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WELCOME TO LOVELAND See SCENE, page 30

Are Chico’s water supplies safe from thirsty southern purveyors?

COYOTES KILLED See NEWSLINES, page 9

BROTHERS I N ROCK

See MUSIC FEATURE, page 24

TINY LIBRARIES See GREENWAYS, page 12

FICTION 59

See CONTEST RULES, page 33

BY ALASTAIR BLAND PAGE 20

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

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Vol. 37, Issue 25 • February 13, 2014

OPINION Editorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Comment. . . . . . . . . . . . . Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them.

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353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2240 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

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Associate Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom Gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Healthlines Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Emiliano Garcia-Sarnoff, Meredith J. Graham, Miles Jordan, Karen Laslo, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, Melanie MacTavish, Jesse Mills, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Matt Siracusa, Robert Speer, Allan Stellar, Daniel Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky

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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

The end of security As our cover story this week suggests, California’s drought is

Curbing the unwanted-pet population CAstheyounextbegin eight seconds? to read this, a cat or dog will be euthanized

Chico comes in; we help people get their pets spayed or neutered by paying part of the cost. Feb. 25 has been designated World Spay at a shelter somewhere in the U.S. By the time you’ve finDay by the Humane Society of the United ished the first paragraph or two—or as States, as a way to highlight the critical imporfar as you get in about eight seconds— tance of this effort. Paws of Chico is staging another dog or cat will die. And when its own “celebration” by conducting a lowyou get to the end of this piece, another cost spay/neuter clinic on Feb. 22 and 23. dozen or so will have been Together with Valley Oak Vet“humanely” put down. erinary Center and All About An hour after you’ve We believe that every pet Pets, we hope to spay or finished reading and turned neuter 90 cats and 30 small your attention back to other owner should have spay/neuter dogs (up to 39 pounds). That’s things, 450 more cats and enough to prevent hundreds of by services available as an dogs will be dead, and in potentially unwanted kittens Cynthia Gerrie affordable option. It benefits and puppies from being born. another hour, that many more again. It doesn’t stop Anyone who wants to help everyone in the community. The author is when you don’t think about can make a donation to Paws president of the it—or even when you do. of Chico. We’re a nonprofit board of Paws of Chico and director of We’ve made real organization that, since our the organization’s progress since the effort to educate and founding in 2005, has facilitated the spay and spay/neuter program. encourage the public to spay or neuter their neuter of more than 4,500 cats and dogs in the pets began back in the 1970s. Then, only greater Chico area. about 10 percent of domestic (“owned”) We believe that every pet owner should animals were spayed or neutered. have spay/neuter services available as an Individuals who compassionately take affordable option. It benefits everyone in the in stray, starving animals soon realize community. Please join us in this effort. they can’t afford the cost of spay or Paws of Chico can be reached at neuter. More help is needed to accomP.O. Box 93, Chico, CA 95927, plish the goal of eliminating the problem www.chicospayneuter.org or by calling of unwanted pets. That’s where Paws of 895-2109. Ω an you name something that’s sure to happen in

4 CN&R February 13, 2014

forcing us to reconsider our water supply. Granted, Californians have been arguing about water for decades. But there’s always been an assumption that the problem isn’t a shortage of water, it’s how to store and then get that water from where it’s plentiful, in Northern California, to where it’s needed, in the Central Valley and Southern California. The drought, with its images of nearly empty Northern California reservoirs, is showing us that water is no longer reliably plentiful anywhere in California. And yet some people continue to act as if water supplies are limitless. House Republicans, for example, recently approved legislation (H.R. 3964) that would suspend environmental regulations protecting fisheries and authorize construction of new dams and storage facilities to ensure that Central Valley farmers get the water they believe is theirs. Fortunately, this blatant water grab has little chance of passing the Senate. Gov. Jerry Brown opposed H.R. 3964, but his Bay Delta Conservation Plan, with its $60 billion twin tunnels, isn’t much better. It too would clear the way for an unlimited grab of Northern California water—water that, in any event, may not be there to grab. There are better solutions for managing California’s water, as Barbara Barrigan-Parrilla, executive director of Restore the Delta, has suggested. We can reinforce Delta levees to ensure the estuary’s health and then commit to exporting a safe yield of water, one that protects fisheries and does not deplete the watershed. We also need to retire the arid and drainageimpaired corporate agribusiness lands on the San Joaquin Valley’s west side. (The cost would be far less than building the peripheral tunnels.) And, instead of spending billions on the twin tunnels, we need to invest in small, local water-conservation projects around the state that will put far more people to work than a big project like the tunnels. We face a new reality. Nobody in California enjoys total water security. We need to proceed accordingly. Ω

Stop coyote slaughter Needless blood sport. That’s what last weekend’s coyote hunt

in Modoc County was about. Participants who killed the most animals and the largest were awarded prizes. By the end of the bloody weekend hunt, at least 40 coyotes are said to have been slaughtered. Those who entered this so-called contest in this sparsely populated area of far Northern California can talk all they want about predator control as some sort of justification for slaughtering dozens of coyotes. But, as science indicates, the truth is that the animals respond to killings by producing larger litters, thereby increasing their numbers. That’s right. As you’ll read in Allan Stellar’s Newslines story this week (see “Coyote killings under review,” page 9), these contests are actually counterproductive to reducing the population. Coyotes help maintain a balance in nature by culling the number of smaller predators, and they rarely are a threat to livestock. What’s more, there are a number of humane ways to protect domestic animals, such as using guard dogs, llamas, burros or special fencing and corralling. Lethal measures should be a last resort. Outreach by a number of wildlife advocacy groups, including the Coyote Project and the Center for Biological Diversity, have highlighted the backwardness and brutal nature of these types of hunts. And now it’s time for some action on the part of state officials. In April, the California Fish and Game Commission will consider whether to put an end to such wildlife-killing contests, and we urge the panel to do so. Ω

Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Missing Dan Nguyen-Tan The other day, the CN&R office got some snazzy new carpet to go along with our newly painted walls. And during some shuffling around and purging of old stuff, we came across an original illustration depicting certain City Council candidates in a general election back in the early aughts, more than a decade ago (pictured below). I could tell it was that long ago because I recognized some of the faces, namely Coleen Jarvis, Larry Wahl, Steve Bertagna and Dan Nguyen-Tan. But I couldn’t put my finger on a date. So, I headed to our editorial morgue, which comprises, in bound volumes, each and every issue of the CN&R going back to its beginning in the late 1970s. Our website’s archives go back only to 2001. Fortunately, I didn’t have to dig too far to come up with the volumes from fall of 2000. I found that illustration by Steve Ferchaud on the cover of the Nov. 2 issue. And when I dug into the accompanying story, things became clear. The faces I didn’t recognize were that of current Chico Mayor Scott Gruendl (I was thrown off by the hat, I think), and another three candidates who didn’t make the cut that election: Barbie Boeger, DNA and Nancy Wolfe. (Jarvis, Wahl, Bertagna and Nguyen-Tan won seats.) I was still in college back in 2000 and didn’t cover that election cycle. But I was involved in each one in the years since, either here at the CN&R, back at the local daily paper or at Chico State’s student paper. That got me thinking about the candidates over the years and how impressed I was back in the day with Nguyen-Tan, who was in his mid-20s when he got elected. Nguyen-Tan, who seemed like a genuinely nice person, was sharp and represented people his age very well from the dais. He left for San Francisco sometime after deciding to not seek re-election to the City Council back in 2004. I cannot see him coming back to his hometown of Chico anytime soon, and, in my opinion, Chico hasn’t seen a young candidate in the years since who comes close to being able to provide that level of representation. Indeed, where are the young, smart progressives of today? And will any of them be on the ballot next November? It’s not too early to start campaigning.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R

Join the fun Re “Get a date!” (Cover feature, by Meredith J. Graham, Feb. 6): I’ve been a member of Dinner4Six for a little more than three years now. Although I haven’t met that special someone yet, I’ve been having great fun at the weekly mixers and house parties. Give it a try!

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Courts need overhauling Re “Illusions of superiority” (Letters, by Nathan Esplanade, Feb. 6): I empathize with Mr. Esplanade’s legal woes in dealing with corporate America. However, this is the USA, Inc. Our legal system is unequal and favors corporate interests. Justice David Dudley Field codified our laws in the late 1800s when the robber barons were at their zenith. As a result, the interests of corporations are more important than the rights of individuals in our courtrooms—it’s written into our legal system. (Incidentally, the Jamestown Colony was founded by a corporation, the London Company, whose shareholders demanded a profit even though 90 percent of the settlers had died off.) Nowadays, at a time when everyone is clamoring for equality in America, it seems a shame that the most unequal place in the USA is in our courtrooms. We have an obsolete, antiquated legal system that needs to be revamped and updated to place human rights first. In the meantime, we must be consoled by the words of Anatole France: “The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges.”

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Law aids the ‘little guy’ Re “Health-care law’s flaws” (Letters, by David L. Sanders, Feb. 6): My health-care plan was jacked up by Blue Cross from $250 to $550 per month the first month of Obamacare until my Medi-Cal kicked in, and now I pay $0. I can hear the Republicans saying, “I’ve worked hard all my life to ‘get ahead’ and now with one stroke of the ‘socialist’ pen all those ‘other people’ have caught up with me.” Mean people: Life is not a competition, and the only way to ‘get ahead’ in the ‘race’ of life is to develop compassion and gratitude for this gift of life before you die. I live a very rich life below the poverty line. ROLAND MCNUTT Chico

LETTERS continued on page 6 February 13, 2014

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Mismanagement here, too Re “Parents sour on plan for school” (Downstroke, Feb. 6): When the city of Chico brought in Brian Nakamura as city manager, I don’t think anyone expected him to uncover such a disorganized mess. People too often blame financial hardships on external and mysterious forces that are unavoidable. We are learning that it will take years to recover from the mismanagement that humans made. The employees themselves get most of the blame, but they are not alone. Previous City Councils have to take responsibility for ignoring the results. Now fast forward to the Chico Unified School District, which has nosedived for many years, not because of state budgets but by similar mismanagement. I wish that Brian Nakamura had a teaching credential and could do the same house-cleaning at the CUSD. Having graduated from our landmark Citrus Elementary School, I cringe at the thought of another major decision done by a team with a poor track record. I wish our school board would recognize that the woes of our school district will be corrected only with the same drastic steps that our City Council recently took. I urge the school board to seek help, possibly from our City Council that took courageous, painful and dramatic steps to save our city. LESLIE ELENA THOMPSON Chico

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Re “He likes GMOs” (Letters, by Chad Wozniak, Feb. 6): Mr. Wozniak: Please provide a list of the scientific studies that have been published in a scientific journal that prove the increased yields of any GMO crop. The Union of Concerned Scientists published a report (Failure to Yield) in 2009 that documents the fact that GMO crops yield less. Please document the reduction in pesticide use since the introduction of GMO crops. There are two scientific studies published by Dr. Charles Benbrook that document an increase in pesticide use in the U.S. since the introduction of GMO crops. Please convince all of the mothers that the health of their children does not improve when they remove all GMOs from their children’s diets. Golden Rice does have slightly higher vitamin A content than the original rice, but vitamin A cannot

be absorbed by the body without the presence of a specific type of fat that is not present in the Golden Rice. Mothers of children in the Philippines do not wish to see their children used as guinea pigs with this rice that is untested for safety. The process by which GMO crops are made in a laboratory would never happen in nature. HOWARD VLIEGER Maurice, Iowa

There are other victims Re “Out of sight, out of mind” (Cover feature, Jan. 23) and “Change of mind” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Jan. 23): There are many very compassionate people in this town who do not believe the downtown should be allowed to be a giant illegal campground. Maybe discouraging large gatherings for outdoor meals in the City Plaza and moving them to a less central location does not “mostly benefit a small interest group of wealthy property owners,” but is reasonable public policy. The truly homeless, as well as the people who choose to live on the streets, are not the only “victims” here. It is difficult for young families to feel comfortable using public facilities where potentially aggressive, unvaccinated dogs, random loud obscenities, and open drug use are often present. It is challenging for small businesses to thrive in an atmosphere that does not feel safe or clean. Those are the same small businesses whose taxes pay for much of the infrastructure of this beautiful place. I applaud Pastor Jim Culp for being willing to move his private ministry to another public property a few blocks away. Hopefully we can all work together to find some compassionate compromises that truly respect the rights of all the people who are impacted by this social issue. Civil discourse will be a good start. DAVE HOLLINGSWORTH Chico

Immigration flip-flopper During his run for Congress, Doug LaMalfa (R-Richvale) left no doubt where he stood on immigration: “America needs a clear and enforceable policy that promotes legal immigration and doesn’t reward illegal immigration. Amnesty is not an acceptable option. “The current policy does not work and America sends a mixed message …” Strangely enough, though, his

Congressional website at www.lamalfa.house.gov is totally silent on immigration. Not a word on immigration. Then comes an article by Tim Hearden in the Capital Press that explains what’s going on: “LaMalfa said he has been swayed by conversations with farmers—particularly in the nursery industry—who have suffered through labor shortages in recent years.” “Certainly we’ve had some very spirited conversations about how tough it is on them,” the freshman congressman said while appearing at a recent cattlemen’s dinner. “It’s been those conversations that have made me kind of pivot and say we’ve got to get something done.” Well, isn’t that special? All it took was dinner with agribusiness buddies to persuade Doug to compromise his strong pledge of no rewards, no amnesty, no mixed messages. So, congressman, what’s this “pivot” stuff all about? Conservative minds want to know. PETE STIGLICH Cottonwood

Pot talk Re “Say no to pot petition” (Letters, by Bonnie Masarik, Feb. 6): Readers should disregard any comments by a letter writer who is so misinformed that she thinks cannabis plants require 10 gallons a day of water. Cannabis does not require any more water than tomatoes or any other common plants, and if they are watered once a week, or less, they do just fine. DAVE LANE Santa Cruz

I’d like to add that the cannabis-legalization issue is not whether cannabis is completely safe for everybody, including children and adolescents. It is not. The issue is freedom of choice for adults. Children have died from eating peanuts and peanut butter, but we don’t cage peanut growers, sellers or consumers. And the voters in Colorado and Washington have decided that we should not cage cannabis growers, sellers or consumers. California adults have the freedom of choice of whether or not to consume legal alcohol. Shouldn’t California adults have to same freedom of choice that Colorado and Washington adults have? Those opposed to cannabis use would still have the freedom to not grow it, sell it or use it. KIRK MUSE Mesa, Ariz.

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TYME MAIDU TROUBLES

Meagan Meloy became interested in homeless issues after working with women who were victims of domestic violence.

On Feb. 5, the Butte County Grand Jury indicted 24 people connected with the May 16 takeover and 12-hour occupation of the Tyme Maidu tribal offices in Oroville to protest a disenrollment procedure aimed at a number of tribal members. According to a press release from the District Attorney’s Office, the occupation caused more than $20,000 in damages. District Attorney Mike Ramsey said using the grand jury was more efficient than holding 24 separate hearings. In a recent phone interview, Ramsey noted that there was a recent election to enroll members into the tribe and that absentee ballots were sent to a post office box at the Oroville post office. But over the weekend of Feb. 8 and 9, someone entered the post office and pried open the post office box that held the ballots and stole them. The Oroville Police Department is investigating, Ramsey said.

MEDI-POT RULES FINALIZED, MAYBE

In a unanimous vote, the Butte County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday (Feb. 11) approved an amendment to the county’s medicalmarijuana ordinance that reduces the allowable number of plants significantly. The panel has recently considered arguments from medi-pot advocates who call the new rules prohibitively restrictive, as well as those who support the amendments as a means of addressing environmental degradation caused by grading work, a perceived increase in criminal activity, and general nuisances such as the plant’s strong odor. The regulations are based on a marijuana garden’s square footage rather than number of plants and also include new guidelines for setback distances and the required number of doctor’s recommendations. Though the rules are set to go into effect 30 days after Tuesday’s vote, the political action group Butte County Citizens Against Irresponsible Government has already begun a petition drive, intending to bring the issue to voters on the November ballot.

BURGLED BIRD RETURNED

Last Saturday morning (Feb. 8), Chico Police officers responded to a call from Valley Oak Veterinary Center on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway regarding the previous night’s theft of an 18-year-old Amazon parrot by a white, goateed man wearing a long coat. The next day, CPD Officer Dane Gregory— who’d been assigned to investigate the case of the purloined parrot— was dispatched to the 2800 block of Fair Street for a problem with transients. He arrived to find 28-year-old Corey Luse with a parrot (not the one pictured). Luse also fit the description of the bird burglar. The parrot, valued at $2,000, was returned unharmed and Luse was booked into the Butte County Jail on burglary charges. 8 CN&R February 13, 2014

Life changer BCOE youth coordinator nominated for national award

Gchoose a career in social work for the glory. Though their daily actions may profoundly enerally speaking, people don’t

impact the lives of the individuals and communities they serve, recognition is story and rare, and the rewards more often photo by personal than public. Ken Smith “It’s more of a culmination of kens@ little things, like the look on a newsreview.com child’s face when they have a success, no matter how big or small,” said Meagan Meloy, of her job’s rewards. For the last decade, Meloy has served as coordinator for the Butte County Office of Education’s (BCOE) homeless and foster youth services (collectively known as the School Ties program). “They can be as simple as seeing a kid being so excited and proud to go to school with a new backpack, to going to graduation and GED ceremonies.” Meloy is now being recogSchool Ties nized in a big way, with a nomiconnection: nation for a national LifeChangGo to er of the Year Award. The award www.bcoe.org/ is presented annually to 10 K-12 divisions/sps/ educators and school district school_ties to learn more about employees by the National Life the BCOE’s Group, a consortium of finanSchool Ties cial-service companies that also program. operates a nationwide charitable

foundation. Winners will be announced this spring, with the grand prize carrying a $10,000 cash award ($5,000 for the winner, and $5,000 donated to winner’s school district). Though she acknowledged she’s “honored” by the nomination, the modest Meloy—who is one of four California school employees in the running— said she sees it more as recognizing the work of her whole team, as well as the government and community agencies with which they partner. She also said she’s more excited about the spotlight it puts on the program and the greater issues it addresses than she is about receiving a personal commendation. “I’m happy to see attention brought to the issue,” she said. “Any recognition that helps people realize that there are a lot of homeless and foster kids here in Butte County is good. This isn’t just an urban issue or something happening somewhere else. It’s happening here.” Meloy estimated that School

Ties provides about 500 foster and 500 homeless children in Butte County with services including enrollment assistance, transportation arrangement, school supplies, advocacy and case management. Meloy and her small staff, headquartered in a mobile unit at the edge of Chico’s “Tree Farm” (officially

known as the USDA Forest Service’s Genetic Resource and Conservation Center) oversee these operations for 14 separate school districts within the county. Meloy said about 125 of these youths are homeless in the commonly recognized sense—living on the streets without parent or guardian supervision. She explained that the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act expanded the definition of homeless, when applied to children, to include those in shared housing situations, which she said accounts for about half of the children School Ties serves. “That’s the group I consider the hidden homeless,” she explained. “There’s a lot of controversy and attention with homelessness issues like what’s evident in downtown Chico, but that’s just a little sliver of the picture. “There’s a whole segment of that population not hanging out downtown or causing problems,” she said, “but going to school and work and trying to make ends meet, and bouncing around between family and friends. Those families need a voice, too. “The instability of those situations can have just as much psychological and emotional impact as being on the street,” she continued. “In some ways, I think they have an even greater need, because there’s no structure and services in place for them.

