, and eventually became a performer at the Southern California Renaissance Pleasure Faire for many years. I performed Shakespeare. I portrayed a sword-fighter, a nobleman, a merchant, a peasant, and engaged in countless hours of impromptu street performance.

What kinds of places do you appear in costume? I’ll wear a costume anywhere. I’ve done a lot of historical reenactment. I’ve done street performance, parties, shows, weddings, and I’ve even worn a costume to a funeral. I keep expecting to see

myself show up some day on the “People of Walmart” Web page, as I have no problem running into a store on my way to or from a performance.

What’s the most unusual thing that’s happened doing this work? Once I was doing a public swordfighting demonstration. My partner was my instructor in swordfighting, and was considerably better than I was. I was losing, and quite obviously so. So I decided to turn the tables. I had a replica wheel-lock pistol, which I decided to use to my advantage. However, as I drew the pistol in haste, it caught on my belt and flew out of my hand, landing directly at the feet of my opponent, who quickly picked it up and turned it on me. Hoist with my own petard!

What’s your best pirate joke? There once was a pirate called Greybeard / Whom everyone thought was quite weird / Because his 14 wives / Weren’t frightened by knives / ’Twas his ticklish whiskers they feared! —CATHERINE BEEGHLY

by Meredith J. Graham meredithg@newsrev iew.com

My love of cheese began very “American.” Kraft sliced American cheese. String cheese. Velveeta. Swiss. Cheddar. France changed everything. The town we lived in had the most amazing farmers’ market, where there were at least a dozen cheese vendors. This is where I learned about artisan cheeses, and where I discovered a love of soft as well as firm, aged varieties. Back in Chico, the availability of truly delicious, artisan cheeses is pretty sad. The folks at The Galley cheese counter know me well, but I was sorry to see Creekside Cellars close. There are a handful of local cheesemakers, though, who can be found mostly at farmers’ markets. That’s where I first stumbled upon Pedrozo Dairy & Cheese Co. During a recent visit to the Pedrozo farm in Orland, owner Tim Pedrozo took me on a tour, introducing me to the 30 dairy cows, most of them milling about in the large field. A few came up to say hello, and one even surprised me with a kiss. (I didn’t know cows gave kisses like dogs!) What a sweetie. Inside the cheese room, we spied the fruits of the previous day’s labor. The process is fairly simple, Pedrozo said. First, they milk the cows in the milking barn. The milk then is transferred into the cheese-making room, where it’s placed in a large drum and the temperature is equalized. “We make a traditional, farm-style semi-firm raw milk cheese,” he explained. To keep it raw, they never heat the milk above “cow temperature,” the natural heat it would reach inside the cow. They introduce a starter, which begins the process of turning the milk into cheese, and then a rennet, which helps make it firm. In all, it takes about four hours. Every part of the process affects the taste of the cheese, Pedrozo said, starting with what the cow eats and going all the way to how long they age it. (Pedrozo cheeses are aged at least 60 days, some of them much longer.) About a year and a half ago, when grain prices skyrocketed, Pedrozo said he decided to go back to a grass-fed model. A third-generation dairy farmer, he remembers when grass-fed was the only way. Then farmers started serving their cattle grains in the interest of helping them grow bigger, faster. Going back to grass has been time consuming, but is worth it, he said—he can taste it in the flavor, texture and overall quality of his cheeses. That’s especially true for the deeply rich Black Butte Reserve, my personal favorite, which is made using only spring milk—“Spring milk has so many flavor layers; the grasses are different, and they’re growing faster.” Other varieties include the mellower Northern Gold, the slightly sweet Red Pepper and the earthy Tartufello. You’ll find Pedrozo cheeses locally at the Saturday market in Chico, at the Glenn County markets in Orland (Thursdays) and Willows (Saturdays), at the Rusty Wagon (420 Walker St., Orland) and soon at Holiday Quality Foods in Paradise. Also, go online (www.realfarmstead cheese.com) to learn more and to place a special order.

Apartments Seniors Can Afford!

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June 19, 2014

CN&R

17


Life death

Family and friends of Craig Smith scatter flower petals on the pool at One-Mile Recreation Area, his favorite place in Chico, during a celebration of life ceremony held April 6. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

their precise moment of departure, often sparing loved ones from witnessing their final, haunting breath. Skeptics might shrug such notions off, but many who’ve dealt with death firsthand believe the surrounding circumstances are something far greater than mere coincidence or blind chance—at least mysterious, if not mystical. This was again the case shortly after, when our friend Jose walked through the door within 10 minutes of Craig’s passing, having driven all night from San Diego to lay a picture of our mother beside his bed. The message wasn’t lost on me and my siblings—he was with her now. When we returned home, friends and family began gathering on our front porch as news of Craig’s death spread, some bringing flowers, beer and food. Well before noon, my friend Rogelio solemnly set a bottle of Jameson Irish Whiskey in front of me, which I decided not to open until the time was right. I had phone calls to field, including questions from the hospital, the coroner, and a particularly detailed and difficult conversation with a body donor program representative. There were also children there, experiencing the death of a loved one for the first time, and I didn’t want to add to their confusion by reducing myself to a blathering puddle of snot and tears. Not yet, anyway. By afternoon, I’d fulfilled all of my obligations, the kids were gone and I’d held myself together as long as I humanly could. We gathered at one end of the porch and my friend John picked up his guitar and started playing the opening chords of Alice Cooper’s “I Never Cry,” another of Craig’s favorites. I cracked the whiskey and the tears came, and we all sang and cried and drank together long into the night.

after

After a season of loss, CN&R writer searches for his own ‘invincible summer’ by Ken Smith kens@newsreview.com

I

will never know exactly why my brother Craig died. I don’t mean that existentially, as in the perpetual question asked by philosophers, theologians and anyone who’s experienced loss— why does anyone have to die?—but in a very literal sense. He was recovering from a mild chest cold, but otherwise mostly healthy, and there were certainly no indicators foretelling the terrible sequence of events—respiratory failure, heart failure, a severe seizure—that caused him to fall unconscious on March 15. My partner, Kate, and I were awoken by an EMT knocking on our door early that morning, before the sun had fully risen, asking if we could identify the man lying on the sidewalk, surrounded by first responders attempting to resuscitate him. I was overwhelmed when I saw it was him, and fell to my knees as my worst fear unfolded just steps from our front door. As Craig’s caretaker—he suffered from acute schizoaffective disorder and required full-time help—my primary concern for my entire adult life had been his wellbeing (see the story I wrote about our relationship, “Bond of brothers,” Jan. 12, 2012). The emergency workers succeeded in resuscitating him en route to Enloe Medical 18

CN&R

June 19, 2014

Center, where he survived six days in a comatose state, during which doctors determined how his body had failed, but not why. Nor did we know how long he’d been deprived of oxygen until the fourth day, when tests showed his brain was damaged so significantly he’d never recover. Awful decisions had to be made, and friends and family gathered to say goodbye. I’d experienced grief before, most profoundly with the death of my mother when I was 19, the event that led me to be Craig’s caregiver. That loss shook my life so considerably I still feel shockwaves today, 19 years later. Craig’s loss is no less tragic to me— more than my brother and my ward, he was

my life’s guiding light—but rather than crumble during his hospitalization, I found myself possessed of an incredible strength and clarity, and the determination to maintain that fortitude moving forward. I recalled a quote from Albert Camus I’d read in a pamphlet on grief a nurse had given me when my mom died, which I’d tried but failed to relate to then: “In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.” I know better now that wallowing in darkness is no way to honor the dead—living is—and I resolved not to ignore my grief, but to focus it toward constructive ends. Grief, like any force of nature, ebbs and flows, spirals and shifts, and arguably never ends. The first month is especially turbulent, a tempest of emotions and painful realizations as the whole of one’s reality is smashed apart and repatched together into the foundation of some strange, new normal. In the case

of Craig’s passing, that tumultuous time was book-ended by the start of spring and the Easter holiday, and is made up of some of my life’s most intense moments thus far, some of which I shudder to remember, others I swear to never forget.

Craig took his last breath early in the morning

on March 21, as Elton John sang “Rocket Man.” Craig loved music, and the staff at Enloe kindly allowed us to bring a music player stocked with his favorite songs after they’d removed him from life support the previous morning. Kate and I, along with several members of my family—my brother Chris, sister Kim, father Don, and nephew Brian—sat with him through that last long day, but the three of us present at the end drifted to sleep minutes before he actually passed. The nurse told us this was common, for the dying to choose

The upside of tragedy, if there is one, is that it brings people

together. My father, brother and sister—my dad coming all the way from Utah, and siblings from Southern California— made it to Chico within 24 hours of Craig falling ill. Visits between us are infrequent and usually rushed, but when something so hard hits so close, the rest of the world can be put on hold. With our hearts and heads in the same unique place, we spent more quality time together than we have in years. Alas, life continues, and within days of his death, everyone needed to get back to their respective real worlds. Kate and I were worried about being left alone in a house devoid of Craig’s STOMP-slide-STOMP footsteps across the wooden floor, the staticky classic rock coming from his always just-out-of-tune radio, and his near constant laugh. He was such a huge presence even the cats took notice of his absence, holding their own days-long vigil on his empty bed. To maintain my sanity, I threw myself—arguably to an obsessive degree—into planning a celebration of Craig’s life. Plenty of people advised me such affairs are best held some distance off, but I’d hear none of it. I needed some sort of

closure and didn’t want his memory, or any strength of emotion, to fade. From dealing with funeral planners for my mom’s memorial, I’d seen the less sympathetic side of the death industry—with its upsold caskets, financing options and impersonal results—and wanted to avoid it altogether, instead taking a doit-yourself approach and using only essential services. We booked the CARD Community Center for Sunday, April 6, a good venue for a short, organized service and longer, informal reception. Pictures needed to be gathered, an officiant needed to be found, music was essential, and there were tons of other details to look after. We received an outpouring of support from local friends, who brought us meals, lent shoulders to cry on, and helped bring the memorial together—kindnesses for which I can never adequately express my gratitude. I felt particularly empowered by the DIY course of action. Sure, I’d never planned a funeral before, but as I quartered and cut programs at Kinko’s one day, I realized it wasn’t much different from planning a punk show, something I’ve done lots more times. Some days I almost felt like my normal self, and others I couldn’t pull myself out of bed, especially after nights spent lying awake in fear of what dreams and memories might come. Other days, I’d think I was just fine until I realized I’d been driving around aimlessly for an hour, afraid to go home and not find Craig waiting for me on our porch.

The author, Ken Smith (right), and his brother Craig on the porch of their Chico home just a few months before Craig’s unexpected passing. PHOTO BY KATE RONAN

“I don’t like it much … looks like a spook house,” he said, again with an odd laugh. “Full of spirits. I hate ghosts.” As I laughed, he surprised me by adding, “I’m gonna be a ghost someday, and I’m gonna come back to haunt you.” A bit shocked but still laughing, I asked, “Why the hell would you even say something like that?” “Oh what?” he said, feigning insult. “You don’t want me to come back and say ‘Hi’?” Even today, I keep expecting him to jump out from behind a door and say “Boo!” I have an irrational fear of this happening, but simultaneously wish it would.

