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Adventurous Chico reporter travels from Oregon to Mexico on two wheels

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 37, Issue 38

BY HOWARD HARDEE PAGE

18

Thursday, May 15, 2014

FORBIDDEN MORELS See See CHOW, CHOW, page page 29 29


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Vol. 37, Issue 38 • May 15, 2014

OPINION Editorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment. . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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ARTS & CULTURE Arts Feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . .

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PLEASE JOIN US, GRADY AND TRACY DAVIS, IN VOTING FOR ERIC ORTNER, JUNE 3RD, 2014. “Ric Ortner knows his way around a courtroom and a case file. He has the respect of the legal community even when in the midst of an emotion-laden proceeding without becoming imperious or dictatorial. As professionals working in the legal arena, we can assure our friends, family and community that Eric “Ric” Ortner is the clear choice for Butte County Superior Court Judge.” Grady and Tracy Davis Attorneys

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Distribution Director greg Erwin Distribution Manager Mark schuttenberg Distribution Staff ken gates, bob Meads, lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara schultz, larry smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, bill unger, lisa Van der Maelen Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa daugherty Associate Editor Meredith J. graham Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Healthlines Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer ken smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Craig blamer, alastair bland, Henri bourride, Rachel bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, kyle delmar, Miles Jordan, karen laslo, leslie layton, Mark lore, Melanie MacTavish, Jesse Mills, sean Murphy, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, shannon Rooney, Toni scott, Claire Hutkins seda, Juan-Carlos selznick, Robert speer, allan stellar, daniel Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky Intern katherine green Managing Art Director Tina flynn Editorial Designer sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla garcia Design Melissa bernard, Mary key, serene lusano, kyle shine, skyler smith Advertising Manager Jamie degarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth alderson Advertising Consultants alex beehner, brian Corbit, krystal godfrey, laura golino Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla ubay

President/CEO Jeff vonkaenel Chief Operations Officer deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialist Tami sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan schultz Senior Support Tech Joe kakacek Developer John bisignano System Support Specialist kalin Jenkins 353 E. second street, Chico, Ca 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2240 Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. all letters received become the property of the publisher. we reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them.

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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

Like a bad penny We thought it likely that Todd Boothe’s name would pop up

again. He’s the Chico police officer who posted racist and homophobic content on his Facebook page and was called out for it by City Councilman Randall Stone last fall. That flap pitted the Chico Police Officers’Association against Stone, who’d dared to question the overly generous salaries and benefits packages afforded to public-safety employees during the contentious negotiations between the city and the union. Boothe retaliated with a profanity-laced post on Stone’s Facebook page, and Stone responded by airing the Chico cop’s unprofessional online presence. Both men displayed poor behavior—Stone, a member of the Police Community Advisory Board, showed a lack of restraint on the issue by going to the media. And Boothe’s posts, which include calling someone a “fag,” are inexcusable. Boothe deserved to be disciplined, and as we now know (see “Officer claims damage,” Newslines, by Tom Gascoyne, page 10), he was censured by his supervisors following a departmental investigation. We know this only because Boothe is taking the steps necessary to be able to file a lawsuit against the city for alleged damages. Last week, he filed a claim with the city, charging he was denied promotion and special assignments for a year. In other words, instead of taking his lumps and moving on from this unsavory affair, Boothe intends to try to wring some dough out of the city. And he’s doing so under the banner of “freedom of speech and protected beliefs.” In our view, Boothe got off easy with a one-year moratorium on promotion and special assignments. Considering his behavior, it’s a slap on the wrist. What he ought to do is move on from this embarrassing incident, either by resigning from his position as a member of the police department or by accepting the punishment he most definitely deserved. Ω

What is wisdom? Wstudent studying the U.S. Supreme Court, I was in awe of the court. The language of the opinions fascinated

hen I was a political science undergraduate

me. The construction and logic of the decisions enthralled me. One example I studied in a constitutional law class is the 1954 decision of Brown v. Board of Education. The court ruled that having separate schools for blacks and whites was not right; that separate education was inherently unequal. This historic decision changed the course and quality of education and civil rights for all Americans. In the recent Town of Greece v. Galloway, the court has ruled that it’s OK to by George Gold have prayers at the beginning of governmental meetings. The court’s advice is, don’t like the prayers? Walk away, The author, a ignore them. The court says religious computer systems engineer specializing invocations are part of our history, and in disk storage, is that’s how it’s always been. So there. president of the Really? But wasn’t slavery and racial Atheists of Butte discrimination part of our history? In County. To learn fact, didn’t most of the Founding Fathers more, visit own slaves? Considering slavery still www.butte exists in many parts of the world, would countycor.org. the court now say that slavery is part of history so it’s permissible? But let’s take a closer look at Greece v. Galloway, because after all 4

CN&R

May 15, 2014

the publicity and the media coverage, the case really wasn’t quite what you might think. Susan Galloway never asked the court to ban prayer at the beginning of the town of Greece’s meetings, “but rather requested an injunction that would limit the town to ‘inclusive and ecumenical’ prayers that referred only to a ‘generic God’ and would not associate the government with any one faith or belief.” Greece v. Galloway certainly should not have been (and was not) the case that nonbelievers should hang their hats on in hopes that the court would find that all prayers at the beginning of government meetings violated the establishment of religion clause of the First Amendment. Perhaps the only clear intimation is that invocations must be inclusive and representative of a cross section of the population. Although this court ruling must be classified as a narrow ruling (just the facts, ma’am, just the facts), it’s quite clear that whether sectarian or not, the court sees prayer as an integral part of American life and thereby, government life. But then again, this Supreme Court probably would not have found that education opportunity in historically racially segregated schools was inherently unequal. Ω

Quit the denial This week’s news that the collapse of glaciers on the West

Antarctic Ice Sheet is imminent should checkmate climate-change deniers and their propaganda. But considering some of the consequences of the melting ice may take centuries to bear out, we’re not holding our breath. Scientists have long worried that the retreating ice would pass a point of no return, and two recent studies conclude that scenario is upon us. Researchers at NASA and UC Irvine report in the journal Geophysical Research Letters that the melting glaciers in one region ultimately will result in sea-level rises of 4 feet. Meanwhile, another study, this out of the University of Washington and published in the journal Science found the Thwaites Glacier disappearing at a rate of several meters per year. It’s estimated to be nonexistent anywhere from 200 to 500 years from now. What’s most concerning, note the scientists, is that the glacier’s collapse likely will trigger further disintegration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in amounts that would drive sea levels up by 10 to 13 feet—or higher. It’s not like any of this comes as a shock to the scientific community, which has been warning the public about the catastrophic consequences of man-made greenhouse gases for decades. However, there is an urgency to the concerns since the glaciers are melting more rapidly than expected. Why should we care? Well, for starters, it will devastate the environment as we know it, displacing millions of people. And it’s likely to occur within eight generations. It may be too late to take steps to stop the collapse of these glaciers, but it’s not too late to heed the warnings of other coal-mine canaries. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Walking for Jane Life is fragile. This occurs to me every now and again, but especially when I hear about someone I know passing away. That happened recently and, as usual, I have a weird feeling in the pit of my stomach. In this case, I read the news on Facebook. A local TV station reported on Monday that Jane Rodgers—a longtime Butte College nutrition instructor—was killed in a head-on collision on Highway 99 near Biggs on Friday. I saw the post at the end of a long day at the office, and sat there stunned. And I remain deeply saddened, as do so many others in the community, by this terrible news. In addition to teaching at the community college, Jane worked through Far Northern Regional Center to provide nutrition counseling to the agency’s clients. That’s how I knew her. She set up dietary plans for my medically fragile toddler son, Henry, who has Down syndrome and was born premature. Every couple of months, Jane would come into our home and check on his progress growthwise and adjust his caloric intake. Jane was extremely thorough. So thorough, in fact, that my husband and I always made sure we tweaked our schedules—accommodating for a session of an hour and a half for what was supposed to be an hour-long meeting. And while her job was somewhat clinical, Jane was warm and funny. She was sharp, too. I liked her a lot. According to California Highway Patrol reports, a large truck heading southbound drifted into the northbound lane near Rio Bonito Road and struck her small Honda sedan. Jane died at the scene. She was 58 years old. I’m sure her loved ones, as I do, want to know what exactly happened. An investigation is ongoing. In the meantime, dozens of people have posted comments on Facebook. Jane was obviously a beloved Butte College faculty member and much appreciated for her work with Far Northern clients. I’ll be thinking about her this Saturday, May 17, while I’m at Bidwell Park for the Buddy Walk. For the uninitiated, the Buddy Walk—started in 17 cities by the National Down Syndrome Society back in 1995—is the one of the leading Down syndrome advocacy events in the nation. It’s grown to more than 250 walks annually, and is being held locally for the first time this year. Online registration for the Buddy Walk ended a few weeks ago, but the community is still encouraged to participate. For more info, look up Chico Buddy Walk on Facebook. Event organizers will have a few extra T-shirts to sell on the morning of the walk and there’s going to be a silent auction and vendor booths. I actually missed the deadline myself, but I’ll be there, along with other members of the local Down syndrome community. I’ll be walking for Henry. I’ll be walking for Jane, too.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

About that column Re “It’s called editing” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, May 8): I read with interest Melissa Daugherty’s column regarding ending Anthony Peyton Porter’s From the Edge column. Daugherty sounds righteous, correct, upstanding and all. Yet, something doesn’t sit right. Anthony was a long-term contributor to the CN&R; not just a “freelancer.” He has roots in this paper. His column brought emotional depth, originality, diversity, quality and maturity to the CN&R. Daugherty might be “right,” but that doesn’t mean she made a good move in discontinuing his column. Ultimately we all make errors in judgment, say dumb things, and have opinions that are too strong to handle. That really isn’t the point, is it? I agree with some of Daugherty’s reasoning for firing Porter. Yet, I miss his column. I found his free thinking refreshing; it kept my faith that the CN&R is not run on fear, narrowness, or the boring construct of sameness. Fortunately, it is not too late. Anthony is still around. And I have a suspicion he has the maturity and open-heartedness to engage in a sincere dialogue about the continuation of his column. This could be a turning point for Daugherty. Owning her strong opinions of correctness, yet valuing relationship over righteousness, she might find the courage to talk with Anthony over tea. Just because relationships matter and this is a small town. KRISTIN OLDHAM Chico

Good for you, Ms. Daugherty. Mr. Porter is a needlessly offensive, hurtful jerk, and has been for some time. I once sent a letter about his lack of professionalism when he wrote of the “tardos” who hung out by the Work Training Center. My letter was butchered by a previous (very temporary) editor. Apparently my comments about Mr. Porter’s pubescent attempts at being “edgy” cut too close to the bone. Mr. Porter’s response to my (and others’) letter(s) was “different folks get offended by different words” or something to that effect. Other letter writers say that Mr. Porter makes the occasional good points. I would offer that he also occasionally offers innovative insight. However, he often needlessly hurt individuals and groups (like disabled adults who cannot defend themselves), and dismissed large sectors of society with a word or two. I could not believe he had a regular space in your (otherwise) open, but journalistically professional publication. I’m relieved he’s gone from the CN&R. ABE BAILY Chico

For those needing an explanation in a political sense, letting Anthony Peyton Porter loose was simply a necessary act of Stalinist feminism (which censors information and suppresses dissent). Feminism is cultural Marxism using critical theory. Critical theory LETTERS continued on page 6

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says you can get rid of an institution and don’t have to replace it with anything better, nor anything at all. Porter is feeling the iron heel of the boot of Stalinist feminism on his neck—in academic terms he is a victim of critical theory. I wish the CN&R well on its journey to becoming another Good Housekeeping magazine. MICHAEL PETERS Chico

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From the ACLU website: Censorship, the suppression of words, 24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) images or ideas that are “offenwww.rapecrisis.org sive.” It seems to me like what you did to Anthony Peyton Porter was DESIGNER REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE indeed censorship, albeit with JEN_PU JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. & PREV. good reason. I’m glad you censored him on both accounts for a variety of reasons. And if I understand you correctly, the reason you “showed him the door” was because you perceive that by “crying censorship” in his article, which he eventually printed on his blog, he was giving you and the other editors the middle finger. Well, maybe. Even so, that might be interpreted as a chicken-shit move on your part. I mean, his censorship article was his perception, just as his article on Sid Lewis was, and as misogynistic and victimblaming as I agree it was, it also made some good points. And, maybe he really was unclear as to why you actually fired him. The reasons you’ve offered here don’t sit well with me. His column was a great addition to CN&R and I’ll miss it. I wish • All OrgAnic POtting the you would have let him have his SOil-1.5 cu. ft. rant and then rather than reacting and showing him the door, gone • WAterhOld on with business as usual.

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It’s about people Re “Getting to the root of homelessness” (Guest comment, by Dan Everhart, May 8): The root of homelessness is a person: Blessed human beings in God’s image, who find themselves without safe and stable housing for reasons that are often cloudy to all persons concerned, including the homeless individual themselves. Many notions gnaw at our ability to provide housing, none larger than the perception of having to get something before giving something. Applying a capitalist paradigm for extreme poverty pushes hopelessness to greater depths and transposes changing the paradigm with perpetual inertia. This also applies to organizations and action teams that have formed to propose and implement solutions. Many of these endeavors find themselves insuffi-

ciently prepared, or committed, to empower people experiencing homelessness, while providing a vehicle and mechanism to meaningfully engage them in the process. Many without roofs have few things they are capable, or more worthy, to provide than ideas and passion draped in blood, sweat and tears, held precious by helping hands and minds. BILL MASH Chico

Council duo strike back Re “Enough with the rigidity” (Editorial, May 8): The CN&R is correct: We are rigidly opposed to any blatant waste of public funds. Council has a written policy against the waste of city resources on matters of duplicative regulation and nonlocal subjects. The policy has been cast aside for election year pandering. GMOs: Our beliefs, pro or con, on the subject do not matter. A resolution from the city of Chico will have little or no impact on state and federal lawmakers, and was a pure waste of expensive city staff time. Plastic-bag ban: More tax dollars and city staff time spent accomplishing nothing, the state will regulate this issue. Nondiscrimination: Pure duplication of existing law. Any issues in this area would be pursued via state and federal law, not a municipal code. Fast forward to two years from now: These measures will have wasted thousands, probably tens of thousands of dollars of city resources, they will have accomplished nothing measurable and provided no benefit to the citizens of the city of Chico. The CN&R is merely engaged in diverting attention from the substantive and truly local issues facing our great city. MARK SORENSEN AND SEAN MORGAN Chico

Editor’s note: Mark Sorensen is vice mayor of Chico. Sean Morgan is a member of the City Council. “We’re tired of the same old rhetoric and would like to see some flexibility on issues that clearly are important to the citizens of Chico.” Your paper of all papers has the audacity to make this baseless request of conservatives. This request that comes from an extreme far-left progressive liberal “It’s our way or the highway” ... we know what’s best for you weekly? Show me one time the liberal council members took up a debate on the $20 million the taxpayers lost from spending faster than Obama has. While O’Liar wasted

away and grew our public debt to an all time high of $17 trillion plus, our council passed a bag ban. Do you know how many times I have heard these slogans: “Greedy developers destroying our beautiful city,” “climate change is destroying the world,” “evil corporations are ruining the human race with their income inequality, the evil bastards!”? I’ll tell you how many times: Year after year after decade and three decades to the present. You want flexibility. Practice what you preach or shut the hell up! RICK CLEMENTS Chico

Cop’s wasting dough Chico Police Officer Todd Boothe may sue the city of Chico after Boothe verbally abused City Councilman Randall Stone on Facebook. The visuals of a big, white police officer going after our partially Hispanic councilman for representing us are ugly. I challenge Chico Police Officers’Association President Peter Durfee to condemn Boothe’s actions. I’m sure that the majority of Chico’s officers are appalled. We need more officers on the streets, not wasting money in legal activity. By the way, we pay council members about $7,260 a year, while Boothe’s wages and benefits in 2012 cost us $147,481. MICHAEL JONES Chico

Editor’s note: For more on this subject, see “Officer claims damage,” Newslines, page 10.

Note to Nielsen Re “Neilsen defends fracking” (Downstroke, May 8): I understand Sen. Jim Nielsen has defended the practice of fracking. I wish he would find out and inform us of the chemicals that are involved in the process. I would like to know if he would drink water from the water tables affected by this flawed process. Nielsen also pushes for getting government out of our lives. Since when did private agencies test for air and water quality; build infrastructure such as highways and railways; and provide for fire, health and law protection; along with providing equal justice for all? I wish Mr. Nielsen and others like him would think of others and the future rather than themselves and now. RICHARD SHULT Orland More letters online:

We have too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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DEPUTY CHARGED IN BEATING

The Yuba County sheriff’s deputy accused of beating a man unconscious on St. Patrick’s Day outside a restaurant in downtown Chico will face three felony charges in Butte County Superior Court on June 10. Nelson Magana allegedly beat the man, stomping on his head after he’d lost consciousness, near the restroom that serves Burgers & Brew and Crush restaurants. Magana, who is out on $150,000 bail, has pleaded not guilty to charges of battery with serious bodily injury, assault by means likely to produce great bodily injury and dissuading a witness from reporting a crime. The case is scheduled to be heard by Judge Stephen Benson.

AUCTIVA OWNER GOES PUBLIC

The Alibaba Group, the giant Chinese e-commerce company that owns Chicobased Auctiva, has announced it will sell stock in the United States. According to a story in The New York Times, Alibaba could raise $15 billion to $20 billion, possibly outselling Facebook’s $16 billion offering two years ago. Auctiva was founded by Chico State grad and former Paradise resident Jeff Schlicht (pictured) in 1998, and Alibaba purchased the company in 2010. Auctiva, according to its website, provides “tools to make selling on eBay easy and profitable” and posts 3 million eBay listings a month.

LAST CHANCE TO REGISTER

The June 3 primary election is quickly approaching, and the last day to register to vote is Monday, May 19. Those who are currently registered but have moved to a new address or had a name change must re-register. Registration is available online at http://ButteVotes.net or forms can be picked up at libraries, post offices and at the Butte County Elections Office at 25 County Center Drive in Oroville. Candace Grubbs (pictured), the county clerkrecorder, is quoted in a press release urging people to take action. “If you have not yet registered to vote in next month’s primary election,” she says, “it’s time to make it happen.” Grubbs is running for reelection against Pamela Teeter, who works for the nonprofit Youth for Change in Paradise and is married to District 5 Supervisor Doug Teeter.