“In a shelter, for example, there’s 24-hour staff on duty, there’s food every night, showers and supplies, heat and warmth, and the opportunity to get connected to health care and other services. Families outside of that system can be even more at risk.” Meloy said she’s seen a steady increase in homeless students every year. In 2004, BCOE identified about 100. Though she partly chalks up increased numbers to her program’s improved outreach and ability to identify these children, she said actual numbers have also risen, with the biggest spike in 2010. In recent years, Meloy said

School Ties has been invigorated by increased input from the youths it serves. This input has led to the latest goal of establishing a mentoring program, in which Butte College and Chico State students who’ve experienced homelessness and foster care firsthand will help junior high students in similar situations identify and accomplish their educational goals. A School Ties intern currently working to help establish this program, who asked not to be named, is a living example of the program’s benefits. She is a former foster child who became involved with advocacy after attending a California Youth Connection “Day at the Capitol” conference in Sacramento six years ago, and used School Ties services to help her graduate from high school and go to Butte College. Now she’s a Chico State student finishing her final semester before graduating with a degree in political science. She noted only 3 percent of foster children earn college degrees. “It gave me an opportunity to see there’s a way out for foster youth, a chance to have a better life,” the intern said of School Ties, adding that Meloy herself has been an inspiration. “[Meloy] definitely changed my life,” she said. Meloy’s co-workers also speak highly of her, praising her “infectious energy,” tireless work ethic and commitment to her cause. “We are so proud of Meagan for her recognition,” BCOE Superintendent Tim Taylor said via a press release. “She truly is a ‘life changer,’ and her commitment to help our foster and homeless youth succeed through education is truly inspirational. She reminds people what education is all about.” Readers can help Meloy win the award by commenting on her profile at www.lifechangeroftheyearnominees.com. The School Ties program produced a video called “When Students Are Homeless” that can be seen or purchased on the BCOE website (www.bcoe.org/ divisions/sps/school_ties). Ω

Coyote killings under review Annual Modoc County hunt’s days could be numbered contest was held in Modoc Awascoyote-killing County last weekend (Feb. 8 and 9). It the eighth year in a row for the Big Val-

ley Coyote Drive, sponsored by Adin Supply Co., and the number of coyotes killed—at least 40—was similar to that of prior years. As Chris Clarke wrote in his ReWild column for KCET, a public television station based out of Southern California, the event has proceeded with very little fanfare or publicity. It has gone underground, organized by a few local fliers and a presence on the Internet in hunters’ forums. For the second year in a row, the dead coyotes were dumped on private land, far from public view. The town seems to have circled the wagons regarding the affair, as the slogan on this year’s Coyote Drive 2014 T-shirt—given to every participant—had new sponsors and proudly proclaimed: “Our Outdoors. Our Freedoms.” The contest was a matter of statewide controversy one year ago, when several environmental organizations, including Project Coyote and the Center for Biological Diversity, gathered 20,000 signatures in a petition and lobbied the California Fish and Game Commission to stop the 2013 coyote hunt. Their efforts were unsuccessful. This year’s event didn’t go without incident: It was reported that Steve Gagnon, owner of the Adin Supply Co. store and primary sponsor of the hunt, pushed a 73-yearold man, Roger Hopping of Adin, to the ground for attempting to photograph hunters

gathered outside the store. The incident reportedly took place after a verbal confrontation. Hopping, who sustained a fractured lumbar vertebra in the altercation and is expected to fully recover, said that Gagnon was cited for assault and battery and released on his own recognizance at the scene. The case has been referred to the Modoc County District Attorney, who will decide whether to press formal charges against Gagnon. Opponents of the annual hunts will be especially curious to see what comes of the alleged assault, since Modoc County Sheriff Mike Poindexter appears on the Coyote Drive 2014 T-shirt as a sponsor. The hunt in the Adin area has

become high profile in recent years, but it’s among a number of similar coyote-killing contests that have become increasingly popular in California. Besides the Modoc County hunt, there are informal coyote-killing events arranged on the Internet via hunters’ forums. One such contest—organized on a Facebook page—is held monthly near Taft, in Kern County. This weekend, the first annual Coyote Derby will be held in the Fresno County community of Prather. Participants there will pay $25 for two-person teams, with the top three teams receiving unspecified cash prizes.

SIFT|ER Bleeding water With the current California drought, some areas of the state are going to have to crimp their hoses tighter than others. According to the California Department of Water Resources, the amount of water usage varies wildly across the state. In the Sacramento River region—where summers are long and hot—residents use 279 of gallons of water per day per person (286 in Chico; 335 in Oroville). Compare that to the central coast (147 gallons), or San Francisco’s mere 98 gallons. At least we’re not as bad as the desert resort community of Palm Springs and its whopping 736 gallons per person. Here’s how it breaks down by region (agricultural numbers—which account for 80 percent of state’s water usage—are not included):

Hydrological Gallons of water used region per day (per capita) Central Coast . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 San Francisco Bay . . . . . . . . .156 North Coast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160 South Coast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189 San Joaquin River . . . . . . . . .239 North Lahontan . . . . . . . . . . .253 South Lahontan . . . . . . . . . . .272 Tulare Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272 Sacramento River . . . . . . . . .279 Colorado River . . . . . . . . . . . .379

Source: San Jose Mercury News

The spoils from a previous coyote hunt in Modoc County. PHOTO COURTESY OF PROJECT COYOTE

The contests have not escaped the attention of the California Fish and Game Commission. On Feb. 5, the commission voted 4-0 to look into a statewide ban on wildlifekilling competitions. “I’ve been concerned about these killing contests for some time,” said commission President Michael Sutton, quoted in Clarke’s Feb. 5 ReWild column. “They seem inconsistent both with ethical standards of hunting and our current understanding of the important role predators play in ecosystems.” Indeed, as Capt. Rick Banko, a Department of Fish and Wildlife officer, noted in a CN&R story on the Modoc County hunt one year ago, hunting coyotes is actually counterproductive when it comes to culling the population. “In my opinion, coyotes are really not a problem up there,” Banko said, referring to Lassen and Modoc counties. “We get a few complaints about coyotes, but it is a sparsely populated region. Besides, the more coyotes are killed, the more they breed, so this event is not controlling the coyote population.” As a result of the Fish and Game Commission’s vote, a formal rule-making process will commence, and the issue will be placed on the commission’s April 16 meeting agenda in Ventura for a full public vetting before the commission votes on whether to permanently ban wildlife-killing contests statewide. After receiving public input, which is sure to include challenges by groups representing agriculture and hunting, a vote to actually ban wildlife-killing contests would more than likely be held by the Fish and Game Commission later this summer. Camilla Fox of Project Coyote gave her take on the matter in a recent phone interview. She said she sees banning coyotekilling contests as a good first step to reviewing the entire role predators play in California’s wild lands—especially coyotes. Fox points to yet another state apparatus, the Wildlife Resources Committee, which is looking at overall predator regulations. “We want to push the committee to take on bag and possession limits of nongame and furbearing predator species that currently have an open-ended, unlimited season,” she said. —ALLAN STELLAR

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 February 13, 2014

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Help for struggling families brought closer to home uesday, Feb. 11, was National Tattention 2-1-1 Day, and to bring local to this day and what it

means, a documentary film called American Winter was shown at the Pageant Theatre. The film documents the strug24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) gles of middle-class families in Open 7 days www.rapecrisis.org Portland, Ore., during the winter of 2011-12 as they fall behind in rent, DESIGNER REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE JEN_PU JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. &mortgage PREV. payments, and utility and medical bills. The film includes people accessing 2-1-1, an information and referral telephone service that has been national for the s a m e g r e at s e r v i c e past few years. A local version of the service— master cut + color Butte 2-1-1—was established in new clients welcome Butte County in October to help hair extensions connect those in need to local comstraightening munity resources and social servic& waxing es. Tara Sullivan-Hames, director of Butte 2-1-1, coordinated the effort with the help of the Greater Chico Homeless Task Force and h a i r s a l o n other agencies that provide social ly On Ne w Cli en ts assistance to Butte County families. 1194 e lassen, ste 110 | 530.893.8851 “The film has a connection to 2-1-1 because the filmmakers actually sat in at the 2-1-1 call center in coming soon Portland, Ore.,” Sullivan-Hames explained before the showing of the film. “They got to listen to 2-1-1 calls that are normally confidential. But they got permission from callers and families to follow them for the winter, and to be able to tell their stories as they were struggling to survive the recession. “That connection between 2-1-1 and families in need highElEctric loungE is Red, singlE girls arE Blue, lights the economic-hardship realities of American middle- and comE gEt your tan on, and snag a hot dude! lower-middle-class families struggling to make ends meet. We rec$25/month · unlimited tanning · no contract! ognized that is a reality for families in our county as well.” 995 nord avE stE 140 chico · 530.894.7090 · The HBO film, directed by Joe Gantz, profiles eight families going through rough times that range from water- and electric-service cutoffs to their homes for lack of payment, to facing eviction and foreclosure for falling behind in rent and mortgage. Medical bills, chronic unemployment and being forced to work jobs that pay minimum wage add up to troubled times for the families who are folEnjoy our Scrumtious Food Menu as you lowed closely by the filmmakers. American Winter also docuExperience an ever changing collection 13 of ments the families turning to Portartisan beers.

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land’s 2-1-1 services and gaining help to pay off bills, find shelter or get food stamps. In each case, the parents are unnerved and embarrassed that they’ve stumbled upon such hard times, letting down their children and, in some cases, their own parents. “The American dream has turned into the American nightmare,” one woman laments. Many of the social-service workers quoted in the film blame an American economy that, in their words, allows the rich to grow richer while the middle class descends into poverty. Noting the political thread of the film, Sullivan-Hames stressed after the showing that 2-1-1 policy is politically neutral. “No matter what national or state or local economic or public policies are in place, 2-1-1 is here to help people who need support get connected to the community resources that offer help and assistance,” she said. The service itself is “nonjudgmental of the entire situation,” Sullivan-Hames said. “If there is a person calling for help, and there is a program in the community that offers that help, 2-1-1 will try to make that connection.” She said the key to the success of the service is simply getting people to know it exists.

“We need to let people know that there is a starting point for getting help—a simple, easy-toremember number that they can call to get connected to community resources and support programs,” Sullivan-Hames said. “They can call 2-1-1 and we can help them navigate the possible resources. I think that gives a sense of hope when people are hurting—that there is someone who will answer their call 24/7 and try to explain options and point them toward available resources.” She said the Butte 2-1-1 database has more than 800 lowcost or no-cost programs available in Butte County, ranging from jobtraining programs to support groups and even low-cost recreation programs for families. “Many calls to Butte 2-1-1 are from people experiencing some type of hardship, similar to the families portrayed in the film,” Sullivan-Hames said. “The calls are for utility bill payment help, low-cost housing, food or legal assistance.” She said the callers are “prescreened” to determine whether they are eligible for a state nutrition-assistance program called CalFresh. “We can get them connected to the CalFresh application and enrollment process,” she said. “Having additional dollars to buy food each month can often be the safety net that allows families to make ends meet in an already stretched budget.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

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the North State is in the middle of a severe drought. But local farmers—those whose livelihoods are most directly threatened by the dry conditions—are very much aware that it’s going to take more than one storm for groundwater levels to rebound to normal. Christina Buck, a water resources scientist with Butte County’s Department of Water and Resource Conservation (DWRC), underscored that point during a county-hosted meeting concerning groundwater conditions at Durham Veterans Memorial Hall off the Midway on Monday (Feb. 10). “This last storm was pretty significant, but we need a whole lot more precipitation to make up for how dry it’s been,” she said in addressing dozens of concerned farmers from the Durham-Dayton area south of Chico. In fact, if California were to receive average rainfall between now and the end of winter, “it would still be the third-driest year on record,” said Vickie Newlin, assistant director of the DWRC, who also attended the meeting. Though the forum briefly touched on statewide drought issues (see “The big squeeze,” Cover feature, page 20), it mostly provided information specific to groundwater conditions in Durham-Dayton. The story is a familiar one throughout Butte County— of the eight wells in the area equipped with data loggers, two were at historic lows when they were recorded last fall, while groundwater levels in general have been in steady decline over the last 15 years or so. Know your well:

A number of free resources are available online for farmers and well owners alike, including www.wellowner.org, which includes a tool to locate water-well contractors; wwwcimis.water.ca.gov/cimis/data.jsp, which provides statewide data on irrigation for registered users; and www.wateright.org, which includes an irrigation-scheduling tool useful for managing low water supplies.

Paul Gosselin, director of Butte County’s Department of Water and Resource Conservation, emphasized during a recent meeting in Durham that local groundwater levels will eventually rebound. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

Newlin explained that the drought pattern could amount to “really dire economic and environmental problems.” As the water table is continually lowered, she said, it becomes more expensive for well owners to pump. Since there is no help forthcoming from the California State Water Project, which announced at the beginning of February that it will stop releasing water from its reservoirs—including Lake Oroville and Lake Shasta—many farmers will be forced to reduce their number of crops, while some will have “a choice of pumping groundwater or not farming at all,” Newlin said. As a result, many seasonal farmworkers likely will find themselves unemployed this summer.

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unavoidable, and the drought’s indefinite duration representing a reasonable cause for uncertainty and fear, DWRC Director Paul Gosselin stressed that it won’t last forever. “We’re not sure when [the drought] will end, but it will end,” he said. “We’re seeing that, historically, the water basin does recover, and we’re looking forward to that. We will come out of this.” So, what are local farmers and well owners to do in the meantime? While acknowledging that much is out of the community’s hands, Buck and Newlin made several suggestions, including coordinating with neighbors on when to pump in order to give groundwater sufficient time to replenish; receiving an annual well checkup from a licensed well driller; keeping a well log to keep track of groundwater levels; and reporting abnormal groundwater levels to the county. (Go to www.tinyurl.com/butte drought to make a report.) —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com February 13, 2014

CN&R 11

EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Oliver Allen (left), outreach coordinator for the Butte County Library, and Chico State social work intern David Overton flank the newest Little Library box in the Chapmantown neighborhood, in front of Subud Hall (574 E. 12th St.).

EPA: BRISTOL BAY MINING DESTRUCTIVE

Last month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released its long-awaited report on the potential impacts of large-scale gold and copper mining on the Bristol Bay watershed in western Alaska. Titled “An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska,” the report found that “[a] large-scale mining operation in Alaska’s Bristol Bay would destroy a significant portion of the watershed, a pristine fishery that supports nearly half the world’s sockeye salmon and dozens of Native villages that have relied on fishing for thousands of years,” according to The Washington Post. The EPA’s report—which is a blow to the Northern Dynasty Mining company’s aim to dig its massive and controversial Pebble Mine, for which it has not yet filed a permit—was compiled over three years’ time at the request of tribes in the area. Perhaps not surprisingly, Northern Dynasty and Republican supporters of the proposed mine described the report as “biased, premature and bad for business.”

Below: The Little Library box in front of Subud Hall is typical of similar small, free neighborhood libraries popping up around the United States and the world.

KEYSTONE XL GETS OFFICIAL NOD

A new report from the U.S. Department of State offers no major environmental objections to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the southern United States. The State Department’s analysis said that approval of the controversial pipeline project, which would be built by TransCanada Corp., “is unlikely to significantly impact the rate of extraction in the oil sands or the continued demand for heavy crude oil at refineries in the United States based on expected oil prices,” according to BBC News. Environmentalists have long objected to the pipeline, citing increased carbon emissions and the resultant increased contribution to global warming, as well as risk of oil spills along its route, which includes the Ogalalla Aquifer, a major source of fresh water for the Great Plains region. “Keystone XL would pipe some of the world’s dirtiest oil through the American breadbasket to be refined on the Gulf and shipped overseas,” said actor/environmentalist Robert Redford, in a Feb. 4 Reader Supported News piece he wrote.

CITRUS GROWERS SQUEEZED BY FREEZE

California’s citrus industry took a large financial hit as a result of December’s below-freezing temperatures. California Citrus Mutual (CCM), a citrus-producer trade association, released an estimate on Feb. 3 indicating that as a result of seven nights in a row of icy temperatures, the Golden State’s $2 billion citrus industry lost about $441 million, according to Action News Now. The citrus-crop damage was limited to the state’s Central Valley, according to CCM. Approximately $24 million worth of lemons, $150 million in mandarin oranges and $260 million worth of navel oranges were lost—or 30 percent of the navel-orange crop. Send your eco-friendly news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R February 13, 2014

Spreading democracy Chapmantown’s Little Libraries are part of larger movement to promote literacy and community in neighborhoods nationwide and beyond story and photos by

Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

O significant rainfall in quite some time—Friday, Feb. 7—another praisewor-

n the day that Chico got its first

thy event occurred: A bright-green Little Library box containing two shelves packed with a variety of books was installed in the Chapmantown neighborhood. Oliver Allen, Butte County Library outreach coordinator, and Chico State social work student (and Love Chapmantown Community Coalition intern) David Overton erected the cute, wooden box-on-a-pole in front of Subud Hall on East 12th Street—the second such Little Library box in the south Chico neighborhood; the two are the first ones in the larger project that Allen is shepherding. The guiding principle of the boxes is “take a book, return a book,” though Allen is quick to point out that “people are encouraged to take [a book] and not really worry about returning [one]. … We’re trying to get people to take [books], get involved with the material and

don’t worry about the ‘back end.’ … Share the information and the experience of the box!” Chapmantown’s first Little Library box—installed 2 1/2 months ago—is located just outside Has Beans Coffee & Tea Company at 1078 Humboldt Ave. And, Allen said, “a couple of individuals have them on their front lawns,” though those particular boxes are not part of Allen’s program—they are officially part of the national Little Free Library program (there are actually four official Little Free Library boxes altogether in Chico; go to map at www.littlefreelibrary.org to see locations). The Little Libraries that Allen is creating—which contain both fiction and nonfiction books—are modeled on the larger Little Free Library program (which has spread worldwide). That program was

Helping Little Libraries grow:

To volunteer books, money and/or time as a Little Library box “steward,” contact Butte County Library Outreach Coordinator Oliver Allen at 538-0840. Go to www.littlefree library.org to learn more about Little Free Libraries nationwide.

started in Wisconsin in 2009 by a man named Todd Bol, who erected a little, red, schoolhouse-style free-library box full of books in his front yard as a tribute to his mother, a former schoolteacher who loved books. Allen plans to register the local Little Library project with the bigger Little Free Library organization in the very near future, as soon as he raises the $39 fee to do so (his project, despite being under the umbrella of the Butte County Library, currently has no allocated budget). “What we’re trying to do is spread literacy, and build community and the sharing economy of people and resources,” he offered. The Love Chapmantown Community Coalition had originally conceived of the idea of the neighborhood library boxes, Allen said, and had built some boxes that were never installed. After he became the Butte County Library’s outreach coordinator six months ago, and after spending some vacation time in Portland, Ore.— where there are dozens of Little Free Libraries—Allen got the idea to start a similar program in Butte County. He menGREENWAYS continued on page 14

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tioned his idea to a co-worker, who told him about the boxes that the Love Chapmantown coalition had built together with the local Mormon Helping Hands group. Allen contacted Love Chapmantown, and the rest is history. In addition to using books from the Butte County Library to stock the Little Libraries, Allen received donated inventory from local downtown bookseller Lyon Books. The Little Library box out-

side of the Chapmantown Has Beans “has a pretty good turnover of books,” Allen said. “It’s created a point of interest in that area. The [volunteer] steward of that box said quite a few people are taking books. … And the owner of Has Beans is positive about it.” Allen is hoping to install four more Little Libraries in the near future—in Chapmantown at the end of Cleveland Street near Chapman Elementary School, at the Dorothy Johnson Center and at the Second Baptist Church on Ohio Street, as well as in tiny Rotary Park, in the Barber neighborhood in south Chico. His goal is to get 30 to 40 Little Library boxes up and running around Butte County over the next two years. “There’s a lady in Bangor right now who is working on getting a box,” he added. “I’m trying to bring a little more contact with and spreading of the word about our wonderful democratic institution, the library, you know,” Allen said of the project. “The library is one of the most democratic institutions in our

ECO EVENT

POW WOW IN WINTER Take a little road trip down to Marysville on Saturday, Feb. 15, to attend the Marysville Winter Pow Wow at the Allyn Scott Youth & Community Center (1830 B St.), which runs from noon until 6 p.m. All drummers and dancers are welcome, as is the general public. Sponsored by the American Indian Education Program of Marysville, this free event that includes a dance contest and craft/food vendors is a nosmoking, no-alcohol, no-drugs affair. Call 749-6196 for more info.

country; it provides equal access for all. … It’s more of an apolitical institution that allows people to explore the various debates of society. There is information on all sides, access to information that you choose. And with these little boxes, who knows what you will get?” Allen is clearly enamored of the potential for education, discussion and just plain pleasure that the Little Libraries can provide with their rotating inventory of books in both English and Spanish. He is convinced that reading—and access to books—is a good and necessary thing. As he put it, “Every book has a person, every person has a book.” Ω

UNCOMMON SENSE Conserve water in the kitchen We’ve talked about conserving outside water use—here’s how to cut back in the kitchen: Fill the dishwasher before using and choose the fastest setting. If don’t have a dishwasher (good for you!) and have to wash by hand, soak the dishes first to soften food residue, then scrub with a brush or sponge and use running water only for a final rinse. Use small amounts of dish soap because it takes more water to rinse it off. Put a sprayer on the faucet as it will distribute less water to a larger area.