Just as Craig’s mental condition caused him to live between

realities, my own daydreams and delusions have become more lucid and tangible since he’s passed. Thoughts I’d normally acknowledge with passing recognition become fullblown fantasies I’m prone to falling into, eventually escaping with details so fine-focused they’re difficult to discern from real memories. This happened one afternoon as I was leaving the CARD Center on some pre-memorial business. Suddenly, I wasn’t “LIFE AFTER DEATH” continued on page 20

Craig rarely spoke of his own death, except in

the past tense. “I’ve died on crosses,” he’d sometimes proclaim. “Crosses, Craig?” I’d ask, emphasizing the plurality. “Yup. Lots of them.” I recall twice in the last year when Craig did mention his own mortality. The first was passing the Chico Cemetery, en route to grabbing some McDonald’s for lunch on his way to OneMile, his favorite place in town, when he spotted a funeral taking place beneath a white canopy. “They’re having a funeral today,” he said with an uncomfortable laugh. “There’s a body under that tent. That’s gross.” “It’s not gross, Craig, just a part of life,” I offered. “Nah. It’s just gross,” he said. Around the same time, while driving through orchards outside of town, I pointed to a crumbling farmhouse with boarded-up windows, and said I thought it would be neat to fix up. Craig fell into a comatose state on March 15, and passed away six days later. PHOTO BY KATE RONAN

June 19, 2014

CN&R

19


Life death

Family and friends of Craig Smith scatter flower petals on the pool at One-Mile Recreation Area, his favorite place in Chico, during a celebration of life ceremony held April 6. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

their precise moment of departure, often sparing loved ones from witnessing their final, haunting breath. Skeptics might shrug such notions off, but many who’ve dealt with death firsthand believe the surrounding circumstances are something far greater than mere coincidence or blind chance—at least mysterious, if not mystical. This was again the case shortly after, when our friend Jose walked through the door within 10 minutes of Craig’s passing, having driven all night from San Diego to lay a picture of our mother beside his bed. The message wasn’t lost on me and my siblings—he was with her now. When we returned home, friends and family began gathering on our front porch as news of Craig’s death spread, some bringing flowers, beer and food. Well before noon, my friend Rogelio solemnly set a bottle of Jameson Irish Whiskey in front of me, which I decided not to open until the time was right. I had phone calls to field, including questions from the hospital, the coroner, and a particularly detailed and difficult conversation with a body donor program representative. There were also children there, experiencing the death of a loved one for the first time, and I didn’t want to add to their confusion by reducing myself to a blathering puddle of snot and tears. Not yet, anyway. By afternoon, I’d fulfilled all of my obligations, the kids were gone and I’d held myself together as long as I humanly could. We gathered at one end of the porch and my friend John picked up his guitar and started playing the opening chords of Alice Cooper’s “I Never Cry,” another of Craig’s favorites. I cracked the whiskey and the tears came, and we all sang and cried and drank together long into the night.

after

After a season of loss, CN&R writer searches for his own ‘invincible summer’ by Ken Smith kens@newsreview.com

I

will never know exactly why my brother Craig died. I don’t mean that existentially, as in the perpetual question asked by philosophers, theologians and anyone who’s experienced loss— why does anyone have to die?—but in a very literal sense. He was recovering from a mild chest cold, but otherwise mostly healthy, and there were certainly no indicators foretelling the terrible sequence of events—respiratory failure, heart failure, a severe seizure—that caused him to fall unconscious on March 15. My partner, Kate, and I were awoken by an EMT knocking on our door early that morning, before the sun had fully risen, asking if we could identify the man lying on the sidewalk, surrounded by first responders attempting to resuscitate him. I was overwhelmed when I saw it was him, and fell to my knees as my worst fear unfolded just steps from our front door. As Craig’s caretaker—he suffered from acute schizoaffective disorder and required full-time help—my primary concern for my entire adult life had been his wellbeing (see the story I wrote about our relationship, “Bond of brothers,” Jan. 12, 2012). The emergency workers succeeded in resuscitating him en route to Enloe Medical 18

CN&R

June 19, 2014

Center, where he survived six days in a comatose state, during which doctors determined how his body had failed, but not why. Nor did we know how long he’d been deprived of oxygen until the fourth day, when tests showed his brain was damaged so significantly he’d never recover. Awful decisions had to be made, and friends and family gathered to say goodbye. I’d experienced grief before, most profoundly with the death of my mother when I was 19, the event that led me to be Craig’s caregiver. That loss shook my life so considerably I still feel shockwaves today, 19 years later. Craig’s loss is no less tragic to me— more than my brother and my ward, he was

my life’s guiding light—but rather than crumble during his hospitalization, I found myself possessed of an incredible strength and clarity, and the determination to maintain that fortitude moving forward. I recalled a quote from Albert Camus I’d read in a pamphlet on grief a nurse had given me when my mom died, which I’d tried but failed to relate to then: “In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.” I know better now that wallowing in darkness is no way to honor the dead—living is—and I resolved not to ignore my grief, but to focus it toward constructive ends. Grief, like any force of nature, ebbs and flows, spirals and shifts, and arguably never ends. The first month is especially turbulent, a tempest of emotions and painful realizations as the whole of one’s reality is smashed apart and repatched together into the foundation of some strange, new normal. In the case

of Craig’s passing, that tumultuous time was book-ended by the start of spring and the Easter holiday, and is made up of some of my life’s most intense moments thus far, some of which I shudder to remember, others I swear to never forget.

Craig took his last breath early in the morning

on March 21, as Elton John sang “Rocket Man.” Craig loved music, and the staff at Enloe kindly allowed us to bring a music player stocked with his favorite songs after they’d removed him from life support the previous morning. Kate and I, along with several members of my family—my brother Chris, sister Kim, father Don, and nephew Brian—sat with him through that last long day, but the three of us present at the end drifted to sleep minutes before he actually passed. The nurse told us this was common, for the dying to choose

The upside of tragedy, if there is one, is that it brings people

together. My father, brother and sister—my dad coming all the way from Utah, and siblings from Southern California— made it to Chico within 24 hours of Craig falling ill. Visits between us are infrequent and usually rushed, but when something so hard hits so close, the rest of the world can be put on hold. With our hearts and heads in the same unique place, we spent more quality time together than we have in years. Alas, life continues, and within days of his death, everyone needed to get back to their respective real worlds. Kate and I were worried about being left alone in a house devoid of Craig’s STOMP-slide-STOMP footsteps across the wooden floor, the staticky classic rock coming from his always just-out-of-tune radio, and his near constant laugh. He was such a huge presence even the cats took notice of his absence, holding their own days-long vigil on his empty bed. To maintain my sanity, I threw myself—arguably to an obsessive degree—into planning a celebration of Craig’s life. Plenty of people advised me such affairs are best held some distance off, but I’d hear none of it. I needed some sort of

closure and didn’t want his memory, or any strength of emotion, to fade. From dealing with funeral planners for my mom’s memorial, I’d seen the less sympathetic side of the death industry—with its upsold caskets, financing options and impersonal results—and wanted to avoid it altogether, instead taking a doit-yourself approach and using only essential services. We booked the CARD Community Center for Sunday, April 6, a good venue for a short, organized service and longer, informal reception. Pictures needed to be gathered, an officiant needed to be found, music was essential, and there were tons of other details to look after. We received an outpouring of support from local friends, who brought us meals, lent shoulders to cry on, and helped bring the memorial together—kindnesses for which I can never adequately express my gratitude. I felt particularly empowered by the DIY course of action. Sure, I’d never planned a funeral before, but as I quartered and cut programs at Kinko’s one day, I realized it wasn’t much different from planning a punk show, something I’ve done lots more times. Some days I almost felt like my normal self, and others I couldn’t pull myself out of bed, especially after nights spent lying awake in fear of what dreams and memories might come. Other days, I’d think I was just fine until I realized I’d been driving around aimlessly for an hour, afraid to go home and not find Craig waiting for me on our porch.

The author, Ken Smith (right), and his brother Craig on the porch of their Chico home just a few months before Craig’s unexpected passing. PHOTO BY KATE RONAN

“I don’t like it much … looks like a spook house,” he said, again with an odd laugh. “Full of spirits. I hate ghosts.” As I laughed, he surprised me by adding, “I’m gonna be a ghost someday, and I’m gonna come back to haunt you.” A bit shocked but still laughing, I asked, “Why the hell would you even say something like that?” “Oh what?” he said, feigning insult. “You don’t want me to come back and say ‘Hi’?” Even today, I keep expecting him to jump out from behind a door and say “Boo!” I have an irrational fear of this happening, but simultaneously wish it would.

Just as Craig’s mental condition caused him to live between

realities, my own daydreams and delusions have become more lucid and tangible since he’s passed. Thoughts I’d normally acknowledge with passing recognition become fullblown fantasies I’m prone to falling into, eventually escaping with details so fine-focused they’re difficult to discern from real memories. This happened one afternoon as I was leaving the CARD Center on some pre-memorial business. Suddenly, I wasn’t “LIFE AFTER DEATH” continued on page 20

Craig rarely spoke of his own death, except in

the past tense. “I’ve died on crosses,” he’d sometimes proclaim. “Crosses, Craig?” I’d ask, emphasizing the plurality. “Yup. Lots of them.” I recall twice in the last year when Craig did mention his own mortality. The first was passing the Chico Cemetery, en route to grabbing some McDonald’s for lunch on his way to OneMile, his favorite place in town, when he spotted a funeral taking place beneath a white canopy. “They’re having a funeral today,” he said with an uncomfortable laugh. “There’s a body under that tent. That’s gross.” “It’s not gross, Craig, just a part of life,” I offered. “Nah. It’s just gross,” he said. Around the same time, while driving through orchards outside of town, I pointed to a crumbling farmhouse with boarded-up windows, and said I thought it would be neat to fix up. Craig fell into a comatose state on March 15, and passed away six days later. PHOTO BY KATE RONAN

June 19, 2014

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“LIFE AFTER DEATH” continued from page 19

sitting in the car alone in an empty parking lot under drizzling rain, but the sun was shining, the lot was full and Craig was beside me, dressed in the slightly too-small sport coat he’d gotten last Christmas and loved to show off at any opportunity. “What are we doing here?” he asked somewhat nervously, the way he would when I’d surprise him by taking him to lunch or someplace unexpected. “You’ll see, Craigy.” “What are we doing here? Why are we stopping?” He asked a few more times as we walked through the main doors of the center’s event room, him even more confused to see it filled with family and friends. “Look Craig, there’s Grandpa Tiger. There are your brothers, Corey and Chris, your sister Kim. There’s Dad, all your nephews and nieces, friends from Redding and Chico and San Diego … it’s a party, Craigy—a surprise party for you.” He would have liked that a lot. Chris and I had talked about throwing him a huge, belated 50th birthday party. Missed opportunities, trips never taken and promises unfulfilled are the basis of many of these fantasies. If only I had one more year, one more month, one more week, even just one more day. I was shaken from my daydream by a thought that made me laugh through my tears. All funerals are surprise parties. The guest

of honor never knows when they’re coming.

The logo for an event at Chico State’s Craig Hall surprised visitors in town for Craig’s memorial.

One morning, a gas station atten-

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

dant asked me how my day was going, and I was so lost in my own dark thoughts I almost blurted out an honest answer: “Pretty shitty. I just watched my brother’s body be burned to cinders.” I was a bit taken aback the previous week when a funeral home director had asked if I wanted to be present when Craig was cremated, or as the director put it,“cared for.” He explained it was something of a trend for family members to attend. I said I’d like to be notified, and maybe watch from a distance, but was unsure if I wanted to endure that part of the process. I’d almost forgotten that conversation when the phone rang early the Monday morning before the memorial, the same director informing me Craig would be “cared for” at 10 a.m. I was still torn, and waited until the last minute before deciding to head to the cemetery, where I parked about 50 yards from the crematorium building. I turned up the stereo—the Flying Burrito Brothers version of “Wild Horses” playing—and lit a cigarette, the last I’d share with Craig. I remember being surprised there was no smoke, only vapors rising into the gray sky against the falling rain. Even as his body was reduced to ashes, I felt his presence and apologized aloud for all the times I’d lost my patience or

myself together, and drove away.