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May 15, 2014

If those walls could talk Local historians celebrate Preservation Month with awards, tours through Chico’s past

Taround one corner of the beautifully aged home at the corner of East Fourth and Olive

o most passersby, the porch wrapping

streets seems like a natural fit. “It just works,” Chico Heritage Association President John Gallardo said by during a recent visit to the propKen erty, historically known as the Smith Schwein Home, though he admits some of his colleagues kens@ newsreview.com might disagree. “It’s an Italianate-style building, and then it has this classical revival porch,” Gallardo explained. “Some architectural experts might look at that and say, ‘Ugh, it’s not pure,’ or whatMore ever, but to the average person it information: looks very nice. In other words, The Chico it works.” Heritage The Schwein Home is one of Association has three houses scheduled to be an office at honored at the association’s 441 Main St. in the Old Municipal Preservation Awards ceremony Building. Office on May 28, the culmination of hours are Preservation Month events. GalWednesdays, lardo explained that, though his1-3 p.m. More torical and architectural integrity information on the association and are factors in determining honPreservation orees, few buildings remain Month events, exactly as originally built (Bidincluding the well Mansion, which has been awards ceremony largely restored, and the Stansand walking tours, is available at bury Home, which has been www.chico mostly preserved, are the two heritage.org. rare examples he could think of

in Chico). In the case of the Schwein Home, where the porch was added and the second floor widened in 1911, the additions themselves are of historical significance. Another factor in determining awards is just who should receive them, as properties tend to change hands more often today than they did in the past. This wasn’t a factor in the case of the Schwein Home, which has been owned by the same family for more than 100 years. Mathias Schwein was a German immigrant who came to the North State through the Panama isthmus in 1857, eventually settling in Chico in 1887, said Jeff Schwein, a fifth-generation Chicoan also present during the visit to the home. The house, built in 1885 and sold shortly thereafter to Mathias’ son Ludwig “Louis” Schwein, has been passed down through the family and is today owned by Jeff’s distant aunt, Janis Sylvester, who currently lives in Maine. Sylvester and other Schwein descendents plan to attend the May 28 awards ceremony. As does Jeff, who has no personal connection to the home—he comes from a different line of Schweins, and is the great-grandson of Ludwig’s brother, Theodore, whose historic home still stands in the south campus area. A family history buff, he’s donated dozens of photos to Meriam Library’s Special Collections (viewable online) and noted he and his wife are raising two sons here,

yet another generation of Chico Schweins. Two other Chico buildings, the

Walker Home and the Stamper Home, also will receive awards, as will local historian Michele Shover. Gallardo noted the Walker Home, at the corner of West Third and Ivy streets, is also a hybrid of styles, with an overall Italianate design accented with federalstyle front porch and other details. “It has the only half-moon-shaped skylight [above] the front door we’ve seen in Chico,” he said. More obviously unique is the material—the house was built from brick in 1875. “Jefferson Stamper owned a brickyard and supplied bricks to a lot of early buildings in Chico and other cities, like you see in most of downtown,” Gallardo said, noting that longtime owners the Riley family will receive the award. “He wanted it to be like a showcase to show what you could do with bricks, but it never really caught on with homes here.” The Stamper Home, located on The Esplanade next to the Chico Veterans Memorial Hall, is a 1912 Craftsmanstyle home built by Walter Hahn, one of Gallardo’s favorite historic home designers and builders. “There’s nobody else that did what he did in terms of the quality of construc-


Farmers’ market marches on Fifth-generation Chicoan Jeff Schwein and Chico Heritage Association President John Gallardo on the porch of the home once owned by Schwein’s great uncle.

Proponents turn in signatures, stand behind initiative’s legality

PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

S Farmers’ Market’s Saturday event cleared another hurdle Monday (May 12). Or

The Schwein Home in the early 1900s. Mathias Schwein owned several meat markets in Chico. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHICO STATE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

tion—the woods, the finishes, the fitting of the joints, everything,” he said. “His homes were rock solid and the best possible quality. One of his relatives said he could have been much wealthier if he and his crew didn’t spend so much time making sure everything was perfect, and he insisted on the highest quality of craftsmanship and materials.” Dianne Ayers Ferris and family will receive the award for the Stamper Home. Local historian and past Chico Heritage Association Vice President Shover will receive a special Preservation Award. Shover is a retired professor of political science at Chico State, and has spent years restoring her own 12th Street home, the A.H. Chapman House, more commonly called the Little Chapman Mansion. Shover also owns and is restoring several other houses in the Chapman neighborhood. “She does an incredible amount of research in various areas of Chico’s past,” Gallardo said. “She’s our local expert on the history of women, blacks and Chinese in Chico, as well as on Annie Bidwell. “A number of people she interviewed and recorded personally in the last 30 years are gone now, and a lot of history would be lost if not for her efforts.” The association also is hosting two guided walking tours of historic Chico homes during Preservation Month. On Saturday (May 17), Gallardo will guide a tour of south campus homes, and Randy Taylor will lead a May 24 tour of downtown businesses. The association is a nonprofit organization incorporated in 1981, and Gallardo is a founding member. He and other members spend a great deal of time researching Chico’s historic buildings, a never-ending effort for an organization made up entirely of volunteers. “We’re working to get a lot more information online so anyone can contact us; we can give them some hints on how to do the research and point them in the right direction,” he said. “Our main goal is to help enable the public to find their own information. “There are literally thousands of people in Chico who would like their homes researched, but we just don’t have enough time.” Ω

upporters of the Chico Certified

at least they think they did. After months of collecting signatures around town for an initiative meant to keep the market in its current location for at least the next six years, they were ready for the next step. So a smiling group gathered outside City Hall to deliver the petitions to the city clerk. Whether the wording of the initiative is legal is yet to be determined. In all, the Friends of the Farmers’ Market, which led the petition drive, gathered 9,265 signatures. The City Clerk’s Office confirmed that number, but the signatures must be verified by county elections staff before the initiative moves forward. (Only 4,750 signatures— 10 percent of Chico’s registered voters—were required to advance the initiative.) The ballot initiative is just the latest in a long string of events involving the future of the Saturday farmers’ market. For years, there have been grumblings among some downtown businesses that use of the parking lot at Second and Wall streets for the market on Saturdays has a negative impact on parking and, ultimately, sales. Last summer, the Chico City Council voted to extend the market’s franchise agreement on the lot through December 2014, during which time a committee would be formed to discuss where to go from there. “We’ve been in that lot for 21 years,” said Cheryl King, Friends of the Farmers’ Market spokeswoman, during the recent press conference. “It’s become a tradition, a community event.” The initiative, most basically, includes the terms of the current agreement between the city and the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market

(CCFM). It changes it in a few key ways: • Instead of opening the cityowned lot from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. for the market on Saturdays, it would be open from 5:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Instead of opening just part of the parking lot, it would include the entire lot. • Instead of the CCFM paying an annual fee of $284 (what was paid this year) to the city, it would pay $5,000. • Instead of being renewed annually, the franchise would be renewed every eight years (with the initial franchise lasting until Dec. 31, 2020). “The intent of the additional space isn’t just to have more vendors, but to be able to add community space, seating, a designated area for musicians,” explained Natalie Carter, office manager for CCFM. (While CCFM did not lead the petition drive, it did have input on the wording of the initiative.) “If you go to the market on Saturdays, sometimes you’ll see a mother and her kids sitting on the curb eating tamales—we want to be able to add tables and chairs so people can sit. We just don’t have the space for that right now.” Carter pointed to the increased annual fee as an offer to repay the city for the lost parking spaces. She said they came to the $5,000 amount by calculating roughly what the city would make if the entire lot were full for the length of the market and metered (parking is free on Saturdays). City Attorney Vince Ewing has questioned the legality of the initiative, saying it violates the state Constitution because it

SIFT|ER Obama job approval Despite what the right-wing radio raconteurs report, President Obama’s approval ratings (45 percent) are not completely in the toilet, except maybe with those raconteurs and their faithful listeners. The following Gallup poll numbers were taken between April 28 and May 4. By age Ages 18 to 29 Ages 30 to 49 Ages 50 to 64 Ages 65+

By ethnicity 50% 44% 43% 40 %

White Nonwhite Black Hispanic

By political party 33% 69% 84% 60%

Democrat 80% Independent 40% Republican 10%

Friends of the Farmers’ Market members Karl Ory and Cheryl King present more than 9,000 signatures during a press conference Monday (May 12) in front of Chico’s City Hall. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. GRAHAM

would create a law binding the city to contract with a private company (CCFM). Ewing did not return a phone call seeking additional comment by press time. Proponents of the market stand by their initiative and its legality. If enough signatures are confirmed by the county ClerkRecorder’s Office, which has 30 days to count them, the initiative will go before the Chico City Council. It will then either be approved and signed into law or it will be added to the November ballot to be voted on by the people of Chico. In the meantime, a subcommittee has been formed, consisting of two council members and Community Development Department Director Mark Wolfe. Despite a slow start, the committee did meet with CCFM representatives May 6 to start a dialogue about the market. “The bulk of the conversation was about how we might approach perceived parking issues in downtown Chico—at least I consider them perceived,” Carter said. “The meeting was positive enough, and we agreed to meet again, but no date was set for a second meeting.” For now, people like King and Carter are hoping for the best. “We’re putting our eggs in the initiative basket,” Carter said. “If it came to it, would we move? We probably would, but I don’t know where. We don’t have a lot of good options.” —MEREDITH J. GRAHAM meredithg@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 May 15, 2014

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police officer of racism is back in the news. Officer Todd Boothe has filed a claim against the city for damages related to personal injury and defamation. He is asking for an “unlimited civil claim,” which means $25,000 or more. The trouble began when, during contract negotiations between the city and the Chico Police Department, Boothe called Councilman Randall Stone “incompetent” and an “asshole” on Stone’s Facebook page. Boothe also posted, “Feed the homeless and fund worthless programs and take your personal insurance to the best rate in the City! Complete incompetency by our city council and their hired henchmen.” Stone allegedly retaliated by searching Boothe’s Facebook page, where he discovered what could be considered a racist Photoshopped image of President Obama as a witchdoctor with a bone through his nose and “Obambacare” running as a caption. Boothe had posted the image in 2009. Another more recent post was of a skull with a Confederate flag design and a caption that read, “Rebel ’till The Day I Die.” Stone also pointed to a comment in which Boothe called a friend a “fag.” Stone shared the information he’d discovered with Police Chief Kirk Trostle and asked for an investigation. He also shared the information with the media, and on Nov. 11 Action News Now broke the story in an interview with Stone, who said Boothe was homophobic and “clearly harboring racist views.” Both men were criticized in letters to the editor and in posts on social media. Stone said Boothe’s posts reflected poorly on the police department as a whole. In his claim, Boothe charges he was exercising his rights to free speech as a private citizen. The Police Officers Bill of Rights reads: “Except as otherwise provided by law, or whenever on duty or in uniform, no public safety officer shall be prohibited from engaging, or be Police Officer Todd Boothe posted this image on his Facebook page and City Councilman Randall Stone brought that fact to light. FILE PHOTO

coerced or required to engage, in political activity.” However, the Chico Police Department’s policy manual does prohibit certain forms of communication: “Speech or expression that, while not made pursuant to an official duty, is significantly linked to, or related to, the Chico Police Department and tends to compromise or damage the mission, function, reputation or professionalism of the Chico Police Department.” Further, as it relates to privacy, “Employees forfeit any expectation of privacy with regard to anything published or maintained through file-sharing software or any Internet site open to public view (e.g., Facebook, MySpace).” In documents obtained by

this newspaper, Boothe’s claim against the city, filed May 7, reads: “As a result of the defamatory statements and/or wrongful conduct made by Stone claimant was and continues to be harmed, including but not necessarily limited to harm to claimant’s business, trade, profession and/or occupation, as well as harm to claimant’s personal and/or professional reputation.” Boothe, who is being represented by Sacramento attorney John Tribuiano, originally filed a discrimination and retaliation com-

plaint with the Department of Fair Employment & Housing in February, and then immediately requested the “right to sue,” which was granted. The Department of Fair Employment & Housing policy says that it “maintains the authority to investigate complaints of discrimination in the areas of employment, housing, public accommodations and hate violence.” In his complaint, Boothe describes the incident that led to this point: “I called a Chico councilmember an asshole on his public Facebook page as a voting citizen and no affiliation to my employment. He then discovered my employment as a police officer and notified the media. He slandered me in the media and attacked me. I have undergone an internal investigation at my department and endured public scrutiny based on his allegations.” He goes on to explain the reason for the complaint. “Due to this I have been disciplined which has prevented me from promotional and special assignment opportunities for at least 1 year.” For his part, Stone said he could not comment on the matter at this time for legal reasons and Trostle echoed that sentiment. Boothe could not be reached for comment. The city has 45 days to accept or reject the claim. If rejected, Boothe will have the opportunity to sue. —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com


Migration education Eco-company uses World Fish Migration Day to connect children an ocean apart

Eand other migratory fish journey 250 miles from the Pacific Ocean to Butte and

ach year, thousands of salmon

Big Chico creeks to spawn. “You imagine the challenges they face,” said Gabriel Kopp, director of operations at FISHBIO, “and have a great deal of respect for a species able to thrive through that.” Kopp hopes Chicoans will take on a more modest trek aimed at calling attention to the importance of open waterways for migratory fish species. On May 24, or World Fish Migration Day, FISHBIO is hosting the Bidwell Park 5K Salmon Run. The event will serve as a capstone for a year of educational outreach efforts both in California and the Mekong River Basin in Southeast Asia, dubbed the Three Rivers Education Program. Chico State grad Doug Demko created FISHBIO six years ago in the Stanislaus County town of Oakdale, subsequently establishing locations in Laos and Chico. The company uses state-of-the-art technology it manufactures in Oakdale to research and monitor fish populations—a measure of a river system’s overall health—working with water companies, irrigation districts and the Army Corps of Engineers. FISHBIO has “a culture of being responsible and giving back,” Kopp said. He pointed to fish counts in Big Chico Creek conducted pro bono last summer, as well as company-organized volunteer stream cleanups as examples. About a year ago, FISHBIO got word of World Fish Migration Day, the website for which reads: “Free migration for fish is crucial to achieve healthy fish stocks. … If they can’t migrate, the population will die out. This has happened with many species in different places around the world already.” While acknowledging that natural challenges for migratory fish are plentiful, the website emphasizes that fish are impeded by man-made obstacles like dams and pumps. “We have built so many barriers in the rivers Run for the fishes:

The Bidwell Park 5K Salmon Run will be held on Saturday, May 24, starting at One-Mile Recreation Area in Lower Bidwell Park at 8 a.m. Festivities will include games, raffles, educational opportunities and more. Race registration is $20-$25; go to www.fish bio.com/race.html to register.

This third-grade class at Vientiane Patanna School in Vientiane, the capital of Laos, learn about salmon and other migratory fish in California as part of FISHBIO’s Three Rivers Education Program. PHOTO COURTESY OF FISHBIO

and on the coast that it is very hard for migratory fish to reproduce,” it says. Since the message of World Fish

Migration Day aligns with that of FISHBIO, Kopp said, the company wanted to participate but considered a one-time event inadequate. The Three Rivers Education Program was conceived and has since connected schoolchildren in Chico and Oakdale to those in Laos, where dams are threatening Mekong River fish populations—the main source of protein for millions of people. “We talk with kids about migratory fish, the rivers and people and the interdependence between the three,” Kopp said. “We talked about the streams in the opposing countries. The kids in Laos learned about salmon; the kids in California learned about the Mekong giant catfish.” The students also exchanged letters and drawings of various fish. Kopp said the program will continue after World Fish Migration Day. The Salmon Run, meanwhile, will underscore how the community can take small steps to help clear migratory pathways for fish, Kopp said. “Most people think of larger things—a dam, a pump—but it’s down to even smaller levels,” he said. “Even things like creek cleanups; having a mattress in the middle of a stream doesn’t allow for a clear migration pathway. Every stream has its needs, and we can all be part of making it better.” By holding the event in Lower Bidwell Park, FISHBIO hopes to bring the message home for locals. “The race itself is built on celebrating our local streams and fishes,” Kopp said, “and what’s more iconic than Big Chico Creek?” —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com May 15, 2014

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THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES

DRUGS TESTED ON HUMANS FIRST?

A growing pharmaceutical niche is taking human drugs and converting them to medications for cats, dogs and other companion animals. Globally, veterinary medicines and vaccinations make up a $22 billion industry, the bulk of which is for livestock, according to SFGate.com. But increasingly, animal pharmaceutical businesses are branching off as divisions of large human drug manufacturers, fueled by owners who treat their pets like members of the family and are willing to spend accordingly. For instance, Burlingame’s Kindred Biosciences Inc. has developed a canine version of the allergy medicine Allegra, a feline version of epoetin to treat kidney disease, and is enrolling dogs in trials for a canine version of the human osteoarthritis drug diacerein. The company is hoping to receive approval for the drugs from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine by 2015.

FIGHTING FOR SICK DAYS

A statewide campaign called 10,000 Mothers Strong is advocating for a pending bill that would grant all Californians at least three days of paid sick leave each year. The Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act would allow sick leave for illness, to care for a sick family member or as leave for domestic violence and sexual assault victims, according to California Public News Service. A report released by the nonprofit agency Next Generation found that only 61 percent of Americans working in the private sector receive paid sick leave; those with greater access to sick leave are often full-time, high-wage employees. “This lack of earned sick days is a tremendous problem, straining the pocketbooks of working families, the health and well-being of workplaces and stores, and the sustainability of our health care system,” said Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego).

QUIT FEUDING, FAMILIES!

Constantly arguing with loved ones may increase the risk of premature death in middleaged people, a Danish study finds. A research team from the University of Copenhagen used data on 9,875 men and women ages 36 to 52 to determine that frequent arguments with partners, friends or relatives increases one’s mortality rate by two or three times the normal rate, according to BBC News. Past studies have indicated anxiety due to demands from partners or children raises the likelihood of heart disease and stroke; in this study, the authors agreed that physiological reactions to stress, such as high blood pressure, likely were behind the increased risk of premature death. Unemployed individuals were most vulnerable, displaying a greater risk of death from all causes than those who had a job. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

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Mark Gordon runs Here’s the Deal, an agency providing assistance to people with disabilities served by the Far Northern Regional Center. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

Supporting independence Local agencies help people with disabilities remain active community members by

Evan Tuchinsky

M with cerebral palsy when he was 18 months old. He’d been born three

ark Gordon was diagnosed

months premature, and his lungs did not fully develop. Difficulties breathing made walking “a really laborious process,” he explained during a recent phone interview. Gordon, who’s 53, is a client of the Far Northern Regional Center, a nonprofit organization empowered by state legislation to support individuals with developmental disabilities. He embodies that mission—so much so that he also helps other clients. He used a manual wheelchair until he was 11, when he got his first motorized wheelchair. Far Northern has provided funds to adapt equipment to his specific needs. He moved from Redding to attend Chico State, and he started law school in Sacramento before a medical leave brought him back to Chico, where he completed studies to become a paralegal. Gordon also worked, teaching independent living skills to others with disabilities. He got promoted to supervisor, and after four years in that capacity, he decided to branch out on his own. In 1998, he formed Proactive Resources, an agency providing assistance to people served by Far Northern. “Far Northern was generous enough to give me start-up money,” he said. Originally just himself and two parttimers, his business—now known as Here’s the Deal, headquartered across from the Chico City Plaza at 500 Main St.—has grown to 55 employees.

“I knew that we could do things a little bit differently,” Gordon said. “Knowing what it is to need assisted-living services has given us insight into some of the challenges that clients go through.” Laura Larson, Far Northern executive director, is thrilled by Gordon’s accomplishments. “He’s his own success story; I just believed in him,” she said. “He really provides good services. He understands the population he’s serving; they’re his brothers and sisters, and he brings an enormous amount of respect to people … and builds supports around what people want for their lives.” The same could be said about Far

Northern, which serves 7,000 customers in nine counties across Northern California, reaching the Oregon and Nevada borders. “I put a lot of miles on my car,” said Larson, whose organization has offices in Chico, Redding, Mount Shasta and Lake Almanor. Statewide, Far Northern is one of 21 regional centers. The system developed in the 1960s, spurred by President John F.