14 CN&R February 13, 2014

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GROWING, COOKING AND EATING GOOD FOOD Grow, Cook, Eat is the

name of the new cookbook that chef (and cooking/gardening teacher) Richie Hirshen has written and published with his students at Sherwood Montessori public K-8 charter school. It follows Smart Garden, the cookbook that Hirshen and Sherwood students produced in 2011. Hirshen recently came down to the CN&R office to show me a digital version of the cookbook. He was clearly, as he put it, “proud as a papa” to show me, page by page, the end result of his and his students’ love and hard work. The Chef Richie Hirshen pores over the digital book is filled with photos of version of Sherwood Montessori’s new and quotes by students and, of cookbook, Grow, Cook, Eat. course, an assemblage of PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA yummy, healthy recipes. Hirshen’s main goal for Grow, Cook, Eat, he said, is to get local educators to start (or expand, as the case may be) their own garden-kitchen programs as an essential part of providing students with “a sustainable education.” A book-signing event for Grow, Cook, Eat will be held in Chico State’s Bell Memorial Union auditorium on Thursday, March 6, at 10 a.m., following Hirshen’s 9 a.m. presentation about his work at Sherwood Montessori during the university’s This Way to Sustainability Conference IX. Due for release next week, the book is also available by The front cover of Grow, Cook, Eat. contacting Hirshen at 828-8890 or IMAGE COURTESY OF RICHIE HIRSHEN chefrichie@msn.com. Cost: $10 (tax-deductible).

HOP FOR HEALTH Reid Seibold, Chico Certified Farmers’ Market vendor and

board member, sent me a press release detailing a new partnership between the farmers’ market and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. The two entities have teamed up to offer the Sierra Nevada Healthy Opportunities Program (HOP), which will provide quarterly vouchers—“HOPtimal Weight Incentive” rewards—to brewery employees for use at any of the CCFM’s five Butte County farmers’ markets. HOP is “aimed at providing employees an incentive for reaching, maintaining or working toward a healthy weight,” as the press release said. Brewery employees will “be able to buy the fresh fruits, vegetables, nuts, meats, eggs, cheeses and other products available at the Saturday morning farmers’ market at Second and Wall streets in downtown Chico.” Additionally, the release noted, the CCFM’s other four markets will be open during the months of May through November for similar purchases: on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Paradise, Wednesdays in Chico, and Saturdays in Oroville. Go to www.chicofarmersmarket.com for more info about the CCFM.

FAREWELL, ORIGIN! Chico Chai brewmistress and Origin Tribal Bellydance belly dancer Sarah Adams reminded me that the Origin troupe is breaking up after 10 years and will offer a finale show—titled “It’s Not You, It’s Me”— tonight, Feb. 13, at 8 p.m., at Duffy’s Tavern (337 Main St.). Sarah promises it will be “one last epic performance!” I believe her. EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

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HEALTHLINES

THE HIGH COST OF CHEMICALS

Chronic diseases caused by exposure to widely used synthetic chemicals like bisphenol A (BPA) are dramatically driving up health-care spending in the U.S., a study finds. Newly published research from NYU Langone Medical Center estimated that each year, the use of BPA in food and beverage containers alone is responsible for $3 billion in health-care costs associated with childhood obesity and adult heart disease, according to The Huffington Post. Leonardo Trasande, the study’s author, said “[o]ne could argue [the estimate] is absurdly conservative,” because his research did not account for the costs of prostate and breast cancers, asthma, migraine headaches, reproductive disorders and behavioral problems—all of which have been linked to BPA exposure. While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has banned the use of BPA in children’s sippy cups and baby bottles, it remains in many products, including the inside lining of food cans.

The flu demystified Local health experts discuss both sides of flu vaccine controversy

CVS KICKS TOBACCO

CVS Caremark, a drugstore chain with more than 7,600 retail locations, plans to stop selling all tobacco products by Oct. 1, a decision that will cost the company about $2 billion in annual sales. Second only to Walgreen Co. in number of retail locations, CVS will become the first national pharmacy company to cease tobacco sales, according to the Los Angeles Times. Larry J. Merlo, the chain’s president and chief executive officer, explained that since CVS has been increasingly providing medical care via its pharmacists and opening urgent-care clinics at its retail locations, “the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose.” But don’t expect Walgreen Co. to follow suit. In 2009, the company unsuccessfully went to court to stop San Francisco from imposing a ban on tobacco sales in pharmacies.

BIONIC PROSTHETICS ON HORIZON?

An international research team built a bionic hand that allowed a Danish amputee to feel lifelike sensations. “It is the first time an amputee has had realtime touch sensation from a prosthetic device,” said Silvestro Micera, one of the researchers on a team that included robotics experts from Germany, Italy and Switzerland, according to BBC News. The team added sensors to the artificial hand that could detect and measure information about touch, using computer algorithms to transform the electrical signals into impulses that sensory nerves can interpret. The hand was given to 36-year-old Dennis Aabo (pictured), who lost his hand in a fireworks accident almost a decade ago. Aabo spent a month doing laboratory tests, reporting that he could tell the shape and consistency of objects he picked up, even when blindfolded. However, scientists believe a commercially available sensory-feedback bionic hand is still more than a decade away. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R February 13, 2014

by

Evan Tuchinsky

Ithe flu is going around, but its virulence may be a surprise. The California Departt’s hardly breaking news that

ment of Public Health reported that as of Feb. 7, more than 200 Californians under age 65 have died from influenza this flu season, compared to 106 for the entire 2012-13 flu season. That figure likely will increase with new diagnoses as well as CDPH investigations into 44 other deaths that may be flu-related. “It’s been a bad year,” said Dr. Mark Lundberg of Butte County Public Health, “with more than the expected number of deaths—and those deaths, and complications, have occurred disproportionately more severely in young people. Most times younger people can tolerate it, but there have been complications and death [among] people you wouldn’t have expected.” Like many public-health officials, Lundberg encourages vaccination against influenza, such as the flu shot or flu mist. “There are still at least two months left in the flu season, and if you haven’t had the flu yet, it still could be a good idea,” he said. Both Lundberg and Susie Benson, a nurse and infection preventionist at Enloe Medical Center, recommend flu shots for anyone older than 6 months old. But not everyone agrees. “I do not get vaccines myself or recommend them,” wrote Deborah Penner, chiropractor and nutritional consultant at Chico Creek Wellness Center, in an email. “Evidence shows that there are more incidences of sickness and death in the vaccinated

population than the unvaccinated population where the flu shot is concerned. Even a nonmicrobiologist can easily deduce the idiocy of creating a vaccine that takes many months to develop for a virus that is mutating at lightning speed. “It is dumbfounding to learn the history of vaccines, and sickening to realize the financial forces involved,” she continued. “There is a large and growing body of evidence that vaccines are at the very least contributory to neurological development disorders (ADD, autism, bipolar) as well as autoimmune disease, asthma, allergies, cancer, diabetes and gastrointestinal disease, which are occurring at a frighteningly increasing rate, especially in the [U.S.].” Penner referred to the work of fellow Northern California chiropractor Tim O’Shea, specifically his book Vaccination is not Immunization, which she said “should be in every household, in my opinion. As he says, the decision to vaccinate, or not, is quite possibly the most important decision you will ever make for your child.”

Lundberg understands “reasonable people having reasonable fears”—he hears concerns from patients and parents—but remains steadfast in his recommendation. “Vaccines are probably one of the greatest medical advancements,” he said. “It’s certainly not to say that there is not a complication with any therapy; with any medical treatment that’s of benefit, there can be a complication rate. … So I think public-health officials and medical professionals all have to be diligent to weigh the risk [versus] benefit analysis. “I believe that vaccines—the ones we have now, the ones that are recommended—always come down on the side of benefit.” Regarding the flu vaccine specifi-

cally, Lundberg and Benson field a common set of concerns: • “I got the flu from the flu shot.” Since the flu shot contains dead virus, HEALTHLINES continued on page 19

APPOINTMENT WALKING FOR HEALTH Enloe Medical Center is hosting a series of hour-long “Walk with a Doc” events beginning on Saturday, Feb. 22, at 8 a.m. Dr. Walter Kusumoto, a local cardiologist and electrophysiologist, leads the series off with a health-inspiring message and all-ages walk starting at Chico Mall (1950 E. 20th St.). Enter the mall on the Springfield Drive side and look for the “Walk with a Doc” sign.

This Way to Sustainability Conference IX Growing Toward a Sustainable Future March 6-8, 2014. Join us for over 80 presentations and workshops from sustainability professionals throughout California and beyond during three full conference days. Please visit www.csuchico.edu/sustainablefuture/conference for full conference pricing, schedule of events and to register. Hosted by the Institute for Sustainable Development and the Associated Students at Chico State.

(530) 898-3333 | twts@csuchico.edu TopICS InClude: Sustainable Food & Agriculture, Energy, Water & Climate Issues, Sustainability in Education, Business and Economic Strategies, Sustainable Lifestyle Goals, Emerging Ideas

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February 13, 2014

CN&R 17

Are you Living with Neuropathy Pain? “My name is Pat Bell and I am a 12 year cancer survivor. Most people think the road to good health is easy and runs in a straight line, however, that is not always the case. About 6 months ago I developed burning and tingling in my feet. The pain was so severe that I couldn’t wear shoes. My biggest fear was not being able to walk my daughter down the aisle at her wedding. The doctors called it Neuropathy. I was in quite a depression when I met Dr. Kremer. My road to health took a turn, but this time for the better. Dr. Kremer’s program showed me how to care for my body. He took the time to explain what was going on and how to fix it. I am now doing GREAT with my treatment and I can wear my cowboy boots again. Dr Kremer taught me how to think differently about my health and life. I am extremely happy with Dr. Kremer and his staff’s professionalism and their genuine concern for my health. I highly recommend them to everyone.”

– Pat Bell, Chico, CA

Hi, I’m Dr. Ryan Kremer and every day I see patients in my office who have suffered years from Neuropathy pain and are finally getting relief! I will explain to you why you are having this problem in the first place and what you can do to reverse this degenerative nerve disease and eliminate your numbness, tingling and pain, and get your life back!

Here’s what you do… CALL 530-513-6546 TODAY & SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION 18 CN&R February 13, 2014

HEALTHLINES continued from page 16

Flu shot versus flu mist:

and the flu mist has what Lundberg referred to as “attenuated live virus” (a virus that’s been weakened), the vaccine does not deliver the illness; rather, it stimulates the immune system to create antibodies. The process of building resistance can take two weeks, so a person exposed to the flu before then can come down with the disease. Often, though, the illness a person develops is not actually the flu. “There are a lot of respiratory viruses circulating,” Benson said, which can have symptoms similar to influenza. In addition, what people call “the stomach flu” is not actually flu because influenza viruses cause respiratory—not gastrointestinal—sickness. • “The flu vaccine doesn’t work.” No vaccine—or any medical treatment, for that matter—is effective 100 percent of the time for 100 percent of people. “But, even if [flu vaccine is] effective only at 60 percent, and even if it doesn’t prevent the flu for certain populations, it actually can prevent a person getting a severe complication or death,” Benson said. Flu viruses do mutate, and each year’s vaccine includes only strains that immunologists predict will be widespread for the particular flu season. So far this winter, Lundberg said, all the positive flu tests analyzed by the state have been for anticipated strains. • “I’m allergic to eggs, so I can’t get the flu shot.” That was true in the past, Ben-

The vaccine that’s injected differs from the vaccine that’s inhaled nasally. The flu shot consists of dead virus; flu mist has live virus that’s been weakened. The shot and mist are not wholly interchangeable: The shot is recommended for people over 6 months old, the mist for people ages 2 to 49—and certain health conditions (such as autoimmune diseases) may preclude one or the other, if not both.

son said, but now the risk of reaction is seen as “so minute that unless you have a true egg allergy where you have an anaphylaxis reaction, it’s not a contraindication for the flu shot.” She added that a vaccine grown in a nonegg medium called Flublok hit the market this year. • “If everyone else is getting vaccinated, perhaps I can sneak through.” The concept of “herd immunity” suggests that people who get flu shots and don’t get the flu protect those who don’t get vaccinated because the illness won’t spread. That, of course, is a numbers game. “The more we can get people vaccinated,” Benson said, “the more we protect the age-6-months-or-less child who can’t get vaccinated.” Beyond a sense of social responsibility, there’s also a selfcentered reason for considering a flu shot. “The flu will mess your life up,” Lundberg said. “I think people should view [the vaccine] as an insurance policy, that your life will not be impacted by this illness that can stick you in bed for any number of days.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE A runny nose is common during winter months, but it doesn’t necessarily indicate the presence of a cold. It could be allergies. Those who suffer from spring and summertime allergies often have them in the wintertime, too. That’s especially true for those allergic to mold, mildew and pet dander, since those indoor allergens are trapped in areas that don’t get fresh flowing air this time of year. Here are certain symptoms to help distinguish between a cold and allergies:

Source: WebMD.com

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February 13, 2014

CN&R 19

THE BIG SQUEEZE

Water officials say Lake Oroville is at 38 percent of capacity.

Jim Brobeck, a water-policy analyst with AquAlliance, says the selling of surface water and subsequent groundwater pumping by farmers is a threat to the Tuscan Aquifer.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

BY ALASTAIR BLAND

Above: The receding of the lake has revealed all sorts of junky treasures, including this old car entangled with fallen tree branches.

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

North State water supplies feel the pressure as drought parches farmland to the south

20 CN&R February 13, 2014

A

thousand feet beneath the city of Chico, in the pitch-black waters of the Tuscan Aquifer, time has proceeded for ages without sound or sunlight, mostly unaffected by the world above. But in recent years, an increasing tug of upward force has been moving the Tuscan Aquifer’s water toward the surface of the Earth—drawn, ultimately, by the thirst of fruit trees and vegetable fields hundreds of miles away. And in 2014, there simply is not enough water to go around. The driest year in California’s history ended just six weeks ago, and a second dry winter is underway. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency on Jan. 17, and state and federal water agencies have warned farmers and cities that there will be virtually no allocations this year unless a great deal of rain should soon fall. Recent weekend storms did little to dent the huge water deficit. Shasta Lake and Lake Oroville are up to 37 percent and 38 percent of capacity, respectively, whereas both were at 36 percent the week before. Folsom Lake is at just 26 percent. In the San Joaquin Valley, San Luis Reservoir—a major agricultural supplier filled with Delta water—is just 30 percent full, and streams and rivers that usually become wintertime torrents of mud-brown water have dwindled into quietly trickling brooks. Sierra Nevada snowpack—usually relied upon for late-summer water—is a fraction of its normal amount. As of last week, Black Butte

Lake had entirely dried up. To meet the needs of the parched state, water managers are increasingly relying upon the groundwater reserves of the Tuscan Aquifer, a trend that critics say is already proving unsustainable. The aquifer’s volume has apparently been diminishing through the years as farmers are forced to drill deeper and deeper to tap the reservoir, according to Christina Buck, water-resources scientist with the Butte County Department of Water and Resource Conservation. This not only threatens Chico’s municipal water supply but also could eventually cause measurable shrinkage of surface rivers and lakes. “Officials know that we could be looking at longer droughts in the future, and they’re looking for another source of water as a life-extender,” said Jim Brobeck, water-policy analyst with Chicobased AquAlliance. “So they want to integrate our groundwater into the state water supply.” Brobeck says the chief threat to the region’s

underground water stores is an increasingly common practice called groundwater substitutions, or transfers, whereby landowners sell their own surface water to others in need— often making a healthy profit—and replace it with well water from the public supply. This wasn’t a problem years ago, when there was less demand for the state’s water. During the previous worst-ever drought in California’s history in the late 1970s, only 22 million people lived in the state. Today, almost 40 million people populate California, and more farmland than ever before is under intensive cultivation. Salmon and steelhead numbers are dropping as their spawning streams are increasingly diverted for human use. The governor now wants to build a pair of giant tunnels that could divert most of the already heavily used Sacramento River to the San Joaquin Valley—a project that critics argue will not solve the state’s water shortage. Forecasters expect a dry winter. Should March, April and May come and go with little to no rain, the likelihood that any will fall before September is virtually zero. With growers in the Sacramento and the San Joaquin valleys already banking on reduced production, and salmon unable to spawn under current conditions, no one knows how California and its environment will cope should a second year pass with almost no rain.

Several miles south of Chico, straddling the line

between Butte and Glenn counties, is the large property owned by John Thompson. The rice grower works 1,400 acres on land that his grandfather worked in the 1940s. Thompson produces several varieties of rice, mostly for table use but also for an Oregon sake brewery. His water comes from the Feather River and is provided on a contractual basis by the state’s Department of Water Resources. This year, though, there may be very little—even none—available. “We still have a chance for some rain in

“The emergency is not the fact that we’re having a drought. The emergency is the fact that people are planting thousands of acres of permanent crops in areas with an unreliable water supply.” –Jim Brobeck, AquAlliance

February and March, but it’s looking almost certain that our production will be cut by 50 percent,” Thompson said. If the state allots him no water at all from the Feather River, he will still have his wells—though Thompson estimated that he could keep only 300 to 400 acres of his land in production using groundwater. He noted that even the drought of 37 years ago did not reduce Lake Oroville as much as the current conditions have. “We’re really in uncharted waters here,” he said. “In ’77, we had more water in the lake and less people in the state.” While the Sacramento Valley’s farmers will feel the strain caused by the drought, the severe absence of rainfall will devastate few agricultural areas as severely as it will the Westlands

Water District, on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley. The region receives just six or seven inches of rainfall in an average year and relies almost entirely on water from the Sacramento Valley, transported south from the Delta via two canals. This year, hundreds of thousands of acres of Westland’s farmland will almost certainly receive no water at all. “We’re bracing our farmers for possibly no allocation this year,” said Jason Peltier, Westlands’ deputy general manager. “If that happens, farmers will let their fields go dry and use what water they get to keep their orchards alive.” Peltier said his region’s 600 farmers may need to fallow as much as a third of their land “WATER” continued on page 22 February 13, 2014

CN&R 21

THE BIG SQUEEZE

Water officials say Lake Oroville is at 38 percent of capacity.