I am aware that my allusions to

fell short in being the best I could to him. I thanked him for all he’d taught and given to me. In my mind, the scene inside the building was playing out just like it does in movies—oven doors open revealing flames, a coffin slowly rolls inside, the doors clank shut, and then they’re gone. I sat there half an hour, thinking enough time

had elapsed, then made the mistake of Googling how long it takes for a body to be cremated (I’d made the same mistake when he was in a coma). Apparently, it takes up to three hours for an adult male to be reduced to cremains. Part of me was scared to leave him alone, but a bigger part knew he was already gone. I lit another cigarette, pulled

preternatural coincidences and spiritual mumbo-jumbo are typical of those experiencing great loss, and that some might write it off as a rationalization technique employed by the human brain to help make sense of life and death, which really make no damned sense at all. I might agree, in more clear-headed times, were it not for the most tremendous occurrence to happen in the wake of Craig’s passing. On the weekend of the memorial, a number of out-of-town guests were scattered around downtown Chico when they began to notice the streets were filled with dozens of college students wearing red shirts emblazoned with a shocking message: “KEEP CALM AND CRAIG ON.” The same motto was written on fliers tucked beneath windshield wipers when they returned to their vehicles. The swag was for a completely unrelated event at Chico State dormitory Craig Hall, and I realize the “Keep Calm” thing has been wildly over-appropriated … but it’s a coincidence of cosmic proportions, especially when you understand that Craig’s inner circle are likely the only people on the planet to regularly use the word “Craig” as a verb. He’d started it himself, substituting it in songs like “For Those About to Craig.” If we’d be getting ready to have a party, or go somewhere fun, he’d sometimes ask excitedly, “Are we gonna Craig tonight or what?” We also used the word to describe his various mood swings and levels of manic tension: a solemnly spoken, “Oh man, he’s Craig-ing out pretty hard,” might be cause for concern, while the same phrase spoken casually meant all was well. A message perhaps, and one that shouldn’t have been surprising. Everyone who knew Craig well knew there was something otherworldly about him.

The memorial was everything I’d

hoped for and more, a true celebration. All of the components served the purpose of paying tribute to the larger-than-life character Craig Craig’s memorial was attended by more than 100 people, including these family members who traveled from as far away as Seattle and San Diego. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

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June 19, 2014


In memoriam:

The author, CN&R staff writer Ken Smith, previously wrote a story about being his brother Craig’s caregiver (see “Bond of brothers,” Jan. 12, 2012). He also maintains a memorial website at www.longlive thecraig.com.

July 11 - 27, 2014

THE GOOD NEWS - No brutal farrowing crates this year (due to the porcine virus sweeping the country), and no hermit crabs sold as pets (but only because no one applied for a booth). Both are still possible in 2015 and beyond. THE BAD NEWS - Despite major public outcry, the 2014 Fair again plans to allow vendors to give away goldfish as “prizes” -- a reported 15,000 of these unfortunate creatures at the 2013 Fair. There’s still time to stop the mayhem.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

imagined Craig’s beautiful green eyes enabling someone—possibly and quite likely a child—to behold the Mediterranean Sea, or perhaps the Sahara Desert, for the first time, the thought of which I found not just comforting, but joyous. I will never know the cause of Craig’s fall that morning, exactly how or why he died, and dwelling on details like that—and all the other “hows” and “whys” and “what ifs”—could drive me to dark places, if I allow them to. Instead, I think of how he lived a big life, was loved by many, and just by being himself taught those around him about tolerance, acceptance and unconditional love. I take comfort in knowing I helped provide him with a quality of life and close relationships rare for someone as acutely afflicted as he was, and my family’s efforts blessed him with a level of independence some doctors said he’d never be capable of achieving. I’m proud to have fulfilled the promise I made to my mother, and I’m grateful for every day I spent with Craig. And that’s all I need to know to keep on living. Ω

CRIMES AGAINST NATURE at the CA STATE FAIR

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

was, rather than depicting him as some sad mental-health tragedy shackled by his infirmity. At the end, we walked together to OneMile, following the same route he took almost every day, and spread flower petals on the pool while our friends Kelly Brown and Lisa Marie played a song. The week’s rain had passed, and the sun shined as brightly as it did in my daydream. Easter came just two weeks later, and it was tough. Craig loved holidays, though whether he really believed in the Easter Bunny or just liked chocolate and ham is debatable (his belief in Santa Claus, though, was quite real, a theme that figured prominently in his eulogy and in the memorial tattoo I intend to get—a Christmas tree, just like his). Kate and I exchanged candy, more in tribute to him than, well, Him, but without witnessing Craig’s child-like glee that morning, and with our families far away, it was mostly just another Sunday. Two days later, I received a phone call from a woman with the donor agency, who said she knew the first month was hard and was calling to see if I wanted to talk. To my own surprise, I had plenty to say to a complete stranger. She also informed me Craig’s corneas had been successfully implanted in a patient in Tunisia, giving sight to a blind person. I

Many fish will suffocate in those tiny plastic bags, be illegally dumped into local waters, or simply flushed down the toilet, treated as mere “expendables”. A terrible message to send to impressionable young children. State law (Penal Code 599) prohibits the awarding of poultry and rabbits as prizes. Why not ALL animals? CalEXPO needs to adopt a permanent, written policy banning all these abuses. Failing that, state legislation is in order. HOW YOU CAN HELP - Contact Rick Pickering, CEO, and the Board of Directors, at CalEXPO & State Fair, 1600 Exposition Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; email calexpoboard@calexpo.com; tel. 916-263-3010. Senator Darrell Steinberg and Assemblymember Roger Dickinson are both ex-officio Fair Board members. They need to hear from us, too: All legislators may be written c/o The State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814. INFO: COMMITTEE FOR A MORE HUMANE STATE FAIR - Sacramento SPCA, Oakland/East Bay SPCA, SPCA of Monterey County, Peninsula Humane Society, Marin Humane Society, Ohlone Humane Society (Fremont), Humane Society Silicon Valley, Humane Farming Association, In Defense of Animals, Animal Place. P.E.A.C.E., Animal Legal Defense Fund, and many individuals, c/o ACTION FOR ANIMALS, P.O. Box 20184, Oakland, CA 94620; email - afa@mcn.org

SWEET STUFF FOR 5 BUCKS Az tlan Mexican Food: $10 gif t certif icate for $5 CAMMIES 2014 T-Shirts Gogi's Cafe: $10 gif t certif icate for $5 Keep Chico Weird 2014 T-Shirts Lunatic Fringe Belly Dance Essentials: $10 gif t certif icate for $5 Tacos Cortés: $10 gif t certif icate for $5 Teddy Malibu's: $10 gif t certif icate for $5

Buy online anytime with credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card, M-F 9am-5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

The author refers to his brother as his “life’s guiding light.” PHOTO BY KATE RONAN

E VC IOEMW . C O M W WWW.WNW. E WNSER W E VSI ERW. June 19, 2014

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Arts & Culture p o h k c o s p o Lolip Los Angeles label parks its garage in Chico

L cranking out rock ’n’ roll via the pure format of the cassette for four years olipop Records has been

now. These days the label puts out albums from dozens of artists of the garage-rock variby ety, including White Mark Lore Fang and even a cassette single from thee legendary Oh Sees. Preview: Lolipop opened its Lolipop Records Revue, featuring storefront record shop Mystic Braves, in July of last year, Burning Palms, located in the heart of The Electric garage rock’s sunny Magpie, and summer home of Los Corners, Monday, June 23, 9 p.m., at Angeles. And four the Maltese. bands from the growCost: $5 ing roster will be making an appearance in Maltese Bar & Chico as part of the Tap Room Lolipop Records 1600 Park Ave. 343-4915 Revue, a roving sock www.themaltese hop that’ll get even the bar.com wallflowers to the dance floor when it stops at the Maltese Bar & Tap Room Monday, June 23. Here’s a sneak peek of the action, with a few words from some of the players.

Mystic Braves

If I didn’t know these guys were in their 20s, I’d swear my parents probably grooved to Mystic Braves in Southern California circa 1966. Hailing from the hotbed that gave us the Seeds and the Electric Prunes, this Glendale four-piece sounds the part, they look the part, and they do it well. Mystic Braves just released their second LP on Lolipop, Desert Island, which is loaded with the kind of psychedelic rock ’n’ roll that made the girls squeal back in the day. The band recently opened for The Zombies (yes, the Odyssey and Oracle Zombies): “It was surreal in every way,” said frontman Julian Ducatenzeiler. “Met the guys and they claimed to love our sound. A friend of ours got Colin [Blunstone, Zombies vocalist] to sing a cappella with us—pretty magical. And we get to do it again in August!”

Burning Palms

Simone Stopford throws all sorts of musical styles into her cauldron with 22

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June 19, 2014

Burning Palms, whose debut Church of Ra emanates mysticism from another time. “I’m pagan and I’m fascinated with Wicca, Egyptian magic, the occult … white magic,” she explained. “So the concepts and symbols connected to these themes usually bleed into our music.” The UKAustralian-South African citizen now resides in Burning Palms Tucson, Ariz., where she was drawn to the Saguaro Desert. You can hear the unforgiving terrain in Burning Palms’ music, too. What started as stripped-down murder ballads has turned into another creature altogether with the addition of a full band. “We’re now less about being morose, and more about jumping up and down,” Stopford said.

Mystic Braves

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THURS

Special Events CIRQUE DE SOLAR: A benefit for GRID Alternatives, celebrating solstice and clean energy from the sun. Vendors, no-host bar, plus live entertainment from Bogg, Erin Lizardo, The Rugs, and Meg Amor. Th, 6/19, 5:30-9pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E Third St., (530) 894-1978.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: The market is back with fresh produce, local food, arts and crafts, plus live entertainment. This week: A West African dance and drum show from Gogorlu. Th, 6-9pm. Free. Chico City Plaza, Downtown Chico.

Music BEER RELEASE PARTY: Brewmaster Roland Allen partnered with Morse Madarin Farms in Oroville to create the Emperor’s Mandarin Wheat Beer. Th, 6/19, 6pm. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

DAVE AND PHIL ALVIN: Join the Alvins for frolicking roots and

stomping country blues. Th, 6/19, 7:30pm. $22.50. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierra nevada.com/bigroom.

The Electric Magpie

Over the past decade the Bay Area has become a hotbed of retro rock, and San Francisco’s The Electric Magpie is looking to keep it that way, as fellow garagerockers Ty Corners Segall and Thee Oh Sees have both recently fled the city for sunny (less expensive) LA. This five-piece keeps the hooks sharp and the attitude snotty, and you won’t hear a more fun song than “Airport Blues” from their new Lolipop release, Begins. “The rawness of our record was mostly because of the lack of funding,” explained vocalist/multiinstrumentalist Peter Maffei. “Songs like ‘Airport Blues’ have a clear garage influence, but as a band we are trying to move forward and add even more dynamics to our music.”

