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SUSHI BURRITO! See CHOW, page 27

ANIMAL LOVER See GREENWAYS, page 12

CHICO PLAYLIST See ARTS DEVO, page 34

THINK

Turning to our ancestral ways for security and community

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Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

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Volume 37, Issue 40

Thursday, May 29, 2014


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Vol. 37, Issue 40 • May 29, 2014

OPINION 4 4 5 5 7

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Editorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment. . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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NEWSLINES  Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HaveASeniorMoment.org HaveASeniorM

GREENWAYS  Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

THE GOODS  15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Bottom Line . . . . . . . . . . . 15

HEALTHLINES  Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE  Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . .

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CLASSIFIEDS  

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO by Cliff VOlPE

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Ken Gates, bob Meads, lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, bill Unger, lisa Van Der Maelen Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Associate Editor Meredith J. Graham Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom Gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Healthlines Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Craig blamer, Alastair bland, Henri bourride, Rachel bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Miles Jordan, Karen laslo, leslie layton, Mark lore, Melanie MacTavish, Jesse Mills, Sean Murphy, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Shannon Rooney, Toni Scott, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Robert Speer, Allan Stellar, Daniel Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Katherine Green, Ashiah Scharaga Managing Art Director Tina flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Design Melissa bernard, Mary Key, Serene lusano, Kyle Shine, Skyler Smith Advertising Manager Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Alex beehner, brian Corbit, Krystal Godfrey, laura Golino

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialist Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2240 Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

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Endorsements The primary election is around the corner and the CN&R’s

Protecting Butte County from fracking S falsely claiming that the Frack Free Butte County campaign is against “safe domestic oil production in California.”

tate Sen. Jim Nielsen recently sent out a mailer

We are not against safe, traditional oil and gas extraction. We are opposed to fracking and nontraditional oil and gas extraction methods, which use millions of gallons of water laced with carcinogenic chemicals, injected into the ground and placed under extreme pressure to fracture strata to release trapped oil and gas. As our petition states, we’re calling on Butte County supervisors to “impose an immediate ban on … fracking and other by nontraditional oil and gas recovery techDave Garcia niques.” For more information, visit www.frackfreebuttecounty.org. The author, a The toxicity of frack fluid is frightenlongtime Oroville ing. One gallon can contaminate up to resident, is the 1 million gallons of drinking water. This spokesman for Frack is an enormous risk—too great to chance Free Butte County. in Butte County. Water is the lifeblood of agriculture and poisoned water poisons our food, livestock, economy and future. The fossil fuel industry’s own service company, Schlumberger, reports a 6 percent well-casing failure rate on all new wells and up to a 50 percent well-casing failure rate after a 30-year period. Other states are suffering the consequences of fracking with poisoned water 4

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May 29, 2014

and topsoil. According to The Denver Post, which analyzed spills from fracking in Colorado, “At least 716,982 gallons (45 percent) of the petroleum chemicals spilled during the past decade have stayed in the ground after initial cleanup—contaminating soil, sometimes spreading into groundwater.” Here in California, in Kern County, farmer Fred Starrh won an $8.5 million lawsuit against Bakersfield-based Aera Energy after his almond orchards died from fracking wastewater seeping into and poisoning his aquifer. Frack wastewater injection wells also are causing earthquakes. Oklahoma has had a rate of two earthquakes a year from 1978 to 2008. That rate has escalated to 147 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 and larger just this year, because of frack wastewater injection wells. Can these wastewater injection wells cause another Loma Prieta earthquake here? We want to protect Butte County’s water and agriculture, plus have safe, secure domestic energy and energy independence. A ban on fracking in Butte County will not raise your energy prices, but lifting export restrictions on crude oil and natural gas will. This will increase energy costs to consumers and our nation’s industries. This global sale of crude oil and natural gas will only undercut our energy independence goals and wipe out our children’s future energy reserves. Ω

editorial board members have done a lot of homework, especially on the local races. We announced our endorsements last week, but are reprinting them here for voters’ convenience. On the surface, certain competing parties appeared equally competent and experienced. It took a lot of research and interviews and candidates’ forums to come up with our picks. Below are our recommendations in the races and ballot initiatives we’ve studied sufficiently to feel confident about our endorsements. Still, we urge voters to do their own research. The League of Women Voters website, www.smartvoter.org, is an excellent resource for additional info about candidates. The league’s Butte County affiliate has uploaded videos of their local forums at www.lwvbuttecounty.org. Go there to watch the candidates in action, and get out and vote on June 3. Local offices Superior Court judge: Sandra McLean. Her reputation as a tough judge has earned McLean critics, but that’s one of the traits making her the right person for the job. We admire Eric “Ric” Ortner’s desire to give back to Butte County, but he’s outmatched by McLean’s breadth of experience. County supervisor, District 3: Maureen Kirk. Kirk is a popular leader and well-liked and admired by her constituents. She’s a veteran at setting policy, having served multiple terms on the Chico City Council and Board of Supervisors. She brings a moderate voice to a conservative-majority panel and keeps an open mind. Bob Evans is a thoughtful candidate, but he’s running in the wrong race. County supervisor, District 2: No endorsement. Incumbent Larry Wahl’s commitment to protecting property owners from the ills of rogue pot growers is commendable, but his tendency to be doctrinaire about medical marijuana despite its legality does many of his constituents a disservice. That said, Andrew Merkel is mostly a one-issue candidate, and he lacks civic experience. County assessor: Diane Brown. One of the toughest calls, the CN&R chose Brown over the other qualified candidate, Al Petersen. Brown should be able to hit the ground running. She’s worked in the Butte County Assessor’s Office for decades and is endorsed by the current assessor, Fred Holland. County clerk-recorder: Candace Grubbs. Incumbent Grubbs has some work ahead of her to get the Clerk-Recorder’s Office in order, but her experience, with elections and finances, earns her our nod. Grubbs is also in the midst of establishing the county’s Hall of Records, and she’s the right person to see that project to fruition. County treasurer-tax collector: Peggy Moak. Her experience is unmatched in this race. Moak spent six years as the assistant treasurer-tax collector, was appointed to the top spot, and is endorsed by all five Butte County supervisors and her predecessor, Linda Barnes. U.S. Congress Representative, District 1: Heidi Hall State Legislature State Senator, District 4: CJ Jawahar State Assembly, District 3: Jim Reed State executive Governor: Edmund G. “Jerry” Brown Lieutenant governor: Gavin Newsom Attorney general: Kamala Harris Proposition 41: Yes. Six years ago, voters approved the sales of hundreds of millions of general obligation bonds to aid struggling veterans with housing. The intentions were good, but it turns out the vets who qualified for assistance found lower mortgage rates through private lenders. The new plan calls for $500 million in bond revenues for affordable housing units, including multifamily rentals and transitional housing, among other options. It’s a much-needed plan at a time when many vets are facing homelessness. Proposition 42: Yes. In some cases, communities in the state have been wavering on adherence to the laws governing public records and open meetings, citing the state’s failure to provide reimbursements. Prop. 42 amends the state Constitution, requiring full compliance with those laws— the Public Records Act and the Ralph M. Brown Act. It’s essential to the public’s right to know. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Anniversary and election It occurred to me a few days ago that it’s been one year since I took over as CN&R editor. And exhale. It’s been one heckuva ride thus far. I’ve learned many things over the past 12 months, including the fact that I’ve become somewhat of a public figure, and thus a target of a lot of criticism. I knew that came with the job, but people have gone overboard in a few instances. The highlights include an overtly misogynistic death threat in response to an editorial asking for further scrutiny into the shooting death of a teenager, 19-year-old Breanne Sharpe, by Chico police officers. Then there was a veiled death threat over a story in which I watched and described a sheep getting slaughtered and eviscerated. I’ve written about many controversial topics over the past dozen years and never received such vitriolic reactions. Neither had my predecessor during his 30-plus years in journalism. So, what gives? Is it because I’m now editor? Is it because I don’t pull punches? Is it because I’m a woman? Probably. How disappointing. Then again, for every woman-hating, condescending comment sent to my email inbox or voicemail, I’ve heard from many more supportive readers. I’m extremely appreciative of them. And I’m thankful for the readers who respectfully disagree with this newspaper and other readers. Our letters section continues to be a space for vigorous debate, with occasional acerbic comments. I’m also thankful that I’m surrounded by an amazing staff. We all work hard to meet the mission of this newspaper—to inform our community and make it a better place to live. Another thing I’ve learned is that people have a hard time adjusting to change. I get that. Some pages of the CN&R look a little different than they did a year ago. The same is true of the prior year and the year before that, and so on and so forth. Time will tell whether those changes are good or bad. There are more changes to come. I’m certain readers will let us know what they think about them, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. But enough about me. The June primary is quickly approaching. If you haven’t been following the races, you ought to do a couple of things. First, head to our online archives and read about some of the more interesting contests. Second, look over our endorsements, which we’ve reprinted this week (page 4). And third, do some independent research about the candidates by mining the website of the League of Women Voters, smartvoter.org. There, you’ll find each candidate’s official ballot statement, along with other helpful info. In 2010, primary turnout hit an all-time low with just a third of California voters showing up at the polls. Predictions for participation in this year’s election are looking pretty poor, too. Gov. Jerry Brown has no serious challengers, so it’s been hard for some folks to get excited. I’m hoping Butte County bucks the trend. After all, there are some important local positions on the line.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

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I have known Judge Sandra McLean for the past eight and a half years. I have seen how organized and prepared she is for all of the cases she handles. She is fair, honest, intelligent and just. She is respectful to all in her court. She takes matters very seriously for all involved. She has true dedication and respect for her position. Butte County couldn’t ask for a better Superior Court judge. BARBARA BARROW Chico

Andrew Merkel is running for the Board of Supervisors. He blames his opponent solely for his difficulties in growing and profiting in the illegal trade [of marijuana-growing]. Merkel thinks marijuana growers are helping the economics of the county. How does forprofit pot help the economy? Do they pay taxes on the illegal sales? The money from for-profit pot is received for future favors. The citizens of Butte County complained and a pot ordinance was voted on by the board. The potheads and dopers (cannabis criminals) only wanted more pot in our county. The ordinance has a provision for medical-hardship cases to grow more than allowed by the ordinance. This ordinance irked the for-profit growers. The only agenda item Merkel would bring to the board is marijuana. He has no LETTERS continued on page 6

PAMELA TEETER Butte County Clerk-Recorder Moral & Ethical Compass Inclusive Family Values Responsible Job Philosophy ●

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compassion for anyone other than those who follow his advocacy for marijuana. EVERETT GREMMINGER Magalia

I seem like a one-issue candidate because I am running against a one-issue opponent in a primarily one-issue race. The issues I champion are: Legalize medical pot and tax it, protect the Greenline, and stop fracking. Sometimes people endorse me because my opponent is intolerable: Larry Wahl dropped the ball; he tried to pass economy-crashing ordinances. Wahl loves alcohol; he has a DUI and has no moral standing judging people who use marijuana as medicine. Wahl made the call; calling in federal agents to shut down our dispensaries, costing us millions in tax revenues, jobs and forcing 20,000 patients to grow their own. I sincerely apologize that I am not a better candidate. However, I am fighting for you and your rights. Even if I never show up to vote, I would do a better job than Wahl because he threatens the livelihoods of thousands of our people. We are all in the same boat, and while I might not be perfect, I will stop gnawing holes in the bottom! Vote jobs, not snobs on June 3. ANDREW A. MERKEL Chico

Two years ago Bob Evans exposed for all of us the massive debt that the city of Chico had accumulated and was hiding. Then, I called him a “truth-teller.” He did the right thing to reveal the fiscal mess and mismanagement of the city’s finances. Very unfortunately for all of us, his revelations proved completely true. Bob’s honesty and problemsolving skills are traits we need for elected officials. Bob supports job creation, protecting personal rights, improving public safety and protecting our water. Join me please in supporting Bob Evans for Butte County Supervisor. LAURIE MOORE Chico

Bob Evans is running for Butte County Supervisor. If you haven’t encountered Bob, you should know he served this nation in the Air Force as a flyer and senior logician, which prepared him for a successful second career running one of Butte County’s largest employer-companies. He served the city of Chico on the City Council, and in numerous volunteer positions. He has my vote because I trust the man, his inten6

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tions, and his judgment. I trust Bob Evans. TIM O’NEILL Chico

The good ol’ boys and girls on the Tehama County Board of Supervisors (Steve Chamblin, Burt Bundy, Bob Williams, Dennis Garton, and Sandy Bruce) have always been stupid and backward in this redneck, Podunk backwater of the Central Valley, but have finally figured out that they can actually circumvent and pervert state law regarding medical marijuana to turn it against those it was intended to help. In their hysterical, egomaniacal, immoral ignorance and arrogance, they are now empowered to deny their constituents’ medical needs with near impunity, and are gleefully exercising their newfound means of repression and discrimination. After already unethically prohibiting medical-marijuana dispensaries in Tehama County several years ago, in August of 2013 they unanimously rammed through a draconian new county ordinance perversely designed in a desperate attempt to abate and hopefully completely eradicate growing physician-prescribed pot by zoning it out of existence with ridiculous restrictions. To make matters worse, they keep changing the ordinance and adding even harsher “urgency” measures and fees, so that it is extremely difficult for medicalmarijuana patients to stay up-todate about the regulations and plan their grows and lives effectively. Responsible, intelligent, informed citizens are mobilizing to vote the bums out of office on June 3. STEPHEN RALEY Corning

Please support the members of the Butte County Board of Supervisors who have the intelligence and courage to vote for a fracking ban. The fracking process destroys the groundwater wherever it is done, destroying lives and property values. Bill Connelly and Maureen Kirk have the courage to oppose fracking. What type of tax assessor will Al Petersen make if he lacks the courage to oppose fracking and does not understand that fracking will destroy the Butte County property tax base? Bob Evans will vote for fracking just like Larry Wahl did. Future generations need public servants who are smart enough and have the courage to protect their future, and not have their moral compass set on the dollar sign. Fracking is not about jobs and

the economy; if it were, why would the greedy energy companies be pushing to change the law to allow them to sell our surplus energy overseas to the highest bidder, allowing Big Oil to keep all their energy profits offshore and again stick it to the American taxpayers? This is a moral issue and I hope you will vote only for candidates who oppose fracking. Vote for Bill Connelly and Maureen Kirk, because they are on the moral side of history. JOHN SCOTT Butte Valley

Editor’s note: The county assessor will not vote on fracking.

Response to endorsements Re “Primary picks” (Editorial, May 22): I am surprised that the editorial board of the Chico News & Review was unable to discern that the Butte County Assessor’s Office is in dire need of rehabilitation. Your endorsement reflects an acceptance of the status quo, and that’s just not good enough for me or our county. AL PETERSEN Chico

I work for the Butte County Assessor’s Office and have great interest in the upcoming election. The new assessor will impact this office greatly. Many experienced employees are nearing retirement, and a considerable number of employees are still learning their job. It is crucial that the new assessor provide leadership, experience and a plan to navigate this challenge. While I appreciate the time spent with candidates in your recent endorsements, I am disappointed with your conclusion. Assessor Fred Holland chose to endorse Diane Brown, but many of my co-workers and I endorse Al Petersen as our candidate for assessor. Al Petersen is the only candidate who planned to run for this office before Fred Holland decided to retire. Every other candidate declared as a reaction to this news. Not only is Al Petersen the only candidate with a plan, he is also the only candidate with leadership experience in managing and supervising office staff. Voters should choose their candidate as if they are “hiring” the best person for this job. Al Petersen has the experience and integrity to lead this office. The citizens of Butte County deserve a hardworking and effective assessor, and Al Petersen

deserves your vote June 3. BRENT FOSTER Paradise

Note from a volunteer Re “Let the endorsements begin” (Letters, by John Scott, May 22): I would like to point out that counties have used volunteers in support to the voting effort for as long as I can remember, and I’m 62. One of my first recollections of voting was seeing private residences used as polling places. The collection and tabulating of votes cannot be timely accomplished without volunteer help. I have volunteered as a polling officer in two counties over the years and excuse me if I take your opinion as a slap in my face and to the face of every election volunteer. No individual can volunteer to assist in an election until he or she has received the required training session/s. At the conclusion of your training, you are sworn in as an election official. You cannot work an election until then. I have an idea for you, Mr. Scott: Why don’t you volunteer for the upcoming election and see for yourself what exactly is the process before speaking in such broad strokes. Our freedoms cannot exist without our participation. MICHAEL PAGAN Chico

He’s tired of it Re “Note to the progressives” (Letters, by Patrick Newman, May 22): Let’s examine the overall progressive (socialism) liberal movement’s accomplishments: Factually, what America has gone through with its first-ever progressive liberal president, President O’Liar, is scandal after scandal, lie after bigger lies, concoctions of the most creative spin talking points and packaged for political correctness by his White House staffers who were ordered to support the most lawless slow-walked investigations into damages and deaths his reelection caused to American citizens—investigations he designed to not be completed until after he leaves office. Every scandal of harm progressives have caused to all Americans, whether politically, environmentally, or involving National Security and/or foreign policy, O’Liar has used “plausible deniability” to excuse his gross ignorance of leadership. Yes, six years of O’Liar’s progressive “We know what’s best for you” policies have caused Americans to endure the highest real unemployment rate of 25 percent,

black unemployment since 2008 rose to 16 percent, Hispanics to 22 percent and college grads at 28 percent. Since his election, the highest growth rate of poverty since the Great Depression. Why not consider that normal people are tired of the Democratic progressive lying, bribing, false wars on women, gays and stray dogs liberal bullshit! RICK CLEMENTS Paradise

‘Cry me a river’ Re “Quality teaching, quality learning” (Guest comment, by Joe Asnault, May 22): While I appreciate the defense of the value of teachers, it is transparent that Mr. Asnault was trying to claim that unless he’s paid more, teachers aren’t valued. Give me a break. This age-old argument never ends. Maybe we should break the cycle and try things differently. There are great retail products out there, but if they don’t sell, the price goes down. If demand increases, prices go up. Some communities have incredible schools, waiting lists, and results are obvious. Conversely, look at Chico Unified. It has a terrible reputation despite having good teachers like Mr. Asnault. Efforts should be made to find out why. Teachers repeatedly claim it’s the poor management at the top. Based on Asnault’s logic, if the bad administration were paid more, would there be better results? Even restaurants with great waitresses close if management isn’t strong. The food doesn’t get better by paying the cook more. Fix it, improve, demand changes, and only then ask for a raise. We have been in a terrible recession. Teachers have incredible health plans, retirement, vacations, that few have. I am at work by 6 a.m. and get home late at night. Cry me a river, Mr. Asnault. TERRY CAVENAUGH Chico

Correction In the May 22 Scene story “Still standing up,” by Ken Smith, we incorrectly said that the comedy open mic at Mondos café was hosted by Mark Joseph Leathers. In fact, Jerm Leather is the host. We apologize for the error, which has been corrected online. –ed. More letters online:

We have too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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Ronda Wasson stands next to her father, William Davis, while holding stacks of some of the paperwork she’s collected over the past two years while trying to get him into a Veteran Affairs residence.