Jim Brobeck, a water-policy analyst with AquAlliance, says the selling of surface water and subsequent groundwater pumping by farmers is a threat to the Tuscan Aquifer.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

BY ALASTAIR BLAND

Above: The receding of the lake has revealed all sorts of junky treasures, including this old car entangled with fallen tree branches.

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

North State water supplies feel the pressure as drought parches farmland to the south

20 CN&R February 13, 2014

A

thousand feet beneath the city of Chico, in the pitch-black waters of the Tuscan Aquifer, time has proceeded for ages without sound or sunlight, mostly unaffected by the world above. But in recent years, an increasing tug of upward force has been moving the Tuscan Aquifer’s water toward the surface of the Earth—drawn, ultimately, by the thirst of fruit trees and vegetable fields hundreds of miles away. And in 2014, there simply is not enough water to go around. The driest year in California’s history ended just six weeks ago, and a second dry winter is underway. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency on Jan. 17, and state and federal water agencies have warned farmers and cities that there will be virtually no allocations this year unless a great deal of rain should soon fall. Recent weekend storms did little to dent the huge water deficit. Shasta Lake and Lake Oroville are up to 37 percent and 38 percent of capacity, respectively, whereas both were at 36 percent the week before. Folsom Lake is at just 26 percent. In the San Joaquin Valley, San Luis Reservoir—a major agricultural supplier filled with Delta water—is just 30 percent full, and streams and rivers that usually become wintertime torrents of mud-brown water have dwindled into quietly trickling brooks. Sierra Nevada snowpack—usually relied upon for late-summer water—is a fraction of its normal amount. As of last week, Black Butte

Lake had entirely dried up. To meet the needs of the parched state, water managers are increasingly relying upon the groundwater reserves of the Tuscan Aquifer, a trend that critics say is already proving unsustainable. The aquifer’s volume has apparently been diminishing through the years as farmers are forced to drill deeper and deeper to tap the reservoir, according to Christina Buck, water-resources scientist with the Butte County Department of Water and Resource Conservation. This not only threatens Chico’s municipal water supply but also could eventually cause measurable shrinkage of surface rivers and lakes. “Officials know that we could be looking at longer droughts in the future, and they’re looking for another source of water as a life-extender,” said Jim Brobeck, water-policy analyst with Chicobased AquAlliance. “So they want to integrate our groundwater into the state water supply.” Brobeck says the chief threat to the region’s

underground water stores is an increasingly common practice called groundwater substitutions, or transfers, whereby landowners sell their own surface water to others in need— often making a healthy profit—and replace it with well water from the public supply. This wasn’t a problem years ago, when there was less demand for the state’s water. During the previous worst-ever drought in California’s history in the late 1970s, only 22 million people lived in the state. Today, almost 40 million people populate California, and more farmland than ever before is under intensive cultivation. Salmon and steelhead numbers are dropping as their spawning streams are increasingly diverted for human use. The governor now wants to build a pair of giant tunnels that could divert most of the already heavily used Sacramento River to the San Joaquin Valley—a project that critics argue will not solve the state’s water shortage. Forecasters expect a dry winter. Should March, April and May come and go with little to no rain, the likelihood that any will fall before September is virtually zero. With growers in the Sacramento and the San Joaquin valleys already banking on reduced production, and salmon unable to spawn under current conditions, no one knows how California and its environment will cope should a second year pass with almost no rain.

Several miles south of Chico, straddling the line

between Butte and Glenn counties, is the large property owned by John Thompson. The rice grower works 1,400 acres on land that his grandfather worked in the 1940s. Thompson produces several varieties of rice, mostly for table use but also for an Oregon sake brewery. His water comes from the Feather River and is provided on a contractual basis by the state’s Department of Water Resources. This year, though, there may be very little—even none—available. “We still have a chance for some rain in

“The emergency is not the fact that we’re having a drought. The emergency is the fact that people are planting thousands of acres of permanent crops in areas with an unreliable water supply.” –Jim Brobeck, AquAlliance

February and March, but it’s looking almost certain that our production will be cut by 50 percent,” Thompson said. If the state allots him no water at all from the Feather River, he will still have his wells—though Thompson estimated that he could keep only 300 to 400 acres of his land in production using groundwater. He noted that even the drought of 37 years ago did not reduce Lake Oroville as much as the current conditions have. “We’re really in uncharted waters here,” he said. “In ’77, we had more water in the lake and less people in the state.” While the Sacramento Valley’s farmers will feel the strain caused by the drought, the severe absence of rainfall will devastate few agricultural areas as severely as it will the Westlands

Water District, on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley. The region receives just six or seven inches of rainfall in an average year and relies almost entirely on water from the Sacramento Valley, transported south from the Delta via two canals. This year, hundreds of thousands of acres of Westland’s farmland will almost certainly receive no water at all. “We’re bracing our farmers for possibly no allocation this year,” said Jason Peltier, Westlands’ deputy general manager. “If that happens, farmers will let their fields go dry and use what water they get to keep their orchards alive.” Peltier said his region’s 600 farmers may need to fallow as much as a third of their land “WATER” continued on page 22 February 13, 2014

CN&R 21

“WATER” continued from page 21

this summer—roughly 200,000 acres left to bake in the sun. But many water-policy analysts say that Westlands’ farmers are largely to blame for any droughtrelated grievances they may suffer. The region is a relatively young farming district whose contract with the federal government stipulates that other farming areas as well as environmental needs must come first in dry years. Chinook salmon, for example, must have enough water to spawn in and enough flowing downstream to the sea to carry juveniles safely past the two major pumps that serve the San Joaquin Valley. Nonetheless, farmers in Westlands have been shifting en masse from annual field crops to fruit trees—especially almond orchards. Critics say this is a bad strategy in arid regions. “Those trees need water every year,” said Mike Hudson, a water activist and commercial salmon fisherman in Oakland. “You can’t fallow them during drought. This is creating a constant demand for water in a state without a constant supply of water. It takes away all flexibility in management.” In years when vegetable farmers may have once simply fallowed their fields due to shortages in the state and federal supplies, nut and tree-fruit farmers now pay large amounts of money to irrigation districts in the Sacramento Valley for deliveries of water. This trend, critics like Brobeck say, is driving the rise in groundwater substitutions. Not only is this process denting the Chico region’s supply, it may also be driving a decline in salmon populations.

That’s because transferring water from north to south requires using two giant pumps in the Delta that can actually reverse the seaward flow of the river system. This causes young fish migrating toward the sea to swim toward the pumps instead. Millions of baby salmon have died through the years in this way. If more water continues to be removed for the benefit of farmers, some fish species likely will go extinct, critics say. In 2013, the Yuba County Water Agency sold away 72,000 acre-feet of groundwater and replaced it with well water, according to a report last year from the Bureau of Reclamation. The same document predicted that other districts along the Sacramento River would make more than 37,000 acre-feet of groundwater transfers, including 5,000 from the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, in the same year.

Local groups, including AquAlliance and

the Butte Environmental Council, believe these groundwater transfers have the potential to create a water deficit in what is currently one of the last water-secure regions in the state. And the transfers could be ramped up in coming years. In 2010, the Bureau of Reclamation and the state’s San Luis & DeltaMendota Water Authority submitted a proposal to make up to 600,000 acre-feet of annual groundwater transfers from Northern California to users south of the Delta. The proposal, which intends to supplement the federal water-delivery system with a new water source, requires an environmental impact report before it can be initiated—a man-

“[I]f we don’t get rain this winter, and if next fall is dry, too, we’re going to see people leaving the state.” — Jerry Cadagan

date of the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA. However, the government has bypassed this potentially costly step by edging through a legal loophole, according to critics. “They’re calling it a one-year water transfer, instead of a longterm project, and that allows them to skip the CEQA guidelines,” explained Robyn DiFalco, executive director of the Butte Environmental Council. “Now, we’re seeing multiple one-year transfers, year after year, without environmental review.” Brobeck at AquAlliance confirms the same—that the federal and state applicants are skirting environmental laws and essentially stealing Northern California’s water. “They just keep delaying the environmental review, which allows them to operate on a yearby-year basis,” Brobeck said. On Feb. 3, the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District announced it would be activating five wells this winter to draw up groundwater from the Tuscan Aquifer and trans-

fer it to orchards in Glenn and Colusa counties. The measure is an emergency action never taken before, since these trees normally would receive surface water from the Sacramento River. Thaddeus Bettner, general manager of the irrigation district, says roughly 10,000 acres of almond and walnut trees have woken from winter dormancy several weeks early and are now budding. Without water on their roots, the trees could suffer damage—not only for this year but for successive seasons, as well. “We’re faced this season with a situation that we’ve never seen before,” Bettner said. “We’ve had to decide whether we allow damage to occur to the season’s yield and maybe the trees themselves, or use groundwater and try and protect the trees and the area’s economy.” Bettner guesses his district will use about 3,000 acre-feet of groundwater on the area’s orchards this winter—a fraction, he points out, of the 700,000 acre-feet of water used in the region per year. But this one-time emergency strategy could become a long-term one. Bettner said the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District will soon begin the CEQA environmental review process with the aim of making these transfers any time allocations of river water are reduced. Brobeck said the area’s canal system was initially built to alleviate pressure on groundwater reserves. “So, using them to distribute groundwater represents a huge shift,” he said. About 10 percent of California’s land surface area is cropland, most of it irrigated—and there are critics who believe the state’s agriculture industry has exceeded its sustainable level. “Agriculture needs to be using half the water it is now,” said David Zetland, a water-law blogger and author of the forthcoming book Living with Water Scarcity. Zetland calls the San Joaquin Valley “the No. 1 hotspot of unsustainable agriculture” and believes one way to curb farm growth and sustainably manage the industry would be to prohibit agricultural districts from importing water from other drainages. He said the perception that Northern California has a surplus of water is false. The governor’s drought emergency brought Californians quickly Frank Gehrke, chief of snow surveys for the California Department of Water Resources, measures the snowpack near Echo Summit on Jan. 3, finding levels at one-fifth of what is typical for early January. PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

22 CN&R February 13, 2014

to attention in January, spurring action, including issuing rationing measures or enforcing those already in place, among urban and rural water districts. But Brobeck at AquAlliance isn’t convinced, and he even takes issue with the notion that there is an emergency. We know, Brobeck says, that California is a dry region. We know that droughts occur here. Farmers who settled land that receives only six inches of rain per year took a gamble—and he feels they are now dragging down the rest of the state. “The emergency is not the fact that we’re having a drought,” he said. “The emergency is the fact that people are planting thousands of acres of permanent crops in areas with an unreliable water supply.”

West Coast salmon numbers have

declined all the way north to Alaska, but only in California are their troubles so directly related to water shortages. In the Central Valley, federal laws protect salmon by guaranteeing that enough water will always be left in the Delta to support their populations. However, these laws are failing, and even in nondrought years, salmon seem to come up short when farming districts want the same water. The Central Valley chinook runs have declined through the years, while agriculture acreage has steadily grown. Already, the current drought has heavily impacted Central Valley fish populations. In November, the Bureau of Reclamation began reducing the outflow from Shasta Dam as an emergency effort to conserve water in Lake Shasta. But the drastic measure left thousands of nests—or redds—full of fertilized chinook salmon eggs high and dry. Biologists believe that as much as 40 percent of the fall-run chinook spawn was lost. A similar loss of more than 10 percent of chinook salmon redds occurred in the American River after officials reduced the outflow from Folsom Lake in January. Even in times of drought, endangered fish species are supposed to be protected by the Endangered Species Act. Additionally, a 1992 law called the Central Valley Project Improvement Act requires that a minimum of 800,000 acre-feet of water be reserved every year for the benefit of fish and wildlife. The intent of that law was to protect chinook salmon and, in fact, double their population. But the law has so far failed. Zeke Grader, executive director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations, explained that the Bureau of Reclamation reg-

Chico farmer and winemaker Berton Bertagna is worried about water allocations for his 600 acres of orchards. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

ularly “games the system” by releasing water from Folsom or Shasta lakes and officially logging the releases as part of the required 800,000 acre feet intended to support wildlife and migrating fish. This meets the obligations of the 1992 Improvement Act. “But then, when the water reaches the Delta, they pump it south,” Grader said. “They’re double accounting with the water.” The drought has stoked up the debate surrounding the Bay Delta Conservation Plan, the state’s proposed water conveyance project that would divert much of the Sacramento River via two giant tunnels into the San Joaquin Valley. Peltier, of Westlands, like many in the agriculture industry, supports the plan. He thinks the proposed 35-mile-long twin tunnels would increase reliability for farmers by allowing sufficient transfer of water, even in dry years, without compromising the health of the Delta. The existing water pumps near Stockton, operating at full force, can reverse the seaward flow of the Sacramento River, confusing migrating fish and disrupting their natural life cycles. But opponents of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan, including salmon fishermen and environmental groups, say the project likely would destroy struggling fish populations by simply removing too much water, too consistently. One of the plan’s main drawbacks, they say, is that the twin tunnels would not produce any new water, as desalination and water-recycling systems would do. Many farmers in the San Joaquin Valley have lamented what appears to them to be a waste—river water flowing past the Delta and out to sea. “In years when there is a surplus, the Bureau of Reclamation should allow us to capture that water,” said Joe Del Bosque, who farms mostly almonds and melons

on 2,000 acres in the Westlands Water District. Del Bosque said he might have enough water stored in San Luis Reservoir to last him through the year—but 2015, he says, could destroy him. But environmentalists say that, to support the Sacramento River’s fisheries, a substantial portion of its water must be allowed to flow undisturbed to the sea. “It really gets me when people say that the water flowing into the Bay is wasted,” said Jerry Cadagan, a longtime water activist in Sonora. “It’s not wasted. It’s essential to keep alive a valuable fishery. Salmon is a food source, healthy just like pomegranates and almonds.”

Earlier this week, Northern Californians

were reminded what it feels like when water falls from the sky. Umbrellas came out, and clusters of people assembled under awnings and bus shelters. The roads grew slick and fishtails of spray erupted from passing cars in the streets. It was pouring. But it wasn’t nearly enough. The culprit for the ongoing drought is a massive ridge of high pressure that remains anchored over the North Pacific Ocean. It has hardly shifted for 14 months and is creating a massive atmospheric rain shadow on the West Coast. Storms that would normally float eastward over California with the jet stream are being deflected northward by the ridge, which is roughly the size of the Andes Mountains. When this devastating barrier will dissipate is unclear. Randall Osterhuber, the lead researcher at the Central Sierra Snow Laboratory near Donner Pass, said if this ridge breaks down, another large storm or two could still swoop in over California, soaking the valleys and cloaking the mountains. “But every day that it’s clear

and dry,” he said, “the statistical chances that we’ll have an average or almost-average water year decline significantly.” Cadagan, who has lived through at least two severe droughts in California, says this one takes things to a new level. He is confident the state’s residential water supplies will last the rest of 2014. “But if we don’t get rain this winter, and if next fall is dry, too, we’re going to see people leaving the state,” he said. Ed George, a farmer near Davis, believes he may survive the year. He uses water from wells, which he suspects to be part of a subterranean water system fed and recharged by the perennial supply of Lake Berryessa—rather than the drainage of the dwindling Cache Creek—and George believes his water supply will hold out. He hopes so, anyway. Other growers, he is certain, will produce little to nothing in 2014. “Food is going to be really expensive,” he predicted. George expects that ranchers will have to cull their herds of cattle when the dry spring provides no ample pasture. And in fact, that’s happening locally already, according to Orland-based cattle rancher Shannon Douglass. Last week, Douglass began selling some black Angus steers from the 50-head herd she and her husband, Kelly, have built up over the last decade. “I just announced to customers this week that we will be out of beef very shortly, as we are forced to sell livestock that we would have kept for finishing,” she told the CN&R. Berton Bertagna, a fourthgeneration farmer in Butte County, has more than 600 acres of orchards that could go dry this year if his water supply is cut off. Worse, his groundwater supply is dwindling—evidence, perhaps, that we are overdrafting the Tuscan Aquifer. “I had to lower three different wells last year,” he said, adding that many other area farmers will be tapping the aquifer if they receive no allocation from their irrigation districts. “We’re all really worried about the groundwater supply,” Bertagna said. “Those of us who have orchards need to water those trees every year. But we might not get rain, and we might not get snowpack, so we’re just hoping we can get our trees through the year with our wells.” Ω

Join us for the release of

2010

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accepting applications for kindergarten 2014

School tours weekly through the first week of February Kindergarten Applications due February 12, 2014 at 4pm

K-8 WALDORF-METHODS PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL

450 W. East Ave • Chico (530) 879–7483 www.BlueOakCharterSchool.org February 13, 2014

CN&R 23

Arts & Culture The Carneys of Pontiak: (from left) Van, Jennings and Lain. PHOTO COURTESY OF THRILL JOCKEY RECORDS

THIS WEEK Rockin’ the here and now

13

THURS

Special Events IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME: Origin Tribal Bellydance is

Virginia space rockers Pontiak return to Earth with INNOCENCE

“Wphis,” Pontiak guitarist/vocalist Van Carney tells me over the phone. “Someone just asked e’re in a Whole Foods in Mem-

me to watch their cart. Sounds like the beginning of a weird movie.” Maybe not a movie, but the sceby nario sounds familiar. If I recall Mark Lore correctly, the last time I spoke with Carney, he and his brothers/bandmates—bassist Jennings Carney PREVIEW: Pontiak performs and drummer Lain Carney—were Friday, Feb. 14, gathering supplies between gigs 8 p.m., at Café somewhere in the South. Coda. Golden Void The heavy rock behemoth that and Shadow Limb is Pontiak spends plenty of time on open. the road—steamrolling cities Cost: $10 worldwide, trying the local cuisine Café Coda and, of course, sampling the local 265 Humboldt Ave. beer. And the band’s latest full566-9476 length, INNOCENCE, was made www.cafecoda.com for the sole purpose of playing live. It’s loose. A little greasy. The first time I put it on it reminded me of the primal ferocity of The Stooges’ Fun House. Carney clarified: “We’re huge fans of The Stooges but, man, James Brown. … I’ve always been a huge James Brown fan—you listen to him and he’s just insane.” The brothers Carney, who with their rugged beardedness sort of look like they should be making beer instead of music, took a less finicky approach than normal with INNOCENCE. You could hear that evolution (de-evolution?) in 2012’s Echo Ono, which played things a little straighter than some of their more angular and shifty early work. That’s not a gripe. Their songs still retain their precision and intensity (the first three songs on INNOCENCE are all the proof you need), but they feature a few new textures. 24 CN&R February 13, 2014

One thing that has remained constant is the Carneys’ routine of holing themselves up in the mountains west of Washington, D.C., to record. This time they spent five months building their own studio in the loft of an old barn before starting the process. The entire album was recorded to tape, which cut down on the band going back and prettying things up. “It lays it bare,” Carney explained. “We’re less likely to go back and fix things. The flubs become part of the serendipity of it.” He says there was never any urge to go digital (“With computers, it partially becomes a visual process, which is really weird”), or bring in electronic instruments to spice up the sound. What you hear is essentially what you get. He says part of the fun is stretching the guitar-bass-drums formation in new directions. The assumption by some that rock music is already splayed on the embalming table is ridiculous to Carney. “It’s like the novel—people say the novel is dead. That’s bullshit. It’s just changing.” It’s no surprise that for the past few records Pontiak has called Thrill Jockey home. It’s a label that has consistently put out otherworldly records that are pushing music in exciting directions. But for as spaced-out as Pontiak’s music can get, these three brothers raised around the Blue Ridge Mountains in northern Virginia are surprisingly down-to-earth (they’re foodies at heart, and you could spend hours just talking about their travels). INNOCENCE (capitalized simply for aesthetic reasons) seems to capture the brothers’ personalities. They’re still mad scientists who like to hole up in their studio, but this time around it feels like everyone’s invited. “We wanted a record we could play live,” Carney said. “We wanted to be able to connect with people. It’s an artistic experience that’s lived in. When you’re in it, you’re in it.” Ω

having one last performance. An evening of bellydance dedicated to love, breakups, heartache and new beginnings. Th, 2/13, 8pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

Music THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME: Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and get on down with Brooklyn/New Orleans’ The Pimps of Joytime. Plus, DJ Spenny and Good Gravy. Th, 2/13, 9pm. $15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

TRUE BLUES - HISTORY OF THE BLUES: Based on

the film of the same name, True Blues chronicles the living culture of the blues in an evening of music and conversation with host Corey Harris and guitar masters Guy Davis and Alvin Youngblood Hart. Th, 2/13, 7:30pm. $15-$28. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperformances.com.