THIS WEEK

The Electric Magpie

Theater FOREVER PLAID: Take a trip back to the 1950s with The Plaids, on

their way to a gig in 1964. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 6/29. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 8943282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

Corners

Another Southern California band that remains parked in the garage. There are hooks o’ plenty on Corners’ fulllength Beyond Way, which singer-guitarist Tracy Bryant said began as an experiment on a Tascam four-track tape recorder. The power trio has since released a split 7-inch with fellow LA-LA-landians Dirt Dress. It’s garage rawk fun, but there’s plenty more to chew on. “We never found it difficult to stand out from the influx of garage rock bands,” Bryant explained. “We draw influences from late-’70s punk and many other things we’re inspired by, so it never felt like a chore to try to be different.” Ω

CIRQUE DE SOLAR Thursday, June 19 Chico Women’s Club

SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS OTHER DESERT CITIES: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

SHE LOVES ME: See Friday. Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

Auditions MS NELSON IS MISSING AUDITIONS: The Blue Room Young Company hosts auditions for their tuition-free program. Ages 9-15. See website for more details. Sa, 6/21, 10am. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

FARM TO TABLE DINNER Saturday, June 21 Sierra Nevada Big Room

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SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

SUN FRESH INK ONE ACT FESTIVAL: Celebrate Shakespeare’s 450th birthday with four directors, 16 actors and four authors who were given a limited amount of time for each play that must include a Shakespearean quote, name and imagery. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 6/22. $10-$12. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

OTHER DESERT CITIES: Brooke Wyeth returns home to Palm Springs after a six year absence, stirring up tragic events in the family’s history with a memoir she’s writing. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 6/22. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Poetry/Literature POETRY READING: Poetry from a variety of local wordsmiths. Th, 6/19, 6:30pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

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FRI

Special Events FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Downtown Chico’s summer music series continues with Latin dance music from Los Caballitos de la Cancion. F, 6/20, 7-8:30pm. Chico City Plaza, Downtown Chico.

Art Receptions SAL CASA RETROSPECTIVE: A lifetime of art by Sal Casa, retired member of the Chico State University Art Department and a Signature Member of the American Watercolor Society. F, 6/20, 5-7pm. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

Theater FOREVER PLAID: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

FRESH INK ONE ACT FESTIVAL: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

OTHER DESERT CITIES: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

SHE LOVES ME: A nostalgic romantic comedy.

Directed by Jerry Miller. F, Sa, 7:30pm through 6/22. $15.50-$18.50. Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave., (530) 899-2692.

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Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

FOREVER PLAID: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

FRESH INK ONE ACT FESTIVAL: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

OTHER DESERT CITIES: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

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SAT

MON

Special Events

Music

DRAGOPOLIS: “The future of drag” show, hosted by Claudette de Versailles. All entertainers welcome to perform. Third Sa of every month, 10pm. $3. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

FARM TO TABLE DINNER: Enjoy food prepared by chef Michael Iles from local farms and the estate garden. Sa, 6/21, 7pm. $50. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 3452739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

GOLDEN SUN FESTIVAL: Roots and Wings hosts a sustainability-awareness and -action festival with community art for the sky project, a breakdancing competition and live music from Ira Walker and Kenny Roland Detroit. Sa, 6/21, 10am. $1 donation. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

PAPER BIRD: The Denver indie-folk/baroque-pop

band visits Chico. M, 6/23, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 3452739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

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WED

Poetry/Literature LOCAL AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Hannie Voyles

book signing and reading. W, 6/25, 7pm. Lyon Books, 135 Main St., (530) 891-3338, www.lyon books.com.

1078 GALLERY: Out of Class: Out of Casa, Selections of life drawings from the students of Sal Casa. Through 6/21. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.107 8gallery.org.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Carlos Loarca In Chico, the winner of Avenue 9 Gallery’s “Be Our Guest” competition Carlos Loarca showcases his large-scale, colorful paintings often drawing inspiration from Mayan and Guatemalan folklore. Through 7/19. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9 gallery.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: Sal Casa Retrospective, a showing of Art by Sal Casa, a retired member of the Chico State University Art Department and a Signature Member of the American Watercolor Society. 6/20-7/11. 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

CHICO PAPER CO.: The Totem Series, new works inspired from textiles, jewelry design, painting, and collage by artist Marilynn Jennings. California Rivers, Jake Early’s latest series. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: New Works, figu-

rative drawings from local artists. Ongoing. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

THE UPS STORE: New Works, etchings, engraving and collagraph prints from artist Michael Halldorsen. Through 6/30. 702 Mangrove Ave. #224.

THE WINCHESTER GOOSE: Meow Meow, A summer showcase featuring watercolors from local artist Sea Monster. Ongoing. 800 Broadway St., (530) 715-0099, www.thewin chestergoose.com.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: Broken

Color, oil paintings, prints and illustrations from artist Jon Shult. 6/19-7/20. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

ALL-MEDIA ART SHOW: The Chico Art Center hosts its annual national all-media juried art competition. See website for details. Ongoing. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

FLORALS AND FLOWERS: Artwork can be of any subject, but must contain at least one flower in the image. See website for more details. Ongoing. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

POSTER CONTEST: Submit drawings and designs for the upcoming season of show posters at Theatre on The Ridge. See website for more details. Ongoing. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Changing

California, journey through geological and ecological transformations in Northern California. Investigate invasive plant and animal life, transfer of disease, species adaptation and our modern ecosystem. Ongoing. $3-$6.Explore Evolution, investigate evolutionary principles in organisms ranging from smallest to the largest. Ongoing. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

PARADISE DEPOT MUSEUM: Paradise Depot

Museum Open House, a railroad and logging museum in Paradise. Ongoing, 7-9pm. 5570 Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 877-1919.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Into The Blue: Maritime Navigation and the Archeology of Shipwrecks, featuring artifacts recovered from the Frolic shipwreck and the story behind the ship’s history. TuSa through 7/24. Meriam Library Complex Chico State.

Call for Artists ALL-MEDIA CALL FOR ARTISTS: Submit artwork for the Chico Icons 2014 Exhibit: “Historic Heart and Arteries”. June 29 deadline. See website for more info. Through 6/29. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

MOVIES IN THE PARK: A summer movie in the

park. This week: Frozen. Begins 15 minutes after sunset. Sa, 6/21, 8:30pm. Bidwell Park: Group Picnic Area by Sycamore Field, (530) 343-1232.

Theater

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 28

FOREVER PLAID: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

FRESH INK ONE ACT FESTIVAL: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

FREE LISTINGS!

Theater

Art

HANNIE VOYLES BOOK SIGNING AND READING Wednesday, June 25 Lyon Books

SEE WEDNESDAY, POETRY/ LITERATURE

Summer cinema There are few better ways to enjoy a movie than on a blanket beneath the stars, a rare opportunity offered twice this year during the Chico Area Recreation and Park District’s Movies in the Park. This summer’s first installment is a showing of Frozen this Saturday, June 21, approximately EDITOR’S PICK 15 minutes after sundown. Movies are shown on an inflatable projector set up near Sycamore Field at Bidwell Park’s One-Mile Recreation Area. The event is family-friendly, and includes refreshments available for purchase.

June 19, 2014

CN&R

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IN THE MIX Turn Blue

Custom Furniture for your Custom Yard

The Black Keys Nonesuch Records The Black Keys are no longer the scruffy underdogs they once were, showing up late and all bleary eyed as they did to the garage-rock revival of the early 2000s. Back-to-back mega-smash albums—2010’s Brothers and 2011’s El Camino, chock-full of those snappy tunes your mother likes—transformed the duo into a stadium-stomping, festival-headlining machine churning out commercial spokesmusic for cars and vodka. So, what’s the logical next step? On Turn Blue, the Black Keys continue ransacking classic rock’s Library of Congress, but this time around, their reference material is less CCR and more Pink Floyd. The lead track, “Weight of Love,” clocks in at over seven minutes and, with its lush studio layering (courtesy of coproducer and longtime collaborator Danger Mouse) and several mournful, reverb-soaked guitar solos, is clearly intended to blow the minds of headphone-wearing stoners. Though frontman Dan Auerbach is distinctly noodlier on guitar than ever before, he’s still partial to succinct, whistleworthy tunes, like the synthesizer melody on the lead single, “Fever.” Overall, it’s a moodier and more psychedelic Black Keys album than we’re used to. That is, until the album’s final track, the cowboy-boot-stompin’ “Gotta Get Away,” which John Fogerty probably wants back.

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CN&R

June 19, 2014

THINK FREE.

—Howard Hardee

One Tap Quest www.shimage.net/one-tap-quest online game It’s the simple things in life, really. At first glance, this Web-based game from an unknown designer resembles Frogger: a lone hero needs to move toward the top of the screen through a variety of shifting dangers. However, unlike Frogger, once you set the 8-bit–inspired hero in motion, his unwavering linear movement is beyond your control. One tap—click of the mouse—to set your starting place and then you’re off on your quest. Along the way, the warrior will kill baddies, collect powerups, earn experience points and levels, or die at the hands of a more powerful enemy, causing the game to reset with randomized locations for the enemies and power-ups. If you do make it to the top of the screen, you battle the boss—no, you don’t get to click the mouse again—and, if successful, complete the game and receive your high score. A praiseworthy score is one over 20,000—an accomplishment that’s a combination of random power-up placement, a little skill, and a lot of luck. One Tap Quest is an addictive time suck that asks how far— and for how long—will we chase the high score?

GAME

—Matthew Craggs

Road Shows, Vol. 3 Sonny Rollins OKeh Records Tenor sax giant Theodore Walter (“Sonny”) Rollins’ third collection of his road-show gigs finds the octogenarian (he turns 84 in September) in performance at five global venues dating from 2001 to 2012. Rollins has long preferred clubs and concert halls as the sites for live recordings and the six tunes on this disc were recorded in concerts in France, Japan and the United States. Not only does recording “live” free him and his combo from, say, the time constraints of a studio setting, it also allows him a direct connection with the audience as the enthusiastic responses captured here reveal, especially at the end of his 20-minute solo and multichorus interaction with drummer Steve Jordan on “Why Was I Born?” Rollins loves the “old ones” and here revisits Noel Coward’s “Someday I’ll Find You,” a lovely 15-minute waltz from a 2006 French concert that features magnificent contributions from guitarist Bobby Broom and Rollins, whose “emotional surges” (to use liner-note writer Bob Blumenthal’s felicitous phrase) show the then-76-year-old saxophonist still in stunning form. Another stand-out track is the eight-minute “Solo Sunny,” from 2009, which is exactly what the title says, and allows Rollins the freedom to quote from a number of sources (e.g., “Tennessee Waltz,” “In the Mood”). Another very worthy addition to one’s Rollins collection. —Miles Jordan

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Kathryn Jackson (left) and Betty Burns in Shakespeare in Space. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

Fresh Ink follies Crazy humor carries the day at festival of one-acts

Ifour locally written one-act plays on the boards in the Blue Room Theatre downtown, a character, Brann Thou Art an Ass, Orlando, one of the

don, reads aloud a scathing newspaper review of a local production of Romeo and Juliet. His wife, Beatrice, who authored the by Robert review, looks on. Speer “Aren’t you being rather harsh?” he asks her. “I’m just being honest,” Review: she replies. “But they’re seventhFresh Ink: Festival graders!” he exclaims. “Details,” she of New Works says scornfully. shows ThursdayI can relate to that. The four plays Saturday, that comprise this year’s Fresh Ink, 7:30 p.m., through the Blue Room’s annual festival of June 21, at the Blue Room one-acts, aren’t high art, either as Tickets: $10-$12 plays or performances. (I’m just being honest.) But they’re delivered Blue Room with tremendous enthusiasm, a couTheatre ple of them are terrific fun, and the 139 W. First St. 895-3749 others are always interesting. For the festival, the playwrights www.blueroom theatre.com had to work within certain constraints. They had only about 15 minutes of stage time and little in the way of props (a barrel, a hobby horse, a table and some chairs) to add to the Blue Room’s black-box stage. In addition, this year they were required to include lines from Shakespeare in their plays to honor him on the 450th anniversary of his birth. The funniest play was Matt Brown’s Shakespeare in Space, a Star Trek send-up in which the spaceship “Life Transport Vessel D-5,” with its cargo of cultural relics from a long-abandoned Earth, is under assault from “Caligulan dagger worms” that penetrate through the anus and cause “scorching space insanity.” Among the characters are Dr. Butts (Betty Burns), a mad German ship’s doctor with a Hitlerian moustache; Capt. Dogberry (Kathryn Jackson), a garishly costumed figure who emerges from the barrel, and Patient Lavinia (John Loss), whom the dagger worms have turned into a man with a donkey’s head, greenery growing from his fingers and a celery stick for a penis. If you’re going over the top, might as well go all the way.

