Issuu on Google+

KISS THIS See MUSIC, page 30

CO UNCIL

PLOTS COURSE See NEWSLINES, page 8

TALKIN’ TESLA See GREENWAYS, page 16

TRAILER TRASHIN’

High-stakes players in Butte County’s medical field PAGE 18 Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Vol. 37, Issue 20

Thursday, January 9,

See REEL WORLD, page 28

2014


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cleft lip and palate related problems. He is also an active member of the following professional organizations: • American Dental Association • California Dental Association • Northern California Dental Society • American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons • California Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons • American Dental Society of Anesthesiology • California Dental Society of Anesthesiology

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1HZ´<RX¾6SHFLDO0RQWKV)5((6HHPHPEHUVKLSIRUGHWDLOV 2 CN&R January 9, 2014


Vol. 37, Issue 20 • January 9, 2014

OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES The Pulse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

GREENWAYS EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . 17 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . 17

17

33 COVER STORY

18

ARTS & CULTURE Film Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . 25 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

REAL ESTATE

35

CLASSIFIEDS

37

BACKSTOP From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . 39

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

CN&R

ON THE COVER: PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Associate Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom Gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Projects Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Emiliano Garcia-Sarnoff, Meredith J. Graham, Miles Jordan, Karen Laslo, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, Melanie MacTavish, Jesse Mills, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Matt Siracusa, Robert Speer, Daniel Taylor, Evan Tuchinsky Intern Katherine Green Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Design Mary Key, Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Manager Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Alex Beehner, Brian Corbit, Krystal Godfrey, Laura Golino, Matthew Keller Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

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A rush to judgment Two eyewitnesses to an incident at the downtown Starbucks

A public-safety pitch Wsients appear successful, many of the problems just moved into our neighborhoods and parks. One incident I read hile efforts to clean up our downtown of tran-

about involved a woman and her grandchildren who were heading into Children’s Playground, where, to her horror, she saw a homeless man defecating under a tree just yards from where dozens of youngsters were playing. She correctly surmised, “We have not yet found a solution.” But there are solutions. Imagine you’re visiting your favorite park when three uniformed Chico firefighters greet you as they pass by on their way to speak with a few transients who by are hanging out there. With the training Bob Evans they already have, firefighters should be capable of identifying those who genThe author is a uinely need help, and guiding them to longtime Chico facilities where they can get it. And for resident and former the troublemakers, just knowing somecity councilman. one is watching would be very effective—within a few visits, they will probably take the hint, pack their belongings and leave. Is this possible? Do our firefighters have the time to join our community-wide efforts to find additional safety solutions? Yes, firefighters stay busy when not responding to calls. They have equipment to maintain and training to complete. But 4 CN&R January 9, 2014

with a little creative planning, each crew, I believe, can fulfill these duties and still add neighborhood patrols to every shift. Want an example? Firefighting crews respond to medical calls every day, meaning they’re already out in the community. Adding patrols could be as simple as taking an extra 15 minutes on their way back to their station to patrol known neighborhood trouble spots. Firefighters have valid concerns about dealing with illegal activities or belligerent transients. We’re not asking them to. They should do what they would normally do: call for a police response. Personally, I’d rather have three firefighters happen upon these troublemakers than an unsuspecting family. Are there other details to work through? Possibly, but the basic concept makes so much sense. Remember, at any given time, we normally have 17 firefighters on duty. At the same time, only six police officers are on patrol. Yet, making Chico’s families feel safer in our parks and neighborhoods is still within our reach. Our firefighters’ willingness to add these patrols could be one key to making that happen. In my view, it makes perfect sense that, in this time of tight budgets, we explore every opportunity to use the public-safety employees we already have on duty to help safeguard our parks, neighborhoods and citizens. Ω

on New Year’s morning say a man who was arrested at the coffee shop was unfairly singled out. We believe that’s because that man is a transient. According to their accounts, Chico Police officers showed up to arrest 28-year-old Gerard Devaughn Hamlett, whom a store manager reported had an offensive odor. That unidentified female manager called the police when Hamlett reportedly refused to leave the chain coffee shop. But instead of asking Hamlett to explain his side of the story, the officers rushed to judgment. They pushed him off his chair, cuffed him and forcefully escorted him out of the building. He was arrested for trespassing and on warrants for other infractions homeless individuals face in their day-to-day lives on the streets. Problem is, the same witnesses say that Hamlett didn’t smell bad to begin with, and that he became belligerent only after being asked to leave. And by the time the CPD got to the scene, he was quite calm. If the officers had bothered to talk to these witnesses, they’d have known all that. A police sergeant told the CN&R that the store manager called the CPD for what amounted to a citizen’s arrest—only the police would be the ones to enforce it. It happened as a result of a “legal technicality” whereby Starbucks wanted him booted and was willing to testify Hamlett committed a crime. That alone triggered the arrest. In other words, the officers sided with the manager without investigating the situation whatsoever. It’s hard to imagine that the Chico Police would apply this logic elsewhere. And that seems criminal. At the very least, CPD officers should have asked Hamlett to leave. They ought to have given him a chance to do so, before slapping him with a citation. Going forward, the department should take a close look at its protocol in these situations. As it stands, it smacks of favoritism. As for Starbucks and its manager, we understand that businesses have a right to refuse service to whomever they choose, but it certainly isn’t good business to toss people out, especially for no good reason. Ω

In the hands of voters Last weekend, advocates of the Chico Certified Farmers’

Market and its Saturday-morning market announced they are seeking a ballot initiative in the general election that will allow citizens to decide whether the weekly event should stay at its current location. We cannot think of a better way to once and for all put an end to the controversy over the market’s location at the city-owned parking lot at Second and Wall streets. Debate about whether or not the event is good or bad for downtown business has been taken up by various factions for many years. Despite actual research conducted by Chico State University that claims the market is beneficial to commerce, several critics in the business community continue bleating on about how the opposite is true. Meanwhile, market leaders have had no intention of ever moving the event. They have also refused to partake in stakeholders’ meetings organized by the city, charging the group was weighted in favor of business people. We don’t see it that way, but it is what it is. The bottom line is that neither side is budging. We’re tired of the perennial arguments about the market’s location. We think the event is great where it is, but we also think it’s outgrown the space. If voters believe the market should stay put, hopefully that will allow it to expand to the other rows of the parking lot. If voters decide the Second and Wall lot isn’t a good spot, perhaps another location will be even better. Either way, this is a chance for the community to have the final say. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

I ❤ nurses Our cover feature in this week’s paper introduces readers to eight people in the local health-care field who often work in intense emergency situations. The list includes a doctor, an emergency medical technician, a couple of paramedics, and a few nurses. And nurses, in my experience over the last year, are unsung heroes. In February, my father had a heart attack. I didn’t have an opportunity to meet the doctor who performed the life-saving angioplasty, but I did meet, as I sat in his recovery room at Enloe Medical Center, some wonderful nurses who took care of him after the procedure. They were amazing. Kind and supportive. Every time I left my dad’s room, I felt like he was in good hands. At the time, I had no idea I’d be spending so much time in hospitals in 2013. Between spring and early fall, my toddler son, Henry, battled pneumonia three times. Twice we rushed to Enloe’s emergency room, where we were well taken care of by ER nurses, including the triage nurses who, realizing his fragile state on both of those occasions, whisked Henry into the care of excellent doctors. This past fall, in efforts to resolve his chronic respiratory issues, Henry underwent two surgeries, the latter of which required him to spend the night at the hospital. His surgeon—an ear, nose and throat specialist—was great at easing the worries my husband and I had about the procedures: an adenoidectomy and a tonsillectomy. And then there was the aftercare we received during his hospital stay. I say we because it became clear to me that, as an extension of our son, my husband and I were affected by the care he received. All of the nurses who looked after Henry were pros, but pediatrics nurse Molly Rudgers was a blessing. She kept his mother (a reporter with an insatiable curiosity) apprised of everything she did to care for him. That included explaining why the alarms he was hooked up to beeped, as well as, say, what types of medications he was being given and what sort of side effects they might have. If she was annoyed by my motherly inquisitiveness, she never let on. I’m nowhere near being a “hugger,” but when Molly walked the three of us out of the hospital, I couldn’t help myself. More recently, in early December, my stepfather, Rick, had a brain aneurism. He was flown by helicopter to Enloe and then to UCSF Medical Center. There, he underwent surgery to repair the broken blood vessel. The intensive-care unit was his home for weeks before he was stable enough to be transported to a rehabilitation facility. I was with my mom for the first few days of his care, a rollercoaster period during which, at times, the situation appeared very dire. He was one of the lucky ones and, as I write this column, is headed back to his real home. In that situation, too, we turned to nurses for guidance and support—for Rick and for us. There’s a saying that goes, “Nurses are angels in comfortable shoes.” I believe it.