Day burlesque and vaudeville show, with live music performed by Aubrey Debauchery & The Broken Bones. Th, 2/13, 7:30pm, F, 2/14, 7:30pm. $12-$15. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

GIDION’S KNOT: A devastated mother confronts the teacher she blames for her son’s suicide. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 2/23. $10 Thursdays $12 advance $15 at door. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

Poetry/Literature WORD! POETRY SLAM: A two-round slam in celebration of Black History Month. Sign-ups at door. First 20 poets compete, five make it to the final round. Th, 2/13, 6pm. Naked Lounge Tea and Coffeehouse, 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

14

FRI

Special Events ART ABOUT: A monthly art walk coordinated by

Theater BARK! THE MUSICAL: Follow six canine characters for a day at Deena’s Doggie Daycare. Partial proceeds benefit the Butte Humane Society. Th-Sa, 7:30pm & Su, 2pm through 2/16. $12-$22. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

EVERYBODY IN OUTER SPACE BURLESQUE: Uncle Dad’s Art Collective presents a Valentine’s

the Chico Visual Arts Alliance (ChiVAA). Each second Friday a different area of Chico is featured. This week: South of Post Office. F, 2/14, 5-8pm. Free. Call or visit website for details, Chico, www.chivaa.org/artabout.

ROMANTIC SILENT FILM FESTIVAL Saturday, Feb. 15 Pageant Theatre

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

VULTURUS: Opening reception for new series of B&W medium-format photographs by Kyle Forrest Burns. Music by The Hasta La Pizzas.

Sa, 2/15, 7pm. Naked Lounge Tea and

Coffeehouse, 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

Theater BARK! THE MUSICAL: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE FUN IN FUNERAL: See Friday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 5332473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

GIDION’S KNOT: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

16

LOVE & BICYCLES RIDE

SUN

Saturday, Feb. 14 Habitat Lab

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

HEART ART: a collaborative Valentine’s workshop between artists and writers. Props, cheese and chocolate will be provided. F, 2/14, 56:30pm. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

LOVE & BICYCLES: Butte Environmental Council and Magic Pedal Productions host a romantic Valentine’s date night for bicycle lovers to benefit the Chico Bicycle Music Fest. Dinner by Blush Catering, plus chocolate and coffee tasting, and live music by The Railflowers. F, 2/14, 4-7pm. $40-$50/person. Habitat Lab, 199 E. 13th St.

Music PONTIAK: The Virginia neo-psychedelic rawkers have a new album and will hit Chico with Thrill Jockey labelmates Golden Void (Bay Area). Locals Shadow Limb (formerly La Fin du Monde) open. F, 2/14, 8pm. $10. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafe coda.com.

Theater BARK! THE MUSICAL: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

EVERYBODY IN OUTER SPACE BURLESQUE: See Thursday. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

THE FUN IN FUNERAL: Set during the days of the dot-com explosion, this comedy follows a group of young urbanites and their scheme to make money with performance-art showings at funerals. F-Sa, 7:30pm & Su, 2pm. $15. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

GIDION’S KNOT: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

ually charged misfit overwhelmed by grief. One night only. Friday’s show will be followed by two-day Write Your Life workshop over the weekend. (See Scene, page 30). Tickets for show and workshop available at www.brown papertickets.com. F, 2/14, 7:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978.

15

SAT

Music NORTH STATE SYMPHONY: An Embrace of

Romantic Masters, a Valentine’s-themed program, including two tributes—by Prokofiev and Tchaikovsky—to Shakespeare’s mostfamous star-crossed lovers. Also, works by Puccini and Griffes. Free pre-concert talk by conductor, at 1pm, Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall. Su, 2/16, 2pm. $6-36. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.north statesymphony.org.

Special Events

Theater

ROMANTIC SILENT FILM FESTIVAL: Extend

BARK! THE MUSICAL: See Thursday. Theatre on

Valentine’s Day festivities with a showing of Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights and a Tuscan picnic lunch. Presented by Chico State’s Interdisciplinary Center on Aging. Sa, 2/15, 11am-2pm. $25- $40 (call for info: 521-7301). Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St., (530) 3430663, www.csuchico.edu/icoa.

Music MAD CADDIES: Ska/punk/reggae/dixieland rock from Santa Barbara, with Canadian reggaepunks illScarlett and locals Big Tree Fall Down. Sa, 2/15, 8pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

Art Receptions MYRIAD WONDER: Johnny Dutro’s mixed-media sculptures inspired by the Tao spirit and created with with the Fab Lab’s modern equipment. Sa, 2/15, 3-6pm. Idea Fabrication Labs, 603 Orange St., (530) 592-0609.

the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE FUN IN FUNERAL: See Friday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 5332473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

18

TUES

Music JELLY BREAD: Full frontal funk with a three-piece horn section from Reno. Tu, 2/18, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/ bigroom.

19

Music SIMON LYNGE: Singer/songwriter from Greenland is touring to promote the release of his second full length album, The Absence Of Fear. W, 2/19, 7pm. $15. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise, (530) 873-1370.

solo show takes place on a cross-country flight as she portrays an out-of-control, sex-

Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Art 1078 GALLERY: Jacob and the Angel, figurative painter and art instructor Sal Casa showcases new work. Through 3/1. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078 gallery.org.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: P.S. We Love You, original works in various media by 18 Avenue 9 Guild artists in celebration of the gallery’s 10th anniversary. Through 3/1. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: Members’ Showcase, the Chico Art Center’s annual exhibition of member artwork. Through 2/14. 450 Orange St., (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Metal-infused prints by Larry Leigh.California Rivers, Jake Early’s latest series. Mariam Pakbaz, drawings and paintings by the recent Chico State graduate. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopaper company.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Machelle Conn, mixed-media work by Northern California artist. Gallery highlights works of those touched by cancer. Through 4/17. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS & APPRAISALS:

Recent paintings, Jerry Frost’s new oil paintings provide a visual journey across the large canvases. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.jamessnidle finearts.com.

MANAS ARTSPACE & GALLERY: Everything

Blue, mixed-media group show featuring works inspired by the color blue. Through 3/7. 1441-C Park Ave., (530) 5885183.

NAKED LOUNGE TEA AND COFFEEHOUSE:

VULTURUS, new series of B&W mediumformat photographs by Kyle Forrest Burns. 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: The Way of the

New Year, original art by local makers, plus J. Daniel Walker’s holocaust memorial painting. Through 2/28. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

THE JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM:

Pushing Boundaries—Expanding Horizons, the 10th Janet Turner National Print Competition. The joint exhibition with the University Art Gallery surveys new and innovative “must sees” in the print world. Through 2/22. Chico State, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Pushing

Boundaries—Expanding Horizons, the 10th Janet Turner National Print Competition. This joint exhibition with the Turner surveys new and innovative “must sees” in the print world. Through 2/22. Trinity Hall Chico State, (530) 8985864.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: World

Photography and Paintings, Ayse Taskiran’s nature, architecture and street scenes from Turkey, Greece and California. Through 3/2. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by

Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bid wellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Reverie: Interpretations

of Nature, new abstract paintings by Dennis Leon. Through 3/31. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Explore

Evolution, investigate evolutionary principles in organisms ranging from smallest to the largest, with interactive exhibits giving the viewer an opportunity to experience how scientists conduct research on evolution. Ongoing. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/ gateway.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Into The Blue: Maritime Navigation and the Archeology of Shipwrecks, featuring artifacts recovered from the Frolic shipwreck and the story behind the ship’s history. Tu-Sa through 7/24. Meriam Library Complex, Chico State.

WED

LOVELAND: Ann Randolph’s critically acclaimed

FREE LISTINGS!

FINE ARTS

THE FUN IN FUNERAL Opens Friday, Feb. 14 Birdcage Theatre SEE THEATER

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 28

SOPA is for lovers If you’re looking to impress your Valentine this Friday, Feb. 14, with a little culture, head south of the post office (SOPA), where the Chico Visual Arts Alliance (ChiVAA) is hosting it’s monthly Art About. Participating galleries will put their best foot forward, and there’s bound EDITOR’S PICK to be wine and finger foods involved. The 1078 Gallery should be especially hopping with Heart Art, a collaborative workshop between writers and artists, early in the evening, followed by the Everybody in Outer Space Stayed in Room 213 burlesque, a Vaudeville-style variety show featuring live music by Aubrey Debauchery & The Broken Bones. Serving as a most excellent backdrop to both events is painter Sal Casa’s current 1078 show, Jacob and the Angel. February 13, 2014

CN&R 25

BULLETIN BOARD

AN EMBRACE OF ROMANTIC MASTERS

C CO CHI OC CONC O ERTT ONC SP NSO SPO NSO OR

Community

Mat M atson on and an a d Isom o

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave., (530) 321-5607.

CHICO CHI ICO CO GUE GUES UEST A IS ART AR ST SPONS ST SPPONS NSOR NS O OR

AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Maarilyn Mar M ar n A. Krus ruscchk chke inn mem m ory ry off Drr. Ear a Kr arl Krusc usc us s hke kee

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

CHICO POLICE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD:

C N CO ND DUC UCTE TED ED BY YK KYL YLLE WILE L Y PI P CKETTT

K thh Bra Ke Kei Brattton ton, Romeo Rom

Monthly meeting hosted by the Chico Police

Chief to discuss community issues. Third W of every month, 5:30-7pm. Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1877 Hooker Oak Ave., (530) 342-7777.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle,

Simone Sim one nee K Keerte rtesz sz, z, Jul Ju u iet ett

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16 LAXSON AUDITORIUM 2:00PM Free pre-connce cert tal a k at al a 1:000 PM M in the Rowland-Tayloor Re Reci cita cita t l Haalll For tickets, cal all thhe Univveerrsi sity tyy Box Of Box Offific fice,, 530.898 fice, 300 9 .633 3333 www ww w.nnor ortthstattes esym mphhon ony.oorgg

MUSICAL CHAIRS

PARTY & ART AUCTION

drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for more info. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCES OF UNIVERSAL PEACE: Simple, medita-

A CONC O CERT ERT RTT FO FOR RV VALE ALE LEENTI NTINE’ NT NE’S NE’ S DAY AY AND AND FOR OR LOV L ERS RS MUSIC FOR MUSIC MUS F R RO R MEO MEO AN ME AND D JULI ULLIET U ET BY TCH T HAI AIK KOVS OV O V KY Y AND A D PPR PROK ROK OKO O KOFIE FIIEEV W H THE WIT HE WOR WOR RD DS S OF O WIL WILLIAM M SHA HAKES KES ESPEA ES SPEA P RE RE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 7:00PM · HABITAT LAB · 199 EAST 13TH ST., CHICO MORE INFORMATION 530.898.6692

tive and uplifting group dances honoring many of the world’s spiritual traditions. Third Sa of every month, 7-9:30pm. $5-$10 donation. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 891-8789.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. F, 6-8pm. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

EVENING DANCE JAM: A weekly meditative dance session. F, 7:15pm. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Suite 150, (530) 3420100.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:30pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMERS’ MARKET: CHAPMAN: A year-round Featured pa ppaintin paintin nting tinng byy Tri TTr cia i Kibl bler bbl er er

Certified Farmers’ Market serving as a community forum for healthful-lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

FARMERS’ MARKET: SATURDAY: Chico’s weekly community gathering, with fresh produce, crafts, baked goods and more. Sa, 7:30am1pm. Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second & Wall streets.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave., (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfree clinic.org.

ISHI: SECRETS ABOUT THE NATURAL WORLD Monday, Feb. 17 Chico Creek Nature Center SEE COMMUNITY

SIERRA CLUB MEETING: Clearcutting will be the topic of the Yahi Group of the Sierra Club’s meeting. Featured speaker: Chris Nelson. W, 2/19, 7pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 342-9214, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

SOUNDS OF THE VALLEY CHORUS: Women singers welcome to sing in four-part harmony barbershop style. Call for more info. W, 7pm. Marigold Elementary School, 2446 Marigold Ave., (530) 343-5183.

SQUARE-DANCE CLUB: Square-dancing classes for beginners and advanced-level dancers. Call for more info. Th, 7-10pm. Veterans Memorial Hall, 6550 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1962.

TRADITIONAL WEST-AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of

drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.,

(808) 757-0076.

WINTER OWL PROWL: A night hike to view the birds of prey and meet the Nature Center’s Western Screech Owl. Call to Register. Sa, 2/15, 6pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwell park.org.

HAPPY HEALING: Experience a variety of healing modalities. F, 7pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

INFINITE RHYTHMS ECSTATIC DANCE: A shoefree, food-free, drug-free, smoke-free dance for you and yours with DJ Clay. Th, 7:309:30pm through 5/8. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, (530) 342-0100.

ISHI: SECRETS ABOUT THE NATURAL WORLD: Join Richard Burrill to learn more about the last free Yahi-Yana caregiver and woodsman. M, 2/17, 6:30pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwell park.org.

LOVE THE PARK DAY + PARENTS NIGHT OUT: Educational crafts, songs, up close animal visits, naturalist-led activities, games and more. F, 2/14, 7:45am-5pm & 4-10pm. $35. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

THE POPPY WALK: Run, walk, roll or stroll in this

Volunteer ADOPT A HIGHWAY VOLUNTEER DAY: The Butte County Resource Conservation District (BCRCD) and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) have a volunteer work day for our Adopt-A-Highway program. Th, 2/13, 9am. Call for details, (530) 534-0112 x125.

BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive-plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water-quality testing and more. Check Friends of Bidwell Park website for dates and locations. Ongoing. Bidwell Park, Bidwell Park, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, (530) 514-3903.

5K run to celebrate Spring and benefit the Peg Taylor Center. Sa, 2/15, 8am. $25-$35. One-Mile Group Picnic Area, Bidwell Park, (530) 896-7800, www.poppywalk.org.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 872-7085.

26 CN&R February 13, 2014

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.

CHOW

PHOTO BY AVLXYZ (VIA FLICKR)

Flavor of love he best thing in life may be free—but

knees and throbbing chests—and some of the greatest works of art, music and literature were created from the gloomy by Alastair Bland depths of heartache. Wouldn’t it be nice, so many have wondered, if affection could be won via some medicine, potion or food? Indeed, the notion of the aphrodisiac may be as old as humanity. The word itself, of course, derives from the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite, and for ages the Greeks and Romans, the Egyptians, cultures of East Asia, and indigenous peoples of the New World have been touting certain herbs, spices and miscellaneous odd edibles as enhancers of libido and affection. But has an aphrodisiac ever truly worked? Most scientific sources seem to believe not—and the fact that so many items in so many cultures are named as love enhancers may indicate that people are still looking for that secret powder or potion that actually does the trick. Should you want to experiment this Valentine’s Day, you might as well start cheap and simple: Get some onions simmering at low heat in a pan of olive oil—for even this vulgar bulb of the farm field has been credited by some as bearing aphrodisiacal powers. Garlic and ginger are also believed to induce feelings of desire; so mince them and add to the simmering onions, and have the house fragrant and hot by the time your sweetie gets home. Doubt that cheap root veggies will work? Then boost your budget and move to the fancy-food aisle, where dark chocolate, caviar, lobster, truffles (both the chocolate ones and the fungal), and fresh figs are often said to be passion promoters. We even know a farmer named Kevin Herman in Imperial County attempting to capitalize on the perceived sexual powers of figs.

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He has been striving for several years through advanced farming methods to extend his annual autumn harvest of figs through the fall, past the winter, and well into the new year with the chief objective of selling fresh figs on Valentine’s Day. Shape and form are obvious reminders of sexuality, and it’s the physical build of certain fruits and vegetables that have garnered them reputations as aphrodisiacs. Indeed, such ubiquitous staples as bananas and asparagus can supposedly spark passion. Aroma, too, undoubtedly affects the brain and memory—and if a smell hits your lover just right, it could get him or her purring (not that you should necessarily hang your Valentine’s Day evening on a saucepan of onions). One of the oddest foods I’ve ever heard touted as an aphrodisiac is burro meat, which cowboys in Baja California have told me will charge a man’s engine like a jumper cable from a Chevy. Other sorts of folks, meanwhile, may get witchy on Valentine’s Day; among their favored libido builders are frog bones, a lover’s hair, bird brains, and even human skin burned to ashes and mixed into blood. But let’s get real: Many sources say the chemical effects of aphrodisiacs are imaginary and that the only results, if any, of applied love potions can be attributed simply to placebo. If that’s the case, then no sense in stealing bones from the cemetery and grinding them into a powder (another supposed trick) and secretly sprinkling it over your lover’s morning latte. Instead, make it plain and obvious what you’re up to: Put a bottle of LaRocca Vineyards sparkling wine in a pail of ice cubes, bring it to her in bed, tell her it’s organic—and add that it cost you $50. Then push a tray of oysters at her, plus some of those figs, if you can land a handful. No, these foods won’t have any chemical effects that turn your lover on. Instead, like so much else in the game of love, it’s the thought that counts—and if this gourmet platter doesn’t win you a kiss, heck, get the shovel and wait until sundown. Ω

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February 13, 2014

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 2/13—WEDNESDAY 2|19 OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Café & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

OPEN MIC: All singer/songwriters wel-

come. Th, 6-9pm. Opens 2/13. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME: Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and get on down with Brooklyn/New Orleans’ The Pimps of Joytime. Plus, DJ Spenny and Good Gravy. Th, 2/13, 9pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

TRUE BLUES - HISTORY OF THE BLUES:

13THURSDAY BLUES NIGHT: With Stephen Truskol and

the Next Door Blues band. Th, 2/13, 710pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

CHICO UNPLUGGED: An open-mic series showcasing local acoustic singer/ songwriters in an intimate setting. Top performers will be given a chance to record their music. Presented by Chico State’s SOTA Productions. Th, 2/13, 7-9pm. Free. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St., (530) 893-1500.

VANDELLA

Friday, Feb. 14 Maltese Bar & Tap Room SEE FRIDAY

ICARUS THE OWL: Technical indie-pop/ rock from Portland, Ore., with local boys Nude and True and Redding’s Monk Warrior. Th, 2/13, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

JOHN SEID DUO: John Seid and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 69pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

Based on the film of the same name, True Blues chronicles the living culture of the blues in an evening of music and conversation with host Corey Harris and guitar masters Guy Davis and Alvin Youngblood Hart. Th, 2/13, 7:30pm. $15-$28. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperformances.com.