Hey, it’s laugh-out-loud funny—crazy costumes, an absurd premise, and actors who can pull it off. Burns is especially terrific, spitting out unds like bullets, and the rest of the cast keeps right up with her. Credit to director Stephanie Ditty for making it all work. Sean Proctor’s Asap, directed by Hugh Brashear, is also wildly comical, thanks to a scene-chewing performance by the fearless Samantha Perry as Miss Hamlet and a script that has something to do with a weapons-development scheme based on Shakespeare’s characters (there’s a gun that can turn people into donkeys, for example). There’s also a “tree man” (or, as Miss Hamlet calls him, a “manatree”) who pops up from the barrel. When the “manatree” is shot with the donkey gun, he becomes a “manadonkatree.” Trust me, it’s funny. Absurdism also rules in Tara Grover Smith’s Resolution (directed by Cal Reese), though with a kind of grim seriousness. The play is set in the offices of a corporation that is developing eyeglasses that increase tech workers’ productivity by recording their eye movements and eliminating those that are unnecessary. The only problem is that the glasses make the eyes bleed. There are a couple of robotic female employees named Titania and Viola (Jessica Sijan and Cat Campbell, respectively); a male employee named Mercutio (Brett Edwards), who’s writing a novel about corporate oppression; and a boss called Mr. Bottom (Trevor Allen). I’m still not sure how it all fits together, and it was rough around the edges at times, but it held my interest. (I’m just being honest.) Finally, there was Saralysette Ballard’s aforementioned Thou Art an Ass, Orlando, directed by Delisa Freistadt. This was the most literate of the four plays and also made the most sophisticated use of Shakespearean imagery and lines, but it didn’t stage well. The characters were intriguing (especially the crassly narcissistic Orlando, played by Garrett Miller), but on opening night they didn’t cohere physically. A good thing about a collection of short plays is that, if one doesn’t work, another will be along soon. All in all, there’s plenty to enjoy is this year’s Fresh Ω Ink festival. June 19, 2014

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CHOW BELLE

FRIDAY 6/20 – MONDAY 6/23 22 Jump Street (Digital) (R) 11:10AM 12:35PM 2:00PM 3:25PM 4:45PM 6:15PM 7:40PM 9:05PM 10:30PM edge Of tOmOrrOw (Digital) (PG-13) 11:20AM 2:05PM 4:55PM 7:35PM 10:20PM

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Call 343-0663 or visit www.PageantChico.com

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Local beer drinkers thirsty for Russian River brews as Chico’s taps run dry

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CN&R

June 19, 2014

The Santa Rosa brewery is well-known among beer aficionados for its sour ales, made with specialty types of yeast, and by its barrel-aged collection. Russian Alastair Bland River is also reputed for its IPAs, which have been hailed by loyal fanatics as the best in the world. For years, several hundred bottles of these acclaimed beers, plus a few kegs, arrived in Chico every month, where customers at the town’s better beer shops and bars guzzled up the supply within days of each shipment. But no longer, for Chico has been cut off. Russian River’s owner, Vinnie Cilurzo, says it’s a simple case of not enough beer to meet the demand. “Of course, we would love to be selling our beer in Chico, but we can’t sell what we don’t have,” he told the CN&R. In January, Russian River halted all distribution to Washington state for the same reason. Chico came shortly thereafter. Cilurzo says this was necessary in order to meet the on-site demand at the Russian River brewpub, where beer fans from around the world convene to taste the beer fresh from the taps, and where a shortage of the highly esteemed, almost legendary triple IPA Pliny the Younger might easily spark a riot. That particular beer is brewed in limited quantity every February, and hundreds of people line up early in the morning of the release day, all jockeying to have a glass of the coveted beer. Though Pliny the Younger was not distributed regularly to Chico (or anywhere else, for that matter), its slightly downsized counterpart, a double IPA almost equally acclaimed named Pliny the Elder, was. Now, Chico must do without. But life will go on, bitterly. In the realm of barley, hops and American craft brewers, there are literally thousands of IPAs to choose from. Many are available in local stores, and many, says Kevin Jaradah, owner of Spike’s Bottle Shop, are just as good as Pliny the Elder. Jaradah says he used to receive a

five-case shipment of Pliny the Elder every three months. The bottles would sell out in two days or less. “But there are lots of good, 100-point double IPAs out there,” Jaradah said. “They aren’t the same as Pliny, which has that fruit-forward, really juicy flavor, but they’re just as good. We have 1,200 beers, so there are plenty more options.” Jaradah recommends Hoptologist, a strong double IPA from Knee Deep Brewing Co. in Auburn, The Maharaja IPA from Avery Brewing Co. in Boulder, Colo., and Racer X and Apex, both IPAs from Russian River’s neighbor brewery Bear Republic. Another top-notch IPA, Jaradah says, is Stone Brewing Co.’s Enjoy By, a beer brewed monthly and sent into the market with the intention that it be consumed within 35 days. (Hop flavors can fade quickly in a beer, and for many IPAs, fresher is better.) Ryan Post, a Chico resident and a fan of Russian River beers, has twice made the February pilgrimage to Santa Rosa to drink Pliny the Younger. Unlike thousands of others, Post says he prefers Elder to the Younger. He says the double IPA possesses a rare crispness that some high-alcohol, heavily hopped beers do not. Yet, he says that there are other readily available IPAs that he enjoys as much as Pliny, including Hoptimum from Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. and Hop Stoopid from Lagunitas Brewing Co., in Petaluma. There seems to be no getting around the fact that there isn’t enough Pliny the Elder for everyone in the state to have a taste. Still, some locals feel Chico has been selectively shortchanged by Russian River’s pullout. At The Handle Bar, owner Brian Kanabrocki says he thinks Russian River should have first withdrawn its beer from regions farther away than Northern California. “We’re confused why Russian River will send beer to Denver, Portland and Philadelphia but not here,” he said. “Those people are not likely to ever go to the brewpub, whereas people here are. Yet they pulled out of Chico. It doesn’t make sense. If they don’t supply the people here, they’ll eventually lose that customer base.” Ω


Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Meredith J. Graham, Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Jersey Boys

Ready to jump Action and comedy drive this sequel

H Johnny Depp as undercover Officer Tom Hanson on TV, I was a bit aving grown up watching

uncomfortable with the idea of remaking 21 Jump Street as a movie. Turns out I had no reason by Meredith J. to worry, because the films really are not Graham remakes of the show at all. meredithg@ newsreview.com Instead, they could be considered homages— nods to the narc-cop genre wrapped in ridiculous, sometimes silly humor. Take, for instance, the show’s somewhat absurd 22 Jump premise of cops in their Street mid-20s infiltrating high Starring schools week after week Channing Tatum, impersonating teenagers. Jonah Hill and Their shop is a converted Ice Cube. Directed by Phil church, their budget is Lord and next to nada … you get Christopher the picture. There’s a lot Miller. Cinemark to poke fun at here, and 14, Feather River while fans of the show Cinemas and Paradise Cinema might get more of the ref7. Rated R erences, the beauty of these films is that “getting it” is really just a bonus, a very small part of the fun. For this second installment, Channing Tatum Poor and Jonah Hill return as Officers Jenko and Schmidt, respectively. The Fair film—called 22 Jump Street because of an actual address change—starts Good off, appropriately enough, with a recap of the first film, then launches into the new plot. Ice Cube is Very Good back as Capt. Dickson, angry as ever about, well, everything. He explains to Excellent his star officers that

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instead of high school, this time their assignment is to infiltrate a college campus, where they are to locate a drug dealer whose product has been linked to a student’s death. As college freshmen, Jenko and Schmidt reprise their roles as jock and nerd, frat boy and intellectual (sort of). Jenko joins the football team and Schmidt tries his hand at slam poetry. In the process, they both make connections—one a “bromance,” the other an actual romance—that threaten to fracture their friendship. This leads to my only real complaint about the film: the homo-erotic hints are way overdone. The first few jokes are funny—sure, a friendship can be like a relationship—but by the fourth, fifth or sixth time Hill looks at Tatum with doe eyes and kicks his feet at the dirt like an abandoned puppy, I wanted to reach out and slap them, then remind them to get back to the action. Speaking of action, there is plenty of it here, from football games to car chases to a particularly hilarious scene in which the pair try to stealthily break into a frat house to install surveillance equipment while high on the drugs whose source they’re trying to find. Throughout the film, Ice Cube shows up to make thinly veiled references to the fact that this is a sequel and a remake. He plays pretty prominently in one of the storylines, too, adding his special brand of humor to the mix. The other notable addition to the cast is Jillian Bell (Workaholics), whose quiet introduction into scenes (“How long have you been sitting there?”) is second in hilarity only to her deadpan delivery, mostly of age jokes. Plain and simple, 22 Jump Street is a lot of fun. With the exception of a few short detours, the plot stays on point, the action keeps it moving, and the comedy keeps everyone laughing. Ω

Based on a Tony-winning Broadway musical, Jersey Boys chronicles the meteoric rise of real-life 1960s pop-rock vocal group the Four Seasons. John Lloyd Young plays bandleader Frankie Valli, Christopher Walken takes a turn as mobster Gyp DeCarlo and the film is directed by Clint Eastwood, who’s previously tackled biopics on J. Edgar Hoover (J. Edgar) and Charlie Parker (Bird). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R

The Rover

Part crime drama and part dystopian science fiction, The Rover is an Australian film directed by up-andcomer from Down Under David Michod. In the movie, a pair of men—one bent on revenge, the other a naïve tagalong—navigate a ruthless Australian outback populated by refugees from around the world, 10 years after the global economy has collapsed. Cinemark 14. Rated R

Think Like a Man Too

All of the primary players have reprised their roles in this follow-up to the 2012 film based on Steve Harvey’s book Act Like a Man, Think Like a Lady. This time around, the four central couples’ relationships are challenged by the chaos and temptations of a Las Vegas wedding weekend. Comedian Kevin Hart leads an ensemble cast in this comedy. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13

Words and Pictures

Has-been writer turned drinker Jack Marcus (Clive Owen) and plucky abstract painter Dina Delsanto (Juliette Binoche)—both working at a prep school— draft their students into a romance-tinged rivalry over what is more important, words or pictures, in this witty romantic drama. Pageant Theatre. Rated R

Now playing

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22 Jump Street

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —M.J.G.