Kennedy; the local chapter opened in 1969. At the time, state hospitals represented the extent of services for people with disabilities. Starting with children, and then expanding to adults, regional centers began offering assistance on an outpatient basis. “Our mission is to provide services and support throughout a person’s lifetime,” Larson said, “so they can live a productive life as a welcome member of the community.” Services are free. Funding comes from the state, which stipulates how the services get provided through a series of legislative bills (i.e., the Early Intervention Services Act and the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act). However, regional centers are not part of the state government. “We’re highly regulated, but there’s enormous room for creativity,” Larson said. Early interventions are for newborns to children younger than 3. As Dr. Lisa Benaron, Far Northern medical director, HEALTHLINES continued on page 15

APPOINTMENT FOSTER A FRIEND Butte Humane Society (2580 Fair St.) is hosting foster volunteer orientations on Thursday, May 15, from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturday, May 17, from 10 a.m. to noon. The sessions will cover how the foster program works, the variety of animals in need, and more. Call Toni Evans at 343-7917, ext. 169, or email tonievans@buttehumane.org for more information.


Taking life back from hip and knee pain When the pain you are experiencing in your hips or knees severely restricts your ability to walk or perform simple activities, it may be time to talk to an orthopedic surgeon and consider a joint replacement procedure. Mobility is a vital part of life and Feather River Hospital’s award winning Joint Replacement Center of Excellence is seeing to it that patients get back to the life they know and love faster. This includes patients who would consider themselves too young for a replacement. Feather River Hospital surgeons use unique, advanced techniques that require smaller incisions and damage less muscle tissue. These techniques allow faster recovery and a shorter hospital stay. Because surgeons are part of a skilled care team that provides a consistently high level of treatment from pre-op through recovery, patients are able to be active again more quickly. The care team comprised of surgeons, nurses, therapists and even dieticians also focuses on the patient experience and the benefit of compassionate, patient-focused care in promoting healing. This approach has helped the program to reach a level of excellence recognized by awards such as a 5-Star Rating in Total Knee Replacements from Healthgrades. Feather River Hospital is also a Blue Distinction Center+ for Hip and Knee Replacements. “Blue Distinction Centers

set themselves apart by adhering to best practices in patient safety and surgical care and producing consistently strong outcomes with fewer complications,” says Marcus Thygeson, M.D., senior vice president and chief health officer at Blue Shield of California. The Joint Replacement Center of Excellence offers an innovative, proactive approach to care for total knee and total hip replacement patients utilizing pre-operative learning classes and group therapy. When recovering in the hospital, patients recover as a group – exercising, enjoying various activities, and providing support and encouragement to each other. Total joint replacement patients average a hospital stay of only one to three days. Most patients are putting weight on their new joint later in the same day that they have their surgery. For patients who once suffered from joint pain, being able to hike, golf, play with their children or even ride a motorcycle again greatly improves their lives. Feather River Hospital’s joint replacement program is helping them to achieve these excellent outcomes as fast as possible. For more information about the Feather River Hospital Joint Replacement Center of Excellence call (530) 876-7243 or visit www.frhosp.org. To learn more about Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care®, please visit www.bcbs.com or contact your Local Plan.

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May 15, 2014

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A Nuisance Endangering School Children, Elders and Neighbors

The Situation: Do Chicoans miss Taylor’s Drive-in on Park Avenue? Of course not. The City tore it down. Hurrah! But the blight we call “Halimi Plaza” still offends Park Avenue drivers. Halimi Plaza is an insult to Chico. Businesses deserve a dignified entry to downtown. 1200 Park Avenue elders, Jesus Center clients and we neighbors live near this dangerous nuisance. In 2010 the City decided the only way to rid Chico of the Halimi blight was to buy 2 David Halimi owned parcels on Park Avenue and a Halimi owned house on E. 11th. The City purchased 2 other lots adjoining the Halimi house and cleaned up some toxins. Development funds evaporated, and the project collapsed. The result? The City owns two house lots. Halimi recovered 2 Park Avenue lots, 174 E.11th and toxins. Chico’s problem: 5 contiguous parcels with abandoned buildings. Halimi’s parcels deteriorated over 40 years. What’s different now? Transient addicts, who reject Torres Shelter and Jesus Center rules, sleep, cook and toilet around “The Halimi,” once a junk store, now transients’ flophouse. Because Halimi parcels house criminals with warrants, police calls require two or three officers. A caretaker Halimi added to one parcel regularly calls police. Last summer firemen extinguished transient-set fires in dry weeds adjoining wooden houses. We are not attacking Hal LLC's property rights. However, City nuisance codes exist to protect lives and property from negligence like Halimi’s. The City has cause to condemn Halimi Plaza and require the company to clean up toxins and restore or raze its buildings at company expense. Taxpayers provide police and fire security for Halimi property. If Halimi lots were properly used, like our lots are, City expenses there would be negligible and the property would generate taxes. The City is giving 168 and 178 E. 11th -- on each side of the Halimi house -- to Habitat for Humanity. Then it plans to walk away, leaving Halimi’s squalor to Habitat and us. Halimi! Pay some dues! Give Habitat 174 E. 11th or make your shabby rental a decent residence.

The City has leverage. City approvals for Halimi developments should hinge on improving Halimi Plaza. Aware of Hal LLC ‘s mismanagement of residential properties, the City should scrutinize Halimi permits and make extended, minute reviews. Halimi must remedy all blight out of pocket. Remedies will test City staff’s command of the nuances of municipal codes, forfeiture and condemnation law and other California legal procedures for formal and informal remediation. The Jesus Center did not create this blight. We neighbors are responsible people. The blight exists because Hal LLC and the City created 5 abandoned, contiguous parcels in the heart of central Chico. They would attract dangerous transients anywhere in town. Unlike a park, Halimi Plaza is not a sprawling, natural nuisance. Owners created and sustain this continuing nuisance. The City must not allow Hal LLC to interpret the city's exit as a green light to continue the company's destructive role on Park and E. 11th St. Our Response to David Halimi's statements in the CN&R 8 May 2014: 1. Halimi never acknowledged his properties endanger schoolchildren, neighbors, elders and Jesus Center clients. 2. Halimi’s tactic until the “heat” subsides: do minimal cleanup and pack tiny 174 E. 11th with renters. 3. Halimi thinks his nice downtown buildings exempt him from accountability for his Park Ave. blight. They do not. 4. Halimi blames us neighbors for his refusal to develop “Halimi Plaza.” Not credible. 5. Halimi mentions improvements -- maybe, possibly, someday. Smoke and mirrors. When Hal LLC produces a handsome entry to downtown Chico, the company will have no greater supporters than its neighbors. Until then, he can expect continued pressure from us to do the right thing. Yes, the City’s Plan A failed. Now, Plan B requires the City to use its influence and authority to compel Hal LCC to remedy its damage to Chico. East 11th Street Neighbors

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GREENWAYS Roxanne Vaughan, sales director at Roplast Industries, shows off some samples of her company’s reusable grocery bags. Roplast bags are made entirely at the company’s Oroville factory.

A better bag Oroville company designs reusable plastic sacks that comply with city ordinances story and photos by

Ken Smith

kens@newsreview.com

Wtrend of ordinances meant to curb the use of single-use plastic bags, Roxanne hen discussing the growing

Vaughan is quick to clarify that the term “plastic bag ban” is incorrect. To Vaughan and her colleagues at Roplast Industries Inc., whose primary function is the manufacture of plastic bags, it’s more than a matter of simple semantics. “We try to make it explicitly clear that the intent with these ordinances is to reduce waste and encourage reuse,” Vaughan, the company’s sales director, explained during a recent tour of the Roplast factory in south Oroville. “Single-use, light plastic bags have been targeted as being difficult to capture and recycle, and they’re commonly thrown away. It’s really more of a visible waste problem and more of a packaging regulation and not a ban on all plastic bags.” Roplast’s focus is on manufacturing thicker-gauge, reusable polyethylene bags, and the company—founded in 1989—does make some bags for food and product packaging, but Vaughan said more than 70 percent of Roplast’s production is focused on reusable grocery and retail bags. “We started off making reusable bags way before it was popular, which people kind of laughed at because they thought it was more of a commodity product, and something that was done more in Europe,” she said. 16

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Now, Chico has joined more than 100 other California communities in adopting ordinances to regulate single-use bags, and California is considering statewide limitations (Senate Bill 270) for the fifth time in seven years. Conservation organization Californians Against Waste, which tracks such ordinances, lists Fairfax as the first community to adopt a measure, in 2008. There are also similar ordinances in cities in Washington, Oregon and Texas. The Roplast website (www.roplast.com) contains news updates and information about specific ordinances, and marketing is geared toward helping companies comply. “We actually send people into stores to educate them on how to be compliant and get them set up with everything they need,” Vaughan said. Some ordinances are stricter than others, and Vaughan said Roplast makes products to comply with the most stringent. The strongest bags, such as those specified in L.A. County’s ordinance, must pass what is known at Roplast as the “walk test,” which means they need to be able to carry 22 pounds 175 feet, 125 times. “The Chico ordinance is drafted in the same spirit as most, requiring a certain gauge and carry weight,” she said. “The local ordinance will encourage reuse, and we’re supportive of that.” A number of area grocers, including locally owned Chico Natural Foods Co-op and Ohio-based Food4Less, already carry reusable Roplast bags. Vaughan expects

more local companies to make use of Roplast’s products when the ordinance takes effect in large grocery stores Jan. 1. In addition to producing ordinance-

compliant materials, Roplast works to make its operations environmentally friendly, which Vaughan explained further as she conducted a tour of Roplast’s sprawling 130,000-square-foot facility. A few dozen of Roplast’s 140 employees were working in the production area that morning, attending to the lines of huge machinery that birth the bags. At one end the plastic is extruded, or melted from the recycled aggregate, which looks like small plastic pebbles. The “plastic lava,” as Vaughan called it, is formed into sheeting, which is then formed into bags with blown air. A long, continuous sheet runs through more machines, where it is printed with the desired logos and cut into individual bags. More workers check the quality of each run before the bags are transported to another part of the floor to be packaged. Completed, packed bags are shipped by truck or train— another part of the building contains loading docks for trucks, and part of the company’s 12-acre property serves as a rail yard. The bags are made completely of recycled content, including about 30 percent post-consumer recycled plastic. After obtaining the recycled plastic, every other part of the process—including printing with waterbased ink rather than less environmentally sound metallic inks used on some imported

bags—is done in-house, greatly reducing the product’s carbon footprint. Roplast is certified by Sustainable Green Products Inc., a membership organization that helps plastic, paper and consumer-product companies be more green. Vaughan said Roplast’s efforts don’t stop once the bag is shipped, either. “We try to do our best to educate the public to make the best use of plastic bags,” she said. “We make sure all of our bags have recycling logos, and when possible print instructions on how and where to dispose of that bag. We try to follow the bag through its whole life cycle.” Vaughan noted that plastic has a bad rap, environmentally speaking, but that paper bags, by comparison, aren’t necessarily as green as people assume. According to a Washington Post report, it takes four times more energy to create a paper bag than a plastic one. Each year, 14 million trees are cut down to create the nearly 10 billion paper bags we use. In contrast, four out of five bags used are plastic— we use 100 billion of those each year—and we use about 12 million barrels of oil to produce those bags. Vaughan countered that plastic is not always tied to oil production. “That’s a misconception,” she said. “In America, our plastic bags are made from polyethylene, which is derived from ethylene, a byproduct of natural gas that, unless we capture it to use for plastic, just gets burned off.” Ω

ECO EVENT ALL ABOUT SALVIA Join local author John Whittlesey as he reads from his recent book, The Plant Lover’s Guide to Salvias, at 7 p.m. Thursday (May 15) at Lyon Books & Learning Center (135 Main St.). As owner of Oroville’s Canyon Creek Nursery & Design, Whittlesey is intensely knowledgeable about plants and here he shares his particular love of salvias, which are not only beautiful but also useful in foods and medicines.


THE GOODS PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. GRAHAM

15 MINUTES

THE BOTTOM LINE

Down to a T

Dreams of purple lines George Barber has a vision for the roads of this region to be painted with purple lines—to assist wine lovers in visiting all the local wineries. That’s why he named his downtown Oroville-based winemaking operation Purple Line Urban Winery. As part of the North Sierra Foothills Vintners Association, part of Barber’s goal—and the goal of the association—is to build on the region’s wine-related tourism. “We haven’t painted the streets yet, but someday, hopefully, we’ll be able to negotiate with the city and county.” A 21-year Oroville resident, Barber and his wife, Kate, opened the winery in November 2013. Their wines are not available in stores, but they are poured at Bird Street Café in Oroville and at Monks Wine Lounge & Bistro in Chico. Purple Line Urban Winery is open Wednesday through Sunday for tastings and can be booked for special events. It’s located at 760 Safford St., 534-1785, purplelinewinery.com.

How’s business? We’ve been so busy. Every week is busier than the week before. One thing we do every week is a potluck dinner on Wednesdays. Close to 80 people show up. It’s from 6-8 p.m. Just bring a dish to share.

I understand you’re a former California Highway Patrol officer. How did you make the leap from CHP to owning and operating a winery? I retired from the CHP almost eight years ago. [Opening the winery] was a bit of an ordeal. It took

by Toni Scott

us about 10 months to even get a building permit, and almost another year to build the winery. During that time we also had the grape crush. We started making wines well before we opened the winery. We had the crush come through and managed to open in November.

You probably had to do a lot of research to start this business. What was the most unexpected thing you learned? How hard it is to get a label approved. You have to upload your labels, front and back, and send them to the Alcohol and Tobacco Trade and Taxation Board. If there’s anything they don’t like, or they’re not in the exact format they want with the government warnings and all, it’s rejected. Sometimes it takes 45 days to get approved, which is a long time if you’re not expecting that kind of delay. That was rather surprising. But so far all of our labels have been approved, if not the first time, by the second.

What’s the difference between an urban winery and any other winery? An urban winery is in town, in the city limits. Secondly, we don’t grow any of our grapes. We outsource grapes, going out to vineyards and bringing them to town. If we can buy them locally, we do. But [if we] can’t get the variety we need, we shop the grape market. We’ve gone as far as Hollister to pick up grapes, as well as to Murphys and Sonoma.

What makes your wines special? The flavors make it special. Our whole process is very gentle on the grapes. Everything we do is with gravity flow, so grapes are never agitated by running them through any kind of a pump. We don’t pump anything anywhere on the premises. It’s very old-school, but very gentle, and it makes great wine. —CATHERINE BEEGHLY

tonis@newsreview.com

This time of year, one of my favorite places to be is T. Tea Bar & Fusion Café. Actually, up until this year, I still called the restaurant by its former name, Teaz Me, an indication that my fanaticism is long-lived. I finally realized that I needed to relent and start referring to T. Bar as such when I heard that owners Shelley and Lance Blanshei were opening a second Chico location. I felt as though as I was denying T. Bar’s success and not recognizing its evolution over the past eight years by continually harking back to the past. It’s sort of like how, after seeing The Departed, I stopped calling Mark Wahlberg “Marky Mark.” The Blansheis have been mainstays in Chico’s food and beverage business for years, once owning Bidwell Perk, before launching Teaz Me, which evolved into T Bar. Their latest venture, an expansion in southeast Chico, opened last month and business has been booming. Though many businesses are still climbing out of the recession, T. Bar’s unique menu— featuring blended, sparkling and brewed tea beverages and fresh Asiainspired fare like wraps and teriyaki bowls—has paved the way for growth in otherwise challenging times. Lance Blanshei said he is expecting to add at least 35 new part-time jobs to the workforce as a result of the expansion. Yet there is perhaps a more compelling outcome from the opening of the new location: The change at the corner of Forest Avenue and Flying V Street, where the new T. Bar is located, is striking. The bold colors of the restaurant’s signage have certainly brightened up the block. In addition, over the last few weeks, an energy has emerged that transforms the area. Blanshei described the location as previously being a “very sleepy, subdued strip mall.” I couldn’t agree more. There was nothing noteworthy about the space. Not so now. On an average afternoon, you’ll find people sitting out on the spacious patio and you can’t help but be drawn in. It is a complete revitalization. People often talk about events or art pieces as being place-makers. Businesses can have the same effect. Chico has seen a similar shift in other locations, such as the block between Sixth and Seventh streets on Broadway that’s home to the Tin Roof Bakery and Nantucket Home. The once drab downtown stretch is now inviting and has anchored the area for future businesses. I’m betting the same will happen around the new T. Bar location and look forward to seeing businesses pop up there, building on the energy in the area. If you haven’t checked out the new spot, a ribbon-cutting is planned for today, May 15, at 5:30 p.m. at 555 Flying V #1. Grab a tea—you can never go wrong with the Chocolate Chai Frost or blackberry lemonade— and keep watch on that block. I’m certain it will continue to blossom over the next few years.

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THE ENDLESS CYCLE

by

Howard Hardee howardh@ newsreview.com

Observations from pedaling the California coast, from Oregon to Mexico

A

s the sun burned fog off the Pacific coast early one mid-April morning, my girlfriend, Hannah Dillard, and I said goodbye to my parents at the border of Oregon and California. My mother, tortured by the bizarre worst-case scenarios she envisioned, was tearful. My father reassured us that we were starting a grand adventure.

I asked him if this was crazy. “People do stuff like this all the time,” he said. Sure enough, not long after we began bicycling south along a back road paralleling Highway 101, we met a like-minded traveler. A few hundred yards ahead, a cyclist, sitting in the middle of the road, was waving at us. From that distance, we thought he must be badly

injured, flagging down the first passerby to call 911. As we got closer, though, we could see him smiling; then we could see that he was making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. “Hey guys!” He introduced himself as Joseph, explaining that he was simply sunning himself on the asphalt as he prepared his second breakfast—a meal we would soon appreciate. “Where are you headed?” We were less than 5 miles into our first bicycle tour, an epic 1,100-mile journey along the Pacific Coast Highway, from Oregon to Mexico. Joseph was also touring for the first time, headed north from Los Angeles to Seattle. To meet a fellow touring cyclist so quickly seemed like a gift. We barraged him with questions reflecting our doubts and fears. What kind of gear was he carrying? How much did it weigh? Had he slept well? Which hills were particularly brutal? Had it

Hannah Dillard and the author, cycling just south of Limekiln State Park, 13 days into their three-week bicycle tour of the California coast. PHOTO BY AUGUST SWANSON

Inset: August “Fearless Leader” Swanson of Seattle accompanied the couple for most of their ride. PHOTO BY HANNAH DILLARD

ON THE COVER: The author and Hannah Dillard riding their bicycles on the Avenue of the Giants, a 30-mile stretch of highway running through Humboldt Redwoods State Park. PHOTO BY AUGUST SWANSON

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O R E G O N Crescent City rained? Did enraged motorists run him off the road? Had he been robbed? Joseph asked us if we packed toilet paper. We told him we had. “Good,” he said. He shook his head, adopting a faraway look as he presumably recalled some unspeakable roadside trauma. “Oh, God. Good.” As we chatted, a south-bound cyclist, riding a bike almost entirely hidden by bags, stopped to join the party. One could tell from the couple weeks’ worth of white stubble beneath his sunglasses that he was in his middle years, and that, by the look of his legs, the excessive baggage wasn’t much of a handicap. He already knew our names. When he stopped at the border to take a selfie in front of the “Welcome to California” sign, my father, yet to drive off, offered to take the photo for him and struck up a short conversation. My father had told him that Hannah and I were just up the road, surely frightened, floundering and in need of an experienced hand. And so we fell in with August Swanson, a 55-year-old contractor from Seattle on a yearlong sabbatical and about halfway through his five-week ride from the Canadian border to Mexico. We would ride alongside August for most of our three-week trip, initially tapping into his wealth of road-cycling knowledge and mechanical expertise, surely annoying him with our passive aggressiveness, and ultimately becoming great friends. As we began pedaling south again, now as a trio, Joseph shouted after us. “You’ll have an awesome time,” he said, his voice rising theatrically. “But beware!” EVEN BEFORE HANNAH AND I BECAME AN ITEM, WE

had discussed our interest in a long bike tour. We met during a pickup game of ultimate disc about two years ago. She’s a lifelong Chicoan and Chico State graduate who’s always been an endurance athlete. I was born and raised in Fairbanks, Alaska, was relatively new to Chico, and had just recently gotten into cycling. Hannah is the stronger cyclist. When I first moved to Chico nearly three years ago, biking the perimeter of Lower Bidwell Park was my definition of a long ride. Once Hannah and I hit it off, she promptly left for an indefinite period of time to backpack South America. We stayed in touch via email, and she eventually floated the crazy idea of biking the length of California, should she both return to Chico and find me suitable as a boyfriend. When she came home, we started talking seriously (about the bike trip). We received approval for three weeks of time off in April from our respective employers and slowly began collecting equipment over the course of several months. We purchased matching REI-brand Novara bikes designed specifically for touring, panniers (bike bags), and, after announcing our intentions to our families, scored a good amount of clothing and lightweight camping gear for Christmas. To guide our journey, we borrowed a woefully outdated copy of Bicycling the Pacific Coast and two Adventure Cycling maps that covered San Francisco to the Mexican border. We decided to roughly follow the mileage suggestions in Bicycling the Pacific Coast,

which outlined 20 days for riding California. Even if we averaged nearly 60 miles a day, there would be no time to spare. Once our gear was assembled, we staged a trial run to Woodson Bridge State Recreation Area. We camped overnight and rode back to Chico the next morning. The trial run reaffirmed what we already knew: Cycling is an ideal way to take in countryside. The sounds, smells, exposure to the elements, physicality of propelling yourself down the road, and occasional swallowing of a bug all provide a level of immersion you just don’t get from speeding along the highway in a metal box. It would be painful at times and frustrations were likely to boil over, but we knew there would be no better way to enjoy one of the most scenic coastal highways in the world. OUR FIRST STOP AFTER MEETING AUGUST WAS A

Safeway in Crescent City, where we stocked up for dinner. A store employee asked if we were heading south, and told us “the hill from hell” was awaiting us just outside of town. “I can’t even get my car up there,” he said. Bicycling the Pacific Coast confirmed that a 1,100-foot climb began south of Crescent City. August hadn’t encountered a higher peak in all of Washington and Oregon; we would be tackling it on our first day.