14FRIDAY BASSMINT: A (mostly) weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St., (530) 895-3888.

Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/ brewing-co.

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday-night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

swingin’ gypsy jazz and wild Eurogypsy dance. F, 2/14, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3

tickets.com); $29/door. The Rendezvous, 3269 Esplanade.

MAD CADDIES: Ska/punk/reggae/ dixieland rock from Santa Barbara, with Canadian reggae-punks illScarlett and locals Big Tree Fall Down. Sa, 2/15, 8pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

DECADES: Playing the best rock and pop from the 1940s to today. A partial benefit for Paradise High School. Sa, 2/15, 6pm. $20. Paradise Performing Arts

local acoustic singer/songwriters and musicians. F, 7:30pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

PONTIAK: The Virginia neo-psychedelic rawkers have a new album and will hit Chico with Thrill Jockey labelmates Golden Void (Bay Area). Locals Shadow Limb (formerly La Fin du Monde) open. F, 2/14, 8pm. $10. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

VANDELLA: F, 2/14, 9pm. Roots-rock/ Americana/soul from the Bay Area, plus local songstress Lisa Valentine and Heather Michelle and the Make You Mines. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

15SATURDAY ’80S NIGHT: Wear your best ’80s attire

and dance the night away. Sa, 2/15, 8pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway St., (530)

ANIMAL LIBERATION ORCHESTRA: One of

WINTER DANCE MACABRE

After a Feb. 3, 1959, performance in Clear Lake, Iowa, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. Richardson (better known as The Big Bopper), boarded a plane and flew into history as rock ’n’ roll’s first great tragedy— the plane crashed shorty after takeoff, killing all aboard. The three were touring together on a bill called the Winter Dance Party. It’s a rather strange thing to commemorate— although they are stopping before the bummer part happens—but tributes to all three will happen this Saturday and Sunday (Feb. 15 and 16) at the Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. The event may be a touch morbid, but the music rocks, so it’s likely to live up to it’s “dance party” moniker.

the grooviest bands on the jam scene,

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Center, 777 Nunnelley Rd. (530) 8728454, www.paradiseperforming arts.com.

MONKEY MUSIC SHOWCASE: Spotlighting

893-1891.

DIRTY CELLO: A mix of soulful blues,

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Thurs. Feb. 13 Pimps of Joytime, Gravy Brain, DJ Spenny $15/$17 *TICKETS ONSALE NOW* Fri. Feb. 14 Valentine’s Day Sofa King, Maker’s Mile $5

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28 CN&R February 13, 2014

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 pre-concert talk by conductor, at

1pm, Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall. Su, 2/16, 2pm. $6-36. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.northstatesymphony.org.

WINTER DANCE PARTY: See Saturday. Su, 2/16, 9:30pm. Feather Falls Casino

Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr., Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

MOTOWN FILTHY & FURLOUGH FRIDAYS: Local Motown-infused groove with some alt-rock bombast. Sa, 2/15, 9pm. $5. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

NOR CAL PUNK/METAL: Redding, Paradise and Chico punks and heshers unite! With Chemical Burn, Gorilla X Monsoon, Smak City and Kong. Sa, 2/15, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 3457672.

WAKE: Sa, 2/15, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

WINTER DANCE PARTY: A live re-creation of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper. Sa, 2/15, 9:30pm; Su, 2/16,

TRUE BLUES-HISTORY OF THE BLUES Thursday, Feb. 13 Laxson Auditorium SEE THURSDAY

9:30pm. $10. Feather Falls Casino

Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr., Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

16SUNDAY NORTH STATE SYMPHONY: An Embrace of

Romantic Masters, a Valentine’sthemed program, including two tributes—by Prokofiev and Tchaikovsky—to Shakespeare’s mostfamous star-crossed lovers. Also, works by Puccini and Griffes. Free

and friends. Tu, 7-10pm. Opens 2/18. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

with Carey Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Opens 2/17. Free. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.we ebly.com.

18TUESDAY GRAPH RABBIT: Graph Rabbit is the

Brooklyn-based duo of artist/ composer Austin Donohue and experimental pianist Shy Kedmi. Locals Nude and True and Fera open the night. Tu, 2/18, 7:30pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

JELLY BREAD: Full frontal funk with a

three-piece horn section from Reno. Tu, 2/18, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

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FULL HOUSE BLUES JAM: Join the house

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band, The Growlers, and bring an instrument and sign up to be a guest player. W, 2/19, 7:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feath erfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

If you’re one of those Americans who thinks Canada is just a nicer, watered-down United States, there’s a band marching towards Chico this very minute to prove you wrong. Saturday, Feb. 15, Calgary, Alberta-based WAKE promise to soak Café Coda in maple-flavored grindcore, with locals metalheads Cold Blue Mountain and Touch Fuzzy Get Dizzy helping to sop up the mess.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues,

country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more.

W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E.

Second St.

OLD-TIME SLOW JAM: Bring your blue-

grass instruments and song suggestions for this jam hosted by Jim Meyers. Third W of every month, 7-9pm. Free. Sid Lewis’ Acoustic College, 932 W. Eighth Ave., (530) 876-8629.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

The 2014 Chico Area Music Awards are coming APRIL 3-5 & APRIL 13 www.facebook.com/chicocammies

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“I LOVE YOU CHICO.” –SONNY

SCENE Playwright Ann Randolph and her Loveland character Frannie Potts (inset). PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANN RANDOLPH

Stage flight

13

118 W 2ND ST | FACEBOOK.COM/NLCHICO 13

Performer/playwright Ann Randolph deals with grief on hilarious plane ride in acclaimed one-woman show

A for four years of her life before taking a job earning $8 an hour working the graveyard shift at a homenn Randolph lived in a mental hospital

less shelter for mentally ill women. She’s also shared the comedy stage with the likes of Saturday Night Live vets Will Ferrell by Christine G.K. and Cheri Oteri (as part of L.A. LaPado-Breglia improv/sketch-comedy outfit The christinel@ Groundlings) and comedian Drew newsreview.com Hastings (now the mayor of Hillsboro, Ohio). PREVIEW: And the playwright/performer’s Loveland , Friday, autobiographical one-woman show Feb. 14, 7:30 p.m., Squeeze Box—which was produced at the Chico Women’s Club. by comedy legend Mel Brooks and Ann Randolph will his wife, the late actress Anne Banalso present a croft—has been produced all over the two-day Write United States and even headlined Your Life workshop Scotland’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe. at the club, Feb. 15-16, It also won an LA Stage Alliance 10am-5pm. Tickets Ovation Award and was named Best for show are $20 Solo Show by LA Weekly. advance, $25 at Similarly, Randolph’s latest solo door; workshop is show, Loveland—on which Brooks $325. All tix available at (who calls her “a genius”) and Banwww.brownpaper croft also worked with her—was tickets.com or hailed by both LA Weekly and SF 800-838-3006. Weekly as Best Solo Show. More info: And this week, Randolph is www.ann bringing Loveland to the Chico randolph.com Women’s Club (on Friday, Feb. 14). So, how did this critically Chico Women’s Club acclaimed show end up booked at 592 E. Third St. this relatively small Chico hall? Ran894-1978 dolph was asked that question in a recent phone interview from Washington, D.C., where she was promoting her upcoming show at the Arena Stage (which runs March 20 through April 13). Randolph, who also teaches grief-centered writing workshops, explained: “One of my students at [The] Esalen [Institute in Big Sur] said, ‘I’d like to bring you to Chico. What would it take?’” (That student was Chicoan Christine Satava.) “I go wherever I’m invited,” Randolph offered. “I do not say no to an invitation. This is what I like to do.” Loveland—the name of the show comes from the name of Randolph’s hometown of Loveland, Ohio—is a 90-minute-long “totally demented, unforgettable, 30 CN&R February 13, 2014

over-the-top comedy that forces people to think,” as The Huffington Post described it. In it, Randolph plays Frannie Potts, a dorky, filterless performance artist who is reeling from the death of her mother and acts out outrageously and hilariously on the flight home to Loveland, Ohio; she also plays a number of other characters in the one-woman show, including her own mother. While Loveland is semiautobiographical, Randolph’s mother is not deceased. Her impetus to write the performance piece came while she was dealing with both the impending death of her father and a stroke that her 70-something mother had (“She started drinking for the first time in her life,” Randolph said of her mom’s coping strategy). Randolph, as a result, began suffering what she termed “anticipatory grief,” which was “so huge I started writing about it even before [my parents] were dead.” Randolph’s father passed away before she finished writing the show. The character of her mother “is a composite of both of my parents,” she said. Loveland first opened in San Francisco in 2009, two weeks after her father died. In performing Loveland, Randolph said she is expressing both anticipatory grief as well as real grief over the loss of her father and the loss of her mother as she used to be: These days, Randolph’s mom is in a nursing home, “still drinking, but doing better. … “Humor is my coping mechanism,” she said. Randolph agreed that Frannie Potts could be characterized as “‘pure grieving id.’ She has no impulse control whatsoever; she’s rubbing up against poles and banisters—anything that could help her get rid of the pain.” After each show, Randolph conducts a free workshop for interested audience members “on writing and looking at their grief.” She will also hold a separate two-day “Write Your Life” workshop during her Chico visit (see column note). “It’s a ride. It’s a real ride,” said Randolph of Loveland. “You’ll laugh your ass off and then you’re gonna be weeping. … “I was around mentally ill people for a majority of my life,” she said. “There’s nothing hiding at that point [in their lives]. When people hit rock bottom, there’s no more mask. “Let’s remove the mask; let’s see our vulnerability. Let’s express our grief. Nothing’s going to happen— it’s going to be a tremendous relief to look at it, just Ω say it.”

IN THE MIX With the Wind and the Rain Joshua Breakstone Capri Records

MUSIC

—Miles Jordan

Never Go Back

www.newsreview.com

This is guitarist Joshua Breakstone’s 20th album in a career that began in his late 20s. On several of those recordings, he sometimes worked with horn men (i.e., baritone saxist Pepper Adams, trombonist Jimmy Knepper) but primarily pianists (e.g., Kenny Barron, Tommy Flanagan). For the past five years, Breakstone—now 58—has hooked up with bassist Lisle Atkinson and drummer Eliot Zigmund, who, in the late 1970s, worked with pianist Bill Evans. For this CD, subtitled “Guitar Trio/Cello Quartet,” Breakstone has utilized the not inconsiderable talents of cellist Mike Richmond on four of the disc’s nine tunes. Breakstone says that, thanks to Richmond’s pizzicato presence, he began hearing the quartet’s music in a different way: “as essentially a string section— i.e., cello, bass and guitar, 14 strings!—plus percussion.” While the cello in jazz has a long history beginning with Oscar Pettiford’s use on recordings in 1950, its use of late has been rather spotty, so it’s a treat to hear the string section’s work on Pettiford’s “Laverne Walk.” Breakstone—a bebopper at heart—really rips it up on the nine-minute “Short Story,” and his haunting intro and interpretation of “The Very Thought of You” is magnificent. Stunning playing and a great selection of tunes make this a memorable experience.

Lee Child Delacorte Press Let’s face it, Lee Child’s Jack Reacher novels are silly macho fantasies. What else to make of stories whose hero who can disable two hostile toughs—one by breaking his fingers, the other by breaking his arms— while on an airliner with a hundred potential but oblivious witnesses? As Reacher says, “Ninety-nine of us grow up to fear the howling wolf, and one grows up to envy it. I’m that guy.” Child’s genius is his ability to throw Reacher into impossibly dangerous and difficult situations, crank up the action to propulsive levels, and watch his hero make mincemeat of a legion of bad guys. In this latest tale, he uncovers a conspiracy having something to do with military corruption in Afghanistan while being forced to avoid the FBI, military police and four pursuing thugs who want to kill him, all while searching for a teenage girl who might be a daughter he didn’t know he had. Oh, and there’s also the closest thing to a love story you’re going to find in a Jack Reacher novel. It’s a wild ride, but ultimately it all makes sense.

BOOK

—Robert Speer

Space Dandy Adult Swim Bones Inc. If you made a drinking game out of Adult Swim’s new anime Space Dandy and drank every time someone said “boobies,” you’d be dead before the first episode concluded. Yes, it’s that kind of cartoon. However, before it’s dismissed as late-night cable vulgarity, it’s worth noting that Shinichiro Watanabe’s (Cowboy Bebop, Samurai Champloo) latest isn’t that offensive. Sure, Dandy loves to visit the intergalactic version of Hooters—the only slightly less subtly named BooBies—but Dandy’s love of boobies is the show’s biggest crime. Side boobies aside, Dandy’s adventures in hunting down previously undiscovered alien species for reward money—aided by his robot and cat companions—are a fun romp through a colorfully outlandish galaxy seemingly inspired by the nonsensical creativity that’s currently thriving across the Internet. In one episode, the trio attempts to hunt down the infamously delicious Phantom Space Ramen. And within the varieties of space ramen alone, there’s more weird imagination than many animated shows out there. A secondary story of an intergalactic war waged between the Jaicro and the Gogol Empires—the latter of which is after Dandy for unknown nefarious reasons—could build and carry the show through its first season and beyond. Or it could turn out to be all about the boobies. —Matthew Craggs

TV

February 13, 2014

CN&R 31

RECYCLE

ENDS MONDAY COEN BROTHERS

THIS PAPER.

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS THURS 8PM; FRI/SAT 7:45PM SUN/MON MATINEE 12:30PM STARTS FRIDAY

WALKING THE CAMINO

FRI/SAT 6PM; SUNDAY/MONDAY 3PM & 6PM TUES/WED 4PM

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

An entertaining, if formulaic, account of real-life effort to recover art treasures from the Nazis

Call 343-0663 or visit www.PageantChico.com

lf to Treat yourse to es up gift certificat

Tbased on a fascinating episode in the history of World War II; it’s agreeably entertaining; and it has a he good news: The Monuments Men is

75% ! F F O

big, attractive cast. The bad news: The film’s version of history feels too much like moviefriendly fiction, and the cast members by mostly play versions of themselves, Juan-Carlos with only the bare minimum of links to Selznick the historical figures on whom they are based.

www.newsreview.com

friday 2/14 – wednesday 2/19 About LAst Night (Digital) (R) (10:15AM*) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM 10:25PM ENdLEss LovE (Digital) (PG-13) 12:15PM 2:45PM 5:15PM 7:45PM 10:25PM FrozEN (2013) (Digital) (PG) 11:50AM 2:25PM 5:00PM 7:35PM 10:10PM LAbor dAy (Digital) (PG-13) 12:25PM LEgo (3D) (PG) (10:40AM*) 12:20PM 1:10PM 2:50PM 5:20PM 6:10PM 7:50PM 8:40PM 10:20PM LEgo (Digital) (PG) 11:30AM 2:00PM 3:40PM 4:30PM 7:00PM 9:30PM LoNE survivor (Digital) (R) (10:45AM*) 1:35PM♥ 4:25PM♥ 7:15PM 10:10PM MoNuMENts MEN (Digital) (PG-13) 11:00AM 1:45PM 4:45PM 7:30PM 10:15PM

Nut Job, thE (Digital) (PG) (10:05AM*) 12:30PM 2:45PM 5:05PM ridE ALoNg (Digital) (PG-13) 12:15PM 2:40PM 5:10PM 7:35PM 10:00PM robocop (2014) (Digital) (PG-13) 11:10AM 12:35PM 1:55PM 3:20PM 4:50PM 6:15PM 7:40PM 9:05PM 10:30PM thAt AwkwArd MoMENt (Digital) (R) 2:45PM 5:05PM 7:25PM♦ 9:45PM♦ vAMpirE AcAdEMy (Digital) (PG-13) 8:00PM 10:30PM wiNtEr’s tALE (Digital) (PG-13) 11:05AM 1:50PM 4:35PM 7:20PM 10:05PM (spEciAL showiNg) - roMEo & JuLiEt oN broAdwAy (Digital) (PG-13) Fri. 2/14 7:30PM & Sun. 2/16 2:00PM

Showtimes listed w/ ( *) shown Fri. 2/14 – Sun. 2/16 ONLY

TRUE BLUES: HISTORY OF THE BLUES

The Monuments Men

Starring George Clooney, Matt Damon, Bill Murray, John Goodman and Cate Blanchett. Directed by George Clooney. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

THE GRADUATE Live Radio Theatre (2/20)

CARLOS NUÑEZ

Power Packed Celtic Music (2/23)

THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER Jazz/Pop Superstars (2/26)

KEEPING DANCE ALIVE!

Eclectic Dance Concert (3/7 & 8) JUST ADDED!

LEWIS BLACK

1

Poor

2

Fair

3

Comedian (3/8)

Good

All shows at Laxson Auditorium California State University, Chico (530) 898-6333

Very Good

4

5

Excellent

WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM

that it perhaps undercuts even the more genuine instances. Still, there are several bravura set pieces that succeed: curator Claire Simone (Blanchett) braving errant gunfire on a railway overpass; architect Richard Campbell (Murray) hearing recorded Christmas greetings from his family while showering in bivouac; Campbell and ballet director Preston Savitz (Balaban) improvising a sit-down cease-fire with a lone wild-eyed German infantryman; scholar/officer Frank Stokes (Clooney) performing a moral and psychological take-

3

Corey Harris, Guy Davis & Alvin Youngblood Hart (2/13)

Showtimes listed w/ ♦ NOT shown Fri. 2/14 Showtimes listed w/ ♥ NOT shown Sun. 2/16

32 CN&R February 13, 2014

Raiders of the lost art

Based on the actual exploits of U.S. Army specialists charged with recovering stolen treasures of European art in the late stages of World War II, the film follows a handful of characters through a mildly suspenseful adventure that is part secret mission, part cultural commando raid, and part rambunctious caper. There are nods to serious, painful history here, but the script (by George Clooney, who also stars and directs, and Grant Heslov) often seems little more than a spinoff of the Ocean’s Eleven cycle, with Clooney’s version of the Rat Pack working variations on caper-movie riffs made suitable to the particular circumstances of this tale. Each of the eight top-billed actors (Clooney, Matt Damon, Bill Murray, John Goodman, Jean Dujardin, Bob Balaban, Hugh Bonneville and Cate Blanchett) gets at least one moment of heroism, a formulaic pattern so obvious

down on a defiant Nazi SS officer. Clooney seems to be enjoying himself in the role, but the performance is nothing special. The characters played by Damon and Blanchett are the designated Love Interest, which they perform with casual geniality even when the script inverts the whole idea. Murray and Balaban come across as an arbitrarily designated comedy team, simply being themselves while playing stock war-movie characters with only the skimpiest of nods to their reputed historical models. Young Dimitri Leonidas makes the most of a small, semiobligatory role as Pvt. Sam Epstein, ostensibly a German Jew from New Jersey who joins the group when Stokes commandeers the Jeep he’s driving. Maybe the best performance is the least obvious one: The burly sculptor Walter Garfield (Goodman) looks like the warrior/titan in the bunch, but consistently behaves like a decent, slightly goofy guy with no taste whatsoever for combat. His dignity and toughness are real, but his body language bespeaks someone with zero interest in playing soldier, let alone looking good, even when heroism is thrust upon him. Murray’s brief, sidelong channeling of the spirit of John Wayne is also a bit of brilliance in the margins. Ω

Reviewers: Craig Blamer and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week About Last Night

The Brat Pack-era flick (based on a David Mamet play) gets an update, with the cast of Kevin Hart, Michael Ealy, Regina Hall and Joy Bryant taking over the roles of young lovers struggling with the transition from onenight stands to committed relationships. Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Endless Love

The 1981 film (starring a young Brooke Shields) gets cleaned up for a tween treatment with a couple of young Brits (Alex Pettyfer and Gabriella Wilde) taking over as the star-crossed lovers. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

RoboCop

Joel Kinnaman stars as the title character in this loose remake of the 1987 sci-fi actioner about a half-man/half-robot super cop who is cleaning up the streets while the nefarious corporation that built him pulls the strings with ulterior motives. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

3

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

Lydia Smith’s good-natured documentary follows a half-dozen folk taking the traditional pilgrimage, on foot, to Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain. Smith’s approach may seem a little reminiscent of reality TV (the trials and tribulations of six lively, spirited people on a 500-mile hike), but with lots of soulfulness and none of the lowbrow sensationalism. The net result is a charmingly lyrical travelogue, with bucolic landscapes, beguiling character sketches, and a quietly poetic sense of the spirituality of long-distance walking. Note: Director Smith will be on hand during screenings on Sunday, Feb. 16, to discusss her film. Pageant Theatre. Not rated —J.C.S.