Belle

A dramatic re-creation based on the life of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the mixed-race daughter of a mid-18th century British naval officer and an African slave, who was raised in an upper-class household by her great uncle, a British aristocrat. Pageant Theatre, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Edge of Tomorrow

Doug Liman (The Bourne Identity, Mr. & Mrs. Smith) directs this Americanized adaptation of the 2004 Japanese teen sci-fi novel, All You Need Is Kill, with Tom Cruise starring as a man caught in a time loop and replaying battles with an alien race with the help of a warrior (Emily Blunt) from the future. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

The Fault in Our Stars

A film version of John Green’s best-selling love story about a 16-year-old cancer patient named Hazel (played by Shailene Woodley) who meets 17-year-old amputee Gus (Ansel Elgort) in a support group. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

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Godzilla

There is no story in director Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla to confuse the viewer, just an hour of his screenwriter working out abandonment issues followed by Edwards turning over the helm to the com-

puter jockeys for the battle royale between Big G and some intruder monsters. The first hour of this film is almost entirely disposable, interminable stretches of human drama, none of it really applicable to the second half of the movie. There is some wonderful imagery to be found, brief flashes of brilliance that make one wish the director had worked with $50 million instead of $160 million so that he would’ve been allowed some narrative risks. If you’re looking for a matinee of city smashing, Godzilla ends up delivering the goods after the first hour. Sort of. The mayhem is set at night and there’s lots of dust flying, so I’d recommend not doing the 3-D. And Edwards has an annoying habit of cutting away from the action when things are finally getting good, either to evening news footage of the monsters going at it or, even worse, more family drama. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

How to Train Your Dragon 2

In the second installment of what is planned to be a three-part franchise based on Cressida Crowell’s series of children’s books, the young Viking Hiccup and his dragon, Toothless, are faced with trying to keep the peace in a conflict between humans and dragons. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Maleficent

Special-effects master Robert Stromberg (Oscars for Avatar and Alice in Wonderland) makes his directorial debut in this reworking of the Sleeping Beauty story from the vantage point of the “evil” fairy Maleficent (played by Angelina Jolie). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

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A Million Ways to Die in the West

All told, writer/director/star Seth MacFarlane’s satire is a blandly conventional western, albeit one wrapped around a crudely rambunctious comic fantasy decorously splattered with sophomoric scatology. The story, such as it is, has a somewhat mopey sheepherder named Albert Stark (MacFarlane) incurring the wrath of a murderous cattle rustler named Clinch Leatherwood (Liam Neeson). Plus, Albert’s wispy girlfriend (Amanda Seyfried) dumps him and turns her attentions to a mustachioed merchant and fop named Foy (Neil Patrick Harris). Albert’s ferociously stolid parents communicate exclusively through foul language and explosive farts. The poor guy’s only friends in town are nerdy Edward (Giovanni Ribisi) and his rowdy fiancée (Sarah Silverman), a very energetic prostitute named Ruth who won’t sleep with him until after they are married. The difference-makers for Albert’s dilemmas are found elsewhere—Leatherwood’s cheerfully disillusioned wife (Charlize Theron) and an amiable and slightly stoned Native American (Wes Studi). But it’s Theron who really stands out. She’s playing a fantasy character who knows she’s obliged to live up (or at least play up) to the fantasies of characters around her. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

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X-Men: Days of Future Past

A big contributor to the awesomeness of the latest installment in the franchise is the return of Bryan Singer to the director’s chair. Singer piloted the first two X-Men films, and he has a nice command of the characters in their old and younger incarnations. The film starts in the future, where the likes of Professor X (Patrick Stewart), Magneto (Ian McKellen) and Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) have been reduced to hiding out in a dark, apocalyptic world where their enemy is a vicious robotic mutant-hunting force called the Sentinels. With help of the powers of Kitty Pryde (Ellen Page), Wolverine travels back in time to the early 1970s, before the Sentinels have gone into production, and before shape-shifting Raven/Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) commits a murder that will ultimately bring about the doom of the future. Most of the action takes place in the past, so the younger X-Men: First Class actors get most of the screen time. That means more of the terrific Michael Fassbender’s take on Magneto, and James McAvoy stealing the show as young Xavier/Professor X. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

June 19, 2014

CN&R 27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 6/19—WEDNESDAY 6/25 JOHN CRAIGIE: folk singer, songwriter

THE VESUVIANS, ALIEN HELLBOP, JUDSON CLAIBORN, ADAM SCARBOROUGH Saturday, June 21 Cafe Coda SEE SATURDAY

and storyteller comes to Chico. Local dreamboat Jack Knight opens. Th, 6/19, 8pm. $10. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway; (530) 343-1973; www.1078gallery.org.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to share your music, poetry, comedy, or other talents in a 10-minute slot. First and Third Th of every month, 7pm. $1. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise; (530) 873-1370.

20FRIDAY BASSMINT: A (mostly) weekly electronic

19THURSDAY AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music round-robin. Third and First Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse

Saloon, 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

BEER RELEASE PARTY: Brewmaster Roland Allen partnered with Morse Mandarin Farms in Oroville to create the Emperor’s Mandarin Wheat Beer. Th, 6/19, 6pm. Feather Falls Casino

Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main

dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St.; (530) 895-3888.

$22.50. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

JEFF PERSHING BAND: A local funk/jam

band. Th, 6/19. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891; www.lasallesbar.com.

Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.; (530) 343-4915.

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday-night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the

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CN&R

June 19, 2014

’60S SUMMER OF FUN: Dance to music of the ’60s on the first day of summer. Sa, 6/21, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.feather fallscasino.com/brewing-co.

and dance the night away. Sa, 8pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891; www.lasallesbar.com.

Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Rd. in Paradise; (530) 872-8454; www.starbrightshows.com.

HAPPY HOUR: Madhouse BBQ and live

music from Retrotones. Sa, 6/21. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891; www.lasallesbar.com.

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“Exquisite corpse” is one of those phrases most people have heard, but likely can’t define. It turns out it’s a method used by surrealist artists to reassemble familiar images (i.e. body parts) into something strange yet familiar, similar to those three-part kid’s flipbooks where you can mix-and-match heads, legs and torsos. The name fits Sacramento “chamber rock” group Exquisite Corps— composed of a rock-rhythm section (drums and bass), singing acoustic guitarist and three-part string section— perfectly. The band comes to the Maltese Bar & Tap Room on Friday, June 20, with Nevada City’s The Soft Bombs and locals Lush Baby.

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Goblin and friends. F, 6/20. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891; www.lasallesbar.com.

MIX AND MATCH

tribute to CCR visits the Ridge. Sa,

jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 5669476; www.cafecoda.com.

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6/21, 8pm. $20-$28. Paradise

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning

Natural Wellness

REBEL SOUL: A southern-rock tribute

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DAVE AND PHIL ALVIN: Th, 6/19, 7:30pm.

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22

24TUESDAY BURIED AT BIRTH: San Jose hardcore. Tu,

’60S SUMMER OF FUN Saturday, June 21 Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. SEE SATURDAY

6/24, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 3457672.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. Tu, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with key-

23MONDAY LOLLIPOP RECORDS REVIEW:

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd.; (530) 7102020.

OFF THE RECORD: A mix of dance rock covers from the 1980s through today. Sa, 6/21, 9pm-1am. $3. Studio Inn Cocktail Lounge, 2582 Esplanade; (530) 343-0662; www.otrrock.com.

Sa, 6/21, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

22SUNDAY

Psych/garage music from LA record label, with performances by Mystic Braves, Burning Palms, Corners and The Electric Magpie. M, 6/23, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave.; (530) 343-4915.

PAPER BIRD: Denver indie-folk/baroquepop band. M, 6/23, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierra nevada.com/bigroom.

KARAOKE AT LASALLES: Karaoke every Sunday night. Su, 9pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891; www.lasallesbar.com.

THE VESUVIANS: Local rock trio is joined

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by the duo Alien Hellbop, plus roots/rock from Judson Claiborn and Adam Scarborough of Shadow Limb.

boardist Shigemi Minetaka and rotating accompaniment. Tu, 6:308:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade; (530) 343-2056; www.farm starpizza.com.

SIBLING HARMONY

Brothers Dave and Phil Alvin have been playing music together since the late ’70s, when their former band The Blasters helped to unite punk and roots rock with classic songs like “Marie Marie” and “Dark Night.” Dave also did turns in X and its twangier alter-ego incarnation, The Knitters, and both brothers have maintained successful solo careers. Currently touring together, the duo play the Sierra Nevada Big Room tonight (Thursday, June 19).

25WEDNESDAY LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues,

country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more. W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St.

OPEN MIC NIGHT: Open to all performance types. 10 minute blocks each. Sign up 15 minutes before show. W, 6/25, 7pm. Naked Lounge Tea and Coffeehouse, 118 W. Second St.; (530) 895-0676.

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CN&R

29


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

CN&R Is LookINg FoR AN AdveRtIsINg CoNsuLtANt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. The CN&R is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. If you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful Ad Consultant. You must be self-motivated, ambitious and an independent person who wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business.

FoR moRe INFoRmAtIoN, vIsIt www.NewsRevIew.Com/ChICo/jobs equAl OppORTuNITY emplOYeR

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CN&R

June 19, 2014

Brian Corbit, advertising consultant

THE BIG STUFF It’s no secret that, when choosing how to spend the 600-or-so words that Arts DEVO is allotted in this column, I often lean toward the little guys. Part of the reason is because I like to focus on local goings-on and staying connected to Chico’s arts, music, craftbeer and puppy-dog communities. But it’s also because this is my personal column, and as such I am free to talk about all the offbeat, experimental, freaky, noisy, puerile, boneheaded and smelly art, artists and music that I’m kinky for. With a few nostalgic exceptions, I prefer new experiences (however bad) over repeat engagements (however good). But these particular leanings don’t preclude me from recognizing the skills and hard work of the nice people bringing the big shit to town—events that bring out the crowds and make Chico the brightest spot on the Nor Cal cultural map. Without Justin Maximov and his J-Max Productions at the Senator and El Rey theaters, the Sierra Nevada Big Room and its longtime curator, Bob Littell, and especially Chico State’s public-performance arm, Chico Performances, and its passionate staff, Chico wouldn’t see nearly as much art from the world outside of Butte County. And the quality of the art these three bring is pretty incredible, and there is much worth giving a shout out to—e.g., upcoming visits from acoustic/folk greats the Kruger Brothers and the gypsy freak parade of March Fourth Marching Band (at the Big Room Atmosphere July 9 and 18, respectively), and Rhymesayers collective instigators Atmosphere at the Senator Theatre Sept. 9. Also, Chico Performances just announced its 2014-15 schedule. Admittedly, the sound of the whistling voice of Garrison Keillor (appearing at Laxson Auditorium Feb. 2, 2015) is, for me, like having rusty nails being dragged across the chalkboard of my soul (though I strongly suspect that there will be a capacity crowd on hand that will vehemently disagree with my moot opinion). But there are, as usual, several selections that I am looking forward to with great anticipation. The month of October, in particular, is packed! And the first show of that month—New York-based acoustic trio The Lone Bellow (Oct. 2)—is the one I’m most looking forward to in Stephen Cummins’ first full season of booking since taking over as director of University Public Events. Go now to www.thelone bellow.com and watch the live, one-shot, black-and-white video for “Two Sides of Lonely,” which starts with frontman The Lone Bellow Zach Williams singing to the cold, quiet air of a snowy wilderness, before being joined on the trail by his bandmates singing along and playing guitar. The trio then enter an old country church where a piano player adds a few quiet chords and the three passionately sing so loud that veins in their foreheads pop out. Just try and shake off the goose bumps. The rest of October is ridiculously packed with the likes of Rosanne Cash (Oct. 4), Branford Marsalis and the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia (Oct. 9), foot-stompin’ NYC jazz band The Hot Sardines (Oct. 19), and the insane Swiss mime/puppet/mask troupe Mummenschanz (Oct. 28). Highlights for the rest of the season include: Whose Live Anyway? improv-comedy troupe (Nov. 13); Allen Toussaint & the Preservation Hall Jazz Band (Nov. 21); Mavis Staples (Jan. 16); The Hot Club of San Francisco (Jan. 31); Zap Mama & Antibalas (Feb. 18); the radio play/audio-visual theatrical live-action graphic-novel presentation The Intergalactic Nemesis (March 7); and legendary bluesman Buddy Guy (April 7). Series tickets are available now, and individual show tickets will go sale starting Aug. 4. Visit www.chicoperformances.com for info.