A 1,100-foot climb began south of Crescent City. It was pure torture. Sure, I had climbed Honey Run up to Paradise— generally acknowledged as a serious climb—but not with 40 pounds of gear. It was pure torture. Sure, I had climbed Honey Run up to Paradise—generally acknowledged as a serious climb—but not with 40 pounds of gear. Thankfully, August, not much fazed by the climb, kept our minds off it by chatting amiably about his three feisty daughters, all grown and out of the house. Every so often he would identify a roadside plant or shout the reading on his GPS altimeter. “Only 600 more vertical feet to go!” Of course, the slow burn ended eventually. Then we were flying downhill through the coastal forest and inland through groves of giant redwoods to Elk Prairie Campground, about 60 miles from the border. We paid $5 each for a hiker/biker campsite. Most state parks with campgrounds offer areas where touring cyclists and hikers can camp on the cheap. They would prove incredibly helpful; farther down the road, we showed up to full campgrounds and were never turned away. On the second night, as we watched hip-

pies twirling their hula hoops around the plaza in downtown Arcata, I felt a twinge in my left knee. Before reaching Eureka the next morning, just 10 miles down the road, I knew there was a Arcata problem. Straining up hills shot pain through my leg, Eureka forcing me to complain loudly. Avenue of the Giants I asked August what to do about nagging knee pain. He suggested keeping my bike in Leggett its low gears and maintaining a high cadence relative to my road speed, never Fort Bragg placing undue pressure on said knee. Though it seemed counterintuitive, pedaling more furiously helped eased the pain. We entered the Avenue of the Giants at an ideal time— before high tourist season. We Petaluma were alone in a silent hall of ancient redwoods, only the odd beam of sunlight finding the forest floor. With no traffic San Francisco and the road glass-smooth, our gazes fixed upward. Devil’s Slide “Now, that right there’s a big tree,” I’d say every couple hundred yards. Santa Cruz “Big tree—check,” August would reply. We fell into a rhythm. In the mornings, we would heat water for oatmeal, tea and coffee, then Big Sur press on to a café up the road for second breakfast, often our biggest meal of the day. Overall, we doubled our daily caloric intake. The bulk of our riding was in the afternoons. Though we usually kept a quick pace, we stopped regularly to snack or simply take in a vista. They Morro Bay were full days. On more than one occasion, we fell asleep before sunset. On day four, as we continued farSan Luis Obispo ther inland, the temperature soared and Highway 101 steered us through Lompoc rugged mountains. We crossed the San Marcos Pass shimmering Eel River about 17 times, Santa Barbara poppies and lupines coloring hillsides orange and purple. Anticipation began to build for Leggett Hill, the highest unavoidable climb along the coast at about 2,000 feet, beginning where Highways 101 and 1 meet. Given how passing cyclists and our guidebook hyped it up, we were psyched out, especially considering my knee issues. By that point, Hannah and I had learned that climbing is as much a mental challenge as it is physical. Once you resign yourself to working hard and moving slowly for an indefinite period of time, rather than desperately “CYCLE” continued on page 20

Los Angeles

San Diego

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On the ninth day, the trio reached the Golden Gate Bridge—both a major landmark and pain to cross, clogged as it was with tourists. PHOTO BY RANDOM TOURIST

Below: Uphill rides were always rewarded with fastpaced downhill sections like this one in Mendocino County. PHOTO BY AUGUST SWANSON

ocean cliffs north of Jenner. Our legs never rested enough to fully recover. During that stretch, my lower body was so stiff in the mornings that each day’s objective seemed impossible. WE PARTED WITH AUGUST

As we’d stopped along the way, and strangers asked us about our trip, reactions fell into two general categories: either we were badasses of inconceivable fortitude, drawing high-fives and praise, or complete morons practically begging to get annihilated by an 18-wheeler. 20

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May 15, 2014

“CYCLE” continued from page 19

hoping that each turn will reveal the peak, you find yourself in a groove. The promise of a bitchin’ downhill section also helps. We climbed Leggett Hill rather easily, pausing at the peak to scoff, “that’s all California’s got?” before an exhilarating 20-minute descent. Even with our newfound mindsets, the Humboldt, Mendocino and Sonoma coasts were tremendously challenging. The day after Leggett, we hit an absurdly steep series of switchbacks. The day after that, we climbed nearly 5,000 vertical feet as we made our way high along the

south of Bodega Bay, cutting inland to Hannah’s aunt and uncle’s house in Petaluma. There we showered, napped, did laundry, and ate all their food. The next day, Hannah’s uncle, an avid cyclist, escorted us just short of Fairfax and doubled back home. Though we whooped and hollered when we first saw the Golden Gate Bridge, crossing it wasn’t much fun. Apparently, dozens of adult tourists considered this an opportunity to ride bicycles for the first time. Several collisions appeared imminent, but we managed to weave our way to the San Francisco side unscathed. Our frustrations only mounted from that point. Being smalltown nincompoops, we took several wrong turns in reaching the Great Highway, forgetting to eat along the way. Grumpiness began to set in. We reached the Devil’s Slide outside of Pacifica, which our guidebook described as a harrowing mountain pass along an ocean cliff, just before dusk. This led to our first real disagreement: Hannah wanted to press on to Montara that night while I, toasted from 70 miles on the road and sensing impending doom, wanted to check into a hotel. Despite overt huffiness from both parties, we stayed the night in Pacifica. It all seemed silly the next morning when we discovered that Devil’s Slide is no longer harrowing. In fact, there’s a tunnel boring directly through the mountain, complete with an extra-wide bike

lane, constructed since our guidebook was published, in 1998. We met August in Half Moon Bay and hauled serious buttocks to Santa Cruz, a stiff wind at our backs. After our hectic Bay Area experience, we had been let loose. WE ENCOUNTERED HARBOR SEALS, SEA OTTERS

and one Frenchman riding his long board from San Francisco to L.A. as we made a big push through the rugged Central Coast, condensing four days’ worth of riding into three to allow a full day off at August’s friends’ house in Santa Barbara. It would come at just the right time—after two weeks, we needed rest. We made a fateful decision over breakfast in Lompoc: We would climb the 2,200-foot San Marcos Pass, rather than take Highway 1 along the coast to Santa Barbara, because it would be more scenic. About 10 miles into our day, my knee pain came back sharper than ever. When we stopped at a gas station in Buellton, I was confronted with a decision. August asserted that forcing the issue could end my trip altogether, and suggested taking a bus into Santa Barbara. This was sage advice, but ultimately pride interfered. Despite the risk of longterm injury, I chose to press on—I was going to cycle the entire California coast. It didn’t take long to second-guess myself. Highway 154 was unquestionably the least bike-friendly section we’d encountered yet; the grades were steep, the sun relentless, the shoulder nonexistent and traffic constant. Once we began the climb, my legs felt like lead. I was regularly falling behind, furthering my doubts. We ate lunch in gloomy silence. Finally cresting the hill was an immense relief—climbing San Marcos was perhaps the hardest thing I’ve ever done. It was all downhill from there, though, and a much-needed full day’s rest was within reach. WE CONSIDERED SAN MARCOS PASS THE

threshold to Southern California, the land of sports cars, roller blades, women of incalculable age who look like carrots left out in the sun for too long, and unfathomable stupidity. (In L.A., some guy asked us where we were going. We told him Mexico. His next question: “So, are you headed north or south?”) For every picturesque So Cal beach, we encountered something ugly—power plants, never-ending rows of mini-storage, the Camp Pendleton military complex,

BIKE-TOUR TIDBITS: Days of riding . . . . . . . . 20 Total mileage . . . . . . . . . 1,143 Average day’s ride . . . . . 57.15 miles Longest day . . . . . . . . . . 82 miles Total elevation gained . . . 48,792 feet Top speed . . . . . . . . . . . 45 mph Total expense (for two) . . $2,000 Total flat tires . . . . . . . . 1 Drops of rain . . . . . . . . . 0


From top to bottom: Dinner on the last night of camping at San Elijo State Beach consisted of couscous and sausages, about all a portable propane stove and tiny skillet could handle. The flatlands outside of Lompoc were all too brief as the cyclists approached San Marcos Pass, the highest climb of the trip at 2,200 feet in elevation. Natural beauty abounded throughout the ride. Case in point: this lookout over the Eel River in Humboldt County. PHOTOS BY AUGUST SWANSON

strip malls, and the L.A. “River.” We had left the sense of adventure in Big Sur. We had a final night of camping at San Elijo State Beach, where we tossed a Frisbee in the surf and watched the sunset, and then made the push through San Diego and to the Mexican border the next day. We checked into a hostel in Point Loma, dropped off our bags, and rode pannier-free the last 20 miles to Border Field State Park, following a dirt road to the border fence. It was anti-climactic—no mariachi bands, senoritas with margaritas, or other Mexican stereotypes were waiting for us. It was just a fence. We made snide comments, posed half-heartedly for a photo, and took a trolley back to Point Loma. (We were, admittedly, sick of riding bikes.) As we’d stopped along the way, and strangers asked us about our trip, reactions fell into two general categories: either we were badasses of inconceivable fortitude, drawing high-fives and praise, or complete morons practically begging to get annihilated by an 18-wheeler. At one restaurant, a woman condescendingly suggested that, when in traffic, we must close our eyes and hope not to get squashed. “We don’t leave it up to faith and prayer!” August said. He was agitated. “We take reasonable steps to stay safe!” Indeed, we wore bright clothing and followed the basic principles of safe driving—being aware of the situation and surroundings, clearly signaling our intentions to other road users, avoiding unpredictable movements. We never felt endangered by motorized traffic. The morning after we completed our journey, we ate breakfast with August for the last time. As we inhaled pancakes, a friend messaged him: “Congratulations on a lifechanging experience.” Looking back, the days blur together. But particular events or scenes weren’t the point. It was more about stepping outside our daily routines and settling into an entirely different rhythm— one of the road and the natural world. We parted with August, who pressed on to Ensenada, Mexico. We cruised back up I-5 to Chico in a rental car, easily undoing much of our three-week journey in a single day. We considered it: Had the journey changed us in a meaningful way? While much remains to be seen, Hannah and I didn’t think so. We had always envisioned ourselves tackling big outdoor adventures; doing so simply met our expectations, and we’re already planning for more. Ω

FRoM A loCAl FARMeR’S Field

to your table. ChiCo SAtuRdAy 2nd & Wall Streets year round, rain or shine Sat 7:30am – 1pm

ChiCo NoRth VAlley PlAzA Pillsbury Road Now open Wed 7:30am – 12pm

PARAdiSe 6491 Clark Rd Now open tues 7:30am – 12pm

oRoVille Montgomery & Myers St opens this Sat May 17 Sat 7:30am – 12pm

Chicofarmersmarket.com | (530) 893–FARM

always fun & family friendly

May 15, 2014

CN&R

21


your Shopping & Dining Map to Chico

Let us Make

YOu HappY With the Best Chinese

1. 5th Street Steakhouse Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner all Credit Cards accepted

2002-2010

HappY GarDen Chinese restaurant

180 Cohasset road • (near the esplanade) 893-2574 or 893-5068 • HappyGardenChico.com

Celebrating 10 years • Fresh, made to order pitas and salads • delivery & catering available • $5.99 daily specials

Downtown Chico

345 W 5th Street (530) 891-6328

9

(Detail)

2. Birkenstock

333 Broadway (530) 345-4880

3. Christian & Johnson 250 Vallombrosa (530) 891-1881

4. For elyse Boutique

506 Ivy Street (530) 898-9948

6. Happy Garden Restaurant

12. LaSalles

13. Mountain Sports 176 E 3rd Street (530) 345-5011

14. Pita Pit

240 Broadway (530) 899-2847

16. Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy 178 E 7th Street (530) 342-7163

18

16

231 Main Street (530) 343-5686

17. The Graduate

344 W 8th Street (530) 343-2790

17

8. Iron Mountain Leather

511 Main Street (530) 342-8752

2525 Dominic Drive (530)342-7771

2234 The Esplanade 343-7000 Banquet Room Open 7 days a week 6am–11pm

• Ventilation in Crown • Secret Pocket

in the Crown

2005-2013

Mountain Sports 176 East Third Street Downtown Chico • 345-5011

BIRKS FOR GRADUATION

HAPPY HOUR: FRIDAY 4-6PM • CHICO ONLY SPECIALS & REFRESHMENTS!

...and more

destination!

Tasting Room

10

10

10

10

222 W. 2nd Street Downtown Chico Open 5 days a week Wed – Fri 1:30 to 8pm Sat 12 to 8pm • Sun 1:30 to 6:30 Live Music Thu 7pm 800.808.9463 laroccavineyards.com

10

Real Food, Real Butter, Real Good E Home Cooking TH ! RE GO 10

10

10

10

Fresh Flowers & Beautiful Plants

FINE ITALIAN CUISINE

10

TAKE-OUT (530)898-9947 RESERVATIONS (530)898-9948

2:30

Check Out Our Selection of

Leather Jackets for Men & Women, Plus Purses • Backpacks • Wallets Passport Cases • Saddlebags Fanny Packs • Tool Bags

10

OPEN DAILY 6AM - 1:30PM TRY OUR SPECIALTIES:

TODAY!

250 Vallombrosa, Chico - A Century of Quality Since 1907

For Dads & Grads

EXTENDED HOURS UNTIL FOR GRADUATION!

EGGS BENEDICT • CORNED BEEF HASH

10

ChristianAnd Johnson.com

506 IVY ST

SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY & LUNCH AT 11AM 10

See More at

OPEN 11:30 MON-SAT SUN @ 4PM

10

10

Downtown Chico 345-4880 Clark Road Paradise 872-0812

Grad Gifts & More

NOW OPEN

LIVE MUSIC

FULL ESPRESSO BAR • ROOST BURGERS 10

10

“Families Always Welcome” 344 W. Eighth Street • 343.2790 • Open Daily @ 11am

2525 Dominic Dr 342-7771 Outdoor Patio Open 7 days a week 6am–10pm

10

y o u r

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Cocktails • Beer • Wine 13

19. Three Sixty ecotique

10. Italian Cottage

It’s time to celebrate graduation! Kindergarten to PhD’s, we do it all!

13

1144 Park Avenue (530) 892-1281

Key

2234 Esplanade (530) 343-7000

HE S W CAL LO

Repels Rain

• Insured Against Loss

18. The Roost Cafe

8

804 Broadway (530) 342-4788

9. Italian Cottage

Graduation arters Headqu

Since 1965

702 W 5th Street (530) 343-7459

19

1

5

7. Home ec

A CHICO TRADITION 229 Bro adway • 893. 1891 ar www .face book .com / lasa llesb www .lasa llesb ar.co m

not to wear out

• Floats &

15. Riley’s

15

180 Cohasset Road (530) 893-2574

240 Broadway St. Chico, CA | (530) 899 2847

• Guaranteed for Life

2005 - 2013

229 Broadway (530) 893-1891

2

228 Broadway (530) 893-0106

5. Franky’s

222 W 2nd Street (800) 808-9463

7 13

4 14 12

Great times!

11. La Rocca Vineyards

6

3

11

Great food

10

10

& MORE

10

1144 PARK AVE | 530-892-1281

22 CN&R May 15, 2014 10

10

10

10

345 W. 5th Street, Chico (530) 891–6328 www.5thStreetSteakhouse.com

804 Broadway The Junction @ corner of 8th & Broadway

Downtown Chico • 342-4788 May 15, 2014

CN&R 23


your Shopping & Dining Map to Chico

Let us Make

YOu HappY With the Best Chinese

1. 5th Street Steakhouse Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner all Credit Cards accepted

2002-2010

HappY GarDen Chinese restaurant

180 Cohasset road • (near the esplanade) 893-2574 or 893-5068 • HappyGardenChico.com

Celebrating 10 years • Fresh, made to order pitas and salads • delivery & catering available • $5.99 daily specials

Downtown Chico

345 W 5th Street (530) 891-6328

9

(Detail)

2. Birkenstock

333 Broadway (530) 345-4880

3. Christian & Johnson 250 Vallombrosa (530) 891-1881

4. For elyse Boutique

506 Ivy Street (530) 898-9948

6. Happy Garden Restaurant

12. LaSalles

13. Mountain Sports 176 E 3rd Street (530) 345-5011

14. Pita Pit

240 Broadway (530) 899-2847

16. Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy 178 E 7th Street (530) 342-7163

18

16

231 Main Street (530) 343-5686

17. The Graduate

344 W 8th Street (530) 343-2790

17

8. Iron Mountain Leather

511 Main Street (530) 342-8752

2525 Dominic Drive (530)342-7771

2234 The Esplanade 343-7000 Banquet Room Open 7 days a week 6am–11pm

• Ventilation in Crown • Secret Pocket

in the Crown

2005-2013

Mountain Sports 176 East Third Street Downtown Chico • 345-5011

BIRKS FOR GRADUATION

HAPPY HOUR: FRIDAY 4-6PM • CHICO ONLY SPECIALS & REFRESHMENTS!