Artists missing Re “Who to watch” (Cover feature, by CN&R staff, Jan. 2): I wasn’t surprised that not one person in the plastic arts, painters and sculptors was listed in the CN&R’s “Who to watch” in 2014. There wasn’t even one writer, nor a poet. One thing that I liked about living in Europe for 20 years was the great respect Europeans had for artists. Some artists could even be elected prime minister of their country. I do know that art occupies so little of the American mind, but it is important, and the people who produce it are great additions to any society. The importance of art should not be underestimated, especially in our post-postmodern world, where fluff has replaced thinking, and kitsch has taken over. Chico is not alone in this. San Francisco, once the home of the hippies, has now been replaced by techies, all absorbed in their iPads and smartphones. The new year needs thinkers more than it ever has.

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Great news for nonprofits Re “Encouraging food localization” (GreenHouse, by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia, Jan. 2): [Cultivating Community Advocates’ distribution of grant funding] is fantastic news for three crucial Chico community-service providers. I have met and interviewed numerous people whose lives have changed, and continue to change, thanks to all three of these organizations [the Jesus Center, Catalyst Domestic Violence Services and the Work Training Center]. It warms my heart. I’m particularly pleased with the Jesus Center grant for agricultural training for community members experiencing homelessness. BILL MASH Chico

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Let’s talk about bees Re “Saving the bees” (Editorial, Jan. 2): Last summer, I became very aware of another disturbing phenomenon that may or may not be related to the loss of honey bees. Every spring and summer, whenever I turned on a porch light, it would collect a host of flying insects. This last summer, however, there were hardly any. A number of times, the light would not attract even one insect after being on for several hours. It scares me and I would like to know what is happening. I have mentioned this to several people and no one seems concerned. The attitude seems to be, “So what? They are nothing but a nuisance.” Just as honey bees are essential to our LETTERS continued on page 6

Michael Erpino

Christina M. LaPointe

Ralph Slater

Ben Scarfe

January 9, 2014

CN&R 5


continued from page 5

agriculture, all insects are an essential part of nature. If we lose insects, we will also lose plants, birds, fish, amphibians and mammals all the way up and down the food chain. Nature has established a very delicate balance. By introducing deadly chemicals to destroy insects, we might just be sealing our own fate. ROBERT GRIGNON SR. Paradise

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Re “What about my rights?” (Letters, by Andrew Palmquist, Jan. 2): Andrew Palmquist states that because of Assembly Bill 1266, “K-12 children, as young as 5 years old, will be exposed to Jimmy coming to school as Janie and wanting to use the toilet like a girl, and even to exhibit him/herself as a girl in front of other young impressionable students.” Would Mr. Palmquist consent to tell us what schools he went to where he was required to “exhibit” himself so that those of us more concerned by that notion rather than what genitals the person in the next stall possesses might ensure our children do not attend such institutions? NATHANIEL PERRY Chico

Here’s a little reality about Assembly Bill 1266: The phenomenon of transgender people is something all of us who are not among them find difficult to understand. It is foreign to our experience. But it is clearly real. A few of our fellow citizens— including some children—feel deeply that their “real” gender is at odds with their physical bodies. For nearly all such people, the process of transition, living as the person they feel they are, is agonizingly difficult. Many experience bullying, mockery and ridicule. A distressing number are driven to suicide. The new law and school policies to implement it are simply allowing that small number of transgender students in our schools to live their deeply felt sense of who they are. Those who raise the specter of boys using the law frivolously to gain access to the girls’ bathroom are quite simply liars. They know as well as anyone that the law will apply only to those who are living day in and day out as a given gender. And oh yes: School bathrooms have stalls in them—no child in our schools is using the bathroom as a place to sneak a peek at someone else’s private parts. DAVID WELCH Chico

Peace requires new leader Re “No peace without justice” (Guest comment, by Sandra O’Neill, Jan. 2): I have no problem with the people in Palestine as individuals and don’t doubt that many are fine, peaceful people. Time and again, agreements have been made to end hostilities to no avail. The rockets continue to be launched from Palestinian settlements. Israel has no choice except to retaliate and it is my opinion that it has a right to do so. John Kerry, Bill Clinton and others are spinning their wheels in attempts to broker a peace deal that sticks. The only hope for a lasting peace, I believe, lies in the truly peaceful Palestinians voting in a leader who acknowledges that Israel is the legitimate, ancient homeland of the Jewish people and the best friend that the U.S. has in that area. There is no way that Hamas will ever defeat Israel militarily and I remain confident that eventually, the Palestinian people will vote a peaceful leader into power that will end the cycle of hate and violence. There are peaceful Palestinians living in Israel as proof that they can live side by side. All that is required is a change of attitude and policy. Get the government out of the way and the people will do the right thing. MAURICE PICARD Chico

Stop having babies! Re “Helping the climate” (UnCommon Sense, Jan. 2): Each child is a monster carbon footprint. When children get older they have more children. And on and on and on. Try thinking before you procreate. Other than you, who is the beneficiary? Do you think we need your kid? JOSEPH ROBINSON Chico

Supe’s clarification Re “Blame the policy, not the plant” (Cover feature, by David Downs, Nov. 21): Recent articles make it important for me to clearly state my position on medical marijuana. I do not support the total legalization of marijuana and I am skeptical that there are beneficial uses for medical patients. I have stated in the past and currently stand with four points regarding marijuana. One, as currently grown, there is a real threat to personal and family safety. Marijuana is valuable and prone to violent theft. Two, if you live near

a marijuana grow, there are intrusions on you and your family including traffic, dust, noise and odor. Three, generally, if there is marijuana grown near your property, the value goes down. Four, many of our county’s problems with illegal marijuana grows originate from the difference in state versus federal law. It is illegal across the nation, but quasi-legal here. That is confusion. I have stated marijuana laws are creating the same problems as Prohibition did with alcohol. The federal government needs to drop marijuana from a class one narcotic and regulate it from grow site to licensed sales facilities. The Board of Supervisors recently voted 4-1 to strengthen the restrictions on pot cultivation. One supervisor, Larry Wahl, voted against the stronger restrictions, and I don’t believe he favors marijuana legalization either. BILL CONNELLY Oroville

More pot talk Re “Chronic issues” (Newslines, by Howard Hardee, Dec. 12): Watching the Butte County Board of Supervisors meeting of Dec. 10, 2013, I was reminded why government at a national and state level is so inefficient. The issue was the regulation of marijuana. The board previously tried a strict ordinance, which was overturned by a vote of the people. So, the panel put the antis and pros together with the sheriff and the district attorney and came up with an ordinance that lasted one year. I watched the attempt to make the ordinance stricter; four board members voted in favor of it. The other supervisor, Larry Wahl, appeared to be angry he couldn’t get his way [to outlaw growing marijuana], and publicly chastised the other four. Now I cannot remember him ever voting before to keep the rules more liberal nor can I remember him out campaigning to defeat the “Let granny grow initiative.” Mr. Wahl, we need more common sense and less disruption. We the people need more action and less campaigning. In the end, you actually voted to keep things as they are—less restrictive. JOHN ALLEN Oroville

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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From left: City Manager Brian Nakamura, Assistant City Manager Mark Orme and Administrative Services Director Chris Constantin during the special Chico City Council meeting on Jan. 6 to set objectives for 2014.