CRIME AND COINCIDENCE

Chico Police were called to the 600 block of Hickory Street at about 5:30 a.m. Monday (May 26) by residents who said they’d woken up to find a stranger in their apartment, stealing small items as he fled. Shortly afterward, police arrested 18-year-old Vincent Rangamar and charged him with residential burglary. While Rangamar was being detained, the victims realized their 2002 Honda Civic was also missing. At about 7 a.m., another officer spotted the stolen vehicle speeding more than 100 mph on River Road. Minutes later, police received a report that the car crashed into a tree and the driver had run off. The alleged driver—Justin Nelson, 23—was caught riding a bicycle nearby around 7:30 a.m. Nelson was charged with auto theft and other crimes, including committing a felony while on bail for a previous offense. According to a press release, the suspects did not know each other, and their alleged targeting of the same victims was purely coincidental.

GUARDED ACCUSATIONS

The FBI reports that grand juries in Sacramento and Fresno counties have indicted eight current or former members of the California National Guard on charges of “fraudulently obtaining recruiting referral bonuses,” according to a press release. Included in those indictments are Sarah N. Nattress, 26, of Paradise and Brian M. Kaps, 40, of Chico. Both were National Guard recruiting assistants. Nattress is charged with taking $28,000 and Kaps $16,000 in fraudulent bonuses. “It’s disappointing,” Kaps’ attorney Mark Reichel told SFGate. “We were hoping they weren’t going to indict him. To the extent he’s involved at all, he’s minimally involved and certainly not someone I think these type of resources should be spent on.” The defendants face a maximum term of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

SHAKY AWARD

A Chico State professor has been recognized as a national expert on earthquakes— particularly, how buildings respond to them. Curt Haselton (pictured) received the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s (EERI) 2013 Shah Family Innovation Prize, awarded annually for creativity and innovation in earthquake risk mitigation and management, with preference to those focused on preventing the loss of lives in earthquakes, according to a Chico State press release. Haselton has developed a national reputation for his use of nonlinear dynamic analysis, a method representing how buildings respond to seismic activity. Haselton is chair of Chico State’s Department of Civil Engineering and teaches upperdivision courses in earthquake and wind engineering and steel design. He will be presented with the award, which includes a $6,000 cash prize, in July at EERI’s annual meeting in Anchorage, Alaska. 8

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Help for a veteran Local woman laments the difficulties getting VA services to help care for her father

Wthe U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs recently over delays in treatment and services, a

hile national attention has gripped

Chico woman reports she has also run into obstacles with the VA while trying to care for her 90-year-old story and father. photo by Ronda Wasson said her Tom Gascoyne father, World War II vet William Davis, suffers from a number of tomg@ newsreview.com ailments including dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. He’s unable to sign his name on the paperwork associated with VA services, which has led to some difficulties getting him care. For the past two years, Wasson has been working with the VA to try to move her father into a recognized veterans assisted-living facility, the closest of which until recently was in Martinez. All of the local nursing homes in the area that accept Medicare are full, she said, and private facilities are too expensive. “Trying to get my father in a decent place to spend the rest of his days has been difficult,” she said. “One refers me to another, which refers me to another, and so on. Most are private pay, which he cannot afford.” Within the last year the Veterans Home of California-Redding has been built, but its skilled-nursing facility, which her father needs, will not be ready until the end of June. About a month ago, Wasson began working with the

Butte County Veterans Service Office to try to get approval of a VA pension that would help get her father into the Redding facility. “They haven’t gone through all of their final inspections for that particular [skilled-nursing] section and he doesn’t qualify for any other section in that facility,” she said. “My fear is they are going to fill it up before they finalize all the paperwork that I’ve been going back and forth on with them.” Wasson said she has power of

attorney for her father, but that the Butte County Veterans Service Office has not recognized it. That office is not part of the federal VA, but was established by the Butte County Board of Supervisors to help veterans, their dependents and survivors obtain veterans’ benefits from federal, state and local agencies. Wasson said representatives there have asked her to track down an original copy of her father’s Army discharge papers because the microfiche printout she has does not qualify. The papers would help her father qualify for the Aid & Attendance Act pension, which in her father’s case will amount to $1,700 a month to pay for his stay at the Redding facility. But the local Veterans Service Office

is overwhelmed with clients and progress has been slow going. Wasson voiced frustrations about working with the office, but added that there has been some movement in the past week. Wasson can no longer care for her father, who has lived with her and her husband and son for the last six years. Her north Chico house is in short-sale and she and her husband will soon have to move to a smaller place, which will not have a room for her dad. Wasson’s husband is a truck driver and is often on the road. Her 26-year-old son has helped her care for her father, but is moving into his own place soon. “While my son helps me with [my father’s] care, his needs have become more and more difficult to handle on an in-home-care basis,” she said. “The Redding VA home most recently asked me to update all his paperwork, which they’ve had since January. Doing this requires more appointments with his primary doctor, blood work, TB tests, phone calls and so forth.” She said getting the Aid & Attendance Act pension has not been an easy venture. She attended a seminar put on by the county Veterans Service Office on May 12 to try to find out more information, but learned little if anything, she said.


Giving back When contacted about Wasson’s

situation with her father, Hannah Williamson, who works in the local Veterans Service Office, said the work there can be overwhelming. “I know we’ve had some computer upgrades and our office specialist was inundated with walk-ins,” she explained. “I can assure you that my veteran service representative gives out instruction exactly as the VA demands with its rules and regulations. I’m saddened that this particular person didn’t feel like they could call me if there was confusion. We do work within strict guidelines of the Department of Veterans Affairs.” Williamson said there are only three workers in the department and that all are disabled veterans themselves. “We work very long hours in our office to help every single veteran, their dependents and widows as much as possible,” Williamson said. “We saw 402 veterans in April and that was in a total of 22 working days. There are three of us here. If you do the math, you can understand the pressure and the enormous case load we are under. “We’re all disabled veterans here, so we have a personal passion and dedication to help every veteran. It’s the guidelines of the Department of Veterans Affairs that restrict our abilities to work more easily and conveniently with claimants and their veterans.” Wasson said Williamson called her after the CN&R had contacted the Veterans Service Office. “She sent me some stuff to fill out and told me if my dad put his ‘X’ on his paperwork, I could then have two witnesses sign a paper that confirmed he put his ‘X’ there,” she said. Now she and her son serve as the two witnesses to validate his mark. As for her dad’s military discharge papers, Wasson has learned that there is another form she can fill out to get proof of discharge. “I don’t know how long it will take to get the documentation back, but it has to be at least an original or a certified copy,” she said. “They will not take what I have. This county thing has been really difficult to get through.” Just before CN&R’s press time, Wasson and Williamson met in person to try to finish the needed paperwork to get the discharge papers for the Aid & Attendance Act pension to help get Wasson’s father ready for the Redding facility. “It went pretty well,” Wasson said. “Meeting with her in person was much better. She made a phone call to find out the best way to get the discharge papers. The woman is a fireball. Things are beginning to fall into place and I’ll probably get the papers in a couple of weeks. She said if I don’t to let her know.” Ω

Chico State grad helps at-risk kids Peterson hasn’t forgotten his roots and the help he needed to Jneedacob go onto college. And these days, he’s focused on helping kids who similar guidance.

The Chico State graduate founded and has steadfastly developed the Junior Leadership Development Program (JLDP), a nonprofit mentoring program for North State youth. Peterson’s story of how he came to help kids goes back to his own childhood when he and his sister lived with their divorced and cancer-diagnosed mom in a lowincome apartment in affluent Roseville. Clean-cut and dressed in the casual garb of a Chico 20-something, Peterson’s personable manner stood out as he spoke of his past during a recent interview. “We were very poor at the time, growing up,” he said. “We made do off welfare and disability … I kind of always had it reinforced at school by my friends that I had a different lifestyle from many of them.” But, Peterson said, he was very close with his sister and his mother, whom he described as “the ultimate warrior when it came to raising my sister and me … she always had this vision for us that we would make it.” When Peterson was 9 years old, a family at church took an interest and started spending time with them. In high school, the father of this family, now his mentor, told him, “You’re going to go to college!” The mentoring proved priceless, with Peterson and his Get involved: sister developing “this really The JLDP annual banquet is Sunday, June 1, close relationship with them 6-8 p.m., at the Chico Women’s Club, and will … it gave us a whole new include local musicians, a silent auction and a dinner catered by Olive Garden. Students will outlook on what was possibe recognized for their accomplishments, as ble.” will community members who have helped Although Peterson strugJLDP. Tickets are available at EventBrite (log gled initially at Chico State, onto www.eventbrite.com, click on “Find he eventually settled in and events” and enter “JLDP”). School administrators or educators who want a JLDP began volunteering at the program at their school are encouraged to Boys & Girls Club of Chico contact the program. The nonprofit is in need as well as Big Brothers, Big of mentors. To learn more, search for Junior Sisters. Since then, a series of Leadership Development Program on Facebook connections, decisions and or go to jldp.info. opportunities led him to form the JLDP, which is now in its third year with its annual banquet fundraiser coming up June 1. It all started with a presentation Peterson gave at Table Mountain Juvenile Detention Facility while he was still a business student at Chico State. Lisa O’Donnell, a counselor at the facility, assisted him in creating a life-skills-focused mentoring program that was launched in December 2011. It proved to be a success.

SIFT|ER Minimum wage by sex Who is more likely to earn the federal minimum wage in the United States—a man or a woman? You guessed it. Though the U.S. workforce is 53 percent men and 47 percent women, 62 percent of those earning only the minimum wage (currently $7.25) are women, according to Pew Research Center. Some 5.4 percent of women, or 2.1 million workers, made the minimum wage or less in 2013, compared with 3.3 percent of men, or 1.2 million workers. However, that gap has closed significantly since 1979, when the share of hourly workers who earned the minimum wage was 20.2 percent of women and 7.7 percent of men.

Jacob Peterson (left) wants to make mentoring young people, like 16-year-old Fair View High School student William Bell, his life’s work. PHOTO BY SHANNON ROONEY

“Jacob is able to identify well with the youth he serves,” O’Donnell said, “and his authenticity is evident in all that he does.” Now, Peterson has developed and run JLDP in other insti-

tutions, including Fair View High School and Hearthstone School. Fair View Principal David McKay spoke highly of the program. Students who have completed JLDP have “displayed tremendous interpersonal growth and an increased sense of resiliency,” he said. The program includes an element where facilitators go into a school or facility and teach the students specific life skills as well as practical skills, such as résumé-making. Following that, the students are paired with mentors who meet with them weekly for a semester, helping them with, among other things, considering colleges at which to apply, determining a career path and applying for financial aid. Peterson said he realized he needed “to start molding this so it’s not just what I’m doing on the side, but my life’s work.” Various people and organizations have helped him in this process, including Chico Stewardship Newtwork. JLDP continues to evolve, and “pieces are just falling into place,” he said. “I feel that as people catch wind of what we’re doing and what we’re about, they want to be a part of it.” Chico writer Grant Branson, who has mentored students and helped with the program’s development, credited Peterson with an ability to connect with the youth he helps. “Because the development of the JLDP curriculum is rooted in Jacob’s own life experiences, which mirror many of the same things that at-risk youth [have experienced],” Branson said, “it speaks directly to them in an empathetic context. You can see the expression of, ‘At last, somebody who understands me,’ written on the faces of the kids who are there.” Another community member who has assisted with JLDP is Chicoan Rory Rottschalk, a civil engineer and community activist who said he’d read letters written by JLDP participants, in which he noticed “several critical themes that stood out: The kids had a vision for their future, they recognized it was their responsibility to pursue that future rather than make excuses, and they’d been introduced to a community interested in helping.” Looking toward the future, Peterson said his vision for JLDP is to expand to additional schools and youth. Reflecting on the past three years of developing the program, he recalled a defining moment watching one of his JLDP mentees at the Fair View graduation. “We made eye contact when he was reaching for his diploma,” Peterson said. “If I could define what life is really all about, that is a moment I’d really want to capture—impacting someone in a positive way and getting to see the result.” —SHANNON ROONEY

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 May 29, 2014

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continued from page 9

Alarms ignored Police plan to disregard automated alarms, council member wants debate King, the owner of Grana, Jtheeffrecently received a notice from company that monitors his

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downtown restaurant’s alarm system. Attached was a letter signed by Chico Police Chief Kirk Trostle indicating that, as of June 15, police will no longer respond to “unconfirmed automated alarms.” The letter defined those as “any alarm activated by non-human means … which has not been confirmed as valid by either a security guard or other responsible party at the scene, or through video confirmation of a break-in.” During an interview at Grana, King expressed his profound displeasure with the policy change: “If the alarm in here goes off at 2 a.m., what am I supposed to do—come inside and make sure there’s someone in here, then call the police? Why am I paying for an alarm, then?” Police officials say the change is just one part of their broader effort to trim inefficiencies—in this case, responding to thousands of false calls for service each year. In 2012, for instance, Chico police responded to more than 3,000 such alarms, said Lt. Mike O’Brien. Because an extremely small percentage of the alarms police respond to are triggered by burglars or other intruders, and given the department’s staffing shortage and budgetary constraints, police administration believe resources can be put to better use, he said. “If something has to give, you have to look at ways to minimize impact [on the community],” O’Brien said. “We’re trying to find the least-painful solutions. When you’re looking at 3,000 bad calls for service, the right move is to cut.”

Police Chief Kirk Trostle says his new policy of officers not responding to automated alarms will allow the department to “use resources in a better way.” CN&R FILE PHOTO

O’Brien explained that the new policy will not apply to panic alarms triggered by bank tellers and store clerks in immediate peril—hence the “human means” stipulation—and officers will still be dispatched in certain cases. “If there’s something else that goes along with the automated alarm—someone on the scene or broken windows—we’re going to go,” O’Brien said. “That will not change.” Critics of the new policy

include City Councilman Randall Stone, who, considering the ongoing saga related to his accusations of racism against Chico Police Officer Todd Boothe, has become somewhat of a thorn in the side of the police department. Stone told the CN&R that City Council members were unaware of the upcoming policy change until Trostle’s letter to alarm system companies began circulating among home and business owners. “It’s unusual that a policy decision like that went out and the council didn’t even know about it,” Stone said in a phone interview. “We had to hear about it from our constituents. I haven’t seen a staff report; I haven’t seen any information about this policy other than constituents writing to me, telling me this is a disappointing and foolish move.”

Stone suggested the City Council’s upcoming June 17 budget session would have been an ideal time to discuss alternative courses of action, such as raising fees on users with multiple false alarms to recover the cost of police response. “The time we do work on these things is coming up, and the decision was already made to effectuate this policy 48 hours before we are having that meeting,” he said. “There was no attempt to work with the council on this.” Chief Trostle, on the other hand, maintains that the move is fully within his discretion. “It’s an operational decision I made as the chief of police,” he said during a phone interview. “The city councilors are policy makers. They do not oversee operation of the police department.” Trostle also said that not responding to unverified alarms is congruent with municipal code. He pointed to article 5R.40.080, which states: “A robbery, burglary, medical or panic alarm may be activated only in the event of a robbery, burglary, or life-threatening incident which is in progress.” As for Stone’s perceived lack of communication between police administration and the City Council, Trostle said he “followed the chain of command” by vetting his decision through the City Manager’s Office. What’s more, the word has been out—Action News Now initially broke news of the new alarm policy with a story aired on May 9. “It’s been in the media,” Trostle said. “The council has been made aware, as far as I can see.” —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com


Legal dumping City program aims to keep alleyways clean ach year after graduation, the mass exodus Eleaves of thousands of Chico State students behind a lot of debris—furniture in

various states of disrepair, fully functioning appliances, enough Bob Marley memorabilia to fill the world’s largest head shop and, in one case, porn for the blind. “The strangest thing I’ve seen was a 10- to 15-volume set of pornography in braille,” said Raul Gonzalez, a city of Chico code enforcement officer who was overseeing one of two Drop & Dash points last Thursday (May 22). “It was all just white pages and braille … none of us even knew something like that existed. “Some people use [Drop & Dash] as an opportunity to clean out their basements or garages, so we sometimes get freezers filled with something they forgot about a long time ago,” continued Gonzalez. “You open one up and sometimes it smells deadly, like a funk that covers the whole area.” Drop & Dash is an annual effort to curb illegal dumping and redirect usable items to local relief organizations, which Gonzalez has helped organize for the last decade. During the event, anyone—students or otherwise—is invited to leave waste or unwanted items at one of two drop-off points (south of campus at Third and Orange streets and north of campus at West Sacramento Avenue and North Cedar Street) for free. Today (Thursday, May 29) is the final day of the event. “People can just show up and we don’t ask any questions, we just help them unload and get them moving on their way,” Gonzalez said, noting the only things they don’t accept are tires and hazardous materials. “The purpose isn’t just for people to clean out their properties and bring us their garbage, but [also that] several local organizations benefit from what we collect.” Gonzalez explained that city workers

go through and determine what items may still be useful. These items are sorted and set aside, and representatives from The Salvation Army, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore, Esplanade House, The Jesus Center and other organizations are invited to take what they can put to use. “For example, if a student drops off a bunch of dishes, that might go to the Esplanade House, nonperishable canned food will go to The Jesus Center, and any building materials will go to the ReStore,” he said. “Most of the e-waste (electronic equipment) goes to Computers for Classrooms.”

r o f s u join

h c n u l y a d

fri

Top: Raul Gonzalez has helped organize Drop & Dash for 10 years. Above: Public Works employee Mike Slattery moves a beat-up couch into a dumpster. PHOTOS BY KEN SMITH

A loader is kept on-hand to pack any landfill-bound items into large dumpsters, and upon arriving at the dump, they are again picked through for any recyclable material or other items city workers may have overlooked. Linda Herman, administrative manager at the city’s Public Works Department, said an estimated 45 to 50 tons of debris were delivered to the landfill during the 2013 Drop & Dash. Gonzalez estimates about an equal amount of material was diverted and kept out of the dump to be reused or recycled. Gonzalez further explained that the city receives a grant to cover the landfill fees from Butte County. The two local trash-hauling companies, Recology and North Valley Waste Management, provide the dumpsters and haul them to the landfill for free. The only cost to the city is to provide workers at the sites, and Gonzalez said the event is a win-win for everyone involved. “Before we started this, the alleyways used to be so polluted that it would take weeks to get them cleaned up, which took hours and hours of staff time and city funds that we just don’t have any more,” he said, admitting some illegal dumping still does occur this time of year. “It happens, but compared to 10 years ago, it’s just a fraction of the amount of trash we’d have to clean up.” —KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com

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Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am – 2:30pm

Join us for Happy Hour Mon–Fri134:30–6pm

08 09 08 08 call for reservations 09 10 Please

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345 West Fifth Street • Chico, CA 95926 • (530) 891–6328 May 29, 2014

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GREENWAYS In Lion Ark, Dr. Mel Richardson assists in ensuring the health of the 25 lions that Animal Defenders International rescues from Bolivia. Inset: A rescued lion cub plays with a ball, possibly the first stimulation in its cage since it was born.