...and more

Tasting Room

10

10

10

10

222 W. 2nd Street Downtown Chico Open 5 days a week Wed – Fri 1:30 to 8pm Sat 12 to 8pm • Sun 1:30 to 6:30 Live Music Thu 7pm 800.808.9463 laroccavineyards.com

10

Real Food, Real Butter, Real Good E Home Cooking TH ! RE GO 10

10

10

10

Fresh Flowers & Beautiful Plants

FINE ITALIAN CUISINE

10

TAKE-OUT (530)898-9947 RESERVATIONS (530)898-9948

2:30

Check Out Our Selection of

Leather Jackets for Men & Women, Plus Purses • Backpacks • Wallets Passport Cases • Saddlebags Fanny Packs • Tool Bags

10

OPEN DAILY 6AM - 1:30PM TRY OUR SPECIALTIES:

TODAY!

250 Vallombrosa, Chico - A Century of Quality Since 1907

For Dads & Grads

EXTENDED HOURS UNTIL FOR GRADUATION!

EGGS BENEDICT • CORNED BEEF HASH

10

ChristianAnd Johnson.com

506 IVY ST

SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY & LUNCH AT 11AM 10

See More at

OPEN 11:30 MON-SAT SUN @ 4PM

10

10

Downtown Chico 345-4880 Clark Road Paradise 872-0812

Grad Gifts & More

NOW OPEN

destination!

FULL ESPRESSO BAR • ROOST BURGERS 10

10

“Families Always Welcome” 344 W. Eighth Street • 343.2790 • Open Daily @ 11am

2525 Dominic Dr 342-7771 Outdoor Patio Open 7 days a week 6am–10pm

10

y o u r

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Cocktails • Beer • Wine 13

19. Three Sixty ecotique

10. Italian Cottage

It’s time to celebrate graduation! Kindergarten to PhD’s, we do it all!

13

1144 Park Avenue (530) 892-1281

Key

2234 Esplanade (530) 343-7000

HE S W CAL LO

Repels Rain

• Insured Against Loss

18. The Roost Cafe

8

804 Broadway (530) 342-4788

9. Italian Cottage

Graduation arters Headqu

Since 1965

702 W 5th Street (530) 343-7459

19

1

5

7. Home ec

A CHICO TRADITION 229 Bro adway • 893. 1891 ar www .face book .com / lasa llesb www .lasa llesb ar.co m

not to wear out

• Floats &

15. Riley’s

15

180 Cohasset Road (530) 893-2574

240 Broadway St. Chico, CA | (530) 899 2847

• Guaranteed for Life

2005 - 2013

229 Broadway (530) 893-1891

2

228 Broadway (530) 893-0106

5. Franky’s

222 W 2nd Street (800) 808-9463

7 13

4 14 12

Great times!

11. La Rocca Vineyards

6

3

11

Great food

10

10

& MORE

10

1144 PARK AVE | 530-892-1281

22 CN&R May 15, 2014 10

10

10

10

345 W. 5th Street, Chico (530) 891–6328 www.5thStreetSteakhouse.com

804 Broadway The Junction @ corner of 8th & Broadway

Downtown Chico • 342-4788 May 15, 2014

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture Kid in an art store

Clockwise from top: One of Ryan Patrick’s “Rusty Recreations”; Pat Collentine turns one of his neon wall hangings; Monica McDaniel, city of Chico arts commissioner and president of the Chico Arts Foundation conducting the Arts and Economic Prosperity survey; painting by Britta Cartagena Goldmann illuminated in the alcove of her Matador room; the bright paintings of Erin Wynne Moore.

Lots of good, cheap, local art at annual Matador fest

I at the Matador event this past weekend (Friday and Saturday, May 9-10), you f you ventured out to the Art

likely had a nice time in the breezy sunshine and maybe even went home with some story and local art. That is, unless photos by Jason Cassidy you were there in the mid-afternoon on Saturjasonc@ day, when fierce winds newsreview.com trailing the storm system in the foothills Review: Art at the whipped through the Matador Matador Motel’s courtFriday, May 9 yard filled with art, popMatador Motel up canopies and defenseless eyeballs. “The dust from the frontage road median rose up so you couldn’t see,” said Maria Phillips, coowner of Avenue 9 Gallery and one of the Chico Visual Alliance (ChiVAA) members responsible for organizing the event. “Even still, the people came,” she added in an email. “The artists I have spoken to all were happy with sales and said they did better than last year.” This was the fourth edition of the spring arts festival, which changed its name this year—from Arts Fiesta to Art at the Matador—but kept the same fundamental setup featuring artist galleries in most of the individual rooms of the

24

CN&R

May 15, 2014

Mission-style motel, with just as many more showing their works outside in the courtyard. In many ways, it’s the ideal community event for Chico. For one, it exploits the charms of a unique and attractive venue, and includes live local music, food trucks and margaritas for sale. Add to that a ton of quality local art on display and—even though it hasn’t been a point stressed in the marketing campaign—for incredible prices. My wife and I went on the cool, breezy Friday evening, thankfully missing Saturday’s atmospheric disturbance, and we were caught off guard at how affordable, even cheap in some instances, the art was (some of the little paintings in Kandis Horton and Erin Wynne Moore’s well-stocked room were going for as little as $15). After making the rounds, my wife settled on a little ceramic gnome house ($35) from Jodee Merrill Smith, and we also bought a gorgeous hand-pressed ceramic tile light-switch cover ($20) from Heather Alexander. We did, however, miss out on a very cool framed painting ($50) by Moore of a pensive bird perched on barbed wire when we left to get cash. Artists risk underselling their

THIS WEEK 15

THURS

Special Events BEER PAIRING PARTY: Celebrate the release of the Golden Feather Extra Pale Ale with brewmaster Roland Allen. Th, 5/15, 6pm. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

COMBAT VET BOOK: Vietnam vet Bill DeWitt will read from his book

Combat Veterens: Bringing It Home. A survival guide for combat veterans and their loved ones. Th, 5/15, 6-8pm. Free. monca Pop-Up Museum, 215 Main St., (530) 891-4304.

Art Receptions other works by having pieces priced so cheaply at festivals like this (e.g. Chikoko fashion/design collective’s fall and spring Bizarre Bazaars, which are similarly organized), but in the context of an event that draws a couple thousand people or more over one concentrated weekend, the potential for a big payoff via multiple sales makes it worthwhile to have at least some discount. And it’s an arrangement that the community clearly responds to. “The Matador people want us to do it twice a year,” Phillips said, “and artists are already asking if we could, pretty please, do it again in the fall.” There are no plans for a fall version at this time, but there is next year to look forward to.” Ω

A TRIBUTE TO JANICE PORTER: A selection of paintings as well as original book illustrations. live music from Warren Haskell and Tobin Roye.

Th, 5/15, 5-8pm. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

Theater GOD’S COUNTRY: A theatrical docudrama about the growing white

supremacist movement in America. Directed by Steven Dietz. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 5/31. $12 - $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

GARDEN BIKE TOUR Saturday, May 17 Chico Peace and Justice Center SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS

17

SAT

Special Events CHICO BUDDY WALK FOR DOWN SYNDROME: Walk to support kids and adults with Down syndrome. Stroll 3 miles through Bidwell Park, enjoy lunch, live music, vendors, activities and a silent auction. Sa, 5/17, 10am-2pm. $10-$15. Bidwell Park One-Mile Recreation, Woodland Ave., (530) 865-4875.

DRAGOPOLIS: “The future of drag” show hosted by Claudette de versilles. All entertainers welcome to perform. Third Sa of every month, 10pm. Opens 5/17. $3. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

GARDEN BIKE TOUR: GRUB education program

TAMALE DINNER

Saturday, May 17 Trinity United Methodist Church SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Art Receptions COLOR MAGIC: A reception for local artists’ original paintings, pottery, etchings and jewelry. F, 5/16, 4-8pm. Sally Dimas Art Gallery, 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

CONTEMPORARY WOMAN: A reception for the

Poetry/Literature LOCAL AUTHOR PRESENTATION: John Whittlesey

presents his new book The Plant Lover’s Guide to Salvias. Th, 5/15, 7pm. Lyon Books, 135 Main St., (530) 891-3338, www.lyonbooks.com.

POETRY READING: Poetry from a variety of local wordsmiths. Th, 5/15, 6:30pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

16

FRI

Special Events BOOBY BALL: A masquerade fundraiser to benefit the breast cancer fund Climb Against the Odds. Live music from Alli Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co., plus food and drink vendors, live painting, commemorative photography and a silent auction. F, 5/16, 6:30pm. $25-$30. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Downtown Chico’s summer music series continues with variety rock from Urban Legend. F, 5/16, 7-8:30pm. Chico City Plaza, Downtown Chico.

GOD’S COUNTRY

Thursday-Saturday, May 15-17 Blue Room Theatre SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, THEATER

female artists showcasing mixed-media works examining life as women in the art world. F, 5/16, 5-7pm. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

Theater DON QUIXOTE: The Northern California Ballet performs the Russian ballet based on

Cervantes’ famous character. F, 5/16, 7:15pm, Sa, 5/17, 2:15 & 7:15pm. $12-$20. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.paradise performingarts.com.

GOD’S COUNTRY: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

IT RUNS IN THE FAMILY: A comedy directed by Laszlo Szontaph. F, Sa, 7:30pm through 5/18. $7-$15. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcage theatre.net.

Music RESOUND: Chico State music and art students will showcase installations that utilize sound as a material for creating their collaborative works. Three days only. 5/16-5/18. Chico Museum, 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.org.

hosts a fundraiser event with seasonal snacks and garden inspiration at each stop along the family-friendly ride ending at the downtown farmers market. Sa, 5/17, 9:30am-noon. $10. Chico Peace and Justice Center, 526 Broadway, (530) 893-9078, www.chicopeace.org.

TAMALE DINNER: A fundraiser event to help children in Belize and Guatemala, with paintings, jewelry, clothing and traditional fabrics, plus a tamale dinner and live music from Jimmy Brobeck. Sa, 5/17, 5:30pm. $10. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St., (530) 3431497.

Theater ALICE IN WONDERLAND AUDITION WORKSHOP: The Blue Room Young Company hosts a preparation workshop for their upcoming Alice in Wonderland Jr. auditions. Sa, 5/17, 10am-noon. Free. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

DON QUIXOTE: See Friday. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.paradiseperforming arts.com.

GOD’S COUNTRY: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

Art 1078 GALLERY: Need Need Not Repeat, Chico State alumni John Baca showcases new works. Through 5/24. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Delbert Rupp and Friends, thrown and carved large-scale stoneware vessels and sculpture. Through 5/31. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue 9gallery.com.

B-SO SPACE: New Works, a culminating exhibition featuring the work of Eric Carillo.

Through 5/16. Ayres 107, Chico State, (530)

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Color Magic, original paintings, pottery, etchings and jewelry by local artists. Through 5/30. New Works, figurative drawings from local artists. Ongoing. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

THE UPS STORE: New Works, etchings, engraving and collagraph prints from artist Michael Halldorsen. Through 5/31. 702 Mangrove Ave. #224.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: Bird Houses, local artist and craftsman Bernie Vigallon created bird-houses to benefit the Fairview Alternative Education Program. Through 6/20. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

898-5331.

CHICO ART CENTER: Contemporary Woman, mixed-media art that examines the role of women, their struggles, successes, and experiences as female artists. 5/16-6/13. 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO PAPER CO.: The Totem Series, new works inspired from textiles, jewelry design, painting, and collage by artist Marilynn Jennings. Through 6/30. California Rivers, Jake Early’s latest series. Through 6/30, 10am-6pm. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Juried

Student Print Exhibition, celebrating student artists, this exhibit honors the gallery founder’s use of the collection as inspiration and education. Through 5/15. Chico State, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

LAXSON FINE ART GALLERY: Sychronized

Journey, new works from undergraduate art students Ingrid Olson and Payton Cahill. Through 5/16. 400 W. First St. CSU Chico, Laxson Audtorium.

MONCA POP-UP MUSEUM: Veterans Art Pop Up Museum, monCA hosts a temporary art exhibit featuring the work of North State Veterans. Through 5/24, 10am-5pm. Free. 215 Main St., (530) 891-4304.

NAKED LOUNGE TEA AND COFFEEHOUSE: All the

Rest, paintings and prints by Jonny Alexander. Through 5/31. Gallery hours are Open daily. 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

Call for Artists CELEBRATION OF THE SONG CONTEST DEADLINE: KZFR hosts its annual contest open to amateur singer-songwriters. Read all contest rules and conditions listed at kzfr.org. F, 5/16, 5pm. $25. KZFR, 341 Broadway 416, (530) 895-0706, www.kzfr.org.

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Explore Evolution, investigate evolutionary principles in organisms ranging from smallest to the largest, with interactive exhibits giving the viewer an opportunity to experience how scientists conduct research on evolution. Ongoing. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/ gateway.

PARADISE DEPOT MUSEUM: Paradise Depot

Museum Open House, a railroad and logging museum in Paradise. Ongoing, 7-9pm. 5570 Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 877-1919.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Into The Blue: Maritime Navigation and the Archeology of Shipwrecks, featuring artifacts recovered from the Frolic shipwreck and the story behind the ship’s history. TuSa through 7/24. Meriam Library Complex Chico State.

IT RUNS IN THE FAMILY: See Friday. $7-$15. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

Music RESOUND: See Friday. Chico Museum, 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.org.

Call for Submissions CELEBRATION OF THE SONG CONTEST DEADLINE: KZFR hosts its annual contest open to amateur singer-songwriters. F, 5/16, 5pm. $25. KZFR, 341 Broadway 416, (530) 895-0706, www.kzfr.org.

THIS WEEK continued on page 26

Everybody loves boobs Over the course of their lifetimes, one in eight women (about 12 percent) will develop invasive breast cancer. And death rates, though diminishing in the last decade due to greater awareness, are still high, with EDITOR’S PICK an estimated 40,000 deaths from the disease last year. On Friday, May 16, the Booby Ball at the Chico Women’s Club—featuring food, drink, art and live music by Ali Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co.—will raise money for a program called Climb Against the Odds.

May 15, 2014

CN&R

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THIS WEEK continued from page 25

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Music RESOUND: See Friday. Chico Museum, 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.org.

20

TUES

Special Events NAKED WORD 1: I AM HIP-HOP: A new spokenword/lecture series featuring guest speakers focusing on their search for identity and purpose. Up first: self-discovery through hip-hop, with Mazi Akil Wilson Noble and Reed Rickmers. Tu, 5/20, 7pm. $1 suggested donation. Naked Lounge Tea and Coffeehouse, 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

Poetry/Literature BOOK PRESENTATION: Local author Erin McCabe presents her book I Shall Be Near To You. Tu, 5/20, 7pm. Chico Library, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762.

Music THE MOTHER HIPS: A night of homegrown beer and tunes with California soul from the Mother Hips and Chico soul in a glass from Sierra Nevada. T, 5/20,W, 5/21, 7:30pm. $28.50. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

21

WED

Music THE MOTHER HIPS: See Tuesday. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave., (530) 321-5607.

AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am through 12/9. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.buttecounty.net.

CHICO COMMUNITY BALLET RUMMAGE SALE: Help raise money for the nonprofit ballet company. Quality items, baked goods and hot dogs will be for sale. Sa, 5/17, 7am-5pm, Su, 5/18, 8am-2pm. Darling Veterinary Clinic parking lot, 2520 Dominic Dr. Off Skyway by Italian Cottage, (530) 521-5799.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

CHICO POLICE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD: Monthly meeting hosted by the Chico Police

Chief to discuss community issues. Third W of every month, 5:30-7pm. Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1877 Hooker Oak Ave., (530) 342-7777.

COOKING DEMO: Foodies unite and learn from

Richard with Angel Chocolate. Sa, 5/17, noon. Free. The Galley, 551 Country Dr., (530) 3438820.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for more info. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCES OF UNIVERSAL PEACE: A simple, meditative and uplifting group dances honoring many of the world’s spiritual traditions. Third Sa of every month, 7-9:30pm. $5-$10 donation. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 895-4711.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. F, 6-8pm. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

EVENING DANCE JAM: A weekly meditative dance

COMBAT VET BOOK Thursday, May 15 MONCA Pop-Up Museum, 215 Main Street, Chico

SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

session. F, 7:15pm. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Suite 150, (530) 3420100.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:30pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMERS’ MARKET: CHAPMAN: A year-round Certified Farmers’ Market serving as a community forum for healthful-lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

FARMERS’ MARKET: SATURDAY: Chico’s weekly community gathering, with fresh produce, crafts, baked goods and more. Sa, 7:30am1pm. Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second & Wall Streets.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 34

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

26

CN&R

May 15, 2014

medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave., (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfree clinic.org.

CHICO COMMUNITY BALLET RUMMAGE SALE Saturday and Sunday, May 17-18 Darling Veterinary Clinic parking lot SEE COMMUNITY

Branch, 5922 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8726320, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary/ Paradise.htm.

PERMACULTURE GATHERING: Chico Permaculture Guild’s May Gathering: The soil food web. Ensuring your beneficial soil microorganisms are plentiful and diverse for healthy plants. Sa, 5/17, 1-4pm. Free. Chico Library, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.chico permaculture.wordpress.com.

PRESERVATION TOUR: A walking tour of residences south of campus. Led by John Gallardo. Sa, 5/17, 1pm. Stansbury Home, 307 W. Fifth St. On the corner of Salem and 5th street, (530) 895-3848.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 872-7085.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

SOUNDS OF THE VALLEY CHORUS: Women singers welcome to sing in four-part harmony barbershop style. Call for more info. W, 7pm. Marigold Elementary School, 2446 Marigold Ave., (530) 343-5183.

SQUARE-DANCE CLUB: Square-dancing classes for beginners and advanced-level dancers. Call for more info. Th, 7-10pm. Veterans Memorial Hall, 6550 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1962.

TASMANIA: A BIRDER’S TRAVELOGUE: A talk featuring the varied birds of Tasmania, such as the Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo, Superb Fairy-wren, New Holland Honeyeater and the endemic and rare Forty-spotted Pardalote. M, 5/19, 6:30pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwell park.org.

TRADITIONAL WEST-AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of

drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (808) 757-0076.

WORLD DANCE: Classes offered through CARD offering line, circle and partner dances from around the world. No partner needed. Th, 7pm. $7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4711, www.chicorec.com.