COUPLE LINKED TO ROBBERIES

An Orland man and woman were arrested on charges of holding up two Chico convenience stores on the evening of Tuesday, Jan. 7. Around 7:20 p.m., police arrived at the Jackpot Food Mart on West Sixth Street following a report of an armed robbery, according to a Chico Police Department press release. Two hours later, the Tower Mart on East Lassen Avenue was held up; this time, an officer spotted a “suspicious vehicle” and pulled over 20-year-old Lissette Gomez. Her passenger, 24-year-old Joshua Gomez, was later accused by investigators of committing both the robberies that night. Police believe the pair may also be responsible for four other armed robberies dating back to Dec. 18.

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

ENOUGH ALREADY!

Sponsors of a state initiative to place term limits on county district attorneys, sheriffs and assessors have received permission from the state to start collecting voter signatures to qualify it for the November general election. The law would limit these offices to no more than three consecutive four-year terms. Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey was elected in 1990 after being appointed to the job in 1987. He’s faced challengers only three times in his six runs for office, most recently in 2010 when he ran against Sacramento DUI attorney Lance Daniel. Ramsey has not yet announced his political intentions for 2014. Sheriff Jerry Smith, who was elected in 2010, announced in December that he was retiring after 36 years with the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. He has endorsed Undersheriff Kory Honea for the job. Assessor Fred Holland, who was appointed to the position in 2011, is running against challenger Alan Petersen.

GARCIA GETS THUMBS-UP

Sergio Garcia, the local law-school graduate who’s been trying to get his license to practice since 2012, got off to a good new year. On Jan. 2, the state Supreme Court ruled that Garcia (pictured), an undocumented Mexican immigrant who came to America as an infant and returned as a teen, can practice law. Garcia, who applied for a yet-tobe-received immigrant visa in 1995, passed the bar exam in 2012 after graduating from Cal Northern School of Law. In a unanimous decision, the court ruled to allow qualified applicants, regardless of immigration status, to join the state bar. This counters a federal law that prohibits the expenditure of public funds—including professional licensing by state agencies—for the benefit of undocumented immigrants. California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye wrote: “[W]e conclude that the fact that an undocumented immigrant’s presence in this country violates federal statutes is not itself a sufficient or persuasive basis for denying undocumented immigrants, as a class, admission to the State Bar.” 8 CN&R January 9, 2014

Plotting the course As City Council sets goals for 2014, public pleads for more cops and trees

Dmeeting on Monday (Jan. 6) in which the council was tasked with adjusting last year’s

uring a special Chico City Council

objectives for 2014, members of the public were clear in suggesting what should command the council’s attention. by The speakers’ concerns Howard included an understaffed police Hardee department, management of howardh@ Chico’s urban forest, and city newsreview.com administration salaries, to name a few. As discussion progressed through the evening, an underlying theme became apparent: In light of the city’s tremendous financial difficulties, will there be enough funding to properly address each issue? City Manager Brian Nakamura set the tone with a sobering summary of last year’s sweeping cuts, which eliminated dozens of city positions— including the city’s tree-maintenance crew— reorganized or merged departments, reduced hours of operation at Bidwell Park and temporarily closed Caper Acres four days a week. “There was a lot of change in 2013,” Nakamura said in his opening address to the council. “As you know, we’ve had significant reductions in staffing; we’ve had some budgetary issues come forward.” During the 2005-06 fiscal year, Nakamura said, the city had $12.5 million in its general-fund reserve; in 2013, the city faced a $15.2 million general-fund deficit. The council ostensibly addressed the budget deficit on Dec. 17, the final meeting of 2013, by adopting Administrative Services Director Chris Constantin’s decade-long plan that includes repayment of $1.52 million each year through 2021-22 and an additional $700,000 in the final year, 2022-23.

Nakamura led the council through a slideshow presentation during which he highlighted the previous year’s accomplishments in each category and outlined specific goals for 2014. “What we hope to do this evening is set the framework by which we can move the organization forward in a positive way,” he said. Last year’s goal-setting session

set the city’s top priorities as public safety, finance, economic development, transportation and environment, and technology. At the Jan. 6 meeting’s conclusion, those goals remained largely unchanged except for transportation and environment, the scope of which was broadened to “community development and environment.” Public-safety goals included resolving the ongoing mold issues at Fire Station 5 and hiring five new police officers. As it turned out, many who spoke during the public-comment section of the meeting—along with members of the council—had particularly strong opinions about properly staffing the police department, and about publicsafety issues in general. With 64 officers currently on staff, the addition of five officers would still leave the Chico Police Department well short of the 83 officers Chief Kirk Trostle maintains are necessary to adequately protect the city. To that end, Councilman Sean Morgan asked Trostle to illustrate how a fully staffed department would

benefit public safety. With a full force, Trostle said, he could bring back the traffic-enforcement unit in addition to the TARGET team— the department’s gang unit that was eliminated last February due to budget cuts—as well as the currently defunct Street Crimes Unit, which focused on street-level drug sales and took “a proactive approach” by keeping up with individuals on probation or parole. Jack Van Rossum, who identified himself as a longtime Chicoan, told the council “there is more fear in our community than there has ever been as long as I’ve lived here. People are afraid— there are lots of people who will not go downtown to have dinner, people who pick and choose when they use [Bidwell Park]. In my own neighborhood, people getting mugged and armed robbery are not uncommon. “The problem is what you do with the money, because you’ve only got so much money.” Speaker Donna Shary said the police department “is in a crisis point.” “Over the last five years, for whatever reasons, 30 officers are no longer at the department,” she said, her voice trembling at times. “In those same five years, roughly nine or 10 people have been hired to replace them. To me, that’s a crisis.” Councilwoman Ann Schwab said that in place of “Band-Aids,” or reactive measures, she would like the city to “get to the root of problems.” “We know why we have extra issues


on Friday and Saturday night,” she said, alluding to partying in the south campus neighborhood and increased activity downtown due largely to college students. “If we got to the root of that problem, that would allow more police officers to be on the street other times of the week.” On that note, Councilmembers Mary Goloff and Mark Sorensen suggested they’d like to see a stronger partnership between the city and the Chico State administration in tackling alcohol-related public-safety issues. Though much discussion during

the 3 1/2-hour meeting was devoted to public safety, Nakamura identified several other goals for the city as well. Under administrative services—listed last year as “finances” prior to the city government’s reorganization—objectives included continuing deficit-reduction measures, a classification study of the city’s “rightsizing,” and exploring additional revenue sources. In terms of economic development, Nakamura pointed to continuing the efforts of “Team Chico”—an economicdevelopment group led by the city of Chico, the Downtown Chico Business Association and the Chico Chamber of Commerce—as well as working with the DCBA to “further develop and implement business attraction, expansion and development tools.” Community-development and environment goals included completing a “nexus study” on urban growth and how to pay for it; implementing an online building-permit process; continuing general sustainability efforts; and adoption of the urban-forest management and urban-area bicycle plans, both of which are currently languishing in draft form. Several speakers expressed concern for the urban forest, including local tree advocate Charles Withuhn, who noted that “we are cutting down more trees than we’re planting” and that rudderless tree-management will only “accelerate the decline of our urban forest.” Considering the city’s financial situation—too cash-strapped for a tree crew or a full police force—several speakers, including Withuhn and longtime social activist Emily Alma, questioned why certain city administrators are awarded what they claimed to be exorbitant salaries. (The salaries of Nakamura, Constantin and Assistant City Manager Mark Orme are $217,000, $160,000 and $185,000, respectively.) “It’s absurd to me that we have very high-end benefits packages for the people at the very top,” Alma said. “We need to balance it out. [The city] can make reasonable cuts so we can take care of our trees and streets.” Several speakers, on the other hand, commended city staff members for their work and acknowledged the difficult nature of their respective positions. Ω

Bill Mash (left) stands outside the downtown Starbucks where he witnessed the arrest of Gerard Hamlett (inset) for trespassing on New Year’s Day.