Roaring legacy

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ADI

Chico screening of the documentary Lion Ark is a tribute to Paradise wild-animal vet by

Claire Hutkins Seda claires@newsreview.com

I his Paradise home and boarded a plane to Bolivia. For the next few weeks, as the n 2010, Dr. Mel Richardson left

wildlife veterinarian for the nonprofit Animal Defenders International (ADI), Richardson crisscrossed the country with a small team of activists to rescue 25 traveling-circus lions, many of which were sick, malnourished and had been the victims of mistreatment. He assisted in moving them across mountain roads to a safe, central location, and then he and his team flew with them to an animal sanctuary in Colorado. The mission to save the lions was filmed by ADI, and turned into an award-winning documentary, Lion Ark, which is making a detour from the film-festival circuit to stop at the Pageant Theatre this Saturday (May 31). Two screenings—the first for friends and family, the second for the public—are in honor of “Dr. Mel,” as he was affectionately known, who died of heart failure in January at the age of 63. “He really was unique in what he did,” said Dawn Garcia, Richardson’s ex-wife, who remained his best friend until his death. “There are a lot of veterinarians out there who don’t want to go against the industry,” she said, referring to zoos and circuses that use captive wild animals. “He had 40 years’ experience as a keeper and a veterinarian. He wasn’t supposed to be done yet—the ani-

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mals really needed him.” Jan Creamer, ADI’s president and the producer of Lion Ark, agrees. “I first met Mel when he was recommended as an expert witness to provide evidence of the suffering caused to animals in traveling circuses,” Creamer wrote in an email from Peru, where she is arranging the next circus-animal rescue mission. “Our whole team misses him so much.” After Bolivia banned circus animals in 2009 with ADI’s encouragement, Creamer and Tim Phillips, ADI’s vice president and the director of Lion Ark, chose Richardson to join them in helping Bolivia find new homes for the remaining 25 lions. The film follows Creamer and Phillips as they personally tackle just about every angle of the rescue: negotiating with the circus owners, fixing the lions’ ramshackle cages, loading the cages onto trucks to transport them to safety, building temporary enclosures, feeding the lions hunks of meat, and holding cubs for Richardson to administer a deworming medication. The film depicts the mission’s ups and downs, from inclement weather and terrifying cliff-hugging dirt roads that threatened to halt the rescue, to lighter moments of the lions playing with toys and rolling in straw, perhaps having stimulation in their cages for

See the film:

Public screening of Lion Ark , Saturday, May 31, 3 p.m., at the Pageant Theatre (351 E. Sixth St.). All proceeds will go to Animal Defenders International and its current mission in Peru. Go to www.adinternational.org for more information.

the first time in their lives. Unlike most wildlife rescue documentaries, Lion Ark moves through all the steps of the rescue. The result is “more action-adventure style than the usual documentary,” according to Creamer, who said the movie “certainly has a serious underlying message, but it is, overall, good fun.” Richardson appears several times in the film, mostly to comment on the ill health of the lions, but his final appearance is personal: “What motivates me now, is all the 42 years I didn’t do anything, and all the suffering that I’ve seen with captive wild animals,” says Richardson, who worked for years as a zoo veterinarian. “At least thanks to ADI and others, I have an opportunity to make amends.” Richardson was scheduled to assist Creamer and Phillips again, on their current mission in Peru, one of many countries to recently ban circus animals. Meanwhile, Creamer says the stars of Lion Ark are now “strong, their coats have really grown, [and] they are relaxed and happy” at the Wild Animal Sanctuary, which specializes in large carnivores. ADI works on a number of animal-rights fronts, but is possibly best known for its work to save circus animals. Closer to home, its members worked with Congressman Jim Moran (D-VA), who last month introduced a congressional bill called the Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act to end the use of wild animals in circuses in this country. Should the bill pass, the United States would join a multitude of countries that have recently banned exotic circus animals, including

Greece, Slovenia, the Netherlands, Colombia and Paraguay. “Cruelty and suffering in traveling circuses is universal—over the last 20 years, we have worked undercover in circuses all over the world and the problem is that circuses work the animals for a show, not for the benefit of the animals,” Creamer said. “People should not go to the animal circuses—go to the circus with human performers, not animals.” The Pageant Theatre screening is not just a memorial to Richardson, but also a fundraiser for ADI. Garcia, Creamer and Phillips all will be in attendance, ready to share their memories of Richardson. “Mel had a vision that zoos eventually be turned into retirement homes for captive exotic animals—no more breeding,” Garcia said, adding that both she and Richardson had experiences with zoos and other businesses that permitted captured-animal breeding. By the early ’90s, they had mutually concluded that it “exacerbates the cycle” of cruelty, leading to inbreeding, and setting the animals up to be forms of entertainment, rather than rescue animals with an educational story to share. She believes Richardson’s message would be, “Don’t support zoos that are continuing to breed.” Ω

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THE GOODS PHOTO BY SHANNON ROONEY

15 MINUTES

THE BOTTOM LINE

Happy homecare

by Toni Scott

A new Address

With the growing number of seniors in the U.S. these days, there’s more and more demand for care for our aging population. In partnership with her parents, Kaliahna Baxter owns and operates Happy at Home, a nonmedical in-home caregiving business. Baxter gives a lot of credit to her top-notch staff, whose members receive ongoing education and take pride in helping to make others’ lives brighter. Some of the services offered include companionship, errands, transport to doctors’ appointments, light housekeeping, meal preparation, medication reminders and pet care. That takes the burden off other family members, offering piece of mind that their loved one is being looked after and their needs are being met. One of the ideas behind Happy at Home is to allow seniors who don’t need around-the-clock medical care to be independent and live at home. “Our goal is for home care to be as least invasive as possible,” she said. For more information on Happy at Home, which offers services throughout Butte, Glenn and Tehama counties, call 774-2127 or log onto happyathome chico.com

How did you get into caregiving? After high school, I moved to San Louis Obispo for college and worked in in-home situations and in facilities as a caregiver. Then I moved back up here to finish school at Chico State. The last year, I was talking with my parents because I knew I wanted to

own a facility as I knew taking care of seniors was my passion and my purpose.

How did you decide what kind of caregiving business to create? We went back and forth as to how to do it. I realized through looking back on my experience that the people who got to stay home were a lot happier, and I liked the relationships I made with people who were in their own home. I like that that relationship has the opportunity to build. If you find the right caregivers, then they appreciate that relationship as well.

What sets Happy at Home apart? The fact that we’re a familyowned business makes a difference because the business is about family. Usually some son, daughter, or niece is hiring someone for someone in their family.

How many caregivers do you have, and how’s business? We have 10. Just in the last three months, we have seen a huge boom in clientele.

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What do you look for in a caregiver? I want people with experience, and I try to hire an array of backgrounds. I want a couple people who have dementia or Alzheimer’s experience, a couple who have stroke or paraplegic or quadriplegic experience. I try to have that array because when I get that client, then I have that expertise. I try to find people for whom this isn’t just a job.

What do you love most about your work? I love that I get to make a positive difference in people’s lives—not just a client’s life because they now have the help they need to stay at home, but it makes a positive difference in the life of the family member who is relieved that some of the workload is off their shoulders, or if they’re not here, that someone is here to check on their loved one. —SHANNON ROONEY

The morning drive to my office is less than 5 miles, but it’s always stressinducing. I’ve tried to vary my route, but since I ordinarily hit snooze one too many times, I end up driving the fastest, albeit most frustrating, way to work. I get on Highway 99 at the shortest onramp ever—compounded now by construction—and risk getting mowed down by highway drivers or rear-ended by cars on the ramp behind me. Once I survive that, I exit on Cohasset Road, a merge requiring me to slow down, look over my shoulder, and speed up before squeezing over, all within a few seconds. By the time I get to the stoplight at the intersection of Cohasset and East Avenue, I need a breather. The past few weeks, as I have softened my grip on the steering wheel, I’ve noticed some new activity at the vacant building at 2444 Cohasset. There were a few instances earlier this year when I glanced over and saw a man and his dog sleeping on the building’s steps. But more recently, the doors were open, the lights were on and the man and his dog were absent. Mid-May, the signs went up and confirmed The Address is moving into that space. The furniture and home decor store has resided in downtown Chico’s Grand View Building at Third and Main streets for the past five years, making a move from downtown Oroville in 2009, after seven years there. Tracy Lay, who co-owns the business with Stephanie Houston, said the move is an expansion, noting that profits have been stifled due to lack of space. “We know that we could sell more if we had room to show people more,” Lay said. “People are visual.” The new building is more than double the store’s current footprint and will allow them to showcase more of the California custom-made furniture they carry, along with additional rugs and draperies. There will be expanded “looks” with different themed rooms, in addition to a full design center. Plus, there’s off-street parking, restrooms and office space. Considering the issues that have been aired about downtown Chico over the past year, I wondered—perhaps like many others who’ve noticed that The Address was moving—if that played any role in the move. Absolutely not, Lay said. She was adamant that there was “no demise of downtown” and with the need to load and unload large pieces of furniture, the downtown location just doesn’t work for the business. This new location, close to the flurry of new home construction that is happening in north Chico, is more ideal and Lay plans to officially open the new Address at the new address in early June. Lay added that she has heard that there will be even more retail activity coming to the North Valley Plaza and vicinity, increasing traffic in the area. My only hope is that the traffic comes after I’ve already made it to work.

PLEASE JOIN ME, STEVEN TRENHOLME, IN VOTING FOR ERIC ORTNER, JUNE 3RD. I have been practicing law in Butte County for over 27 years. Eric Ortner’s reputation within Butte County’s court system is outstanding. Eric has not only a vast amount of legal experience and a strong work ethic, but the temperament and discernment that outstanding judges should have. My endorsement of Eric Ortner is based on years of experience with both candidates. Your vote in this election really matters. Take the time to vote for Eric Ortner.

Steven Trenholme Attorney, Butte County Drug Court

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THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES When Aurora Beaudry was first interviewed for this story, she had two tattoos—one of an ocean scene, the other of her ex-husband’s name covered up by a sea turtle. This February, she had her sixth surgery to remove the ink.

RULES FOR EASIER BREATHING

If the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency adopts new emission standards for oil refineries, communities in California and across the nation would be spared exposure to toxic pollution. The newly proposed standards, expected to be finalized next spring, would improve monitoring and combustion efficiency requirements when waste gas is burned in a process called flaring, according to California News Service. The proposal comes after Earthjustice and the Environmental Integrity Project filed a lawsuit on behalf of groups in California, Louisiana and Texas. One of the groups involved in the lawsuit has monitored flaring at four refineries within 5 miles of Wilmington from 2000 to 2011, maintaining that each site has increased flaring emissions every year for the past decade. Long-term exposure to benzene, one of the pollutants emitted by refineries, has been linked to cancer, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

OBESITY: NO. 1 HEALTH THREAT?

The U.N. food chief recently declared that obesity now represents a greater threat to health than tobacco, urging the international community to address unhealthy diets in countries both developed and developing. Olivier De Schutter, the U.N. special rapporteur on the right to food, called for imposition of taxes and other regulations on unhealthy foods, tightened regulations on marketing junk food, reconfiguration of agricultural subsidies that drive down the cost and increase availability of some unhealthy foods, and increased support for local food production, according to SFGate.com. Globally, tobacco use remains the world’s leading cause of preventable death, accounting for about 5 million deaths annually.

OF SENIORS’ HEALTHY BEHAVIOR

Seniors in California have the healthiest behaviors of any such age group in the country, though the state ranked 18th overall for the health of its seniors, a report from the United Health Foundation finds. The America’s Health Rankings Seniors Report assessed the health of each state’s seniors using 34 measures, according to California Healthline. California ranked in the top 10 in the U.S. for avoiding obesity, as only 21.1 percent of seniors are obese; maintaining dental care, as 73.2 percent of seniors regularly visit the dentist; not smoking, as 5.9 percent of seniors smoke; and taking part in physical activities, as 78.6 percent of seniors are active. However, a high rate of food insecurity in California, limited access to home health care, and high rates of hospital deaths lowered the state’s overall rating.

Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

16

CN&R

May 29, 2014

Regrettable marks A local woman’s cautionary tale of two tattoos—and their removal

story and photos by

Howard Hardee

howardh@newsreview.com

I

n her youth, Aurora Beaudry

was prone to acting on a whim. In 1983, she was living in the Central Valley town of Lemoore, planning an extended trip to Venezuela. Upon meeting a young man, however, her plans changed. At 18 years old, she followed him to Chico, where they got married and had two children—a son and a daughter. Just prior to meeting her future husband, though, she made another snap decision that would follow her into adulthood. She accompanied her older sister to a tattoo shop and, on impulse, picked out “something cute” from the designs on the wall and had it permanently inked on her pelvis. “I always thought my sister was super cool; she’s seven years older than me,” Beaudry said during a recent interview. “I decided to get [the tattoo] then and there, thinking that I would be super cool, too.” It would take more than a decade for her to regret the tattoo—a blue-and-green ocean scene complete with sea horse, blowfish, seaweed and a treasure chest. By then, she had also gotten the name of her husband, Jerry, tattooed on her backside just below the waistline. The couple divorced in 1999, and Beaudry, sticking with the ocean theme, covered “Jerry” with a sea turtle.

She wouldn’t truly despise the tattoos until several years later, when she first visited a clothing-optional naturist resort in the Sacramento area with her current husband. For Beaudry, it was a pivotal experience she described as “the best thing I’ve ever done for myself.” After grappling with body-image issues since adolescence, bearing all in the company of both friends and strangers was a release. “It made me feel so much better, so much more accepting of myself,” she said. “It just changed me.” As she began returning to the naturist resort, she developed a higher respect for her body, she said. In her eyes, the decadesold tattoos had become “ugly graffiti.” While Beaudry acknowledged that tattoos can have artistic value or be of profound personal significance, hers were not; they were generic. “My tattoos meant

nothing to me,” she said. So, about a year ago, Beaudry began looking into how to get rid of them. Tattoos were, in a generation past,

symbols of rebellion; now they’re very much mainstream. The tattoo industry generates $2.3 billion annually in the U.S. alone, according to business publication Inc. Magazine, while a 2012 study conducted by the American Medical Association’s Archives of Dermatology estimated that 1 in 5 college-age Americans has at least one tattoo. For those who want their tattoos removed, laser treatment has become the standard procedure, but it can take up to 15 sessions to entirely break the ink down HEALTHLINES continued on page 18

APPOINTMENT BABY INFO ABOUNDING Pregnancy and parenthood will be hot topics at Enloe Medical Center’s Baby Faire at Enloe Conference Center (1528 Esplanade) on Saturday, May 31, from 9 a.m. to noon. The event will include a question-and-answer session with a panel of local physicians and exhibits on car-seat safety, breastfeeding, nutrition and safe sleep practices. Admission is $5; register online at www.enloe.org/ events or call 332-6745 for more information.


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(it’s then removed over time by the body’s lymphatic system), and success varies depending on tattoo color and size and whether the individual is a smoker. Indeed, Beaudry considered IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE laser removal, but was told during a consultation that the procedure doesn’t work well for dark ink (which hers was). She subsequently opted for a series of surgeries Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties with Dr. Daniel Thomas, a local plastic surgeon. Over the course of 24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) 10 months, Beaudry underwent six www.rapecrisis.org surgeries—three for each tattoo— during which eye-shaped incisions REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. & were PREV. made and the skin drawn together. The surgeries were spaced months apart to allow her skin to regain elasticity. As Beaudry was administered Private & Community numbing shots before each procedure, she said, the process was Walk-ins Welcome pain-free, although she did get Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. slightly squeamish at one point. Bill Nichols L.Ac. “When [Dr. Thomas] was cutting the one in front, I was watchMost insurance accepted ing and started to feel a little lightMassage available headed,” she said. “I didn’t feel it, but I saw my fat and muscle right there. That stuff’s supposed to stay on the inside!” 1209 Esplanade Ste 1 (corner of West 2nd Ave) The final procedure was com530.342.2895 • 10am–4pm M–F or by Appt pleted in February. AmericanChi.net

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For a graphic look at the full tattoo-removal procedure, check out Aurora Beaudry’s public Facebook album at www.tinyurl.com/thinkb4uink.

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body in the mirror now, it’s no longer marred by silly sea creatures. The scars in their place will fade significantly with time, she said, but she won’t mind if they’re

always there. “I’d rather have the scars than the ink,” she said. So, does she believe her experience serves as a cautionary tale for young people who might spontaneously get tattoos that don’t hold much meaning? Attempting to impart any such wisdom on her own daughter—who has a full sleeve and tattoos all down her back—was a lost cause, Beaudry said. “You’re so smart when you’re young; I thought so, anyway,” she said. “But I really didn’t have a clue. If only you could see what it will look like when you’re 30, 40, 50 or 60. Before I had them removed, I remember thinking, ‘I wonder what these are going to look like when I’m getting a bath in a convalescent home.’” She suggested trying a temporary henna tattoo, which can remain for up to two weeks, before committing for life. “My niece has a good saying: Why put bumper stickers on a Ferrari? My Ferrari days are over,” she laughed, “but I’d like to think I’m a classic Chevelle, at least.” Ω

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WEEKLY DOSE Don’t die for food In light of the recent U.S. Department of Agriculture recall of 1.8 million pounds of ground beef potentially tainted with E. coli from several grocery chains in the eastern half of the U.S., you might be wondering, “How can I tell if my beef is contaminated?” Well, you can’t. But, you can take a few safety precautions to protect yourself from foodborne illnesses: • Thoroughly rinse raw produce. • Keep raw foods separate from other food. • Wash everything—hands, utensils, surfaces—with hot water and soap before preparing and eating food. • Cook meats thoroughly: chicken (165 degrees); beef, pork, lamb (145 for steaks; 160 for ground). • Promptly return perishable foods to fridge or freezer.