HAPPY HEALING: Experience a variety of healing modalities. F, 7pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

INTERNATIONAL DANCING: All levels welcome. No

partner needed. F, 8pm. Opens 5/16. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

PARADISE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Used book sale. Every other Sa, 10am-3pm. Prices vary. Butte County Library, Paradise

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


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257,000 acres of forest and destroyed 11 homes. The Rim Fire also primed the region for a potentially massive by uprising of morel mushrooms. Alastair Bland These finger-sized, wrinkly headed delicacies grow in the springtime, and they sprout most prolifically in regions where fires have burned the previous summer. Mushroom hunters know this, and every spring, they swarm into burned woodlands, baskets in hand, as they reap the bounty that rises from the ashes. But this year, there will be no such foraging bonanza in the Stanislaus National Forest along the north side of Yosemite National Park. The U.S. Forest Service has closed the Rim Fire zone to the public, and morel hunters are in dismay. Forest Service officials are naming safety as the reason for the closure. Dead, burned trees, they say, are liable to drop branches and pine cones onto foragers and other hikers. Even those accessing the area by vehicle are at risk of being crushed by falling trees, they claim. “Hazardous trees are lining the roadways,” said Rebecca Garcia, public-affairs officer with the Stanislaus National Forest. Other large areas that experienced forest fires last summer have been opened to the public—such as the large American Fire area in the Tahoe National Forest. But Garcia explained that the Rim Fire zone has remained closed because of the especially high temperatures at which this particular fire burned. The extreme heat left each standing tree at a higher-thanusual risk of falling and injuring hikers and drivers, according to Garcia. Mushroom hunters are not convinced. “We’ve hunted morels in areas identical to the Rim Fire, where the burn was just as hot, and we’ve never had problems,” said Curt Haney, president of the Mycological Society of San Francisco. Also baffling to mushroom hunters is the fact that 77,000 acres burned by the Rim Fire within Yosemite National Park were opened to the public several weeks ago. “So if it’s safe there, why not outside the park?” Haney asked. Garcia said the Forest Service is now conducting an assessment of the Rim Fire area in order to locate

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all the trees at risk of falling onto roadways. The review will be finished this month. Morels are among the most valued of edible mushrooms. A variety of morel species occur worldwide, with nations in Europe especially prizing the earthytasting, meaty-textured fungus, which may retail for more than $50 per pound. Across the United States, annual morel festivals and group collecting outings reflect the huge popularity of this particular mushroom. Over Memorial Day weekend, for example, throngs of hunters will take to the slopes of Mount Shasta during the McCloud Mushroom Festival, in which porcini and morel mushrooms are the star attractions. Morels do grow in unburned areas—hunters call them “naturals”—throughout the Sierra Nevadas and the Cascades. But these morels don’t sprout anywhere near as abundantly as they do in burned forests, something of which Northern California has no shortage after the last two years of forest fires. “You want to go in the spring after a big fire, and then there are morels just everywhere,” said Henry Lomeli, a commercial mushroom hunter in Chico who sells mushrooms to a number of local restaurants, including the Sierra Nevada brewpub and The Kitchen Table. Todd Spanier, a commercial mushroom collector and owner of the wholesale business King of Mushrooms, says a single-acre forest burned the year prior will produce, on average, about 5 pounds of springtime morels. As of April 15, the wholesale price for morels was $30 per pound, according to Spanier. “There should be about $23 million, wholesale, of morels in that [closed portion of] burn,” he guessed. In the weeks since, the price of morels has reportedly increased. Officials are standing by the closure—and threatening intruders with $5,000 fines and up to six months in jail—yet some locals have reportedly skirted the outer edges of the closed area. According to their reports, woodcutters are at work along area roadways and near campgrounds—and the morels are already erupting in huge numbers. Many mushroom hunters are lamenting the lost opportunity—but not Lomeli. He says true mushroom fanatics will get their morels, regardless of the law. “Mushroom hunters are elusive and sneaky,” Lomeli said. “Just because there’s a sign there saying you can’t go in doesn’t mean they already aren’t. I guarantee pickers are in there now.” Ω May 15, 2014

CN&R

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MUSIC Kyle Wiley Pickett rehearsed with the North State Symphony in Laxson Auditorium before his last Chico concert.

Swan songs

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Symphony conductor goes out with a flourish

S last performance in Chico after 14 years as music director and conductor of the North State Symphony.

aturday, May 10, was Kyle Wiley Pickett’s

the players with his own vision of what a piece should be. If all goes well, he suggested, magic occurs.

As usual, it began with a pre-concert talk in the Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall at Chico State, this time before a standingby Robert room-only audience drawn there by Speer the awareness that this would be the final opportunity to enjoy Pickett’s enlightening insights into the music Review: on tap for the evening. When it was Harmonic over, they gave him a rousing standLandscapes, by the ing ovation. North State Pickett explained that he had Symphony, made his three selections in large Saturday, May 10, Laxson Auditorium, measure because he was saying Chico State. goodbye. For example, he’d chosen Benjamin Britten’s “Four Sea Interludes,” from the opera Peter Grimes, because the orchestra had played it during its first season. The night’s performance would showcase how far the NSS had come, he said: “I thought we did a pretty good job [then], a credible job, but I know we can do much better today.” Besides, he added, the piece comprises four impressionistic seascapes, and “I will miss the sea. It’s a very long way from Missouri.” (Pickett is now music director of the Springfield Symphony, a role he also fills in Topeka, Kan.) When an audience member asked what his favorite instrument was, Pickett replied that, after rehearsing Dvorák’s Cello Concerto with guest cellist David Requiro that morning, he regretted having taken up the flute. Of all the instruments, the cello is closest to the human voice in its range and ability to convey emotion, he said. On the other hand, playing the flute in his highschool marching band led to his becoming a conductor. Frustrated that his instrument couldn’t be heard above the din—it was a “fruitless effort,” he said—he decided to become a drum major, and thus a career was born. A symphony orchestra, he said, is a profoundly collaborative project, one to which the musicians bring lifetimes of musical experience. As “the chief collaborator,” it’s his job to merge the skills and insights of

That’s exactly what happened a few minutes

later, when the orchestra launched into the Dvorák concerto before a nearly full Laxson audience. Requiro, who grew up in Oakland and is currently artist in residence at the University of Puget Sound, is just 28 years old and looks even younger, but he’s in every way a mature musician. He doesn’t just play his cello, he merges with it, and the sounds that poured forth were rich and vibrant. The Dvorák is exceedingly difficult. Pickett called it “the hardest concerto I’ve ever conducted.” There were times during this gorgeous piece when Requiro’s hands moved faster than the eyes could follow, but his performance was flawless, and he received able support from the orchestra. Following intermission, the orchestra moved through the 20th century sounds of Britten’s “Sea Interludes.” At his talk, Pickett had said the four Peter Grimes interludes—“Dawn,” “Sunday Morning,” “Moonlight” and “Storm”—encapsulate the opera’s story of an outsider brought to ruin by misguided townsfolk. He said to listen for the sound of sunlight glittering off water and the church bells of “Sunday morning”—and sure enough, there they were. The concert ended with Brahms’ Academic Festival Overture, which Pickett earlier said was a practical joke of sorts. After receiving an honorary degree from the University of Breslau, Brahms learned he was expected to respond by composing something for the school. Brahms reluctantly complied, but he did so by basing the composition on student drinking songs. Ironically, it became, as Pickett said, “one of the most beautiful overtures in the history of romantic music.” It was a grand way for Pickett to go out—a big, brassy, joyful Brahms piece, the kind the orchestra plays so well, preceded by a brilliantly rendered cello concerto and Britten’s impressionistic tone poems. The crowd loved all of it and gave the maestro and the musicians a standing ovation that went on for several minutes. It stopped only when Pickett turned, just as he was exiting the stage for the fourth time, and waved goodbye. Then the lights came up, and he was gone. Ω May 15, 2014

CN&R

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IN THE MIX

Struggling for Breath?

The Untold History of Ramen George Solt University of California Press When George Solt unravels ramen from Japan’s past, present and future, he reveals the noodle dish’s connection to a country, its people and the world beyond. Particularly interesting are the analyses of the impact World War II had on Japan’s now national dish—which arrived as an import for laborers from China—and the gender-role ramifications of cheap, easy, instant ramen. While the writing can be drier than an unreconstituted package of ramen (it’s no surprise that the book began as a doctorial dissertation), Solt does an incredible job of neither over- nor understating the role of ramen in Japan and throughout the world. The assistant professor of history at New York University accomplishes this by pulling information from a variety of sources and contextualizing his assertions and findings in a wider view of history beyond the bowl. However, Solt rarely touches on the culinary angle of the dish, devoting little to no space to the taste or regional differences in ingredients and cooking methods. Though this may leave a bad taste in some foodies’ mouths, this otherwise informative read might make you appreciate your next bowl of ramen just a little more.

BOOK

—Matthew Craggs

THINKE. Asthma is a nasty condition. I know. I suffered (and I do mean suffered) with asthma all of my child-hood. I would spend months in a room with an air purifier and when I turned blue, my folks would rush me into town for some oxygen. I’m very lucky to be alive and only have some heart damage from the ordeal.

FRE

My mother was a baker and she had asthma, too.

Metatheosis Noneuclid Blood Music The thrash revival has already worn thin its denim vest for many metalheads. Understandably so. A lot of it is style over substance, where faded Testament shirts and old-school production values mask bands’ riff deficiencies (garage rock went through similar issues). Germany’s Noneuclid has been at it for a decade, which hardly makes them neo-thrashists—instead they take ’80s thrash metal into the new millennium by mixing black, doom and prog influences. Noneuclid does bring with it the extra baggage of being a “supergroup” (the band includes members of Triptykon, Obscura and Dark Forttress), typically a recipe for disaster. But Metatheosis—their second full-length—continues Noneuclid’s head-spinning head banging. Their apocalyptic visions are accompanied by equally menacing riffs. “Cult of One” is probably the most straightforward song on the album, with a riff that will cut skin (and a lyric that will turn stomachs: “between the sperms and the worms”). The centerpiece is a three-part suite called “Into the Light,” which is nothing compared with the 16minute album closer “None So Lucid.” The production and vocals are on the tidy side, but that’ll be the last thing on your mind as this beast swallows you whole.

MUSIC

—Mark Lore

Brown Dog Jim Harrison Grove Press Ahab, Huck Finn, Holden Caulfield and Brown Dog are arguably the most compelling male protagonists in American lit, though they couldn’t be more different from one another. BD, as he prefers to be called, is a highly spiritual half-Ashinabe. He is a man’s man—an expert hunter, fisherman, logger, builder and salvage diver who attracts women of all social classes (though usually, only for a short time)—and in this collection of five previously released (and one unreleased) novellas from the last 24 years, author Jim Harrison’s character takes shape like never before. BD is constantly getting in minor scrapes with the law. He discovers his father’s corpse on the bottom of Lake Michigan and hotwires an ice cream truck to take him to Milwaukee. He discloses the site of an ancient burial ground “under the spell of anthropological pussy.” He pursues a scurrilous American Indian Movement leader to Los Angeles to recover his sacred bearskin. All this at age 49. A year later he marries a bisexual woman half his age and they are expecting a baby. What a great read!

BOOK

Asthma is caused by inflammation of the lungs, which is primarily caused by ingestion of sugar, starch, carbs, gluten, and transfats. These foods cause the blood sugars to rise and then plummet. This causes a dive in serotonin, which tends to cause depression and an increase in histamine. This causes expansion of the blood vessels. Other factors, such as herbicide sprayed and GMO foods, promote food allergies and the overgrowth of yeasts, which also promote inflammatory tissue expansion. When blood vessels expand too much they start to leak fluid into places it doesn’t belong. When blood vessels leak in the sinuses, you get sinus drip. When it drips into the brain, it causes head-aches and brain-fog. When it drip into the bronchi of the lungs, it causes asthma. My mother didn’t know this, but now you do. Would you like to say goodbye to *your* inhaler? GIF T CARD

DR DEBORAH PENNER DC

—Jim Dwyer May 15, 2014

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 5/15—WEDNESDAY 5/21 ers Sean Harrasser, Karoline May Farris and Heather Michelle and the Make You Mines. F, 5/16, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

THE LONGSHOTS, LISA VALENTINE AND THE UNLOVEABLES

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning

Friday, May 16 Maltese Bar & Tap Room

jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

SEE FRIDAY

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday-night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Larry

15THURSDAY AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music round-robin. Third and First Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

BEER PAIRING PARTY: Celebrate the release of the Golden Feather Extra Pale Ale with brewmaster Roland Allen. Th, 5/15, 6pm. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Steve Cook and Larry Peterson play and eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 5/15, 6-9pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

MICHAEL BONE: The Bogg drummer performs a collection of solo tunes from his new CD. Friends Bran Crown and Lish Bills open. Th, 5/15, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to share your music, poetry, comedy, or other

talents in a 10-minute slot. First and Third Th of every month, 7pm. $1. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise, (530) 873-1370.

WAKE: Metal with Canadian grind bros.

Th, 5/15. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891, www.lasallesbar.com.

16FRIDAY

A BIG FUNKY MESS

One of the more visible bands currently carrying on Chico’s tradition of loving the funk are Sofa King. More than just a witty name, the five-piece play an upbeat blend of funk, soul, R&B and rock mixed with some extraspecialfunky elements, including some flute-boxing!. The band plays Wednesday, May 21, at the Maltese Bar & Tap Room with Davis funkophiles Big Sticky Mess.

Peterson and Stevie Cook play an eclectic mix of music. F, 5/16, 6-9pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St., (530) 891-9044.

LIVIN’ ON A PRAYER: Bon Jovi tribute

band. F, 5/16, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com/brewing-co.

THE LONGSHOTS: Ska from Eugene, Ore.,

BASSMINT: A (mostly) weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St., (530) 895-3888.

BILLY SHADDOX: American folk from Park

plus local soul/songstress Lisa Valentine and her band The Unloveables. F, 5/16, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

OPEN MIC: All singer/songwriters wel-

come. F, 6-9pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891, www.lasalles bar.com.

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 glass from Sierra Nevada. W, 5/20, 5/21, 7:30pm. $28.50. Sierra Nevada Big

GIGANTES, ASSUMING WE SURVIVE Wednesday, May 21 LaSalle’s Bar SEE SATURDAY

Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

17SATURDAY ’80S NIGHT: Wear your best ’80s attire

and dance the night away. Sa, 8pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891, www.lasallesbar.com.

FUNKSHON: A benefit dance for the Slow Theatre with Afro soul, old school funk/beat, acid jazz, an open-air chill lounge, live drumming, and sounds by Selektor Naphtali One. Sa, 5/17, 9pm. $10. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

LOS C QUARTET AT WINE TIME: Los C Quartet returns to Wine Time to celebrate May with music, fine wine, food and friends. Sa, 5/17, 7-9pm. Wine Time,

26 Lost Dutchman Dr., (530) 899-9250, www.winetimechico.com.

MARK SEXTON BAND: A soul/funk powerhouse hailing from Reno, Nev., plus acoustic soul/pop from Kyle Williams, gritty rock, blues, and boogie with The Muddy Sours and fist fights from Wolves and Wanderers. Sa, 5/17, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

MUMBO GUMBO: A 7-piece celebratory

dance band. Sa, 5/17, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/ brewing-co.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and

18SUNDAY JOHN SEID DUO: John Seid and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Su, 5/18, 6-9pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St., (530) 891-6328, www.5th streetsteakhouse.com.

20TUESDAY BELLY DANCE CLASS: Weekly belly dance with BellySutra. Tu, 7pm. $8. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

THE MOTHER HIPS: A night of homegrown beer and tunes with the California soul of the Mother Hips and Chico soul in a

Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 3452739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

THE MOTHER HIPS: See Tueday. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierra nevada.com/bigroom.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and rotating accompaniment. Tu, 6:308:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farm starpizza.com.

21WEDNESDAY BIG STICKY MESS AND SOFA KING: The three-piece “dirty” funk band from Davis visits Chico for the first time, with local help from soul/funk band, Sofa King. W, 5/21, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 3434915.

HIPS HOMECOMING

The Mother Hips have been going strong since coming together in Chico more than 20 years ago. Though thoroughly ensconced in the Bay Area now, the band has never forgotten its roots and returns every so often for some killer hometown shows. Next week they’ll be playing two!—Tuesday, May 20, and Wednesday, May 21—at Sierra Nevada’s Big Room.

FULL HOUSE BLUES JAM: Join the house band, The Growlers, and bring an instrument and sign up to be a guest player. W, 5/21, 7:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feath erfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more.

W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St.

METAL SHOW: Local metal with Gigantes

and Assuming We Survive. W, 5/21. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891, www.lasallesbar.com.

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REEL WORLD STARTS FRIDAY

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carlett Johansson, an enticing voice

without a body in Her, is an enticing body without a soul for much of Under the Skin. When the rudiments of soul begin to show up, it’s a crisis for the character and a compounded irony for the plot of this movie’s paradoxical foray into sci-fi. by Juan-Carlos The central premise involves an alien Selznick who, disguised in the body of an attractive female (Johansson in black hair and fur jacket), trolls the back streets of a Scottish town (in a van) looking for men. And those whom she entices into the van and seduces are harvested for their bodies. As such, she’s sort of an extra-terrestrial femme fatale, but one of the film’s recurring notions suggests that there is an element of fatality in all human desire, includUnder the Skin ing that which apparently accompanies her Starring Scarlett Johansson. borrowed flesh. And so Under the Skin Directed by also takes shape as a chilly, sexy, ironic Jonathan Glazer. parable about the paradoxes and ambiguiPageant Theatre. ties of human nature. Rated R. Johansson does nice understated work with the femme fatale’s lack of empathy and with empathy’s tentative emergence as well. In a drowning incident involving young parents and an infant, the alien seductress seems very detached but not at all malevolent. And in a scene in which she Poor is sexually assaulted, she seems both angry and perplexed, rather as if what she has begun to experience is alarming but also Fair fascinating and well-nigh indelible. The film’s semi-surrealist special effects have a weird sublimity to them as well. And the paradoxes are ubiquitous. Good The alien’s fateful encounter with a peculiar park ranger feels like some sort of halfstoned horror film, and her weirdly unpredictable encounter with a deformed-lookVery Good ing man evokes the fractured kind of humanism that is rarely seen outside the films of Luis Buñuel or David Lynch. Ω

4

1

2

3

4

5

Excellent

36

CN&R

May 15, 2014

Delayed exposure Finding Vivian Maier

4

Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

by Juan-Carlos Selznick The posthumous discovery of Vivian

Maier’s extraordinary photographs was set in somewhat serendipitous motion by John Maloof’s purchase of a trunk full of photographic negatives at a storage auction in Chicago. This film, directed by Maloof and Charlie Siskel, documents the course of Maloof’s discoveries, including his subsequent efforts to solve the mysteries of her full identity as well as to celebrate, and gain public recognition for, Maier’s artful work. What Maloof finds is fascinating in several respects and, at times, downright astonishing. Maier was born in New York City and made her living as a nanny, mostly in the Chicago area. She apparently took her camera with her everywhere she went, including during nanny duties; she made prolific numbers of photographs, but kept the results (and her collections of everyday minutiae) almost entirely to herself. Traces of family connections and her past prove very elusive, as do her motives for leaving the vast bulk of her work hidden from view (she rarely had prints made, and a large portion of her storage-locker stash consisted of rolls of film which had been exposed but never processed). The puzzles of her life and character are made even more haunting and poignant by the wonderful photos that the film showcases. Joel Meyerowitz, a great photographer in his own right, provides some particularly incisive commentary on the work and the glimpses of the artist he finds in it. Ω


Opening this week Godzilla

Godzilla is back, and by all appearances, it’s bigger than ever. What is it here for? Is it good? Evil? It’s just Godzilla—looking like it did in the original series—and it’s going to be stepping on trains and buses and rattling the theater seats with its screechy roar! Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Million Dollar Arm

Now playing

2

The Amazing Spider-Man 2

Director Marc Webb proves himself adept at drama and romance in this sequel (Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker/SpiderMan and Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy are kind of adorable). But he botches the action elements and tries to juggle too many villains—among them, the goofy Electro (Jamie Foxx), the Green Goblin (Dane Dehaan) and the robotic Rhino (Paul Giamatti). Electro starts off as Max Dillon, a geeky electrical engineer at Oscorp Industries who gets transformed into some sort of bluish, seethrough monstrosity after electrocuting himself and falling into a tank of electric eels. He has the ability to move and stop things with electricity, which makes no sense, and disappear into wires and sockets, which also makes no sense. Yes, this is a comic book movie, but this stuff is just stupid. There’s a big, dramatic occurrence deep in this film, and that sequence is the best thing in the movie, and it should’ve ended directly after it. Instead, Webb and his writers force a terrible finale that feels tacked on, and destroys any dramatic tension. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

In this sequel to Captain America: The First Avenger, the captain (Chris Evans) is struggling to cope in modern society when he is presented with the challenge of fighting against an old friend who’s come forward in time in a different, much more dangerous form. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Divergent

In a Chicago of the distant future, people are divided into five factions based on the strongest virtue they possess. Those who don’t test strong in any one category are divergents, and as one young divergent soon learns, their days may be numbered. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

4

Finding Vivian Maier

See review this issue. Ends tonight, May 15. Pageant Theatre. Not rated —J.C.S.