Bad start

PHOTO OF BILL MASH BY KEN SMITH INSET PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK

Man arrested at downtown Starbucks on New Year’s Day new year began with a rough start for a Tedhetransient who witnesses say was mistreatby employees and responding Chico

Police Department officers at the downtown Starbucks. In his online blog, “Without a Roof,” homeless advocate Bill Mash, who saw the situation unfold, said the African-American man—identified in an arrest report as 28-year-old Gerard Devaughn Hamlett—was told that customers complained he smelled, and that he was told to leave by a Starbucks manager shortly after 8 a.m. on New Year’s Day. After the man reportedly took offense, became argumentative and refused to leave, CPD officers responded and arrested him for trespassing. Another witness, George Gold of Magalia, independently emailed the CN&R with an account that corroborates Mash’s observations. In his blog post and a follow-up interview, Mash said the man initially became “belligerent” when confronted by the manager, but calmed down before officers arrived. Gold came in later during the altercation, and said he didn’t observe Hamlett speaking angrily at all, that the man had raised his voice only enough to be heard by the manager across the room. Both men said they tried to help Hamlett remain calm, with Gold taking the seat directly next to him. Both were in close proximity to Hamlett, and claim he did not emit an offensive odor. The witnesses said they were even more shocked by the actions of the three CPD officers who responded to the call. Mash recalled the conversation in his blog post: “He asks, ‘Why did she ask me to leave? I didn’t do anything wrong,’” Mash wrote. “‘Because she’s the boss—that’s why,’ was the cop’s response. “The cop asks the manager if she wants him arrested, she says yes, and away he goes.”

Gold said that Hamlett had no chance to respond before one of the officers pushed him forward out of the chair and another cuffed him. He said the officers then carried him out roughly. Gold estimated the police arrived, arrested and removed him in less than a minute, taking no time to independently ascertain the situation. “He absolutely had no opportunity to say anything or defend himself,” Gold said in a phone interview. “I’m 100 percent certain of that.” CPD Sgt. Matt Nowicki, who was not

involved in the arrest but reviewed the police reports, said the officers acted immediately upon arrival because the Starbucks manager’s phoned complaint qualifies as a citizen’s arrest. “My understanding is that he’d been asked to leave,” Nowicki said. “It’s a private business and they can refuse service to anybody, and he was placed under citizen’s arrest for trespassing. “They [Starbucks] are basically stating they wish for him to be arrested, they’re willing to appear as a witness, and that this crime occurred,” Nowicki further explained. “There’s no physical arrest done by the citizen, but it’s a legal technicality that establishes they’re willing to testify and want him placed under arrest.” The CPD arrest log reports Hamlett was arrested on the trespassing charge at 8:18

SIFT|ER Know your rights While most Americans are vaguely aware of something called the Fourth Amendment, many have no idea how to practically apply it when dealing with law enforcement, which can lead to unnecessary arrests and lawenforcement officials abusing their power. Last week, Online Paralegal Programs released a convenient flow chart to help citizens understand their rights during an encounter with the law. “Most avoidable arrests occur from trickery and intimidation, which result in the individual consenting to a search or admitting guilt,” reads part of the text, which also advises that you can legally film or make audio recordings of such an encounter.

a.m. The log also reports at 8:30 a.m. his arrest on warrants for failing to appear in court for a November urinating-in-public citation, and an unspecified nonlocal warrant. In both cases, he was cited but not transferred to the Butte County Jail. The New Year’s Day coffee-shop incident seems to be the latest in a string of bad luck for Hamlett, who could not be located for an interview. The name, birth date and description of the arrested man match that of a oncepromising Northwestern University football star who in 2005 was ranked ninth among Big Ten Conference kick-returners, before injuries sidelined his athletic career in 2006. Mash confirmed the hopeful-looking young man profiled at www.nusports.com, and whose Facebook profile lists him as owning a company called LXL Sports, is the same man he saw Jan. 1. Hamlett stopped posting to his Facebook profile last May. Hamlett also had a run-in with police the day before the Starbucks incident, on the morning of New Year’s Eve. According to police reports, he was arrested after staff at Jack’s Family Restaurant complained he was asleep in a booth and refused to leave. The report said he was booked for disorderly conduct, but released with no charges filed. On Tuesday (Jan. 7) morning, a manager at the downtown coffee shop said she couldn’t speak about the incident due to Starbucks’ corporate policy, and provided a number to the company’s Seattle media-relations office. Phone calls initiated an emailed response from Laurel Harper, Starbucks’ global corporate-communications manager. “Our stores are gathering places for the entire community, and all customers are welcome,” Harper wrote. “This customer’s experience is not consistent with the welcoming and friendly environment we strive to create for every customer who visits our stores, and it does not reflect Starbucks’ core mission and values. “We want every customer who visits our stores to feel welcomed and to enjoy their visit, and we are currently attempting to contact this customer to apologize for his experience and offer him a gift card to give us the opportunity to serve him again.” —KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 January 9, 2014

CN&R 9


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10 CN&R January 9, 2014

Across the booze spectrum City Council discusses two alcohol-related items in stark contrast to one another he two major considerations Tregular during the Chico City Council’s meeting on Tuesday (Jan. 7) represented opposite extremes of Chico’s drinking culture. The first was a proposed ordinance city officials touted as a tool for combating underage drinking and big house parties in neighborhoods with dense college-student populations. The second was a proposal that would allow the Bidwell Park Golf Course to sell alcoholic beverages, presumably to a distinctly different age group. Assistant City Attorney Roger Wilson provided a staff report on the current draft of a social-host ordinance that would hold tenants, landlords and property owners financially responsible for “nuisance activities related to underage drinking” on private property. An individual cited for violating the social-host ordinance, Wilson explained, would bear the cost of police and fire department response, in addition to facing a fine—$250 for a first offense, $500 for a second and $1,000 for a third. As currently drafted, the ordinance would subject property owners to such penalties only in cases where a written warning had been issued within the last year. Additionally, exceptions would be made for activities on private property regulated by the state department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC); constitutionally protected activities such as the use of alcohol in religious practices; somebody who calls 911 seeking medical or law-enforcement assistance for another person; and a person who calls law enforcement to terminate an event where minors are consuming alcohol, provided the person who calls “takes reasonable steps to stop the event,” as determined by police, Wilson said. The item came before the council for discussion only, with a goal of providing city staff direction as they fine-tune the ordinance’s language. Prior to the floor opening for public comment, Amanda Mont-