Source: www.mayoclinic.org


The Highest Level of Care to Beat Cancer CanCer is a life-Changing and terrifying event for anyone who gets that diagnosis and for everyone who cares about them. Nearly every family has experience with cancer and according to a report by the President’s Cancer Panel, 41% of Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. Fortunately, thanks to medical science and early detection, the vast majority of people with cancer survive the ordeal, according to the American Cancer Society’s 2013 report. Faced with a diagnosis of cancer, we naturally seek the best care possible. In Butte County, The accreditation we are extremely places the Feather River fortunate to Hospital Cancer Center in have the Feather the most elite echelon of River Hospital cancer treatment facilities Cancer Center, in the country accredited by the American College of Surgeons (ACOS). The accreditation places this Cancer Center in the most elite echelon of cancer treatment facilities in the country, and Feather River Hospital is the only hospital in Butte County to be accredited by the ACOS. To earn the accreditation, the hospital voluntarily committed to providing the

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highest level of cancer care and regularly undergoes rigorous evaluations and reviews. In addition to the accreditation, patients of the Cancer Center have access to clinical trials, state-of-the-art technology, new treatment options and lifelong follow up. The Cancer Center recently upgraded their radiation features, with treatments that are shorter, more accurate, and provide patients with less treatments overall. This next generation machine has the ability to focus on a tumor in real time, which greatly lessens the damage to non-involved tissue. Feather River Hospital has long had an institutional focus on the holistic health and well being of its patients, and the oncologic specialists at the Cancer Center are dedicated to developing a treatment plan that is designed to meet their patient’s individual needs. They employ a multidisciplinary approach that integrates therapies to focus on medical, nutritional, physical, psychological, and spiritual needs, which research has shown to be the most effective treatment of cancer. From nutritional consultants to chaplain services, support groups and social services, the Cancer Center’s team is a diverse group of professionals that together care for the entire patient.

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CN&R 19


Popular gathering underscores ancestral skills and connection to community

(Clockwise from far left): During a “barter fair,” participants laid out blankets and wares they were interested in trading. These participants offered bows, furs, sauerkraut, jewelry and wild nuts. Summer Maroste and her partner, Beau Henegar, show off their creations. Chicoans Matthew Knight and Jahnia Mitchell, of local survivalist collective Earthbound Skills, taught a number of courses at this year’s Buckeye Gathering, including one on acorns. PHOTOS BY CLAIRE HUTKINS SEDA

were almost sold out within 20 hours. In addition, there are two other gatherings in Southern California this year, both of which began last year and are offering similar week-long activities. Yet another brand-new gathering, Sharpening Stone, was held last week in southern Oregon. “I think people are hungry for it. They want to learn these old ways because the new ways aren’t working,” said Maroste, who herself sought out and attended Buckeye for the first time this year. “People are feeling tired and stressed and burned out. The best way to re-energize our minds, bodies and spirits is to go out in nature and just be.”

Many of those in attendance at the Buckeye

“T

he smell is intoxicating to me,” said Summer Maroste, a Forest Ranch resident and schoolteacher. The woven willow basket in her hands filled the room with a very particular fragrance. The deep, rounded basket—the first she’s ever made—was closely woven with thick willow shoots of various shades of brown, gray, even a reddish tan, and she held it with care. “At first, I was like, oh, that’s really strong—and now I can’t get enough of it!” She leaned down, closed her eyes, and inhaled. Maroste had just returned from the Buckeye Gathering, an annual ancestral skills campout that relocated this year to the Lake Concow Campground, and her basket was the tangible result of a week of learning.

20

CN&R

May 29, 2014

She, along with the 600 members of the gathering, attended workshops like beginner’s backstrap weaving (using a basic loom), braintanning (curing animal hides with brains to make soft leather) and dogbane cordage (making rope from the broken-up fibers of dogbane bush bark). The workshop titles might sound foreign, but the skills are the building blocks of all the technologies we have today, said co-organizer Tamara Wilder. “These are the roots of everything we’ve got, and it’s very grounding” to learn basic techniques, she explained. “In our modern world, we’re dependent on all these technologies. “A lot of people have fear over what

would happen if the electricity went out,” she continued. “If you get the skills and you get grounded, then you no longer have any fear around that anymore.” These types of skills are called a number of names: primitive technologies, native arts, wilderness survival skills, Stone Age living skills, Earth skills—and they’re growing in popularity. Buckeye, which held its fifth annual event in early May, regularly sells out within days. This year, despite the move from the Bay Area to Concow, tickets

Gathering seemed to be not only searching for the ancestral skills as alternatives to the unsustainability of our modern culture, but also connection to a community. This is no surprise to co-organizer Chris Sparks. “I think people crave village, and crave community. The gatherings are sort of an overlay or excuse: ‘Hey, I’m going to go learn this ….’ But what people really want is community… the way that our society is structured right now, that’s not something that’s fostered very easily.” Wilder agreed: “If they really just wanted the skills, they could just take a workshop,” rather than committing to a whole week. “Or look them up on YouTube,” Sparks added. Four of the seven core organizers—Russell Sparks, the founder and primary organizer, his brother Chris, Wilder and Edward Willie—met this reporter near the campground’s “old village,” where a creek winds past dwellings made mostly from cedar bark and tule reeds. As they spoke, they could hear the sounds of nearby workshops (singing in the women’s lodge, the clanging of primitive blacksmithing, chatter among a group working on “membraning” animal hides) mixed with the jarringly modern beeps and static of the walkie-talkies the organizers carried. Russell Sparks, barefoot and sitting in the dirt against a log, seemed pleased with his creation and credited Buckeye’s “parent” organization, the Society of Primitive Technology, and other longer-running gatherings with paving the way. He views the week as a chance for participants to question, “What are the best parts [of our human cultures] that serve humanity, and how do we let go of the parts that aren’t serving us?” he said. The gathering has been popular since Sparks started it in Sonoma County in 2010. Despite the event selling out quickly, Sparks is adamant about capping ticket sales to maintain the smallcommunity atmosphere, where, by the end of the week, the group has coalesced and participants no longer see a strange face. “We’re in a gathering—we’re not a festival,” Sparks insisted. “We’re trying to retain some intimacy.” Each morning, the group gathered at the main fire pit for an opening circle. On the first day,

when Sparks asked how many had previously attended Buckeye, he said, about half the participants raised their hands. “This group of people here is a tribe that is united by a desire specifically for basketry and hides and hand-drill fires,” Sparks explained, but they end up uniting “to find moments and ways to touch or model or experiment in having a more healthy culture.” Willie added that many people end up leaving Buckeye with a better understanding of basic living skills and a better ability to coexist with others. He pointed to workshops on healthy communication and on building community as examples of how the gathering fosters community as well as skills-building. The organizers agreed that “disconnection” in modern times is multileveled: alienation from our own ecosystems, alienation from our technology and how things are made, and alienation from each other. Several pioneers in addressing the overlapping layers of disconnection were in attendance, including Jon Young, founder of 8 Shields in Santa Cruz, and Will Scott, a member of Weaving Earth, based in Penngrove. Both nonprofits have multifaceted approaches; 8 Shields’ website states its goal is to “support the development of an emerging international network of deep nature connection, mentoring, and culture repair.” “You can’t have the community without that connection to nature,” Maroste said, referencing Young’s teachings at the gathering, where he spoke of Western society’s disconnections. “They’re essential to each other.” Stephanie Elliott, Chico resident and director of GRUB Education, was similarly inspired by the gathering’s focus on community. She said she was impressed that the organizers realize that “it’s not just about learning these practical skills—on how to carve your own spoon or make your own fire—but how to do that with other people. I think that’s a really strong component in our culture that we’ve lost. I’m really excited that they’re dedicated to bringing both of those together in this gathering.” Elliott attended with her two young children, mostly staying with the family camp program headed by Robin Blankenship, who is the founder of another gathering, in Colorado, called Earth Knack. The program provided daily story hours, outdoor games and hands-on activities for both the parents and children. “We don’t sit in a corner and glue popsicle sticks together,” said Blankenship, while behind her children practiced flint-knapping with two instructors, using a heavy rock to break obsidian into useful tools like arrowheads.

In the middle of the week, Matthew Knight and

Jahnia Mitchell, part of the Chico-based survivalist collective Earthbound Skills, gathered under some ponderosa pines, between the campground’s stage and the main fire pit, to offer a short workshop on acorns. Mitchell passed around toasted acorn bits for participants to chew on, and discussed which oak varieties had the fewest bitter tannins (which, locally, is the valley oak). While participants asked questions and shared tips (“Have you ever tried leaching the acorns in the tank of a toilet?” one man asked; Mitchell had not.), some also kept their hands busy: two women were sewing leather moccasins, another pulled out a journal to take notes. “BUCKEYE” continued on page 22 May 29, 2014

CN&R

21


Popular gathering underscores ancestral skills and connection to community

(Clockwise from far left): During a “barter fair,” participants laid out blankets and wares they were interested in trading. These participants offered bows, furs, sauerkraut, jewelry and wild nuts. Summer Maroste and her partner, Beau Henegar, show off their creations. Chicoans Matthew Knight and Jahnia Mitchell, of local survivalist collective Earthbound Skills, taught a number of courses at this year’s Buckeye Gathering, including one on acorns. PHOTOS BY CLAIRE HUTKINS SEDA

were almost sold out within 20 hours. In addition, there are two other gatherings in Southern California this year, both of which began last year and are offering similar week-long activities. Yet another brand-new gathering, Sharpening Stone, was held last week in southern Oregon. “I think people are hungry for it. They want to learn these old ways because the new ways aren’t working,” said Maroste, who herself sought out and attended Buckeye for the first time this year. “People are feeling tired and stressed and burned out. The best way to re-energize our minds, bodies and spirits is to go out in nature and just be.”

Many of those in attendance at the Buckeye

“T

he smell is intoxicating to me,” said Summer Maroste, a Forest Ranch resident and schoolteacher. The woven willow basket in her hands filled the room with a very particular fragrance. The deep, rounded basket—the first she’s ever made—was closely woven with thick willow shoots of various shades of brown, gray, even a reddish tan, and she held it with care. “At first, I was like, oh, that’s really strong—and now I can’t get enough of it!” She leaned down, closed her eyes, and inhaled. Maroste had just returned from the Buckeye Gathering, an annual ancestral skills campout that relocated this year to the Lake Concow Campground, and her basket was the tangible result of a week of learning.

20

CN&R

May 29, 2014

She, along with the 600 members of the gathering, attended workshops like beginner’s backstrap weaving (using a basic loom), braintanning (curing animal hides with brains to make soft leather) and dogbane cordage (making rope from the broken-up fibers of dogbane bush bark). The workshop titles might sound foreign, but the skills are the building blocks of all the technologies we have today, said co-organizer Tamara Wilder. “These are the roots of everything we’ve got, and it’s very grounding” to learn basic techniques, she explained. “In our modern world, we’re dependent on all these technologies. “A lot of people have fear over what

would happen if the electricity went out,” she continued. “If you get the skills and you get grounded, then you no longer have any fear around that anymore.” These types of skills are called a number of names: primitive technologies, native arts, wilderness survival skills, Stone Age living skills, Earth skills—and they’re growing in popularity. Buckeye, which held its fifth annual event in early May, regularly sells out within days. This year, despite the move from the Bay Area to Concow, tickets

Gathering seemed to be not only searching for the ancestral skills as alternatives to the unsustainability of our modern culture, but also connection to a community. This is no surprise to co-organizer Chris Sparks. “I think people crave village, and crave community. The gatherings are sort of an overlay or excuse: ‘Hey, I’m going to go learn this ….’ But what people really want is community… the way that our society is structured right now, that’s not something that’s fostered very easily.” Wilder agreed: “If they really just wanted the skills, they could just take a workshop,” rather than committing to a whole week. “Or look them up on YouTube,” Sparks added. Four of the seven core organizers—Russell Sparks, the founder and primary organizer, his brother Chris, Wilder and Edward Willie—met this reporter near the campground’s “old village,” where a creek winds past dwellings made mostly from cedar bark and tule reeds. As they spoke, they could hear the sounds of nearby workshops (singing in the women’s lodge, the clanging of primitive blacksmithing, chatter among a group working on “membraning” animal hides) mixed with the jarringly modern beeps and static of the walkie-talkies the organizers carried. Russell Sparks, barefoot and sitting in the dirt against a log, seemed pleased with his creation and credited Buckeye’s “parent” organization, the Society of Primitive Technology, and other longer-running gatherings with paving the way. He views the week as a chance for participants to question, “What are the best parts [of our human cultures] that serve humanity, and how do we let go of the parts that aren’t serving us?” he said. The gathering has been popular since Sparks started it in Sonoma County in 2010. Despite the event selling out quickly, Sparks is adamant about capping ticket sales to maintain the smallcommunity atmosphere, where, by the end of the week, the group has coalesced and participants no longer see a strange face. “We’re in a gathering—we’re not a festival,” Sparks insisted. “We’re trying to retain some intimacy.” Each morning, the group gathered at the main fire pit for an opening circle. On the first day,

when Sparks asked how many had previously attended Buckeye, he said, about half the participants raised their hands. “This group of people here is a tribe that is united by a desire specifically for basketry and hides and hand-drill fires,” Sparks explained, but they end up uniting “to find moments and ways to touch or model or experiment in having a more healthy culture.” Willie added that many people end up leaving Buckeye with a better understanding of basic living skills and a better ability to coexist with others. He pointed to workshops on healthy communication and on building community as examples of how the gathering fosters community as well as skills-building. The organizers agreed that “disconnection” in modern times is multileveled: alienation from our own ecosystems, alienation from our technology and how things are made, and alienation from each other. Several pioneers in addressing the overlapping layers of disconnection were in attendance, including Jon Young, founder of 8 Shields in Santa Cruz, and Will Scott, a member of Weaving Earth, based in Penngrove. Both nonprofits have multifaceted approaches; 8 Shields’ website states its goal is to “support the development of an emerging international network of deep nature connection, mentoring, and culture repair.” “You can’t have the community without that connection to nature,” Maroste said, referencing Young’s teachings at the gathering, where he spoke of Western society’s disconnections. “They’re essential to each other.” Stephanie Elliott, Chico resident and director of GRUB Education, was similarly inspired by the gathering’s focus on community. She said she was impressed that the organizers realize that “it’s not just about learning these practical skills—on how to carve your own spoon or make your own fire—but how to do that with other people. I think that’s a really strong component in our culture that we’ve lost. I’m really excited that they’re dedicated to bringing both of those together in this gathering.” Elliott attended with her two young children, mostly staying with the family camp program headed by Robin Blankenship, who is the founder of another gathering, in Colorado, called Earth Knack. The program provided daily story hours, outdoor games and hands-on activities for both the parents and children. “We don’t sit in a corner and glue popsicle sticks together,” said Blankenship, while behind her children practiced flint-knapping with two instructors, using a heavy rock to break obsidian into useful tools like arrowheads.

In the middle of the week, Matthew Knight and

Jahnia Mitchell, part of the Chico-based survivalist collective Earthbound Skills, gathered under some ponderosa pines, between the campground’s stage and the main fire pit, to offer a short workshop on acorns. Mitchell passed around toasted acorn bits for participants to chew on, and discussed which oak varieties had the fewest bitter tannins (which, locally, is the valley oak). While participants asked questions and shared tips (“Have you ever tried leaching the acorns in the tank of a toilet?” one man asked; Mitchell had not.), some also kept their hands busy: two women were sewing leather moccasins, another pulled out a journal to take notes. “BUCKEYE” continued on page 22 May 29, 2014

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“BUCKEYE” continued from page 21

Instructors are unpaid at Buckeye, but they use the opportunity to network and promote their own survival schools around the state and the country. Buckeye was modeled after “parent gatherings” Rabbitstick, which has been running for 26 years in Idaho, and Winter Count in Arizona. As such, most instructors already understood the general rhythm of the week, even if they had never attended Buckeye before. Knight and Mitchell both taught a number of workshops throughout the week, including how to make coal-burned bowls and spoons, process acorns, and make cordage from local plants. They had attended Buckeye’s first gathering in 2010, as participants. They have attended a number of gatherings nationwide, including Rabbitstick and Winter Count. This year’s Buckeye was the first where they attended as instructors. Knight and Mitchell were just two of more than a dozen instructors who taught a multitude of courses, from those on peaceful communication to health consultations with an herbalist, a cultural appropriation discussion, and a land management by fire course. Skills taught were drawn from cultures throughout the world—for example, shoemaking techniques from the Plains tribes, yoga, Mayan weaving, and fire-starting from Botswana. The volume of offerings were overwhelming. Although the majority of participants stayed close to the main fire pit and in the old village, where most of the workshops were taught throughout the day, many were found lingering by their tents, or dozing in hammocks strung between pine trees, enjoying the solitude and sipping tea. Buckeye’s move to Concow was welcomed by local primitive skills enthusiasts— “We were super stoked it was right here in our own backyard,” Knight said—and bemoaned by the Bay Area hordes who had several more hours to drive to arrive at the camp. After four years at the Ya-Ka-Ma Indian Educational Center in Forestville, in Sonoma County, the center’s board of directors did not renew the contract for the event to continue on their property, which exists to provide space for “the traditional practices … for the local tribes in the area,” said Mario Hermosillo Jr., chair of Ya-Ka-Ma’s board. “[The Buckeye organizers] were always very respectful,” he said, but the board decided to keep the focus on tribal use. By winter, after an exhaustive search throughout Northern California, the Buckeye organizers settled on the Concow Campground, which is privately owned by eight partners who together are called Konkow Partnership LLC. The group, which took ownership of the campground only last year, was impressed by the gathering. “What we’re trying to do here is preserve the land,” said Clara Barber, one of the partners. “And, it fits perfect here,” added partner Raychel Smith.

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Above: Every morning, participants gather around the fire pit before starting the day’s activities. PHOTO BY STEPHANIE WILLIAMS

Right: Participants in Knight and Mitchell’s acorn-processing workshop work on other projects like moccasins while conversing about acorns. PHOTO BY CLAIRE HUTKINS SEDA

Below: The women brought a basket filled with valley oak acorns. PHOTO BY CLAIRE HUTKINS SEDA

Most of the week, Smith’s and Barber’s children could be found racing around the campground on bikes, stopping to watch workshops and crafts being made. Many of the partners even participated in workshops. Smith said she was pleased that she didn’t have to worry about her children overhearing inappropriate conversation, as the participants were focused on the skills at hand—and drugs and alcohol were prohibited. The location was ideal for local enthusiasts; Elliott estimated somewhere around 25 Butte County residents were in attendance. “[Local] people who went there are definitely really excited” about the skills they acquired at the gathering, said Mitchell, but an ancestral skills community has not yet coalesced. “It’s a rock-drop in the pond of the consciousness for the people of Chico and Butte County” who attended, Knight said. “It’s definitely going to have an affect.”