FOR THE WEEK OF JUNE 19, 2014 ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you were

alive 150 years ago and needed to get a tooth extracted, you might have called on a barber or blacksmith or wigmaker to do the job. (Dentistry didn’t become a formal occupation until the latter part of the 19th century.) Today, you wouldn’t dream of seeking anyone but a specialist to attend to the health of your mouth. But I’m wondering if you are being less particular about certain other matters concerning your welfare. Have you been seeking financial advice from your massage therapist? Spiritual counsel from your car-repair person? Nutritional guidance from a fast-food addict? I suggest you avoid such behavior. It’s time to ask for specific help from those who can actually provide it.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “My

music is best understood by children and animals,” said composer Igor Stravinsky. A similar statement could be made about you Tauruses in the coming weeks: You will be best understood by children and animals—and by all others who have a capacity for dynamic innocence and a buoyant curiosity rooted in emotional intelligence. In fact, those are the types I advise you to surround yourself with. For now, it’s best to avoid sophisticates who overthink everything and know-it-all cynics whose default mode is criticism. Take control of what influences you absorb. You need to be in the presence of those who help activate your vitality and enthusiasm.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

“Nikhedonia” is an obscure English word that refers to the pleasure that comes from anticipating success or good fortune. There’s nothing wrong with indulging in this emotion as long as it doesn’t interfere with you actually doing the work that will lead to success or good fortune. But the problem is, nikhedonia makes some people lazy. Having experienced the thrill of imagining their victory, they find it hard to buckle down and slog through the gritty details necessary to manifest their victory. Don’t be like that. Enjoy your nikhedonia, then go and complete the accomplishment that will bring a second, even stronger wave of gratification.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Boston’s

Museum of Fine Arts has a collection of Japanese art that is never on display. It consists of 6,600 wood-block prints created by artists of the ukiyo-e school, also known as “pictures of the floating world.” Some are more than 300 years old. They are tucked away in drawers and hidden from the light, ensuring that their vibrant colors won’t fade. So they are wellpreserved but rarely seen by anyone. Is there anything about you that resembles these pictures of the floating world, Cancerian? Do you keep parts of you secret, protecting them from what might happen if you show them to the world? It may be time to revise that policy. (Thanks to Molly Oldfield’s The Secret Museum for the info referred to here.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the next two

weeks, I hope you don’t fall prey to the craze that has been sweeping Japan. More than 40,000 people have bought books that feature the photos of hamuketsu, or hamster bottoms. Even if you do manage to avoid being consumed by that particular madness, I’m afraid you might get caught up in trifles and distractions that are equally irrelevant to your long-term dreams. Here’s what I suggest: To counteract any tendency you might have to neglect what’s truly important, vow to focus intensely on what’s truly important.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Writing

at Fast Company, Himanshu Saxena suggests that businesses create a new position: chief paradox officer, or CPXO. This person would be responsible for making good use of the conflicts and contradictions that normally arise, treating them as opportunities for growth rather than as distractions. From my astrological perspective, you Virgos are currently prime candidates to serve in this capacity. You will continue to have special powers to do this type of work for months to come.

BY ROB BREzSNY LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accor-

dance with the astrological omens, you are hereby granted a brief, one-timeonly license to commit the Seven Deadly Sins. You heard me correctly, Libra. As long as you don’t go to extremes, feel free to express healthy amounts of pride, greed, laziness, gluttony, anger, envy and lust. At least for now, there will be relatively little hell to pay for these indulgences. Just one caveat: If I were you, I wouldn’t invest a lot of energy in anger and envy. Technically, they are permitted, but they aren’t really much fun. On the other hand, greed, gluttony and lust could be quite pleasurable, especially if you don’t take yourself too seriously. Pride and laziness may also be enjoyable in moderate, artful amounts.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio

novelist Kurt Vonnegut rebelled against literary traditions. His stories were often hybrids of science fiction and autobiography. Free-form philosophizing blended with satirical moral commentary. He could be cynical yet playful, and he told a lot of jokes. “I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over,” he testified. “Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can’t see from the center.” He’s your role model for the next four weeks, Scorpio. Your challenge will be to wander as far as you can into the frontier without getting hopelessly lost.

Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Pet mice that are kept in cages need to move more than their enclosed space allows, so their owners often provide them with exercise wheels. If the rodents want to exert their natural instinct to run around, they’ve got to do it on this device. But here’s a curious twist: A team of Dutch researchers has discovered that wild mice also enjoy using exercise wheels. The creatures have all the room to roam they need, but when they come upon the wheels in the middle of the forest, they hop on and go for prolonged spins. I suggest you avoid behavior like that, Capricorn. Sometime soon you will find yourself rambling through more spacious places. When that happens, don’t act like you do when your freedom is more limited.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s

transition time. We will soon see how skilled you are at following through. The innovations you have launched in recent weeks need to be fleshed out. The creativity you unleashed must get the full backing of your practical action. You will be asked to make good on the promises you made or even implied. I want to urge you not to get your feelings hurt if some pruning and editing are required. In fact, I suggest you relish the opportunity to translate fuzzy ideals into tidy structures. Practicing the art of ingenious limitation will make everything better.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s always important for you to shield yourself against our culture’s superficial and sexist ideas about sex. It’s always important for you to cultivate your own unique and soulful understandings about sex. But right now this is even more crucial than usual. You are headed into a phase when you will have the potential to clarify and deepen your relationship with eros. In ways you have not previously imagined, you can learn to harness your libido to serve both your spiritual aspirations and your quest for greater intimacy.

Go to www.RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Make a name for the dark parts of you,” writes Lisa Marie Basile in her poem “Paz.” I think that’s good advice for you, Sagittarius. The imminent future will be an excellent time to fully acknowledge the shadowy aspects of your nature. More than that, it will be a perfect moment to converse with them, get to know them better, and identify their redeeming features. I suspect you will find that just because they are dark doesn’t mean they are bad or shameful. If you approach them with love and tenderness, they may even reveal their secret genius.

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$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org 269-591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Drummer Seeking Musicians To start a band. Grateful Dead, 60s & 70s rock & roll. Call Bob 530-332-0067

For Rent A 2 Bed Newly decorated cottege located @ 336 Park St Gridly CA Large Yard water & Sewer Paid. Call 925-978-9597 Roommate and Companion Wanted to share my awesome new house. female pref.New custom home in the tranquil forest w/ an awesome view. Migalia. Master BD, pvt bath. Must be honest, financially secure & have a license & vehicle. $600/mo SUPER DEAL. 530-327-7923 Lee ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Great House Near Campus 4BD/2BA, garage, huge backyard, dogs OK. $1650/M. 424 W. 4th Ave Chico Call 530-570-2464

Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Top dollar pay. 916-966-1900 Starting working band Looking for Paradise musicians. Call Dave at (530)877-2797

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A AND M ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES at 1074 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. MASON AXEL MCKELLIPS 24 El Cerrito Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MASON MCKELLIPS Dated: May 15, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000739 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JOLLY FOLLY ENTERTAINMENT, THE JEWELER’S DAUGHTER at 6256 Pebble Lane Paradise, CA 95969. LEE R GREEN 6256 Pebble Lane Paradise, CA 95969 DEENA MAULDIN 6256 Pebble Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: LEE R. GREEN Dated: April 25, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000655 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO at 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CYNTHIA CROSS, PRESIDENT Dated: May 5, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000680 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FORCELLA ITALIAN BISTRO at 1600 Mangrove Ave #175 Chico, CA 95926. AARON ANTHONY JOHNSON 26 Porchlight Ct Chico, CA 95973 JONATHAN ELLIS MEYER 23 Highland Cir Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JON MEYER Dated: May 20, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000766 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as VOODOO TATTOO at 1751 Oro Dam Blvd E Suite 12 Oroville, CA 95966. STEVEN C VANDERVORT 24 Ardeth Ct Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEVE VANDERVORT Dated: May 22, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000772 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MINERS ALLEY BREWING COMPANY at 2053 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. PARKERVORT FARMS INC 2053 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CONSTANCE PARKS, CFO Dated: May 22, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000774 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAIDA VALE’S BAKE SALE at 481 1/2 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. AMBER L HUNTINGTON 481 1/2 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMBER HUNTINGTON Dated: May 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000788 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SD MOTOR HOUSE at 2961 Hwy 32 Suite 117 Chico, CA 95973. SINCLAIR MACGREGOR 352 Panama Ave Chico, CA 95979. DAVID POLSON 3008 California Park Drive Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DAVID POLSON Dated: May 27, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000783 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TONG FONG LOW at 2072 E 20th Street Ste 100 Chico, CA 95928. TONG FONG LOW CORP 2051 Robinson St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRIAN WONG, PRESIDENT Dated: May 9, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000711 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TONG FONG LOW at 2051 Robinson Street Oroville, CA 95965. TONG FONG LOW CORP 2051 Robinson Street Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRIAN WONG, PRESIDENT Dated: May 9, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000712 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CENTERLINE CONSTRUCTION at 1471 Mountain View Ave Chico, CA 95926. PAUL ALLEN FULLER 1471 Mountain View Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PAUL ALLEN FULLER

classifieds

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  CN&R   CN&R

June 19, 2014 June 19, 2014

ATTENTION SN&R Design Dept: Can you please add the horizontal rule at top, full width of page. And, a vertical rule that separates ASTROLOGY from CLASSIFIEDS?

31 31


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as UNDERDOG AROMATHERAPY, UNDERDOG VAPORIZERS at 6226 B Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. AMANDA BRIMM 4698 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. DAVID BRIMM 4698 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DAVID BRIMM Dated: May 22, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000775 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FRONTRUNNER CAMPAIGN FINANCE at 2752 Rafael St Chico, CA 95973. MICHAEL PRICE 2752 Rafael St Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL PRICE Dated: May 7, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000698 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE MAD BATTER CAKE CO. at 110 Oakvale Ct Oroville, CA 95966. KASEY BOONE 110 Oakvale Ct Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KASEY J BOONE Dated: May 23, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000781 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BURNER GAURD at 2902 Neal Road Paradise, CA 95969. DAVID G HOPPER 2902 Neal Raod Paradise, CA 95969. ANGELO LUCIDO 101 Rose Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DAVID G. HOPPER Dated: June 2, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000796 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as POR QUE at 1751 Forty Niner Ct Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT FERNANDEZ 1608 Broadway St Chico, CA 95928. CHARLIE LANDRETH 1751 Forty Niner Ct Chico, CA 95926. BRENTON LEE 1751 Forty Niner Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BRENTON RICHARD LEE Dated: May 7, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000702 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PEIRANO FAMILY BISCOTTI at 56 Hope Lane Oroville, CA

this Legal Notice continues

32 CN&R June 19, 2014

95966. JANICE M WHITE 56 Hope Lane Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANICE M. WHITE Dated: May 29, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000792 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DAVE’S TILE CITY at 2501 South Whitman Place Chico, CA 95928. DAVID GRESHAM 2694 Foothill Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. ERIN GRESHAM 2694 Foothill Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DAVID W. GRESHAM Dated: June 6, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000819 Published:June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICOBI’S at 1345 Marian Ave Chico, CA 95928. OBIDIAH GAGNE 1345 Marian Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: OBIDIAH GAGNE Dated: June 10, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000827 Published: June 19,26, July 3,10, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as D AND L’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURES at 838 Morninghome Ct Chico, CA 95926. DAVID RUSSELL PHELPS 838 Morninghome Ct Chico, CA 95926. LINDA KARIN PHELPS 838 Morninghome Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: DAVID RUSSELL PHELPS Dated: May 19, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000760 Published: June 19,26, July 3,10, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PREMIERE PRIMARY CARE at 888 Lakeside Village Commons Chico, CA 95926. CHICO IMMEDIATE CARE MEDICAL CENTER INC 376 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. Signed: BRAD SMITH, M.D., OWNER/CEO Dated: June 4, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000814 Published: June 19,26, July 3,10, 2014