Amanda Montgomery of Butte County Behavioral Health presenting on the health and public-safety issues related to underage and binge-drinking during the Jan. 7 Chico City Council meeting. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

gomery of Butte County Behavioral Health gave a 15-minute presentation highlighting the large, open-door house parties that “are the norm” in college neighborhoods and the associated nuisances, such as late-night noise, public intoxication, fights, vandalism and public urination. “I’m very happy the council has looked at community policies to address underage drinking and binge drinking,” she said. “It’s critical for our community to have multiple tools and multiple policies to address these issues.” The student population was not strongly represented, though Pleasant Valley High School senior Phoenix Lacque decried how easy it is for high-school students to infiltrate college house parties and gain access to alcohol, and Chico State student Claire Godwin condemned the “excessive, high-risk” drinking common at college gatherings that can lead to blacking out, alcohol poisoning and death. Local landlord Bruce Nikolas was one of a handful of rentalproperty owners who weren’t happy about potentially being fined for parties they maintain are largely out of their control. “Why am I responsible for another adult’s actions?” he asked the council. “I can’t be their parent. I can’t be there every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night. I’ve got young kids; it’s unreasonable to put me in the position.” After a lengthy discussion, Councilwoman Mary Goloff, citing a need for significant improvements to the fledgling measure, motioned to send the ordinance to the Internal Affairs Committee. Councilman Sean Morgan

seconded, emphasizing the importance of crafting an ordinance that doesn’t “totally alienate property owners.” The motion passed 6-1, with Councilwoman Ann Schwab dissenting and expressing disappointment that the council did not take more immediate action to adopt the ordinance. Next up was the sale of

alcohol at Bidwell Park Golf Course, which is managed by Rancho Murieta-based company Empire Golf. For many in attendance—including a posse of grayhaired golfers who showed up at the council chambers in support of the proposal—the issue was as simple as the desire to enjoy a beer on the links. But for Schwab and others, alcohol sales and consumption in Upper Park is contrary to the wishes famously expressed by Annie Bidwell—wife of Chico founder John Bidwell and, during her lifetime, an activist in the Prohibitionist movement—who donated much of the land the park is composed of today. However, the economic boon presented by alcohol sales revenue and a potential increase in golf-tournament activity appeared to sway the opinions of some council members. Rod Metzler, Empire Golf’s chief executive officer, said alcohol sales would increase the course’s revenue by $438,000 a year, money he said will be reinvested through maintenance and infrastructure improvements to the course. With Schwab and Councilwoman Tami Ritter dissenting, the council voted 5-2 to allow the sale of alcohol at the course, a decision that delighted proponents and resulted in a good number of highfives. The alcohol license still needs ABC approval before being finalized. —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com


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Taylor teardown University building and its iconic mural turn to dust State’s Taylor Hall is in its last stages of life, as Cernhico is the hauntingly realistic mural painted on its eastwall in 1981 by trompe l’oeil muralist John Pugh,

a 1983 graduate of the university. For the past few weeks, workers from Sacramentobased Otto Construction have been tearing the building down to make way for a new Arts and Humanities Building set to open in the fall of 2015. The mural, which Pugh named Academe, depicts a gaping hole in the side of the building revealing Greek columns. The French phrase trompe l’oeil means “to fool the eye” and apparently this one did from early on. There have been a few stories associated with the mural since its inception that may or may not be urban myths. One says that soon after Pugh finished the piece a woman who worked upstairs in a building across the street from Taylor Hall called the school and asked the administration when they were going to fix the hole in the wall. There are also stories that the project caused several rear-end automobile accidents at the corner adjacent to the mural— long before the roundabout was installed—that were triggered by distracted drivers looking at the illusionary hole in the wall. Joe Wills, Chico State’s director of public affairs, said the new Arts and Humanities Building will offer classes, offices, recital space and galleries, and Pugh will recreate his mural for it, for which the school will pay him $75,000. “It’ll be the same as the one on the Taylor building,” Wills said. “On the same side and all of that. But in this case, he is doing it offsite and it will be attached to the building as opposed to painting it directly onto the building as he did with Academe in 1981.” About 200 core samples of the mural were removed for those who want some way to remember the work of art, Wills said. “The mementos of the mural will go to people who have requested them,” he said. “There is no cost involved and people have heard and have contacted us—probably about 50 people so far.

“We have not yet discussed when and where we will provide the mural pieces to people, but that will get discussed soon. It’s nice that we were able to find a way to take samples of the mural.” Pugh, who now lives in Truckee, said in an email response that he was in Chico Jan. 3 to see the mural for the last time.

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Taylor Hall mural Academe seen early on (top) and in its final stages as the building comes down. TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN PUGH BOTTOM PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

“I was just in Chico getting some last-minute color swatches from the mural,” he said. “It’s interesting to see them breaking the building with a mural of a broken wall. The ground was shaking, and I could hear and feel the building and the mural moaning.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

January 9, 2014

CN&R 11


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES

DEFICIT LOOMS FOR COVERED CA

When the federal government stops providing funding, Covered California—the state’s healthinsurance exchange through the Affordable Care Act—will face an enormous deficit, according to a budget estimate. Beginning on Jan. 1, 2015, the ACA will cease providing federal grants earmarked for state health exchanges, resulting in a $78 million deficit for California’s exchange, according to U-T San Diego. However, as Covered California spokesman Dana Howard noted, the budget forecasts were made prior to the beginning of open enrollment, making it difficult to estimate how the exchange’s operations budget will be affected until enrollment numbers are finalized. A potential revenue source exists in the form of an administrative fee charged to insurers for each plan sold, and the exchange plans to save federal grant money to offset the upcoming loss.

OF ANCIENT CHINESE MEDICINE

A chemical compound used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years has shown potential for modern Western applications, a new study finds. In a paper published in the journal Current Biology, researchers determined the chemical—called dehydrocorybulbine (DHCB) and found in the underground tubers of the Corydalis plant, a member of the poppy family that grows mainly in central-eastern China—to be effective in treating three forms of pain in mice, according to the Los Angeles Times. Used to treat headaches and back pain in traditional Chinese culture, DHCB effectively treated acute pain, which one might feel from a broken bone or burn; inflammatory pain caused by swelling; and chronic pain caused by nerve damage. Additionally, mice did not develop a tolerance to DHCB, further suggesting its potential use in treating long-term pain in humans.

A DANGER TO THEMSELVES

The danger posed by distractions while driving is much more pronounced in new drivers than in those with more experience, a new study finds. The study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, tracked 42 drivers ages 16 and 17 and 167 adults with more experience using accelerometers, cameras, GPS devices and other sensors, according to The New York Times. The researchers found that an inexperienced driver reaching for a cell phone increased her or his risk of an accident by more than 700 percent; texting or looking at an object on the side of the road quadrupled it; and eating while driving tripled the risk. The most dangerous activity of all was dialing a phone, which increased risk of a crash by eight times. For experienced drivers, only dialing a phone significantly increased their risk of a crash. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R January 9, 2014

Plugged in early Local childhood health professionals weigh pros and cons of ubiquitous electronics by