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Wes Anderson’s new film is the story of an imaginary middle European hotel in the imaginary Republic of Zubrowka in the mostly very real year of 1932. But it’s also the tale of how a modern-day resident of that hotel, the mysterious and rather sorrowful Mr. Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham), came to be its owner. And that story, in turn, centers on the remarkable character and career of Monsieur Gustave (Ralph Fiennes), the legendary and perhaps improbable concierge of that establishment, the Grand Budapest Hotel, in its heyday. The 1932 part of the story is central to everything else in the film. The rise of Nazism lingers on the horizon while center stage is occupied by the semi-picaresque adventures of M. Gustave and an orphaned refugee named Zero (Tony Revelori) and the farcical melodrama that ensues when M. Gustave finds himself named executor of the estate of an elderly woman of wealth (Tilda Swinton). Overall, tragicomic high spirits in deteriorating circumstances are the film’s strong suit, and Fiennes’ superb multifaceted performance ensures M. Gustave’s status as the atypical hero at the heart of Anderson’s vision. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Heaven Is for Real

Seabiscuit director Randall Wallace has adapted the best-selling book by Todd Burpo, a Christian pastor who tells the story of his 4-year-old son’s near-death experience of visiting heaven. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return

A computer-animated follow-up to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, featuring the voice of Lea Michele as Dorothy, who returns to Oz and helps her familiar pals—plus a few new ones—in a fight against an evil jester. Additional voices include Jim Belushi, Dan Akroyd and Kelsey Grammer. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Moms’ Night Out

P r o M i S e

i S

Forever RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

Based on the real-life events in the lives of two Indian athletes—Rinku Singh and Dinesh Patel—the film stars Jon Hamm as a sports agent who devises a reality show to find potential pitchers from a field of baseball novices in India, two of whom win a chance to pitch for a Major League Baseball team. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

5

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

a

T e l l

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w i T h

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Promise Ring Ask her with an Engagement Ring!

(530) 345-1500 • 214 Main Street • Downtown Chico •

A faith-based feature about a group of moms who hit the town for a night out and leave their kids at home with the dads— hijinks ensue. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Neighbors

Director Nicholas Stoller (Get Him to the Greek, Forgetting Sarah Marshall) is at the helm of this hard-R comedy starring Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne as a married couple doing battle with a frat (led by chief instigator Zac Efron) that moves into the house next door. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

The Other Woman

When a married woman (Leslie Mann) meets two other woman (Cameron Diaz and Kate Upton) with whom her husband has cheated on her, the trio decides to work together to exact revenge on the three-timer … hijinks ensue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Rio 2

The two blue macaws (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway) are back for an adventure in the Amazon rainforest. Cinemark 14. Rated G.

4

Under the Skin

EvErybody’s

Goin’ ChiCo

See review this issue. Ends tonight, May 15. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Million Dollar Arm

The Chico News & Review’s Goin’ Chico issue is distributed to new students and their parents at Summer Orientation at Chico State. Starting in June, Goin’ Chico offers unmatched early access to the freshest faces in town. Goin’ Chico is also distributed inside the August 14 issue of the Chico News & Review, just as students, friends and family converge on Chico to gear up for the fall semester. This two-for-one advertising opportunity will also get your back-to-school sales off and running. Advertising Deadline: May 27 For more information, call an advertising representative today at (530) 894-2300 May 15, 2014

CN&R

37


save on sweet stuff Bling on 3rd: $25 for $12.50 CAMMIES 2014 T-Shirts: $5 Cathy’s Sew & Vac: $40 for $20 Floral Native Nursery & Restoration: $20 for $10 Keep Chico Weird 2014 T-Shirts: $5 Lotus Flower Imports: $15 for $7.50 Lunatic Fringe Belly Dance Essentials: $25 for $12.50 Playtime 4 You: $20 for $10

ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

I’m gonna write a show for us and put it on right here … Why, it’ll be the most up-to-date thing these hicks around here have ever seen!—Babes in Arms (1939)

“LET’S PUT ON A SHOW!” Now this is an idea whose time has come. Local theater dude (and longtime CN&R film critic) Craig Blamer is following through on one of his dreams. In an old, mostly forgotten, tin can of a warehouse in south Chico (just off Park Avenue, on 11th Street), he is trying to start “a subscriber-funded workshop and performance space for the local struggling artist.” The building—a former auto-upholstery business—is nothing special, which is kind of the fun of it. It may be old and funky, and dubbed an “eyesore” by some, but with just a little TLC it has the potential to become the perfect blank box where artists can meet up and inject some life by doing their creative work. After getting the warehouse spruced up, building a stage, and hopefully outfitting the place with some basics—plastic chairs, fridge, computer, Wi-Fi, digital projector— A barn, not The Barn. Blamer hopes to stage plays, host comedy and acoustic-music nights, show public-domain films, and have the co-op space available for member-performers to work on their craft. He’s calling it The Barn, which is a nod to that famous (and likely apocryphal) line that supposedly came from one of the old Mickey Rooney/Judy Garland flicks: “Hey, my uncle has a barn. Let’s put on a show!” Whatever the quote’s origin, it’s such a romantic idea that I could almost burst. Visit www.facebook.com/groups/ 268630109985267 and join the group today, and kick down the $25 to become a charter member and help get the party started. SEE, HEAR, AND TOUCH Who knew that Chico State had a Sound Art class?

It’s true. Music professor David Dvorin and art professor Sheri Simons are the co-instructors, and this semester their class has been “exploring acoustics and design principles, exciting and resonating objects, building microphones and experimenting with wireless sensors and processing software.” (Exciting objects!) And this weekend (May 16-18), at Chico Museum, they will be presenting Resonance, an interactive exhibit of the students’ collaborative “Searching for Flow,” Luke Betts works that will “utilize sound as a material, and likewise use art as a vehicle integral to hearing or listening, blurring the boundaries of each area.” Way cool. Oh, and if this talk of experimenting with sound is striking a chord, maybe you should join the noisemakers in the lab? This summer, Simons is teaming up with some well-known sound artists—Sasha Leitman, Trimpin and Michael Shiloh—to present a two-week inventors workshop June 30-July 13 (in Monterey!) titled Sound + Sculpture. Contact Simons at ssimons@csuchico.edu for more info.

w w w. n e w s r e v i e w. c o m Art grenades. 38

CN&R

May 15, 2014

GRENADE ART I ran out of room in my review of the Art at the Matador arts festival (“Kid in an art store,” page 24) to give a shout out to Kyle Campbell and his rad cast-crystal grenades that were neatly on display in padded cases in one of the motel-room galleries. So, here’s me shouting: Go to www.kylecampbellglass.com and to check out the crystal grenades, plus some crystal uzis!


FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 15, 2014 ARIES (March 21-April 19): When the

path ahead divides in two, Aries, I am hoping you can work some magic that will allow you to take both ways at once. If you do master this riddle, if you can creatively figure out how to split yourself without doing any harm, I have a strong suspicion that the two paths will once again come together no later than August 1, possibly before. But due to a curious quirk in the laws of life, the two forks will never again converge if you follow just one of them now.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I see

you as having more in common with a marathon runner than a speed racer. Your best qualities tend to emerge when you’re committed to a process that takes a while to unfold. Learning to pace yourself is a crucial life lesson. That’s how you get attuned to your body’s signals and master the art of caring for your physical needs. That’s also how you come to understand that it’s important not to compare yourself constantly to the progress other people are making. Having said all that, Taurus, I want to recommend a temporary exception to the rule. Just for now, it may make sense for you to run fast for a short time.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you fling handfuls of zucchini seeds on the ground of a vacant lot today, you shouldn’t expect neat rows of ripe cucumbers to be growing in your backyard in a couple of weeks. Even if you fling zucchini seeds in your backyard today, you shouldn’t expect straight rows of cucumbers to be growing there by June 1. Let’s get even more precise here. If you carefully plant zucchini seeds in neat rows in your backyard today, you should not expect ripe cucumbers to sprout by August. But here’s the kicker: If you carefully plant cucumber seeds in your backyard today, and weed them and water them as they grow, you can indeed expect ripe cucumbers by August.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “If we

want the rewards of being loved,” says cartoonist Tim Kreider, “we have to submit to the mortifying ordeal of being known.” How are you doing with this trade-off, Cancerian? Being a crab myself, I know we are sometimes inclined to hide who we really are. We have mixed feelings about becoming vulnerable and available enough to be fully known by others. We might even choose to live without the love we crave so as to prop up the illusion of strength that comes from being mysterious, from concealing our depths. The coming weeks will be a good time for you to revisit this conundrum.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There’s a piece of

art on the moon: a ceramic disk inscribed with six drawings by noted American artists. It was carried on the landing module of the Apollo 12 mission, which delivered two astronauts to the lunar surface in November 1969. One of the artists, Leo maverick Andy Warhol, drew the image of a stylized penis, similar to what you might see on the wall of a public restroom. “He was being the terrible bad boy,” the project’s organizer said about Warhol’s contribution. You know me, Leo. I usually love playful acts of rebellion. But in the coming weeks, I advise against taking Warhol’s approach. If you’re called on to add your self-expression to a big undertaking, tilt in the direction of sincerity and reverence and dignity.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The planet

we live on is in constant transformation. Nothing ever stays the same. To succeed, let alone survive, we need to acclimate ourselves to the relentless forward motion. “He not busy being born is busy dying,” was Bob Dylan’s way of framing our challenge. How are you doing with this aspect of life, Virgo? Do you hate it but deal with it grudgingly? Tolerate it and aspire to be a master of it someday? Whatever your current attitude is, I’m here to tell you that in the coming months you could become much more comfortable with the ceaseless flow—and even learn to enjoy it. Are you ready to begin?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “It isn’t that

I don’t like sweet disorder,” said English author Vita Sackville-West, “but it has to be judiciously arranged.” That’s your theme for the week, Libra. Please respect how precise a formulation this is. Plain-

BY ROB BREzSNY old ordinary disorder will not provide you with the epiphanies and breakthroughs you deserve and need. The disorder must be sweet. If it doesn’t make you feel at least a little excited and more in love with life, avoid it. The disorder must also be judiciously arranged. What that means is that it can’t be loud or vulgar or profane. Rather, it must have wit and style and a hint of crazy wisdom.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I have

three sets of questions for you, Scorpio. First, are you anyone’s muse? Is there a person who draws inspiration from the way you live? Here’s my second query: Are you strong medicine for anyone? Are you the source of riddles that confound and intrigue them, compelling them to outgrow their narrow perspectives? Here’s my third inquiry: Are you anyone’s teacher? Are you an influence that educates someone about the meaning of life? If you do play any of these roles, Scorpio, they are about to heat up and transform. If you don’t currently serve at least one of these functions, there’s a good chance you will start to soon.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

In Raymond Chandler’s pulp-fiction novel Farewell, My Lovely, his main character is detective Philip Marlowe. At one point Marlowe says, “I needed a drink, I needed a lot of life insurance, I needed a vacation, I needed a home in the country. What I had was a coat, a hat and a gun.” In accordance with your astrological omens, Capricorn, I’m asking you to figure out how you might be like Marlowe. Are there differences between what you think you need and what you actually have? If so, now is an excellent time to launch initiatives to fix the discrepancies.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

There’s a slightly better chance than usual that you will have a whirlwind affair with a Bollywood movie star who’s on vacation. The odds are also higher than normal that you will receive a tempting invitation from a secret admirer, or meet the soul twin you didn’t even know you were searching for, or get an accidental text message from a stranger who turns out to be the reincarnation of your beloved from a previous lifetime. But the likelihood of all those scenarios pales in comparison to the possibility that you will learn big secrets about how to make yourself even more lovable than you already are.

6 FIGURES FIRST YEAR International HEALTH & WELLNESS Company Expanding Into Northern NV & CA! Looking For Representative. Earn 1 to 4K PART-TIME! Retire In 2 Years With A 6 Figure Repeat Income FULL-TIME! Contact Mr. Masters At 800-530-8565 &/Or Send Resume To NorthCaNv@Gmail.com AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institue of Maintenance 888-242-3214 COSMETOLOGISTS WANTED! New salon in town looking for a few talented individuals. Three hair stations, one nail station & one esthetician room for rent or commission. Experience preferred. We also offer commission on product sales. Visit our Facebook page for pictures! Crucial has a very clean & professional atmosphere. The location has a ton of traffic! Free parking! Call 530-518-9900 and ask to talk to Lindsay

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Author

Eva Dane defines writer’s block as what happens “when your imaginary friends stop talking to you.” I suspect that something like this has been happening for you lately, Pisces—even if you’re not a writer. What I mean is that some of the most reliable and sympathetic voices in your head have grown quiet: ancestors, dear friends who are no longer in your life, ex-lovers you still have feelings for, former teachers who have remained a strong presence in your imagination, animals you once cared for who have departed, and maybe even some good old-fashioned spirits and angels. Where did they go? What happened to them? I suspect they are merely taking a break. They may have thought it wise to let you fend for yourself for a while. But don’t worry. They will be back soon.

Go to www.RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): According to my reading of the astrological omens, you should draw inspiration from this Chinese proverb: “Never do anything standing that you can do sitting, or anything sitting that you can do lying down.” In other words, Sagittarius, you need extra downtime. So please say no to any influence that says, “Do it now! Be maniacally efficient! Multitask as if your life depended on it! The more active you are, the more successful you will be!” Instead, give yourself ample opportunity to play and daydream and ruminate.

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Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

Wild Thing Wild Woman Semi Annual Sale New women’s clothing size Sm-2XX. Vintage and slightly used kids clothing. Books, jewelry, misc household & more. Sat May 17 - Sun May 18 8am-4pm 858 Lindo Lane Chico Church Yard Sale Saturday, May 19, 2014 from 8am-3pm. Furniture, jewelry, appliances, high quality clothing. UUFC 1289 Filbert Ave, Chico Professional Racing Bikes Felt ZW25 full carbon road bike. Mint Green $1000 OBO Felt F95ARGYLE Garmin Limited Edition road bike. $500 OBO 530-252-8747

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as VOODOO TATTOO AND BREW EAT, DRINK AND GET INK’D at 2053 Montgomery Street Oroville, CA 95965. PARKERVORT FARMS, INC 2053 Montgomery Street Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CONNIE PARKS, CFO Dated: April 4, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000535 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COIT SERVICES OF CHICO at 4935 Brookside Ct Reno, NV 89502. COIT SERVICES OF CHICO 4935 Brookside Ct Reno, NV 89502. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: LONNIE FIXEL, OWNER Dated: March 24, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000465 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BESTCARRIERROUTES, CONTRACTORSGOLD, LISTLOGIK, PAINTERSGOLD, POLITIGOLD at 411 Main St., Suite 105 Chico, CA 95928. CR-GOLD 411 Main St., Suite 105 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: J. PATRICK BREUKER, PRESIDENT Dated: April 16, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000587 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EYEBROW PLUS INC, EYEBROWS 1 at 1950 E 20th St #5517 Chico, CA 95928. EYBROW PLUS INC 43933 Hugo Terrace Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: FARDIN AMIRI, CEO/PRESIDENT Dated: March 11, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000392 Published: April, 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GREEN ENERGY FINANCIAL SERVICES at 1016 Richland Court Chico, CA 95926. PATRICIA L CALL 1016 Richland Court Chico, CA 95926 DAVID ESMAILI 1016 Richland Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PATRICIA CALL Dated: April 18, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000614 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO PRINTING INC at 970 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. CHICO PRINTING INC 970 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TIM HENDERSON, SECRETARY/VP Dated: April 14, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000579 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GET GROUNDED at 939 Sycamore Street Chico, CA 95928. LAURA TAMARA WICHMAN 939 Sycamore Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAMMY WICHMAN Dated: April 7, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000543 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as REMAX OF CHICO at 1140 Mangrove Avenue Suite D Chico, CA 95926. MARK CHRISCO 45 Temperance Way Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT M CONTRERAS 7 Glenview Court Chico, CA 95928. MARTIN T LUGER 14055 Hereford Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ROBERT M. CONTRERAS Dated: April 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000605 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELIJO’AN PUBLISHING, PRINCIPIO, TE CHING at 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. LYNN MARIE TOSELLO 466 Panama Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNN MARIE TOSELLO Dated: April 21, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000627 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAC2MACONLINE at 1406 Locust Street Chico, CA 95928. KAREN BLOOD 1406 Locust Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual.

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Signed: KAREN BLOOD Dated: April 2, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000527 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRO NAILS AND SPA at 1950 East 20th Street Suite #A 102 Chico, CA 95928. BINH T TRAN 1950 East 20th Street Suite #A 102 CHico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BINH TRAN Dated: April 14, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000572 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JAVI’S HOMEMADE GRANOLA at 836 Kern Street Chico, CA 95928. TERESA LOPEZ 836 Kern Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CARMEN L. TORIBIO Dated: April 7, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000540 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NATURE’S HILIGHTS at 1608-A 5th St Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL EPPERSON 6 Merle Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAWN BLANKENHEIM Dated: March 25, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000471 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANGELEGACY DESIGNS, LIVE LIFE JUICE CO at 2355 Lombard Ln Chico, CA 95926. ANGELINA BRITTAIN-RASMUSSEN 2355 Lombard Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELINA BRITTAIN-RASMUSSEN Dated: April 23, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000641 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE ITALIAN KITCHEN at 2275 Myers, Suite A Oroville, CA 95966. CHRISTOPHER MCGLENISTER 203 Mission Olive Oroville, CA 95965. JULIE MCGLENISTER 203 Mission Olive Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JULIE MCGLENISTER Dated: April 24, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000643 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOUNCING BUTTES at 161 Blazeford Gulch Road Oroville, CA 95966. AARON SMITH 161 Blazeford Gulch Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON N. SMITH Dated: April 22, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000630

ClaSSIFIEdS

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Ma y 15, 2014 May 15, 2014

ATTENTION SN&R Design Dept: Can you please add the horizontal rule at top, full width of page. And, a vertical rule that separates ASTROLOGY from CLASSIFIEDS?