The effects certainly seem to be lingering for

Maroste and her partner, Beau Henegar, who also attended. They both say they feel more aware of their surroundings and actions since returning. Maroste looked back on her basket-weaving class as more than just teaching her the skills of creating something. “As [my instructor] is showing us the beginnings of how to weave a basket, she pauses and explains that, the way she was taught, when you weave a basket, you are weaving your intentions, your hopes, your dreams and prayers into your basket, so it’s important to keep your thoughts… really focused, because it’s all going into your basket,” Maroste explained. She met with her


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Animal hides were the focus of several workshops, such as tanning, moccasinmaking and clothes-making. PHOTO BY STEPHANIE WILLIAMS

instructor daily during the gathering to guide her progress. At the end of the week, she had her basket just about completed. “To sit there and dwell on the flaws or mistakes is unproductive,” her instructor told her. “I got a really sharp focus, and I realized … why we were all gathering there.” Henegar had a similar experience when he attended a “plant spirit medicine walk”—which ended up having very little to do with walking. “[The instructor] sat us down for an hour and a half out of his two-hour [course] and just talked about how to approach a plant, how to act, how to connect, and all that she can offer you … in her guidance and support in your life,” said Henegar, using the female pronoun to refer to the plant. That awareness of the task at hand followed Maroste and Henegar back home. “For me … the feelings I have in these first couple of days since coming back, and what I’m taking with me, is that slowing down of whatever you are looking at, [despite being back] in this fast-paced, gimme-that, instant, turn-on, flip-a-switch culture that we’ve created and supported consciously,” Henegar said. Other effects can be more tangible. Maroste noted

that, as she got more inspired by these skills, her “spaces got smaller and smaller”—she needed less indoor space. Russell Sparks noted that a focus on the skills and learning more about the basic things we need to get by, like simple tools and clothing, can help participants in needing less. Mitchell and Knight have experienced the opposite as instructors— their house is full of harvested basket materials and pieces of cedar for fire kits—but they understand the sentiment. “Your house is extended. It’s not just what’s between your four walls, it’s what lies outside too,” said Mitchell. “Your food is out there, your recreation is out there, and your relaxation—all that stuff.” Elliott, on the other hand, brought back a heightened awareness of community. “I’ve been living in community for five years now” as a member of the GRUB Cooperative, “but I still can be reluctant about asking for help, because I still want to hold that composure of, ‘I can do all of this—I don’t need help,’” she noted. “Going deeper with why I have that block, and how to [get] rid of that block, is something that I feel really inspired [me] to continue to investigate.” As for Maroste’s basket, it won’t be gathering dust on her shelf. She is following a tradition of giving away her first basket as an offering to the world, a lesson in nonattachment. “I haven’t given my basket away yet,” she said, “but I’d like to pass it on to someone in the family, so I can visit it and enjoy the magnificent scent of the willow.” Ω

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May 29, 2014

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture Dance outside

Delhi 2 Dublin performs at the 2013 Cal WorldFest in Grass Valley. PHOTO BY ALAN SHECKTER

A guide to Nor Cal’s season of music festivals

THIS WEEK

T during which you become fully immersed in your travel destination,

he best vacations are those

where your real life melts away and you get rejuvenated by being plugged into something by other than bills, bosses Jason Cassidy and alarm clocks. For many locals, that full immersion comes in the form of several days spent camping and dancing in the woods with several thousand like-minded fun-lovers at one of the many spring/summer music festivals spread out across Nor Cal. And there are many opportunities for getting away and cutting loose in the coming months. Let the celebration of summer begin.

Father’s Day Bluegrass Festival June 12-15, Nevada County Fairgrounds, Grass Valley. Featuring: Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band, Laurie Lewis, Lonesome River Band, Junior Sisk & Ramblers Choice, more. Tickets: $35-$55 (one day) to $160 (four days). Camping included. www.fathersdayfestival.com Huichica Music Festival June 13-14, Gundlach Bundschu Winery, Sonoma. Featuring: David Longstreth (Dirty Projectors), Mount Eerie, The Blank Tapes, Meg Baird, more. Tickets: $30 (Friday), $50 (Saturday), $75 (two days). www.huichicamusicfestival.com Reggae in the Hills June 13-15, Calaveras County Fairgrounds, Angels Camp. Featuring: Junior Reid, Tribal Seeds, Luciano, Prezident Brown, Mystic Roots, more. Tickets: $14-$60 (one day) to $110 (three days). Free camping. www.reggae inthehills.com Sierra Nevada World Music Festival June 20-22, Mendocino County Fair, Boonville. Featuring: Shaggy, Rebelution, Sly & Robbie, Barrington Levy, Seun Kuti, SambaDá, more. Tickets: $60-$75 (one day) to $170 (three days). Camping: $75. www.snwmf.com Vans Warped Tour June 26, Sleep Train Amphitheatre, Wheatland. Featuring: Anberlin, Less 24

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THURS

Special Events THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: The market is back with fresh produce,

Than Jake, Survive This!, Teenage Bottlerocket, and tons more. Tickets $45 (general admission). www.warpedtour.com

Sacred Movement June 27-29, Lake Concow Campground, Concow. Featuring: Healing artists, plus music by Delhi 2 Dublin, Jelly Bread, Tracorum, New Monsoon, Dylan’s Dharma, Wolf Thump, Bogg, more. Tickets: $30 (one day) to $75 (three days with camping). www.sacredmusicfestival.com Kate Wolf Music Festival June 27-29, Black Oak Ranch, Laytonville. Featuring: Joan Baez, Los Lobos, Jackie Greene, Rodney Crowell, Darlene Love, Beausoleil, more. Tickets: $185-$210 (two-three days, with camping). Parking extra. www.katewolfmusicfestival.com High Sierra Music Festival July 3-6, Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds, Quincy. Featuring: Widespread Panic, Lauryn Hill, Beats Antique, STS9, Carolina Chocolate Drops, The Del McCoury Band, Lettuce, more. Tickets: $75-$80 (one day) to $160-$222.50 (twoto four-day passes, with camping). Info: www.highsierramusic.com Rockstar Mayhem Festival July 6, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View. Featuring: Korn, Body Count (feat. Ice-T), Avenged Sevenfold, Asking Alexandria, Cannibal Corpse, more. Tickets: $25-$115. www.rockstarmay hemfest.com California WorldFest July 10-13, Nevada County Fairgrounds, Grass Valley. Featuring: Los Lonely Boys, Ozomatli, Delhi 2 Dublin, Claire Lynch Band, Antsy McClain, Incendio, more. Tickets: $60 (one day) to $180 (four days

with camping). www.worldfest.net

Wanderlust Festival July 17-20, Squaw Valley USA, Lake Tahoe. Music and yoga festival featuring: The Polyphonic Spree, Big Gigantic, DJ Krush, MC Yogi, more. Plus, art, theater and yoga and meditation classes. Tickets are $100-$475 for single-, three- or fourday all-inclusive music and yoga packages. squaw.wanderlustfestival.com Northern Nights July 18-20, Cook’s Valley Campground, Mendocino/Humboldt. Featuring: Beats Antique, Zion I, Justin Martin, Odesza, Viceroy, The Floozies, more. Tickets: $139-$179 (three days, with camping). www.northernnights.org Reggae on the River July 31-Aug. 3, French’s Camp, Piercy. Featuring: Jimmy Cliff, Alpha Blondy & The Solar System, Fishbone, Israel Vibration, Iration, Third World, more. Tickets: $190 (three days with camping) to $250 (four days with camping). www.reggae ontheriver.com Guitarfish Music Festival August 1-3, Cisco Grove Campground, Cisco Grove. Featuring: The Mother Hips, Everyone Orchestra, Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers, Pimps of Joytime, California Honeydrops, more. Tickets: $169 (three days with camping). www.guitarfish festival.com For the Funk of It Aug. 15-16, Highway 70, Belden. Featuring: Jelly Bread, Brownout, Moksha, Afrofunk Experience, Funk Revival Orchestra, Gravy Brain, more. Tickets: $30-$50 (one day) to $65-$75 (two days). www.ftffest.com Ω

local food, arts and crafts, plus live entertainment. This week: Hype Dance Studio, Fusion Dance Company, and the Jeff Pershing Band. Th, 6-9pm. Opens 5/29. Free. Chico City Plaza, Downtown Chico.

Art Receptions OUT OF CLASS: OUT OF CASA: A reception for the selections of life

drawings from the students of Sal Casa. Th, 5/29, 6-8pm. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

Music REVEREND HORTON HEAT: Rockabilly, surf, and rock and roll with Heat and his trio, plus banjo punk from Old Man Markley and Tex-Mex punk with PinATA PROTEST. Th, 5/29, 8:30pm. $18. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St., (530) 342-2727.

TOUR KICK-OFF/ RELEASE PARTY: Teeph releases their five-song EP

Solid Jobs, and the Americas release a new tape called Hard Data to kick-off their upcoming tours. Baby Gurl from Salt Lake City and new local instrumental band Decent join in on the shenanigans. Th, 5/29, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 345-7672.

Theater GOD’S COUNTRY: A theatrical docudrama about the growing white

supremacist movement in America. Directed by Steven Dietz. Th-Sa,

CHICO BIKE & BREW Sunday, June 1 Begins at Bidwell Mansion

SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS OUT OF CLASS: OUT OF CASA

Reception Thursday, May 29 1078 Gallery SEE THURSDAY, ART RECEPTIONS

household items, plus art and local crafts. Sa, 5/31, 8am-2pm. Centennial Cultural Center, 1931 Arlin Rhine Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-7690.

7:30-9:30pm through 5/31. $12-$15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

OTHER DESERT CITIES: Brooke Wyeth returns home to Palm Springs after a six-year absence, stirring up tragic events in the family’s history for a memoir she’s writing.

Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 6/21. And Su, 2pm, 6/86/22.$16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Poetry/Literature

HOOKED ON FISHING NOT ON DRUGS: The American Sportfishing Association gives children the chance to learn how to fish in horseshoe lake. All tackle, bait and instruction will be provided. Sa, 5/31, 7am-1pm. Free. Horseshoe Lake, Upper Bidwell Park, (530) 8914757.

MOUNTAIN MUSIC FESTIVAL: A fundraiser event for the Forest Ranch Charter School with live music from Mossy Creek, Dylan’s Dharma, The Jeff Pershing Band, and The Alice Peake Experience. See website for more information. Sa, 5/31, 10am-8pm. $5. www.forestranch mountainmusicfestival.com.

CHICO STORY SLAM: Tell a five-minute, unscripted story related to a weekly theme. Last Th of every month, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

30

FRI

Special Events FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Downtown Chico’s summer music series continues with classic rock/country from The Retrotones. F, 5/30, 78:30pm. Chico City Plaza, Downtown Chico.

Music LUKAS NELSON AND PROMISE OF THE REAL: A benefit show for KZFR with rock from Lukas Nelson and friends, plus Americana/folk/bluegrass from The Brothers Comatose. F, 5/30, 8pm. $20. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St., (530) 342-2727, www.kzfr.org.

Theater GOD’S COUNTRY: See Thursday. Blue Room

Theater GOD’S COUNTRY: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

OTHER DESERT CITIES: See Thursday. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

1

SUN

Special Events 49ER FAIRE: Enjoy local arts and crafts, live music from Coopers Bluff and friends, gold panning and weaving, plus a silent auction and barbecue. Su, 6/1, 9am-4pm. Free. Colman Museum, 13548 Centerville Rd., (530) 893-9667, www.colmanmuseum.com.

CHICO BIKE & BREW: A guided bicycle tour of local historical landmarks starting at Bidwell Mansion and ending at the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. garden for a bike show and cele-

bration. Food and beer will be available for purchase. Pre-registration required. Su, 6/1, 10am-3pm. $5-$15. Bidwell Mansion, 525 Esplanade, (530) 895-6144, www.race planner.com/register/info/ 2014-Chico-Bike-And-Brew.

A COUNTRY PICNIC: Enjoy an afternoon in the country at a fundraiser for the Chico Museum with a barbeque, Shubert’s ice cream, and live music from Jazzupa. Pre-registration required. Su, 6/1, 4-8pm. $10 Kids, $45 Adults. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.com.

HONEY RUN COVERED BRIDGE PANCAKE BREAKFAST: The 49th Annual fundraising event includes breakfast, raffle prizes, and live

Celtic music from the Pub Scouts. Su, 6/1, 711am. $5.00- $7.50. Honey Run Covered Bridge, 1670 Honey Run Rd. 4.5 miles from Skyway, (530) 895-1243, hwww.honeyruncovered bridge.com.

3

TUES

Music DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: San Fransisco’s ambassadors of gypsy rock return to Chico for another round of Eastern European pop, and punk rock. Tu, 6/3, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

4

WED

Special Events FORK IN THE ROAD: Choose from more than a dozen of Chico’s finest food trucks. Live music, beer on tap, and a playground for the kids. W, 6/4, 5-8pm. Free admission. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave., (530) 343-5617.

Art 1078 GALLERY: Out of Class: Out of Casa, selections of life drawings from the students of Sal Casa. 5/29-6/21. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Delbert Rupp and Friends, thrown and carved large-scale stoneware vessels and sculpture. Through 5/31. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9 gallery.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: Contemporary Woman, mixed-media art that examines the role of women, their struggles, successes, and experiences as female artists. Through 6/13. 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chico artcenter.com.

FLORALS AND FLOWERS: Artwork can be of any subject, but must contain at least one flower in the image. See website for more details. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW CALL FOR ENTRIES: Photographers may enter images captured digitally or on film. All entries must be submitted online as a digital file. For further requirements and info see website. $33 for three images, $8 each additional image. www.imagesfromaglasseye.org

POSTER CONTEST: Submit drawings and designs for the upcoming season of show posters at Theatre on The Ridge. See website for more details. Ongoing. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

CHICO PAPER CO.: The Totem Series, new works inspired from textiles, jewelry design, painting, and collage by artist Marilynn Jennings. California Rivers, Jake Early’s latest series. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

NAKED LOUNGE TEA AND COFFEEHOUSE: All the

Rest, paintings and prints by Jonny Alexander. Through 5/31. Gallery hours are Open daily. 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Color Magic, original paintings, pottery, etchings and jewelry by local artists. Through 5/30. New Works, figurative drawings from local artists. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

THE UPS STORE: New Works, etchings, engraving and collagraph prints from artist Michael Halldorsen. Through 5/31. 702 Mangrove Ave. #224.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: Bird Houses, local artist and craftsman Bernie Vigallon created bird-houses to benefit the Fairview Alternative Education Program. Through 6/20. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Explore Evolution, investigate evolutionary principles in organisms ranging from smallest to the largest, with interactive exhibits. Also, Changing California, a journey through geological and ecological transformations in Northern California. $3-$6. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

PARADISE DEPOT MUSEUM: Paradise Depot

Museum Open House, a railroad and logging museum in Paradise. 5570 Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 877-1919.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Into The Blue: Maritime Navigation and the Archeology of Shipwrecks, featuring artifacts recovered from the Frolic shipwreck and the story behind the ship’s history. TuSa through 7/24. Meriam Library Complex Chico State.

Call for Artists ALL-MEDIA ART SHOW: The Chico Art Center

Music CELEBRATION OF THE SONG SHOWCASE: The 2014

hosts its annual national all-media juried art competition. See website for details. Ongoing. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

finalists for KZFR’s 5th annual Celebration of the Song, Dan Casamajor, Hannah Jane Kile and Erin Friedman will be showcasing their musical talents. W, 6/4, 6pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 3452739, www.kzfr.org.

Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

OTHER DESERT CITIES: See Thursday. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

31

UNCLE DAD’S RADIO SHOW DEBUT Tuesday, June 3, 3-5 p.m. KZFR, 90.1 FM

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 30

SEE ARTS DEVO, P. 34

SAT

Special Events ART YARD SALE: A fundraiser event for the Artist’s of River Town. Find art supplies,

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Honey Run and hotcakes The Honey Run Covered Bridge is a gem, a jigsaw-puzzle-picturesque throwback to another time best enjoyed while soaking your feet in Butte Creek. The morning of Sunday, June 1, adds the aroma of grilling hotcakes, a soundtrack courtesy of Chico’s Pub Scouts and some old-timey cars to that mix for the 49th annual fundraiser for the upkeep of the bridge and EDITOR’S PICK adjacent park. This event tops the list of reasons to visit the bridge located just miles from Chico, followed by being the best location to show visiting old people and the best place to test the settings on your new camera.

May 29, 2014

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BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave., (530) 321-5607.

AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am through 12/9. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.buttecounty.net.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for more info. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. F, 6-8pm. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

THINK FREE.

EDIBLE AND USEFUL PLANTS HIKE: Hike around the nature center grounds and learn about California’s cornucopia of edible/native foodstuffs. Sa, 5/31, 10-11:30am. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 8914671, www.bidwellpark.org.

EVENING DANCE JAM: A weekly meditative dance session. F, 7:15pm. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Suite 150, (530) 3420100.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:30pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMER’S BILL OF RIGHTS MEETING: Agriculture professionals and enthusiasts promote awareness and appreciation for the “tillers of the soil” and discuss common concerns and rights. Sa, 5/31, 10am. Free. Chico Grange, 2775 Nord Ave., (530) 895-1976.

FARMERS’ MARKET: CHAPMAN: A year-round Certified Farmers’ Market serving as a community forum for healthful-lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

FARMERS’ MARKET: SATURDAY: Chico’s weekly community gathering, with fresh produce, crafts, baked goods and more. Sa, 7:30am1pm. Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second & Wall streets.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First

Ave., (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfree clinic.org.

HAPPY HEALING: Experience a variety of healing modalities. F, 7pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

INTERNATIONAL DANCING: All levels welcome. No

partner needed. F, 8pm. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

INTRO TO HERBS: An educational class providing you with growing tips, harvesting methods and storage advice, culinary and medicinal herbs , companion planting and how to make your own herbal teas right at home. Sa, 5/31, 10am. Magnolia Gift & Garden, 1367 East Ave., (530) 894-5410, www.magnoliagardening.com.

MONDAY MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE: a non-competitive and friendly beginner mountain bike ride with Hyland Fischer. First M of every month, 6pm through 10/31. Free. North Rim Adventure Sports, 178 E. Second St., (530) 345-6980, www.northrimadventure.com.

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May 29, 2014

EDIBLE AND USEFUL PLANTS HIKE Saturday, May 31 Chico Creek Nature Center SEE COMMUNITY

PAINTING CLAY CANVAS WORKSHOP: Learn a new stencil technique, or make a Father’s Day gift using your new artistic skills. All levels welcome.Space is limited, pre-registration required. Sa, 5/31, 3-5pm. $65. All Fired Up, 830 Broadway, (530) 894-5227, www.allfired upchico.org.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 872-7085.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

SOUNDS OF THE VALLEY CHORUS: Women singers welcome to sing in four-part harmony barbershop style. Call for more info. W, 7pm. Marigold Elementary School, 2446 Marigold Ave., (530) 343-5183.

SQUARE-DANCE CLUB: Square-dancing classes for beginners and advanced-level dancers. Call for more info. Th, 7-10pm. Veterans Memorial Hall, 6550 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1962.