NOTICES CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): JENNIFER D. EVANS and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): J.M. JR. born on (date): August 10, 2010 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): OROVILLE HOSPITAL OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: August 5, 2014 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at:

this Legal Notice continues

Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to presentevidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminated your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 6, 2014 Case Number: J-36827 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): JENNIFER D. EVANS and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): J.M. born on (date): December 13, 2012 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): OROVILLE HOSPITAL OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: August 5, 2014 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attor-­ ney for you. If the court terminated your pa-­ rental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 6, 2014 Case Number: J-36826 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due. The following units contain misc items, boxes, etc Unit 076CC: MICHAEL ARCHULETA (5x15) Unit 446CC: Therese Ward (5x5) Unit 453CC: Dorothy Kempe (5x15) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: June 21, 2014 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: 65 Heritage Lane Chico, CA 95926. Published: June 12,19, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner AILEONNA DRAGON WELLS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as

this Legal Notice continues

follows: Present name: ALEXIS ERICA LEE SUTZ CONNOR NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER ALI SUTZ Proposed name: ALEXIS AURORA DRAGON CONNOR NICHOLAS DRAGON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 16, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 13, 2014 Case Number: 162165 Published: June 5,12,19,26, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PENELOPE HASHERTON BENITEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name as follows: Present name: PENELOPE HASHERTON BENITEZ Proposed name: JAY ROBERT BENITEZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition should not be granted NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 16, 2014 Time: 8:30 A.M. Dept.: TBA The address of the court is: 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 30, 2014 Case Number: 162266 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KIMBERLY KAY ELDRIDGE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KIMBERLY KAY ELDRIDGE Proposed name: KIMBERLY KAY MUEGGENBURG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 23, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: May 30, 2014 Case Number: 162271 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KATHLEEN V STARR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CIERRA NOEL CURTIS Proposed name: CIERRA NOEL STARR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 23, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 30, 2014 Case Number: 162258 Published: June 12,19,26, July 3, 2014

NEED ATTENTION?

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTOPHER CARAWAY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAKOTA STORME HEER Proposed name: DAKOTA STORME CARAWAY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 30, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: June 9, 2014 Case Number: 162366 Published: June 19,26, July 3,10, 2014

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LOVE’S REAL ESTATE Why You Might Sell You can: The real estate market is a seller’s market right now. Houses for sale are in short supply, and buyers for houses are abundant. Sellers haven’t had it this good in years. You can be a buyer, too: The competition among buyers is tough, but it’s worth getting in shape and joining the race. Interest rates are lower than your grandparents could get, and house prices haven’t shot through the roof. A low interest rate means a quicker pay-down on your loan.

Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

You can go short: Short sales are getting easier. If your house is worth less than you owe, and you’re suffering a hardship, you can likely get your house sold and walk away with the loan debt forgiven. Short sale horror stories still abound—delays, false approvals, noncommunication—but nothing like the previous. Foreclosures are friendly to you: Banks have become better sellers of their foreclosures. Vacant, run-down, beat-up houses that sell for cheap and kill neighborhood values are fewer and farther between now. The foreclosed houses look more like normal properties than derelicts, and they sell at normal values. Banks are also negotiating offers more like normal sellers, paying for

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

repairs required by buyers’ lenders, so fewer sales die mid-stream. Maybe you won’t: This might not be your time. You might be one of the people who owe more on their home than it’s worth, but still have a job, are making payments, and plan on hanging in there. Or you might be perfectly happy in your own Shangri-la without the slightest notion of selling. Or you might be gazing into your crystal ball, waiting for the time when you can sell and make a killing. Don’t wait too long, crystal ball-gazer. If you sell high, you buy high. The dollars you make from your sale go further for you in your next buy when interest rates are as low as they are now. Then again, maybe you will: You’ll know when it’s your time to sell. When you find yourself looking at real estate ads, and maybe cruising open houses, it’s probably time to call your realtor for a market analysis. Crunch a few numbers. See if it makes sense. Look into that crystal ball.

Got a question or comment? I’d like to hear from you. Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530-680-0817. Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon.

DOUG LOVE is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530.680.0817

www.chico.newsreview.com

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Homes Sold Last Week SQ. FT.

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ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2 Hill Oak Commons

Chico

$599,000.00

3/ 3

3381

573 E 4th St

Chico

$330,000.00

3/ 2

SQ. FT. 1572

81 Chico Canyon Rd

Chico

$512,000.00

5/ 3.5

3376

162 Via Mission Dr

Chico

$329,000.00

3/ 2

1879

124 Estates Dr

Chico

$425,000.00

4/ 4

3906

1001 Salem St

Chico

$310,000.00

2/ 1

1008

83 Veneto Cir

Chico

$379,500.00

3/ 2.5

2131

4 Arbor Dr

Chico

$305,000.00

3/ 2.5

2018

316 W 4th Ave

Chico

$370,000.00

2/ 2

3736

1620 N Cherry St

Chico

$290,000.00

3/ 2

1632

276 E 2nd Ave

Chico

$368,000.00

2/ 1

1612

4 Goldeneye Ct

Chico

$285,000.00

3/ 2

1647

1876 Humboldt Rd

Chico

$360,000.00

2/ 1

3290

1992 Modoc Dr

Chico

$282,000.00

3/ 2

1701

500 W 6th Ave

Chico

$356,000.00

5/ 2

3064

1311 Yosemite Dr

Chico

$278,000.00

3/ 2

1596

1191 E Lindo Ave

Chico

$349,000.00

3/ 2

2131

359 E 6th Ave

Chico

$275,000.00

3/ 2

1960

1476 Saratoga Dr

Chico

$345,000.00

3/ 2

1869

35 Sunbury Rd

Chico

$265,000.00

4/ 2.5

1611

825 Coit Tower Way

Chico

$330,000.00

4/ 3

1906

767 Portal Dr

Chico

$263,000.00

3/ 2

1565

June 19, 2014

CN&R 33


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of June 2, 2014 – June 6, 2014. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1136 Wendy Way

Chico

$256,000.00

3/ 2

1131

6045 Kanaka Ave

Oroville

$260,000.00

3/ 2.5

2167

1061 Warner St

Chico

$249,000.00

4/ 2

1246

35 Service St

Oroville

$186,000.00

4/ 2.5

2078

3075 Whistler Way

Chico

$244,000.00

3/ 2

1358

31 Buehler Ave

Oroville

$145,000.00

2/ 2

1291

133 Macdonald Ave

Chico

$235,000.00

3/ 2

1653

19 Las Plumas Way

Oroville

$145,000.00

4/ 2

1508

1737 Arbutus Ave

Chico

$220,000.00

2/ 1

1330

41 Cobalto Ct

Oroville

$140,000.00

4/ 2.5

2209

334 W Sacramento Ave

Chico

$210,000.00

2/ 1

1140

5074 Country Club Dr

Paradise

$389,000.00

3/ 3

2260

149 W 20th St

Chico

$203,500.00

3/ 2

1232

5517 Cumorah Ln

Paradise

$310,000.00

4/ 3

3261

478 E 8th St

Chico

$200,000.00

3/ 1

1377

3332 Neal Rd

Paradise

$202,000.00

2/ 1

882

233 W 4th Ave

Chico

$197,000.00

2/ 1

1032

1032 Maple Park Dr

Paradise

$200,000.00

3/ 2

1527

835 El Dorado St

Chico

$160,500.00

4/ 2

1162

328 Valley View Dr

Paradise

$168,000.00

2/ 2

1315

1125 Sheridan Ave 48

Chico

$157,000.00

3/ 2

1035

5200 Parkway Dr

Paradise

$137,000.00

1/ 1

1004

34 CN&R June 19, 2014

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

SQ. FT.


EIGHTH & MAIN ANTIQUE CENTER “WHERE THE NORTH VALLEY SHOPS FOR THEIR HOME” 893.5534 • 745 MAIN STREET, CHICO • EIGHTHANDMAIN.COM

Eighth & Main

ANTIQUES

THINKE.

FRE

open house Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sat. 11-1

Sat. 2-4

791 Westmont Ct ( X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3352 Sq.Ft. $475,000 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508

Sat. 2-4

1186 Vallombrosa Ave (X St: Bryant) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2,800 Sq. Ft. $689,000 Sherry Landis 514-4855

6404 County Road 18, Orland 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3,800 Sq. Ft. $468,500 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837

Sun. 1-4

Sat. 2-4

6173 Toms Trail (X St: Humbug), Magalia 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 4,250Sq. Ft. $587,000 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837

1653 Carol Avenue (X ST: Park Vista Drive) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,940 Sq. Ft. $425,000 Sherry Landis 514-4855

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

3583 Shadowtree Lane (X St: Whispering Winds) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3,569 Sq. Ft. $568,000 Tracy Simmons 925-348-2069

Sat. 11-1

10692 Player Ln ( X St: Estates Dr) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 3011 Sq.Ft. $529,000 Brandi Laffins 321-9562

Sun. 11-1, 2-4

767 Westmont Ct (X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3,515 Sq.Ft. $499,900 Sherry Landis 514-4855

Sat. 2-4

1833 Bree Court (X St: Lott Road) 5 Bd / 4 Ba, 3,163Sq. Ft. $495,000 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

2615 Lakewest Drive (X St: Bruce) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 2,452Sq. Ft. $399,900 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329 Sandy Stoner 514-5555 Steve Laird 321-6375

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1350 Salem St (X St: W. 13th St) 4 Bd, 2 Ba, 1973 Sq.Ft. $364,500 Laura Willman 680-8962 Tracy Simmons 925-348-2069 Chris Martinez 680-4404

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4 788 Silverado (X St: Alamo) 3 Bd, 2,146 Sq. Ft. $360,000 Traci Cooper 520-0227 Becky Williams 636-0936 Larua Willman 680-8962

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

752 Brandonbury Ln (X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1647 Sq.Ft. $357,000 Chris Martinez 680-4404 Emmett 519-6333= 3036 Hudson (X St: Colonial) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,679 Sq. Ft. $325,000 Justin Jewett 518-4089 Traci Cooper 520-0227

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1990 Modoc (X St: Forest Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1490 Sq.Ft. $289,000 Kathy Kelly 570-7403 Marc Shapiro 426-2555

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1037 Windsor Way (X St: Greenwich) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,357 Sq. Ft. $269,900 Johnny Klinger 864-3398

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1090 Palmetto (X St: Sarah) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,413Sq. Ft. $259,900 Marc Shapiro 426-2555 John Wallace 514-2405 Erin Schmidt 575-7431 Paul Champlin 828-2902

10 LakeShore Terrace (X St: Sierra Lakeside) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1300 Sq.Ft. $229,900 Heather DeLuca 228-1480 Traci Cooper 520-0227 589 White Ave (X St: East Ave) 3 Bd / 1 Ba, 989 Sq.Ft. $229,000 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

Sun. 11-1, 2-4

279 Sierra Ave (X St: 2nd St), Hamilton City 5 Bd / 2 Ba, 1676 Sq.Ft. $179,999 Gee Singh 717-3330

Sat. 2-4

261 Camino Sur (X St: Hicks) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,344 Sq. Ft. $49,500 Shane Collins 518-1413

Sat. 11-3

123 Henshaw Ave #206 ( X St: Esplanade) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1344 Sq.Ft. $40,000 Frank “Speedy” Condon 864-7726

Sat. 11-3

123 Henshaw Ave #302 (X St: Esplanade) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1120 Sq.Ft. $28,000 Frank “Speedy” Condon 864-7726

Sat. 11-1

9180 Goodspeed St (X St: Serviss St) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1188 Sq.Ft. $254,950 John Spain 519-5726 June 19, 2014

CN&R 35


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