Evan Tuchinsky

A and more integrated with the Internet, it’s not surprising that children get exposed s people’s lives become more

to technology at a young age. Tablets were especially hot gifts this Christmas—including devices designed for, and marketed to, kids—and even youngsters who didn’t unwrap a smartpad may get the chance to use one in preschool or grade-school classrooms. Is that a good thing? Should we grin or grimace when we see a child engaged with electronics? Perhaps a bit of both, according to North State professionals involved with childhood health and development. Tablets have benefits, provided their use is judicious. “It comes back to the same conversation that we had about TV 20 years ago,” said Heather Senske, administrator of Child Development Programs & Services for the Butte County Office of Education. “It’s about the quality of the program, the appropriateness, the learning that’s offered—and then the adult who’s there to interact in order to facilitate that learning and to make it relevant to the child.” While research on how tablets, computers and smartphones affect child development remains in the early stages, television may prove an apt parallel, particularly since so many children use them to watch videos. The American Academy of Pediatrics lumps viewing and computing into one category— “screen time”—with a recommendation of no more than two hours per day, and only for children at least 2 years old. Even then, the tablet, like the TV, shouldn’t replace parental interaction. All too often, though, an electronic device becomes what Dr. Craig Corp calls “a fancy pacifier,” and an engrossing one at that. In his pediatrics practice in Chico, Corp frequently sees chil-

dren so mesmerized by tablets or phones that he has a hard time getting their attention. Not all parents want their children hardwired to technology. Ronda Gambone, owner of Little Discoveries Preschool, which has two campuses in Chico, said she used to have Leapster tablets and computers for pre-K and kindergarten students, but no longer. “So often the families get so much of it at home that our experience is [parents] don’t

want [their kids] in front of TV or technology here at the school,” Gambone said. “A lot of the preschool environment is socialization; they need to learn how to socialize and problem-solve. [Computing] was just one of those things that wasn’t working; a lot of the younger ones didn’t quite understand the concept of what they were doing.” Exposure is a matter of degrees. While some parents don’t permit their young children to spend time in front of a screen, Corp said, many do. As such, content counts. “If a child is actually going to learn something, and it’s not [presented] at a super-fast pace, that’s probably OK,” he said. “Like everything else in life, if you’re doing something active that engages the mind—doing something creative, actually putting things together—that’s better than doing things that are just passive.” Heidi Cantrell, perinatal outreach coordinator at Enloe Medical Center, has a simple saying: “Active child, passive toy.” Parents should give children objects that offer the child “control over cause and effect”: blocks, tea sets, jack-in-the-boxes and toys with buttons that elicit actions. The latter description may fit a tablet. HEALTHLINES continued on page 14

APPOINTMENT HOUSE OF SERENITY On Thursday, Jan. 9, at 4:30 p.m., the Skyway House is hosting a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for Serenity, a new six-bed substance-abuse treatment facility at 6000 Cohasset Road. The treatment program is based on the “Bio-Psycho-Social Model,” which emphasizes that addiction is the product of biological, psychological and social factors. Call the Skyway House at 898-8326 for more information on the ceremony or the program.


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Well, that’s true when used by older children; a toddler mimicking Mom’s motion of swiping a finger across the screen is probably not deriving the same interactivity, though. That’s why Corp and Cantrell endorse the AAP’s recommended limits on screen time. Children, Cantrell said, require “quality-oflife experience—human-relationship-based experiences that last a lifetime. … All humans need to be accepted and loved and have a purpose. I don’t think technology gives that as well as another human can give that to us or we can give to another human.” With tablets for children a

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relatively new phenomenon, researchers have not been able to complete long-term studies on if or how the technology affects development. A previous study linking TV to ADD could prove prescient, though. That research, published in the medical journal Pediatrics, found a correlation between attentiondeficit disorders and the amount of television children watched as infants and toddlers. The more hours watched under age 3, the greater the likelihood of developing ADD or ADHD. “The brain goes through a tremendous amount of development those first few years of life,” Corp explained, “and that’s at least some of the concern with the overuse of TV with younger kids. There’s at least some limited evidence that it can actually affect brain structure, brain development and nerve connections. “Is that good or bad? As we

Online resource:

The National Association for the Education of Young People has released a series of recommendations for technological devices. Log onto www.naeyc.org and click on the “Topics” bar (at top right), then scroll to the “Technology and Young Children” link.

move into the future with technology more integrated into our lives, I don’t know that we know the answer for that, but I think we need to be cautious with it. Not all things are good for the developing brain.” Cantrell equates a baby’s brain development with gardening, in which billions of neurons “are like seeds, and when they’re nourished by positive experiences, it encourages synaptic growth, or an electrical storm of wiring that goes on in the brain and imprints forever. …If neglected, [the garden] will never grow the root system; and if it’s over-watered and doesn’t struggle on its own, it won’t be as strong, [either].” That’s why child-development experts put such a premium on parental involvement and truly educational experiences—some of which are indeed possible with a tablet. The program in use on the tablet—be it a book, game, puzzle or video—should spark inquisitiveness and conversation. It should be “appropriate to the child’s level of development,” Senske said, and supplement other methods of learning. Noted Corp: “Technology is not all good or all evil—it’s a million shades of gray. It depends on how it’s used.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Resolve to persist

Free show!

If you’ve made a fitness-related New Year’s resolution, here are some general tips for sticking to it in 2014: • Talk about it: If you keep your resolution a secret, it’ll be easier to give up, so make your goals known to your family and friends. • Track your progress: By meeting a series of short-term goals, each small success will be encouraging; log your progress to keep how far you’ve come in perspective. • Let it become a habit: It takes about three weeks for an activity to become a habit, and about six months for it to become part of your personality.

Source: life.gaiam.com

14 CN&R January 9, 2014


New “State-of-the-Art” Outpatient Surgery Center Now part of Feather River Hospital’s vision for the future of health care

F

eather River Hospital opened the new Outpatient Surgery Center in January 2014, which brings Feather River Hospital’s recognized clinical excellence to a new state-of-the-art outpatient surgical facility. The Outpatient Surgery Center is a 13,100-square-foot medical office building located on the campus of Feather River Hospital at 1933 Peach Lane. The new center features a customized design, created through a multiyear planning process and extensive collaboration with the community’s leading physicians who will practice there. The facility integrates the latest advances in surgical technology in a setting that optimizes clinical processes for the patient’s experience in more convenient and affordable settings. The center has 4 operating rooms, 18 private pre-op and post-op recovery rooms, and two exam rooms. Initially the center will focus on GI and endoscopy procedures. In the future, other types of outpatient procedures will be scheduled. The Outpatient Surgery Center (OSC) hours will be 5:30am to 7:00pm Monday through Friday. The OSC will be closed on weekends and holidays. The telephone number for the OSC is (530) 876-7079 and the fax number is (530) 876-2165.

5974 Pentz Rd

Surgery center by the numbers ✓

6,000 cubic yards of dirt was removed from the site in order to build the new building. It took one week to remove the dirt from the site.

✓ The retaining wall contains over 4,100 cement blocks. ✓

1,100 cubic yards of

concrete was poured to create footings, slab on grade, site curbs and sidewalks.

✓ The exterior and structural walls were built of wood; over 63,000 board feet of lumber was used.

✓ Over 1,600 sheets of drywall was used. ✓

300 tons of asphalt were used on the parking lot.

✓ It only took 17 months to complete this project – 4 months in design and 13 months in construction.

P a R a d i s e , C a 9 5 9 6 9 / ( 5 3 0 ) 8 7 7 - 9 3 6 1 / w w w . f R h o s a P. o R g January 9, 2014

CN&R 15


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Left: Tesla owner Steve Foster hasn’t had much time to accumulate any junk in his new car’s “frunk.”

ATOMIC WASTE DUMPED IN OCEAN

For about 15 years after World War II, U.S. sailors aboard the USS Calhoun County dumped thousands of tons of radioactive waste into the Atlantic Ocean, often without wearing protective clothing. For years, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs insisted that the atomic waste on the boat wasn’t dangerous, according to a recent article in the Tampa Bay Times. “We turned off all the lights and … [would] pretend that we were broken down and … we would take these barrels and having only steel-toed shoes … no protection gear, and proceed to roll these barrels into the ocean, 300 barrels at a trip,” the late George Albernaz, a sailor on the ship at the time, was quoted as testifying at a 2005 Department of Veterans Affairs hearing. Albernaz died in 2009 of a heart attack, following a long battle with a brain-debilitating illness linked to radiation exposure.