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Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GIT YA SOME PIZZA at 1950 E 20th St Suite B221 Chico, CA 95928. SHAWN VERLAND RICHINS 1972 Fogg Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAWN RICHINS Dated: April 24, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000648 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as LOS ARCOS AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD at 2454 Notre Dame Blvd #100 Chico, CA 95928. VICTOR M CRISPIN 549 Esplanade Spc# 509 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VICTOR M. CRISPIN Dated: April 22, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000629 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LEGAL STOP FORECLOSURE GROUP at 315 Wall St #14 Chico, CA 95928. JOHN EDWIN SHALBERG 37401 Oakview Burney, CA 96013. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN EDWIN SHALBERG Dated: April 23, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000636 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL The following person has withdrawn as partner from the partnership operating under BODHI SANCTUARY HEALING CENTER at 1390 East 9th ST #150 Chico, CA 95928. KRISTIANA LOPEZ 846 Coit Tower Way Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KRISTIANA D. LOPEZ Dated: April 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2013-0000793 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name RIGHT CLICK ADMIN AND DESIGN at 1411 Heather Cir Chico, CA 95926. JENNIFER BURKE 1411 Heather Cir Chico, CA 95926. JOSHUA BURKE 1411 Heather Cir Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by A Married Couple. Signed: JENNIFER BURKE Dated: April 7, 2014 FBN Number: 2012-0001613 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CIMARRON SOLUTIONS at 3568 Bridle Lane Chico, CA 95973. ALLEN LEE STALLMAN 3568 Bridle Lane Chico, CA 95973. CHRISTOPHER ALLEN STALLMAN 3568 Bridle Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: ALLEN LEE STALLMAN

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40 CN&R May 15, 2014

Dated: April 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000661 Publish Dates: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUMMIT LANDSCAPE at 1334 Laburnum Ave Chico, CA 95926. NEIL GARRETT CARR 1334 Laburnum Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NEIL CARR Dated: April 18, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000613 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name FIFTH AND ORIENT at 1692 Mangrove Ave #142 Chico, CA 95926. LEAH E MORRIS 117 W 18th Street B Chico, CA 95928. PHUONG K LY 533 Orient Street Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnershp. Signed: PHUONG LY Dated: April 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2013-0000319 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as N.M.BOYDSOAPS at 443 Stilson Canyon Rd Chico, CA 95928. ELIZABETH MCDONALD 443 Stilson Canyon Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELIZABETH MCDONALD Dated: April 29, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000664 Publish Dates: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO REMODELING at 868 Kern Street Chico, CA 95928. JOHN ALBERT SCHRAM III 868 Kern Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN ALBERT SCHRAM III Dated: April 18, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000609 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NUCLEUS APPLICATIONS at 1115 West Sacramento Ave #150 Chico, CA 95926. CAMERON BROWNFIELD 1115 West Sacramento Ave #150 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAMERON BROWNFIELD Dated: May 1, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000668 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LORDS GYM OROVILLE at 2120 Bird Street Oroville, CA 95965. FATHER’S HOUSE RESTORATION MINISTRIES INC 2656 Fort Wayne Street Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN KELLY,

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ACCOUNTING Dated: April 16, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000594 Published: May, 15,22,29, June 5, 2014.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as YOVILLE YOGURT AND MORE at 2550 Olive Hwy Oroville, CA 95966. FATHER’S HOUSE RESTORATION MINISTRIES INC 2656 Fort Wayne Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN KELLY, ACCOUNTING Dated: April 16, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000595 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

NOTICES CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): DUSTIN WINTER KYLE VANDERGRIFT and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): TB born on (date): April 3, 2013 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): FEATHER RIVER HOSPITAL PARADISE, CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: August 19, 2014 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminated your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: May 7, 2014 Case Number: J-36876 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GEORGE S. MARTIN AKA GEORGE MARTIN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GEORGE S. MARTIN AKA GEORGE MARTIN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RAOUL J. LECLERC in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: RAOUL J. LECLERC be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions,

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however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 22, 2014 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: C-13 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 Dated: April 21, 2014 Case Number: PR41031 Published: May 1,8,15, 2014

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KATHLEEN J. KRALOWEC AKA KATHLEEN JULIA KRALOWEC To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KATHLEEN J. KRALOWEC AKA KATHLEEN JULIA KRALOWEC A Petition for Probate has been filed by: ARTHUR C. KRALOWEC in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: ARTHUR C. KRALOWEC be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests the decedent’s wills and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and

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shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 22, 2014 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: C-13 Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC PO Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 Dated: April 24, 2014 Case Number: PR41037 Published: May 1,8,15, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (Secs 6101-6107 U.C.C.) 1.Notice is hereby given to creditors of the within named seller(s) that a bulk sale is about to be made of the assets described below: 2.The name(s) and business address of the seller(s) are: MARK WATTS 2049 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928 3.The location in California of the chief executive office of the seller is: Same as above 4.The name(s) and business address of the buyer(s) are: BCK INVESTMENTS, LLC 1113 Downing Avenue Chico, CA 95926 5.The business name used by the seller(s) at said location is: CAFE FLO, 365 East 6th Street Chico, CA 95928 ESCROW HOLDER:

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Bidwell Title & Escrow Co. 500 Wall Street, Chico, CA 95928 ESCROW OFFICER: Jolleen Whitsett Order No. 00248954-002 DATE OF ANTICIPATED SALE: June 2, 2014 LAST DAY TO FILE CLAIMS: May 30, 2014, but under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Act such a claim may be filed at any time before notice is received by the escrow holder of approval of the alcoholic beverage license transfer. Notice is hereby given that Transferor intends to make a BULK SALE of the assets of the above described Business to Transferee including all stock in trade, furniture and equipment used in the said Business, to be consummated at the office of Escrow Holder at the time of consummation or thereafter. Creditors of the Transferor may file claims with the Escrow Holder on or before the last day to file claims stated above. This sale is subject to Sec. 61066107 of the California Commercial Code. Transferor has used the following business names and addresses within last three years so far as known to Transferee: None Dated: May 9, 2014 Signed: CAROLYN KANABROCKI Published: May 15, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JENNIFER EILEEN ANDERSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JENNIFER EILEEN ANDERSON Proposed name: CEDAR ROSE SELENITE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 18, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 10, 2014 Case Number: 161922 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JILLIAN LYNNE RUDDELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JILLIAN LYNNE RUDDELL Proposed name: IAN JOSEPH RUDDELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 4, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: April 3, 2014 Case Number: 161838 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VICTORIA L. HUNT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VICTORIA LEE HUNT Proposed name: VICTORIA LEE ZELLERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 11, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 8, 2014 Case Number: 161810 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JODIE NEAL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JODIE MARIE NEAL Proposed name: JODIE MARIE ROSE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 28, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 15, 2014 Case Number: 161498 Published: May 1,8,15,22, 2014 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ALECANDER BELIALCAIN TUBALCAIN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ALECANDER BELIALCAIN TUBALCAIN Proposed name: ISOTES LOIPOI CHAYIL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 11, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: April 28, 2014 Case Number: 162023 Published: May 8,15,22,29, 2014


ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BRIAN SANCHEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BRIAN SANCHEZ Proposed name: BRIAN GAULTIER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 11, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 28, 2014 Case Number: 162002 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 04, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 10, 2014 Case Number: 161865 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

SUMMONS

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NICOLE M. DIMAGGIO-HALL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NICOLE MARIE DIMAGGIOHALL Proposed name: NICOLE MARIE DIMAGGIO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: MICHELLE R TERRELL YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BEREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California

this Legal Notice continues ➡

this Legal Notice continues ➡

Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 160126 Published: April 24, May 1,8,15, 2014

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: NORMA ALICIA ABREGO YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:

this Legal Notice continues ➡

BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BEREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case.

this Legal Notice continues ➡

The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. Dated: July 19, 2013 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 160033 Published: May 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California SUMMONS Courts Online Self-Help Center NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), AMBER GRACE SIMS AKA your county library, or the AMBER GRACE ALLEN courthouse nearest you. If you YOU ARE BEING SUED BY cannot pay the filing fee, ask PLAINTIFF: the court clerk for a fee waiver BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT If you do not file your BEREAU A CORP Free Real Estateform. Listings response on time, you may lose NOTICE! You have been sued.

the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a

civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. Dated: August 26, 2013 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 160262 Published: May, 15,22,29, June 5, 2014

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Find Us Online At:

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www.chico.newsreview.com this Legal Notice continues ➡

this Legal Notice continues ➡

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com California Park

chico charmer

15176 Jack Pine Way 3/3 1775 sq ft.

$165,000

Great views off the front porch highlight this newer 2 bedroom 2 bath home. Features include 1584 sq ft. lots of built in cabinets, pantry, formal dining room and a two car garage. All for only $253,900

2 beds, Hardwood floors.

Inventory Is low.

$250,000

Call today for a FREE Market Analysis of your Home.

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Frankie Dean

Realtor/E-Pro

Paul Champlin

#01767902

530-717-3884

Making Your Dream Home a Reality

(530) 828-2902

Call or TEXT for more info.

Homes Sold Last Week SQ. FT.

• View, Canyon PE Oaks, Open 3,381 sq ftG$599,000 IN ND

• Heritage Oaks, Stunning 3 bd/ 2.5 ba, 2,165 sq ft $329,750 • Secluded, 18 acs, Forest, 1,550 sq ft, cash only $225,000 • Custom Forest Ranch, 4 bd/ 2.5 ba, 4.89 acs. $329,000 • Easy living, 2 bd/2 ba, Cal Park. $253,500

• Cal Park 3 bd/2 ba, 1,506 ft. $299,950 G NDsq IN PE

• 3bd/4ba, 2,801 sq ft. 1.06 acres $558,000

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1890 Farris Rd

Biggs

$305,000.00

2/ 1

996

1458 Filbert Ave

Chico

$279,000.00

3/ 2

SQ. FT. 1295

13831 Comice Ct

Chico

$586,000.00

4/ 3

3003

24 Vermillion Cir

Chico

$275,000.00

3/ 1.5

1565

914 Arbutus Ave

Chico

$564,000.00

3/ 3.5

2747

17 Coleman Ct

Chico

$261,000.00

3/ 2

1611

14577 Camenzind Ct

Chico

$500,000.00

4/ 3

2839

1563 Kona Dr

Chico

$258,000.00

3/ 2

1497

2338 Alamo Ave

Chico

$490,000.00

6/ 3.5

3196

2205 Holly Ave

Chico

$255,000.00

3/ 2

1662

125 Copperfield Dr

Chico

$405,000.00

4/ 3

2345

1010 Frances Dr

Chico

$245,000.00

3/ 2

1613

801 Moss Ave

Chico

$365,000.00

3/ 2

2004

900 Greenwich Dr

Chico

$235,000.00

4/ 2

1424

753 Woodland Ave

Chico

$350,000.00

3/ 1.5

2558

1046 Poplar St

Chico

$221,000.00

3/ 1.5

1372

3008 California Park Dr

Chico

$309,000.00

3/ 2

1705

954 Chestnut St

Chico

$216,500.00

3/ 2

1119

3419 Hackamore Ln

Chico

$300,000.00

3/ 2

1785

2 New Dawn Cir

Chico

$215,000.00

3/ 1.5

1460

2824 Lucy Way

Chico

$300,000.00

3/ 2

1718

1175 East Ave

Chico

$205,000.00

3/ 2

1594

May 15, 2014

CN&R 41


Love’s ReaL estate Market Weather “Man, the stock market has been going up and down like a yo-yo,” said my friend JP. “It makes my blood pressure go straight up.” JP poured his fourth cup of coffee. His hand shook as he pointed at me and said, “We’ll see the real estate market go down, too. My blood pressure is going up as we speak.” He lifted his coffee cup and gulped. “You think it might be because of all that coffee?” I asked. “No. Coffee futures are pretty stable. It’s the big corporate stocks taking down the market.” I called my friend the Finance Guy and put the speaker phone on so JP could listen in. “Will the real estate market be affected by the stock market?” I asked. “Traditionally, the fibrillation frequencies in housing do not synchronize with the radical fluctuations seen in commodities,” the Finance Guy said. “The obligation elements inherent in the purchase and maintenance of real property discourage extreme speculative behavior such as one might witness inside the hallowed confines of the stock exchange.” “Huh?” JP said. I pushed the “mute” button to screen out JP’s comments. “However,” continued the Finance Guy, “at times, real estate markets do go through periods of irrational exuberance, wherein price

points may indeed display such aforementioned fluctuations.” JP rolled his eyes. I said to JP, “The phone is on ‘mute’ so you can talk.” “Good,” JP said. “This guy’s a real egg-head.” “I heard that,” said the Finance Guy. “Oops.” I pushed the mute button again. The Finance Guy went on. “Considering the binary nature of investments with real estate and stocks we find a certain commonality in cause and effect.” JP leaned back, closed his eyes, and patted his mouth with the palm of his hand, as if stifling a yawn. On went the Finance Guy. “Your question, I assume, is promulgated by the current stock market fluctuations. The winter downturn was caused in part by storms, snow and ice that stalled economic activity, affecting the stock market, and in turn real estate, but I assure you, for the very short term.” “What did he say?” asked JP. “I think he said the real estate market and stock market are affected by the weather,” I said. “Just what I need,” said JP, “an egg-head weatherman.” “I heard that.”

1344 LABURNAM AVE • CHICO Here is a classic Chico charmer in the Avenues that has been given a face-lift! She’s a beauty! New paint inside & out, new windows, new flooring throughout, granite counters, stainless steel appliances, new fixtures, etc. There is large basement that could be used for a number of things; extra storage, wine cellar, etc. Two car detached garage with an extra shop area. And there is even a hot tub situated privately on the side of the house. This house is located in a desirable area in close proximity to Downtown, Enloe Hospital, and CSUC. Come and take a look! You won’t be disappointed!

OpEN HOUsE tHIs wEEkENd! sAtURdAy & sUNdAy 11AM-4pM LIstEd At: $329,900 Garrett French | Realtor | Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530) 228-1305 | GarrettFrenchHomes.com

Doug Love is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530.680.0817

www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Ask the Professionals at Century 21 — 345-6618 Picture Perfect erfect

Decorator’s Dream

Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1558 home, with SOsqLft D many decorator touches. $275,000

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pendin $239,400

NEW: Big Chico Creek Estates. 4 bd, 3 ba, 3352 Sq feet.

5 acres just waiting

Prices are rising and so are the rates! Call me!

Amber Grove, 2200 sq ft, 4/2, pool, 3 car garage and RV parking.

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SMILES ALWAYS

KiMBerLeY tONGe | (530) 518-5508

for a new Home

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Joyce Turner

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of April 28, 2014 – May 2, 2014. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2295 Laurel St

Chico

$150,000.00

3/ 1

1020

3 Hall Dr

Oroville

$125,000.00

3/ 2

1824

611 Pomona Ave

Chico

$106,000.00

3/ 1

1078

1772 Honeysuckle Ln

Paradise

$400,000.00

3/ 3.5

2739

335 Skyline Blvd

Oroville

$304,500.00

2/ 3

2275

3621 Sunview Rd

Paradise

$390,000.00

3/ 2.5

2688

11 Kokanee Dr

Oroville

$280,000.00

3/ 2.5

3195

7337 Skyway

Paradise

$325,000.00

2/ 1

992

253 Crestmont Ave

Oroville

$237,000.00

3/ 2

1377

1043 Buschmann Rd

Paradise

$280,000.00

2/ 1

960

8693 Chrishelle Way

Oroville

$215,000.00

1/ 2

752

5220 Falcons View Ct

Paradise

$245,000.00

3/ 2

1716

11 Ardee Ct

Oroville

$173,500.00

3/ 1

1820

1642 Gate Ln

Paradise

$197,500.00

3/ 2

1568

2730 Orange Ave

Oroville

$157,500.00

4/ 2

2217

300 Redbud Dr

Paradise

$176,000.00

3/ 2

1755

2451 Oro Quincy Hwy

Oroville

$145,500.00

2/ 1

1218

1767 Whitaker Rd

Paradise

$170,000.00

2/ 2

1314

85 Oakvale Ave

Oroville

$145,000.00

2/ 1

949

5915 Pine View Dr

Paradise

$165,000.00

3/ 2

1540

8075 Utah Ave

Oroville

$139,000.00

3/ 2

940

5795 Deanna Way

Paradise

$151,000.00

3/ 2

1664

42 CN&R May 15, 2014

SQ. FT.

SQ. FT.


Heather Jay

Laura Burghardt

Aaron Jay

39 Skymountain Cir. 4bd/3ba. Approx. 2012 sq. ft. 3 car garage, pool w/ waterfall. $325,000

more photos at www.ChicoLaura.com |

CalBRE# 00991783

2655 Waverly Ct. 3bd/2.5ba 1728 sq. ft. Large fenced yard, shows like a model. $239,000

(530) 618-2687

For all your Real Estate Needs call (530) 872-7653

NEED ATTENTION?

Manufactured Home in the Pines!! 2BR/2BA, 1152 SF +/-

POND, PRIVACY, 3 ACRES! 2BR/2BA + Bonus $175,000 #508

$91,200 #624

Shelinda Bryant 530-872-6843

Donna Cass 530-872-6831

Looking for seclusion... then this is it!!! Beautiful 23 acres. Approx. 5.5 miles from Paradise.

THERE MUST BE A BETTER WAY.

LIGHT AND BRIGHT!! Remodeled Mobile Home 3BR/2BA, 1440 SF+/$29,900 #604

$165,000 Ad# 613

Amber Blood 530-872-6817

Susan G. Thomas 530-518-8041

ADVERTISE WITH

(530) 894-2300

5350 Skyway, Paradise | www.C21Skyway.com | Paradise@c21selectgroup.com

open

house Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sat. 1-4 6173 Toms Trail Magalia (X St: Humbug) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 4,250Sq. Ft. $587,000 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 2-4 9368 La Rose Ct (X St: Tracy Rd) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 2272 Sq.Ft. $539,000 Traci Cooper 520-0227 Mark Reaman 228-2229

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 767 Westmont Ct (X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3515 Sq.Ft. $537,500 Brandon Siewert 828-4597 Laura Willman 680-8962

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 10692 Player Lane (X St: Estates Drive) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 3,011 Sq. Ft. $529,000 Matt Kleimann 521-8064 Brandon Siewert 828-4597 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

791 Westmont Ct (X St: W. Sacramento) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3352 Sq.Ft. $515,000 Heather DeLuca 228-1480 Chris Martinez 680-4404

15 Elisha Ct (X St: Cohasset Rd) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1614 Sq.Ft. $299,000 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 Sherrie O’Hearn 518-5904

9099 Midway (X St: Brown & Hanlon) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,250 Sq. Ft. $231,900 Traci Cooper 520-0227 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

Sat. 11-1 1833 Bree Court (X St: Lott Road) 5 Bd / 4 Ba, 3,163Sq. Ft. $505,000 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

Sat. 2-4 1653 Carol Avenue (X St: Park Vista Drive) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,940S Sq. Ft. $449,000 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 11-1 15 Abbott Circle (X St: Windham Way) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2,280 Sq. Ft. $405,000 Morgan Berry 774-7745 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1344 Laburnum Ave ( X St: E 4th Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1510 Sq.Ft. $329,900 Garrett French 228-1305 Justin Jewett 518-4089

Sun. 11-1 1480 Heritage Oak Drive (X St: Springfield Dr) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 1,774 Sq.Ft. $309,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

571 Eaton Rd (X St: Godman) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 1723 Sq.Ft. $265,900 Sun. 2-4, Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

Sat. 11-3 & Sun. 1-4 9180 Goodspeed St (X St: Serviss St) 3 Bd / 2 Ba,1188 Sq.Ft. $254,950 Frank “Speedy “Condon 864-7726

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 112 Wawona Place (X St: Echo Park and Yosemite) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,584Sq Ft. $253,900 Laura Willman 680-8962 Tracy Simmons 925-348

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 292 E. 1st Ave (X St: Laburnum) 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 1258 Sq.Ft. $250,000 Frankie Dean 717-3884 Dana Miller 570-1184

Sat. 11-1 1193 Olive Street (X St: E. 12th Street) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,512 Sq. Ft. $235,000 Brian Bernedo 624-2118

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 375 E. Lassen Avenue #10 (X St: Cussick) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,360 Sq. Ft. $179,900 Kathy Kelly 570-7403 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 11-2 404 Shasta St (X St: 4th St), Orland 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1567 Sq.Ft. $172,500 Sandy Stoner 514-5555

Century 21 seLeCt Paradise Sat 11-1:30 4528 Casa Sierra Vista, Paradise 4BD 3BA 2750+ S.F. $384,000 Chari Bullock 872-6818

Sat 11-1:30 480 Valley View, Paradise 2BD 3BA 1740+ S.F. $242,000 Chari Bullock 872-6818

May 15, 2014

CN&R 43



C 2014 05 15