Winter’s Tale

Colin Farrell stars in this supernatural drama as an early 20th-century thief who falls for a young sick woman (Jessica Brown Findlay), and travels across time to try and save her and to save himself from an evil crime boss (Russell Crowe). Based on Mark Helprin’s fantasy novel of the same name. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Frozen

The new Disney computer-animated feature is an adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytale, The Snow Queen. In the film, a young princess embarks on an epic journey to find her sister—the Snow Queen— whose magical powers have buried the kingdom in a never-ending winter. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

4

Inside Llewyn Davis

I hesitate to give the new Coen brothers movie top marks mostly on account of its staying a little too much outside its title character. At the same time, however, I give it special credit for its diligence and resourcefulness in suggesting character insights while staying resolutely focused on

exterior events. It’s partly a kind of triangulation—our picture of Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) derives less from him personally and more from the revealing fragments of recognition that arise via the assortment of characters and incidents he encounters in the course of the story. The story itself is fragmentary—a few rather fraught and scattered days in the life of a not-quitesuccessful (and more or less homeless) folk singer in New York’s Greenwich Village circa 1960. Musical performances (mostly in the era’s coffeehouses) are interspersed with a disparate array of lively scenes. For me, the cat, the recording session, the road trip, the simperingly permissive academic couple, the cramped stairways and apartments, the solemn and attentive audiences at the coffeehouses, and the soldier/folk singer are the best of it. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Labor Day

The latest from screenwriter-director Jason Reitman (Up in the Air, Thank You for Smoking) stars Kate Winslet as a depressed single mother who is forced by an escaped ex-con to offer him refuge in the home she shares with her teenage son. As time goes by, the man with the complicated past starts to bond with his hosts. Cinemark 14 and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

The LEGO Movie

A computer-animated adaptation of the iconic kids’ toy pits a team of LEGOs led by an ordinary construction-worker minifigure (voiced by Chris Pratt) against an evil tyrant (Will Farrell) who wants to glue everything in the universe together. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Lone Survivor

Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights) directs this true story about a failed Navy SEALS mission to capture a Taliban leader in Afghanistan in 2005. Starring Mark Wahlberg. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

3

The Monuments Men

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

FICTION 59 There are 59 words— exactly 59 words—in your story ! CAN YOU TELL A STORY IN 59 WORDS? WE WANT TO READ IT! The annual Fiction 59 contest is back. Submit your stories to the Chico News & Review today for the chance to have your work published in the CN&R's annual Fiction 59 issue on March 6. Winners will also be invited to read their works (and receive prizes!) at a live reading at Lyon Books, March 6, at 7 p.m. ONLINE AND EMAIL ENTRIES PREFERRED. Visit www.newsreview.com/fiction59 to submit, or email stories to fiction59@newsreview.com. Please specify age and division: adults; high school (ninth–12th grade); junior high (sixth–eighth grade); kids (fifth grade and lower). Under-18 entries, please specify age.

You can also drop off or mail your entries to the Chico News & Review office at 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA, 95928. Deadline for submission is Wednesday, Feb. 19, at midnight. THE RULES: Stories can be on any topic, but must be exactly 59 words. Count carefully. Every year we disqualify at least one amazing entry that has come in over or under by as little as one word. Only three entries per person. Hyphenated words are not considered one word; i.e., “one-stop shop” would count as three words. Exceptions are words that don't become freestanding when the hyphen is removed, as in “re-examine.” Contractions count as one word. The story title will not be included in the word count.

The Nut Job

An animated feature about a park squirrel who teams up with a city rat and plans to rob the goods from a nut store in order to help his park mates with their winter stash. Starring the voices of Will Arnett, Brendan Fraser and Katherine Heigl. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Ride Along

An action-comedy directed by Tim Story (Barbershop) about a small-time security guard (Kevin Hart) who goes on a ride-along with his fiancée’s brother, an Atlanta cop (Ice Cube), in an effort to prove himself worthy to marry his sister (Tika Sumpter). Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

That Awkward Moment

A rom-com about three best buds (played by Zac Efron, Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan) who are struggling with relationships and commitment. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Keep it short!

Deadline: Feb. 19

Vampire Academy

A 17-year-old half-vampire/half-human is tasked with protecting a group of mortal vampires from “bloodthirsty” immortal vampires. Based on the first book in Richelle Meed’s best-selling young-adult paranormal romance series of the same name. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

February 13, 2014

CN&R 33

it’s time to

DisCoVeR CHiCo

A FREE Guide for Visitors and Locals, too. ThE nEwEsT EDiTion is coMinG soon! Advertising in Discover Chico will enrich the stay of visitors to Butte County by directing them to the best places to shop, eat and stay. Most importantly, it can help them find you and your business. To be a part of the next Discover Chico, call your Chico News & Review advertising representative today.

Publication Date: March 21 Call your News & Review advertising representative today, (530) 894-2300

ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

BE MINE, CHICO Didn’t make a reservation for a fancy dinner spot in time for this Valentine’s weekend? Good! There’s way too much killer stuff going on in Chico anyway—our This Week (pages 24-25) and Nightlife (pages 28-29) sections are overflowing with fresh events, and Pontiak is coming (See Music, page 24) on Friday to Café Coda! Here are Arts DEVO’s other picks: Today, Feb. 13: Word! Poetry Slam: Chico State has a full slate of lectures, talks, films, music and more in honor of Black History Month (visit the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at www.csuchico.edu/ diversity for a full schedule), and tonight at the Naked Lounge Tea & Coffeehouse, at 6 p.m., it’s a two-round poetry slam (first 20 to sign up are in!). Also tonight, at 7:30 p.m., the Blue Room Theatre opens Gidion’s Knot (which runs through WORD! at Naked Lounge. Feb. 22). The play—which won best new play at the 2012 Contemporary American Theater Festival—stars Hilary Tellesen and Sheri Bagley. Friday, Feb. 14 (and Saturday, Feb. 15): The Uncle Dad’s Art Collective is bringing all of its creative powers to the 1078 Gallery for Everybody in Outer Space Stayed in Room 213. The original “burlesque and vaudeville show” is from the mind of dancer/choreographer/artist Eva Blanshei and will feature music by Aubrey Debauchery & The Broken Bones. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. both nights. Saturday, Feb. 15: Two art shows: Chico musician/artist Johnny Dutro played with the fancy toys (3-D printer, etc.) at Idea Fabrication Labs to create the works for his new show, Myriad Wonder (reception 3-6 p.m.), and Kyle Forrest Burns debuts a set of large format (120mm) black-andwhite photographs during a reception at the Naked Lounge, starting at 7 p.m. ARTS AND ENDS Word on The Facebook is

that the Blue Room is bringing back the rad and wildly successful Hedwig and the Angry Inch rock-show musical! Local theater stud Matt Hammons will reprise the role he first owned a decade ago, and he’ll be reuniting with at least some of the original cast and band as well. Official dates haven’t been announced, but it looks to be opening in early spring. Stay tuned. Speaking of theater, there’s a new a face in the local scene. Well, some old-school faces—including Blue Room co-founder Denver Latimer—doing something new: Slow Theatre. As the name might suggest, the group’s mission is to take a “deliberate approach to artistic production involving outreach to find stories within our community, published research to bring contextual understanding to our artists and audiences, multiple readings of the script within ever widening circles of our community to prompt critical dialogue, and workshopping the text.” There are currently several projects in the works (including the The Butcher Shop 2014 festival), and the new company will be holding a benefit on March 7—with readings, appetizers and music by Susan Schrader—to raise money to pay for obtaining nonprofit status. Visit www.slowtheatre.com for more info. Last, the Chico Arts Commission is conducting an Arts and Economic Prosperity study to measure the impact that arts has on our community. The results would be an invaluable tool for convincing public officials to be smart and save a little something for art, which we all know pays enormous cultural and economic dividends for very little investment. If you want to take part, contact Commissioner Muir Hughes at muirhughes@yahoo.com. Matt Hammons returns as Hedwig.

CN&R FILE PHOTO

34 CN&R February 13, 2014

Kyle Forrest Burns at Naked Lounge.

Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING

LOVE’S REAL ESTATE Forward in Reverse

Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

The reverse mortgage has shifted into a new gear. The loan program that allows people to tap their home’s equity for income can now be used to either buy or refinance a home. The reverse mortgage is backed by the Fair Housing Administration, and was created for people older than 62 to refinance the equity in their home, eliminate monthly payments and use the money as a cash advance or monthly income, with the guarantee that they will never owe more than their house is worth.

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

Beautiful CALL MIKE McCRADY

530.321.3726

Amber Grove Home 4 bed/2 bath, 2,200 sq ft. In ground pool, cul-de-sac location.

$

379,000!

The program now also allows for people older than 62 to buy a home and finance the debt as a reverse mortgage so they have no monthly payments, and receive money instead. “The reverse mortgage completely changed my life,” says Carol Hennison. “After my husband passed, I couldn’t keep our home. The payments and upkeep were too much.” Carol sold her home and with the proceeds made a down payment on her newer, smaller place. She financed the purchase with a reverse mortgage, which allows her the choice of taking cash advances or receiving monthly payments. Carol chose to receive the monthly payments.

“I have no loan payment and I receive monthly income,” she says. “I can’t believe it!” The catch is that Carol’s loan balance grows over time, as she receives payments, and the loan balance could eventually exceed the value of Carol’s home. If that were to occur, though, the lender can never pursue her or her heirs for anything. The reverse mortgage program is designed to keep people like Carol in their homes and the payments she receives will continue until she moves or dies. If there aren’t enough proceeds from the sale of the house to pay off the loan, the lender takes the loss. John Baxton was behind on taxes and insurance for his house, and late on his mortgage payments. “The last thing I wanted to do was sell my house, but it looked inevitable,” he says. “Then my son heard about this program and I was saved.” Baxton refinanced into a reverse mortgage, which ended his house payments and gave him monthly income, as well as cash to bring his taxes and insurance up to date. “Now I can stay here and live very comfortably,” he says. “It’s quite a reversal!”

DOUG LOVE is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530.680.0817

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com two fire places, hardwood, dual pane windows & many other upgrades $239,400

brandonsiewert.com • 828–4597

g pendin

“Springfield Manor” centrally located in Chico $88,500

ADDRESS

TOWN

$35,000

530-228-1305

GarrettFrenchHomes.com Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in chico, Orland, Willows.

Homes Sold Last Week 29 Sheltering Pines Rd Berry Creek 833 Watson Rd Biggs 35 Perry Ave Biggs 4338 Keith Ln Chico 344 W Frances Willard Ave Chico 3111 Hudson Ave Chico 481 Silver Lake Dr Chico 15 River Wood Loop Chico 1428 Ridgebrook Way Chico 33 Turnbridge Welles Chico

Vacant lot in berry creek on just over 1/2 acre. building area & road in place along w/ 4bd. Septic installed. community water hook up. owner carry $10k down.

Garrett French

Call & see today!

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Just LIstING!

1083 San Ramon Drive, 4 bed 2 bath, 1829 sqft, newly remodeled, large yard. $315,000 call for more info

Live in the best Senior Parks

137 W. 3rd Ave for lease

Brandon Siewert

new listing

Decorator’s Dream

retail/office opportunity

EmmEtt Jacobi

Cell 530.519.6333 • emmettjacobi.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

$220,000 $194,000 $120,000 $407,000 $334,500 $329,000 $320,000 $305,000 $290,000 $270,000

1/ 1 3/ 2 2/ 1.5 4/ 2 3/ 3 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 2.5 3/ 2

1232 2160 1423 2328 1572 1679 1904 1915 2165 1367

770 Lorinda Ln 1012 Frances Dr 217 Tonea Way 1196 Filbert Ave B 1309 Jackson St 287 E 9th Ave 1127 N Cedar St 638 W 1st Ave 200 Sycamore Dr 12225 La Porte Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Clipper Mills

$267,000 $255,000 $250,000 $216,500 $195,000 $152,000 $135,000 $123,000 $108,000 $164,500

3/ 1.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 2 1/ 1 3/ 1 2/ 1 2/ 1 2/ 1.5 4/ 1

1329 1554 1528 1173 1476 1276 832 1071 1248 4070

February 13, 2014

CN&R 35

Come Live on the Ridge in…

PaRadisE For all your Real Estate Needs call (530) 872-7653

Contemporary charmer, call to see today! 3BR/2BA, 1560 SF+/$169,000 Ad #576 Sue Mawer @ 530-872-6803

2,400 SF+/- Shop and 1,368 SF+/- home on ½ acre. $99,500 Ad #533 Mike Metz @ 530-872-6828

Great building lot in gated subdivision with fantastic views, surrounded by gorgeous homes. $55,000 Ad #364 John Hosford @ 530-872-6816

Well-kept 2BR/2BA home in nicely treed, Pet-friendly, Senior park. $17,000 Ad #551 Call Sharon McKee @ 530-872-6838

amber grove Beautiful Amber Grove Home on a large lot at the end of a cul-de-sac. The home features 4 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2200 sq ft, a spacious living room with vaulted ceilings and fireplace, and large bedrooms each with its own walk-in closet. The kitchen has ample counter space and cabinetry, an eating bar, and a separate breakfast nook. From the kitchen, you have a view of the big back yard which features an in-ground gunite pool with security fence, large covered patio, fruit trees, and a private cement patio off the master suite. The home also has a wash sink in the laundry room, an alarm system, fresh interior paint and a new roof installed in 2010.

asking $379,900. Call Mike McCrady at 530-321-3726 for more information.

5350 Skyway, Paradise | www.C21Skyway.com | Paradise@c21selectgroup.com

opportunity is knocking

Great Location 3 bed, 2 bath home with separate living & family rooms, shop off the garage, newer roof & windows! Asking $268k, call Mark for a showing 530-228-2229

Hard to find 5 bd / 3 ba with 2 master bathrooms

$219,000

Dana W. Miller

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

mark reaman

(530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

530-228-2229

Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

Jeffries Lydon

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 27, 2014 – January 31, 2014. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

9554 Cummings Ln Durham 9859 Esquon Rd Durham 14944 Woodland Park Dr Forest Ranch 14175 Racine Cir Magalia 6574 Boulder Dr Magalia 13689 W Park Dr Magalia 3807 Circle J Rd Oroville 5075 Pacific Heights Rd Oroville 3815 Oro Bangor Hwy Oroville 5780 Autrey Ln Oroville 36 CN&R February 13, 2014

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

$280,000 $173,500 $410,000 $250,000 $175,000 $146,500 $350,000 $215,000 $154,000 $145,000

4/ 1.5 2/ 1 3/ 3 2/ 2 4/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5

1764 1247 2782 1640 2038 1647 1920 1507 1150 1397

3460 Stauss Ave

Oroville

$143,000

3/ 1

1165

41 La Cresenta Dr

Oroville

$135,000

3/ 1

936

950 14th St

Oroville

$110,000

3/ 1

1126

46 Highlands Blvd

Oroville

$108,000

2/ 1

1436

6312 Lucky John Rd

Paradise

$177,500

2/ 2

1713

5888 Pine View Dr

Paradise

$170,000

3/ 1.5

1420

1283 Rice Ave

Richvale

$128,500

4/ 2

1795

Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

3881 Benatar, Suite C Chico, CA 95928. BIDWELL NATIVE, LLC PO Box 2273 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ERIC FAIRCHILD, OFFICE MANAGER Dated: January 15, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000100 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AVH PHOTOGRAPHY at 555 Vallombrosa Chico, CA 95926. ASHLEY A VANDERHEIDEN 1712 Broadway Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ASHLEY VANDERHEIDEN Dated: January 14, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000094 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JEFFERSON STATE COFFEE COMPANY at