‘DARK MONEY’ FUNDS CLIMATE DENIAL

A large amount of money funding the climatechange-denial movement passes through organizations that conceal the identity of the original funder, a new study reveals. “The largest, most-consistent money fueling the climate-denial movement are a number of well-funded conservative foundations built with so-called ‘dark money,’ or concealed donations,” according to a recent article by The Daily Climate, referring to the results of a Drexel University study recently published in the journal Climatic Change. The study found that untraceable donations going through “pass-through” organizations such as Donors Capital Fund and Donors Trust have risen greatly over the past five years. At the same time, “the traceable cash flow from more traditional sources, such as Koch Industries and ExxonMobil, has disappeared,” the article noted. “If you want to understand what’s driving this movement, you have to look at what’s going on behind the scenes,” said Robert Brulle, author of the study.

MERCURY ‘BULL’S-EYE’ IN TAR-SANDS

A “bull’s-eye” of mercury from tar-sands operations in Alberta, Canada, extends over an area of approximately 7,300 square miles. Levels of methyl mercury—a neurotoxin— found in the vicinity of the huge production area have registered as being as much as 16 times higher than background levels for the area, according to the Vancouver Sun. Environment Canada researcher Jane Kirk reported the findings at a recent international toxicology conference. “Here we have a direct source of methyl mercury being emitted in this region and deposited to the landscapes and water bodies. So come snowmelt, that methyl mercury is … going to enter lakes and rivers,” Kirk said. Send your eco-friendly news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R January 9, 2014

Below: Just like a cell phone, a Model S charges in Craig Horner’s charging garage.

Who resuscitated the electric (super) car? CN&R contributor takes a sun-powered spin in a Tesla story and photos by

Emiliano Garcia-Sarnoff

S pedal of his incredibly sexy new black Tesla Model S. I actually felt my cheeks— teve Foster hit the accelerator

extra-chubby from the holidays—slam back a half-inch toward my ears. “When you hit the gas, all you hear is a bit of tire noise and wind,” he noted. The soft-spoken disability attorney still uses the phrase “hit the gas” when he refers to his electric car’s accelerator pedal, but in his defense, saying “hit the combination of solar, natural gas, hydroelectric and other renewable sources of power” would be a bit of a mouthful. As we turned a corner, I saw a girl I barely know, and instinctively started waving my arms to catch her attention. Unfortunately, the Tesla took the turn with such alacrity that by the time she saw me in the passenger seat, she likely hadn’t had time to recognize me and how cool I looked throwing my arms around with epileptic desperation. Damn. Then, Foster—mensch that he is— pulled over and let me drive.

The experience of driving a Tesla—

named after famed Serbian-American inventor Nikola Tesla—is quite a bit different than that of the typical luxury sport

sedan, and a lot different than the fourcylinder, dual-baby-seat-equipped 2004 Pontiac Vibe that I’m normally rollin’. Foster’s Tesla goes from zero to 60 in about five seconds, putting it in elite sports-car terrain. But, because of its gearless electric motor, it does so in one smooth, high-torque and nearly silent continuous arc, like the Millennium Falcon going into hyperdrive. There’s none of the internal-combustion engine’s throaty whine or its jerks as it climbs through gears. Because of a center-mounted battery and drive train, the Model S handles like a lithe roadster, cruises like a luxury car and has tons of storage capacity: not only a trunk in the back, but also a “frunk” in the front. With its 85-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery, the Model S (starting price: $70,000) can travel 300 miles on a single charge. Inside, the car is outfitted with a massive 17-inch touch screen from which nearly every feature can be controlled— from asking it where the best sushi is, to navigating there, to visualizing if you’ve got enough of a charge left to do so. And, despite a few over-publicized fires (in which no one was hurt), the Model S is,

Tesla connection:

Go to www.teslamotors.com to learn more about the Tesla Model S electric car.

according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), ranked among the safest cars in existence, with five (out of five) stars awarded in every category. In fact, according to Tesla, no one has ever been seriously injured in a Model S. In short, it’s awesome—and all other synonymous adjectives, too. Foster and I drove to Sun Valley

Acoustical Corporation in south Chico to meet up with its CEO, Craig Horner. Horner was Chico’s first Tesla Model S owner. He placed the down payment on his after looking at a clay model of one, and reading a list of specifications. Horner got the car three years later, in December of last year. “Everything they said it would do, it does—and more,” he said. Horner—who has a pale, flame-colored goatee, and a Silicon Valley-type enthusiasm coupled with a Chicoan’s lack of pretension—is a car guy, a technology guy and an environmentalist, making him the perfect Tesla early adopter. “I’ve been waiting for this for 10 years,” he said. “Once there was the promise of a five-to-seven-passenger vehicle with real range that can basically run off the sun …” Horner trailed off as if having a spiritual experience while talking about the car. He said that he already has a deposit down on the 2015 Tesla Model X, an SUV with gull-wing doors. “It feels really good to be going down the road and not have


ECO EVENTS RAPTORS & SNAKES! Children ages 3 to 5 are invited to the Chico Creek Nature Center (1968 E. Eighth St.) to attend one or both of its upcoming preschool programs, on Saturday, Jan. 11, from 11 a.m. to noon, and Thursday, Jan. 16, from 3 to 4 p.m. Saturday’s event is “Slithering Snakes,” and next Thursday’s— “Rockin’ Raptors” —offers kids an opportunity to learn about birds of prey. $12 per child per event; call 891-4671 for more info and to register.

any exhaust going out and not be polluting this earth,” Horner added. On his own dime, Horner has transformed a large section of his cavernous warehouse at Sun Valley Acoustical into a four-car Tesla charging garage, which he permits Tesla owners to use for free. And, while Horner’s Model S sat there charging and looking for system updates over Wi-Fi like a giant iPhone, Horner told me that a Tesla can be driven from Mexico to Canada for free, charging at nothing but Tesla Supercharger stations. These Supercharger stations—the closest of which is in Corning—can dump in 130 miles worth of charge during a half-hour leg-stretching session. And, according to the amazingly named, Tony Stark-like über-inventor Elon Musk, creator of Tesla (along with PayPal, SpaceX and, possibly some day, the “Hyperloop,” a theoretical mass-transportation system that would whisk passengers from

G

THE Los Angeles to San Francisco in a half-hour via pressurized tubes), they’ll be free forever. By 2015, there will be enough charging stations to be able to traverse the whole country. Both Foster and Horner have solar arrays on their homes

large enough to charge their cars entirely from the sun. But if a Tesla owner (or any other electric-car owner, for that matter) plugs into the existing electrical grid, the car’s environmental benefits get a bit more complicated. Here in California, about 55 percent of our electrical energy comes from natural gas, 14 percent is hydroelectric, and nearly 16 percent is nuclear (with coal making up the remainder). Thus, based on a 40-mile driving day, a Tesla driver would generate about 8 1/2 pounds of CO2 emissions in a Model S (as opposed to 35 pounds in a gaspowered vehicle), according to the Tesla website. However, a road trip up to Idaho to visit Yellowstone could be accomplished with a whopping 80 percent of the electrical charge in the Potato State coming from hydroelectric power. Pretty sweet. But cruise down to Utah and it’s practically like shoveling coal into the back of a 19th century minitrain: Utah gets 82 percent of its electricity from coal. But, though it’s possible to drive them nearly for free, the Tesla Model S—all pimped-out like the ones Foster and Horner have—are sticker-priced at just under 100 grand (before $10,000 in federal and state credits lend some assistance), making it still out of range for the great majority of car shoppers out there. Ω