TRADITIONAL WEST-AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of

drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.,

(808) 757-0076.

WORLD DANCE: Classes offered through CARD with line, circle and partner dances from around the world. No partner needed. Th, 7pm. $7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4711, www.chicorec.com.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive-plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water-quality testing and more. Check Friends of Bidwell Park website for dates and locations. Ongoing. Bidwell Park, Bidwell Park, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, (530) 514-3903.

RIVER AND TRAIL CLEAN-UP: The Butte County Conservation District hosts their third river and trail clean-up day. Sa, 5/31, 9am-noon. Free. Riverbend Park, 1 Salmon Run Rd. in Oroville, (530) 533-2011.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


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Uncharted territory A tasty journey to a land of super-sized sushi rolls

A enough to make you go, “Huh?” But that is, it turns out, the specialty at Sushi King, an odd little sushi burrito. Just the sound of it is

restaurant gem on the north end of town. I’d driven by this location—in the old Dairy Queen building at The Esplanade and Cohasset—many, many times without stopping. The relatively recent name change—from Pizza King to what looked like “Sushi Burrito King”—initially took me by surprise. Sushi Burrito King? I thought to myself more than once. Nah. There’s no way they really make sushi burritos. … Boy, was I wrong. Walking into the odd eatery is like entering an alternate universe, one where sushi and burritos collide and boba teas include juice balls that pop in your story and mouth. The décor is typical of most photo by Meredith J. Japanese restaurants, complete with Graham paper lanterns, but the menu is not. Below the mounted version on the meredithg@ newsreview.com wall behind the counter are big television screens that feature the same menu’s pages, flipping in a distracting loop. For my first visit, I decided to go with the traditional milk tea with boba ($2.95), plus a gyoza appetizer ($4.50 for eight) and, of course, I ★★★ had to see what the sushi burrito was all about (would it be wrapped in a Sushi King 2190 Esplanade, tortilla, or feature refried beans in 892-8688 seaweed?), so I chose the fried softshell crab version ($7.95). I could hardly contain my curiosity while waiting for my order, so I bided my time reading the various menu listings and posters on the wall. One caught my attention: “What are popping pearls?” it asked. I don’t know! I thought, but I want to try them, too! According to the poster, they are smaller than the traditional boba tapioca balls, and are filled with flavored juices surrounded by a thin membrane made to pop in your mouth. I made a mental note to try

them next time. My order finally arrived and when I opened my to-go box, I thought I was prepared, but I was still slightly in shock. What sat before me was, literally, a sushi roll the size of a burrito. All the sushi elements were in place, from the sticky rice to the thinly sliced veggies to the tobiko and crab. It was even wrapped in seaweed. After taking a bite, my mind was blown a little bit more—it was good. The flavors and textures worked together like they would in any sushi roll, just super-sized. And being able to wrap my hands around it and bite into it, burrito-style, was strangely satisfying. I had to go back for another taste, to be sure my first visit wasn’t a fluke. This time I tried the grilled salmon sushi burrito ($7.25) and an egg roll (85 cents). I also ordered a strawberry milk tea with strawberry popping pearls. I have just two words for that: fruity fun! My second visit may even have been better than the first. The perfectly crunchy and flavorful egg roll was better than the gyoza (which were simultaneously crisp and doughy). The sushi burrito was on par with the previous, my only complaint being that this time it was overfilled so the edges of the seaweed didn’t quite meet, making it difficult to hold the whole thing together. On the plus side, I could taste the freshness of the salmon, and attest to it, too, because I watched as it was pulled out of the fridge raw and placed into the pan. Are there things that could be improved? Sure. For one, it would be nice to see actual dishes and silverware rather than paper and plastic in the dining room. And, though they’re not without their cheesy charm, the many signs/menus are overkill. But all in all, Sushi King is probably the most surprising food find I’ve encountered in a long time. I walked in expecting a weird combination AsianMexican joint, and what I discovered was a totally legit Japanese fast-food restaurant doing something different. (They also offer regular-sized sushi rolls, in addition to “combo rice boxes” with grilled chicken, beef or salmon, among other things.) I wish them luck wholeheartedly, and I’ll most definitely be back. Ω

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YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

IN THE MIX Sunbathing Animal Parquet Courts What’s Your Rupture? No one wants to be referred to as a slacker— just ask Stephen Malkmus. Over the past few years Parquet Courts have endured their fair share of slack-attacks from slacker music critics (including, probably, myself). And while some of the squiggly guitars found on the band’s excellent second record, Light Up Gold, bring to mind early Pavement, Parquet Courts are very much doing their thing. And they continue to do so on their latest, Sunbathing Animal, although there’s something a little more tense and jittery about this record. The title track and “Black and White” rip and roar, with guitarist/vocalist Andrew Savage spewing lyrical mouthfuls and guitars jangling noisily. “She’s Rollin’” starts with a bass line and builds slowly, giving plenty of space for Savage and Austin Brown’s guitars to mingle and meddle with one another. It’s not surprising that many of these songs were written on the road (bassist Sean Yeaton said the record speaks to the idea of captivity and anxiety). But Sunbathing Animal is more of a freeing record, as Parquet Courts continue their evolution. I think that’ll continue regardless of whether the audience remains captive.

MUSIC

—Mark Lore

Marvel Dice Masters Collectible dice-building game

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

WizKids

28

CN&R

May 29, 2014

If nerds love one thing, it’s rolling dice. WizKids’ latest collectible dice-building game offers dice-rolling in excess and the always-popular Marvel Universe as the backdrop for dice-based combat and strategy. The starter deck, Avengers vs. X-Men, includes 44 various dice and the cards they control, a collection so large and diverse that the replay value and customization out of the box is impressive. Players take turns rolling dice to earn energy needed to buy more dice and bring various comic heroes and villains into the battle. While earning new dice and knocking your opponent’s health down a notch is straightforward, the die symbols, combat system and playing field are a bit convoluted if only in remembering the different ways dice move about the playing field. Part combat and part resource management, the jumble of strategies—and the rules associated with them—can occasionally suggest the game is trying to do too much. For some, that may be the case, but this is a game meant to be played in the back rooms of comic stores with comic and game fans who don’t let tangled game play get in the way of rolling a couple dozen dice.

GAME

—Matthew Craggs

Conversations Stanton Moore Royal Potato Family Stanton Moore is primarily known as one of the premier funk musicians of his generation, thanks to his powerhouse drumming during his 20-year career in groups like Garage a Trois and Galactic. So it was a bold move to try something new: a jazz trio that he formed with pianist David Torkanowsky and bassist James Singleton, fellow New Orleanians who have a lot of experience working with such N.O. musicians as Professor Longhair, the Meters, and vocalist Irma Thomas, “the soul queen of New Orleans.” To really get down with the music, the trio gigged every Tuesday for 18 months at the Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro, the city’s “premier jazz club.” Moore believes that “improvised music should be conversational,” hence the title of this forward-looking CD. All the tunes but one (Herbie Hancock’s lovingly rendered “Driftin’”) are by fellow Crescent City musicians and the trio does some serious conversing on all of them. While a few numbers feature Moore’s extended solos over a monotonous vamp, which tend to slow things down, his drumming—and Singleton’s solo—really spice up the parade classic “Paul Barbarin’s Second Line,” written by Barbarin (an early N.O. jazz drummer) and “Driftin’,” which features Torkanowsky’s delightful stride piano intro. The elegiac “Waltz for All Souls” is a lovely change of pace. —Miles Jordan

MUSIC


SCENE

Sticks and shears Chico drummer finds his groove in the growing field of barbery

CN&R IS LOOKING FOR AN ADVERTISING CONSULTANT

“I

’ve never wanted to stop playing music,

but I’ve also always wanted to find something else to also do,” Casey Schmidt said recently from behind a barber chair at Chico’s Marinello Schools of Beauty, reiterating a musicians’ mantra that’s likely been uttered by since music began. Ken Smith Schmidt, however, believes he’s kens@ newsreview.com one of the lucky few to have heard that elusive second calling, which in his case beckoned him to the barber shop. He certainly looks the part in his student’s smock, with an immaculately kempt beard, blackrimmed glasses and razor-clean coif. But, sans the smock, he’s more often seen behind a drum kit in numerous local jazz projects or with Chico metal bands Amarok and Into the Open Earth. Schmidt has been a drummer for the majority of his 29 years, and studied jazz and musical technique at the Los Angeles Music Academy. He also owned a short-lived drum shop at the age of 21 and is a longtime employee of The Music Connection, but said he’s long been searching for a permanent day job. “I went back to Butte [College] for a bit, but it got to the point that any time I had to tell someone what my major was I’d just be making something up, because I had no idea,” he recalled. “I took a test there to see what I should do for a living, and it said either a musician or a barber. “That made me start thinking about going to a barber shop, which I had never really done. When I did, I thought, ‘OK, this is awesome, I totally get why people go to barber shops.’” In fact, after many years of decline, the field of barbery is on the rise, growing at a rate of roughly 13 percent a year. Whether due to a desire for a cheaper alternative to beauty salons or a renewed appreciation for the art of a men’s haircut, barbers are becoming hip again, and as a result more and more young men are joining the old man’s game. Schmidt said one major appeal for him was the social atmosphere: “You come in and see people you know and everyone catches up on their lives, especially when you go to the same barber for a long time,” he said. “It’s like a relaxing part of the day.” He started seriously considering the option, and it was—oddly enough—music that solidified his choice to become a barber. While on tour with Into the Open Earth, the band played a show with Reno’s Drag Me Under. The next morning, they visited Maxwell’s Barbershop, which is owned by the Reno band’s drummer, Patrick Sutton. “I walked in and it was just a bunch of band dudes

Casey Schmidt cleans up a fade. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

in black T-shirts and cut-off shorts and Converse, and I got to hang out with Patrick and talk to him and ask him lots of questions, and I realized this is something that can be done.” Schmidt enrolled at Marinello last August, and just completed his course work last week. In order to be licensed, barbers must complete 1,500 hours of formal training before taking a licensing exam issued by the California Board of Barbering and Cosmetology, which Schmidt plans to take next month. Barber training differs in some ways from cosmetology training, including the fact that barbers—unlike cosmetologists—are taught to shave clients with a straight razor. Since beginning his training, Schmidt said he’s approached barbering with the same old-school sensibility he applies to music: “My favorite drummers are those who take a traditional approach but play very modern. I want all my haircuts to look like they came from a classic barber.” To accomplish this, he said he applies traditional techniques, such as using a comb with his electric clippers instead of clipper guards, whenever possible. In addition to his prescribed coursework, he studied classic men’s cuts from a 1960s printing of A.B. Moler’s Standardized Barbers’ Manual, a textbook originally published in 1911. He also invested in some Oster Classic 76 clippers, a model favored by traditionalists (“The difference is like swinging a Louisville Slugger after swinging a crappy aluminum bat”). His attention to vintage styles has made Schmidt a natural fit for many of his fellow local musicians, who appreciate the retro look of his cuts and have been his willing (and repeat) test subjects during his training. Schmidt also said he’s found lots of parallels between drumming and barbering. “There’s an old jazz saying that you’re only as good as the last gig you played,” he said. “It’s the same thing with hair. A barber can give somebody the best haircut ever one day and then screw up on the next guy that walks in. “Your reputation lies directly in your own hands and you’re performing, in a sense. You have to be Ω consistent.”

Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. The CN&R is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. If you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful Ad Consultant. You must be self-motivated, ambitious and an independent person who wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM/CHICO/JOBS

BRIAN CORBIT Advertising Consultant

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER May 29, 2014

CN&R

29


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 5/29—WEDNESDAY 6|4 FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg: This week a tribute to Stevie Wonder. F, 11am. Opens 5/30. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

REVEREND HORTON HEAT Thursday, May 29 El Rey Theatre

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday-night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

SEE THURSDAY

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Larry

29THURSDAY CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON: Join the duo as they play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 5/29, 6-9pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

MIDNIGHT NORTH: Bay Area Americanarockers come to Chico during their Pacific Northwest tour. Also, alt/indie rock from Walking Spanish, and ska/punk from locals Big Tree Fall Down. Th, 5/29, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

REVEREND HORTON HEAT: Rockabilly, surf, and rock and roll with Heat and his trio. Plus, banjo punk from Old Man Markley and Tex-Mex punk with PinATA PROTEST. Th, 5/29, 8:30pm. $18. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St., (530) 3422727.

TOUR KICK-OFF/ RELEASE PARTY: Support local music with heavy-makers Teeph, releasing a new EP, plus the Americas releasing a new tape. Also, Baby Gurl from Salt Lake City, Utah, and new local instrumental band Descent. Th, 5/29, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 3457672.

Peterson and Stevie Cook play an eclectic mix of music. F, 5/30, 6-9pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St., (530) 891-9044.

30FRIDAY BASSMINT: A (mostly) weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St., (530) 895-3888.

BLUE MOON SWAMP: A John Fogerty/CCR

tribute. F, 5/30, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

the new EP from Tom and Jerry, plus Jake Nolen and his band’s final performance. F, 5/30, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

31SATURDAY ’80S NIGHT: Wear your best ’80s attire

and dance the night away. Sa, 8pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891, www.lasallesbar.com.

SONGWRITING SHOWDOWN

The final chapter of KZFR’s 5th Annual Celebration of the Song pits local singer/songwriters in a bare-knuckled brawl onstage at the Sierra Nevada Big Room on Wednesday, June 4. There can be only one victor! This year’s combatants, each armed with only an acoustic guitar and a bag of songs, are Dan Casamajor, Hannah Jane Kile and Erin Friedman.

LUKAS NELSON AND PROMISE OF THE REAL: A benefit show for KZFR with rock with Lukas Nelson and friends, plus Americana/folk/bluegrass from The Brothers Comatose. F, 5/30, 8pm. $20. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St., (530) 342-2727, www.kzfr.org.

OPEN MIC: All singer/songwriters

welcome. F, 6-9pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891, www.lasallesbar.com.

POWER TO THE PEOPLE: A benefit for

BROKEN RODEO & FRIENDS: Dirty boots and honest love from Broken Rodeo, sea-gazing music from Freeport, and singer/songwriter Alec Chumbley from Berkley. F, 5/30, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 3434915.

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TOM AND JERRY: Support local music and

Butte County Citizens Against Irresponsible Government with live music from Swamp Zen, Dylan’s Dharma, Wake of The Dead and DJ PHg. F, 5/30, 8pm. $15-$25. Lost On Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24

4WEDNESDAY ABIGAIL WILLIAMS: The deceptively

PRISS

Saturday, May 31 Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. SEE SATURDAY

named black metal band from Los Angeles is joined by huge bill of heavymakers: North Carolina’s Lecherous Nocturn, Ohio’s The Convalescence, plus Panzerfaust and locals Sorin and Aberrance. W, 6/4, 8pm. $10. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891, www.lasallesbar.com.

LAMBING SEASON

Just as springtime is the season of birth and re-birth, there’s something about this time of year that moves artistic and musical types to likewise push out their new babies. Proving that point, at least three local bands are celebrating album releases this week. Metal band Teeph has a new EP and The Americas a new tape (tape!), which the bands will debut tonight, May 29, at Monstros Pizza and Subs. Also, Tom and Jerry debut their new EP at Café Coda on Friday, May 30.

CELEBRATION OF THE SONG SHOWCASE:

1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

CHOP TOPS: Rockabilly rebels unite and swing the night away. Sa, 5/31, 9pm. Lost On Main, 319 Main St., (530) 8911853.

DRIVER: Live music from the Paradise

guys. Sa, 5/31, 9pm. $3. Studio Inn Cocktail Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (530) 343-0662.

PRISS: An all-female Kiss tribute band. Sa, 5/31, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls

Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com/brewing-co.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and rotating accompaniment. Tu, 6:308:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farm starpizza.com.

funk. Sa, 5/31, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 3434915.

OFF THE RECORD: A high-energy blend of ’80s dance rock. Sa, 5/31, 9pm-1am. Kings Tavern, 5771 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7100, www.otrrock.com.

DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: San Fransisco’s ambassadors of gypsy rock return to Chico with another dose of Eastern European pop, and punk rock. Tu, 6/3, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room,

country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more.

W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musi-

RAY LIVE: A Ray Charles tribute dinner

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted

3TUESDAY

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues,

cians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

SWAMP ZEN: Local jam-rock with a little

by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

The 2014 finalists for KZFR’s fifth Annual Celebration of the Song, Dan Casamajor, Hannah Jane Kile and Erin Friedmanwill be showcasing their talents. W, 6/4, 6pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 3452739, www.kzfr.org.

NTS POST EVE BY E IN L N O ING AT REGISTER ico

show. W, 6/4, 6pm. $10-$35. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

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REEL WORLD Colin Firth & niCole Kidman

FRIDAY 5/30 – tuesDAY 6/3 AmAzing SpidermAn 2 (Digital) (PG-13) 12:40PM 3:50PM 7:00PM 10:10PM Blended (Digital) (PG-13) (10:45AM*) 1:35PM 4:20PM 7:05PM 9:50PM

million dollAr Arm (Digital) (PG) (10:50AM*) 1:40PM 4:30PM 7:20PM 10:10PM million WAyS to die in the WeSt, A (Digital) (R) 11:30AM 12:40PM 2:15PM 3:30PM 5:00PM 6:20PM 7:45PM 9:10PM 10:30PM

Chef (Digital) (R) 11:15AM 1:55PM 4:35PM 7:15PM 9:55PM godzillA (2014) (3D) (PG-13) 11:00AM 4:40PM 10:20PM godzillA (2014) (Digital) (PG-13) 1:50PM 7:30PM mAlefiCent (3D) (PG) 12:20PM 1:10PM 2:50PM 5:20PM 6:10PM 7:50PM 10:25PM mAlefiCent (Digital) (PG) (10:40AM*) 11:30AM 2:00PM 3:40PM 4:30PM 7:00PM 8:40PM 9:30PM

neighBorS (Digital) (R) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM 10:30PM X-men: dAyS of future pASt (3D) (PG-13) 12:00PM 1:00PM 3:00PM 6:05PM 7:00PM 9:05PM

THE RAILWAY MAN

Director Bryan Singer returns X-Men franchise to glory

thu (5/29) 7pm; Fri/Sat 6pm; Sun 2pm; mon-thu 8pm returnS on Friday!

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Fri/Sat 8:10pm; Sunday 4:15pm mon-thurS 6pm Call 343-0663 or visit www.PageantChico.com

RECYCLE

THIS PAPER.