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLEAR CREEK HEALING CENTER at 3561 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. PAULA BARROS 3561 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: Paula J Barros Dated: January 14, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000093 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FINAL TOUCH CLEANING COMPANY at 11630 Dairy Rd Chico, CA 95973. KAREN RACHEL LEWIS PO Box 61 Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAREN LEWIS Dated: January 8, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000048 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO WEB ADVERTISING at 313 Walnut Street Ste 110 Chico, CA 95928 MICHAEL THOMAS ERPINO 2921 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL ERPINO Dated: January 15, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000104 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A LEGAL BRIDGE ATTORNEY SUPPORT SERVICES, A LEGAL BRIDGE SELF HELP CENTER at 3 Silkwood Way Chico, CA 95973. ELIZABETH FLEISCHER 3 Silkwood Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELIZABETH FLEISCHER Dated: January 3, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000011 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY CHICO AREA, KW COMMERCIAL NORTH STATE at 1196 E. Lassen Ave Suite 130 Chico, CA 95973. BCHM CORPORATION 1196 E. Lassen Avenue Suite 130 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOANNE MADLUNG, CEO Dated: January 9, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000055 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TRUCKARONI at 1049 Cherry St Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT BUSICK 776 E 6th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT BUSICK Dated: January 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000114 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as YUROK D AND P, YUROK DESIGNS AND PHOTOGRAPHY JOLENE A SMITH 656 East Avenue, Unit B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOLENE SMITH Dated: January 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000121 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FIRE LITIGATION CONSULTING, PARADISE SAILBAGS at 82 Lariat Loop Oroville, CA 95966. DANNY K NICHOLS 82 lariat Loop oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANNY K. NICHOLS Dated: January 23, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000146 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLISS NAIL AND SPA at 23 Forest Ave Suite 100 Chico, CA 95928. MANG LEPHAM 472 Entler Ave Chico, CA 95928. Signed: MANG LEPHAM Dated: January 24, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000156 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WIZZA TRANSPORT at 355 E Lassen Ave #16 Chico, CA 95973. FAROOQ IQBAL 355 E Lassen Ave #16 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAROOQ IQBAL Dated: January 28, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000174 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ORCHARD HOSPITAL FOUNDATION at 240 Spruce Street Gridley, CA 95948. BIGGS-GRIDLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION 240 Spruce Street Gridley, CA 95948. SHEILA CASSIE ENNES 830 Vermont St Gridley, CA 95948. LISA WEDLN VAN DE HEY 153 E Gridley Rd Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: SHEILA ENNES Dated: January 21, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000126 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE NATURAL DISTRIBUTING at 6244 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. RICHARD LEWIS CSER 6244 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD L. CSER Dated: January 2, 2014 FBN Number; 2014-0000005 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JB CONSULTING, JGB CONSULTING at 333 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. JOSEPH G BACH 333 Crater Lake Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH G. BACH Dated: January 6, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000019 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AWAKE LASH STUDIO at 1 Williamsburg Lane #D Chico, CA 95926. DOUGLAS A L SMITH 1027 N Railroad Ave Susanville, CA 96130. JIMI STURGEON-SMITH 1027 N Railroad Ave Susanville, CA 96130. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JIMI STURGEONSMITH Dated: January 21, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000131 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOR THE FUNK OF IT PRODUCTIONS at 1675 Carol Ave Chico, CA 95928. SPENCER ROUSE 1675 Carol Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SPENCER ROUSE Dated: December 31, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001633 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LEKKER TOYS at 2990 HWY 32, Suite 400 Chico, CA 95973. ELEMENTAL CASTINGS LLC 2990 Hwy 32, Suite 400 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: TOM MONCADA, C.O.O. Dated: January 30, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000186 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COWLICKS HAIR COMPANY at 166 Cohasset Rd #7 Chico, CA 95926. ROBYN L JOHNSON 9068 Stanford Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBYN JOHNSON Dated: January 23, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000144 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL The following person has withdrawn as partner from the partnership operating under: SATORI COLOR AND HAIR DESIGN at 1224 Mangrove Ave #44 Chico, CA 95926. JUDITH CHARLENE LOREN-GRACE 3181 Eagle Lake Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JUDITH C. LOREN Dated: February 3, 2014 FBN Number: 2007-0001410 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RED BANKS WRITING AND PRODUCTIONS at 1884 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOSEPH RAYMOND JR ASNAULT 1884 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE ASNAULT Dated: January 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2014-0000029 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GMB LANDSCAPE ENTERPRISES at 4 Tilden Lane Chico, CA 95928. MICHELLE SAMANIEGO 4 Tilden Lane Chico, CA 95928. SAM SAMANIEGO 4 Tilden Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SAM SAMANIEGO Dated: January 27, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000169 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CASEY’S NATURAL at 498 E 8th Ave Chico, CA 95926. SEAN CASEY APLANALP 498 E 8th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: S. CASEY APLANALP Dated: February 3, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000194 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KING OF BEASTS at 720 W. 2nd Ave, Apt G Chico, CA 95926. CALEB J OTT 720 W. 2nd Ave, Apt G Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CALEB J OTT Dated: January 6, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000020 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KP TUTORING at 546 West 9th Street Chico, CA 95927. KEVIN PARSONS 546 West 9th Street Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KEVIN PARSONS Dated: January 17, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000118 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOORE LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT, SPRINKLER PRO at 819 Black Walnut Way Chico, CA 95973. CINDI R MOORE 819 Black Walnut Way Chico, CA 95973. DAVID L MOORE 819 Black Walnut Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DAVID L. MOORE Dated: February 4, 2014 FBN number: 2014-0000206 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUETEAM, BLUETEAM REAL ESTATE, BLUETEAM REALTY, BLUETEAM REALTY GROUP, THE BLUETEAM at 7020 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BLUE TEAM REALTY INC 7020 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TROY DAVIS Dated: January 27, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000171 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names: BLUE TEAM, THE BLUE TEAM, BLUE TEAM REALTY, BLUE TEAM REALTY GROUP, BLUE TEAM REAL ESTATE at 7020 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. CYNTHIA G HASKETT 1326 Deodara Way Paradise, CA 95969. TROY J DAVIS 3184 Cherokee Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TROY DAVIS Dated: January 27, 2014 FBN Number: 2013-0001264 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RESCUE UNITED at 406 Vilas Road Chico, CA 95973. JOHN MARETTI 406 Vilas Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN MARETTI Dated: February 3, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000193 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SATORI COLOR AND HAIR DESIGN at 627 Broadway Street #120 Chico, CA 95928 DANA BROOKE HOWES 525 Countryside Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANA HOWES Dated: February 10, 2014 FBN Number: 2014-0000235 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6,2014

NOTICES CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To (names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate):

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JASON HOLMES and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): EH born on (date): November 16, 2004 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): OROVILLE HOSPITAL OROVILLE CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: April 8, 2014 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminated your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: S. THOMPSON Dated: January 30, 2014 Case Number: J-36671 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is herby given that the undersigned intends to sell the property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale online by competitive bidding on the online auction site BidCal.com. This online auction will proceed per regulations from February 18 - February 20, 2014 for sale of said property stored and located at Airport Storage, 3158 Thorntree Drive Chico, Butte County, State of California, the following: Sasamoto - Boxes, household misc Hardy - TV’s, boxes, household misc Gehrke - Building materials, household misc Lawther - futon mattress, crib, tv, couch, desk, household Howard - Bikes, ladder, dresser, tv, headboard, microwave, boxes, household Martinez - Dresser, speaker, boxes, child misc Gunn - Table, chairs, mattress/ boxsp, boxes Scott - Dresser, dining table, child bike, household Brousseau - Bike, boxes, household Stevens - BBQ, lawn mower, dressers, shelving, household misc. Collins - Toys, clothing, child bed, stroller Chapman - Ski misc, deep fryer, camping, table, dresser, printers, DVD player, auto misc, tires, toolbox, kneeboard, household misc Larue - Tools, W/D, bbq, golf clubs, rug, cabinet Watte - Couch, leaf blower, recliner, aquarium, snow skis, vacuum Lasonsky - Tools, worktable, ladder, sm fridge Parslow - Holiday misc, boxes Parks - Plastic totes, Nascar misc, boxes Gould - TV, golf, household,

ClaSSIFIEdS ➡

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February 13, 2014

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mattress/boxspring, furniture Custer - table, dresser, vacuums, child misc, household Hope - TV, couch, child mattress/bed Statton - Drum kit, couches, misc Opperman - Desk, dresser, shelving, chair, camping, toys, mattress/boxspring, books, jewelry box, suitcase, boxes Shwarze - TV, table, holiday misc, household, boxspring Purchases must be paid for at the time of winning bid per website policies. $50.00 cleaning deposit per unit collected at time of sale. All purchased items sold as is where is and must be removed within 24 hours after the time of sale. Individual sale subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Dated: this 6th day of February and 13th day of February, 2014. BidCal.com, Auctioneer Bond #MS235-69-21. Published: February 6,13, 2014 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ALLAN E. FORBES To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ALLAN E. FORBES A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARY ANN MICHELON AND JENNIFER ANN MACARTHY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: MARY ANN MICHELON AND JENNIFER ANN MACARTHY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of

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Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 20, 2014 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: PROBATE Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file

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kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40922 Attorney for Petitioner: Richard S. Matson 1342 The Esplanade, Suite A Chico, CA 95926 Published: January 30, February 6,13, 2014

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE WILLIAM R. HARPER, SR To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM R HARPER, SR A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SAUDA AARIF in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: SAUDA AARIF be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests the decedent’s wills and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consent-

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ed to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 3, 2014 Time: 9:00a.m. Dept: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40931 Petitioner: Sauda Aarif 3033 Greenville St Oroville, CA 95966 Published: February 13,20,27, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA BUTTE COUNTY Case Number: PR-40929 (PROBATE CODE SECTION 19050) In re: THE JUNE E. ROTHE-BARNESON REVOCABLE FAMILY TRUST CREATED FEBRUARY 22, 1999 BY JUNE E. ROTHE-BARNESON, DECEDENT NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named decedent that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file then with the Superior Court, at 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico,

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appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 5, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: January 10, 2014 Case Number: 161181 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES SILVA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHARLES SILVA Proposed name: CHARLES MCENESPY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 26, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: January 15, 2014 Case Number: 159311 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RACHEL KERRY CRIBB filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name as follows: Present name: RACHEL KERRY CRIBB Proposed name: RAY KEELAN CRIBB THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition should not be granted NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 26, 2014 Time: 8:30 A.M. Dept.: TBA The address of the court is: 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 9, 2014 Case Number: 161196 Published: January 30, February 6,13,20, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TALIA MAY LEE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TALIA MAY LEE Proposed name: FAHM FEUY SAECHAO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUSTINE MARIE LAWRENCE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JUSTINE MARIE LAWRENCE Proposed name: JUSTINE MARIE LEWIS-LAWRENCE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to

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California, and mail or deliver a copy to JOHN L. BARNESON, III, AND JEAN LAVERE PONCIANO as co-trustees of the trust dated February 22, 1991, of which the Decedent was the settlor, c/o Richard S. Matson, Attorney at Law, 1342 The Esplande, Suite A, Chico, California 95926, within the later of 4 months after February 6, 2014, or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or presonally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code Section 19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Dated: January 31, 2014 Richard S. Matson, Attorney for John L. Barneson, III, and Jean LaVere Ponciano, Co-Trustees Published: February 6,13,20, 2014

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show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 12, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: STEPHEN E. BENSON Dated: January 24, 2014 Case Number: 161293 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PATRICIA JEAN O’BRIEN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PATRICIA JEAN O’BRIEN Proposed name: PADDY O’BRIEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 26, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: January 27, 2014 Case Number: 161291 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOAN FERM filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PEYTON DONEVON PAIVA Proposed name: PEYTON DONEVON FERM THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and

this Legal Notice continues

must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 19, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: F. CLARK SUEYRES Dated: January 23, 2014 Case Number: 161256 Published: February 6,13,20,27, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EDWARD VERN THOMAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EDWARD VERN THOMAS Proposed name: EDWARD THOMAS MCDONALD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 2, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: February 4, 2014 Case Number: 161318 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VAN WYATT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VAN WYATT Proposed name: LARRY EUGENE PIXLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 26, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: February 3, 2014 Case Number: 161323 Published: February 13,20,27, March 6, 2014

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In

her TED talk, science writer Mary Roach made it clear that human beings don’t need genital stimulation to experience orgasms. She spoke of a woman who routinely reaches ecstatic climax by having her eyebrows caressed, and another woman who reaches the “big O” simply by brushing her teeth. Then there’s the woman who can simply think herself into coming, no physical touch necessary. I can’t guarantee that a similar aptitude will suddenly turn on in you, Aries, but the coming days could bring you as close as you have ever been. Right now, you’re a connoisseur of deep pleasure—a blessed bliss master.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The fact that someone else loves you doesn’t rescue you from the project of loving yourself,” writes blogger Sahaj Kohli. Nothing else rescues you from that quest, either, I would add. Sooner or later, whether it’s now or 20 years in the future, you will have to master this fine art. It’s not enough to merely feel affection for yourself; not enough to seek pleasure and avoid pain. You’ve got to make extensive investigations to discover what it means to love yourself, you have to develop rigorous plans for how to accomplish it; and you must fire up a deep commitment as you actually carry out those plans. By the way, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to work on mastering this fine art. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “[D]runk

with my madness, I shouted at him furiously, ‘Make life beautiful! Make life beautiful!’” So says a character in a prose poem by Charles Baudelaire. And now, even though I am neither drunk nor furious nor consumed with madness, I am whispering the same command to you. I hope you will respond by embarking on a heroic effort to make life beautiful everywhere you go. The astrological omens suggest that if you do, you will be inundated with practical blessings that are as valuable as money. This will also be an excellent way to drum up the kind of love you crave.

lovemaking. “Ten years of fitting our bodies together / and still they sing wild songs in new keys,” she writes. What’s their secret? It’s “timing, / chemistry, magic and will and luck.” What I wish for you this Valentine season, Libra, is that you will have access to all five of those ingredients as you reinvigorate your relationship to love. More importantly—based on the current cosmic omens—I predict you will have access to them.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Jesuit priest Pedro Arrupe touted the practical value of being totally in love. “What you are in love with, what seizes your imagination, will affect everything,” he said. “It will decide what will get you out of bed in the mornings, ¡K how you spend your weekends, what you read, who you know, ¡K and what amazes you with joy and gratitude.” Are you in love, Scorpio? With either a person, a beloved animal, a certain patch of land, your creative work or life itself? If not, there’s no excuse! Astrologically speaking, it’s an excellent time for you to be stupendously in love with someone or something—anything! If you are already in this state, trust your intuition to make it even smarter and finer. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Borrowing the words of Rumi (translated by Coleman Barks), I’ve prepared a love note for you to use as your own. Give it to a person whose destiny needs to be woven more closely together with yours: “You are the sky my spirit circles in, the love inside love, the resurrection-place.” Would you like even more inspirational words to deliver to your chosen one? I hope so. Be greedy for lyrical bonding. Lust for springy intimacy. Feed your churning yearning. Try saying this, lifted from the book The Last Unicorn: “We are two sides of the same magic.” And be sure to say this, paraphrased from Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh: “I love you in a way that will always make you feel free.”

I wish for you during the Valentine season: to be happily in love with an intimate partner who loves you back. If that’s not feasible, here’s what I hope: that you are learning provocative lessons about yourself through your growth-inducing relationship with a close ally. And if you’re not blessed with either of those experiences, here’s a third alternative: that you cherish your fathomless longing for its own sake, feeling wonder and reverence for its wild power even if it’s unfulfilled.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “People think a soul mate is your perfect fit,” said author Elizabeth Gilbert. “But a true soul mate is a mirror, the person who shows you everything that is holding you back. ... [T]hey tear down your walls and smack you awake ... shake you up, tear apart your ego a little bit, show you your obstacles and addictions, break your heart open so new light can get in, make you ... transform your life.” Does that sound like the kind of person you want in your life, Capricorn? Or do you prefer someone who likes what you like, appreciates you just as you are, and makes your life more secure and comfortable? This Valentine season is a good time to make or renew your commitment to one choice or the other. Whatever you decide, you’re likely to experience it on a richer, deeper level during the next 12 months.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Making eye contact

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Do you

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s what

is essential for building potent links with people you care about. It bypasses rational thought, stimulating chemical reactions in your bodies that enhance empathy and intimacy. In practicing the art of love, it’s one of the most potent moves you can make. This Valentine season would be an excellent time for you Leos to explore the frontiers of what’s possible through prolonged eye contact. Start here: Cultivate a sincere desire to know what’s simmering inside the souls of your dearest allies. With that as your driving force, your gaze won’t be clouded by shyness or self-consciousness.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “I prefer an

ecstatic orgasm to a lot of angst,” says Filipino artist David Medalla. I hope you consider making that your battle cry during this Valentine season. It would be in rapt harmony with the current cosmic omens. There really is no need for you to get sidelined by anxiety or distracted by stress when the natural remedy is so easily available. In every way you can imagine, Virgo, fight off sourness and dourness by engaging in acts of joy and pleasure.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In her poem

“Implications of One Plus One,” Marge Piercy marvels at the way she and her long-term partner keep finding new nuances in their

Bouquet artist

by Rob Brezsny

feel oppressed by Valentine’s Day? Maybe you’re single and reject the cultural bias that says being in an intimate relationship is the healthy norm. Or maybe you’re part of a couple but are allergic to the cartoonish caricatures of romance that bombard you during the Valentine marketing assault. If you’d rather consecrate love and intimacy in your own unique way, untainted by the stereotypes flying around, I invite you to rebel. Make this the year you overthrow the old ways and start a new tradition: Valentine’s Day 2.0. Mock sappy, sentimental expressions of romance even as you carry out futuristic experiments in radically slaphappy love.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I have

come to be fascinated with the messiness of desire,” wrote novelist Ashley Warlick, “with the ways people fit themselves together, take themselves apart for each other, for want of each other, of some parts of each other.” Your assignment, Pisces, is to celebrate the messiness of desire, to not just grudgingly accept it as an inconvenience you’ve got to tolerate, but rather to marvel at it, be amused by it, and appreciate it for all the lessons it provides. Your motto this Valentine season could be, “ bless the messy largesse of my longing.”

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

story and photo by

Vic Cantu

Valentine’s Day is upon us, and many are giving their sweeties the loving gift of flowers. Women melt for them, and guys love them, too. Chico’s Marc Kessler has been growing, arranging and selling flowers organically for the lovers’ holiday—and all other special occasions—for 18 years. You can find him and his wife, Julia Keener, at the stand for their California Organic Flowers farm during the Saturday Farmers’ Market in Chico from late February through the week before Thanksgiving, or you can visit www.Cali forniaOrganicFlowers.com to order online.

What got you interested in flowers?

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of February 13, 2014

I’ve always loved flowers, farming and the whole lifestyle. Flowers are a beautiful way for people to connect with nature. It’s a thrill to work behind a beautiful stand of flowers and see the joy on someone’s face when they receive a bouquet.

What are the most popular Valentine’s Day flowers? The most popular one is the Anemone, which comes in bright red, white, pink or purple. It’s cup-shaped with a dark purple center that is dense and pincushioned, kind of like a sea anemone. People like them because of their bright colors, and they are long lasting—at least a week. Another Valentine’s favorite is the Narcissus, which is yellow and very fragrant.

What’s your approach to designing bouquets? I choose bright colors with matching textures. It’s similar to how an artist paints, using harmonious colors on their palate to put on the

canvas. For Valentine’s Day I use colors that are adjacent on the color wheel. Red and pink are more romantic and feminine, whereas blue and white are more masculine. I don’t use a lot of filler—mostly big, beautiful flowers.

Is Valentine’s Day your busiest time of year? Actually, Mother’s Day is twice as busy as Valentine’s Day. Everyone has a mom, and often she doesn’t live in the same town, so it’s natural to send her flowers. Valentine’s isn’t as big because many people do something else, like go out.

Why do people choose organic flowers? Mainly people want a happy story behind their purchase. If they’re grown using slave labor in South America, it diminishes their purchase. We don’t spray and kill things. Instead we attract beneficial insects and other animals like bluebirds, dragonflies and hummingbirds that prey on would-be pests. To my knowledge, I’m the only 100 percent certified organic flower-shipping website in the world.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Punishment Anthony is taking the week off; we’re rerunning a 2007 column. When my sons were little boys, during one of their many altercations one of them kicked the other. I yelled and threw a chair—you know how gorillas tear up innocent vegetation and throw it around? Like that. I admit that if my son had been hurt by a stranger, the stranger would be at risk. My knee jerks, too. If he had been hurt by you, you would be at risk. But because my son was deliberately hurt by my son, things were not so clear. I wasn’t going to hurt my son for hurting my son. That’d be like killing a guy because he killed somebody else. Stupid. Should I have let him buy his way out with a fine, like a corporation? Should I have denied him companionship? Confined him to his room? Damned if I know. More than anything else, I just wanted him not to do it again. That was primary, but I also wanted him to be remorseful, to be sincerely sorry he’d deliberately hurt his brother. Why did I want him to feel bad? How could feeling bad be useful? It isn’t, except as an indication that you’re doing something you oughtn’t. I noticed Richard Ek’s recent Guest Comment about the criminal-justice system’s lack of perfection, especially in regard to the value of DNA testing. I’m continually aware of my own good fortune in manag-

ing to stay out of jail, because I know that breaking the law is not a prerequisite for being locked up. I’ve read that our system of punishment is based on the notion that confinement protects the rest of us from those who have offended the sensibilities of lawmakers and others full of various kinds of fear, and gives prisoners time to reflect on their misdeeds and change their ways. Corrections. Right. Wrongful imprisonment commands my attention because one man convicted and sentenced to death in Illinois, my home state, and subsequently released because of innocence was Anthony Porter. That Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after 16 years on death row, two days before his scheduled execution. His family had already arranged for his funeral. The Chicago cops had intimidated a prosecution witness—who hadn’t seen the shootings Porter was accused of—into identifying him as the murderer they were looking for. Neat and tidy. Anthony Porter, like millions of others, was caught up in the almighty system, the system of punishment—not justice—that’s a haven for sadists and bullies that rewards killer cops with a paid vacation. Thich Nhat Hanh says, “Hatred can never answer hatred; all violence is injustice.” As for my wayward son, I couldn’t think of a punishment that made sense to me, so I hugged him. It was the best I could do. February 13, 2014

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