Tstory from the comic book’s heyday, and goes the time-travel route made popular on the screen by James he X-Men film franchise takes a classic

Cameron’s Terminator movies and the J.J. Abrams Star Trek reboot. In X-Men: Days of Future Past, Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) partakes in a unique form of time tripping, and the results are the best in the series since X2. Another big contributor to the awesomeness of the latest installment is the return of Bryan Singer to the director’s chair. Singer piloted the first two X-Men films, and he has a nice command of the characters in their old and younger incarnations. It’s good to have him back. The film starts in the future, where the likes of Professor X (Patrick Stewart), Magneto (Ian McKellen) and

the action takes place in the past, so the younger X-Men: First Class actors get most of the screen time. That means more of the terrific Michael Fassbender’s take on Magneto, who is being held in a prison underneath the Pentagon for allegedly having something to do with the infamous “Magic Bullet.” James McAvoy actually steals the show as young Xavier/ Professor X, who has found a solution for his crippled legs, but with the side effect of crippling his telepathic powers. Peter Dinklage has a pivotal role as the creator of the Sentinels, and Dinklage always adds a level of class to any project. The film also

by

X-men: dAyS of future pASt (Digital) (PG-13) (10:00AM*) (10:50AM*) 1:55PM 4:00PM 4:55PM 8:00PM 10:05PM

Showtimes listed w/ ( *) shown Fri. - Sun. only.

Positive mutation

Bob Grimm

Watch those hangnails.

bgrimm@ newsreview.com

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

4 X-Men: Days of Future Past

Starring Hugh Jackman, Jennifer Lawrence, Michael Fassbender, James McAvoy, Ellen Page and Peter Dinklage. Directed by Bryan Singer. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

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May 29, 2014

Wolverine have been reduced to hiding out in a dark, apocalyptic world where their enemy is a vicious robotic mutant-hunting force called the Sentinels. Things are looking really bad for the mutants, and for the humans. Kitty Pryde (Ellen Page)—whose mutant abilities include being able to pass through solid objects—has perfected a form of time travel to elude the Sentinels. She can send someone time-traveling in their own mind back to a particular point in their memory when they can mess with the fabric of time and avoid future trouble. She says she can send somebody back only a few minutes or so due to brain trauma, but then it strikes the X-Men that Wolverine has instant healing powers … So Wolverine travels all the way back to the early 1970s, before the Sentinels have gone into production, and before shapeshifting Raven/Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) commits a murder that will ultimately bring about the doom of the future. It’s a nice chance to see pre-surgery Wolverine, when his metal claws were still made of bone, and of course, it’s an opportunity to combine the two X-Men casts. Most of

allows for a funny take on Richard Nixon (played by Mark Camacho), who finds himself in the middle of a mutant public relations fiasco. A welcome new addition to the cast is Evan Peters as the speedy Quicksilver. One of the film’s best sequences involves how the world looks to Quicksilver as he rearranges a gunfight with his fingertips in half a second. We see it in slow motion, with much comedic detail. It’s a brilliant scene. This film basically allows the controllers of the X-Men universe to jettison from our memories X-Men: The Last Stand, a film made by the much-abhorred Brett Ratner and one that was not a favorite with fans. I didn’t hate that movie, but it stands alongside the mediocre X-Men Origins: Wolverine as the weakest movies in the series. As with the new Star Trek, the whole system has been reconfigured for X-Men, and all options are wide open for future films. We can still get X-Men modern-day stories, we can get X-Men in the past—it’s an open book. Maybe they could use the whole time-travel thing on the Matrix movies, and fix those screwed-up sequels? Ω


Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Maleficent

Special-effects master Robert Stromberg (Oscars for Avatar and Alice in Wonderland) makes his directorial debut in this reworking of the Sleeping Beauty story from the vantage point of the “evil” fairy Maleficent (played by Angelina Jolie). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

A Million Ways to Die in the West

Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane follows his writer/director debut in Ted with this send up in which he stars as a lily-livered farmer bearing witness to just as many gross-out jokes as methods by which one can die in the wild west. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Re-opening this week

5

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Wes Anderson’s new film is the story of an imaginary middle European hotel in the imaginary Republic of Zubrowka in the mostly very real year of 1932. But it’s also the tale of how a modern-day resident of that hotel, the mysterious and rather sorrowful Mr. Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham), came to be its owner. And that story, in turn, centers on the remarkable character and career of Monsieur Gustave (Ralph Fiennes), the legendary and perhaps improbable concierge of that establishment, the Grand Budapest Hotel, in its heyday. The 1932 part of the story is central to everything else in the film. The rise of Nazism lingers on the horizon while center stage is occupied by the semipicaresque adventures of M. Gustave and an orphaned refugee named Zero (Tony Revelori) and the farcical melodrama that ensues when M. Gustave finds himself named executor of the estate of an elderly woman of wealth (Tilda Swinton). Overall, tragicomic high spirits in deteriorating circumstances are the film’s strong suit, and Fiennes’ superb multifaceted performance ensures M. Gustave’s status as the atypical hero at the heart of Anderson’s vision. Cinemark 14 and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Now playing

2

The Amazing Spider-Man 2

Director Marc Webb proves himself adept at drama and romance in this sequel (Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker/SpiderMan and Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy are kind of adorable). But he botches the action elements and tries to juggle too many villains—among them, the goofy Electro (Jamie Foxx), the Green Goblin (Dane Dehaan) and the robotic Rhino (Paul Giamatti). Electro starts off as Max Dillon, a geeky electrical engineer at Oscorp Industries who gets transformed into some sort of bluish, seethrough monstrosity after electrocuting himself and falling into a tank of electric eels. He has the ability to move and stop things with electricity, which makes no sense, and disappear into wires and sockets, which also makes no sense. Yes, this is a comic book movie, but this stuff is just stupid. There’s a big, dramatic occurrence deep in this film, and that sequence is the best thing in the movie, and the film should’ve ended directly after it. Instead, Webb and his writers force a terrible finale that feels tacked on, and destroys any dramatic tension. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Blended

Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore play two single parents who, after going on an unsuccessful blind date, end up vacationing at the same African safari resort with their respective kids. Woah! What are the odds? Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Chef

Jon Favreau wrote, directed and stars as a chef who loses his job and returns to his cooking roots by purchasing a food truck and driving it across the country. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

2

Godzilla

There is no story in director Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla to confuse the viewer, just an hour of his screenwriter working out abandonment issues followed by Edwards turning over the helm to the computer jockeys for the battle royale between Big G and some intruder monsters. The first hour of this film is almost entirely disposable, interminable stretches of human drama, none of it really applicable to the second half of the movie. There is some wonderful imagery to be found, brief flashes of brilliance that make one wish the director had worked with $50 million instead of $160 million so that he would’ve been allowed some narrative risks. If you’re looking for a matinee of city smashing, Godzilla ends up delivering the goods after the first hour. Sort of. The mayhem is set at night and there’s lots of dust flying, so I’d recommend not doing the 3-D. And Edwards has an annoying habit of cutting away from the action when things are finally getting good, either to evening news footage of the monsters going at it or, even worse, more family drama. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return

A computer-animated follow-up to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, featuring the voice of Lea Michele as Dorothy, who returns to Oz and helps her familiar pals—plus a few new ones—in a fight against an evil jester. Additional voices include Jim Belushi, Dan Akroyd and Kelsey Grammer. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Million Dollar Arm

Based on the real-life events in the lives of two Indian athletes—Rinku Singh and Dinesh Patel—the film stars Jon Hamm as a sports agent who devises a reality show to find potential pitchers from a field of baseball novices in India, two of whom win a chance to pitch for a Major League Baseball team. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Moms’ Night Out

A faith-based feature about a group of moms who hit the town for a night out and leave their kids at home with the dads— hijinks ensue. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Neighbors

Director Nicholas Stoller (Get Him to the Greek, Forgetting Sarah Marshall) is at the helm of this hard-R comedy starring Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne as a married couple doing battle with a frat (led by chief instigator Zac Efron) that moves into the house next door. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Railway Man

An adaptation of the real-life events as told in British Army officer Eric Lomax’s autobiography about his traumatic time as a Japanese prisoner of war during WWII and his efforts to return and confront his torturer years later. Starring Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

4

X-Men: Days of Future Past

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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ARTS DEVO

SECRETS OF

SUCCESS. The CN&R’s annual Entrepreneur Issue will be on stands June 26. Pick up this issue to read the stories of entrepreneurs in our community. For more information about advertising in this issue, call your News & Review advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300.

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Fair street recycling. Fair Street Recycling has advertised our buyback center consistently with the Chico News & Review for many years. As a non-profit organization, it is important that we invest our dollars wisely. For us, the CN&R is a great investment. It helps allow our organization to continue to support our mission of helping the developmentally disabled acquire marketable job skills. Plus, Fair Street Recycling makes money for the Work Training Center to operate programs that don’t make money—we have severely handicapped people that we serve in day centers along with other programs. We are also helping the environment and reducing its waste.

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CN&R

May 29, 2014

by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

THE SOUND OF CHICO ROCKING You grow a bunch of local bands and this is what you reap, Chico. Enjoy the ripe fruit that your local music scene has made just in time for your summer soundtrack. West by Swan – Drought : Like the election of a U.S. president, the World Cup and the Olympics, every four years brings a new album from Chico’s kings of noisy rock. Discussion of the music of the fourpiece (full disclosure: featuring four of Arts DEVO’s best dudes) usually focuses, justifiably so, on their sprawling guitar-centric soundscapes and propensity for operating at high volumes. But WBS have always balanced their experiments with a variety of sonic treats, and there are some delicious bits on this album: ear-worm melodies (especially with the vocals on the incredible, dynamic “Lion” and the singalong chorus of “Go”); surprise instruments (trumpet, slide guitar, Rhodes piano); and the usual crafty guitar interplay (“Killing Fee,” “Yeoman’s Dilemma”). And of course, there are many Godzilla-sized sonic freakouts as West by Swan - Drought well, and right now the loopy, muscular last minute or so of “Who are You” is inducing the most goosebumps. CD-release party Friday, June 6, at 1078 Gallery. Michael Bone – They’ll Keep: Vol. 1 : As he says on his Bandcamp page, this is the Bogg drummer/Pageant Dads singer-guitarist’s “first volume of songs, written about and for my friends.” Two of his buddies—Brandon Hilty on drums and Bogg’s Josh Hegg on keys—joined him on the recording and the result is a gorgeous collection of spare, warm and loungey songs. Visit www.michaelbone.bandcamp.com/ album/theyll-keep-v1 and buy all eight for a buck (or more). Americas – Hard Data : After more than 13 years of playing schizoid melodic math punk-rock, drummer Casey Deitz and guitaristvocalist Travis Wuerthner are as ADD as ever on this always-looping, often-danceable 47-minute exercise in shifting dynamics. Pick of the moment: the power-packed “Kid Cops.” Cassette-release party tonight, May 29, 8 p.m., at Monstros Pizza. Go to www.sound cloud.com/amrcs to stream it. Teeph – Solid Jobs : Bowel-rattling math-metal for shaking fists in the air and melting faces. Release party tonight, May 29, 8 p.m., at Monstros, and visit www.teeph.bandcamp.com to download. Western Divide – Come Lay Your Head : The combined vocals of Sean Harrasser (Envelope Peasant), Evin Wolverton and Janae Lloyd (Sad Bastards) make this a bigger recording than might be expected from an acoustic five-piece. The four-song EP is a soaring example of the group’s unique sort of Americana/chamber-pop. Sticking in my head: the nearly seven-minute-long closer, a typically epic Harrasser sing-a-long Western Divide hymn: “I don’t need words, and I don’t need advice/ I don’t need a lot of shit I can’t use/ I just need you to hold me till I fall asleep/ Till the morning finds me peaceful with you.” Go to www.western-divide.com and download for free. The Rugs – Make Yourself at Home : Vocalist Jeremy Gerrard’s Dylanesque rasp is an acquired taste, but his light and pretty midtempo melodies are a great complement, as are the co-lead vocals of Katrina Rodriguez and four-part harmonies with his cohorts on this incredibly warm recording (engineered by Matt Franklin). These lines from “C’est La Vie”—“The sunlight says it’s time/ Float out on an inner tube with inexpensive wine”—sum up the band’s vibe nicely. Visit www.therugsband.bandcamp.com to purchase ($10). And not yet online, but on the immediate horizon, is the debut recording of Heather Michelle & The Make Your Mines (CD-release: June 6 at the Maltese Bar & Tap Room).


FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 29, 2014 ARIES (March 21-April 19): “When I was

young,” wrote French author Albert Camus, “I expected people to give me more than they could—continuous friendship, permanent emotion.” That didn’t work out so well for him. Over and over, he was awash in disappointment. “Now I have learned to expect less of them than they can give,” he concluded. “[T]heir emotions, their friendship, and noble gestures keep their full miraculous value in my eyes; wholly the fruit of grace.” I’d love to see you make an adjustment like this in the coming months, Aries. If you do, the astrological omens suggest you will experience a blessing like Camus’.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Some

earthquakes happen in slow motion. These rare events occur 22-34 miles down, where tectonic plates are hotter and gooier. Unlike the sudden, shocking jolts of typical temblors, this gradual variety can take many days to uncoil and never send dishes flying off shelves up here on the Earth’s surface. I suspect your destiny will have a resemblance to this phenomenon in the coming months, Taurus. Your foundations will be rustling and rumbling, but they will do so slowly and gently. The release of energy will ultimately be quite massive. The realignment of deep structures will be epic. But there will be no big disturbances or damages.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I suspect

that some night soon you will have a dream of being naked as you stand onstage in front of a big audience. Or maybe not completely naked. There’s a strong possibility you will be wearing pink-and-green striped socks and a gold crown. And it gets worse. In your dream, I bet you will forget what you were going to say to the expectant crowd. Your mouth will be moving, but no words will come out. So that’s the bad news, Gemini. The good news is that since I have forewarned you, you can now do whatever is necessary to prevent anything resembling this dream from actually occurring in your waking life. So when you are called on to show what you’ve got and make a splashy impression, you will be well-prepared.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When I slip into a meditative state and seek insight about your future, I have a reverie about a hearty sapling growing out of a fallen tree that’s rotting on the forest floor. I see exuberant mushrooms sprouting from a cow pie in a pasture. I imagine compost nourishing a watermelon patch. So, what do my visions mean? I’m guessing you’re going through a phase of metaphorical death and decay. You are shedding and purging and flushing. In the process, you are preparing some top-notch fertilizer. It won’t be ready for a while, but when it is, a growth spurt will begin.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Diary:

Almost everything that was possible to change has changed these past 12 months. I am not kidding, and I am not exaggerating. Getting just one of my certainties destroyed would have been acceptable; I long ago became accustomed to the gradual chip, chip, chipping away of my secure foundations. But this most recent phase, when even my pretty illusions of stability got smashed, truly set a record. So then why am I still standing strong and proud? Why is it I’m not cowering in the corner muttering to the spiders? Have I somehow found some new source of power that was never available to me until my defenses were totally stripped away? I think I’ll go with that theory.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): About 32,000

years ago, squirrels in northeast Siberia buried the fruits of a flowering plant deep in their burrows, below the level of the permafrost. Then, a flood swept through the area. The water froze and permanently sealed the fruits in a layer of ice. They remained preserved there until 2007, when they were excavated. A team of scientists got a hold of them and coaxed them to grow into viable plants. Their success has a metaphorical resemblance to a project you will be capable of pulling off during the next 12 months, Virgo. I’m not sure what exact form it will

BY ROB BREzSNY take. A resuscitation? A resurrection? A recovery? The revival of a dormant dream? The thawing of a frozen asset, or the return of a lost resource?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): For German

physicist Arnold Sommerfeld, the good news was that he was nominated for the Nobel Prize 81 times. The bad news is that he never actually won. Actor Richard Burton had a similar fate. He was nominated for an Academy Award seven times, but never took home an Oscar. If there is anything that even vaguely resembles that pattern in your own life, Libra, the next 12 months will be the most favorable time ever to break the spell. In the next few weeks, you may get a glimpse of how it will unfold.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I should

have kissed you longer.” I hope you won’t be replaying that thought over and over again in your imagination three weeks from now. I hope you won’t be obsessing on similar mantras, either, like: “I should have treated you better,” or “I wish I would have listened to you deeper,” or “I should have tried harder to be my best self with you.” Please don’t let any of that happen, Scorpio. I am begging you to act now to make any necessary changes in yourself so that you will be fully ready to give the important people in your life the care they deserve. If you do so, you will be free of regrets later.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Longing, what is that? Desire, what is that?” Those are questions Louise Glück asks in her poem “Prism.” Does she really not know? Has she somehow become innocent again, free from all her memories of what longing and desire have meant to her in the past? That’s what I wish for you right now, Sagittarius. Can you do it? Can you enter into a beginner’s mind and feel your longing and desire as if they were brand-new, just born, as fresh and primal as they were at the moment you fell in love for the first time? If you can manage it, you will bestow upon yourself a big blessing.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You

could really benefit from engaging with a compassionate critic—someone who would gently and lovingly invite you to curb your excesses, heal your ignorance and correct your mistakes. Would you consider going out in search of a kickass guide like that? Ideally, this person would also motivate you to build up your strengths and inspire you to take better care of your body. One way or another, Capricorn, curative feedback will be coming your way. The question is: Will you have a hand in choosing it, or will you wait around passively for fate to deliver it? I highly recommend the former.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Now

would be an excellent time for you to dream up five new ways to have fun. I’m not suggesting there’s anything wrong with your existing methods. It’s just that in the next few weeks, life will conspire to help you drop some of your inhibitions and play around more than usual and experience greater pleasure. The best way to cooperate with that conspiracy is to be an explorer on the frontiers of amusement and enchantment. What’s the most exciting thing you have always wondered about but never done? What interesting experiment have you denied yourself for no good reason? What excursion or adventure would light up your spontaneity?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Now is an

excellent time to transform your relationship with your past. Are you up for a concentrated burst of psychospiritual work? To get the party started, meditate your ass off as you ponder this question: “What fossilized fixations, ancient insults, impossible dreams and parasitic ghosts am I ready to let go of?” Next, move on to this inquiry: “What can I do to ensure that relaxed, amused acceptance will rule my encounters with the old ways forever after?” Here’s a third query: “What will I do with all the energy I free up by releasing the deadweight I had been clinging to?”

Go to www.RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN) 2 Male Chihuahua Puppies 11 weeks old. $100. 530-321-6993

1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer.All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. $6000 530-895-8171 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings. CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name RIGHT CLICK ADMIN AND DESIGN at 1411 Heather Cir Chico, CA 95926. JENNIFER BURKE 1411 Heather Cir Chico, CA 95926. JOSHUA BURKE 1411 Heather Cir Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JENNIFER BURKE Dated: April 7, 2014 FBN Number: 2012-0001613 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CIMARRON SOLUTIONS at 3568 Bridle Lane Chico, CA 95973. ALLEN LEE STALLMAN 3568 Bridle Lane Chico, CA 95973. CHRISTOPHER ALLEN STALLMAN 3568 Bridle Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: ALLEN LEE STALLMAN Dated: April 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000661 Publish Dates: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUMMIT LANDSCAPE at 1334 Laburnum Ave Chico, CA 95926. NEIL GARRETT CARR 1334 Laburnum Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NEIL CARR

this Legal Notice continues

Dated: April 18, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000613 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name FIFTH AND ORIENT at 1692 Mangrove Ave #142 Chico, CA 95926. LEAH E MORRIS 117 W 18th Street B Chico, CA 95928. PHUONG K LY 533 Orient Street Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnershp. Signed: PHUONG LY Dated: April 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2013-0000319 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as N.M.BOYDSOAPS at 443 Stilson Canyon Rd Chico, CA 95928. ELIZABETH MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELIZABETH MCDONALD Dated: April 29, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000664 Publish Dates: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO REMODELING at 868 Kern Street Chico, CA 95928. JOHN ALBERT SCHRAM III 868 Kern Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN ALBERT SCHRAM III Dated: April 18, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000609 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NUCLEUS APPLICATIONS at 1115 West Sacramento Ave #150 Chico, CA 95926. CAMERON BROWNFIELD 1115 West Sacramento Ave #150 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAMERON BROWNFIELD Dated: May 1, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000668 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LORDS GYM OROVILLE at 2120 Bird Street Oroville, CA 95965. FATHER’S HOUSE RESTORATION MINISTRIES INC 2656 Fort Wayne Street Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN KELLY, ACCOUNTING Dated: April 16, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000594 Published: May, 15,22,29, June 5, 2014.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are

classifieds

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  CN&R   CN&R

Ma y 29, 2014 May 29, 2014

ATTENTION SN&R Design Dept: Can you please add the horizontal rule at top, full width of page. And, a vertical rule that separates ASTROLOGY from CLASSIFIEDS?

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as QUEENIES BOUTIQUE at 225 #D Main St Chico, CA 95928. ANNETTE FRAZIER 3305 Splane Lane Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANNETTE KUSSEROWFRAZIER Dated: April 16, 2014 FBN Number 2014-0000589 Published: May 22,29, June 5,12, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing Business as THAT’S A WRAP at 2471 Cohasset Rd #120 Chico, CA 95926. MIKELL INC 3563 Shallow Springs Terrace Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KELLY VADNEY, CFO Dated: May 16, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000747 Published: May 22,29, June 5,12, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALL CATS AND DOGS at 1238 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. GAYLE FRITZ 950 Karen Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GAYLE FRITZ Dated: May 7, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000697 Published: May 22,29, June 5,12, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FALCON AERIAL IMAGING at 39 Forest Creek Circle Chico, CA 95928. BEN DONEY 16 Birdwing Ct Chico, CA 95973 SCOTT GREGORY 39 Forest Creek Circle Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SCOTT GREGORY Dated: May 9, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000715 Published: May 22, 29, June 5,12, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are do-­ ing business as

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36 CN&R May 29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name AUSTIN BROTHERS at 3217 Cohasset Road, Suite 120 Chico, CA 95973. CEA INVESTMENTS LLC 6154 County Road 200 Orland, CA 95963. This business was conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: BOBBIE SMITH, OFFICE MANAGER Dated: May 1, 2014 FBN Number: 2012-0000616 Published: May 22,29, June 5,12, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A AND M ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES at 1074 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. MASON AXEL MCKELLIPS 24 El Cerrito Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MASON MCKELLIPS Dated: May 15, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000739 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JOLLY FOLLY ENTERTAINMENT, THE JEWELER’S DAUGHTER at 6256 Pebble Lane Paradise, CA 95969. LEE R GREEN 6256 Pebble Lane Paradise, CA 95969 DEENA MAULDIN 6256 Pebble Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: LEE R. GREEN Dated: April 25, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000655 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO at 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CYNTHIA CROSS, PRESIDENT Dated: May 5, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000680 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FORCELLA ITALIAN BISTRO at 1600 Mangrove Ave #175 Chico, CA 95926. AARON ANTHONY JOHNSON 26 Porchlight Ct Chico, CA 95973 JONATHAN ELLIS MEYER 23 Highland Cir Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JON MEYER Dated: May 20, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000766 Published: May 29, June 5,12,19, 2014

NOTICES CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): DUSTIN WINTER KYLE VANDERGRIFT and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): TB born on (date): April 3, 2013 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): FEATHER RIVER HOSPITAL PARADISE, CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: August 19, 2014 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attor-­ ney for you. If the court terminated your pa-­ rental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: May 7, 2014 Case Number: J-36876 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): MATTHEW EMERZIAN and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): G.S. born on (date): October 15, 2005 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): FEATHER RIVER HOSPITAL PARADISE, CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: July 16, 2014 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attor-­ ney for you. If the court terminated your pa-­ rental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: May 19, 2014 Case Number: J-36805 Published: May 22,29, June 5,12, 2014

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due. The following unit contains storage totes (4), boxes, holiday decorations, misc items: Unit 251: DEBORAH NOLEN (5x5) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: June 7, 2014 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: 65 Heritage Lane Chico, CA 95926. Published: May 22,29, 2014

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GARY E. ARCHAMBAULT AKA GARY EDGAR ARCHAMBAULT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GARY E. ARCHAMBAULT AKA GARY EDGAR ARCHAMBAULT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JODI BELLER and JASON ARCHAMBAULT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: JODI BELLER and JASON ARCHAMBAULT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 19, 2014 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: PROBATE Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal repre-­ sentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-­ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and le-­ gal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 3120 Cohasset Rd., Ste 10 Chico, CA 95973 Dated: May 20, 2014 Case Number: PR41062 Published: May 29, June 5,12, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ALECANDER BELIALCAIN TUBALCAIN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ALECANDER BELIALCAIN TUBALCAIN Proposed name: ISOTES LOIPOI CHAYIL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 11, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: April 28, 2014 Case Number: 162023 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BRIAN SANCHEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BRIAN SANCHEZ Proposed name: BRIAN GAULTIER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 11, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 28, 2014 Case Number: 162002 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NICOLE M. DIMAGGIO-HALL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NICOLE MARIE DIMAGGIOHALL Proposed name: NICOLE MARIE DIMAGGIO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no

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written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 04, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 10, 2014 Case Number: 161865 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: NORMA ALICIA ABREGO YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BEREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. Dated: July 19, 2013 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 160033 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: AMBER GRACE SIMS AKA AMBER GRACE ALLEN YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BEREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the

this Legal Notice continues

plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal

services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. Dated: August 26, 2013 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 160262 Published: May, 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLS BOOKKEEPING SERVICE at 1966 12th St Oroville, CA 95965. CINDY L STRACHAN 1966 12th St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CINDY L. STRACHAN Dated: May 13, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000734 Published: May 22,29, June 5,12, 2014

MLGRACECAPITAL LLC at 1877 Modoc Dr Chico, CA 95928. MLGRACECAPITAL LLC 1877 Modoc Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: FONG MICHAEL LO, CEO Dated: May 9, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000713 Publiched: May 22,29, June 5,12, 2014

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

doing business as YOVILLE YOGURT AND MORE at 2550 Olive Hwy Oroville, CA 95966. FATHER’S HOUSE RESTORATION MINISTRIES INC 2656 Fort Wayne Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN KELLY, ACCOUNTING Dated: April 16, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000595 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

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LOVE’S REAL ESTATE Big Czar We could have saved millions of dollars if we had created the position of Real Estate Czar of the United States (RECUS), and appointed someone to be in charge of all the banks and compel them to handle their foreclosures and short sales the right way, instead of their way, which has proven to be inept and nonsensical. The President of the United States (POTUS) should have appointed a RECUS when it was needed the most, back in 2006, when the housing bubble burst and the Great Recession was on the horizon. RECUS would have notified every bank that RECUS is in charge of all sales and has direct access to POTUS, and therefore, all bank bailout funds. Then RECUS would have issued the following directive: “RECUS’s New Short Sale and Foreclosure Rules”

Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

1) Banks may no longer refuse a short sale for no good reason. If, in RECUS’s opinion, the seller has a legitimate hardship necessitating a short sale, and the price offered by the buyer is fair market value, the bank must approve the sale. Penalty: RECUS will direct POTUS to subtract $10 million from the bank’s bailout money (BOM). 2) Banks may no longer demand 40 pounds of paperwork to be submitted “for the bank’s sole perusal in settling the aforementioned sale” and then claim “nonreceipt of the aforementioned documentation.”

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Penalty: For every pound of paper required by the bank over one single pound, RECUS will direct POTUS to subtract $10 million from the bank’s BOM. Additionally, the bank will be charged $1 million for every use of the word “aforementioned” more than once. 3) Banks may no longer refuse a short sale, then foreclose on the property, and subsequently sell the property for less than the short sale price the bank had in hand in the first place. Penalty: For every dollar less than the original offered price the bank accepts, RECUS will direct POTUS to subtract $10 million from the bank’s BOM. Additionally, if the property deteriorates during the bank’s ownership after foreclosing, $10 million will be subtracted from the bank’s BOM for every dollar needed to bring the property back to the same condition in which the bank received it. Actually, RECUS wouldn’t have saved us millions; it would have saved billions. Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon. Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530-680-0817.

DOUG LOVE is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530.680.0817

www.chico.newsreview.com

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com CALIFORNIA PARK

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• Easy living, 2 bd/2 ba, Cal Park. $253,500 • 3bd/4ba, 2,801 sq ft. 1.06 acres $558,000 • Secluded, 18 acs, Forest, 1,550 sq ft, cash only $225,000 • Springfield Senior, 2 bd/2ba, 1,578 sq ft $110,000 • Mountain Air! 4.89 ac, 4 bd/3 ba, 2,168 sq ft $329,000 • Near town! 1.66 ac, 3,930 custom home $668,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

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ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

4357 Keefer Rd

Chico

$520,000.00

3/ 2.5

2904

7 Goldeneye Ct

Chico

$299,000.00

4/ 2

SQ. FT. 1790

128 Copperfield Dr

Chico

$435,000.00

4/ 3

2339

345 Denali Dr

Chico

$288,000.00

3/ 2.5

1784

686 Grafton Park Dr

Chico

$376,000.00

3/ 2

1844

2239 Floral Ave

Chico

$285,000.00

3/ 2

1662

1729 Woodview Ln

Chico

$375,000.00

4/ 2

1980

1609 W 8th Ave

Chico

$280,000.00

4/ 2

1968

1697 E 8th St

Chico

$362,500.00

3/ 2

1459

9 Skymountain Cir

Chico

$271,000.00

3/ 2

1562

351 Idyllwild Cir

Chico

$345,000.00

3/ 2

1800

1551 Arch Way

Chico

$270,500.00

4/ 2.5

1546

1680 Cooks Way

Chico

$335,000.00

3/ 2

1720

1281 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$268,000.00

4/ 2

1402

159 Via Mission Dr

Chico

$315,000.00

3/ 2

1787

1325 Salem St

Chico

$255,000.00

3/ 1

1076

3130 Calistoga Dr

Chico

$311,000.00

3/ 1.5

1698

1279 Wanderer Ln

Chico

$238,000.00

3/ 2

1130

310 Legacy Ln

Chico

$310,000.00

4/ 2

1741

1140 Hazel St

Chico

$227,500.00

3/ 1.5

1148

1336 Broadway St

Chico

$306,000.00

3/ 2

1846

2378 Alba Ave

Chico

$225,000.00

4/ 1.5

1358

May 29, 2014

CN&R 37


NEED ATTENTION? THERE MUST BE A BETTER WAY.

15543 Nopel AveNue Forest rANch Come visit this cute home nestled in the heart of Forest Ranch. This 3 bedroom, 2 bath, modified A frame has a cozy cabin feel with beautiful scenery all around. Home has new interior paint, newer windows, new flooring, and an indoor laundry room. The downstairs bathroom has been completely remodeled with a cute new vanity and tile around the tub. Kitchen has a stainless steel range and refrigerator, tile counters and backsplash. Home has central heat and air, a wood stove, and dual pane windows. The .40 acre lot is fully fenced. Home also has an oversized two- car garage and a deck that wraps around the house- great for lounging or entertaining! Schedule your private showing today- you don't want to miss this one! Open House: Sunday , June 1st, 2p-4p

Listed at: $239,900 Heather Cooper | Realtor | Keller Williams | CALBRE# 01843577 | 530-521-2606

(530) 894-2300

ADVERTISE WITH

www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Ask the Professionals at Century 21 — 345-6618 Decorator’s Dream

CLASSIC CHICO CHARMER

NOW’S A GREAT TIME TO SELL!

two fire places, hardwood, dual pane windows & many other upgrades

G

PENDIN

Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, large yard, 1408 sq feet,. $275,000

$239,400

NEW: Big Chico Creek Estates. 4 bd, 3 ba, 3352 Sq feet. Amber Grove, 2200 sq ft, 4/2, pool, 3 car garage and RV parking.

KIMBERLEY TONGE | (530) 518-5508

5 acres just waiting

Prices are rising and so are the rates! Call me!

Call & see today!

SMILES ALWAYS

for a new Home

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

JOYCE TURNER

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 12, 2014 – May 16, 2014. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

397 E 6th St

Chico

$218,000.00

3/ 2

1282

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

378 E 23rd St

Chico

$115,000.00

1/ 1

1218 Bruce St

Chico

$210,000.00

1/ 1

660

865

6815 Alphys Ln

Magalia

$368,000.00

3/ 2.5

2667

390 Yarrow Dr

Chico

$210,000.00

3/ 2

1294

1718 Spruce Ave

Chico

$189,000.00

2/ 1

944

5941 Happy Hollow Rd

Magalia

$229,000.00

4/ 3

2417

6350 Amherst Way

Magalia

$165,000.00

2/ 2

2320 Mariposa Ave

Chico

$178,000.00

3/ 1.5

1636

1100

14688 Tyler Ct

Magalia

$118,000.00

2/ 2

1460 Warner St

Chico

$165,000.00

1672

3/ 1

1088

14 Rosemel Ct

Oroville

$295,000.00

3/ 2

1320 Jackson St

Chico

2042

$161,500.00

3/ 1

922

115 Loma Vista Dr

Oroville

$235,000.00

2/ 2.5

2358 Alba Ave

2184

Chico

$150,000.00

3/ 1

1051

878 Montgomery St

Oroville

$170,000.00

4/ 2

3500

1125 Sheridan Ave 9

Chico

$142,500.00

2/ 1.5

1114

196 Valley Ridge Dr

Paradise

$267,000.00

3/ 2

1566

1455 Muir Ave

Chico

$135,000.00

2/ 1

1368

6182 Opal Ln

Paradise

$131,500.00

2/ 1

925

1165 Palmetto Ave

Chico

$121,500.00

3/ 2

1310

5876 Maxwell Dr

Paradise

$125,000.00

2/ 1

856

38 CN&R May 29, 2014

SQ. FT.

SQ. FT.


Heather Jay

Laura Burghardt

Aaron Jay

CalBRE# 00991783

39 Skymountain Cir. 4bd/3ba. Approx. 2012 sq. ft. 3 car garage, pool w/ waterfall. $325,000

2655 Waverly Ct. 3bd/2.5ba 1728 sq. ft. Large fenced yard, shows like a model. $235,000

more photos at www.ChicoLaura.com |

(530) 618-2687

For all your Real Estate Needs call (530) 872-7653 Spectacular Estate Property! 3BR/3BA, 3041 SF +/-, 3.44 Acres of useable land. Vaulted, open beam ceilings, library, RV Parking, garden area, amazing view! $549,000 Ad #627 Chari Bullock 530-872-6818

THINK

. E E R F

Lake views in two directions! 5 acres, 2000 SF +/home, huge deck, 3BR/2.5BA, pool table. $396,950 Ad# 590 Ginny Snider 530-872-6814

3BR/2BA + Mother-in-Law Unit On 1.59 acres, zoned for horses! $397,000 Ad# 601

Big Shop!! 2BR/2BA Home on ½ Acre $99,500 Ad# 533 Mike Metz 530-872-6828

John Hosford 530-520-3542

5350 Skyway, Paradise | www.C21Skyway.com | Paradise@c21selectgroup.com

open house Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sun. 11-2, 2-4 3155 Shallow Springs Terrace (X St: Palisades Dr) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 3792 Sq.Ft. $749,000 Justin Jewett 518-4089 Heather DeLuca 228-1480

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4 4111 Goldfinch Ct (X St: Garner Ln) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3053 Sq.Ft. $599,950 Frank “Speedy” Condon 864-7726 Sherry Landis 514-4855

Sun. 12-3 3583 Shadowtree Lane (X St: Whispering Winds) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3,569 Sq. Ft. $568,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sun. 11-1 767 Westmont Ct (X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3,515 Sq.Ft. $537,500 Sherry Landis 514-4855

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 2-4

Sat. 11-1

10692 Player Ln (X St: Estates Dr) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 3011 Sq.Ft. $529,000 Tracy Simmons 925-348-2069 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

1332 Marian Ave (X St: Durham Dayton) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1802 Sq.Ft. $359,900 Sherry Landis 514-4855

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

2690 Guynn Ave (X St: W. East Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,762 Sq.Ft. $325,000 Summer Hughes 227-5729

791 Westmont Ct (X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3352 Sq.Ft. $499,500 Marc Shapiro 426-2555 Laura Willman 680-8962

Sat. 2-4 3072 Hegan Ln (X St: Midway) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 3310 Sq.Ft. $399,000 John Wallace 514-2405

Sat. 11-1 887 Westgate Ct (X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 2285 Sq.Ft. $387,500 Paul Champlin 828-2902

Sat. 2-4 5 Luciano Ct (X St: Peninsula) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1735 Sq.Ft. $369,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1 15 Elisha Ct (X St: Cohasset Rd) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1614 Sq.Ft. $299,000 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 Tracy Simmons 925-348-2069

Sat.11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 112 Wawona Place (X St: Echo Park and Yosemite) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,584Sq Ft. $253,900 Steve Laird 321-6375 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

Sat. 11-1 2149 Howard Dr (X St: Manzanita) 3 Bd / 1 Ba, 1050 Sq.Ft. $239,950 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1990 Modoc (X St: Forest Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1490 Sq.Ft. $299,000 Erin Schmidt 575-7431 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 Frank “Speedy” Condon 864-7725

Sun. 11-1 1170 Patricia Drive (X St: Floral Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,408Sq. Ft. $269,000 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508

May 29, 2014

CN&R 39


YOUR FAVORITE SARA EVANS HITS! • Suds In The Bucket

• Born To Fly

• I Could Not Ask For More

FRIDAY, JUNE

8pm

Doors Open At

7pm

13

• A Little Bit Stronger

th

Tickets On Sale Now Tickets Available At The Box Office And Online At www.GoldCountryCasino.com

Management Reserves All Rights

www.GoldCountryCasino.com • 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville, California • 800.334.9400


C 2014 05 29