UNCOMMON SENSE A friend to the animals … online This past New Year’s Eve, there were probably plenty of partyanimal pics floating around your Facebook wall, but the “friends” you can make via the new Wild Me Facebook app are animals of a much wilder sort. Wild Me is a nonprofit involved with wildlife research that is using technology and social media to increase interest in animal conservation. And through its Facebook app you can friend a whale shark, manta ray or polar bear (more species will be added) and follow their activities as recorded by scientists. Search for “Wild Me” on Facebook.

reen HOUSE

WELCOME DR. LISA KLEIMAN

by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

COMPASSIONATE HEALTHCARE EXCLUSIVELY for CATS

ORGANIC GARDENING IN THE VALLEY My job as Greenhouse columnist, as

I see it, is basically to pass on to readers useful information related to environmental, economic and social sustainability (the three pillars of sustainability, as outlined by the United Nations in 2005). Along those lines, I’d like to let readers know about the contents of the latest Gardening Tips e-newsletter put out by Valley Oak Tool Co. (and, for the unaware, the existence of the useful newsletter in general). Valley Oak Tool Co. is headed up by David Grau, a longtime local organic gardener, gardening teacher and maker of gardening tools, such as the popular wheel hoe. Grau’s decades of experience in the organic-gardening world come to bear upon the newsletter’s short, informative pieces. In the Jan. 4 issue, a piece titled “Tools, Tools, Tools” goes into the importance of doing maintenance on one’s garden tools—such as cleaning, sharpening and oiling them as needed—at this time of year. A link is supplied to a video called “Weeding with a Wheel Hoe,” in which Grau (pictured) shows the viewer how to sharpen a wheel-hoe blade with a mill bastard file, as well as how to use the handy wheel hoe in one’s garden. Go to www.tinyurl.com/millbast to watch the video. “Selecting Seeds” notes what a lot of us backyard gardeners have been delighting in lately: the arrival of seed catalogs. “The seed catalogs Local organic gardener and toolmaker David Grau demonstrates how to sharpen a have been arriving in our mail,” the wheel-hoe blade with a mill bastard file in article says. “The attractive photos and descriptions make some of us this still from a YouTube video. inclined to order many new seeds.” Ain’t that the truth? My recently arrived, jam-packed new 212-page catalog from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds is, as always, pretty much coffee-table-worthy despite it not having a hard cover. It contains a wealth of historical, planting and intended-use information (some veggies, folks, are meant for livestock) about—as well as numerous great photographs of—the vegetables, herbs and flowers that result from the planting of the company’s vast array of open-pollinated, non-GMO seeds. Go to www.rareseeds.com/request-catalogus to order your (free) 2014 catalog from that fabulous company. Valley Oak promotes Redwood Seeds, another fine heirloom/openpollinated/non-GMO seed company in nearby Manton, as well as Wild Garden Seed, in Philomath, Ore. “Buying seed from sources close to where you grow supports your local seed farmers and also helps increase local food security,” the article reminds us. Go to www.redwoodseeds.net to learn more about and to order from Redwood Seeds, and to www.wildgarden seed.com to do the same as far as that company is concerned. “Composting is a great way to keep biomass on your property, keep food waste out of the landfills, and help build soil life as microorganisms will be attracted to the bioactivity in the pile,” we are told in a short piece titled “Composting.” The silver lining, as far as composting goes, to our current dry weather conditions in California is pointed out: “[W]e still have a good selection of dry leaves from our deciduous trees around. Dry leaves are a great foundation for making compost. A pile of leaves alone will eventually turn into a crumbly finished product. With the addition of grass clippings and spent produce, or with soiled chicken litter, and some water, the pile will more quickly turn into a crumbly finished compost.” Go to www.valleyoaktool.com to learn more about Valley Oak Tool Co. and to subscribe to its free Gardening Tips e-newsletter. Contact Valley Oak by phone at 342-6188.

A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness; it teaches industry and thrift; above all, it teaches entire trust. –Gertrude Jekyll, famed British horticulturalist

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January 9, 2014

CNR ISSUE

10.23.08

CN&R 17

FILE NAME RAPE CRISIS INTERV. & PREV.


STEADY HANDS A look at high-pressure, high-stakes jobs in the

C

ertain people in the medical profession have the daunting task of performing their duties with the immense pressure of someone’s well-being—or even life—hanging in the balance. For the CN&R’s annual Health & Fitness issue, we chose to highlight local medical professionals who often work in emergency situations where decisions may mean the difference between life and death. The following package of stories includes profiles of a pair of emergency medical responders, an obstetrics nurse, a cardiologist, an emergencyroom triage nurse, as well as a nurse and paramedic who work on a helicopterambulance crew. Each one experiences different mental, physical and emotional difficulties associated with her or his profession, but as the CN&R discovered, it’s all in a day’s work.

18 CN&R January 9, 2014

With lights and sirens EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDERS As emergency medical responders for First Responder Emergency Medical Services Inc. of Butte County, partners Shaun Welsh and Robbie Berge work 24-hour shifts during which they are constantly on call. Berge, an emergency medical technician (EMT), said that during a typical shift, they receive about a dozen calls for service, which can range from assisting with mundane ailments “like the sniffles or a

stubbed toe” to disastrous vehicle collisions or plane crashes. The partners often find themselves killing time in between calls, their ambulance ready and waiting nearby. The dramatic swings from inactivity to emergency situations make their jobs unpredictable and, at times, overwhelming. Welsh, a paramedic, said the calls they respond to generally fall into one of three categories. “In Chico,


ON CALL

Obstetrics nurse Melissa FitzGerald gently sets 30-hour-old Wyatt, the first baby born in 2014 in Paradise, into his crib at The Birth Day Place at Feather River Hospital. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

local medical field probably half the calls are where we pick someone up and take them to the hospital, and they don’t require anything more than a Band-Aid,” Welsh said. “Then there are calls where people are sick, but not in danger. We’ll stabilize them or start their treatment before getting to the hospital.” More rarely, there are true emergencies “where we don’t just have to stabilize the patient—we’re starting behind the curve and we have to work furiously to save their life.” During one particularly exhausting shift, Berge responded to six such incidents, including two automobile accidents that caused “major loss of life.” Understandably, being the first to arrive on the scene of gruesome car accidents and rushing critically sick or injured people to the hospital “with lights and sirens,” as Berge put it, can be too stressful for some. In fact, with six and seven years of experience as emergency medical responders, respectively, Welsh and Berge are already past the point where most in the field “burn out.” Berge said the average career length of an EMT is five years. So, what takes a toll on Berge? “Showing up to the scene of a child not breathing,” he answered without pause, adding that he’s a father of three children. “Everyone dreads it— nobody wants to show up to a call [involving] kids. You go, ‘Oh my God, that looks just like my daughter,’ and you freeze.” As their careers have progressed, both Welsh and Berge have found it becomes easier to distance themselves from disturbing scenes. Maintaining a certain level of emotional detachment is necessary to perform under pressure, Welsh said. “Don’t get me wrong, we care about our patients,” he said. “We’re not in this for the money. But if you connect with them too much on an emotional level, if you consider everyone your family, then you can’t make it through those calls.” Berge said that his detachment is such that, once a job is done, he usually won’t dwell on the day’s events whatsoever. “Once you’re done with that critical call and you’re leaving the ER, you go, ‘Hmm. Where are we going to eat?’” Berge said. “It sounds terrible, but it’s true.” “That’s the only way to do it,” Welsh agreed. —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com

When someone calls 911, emergency medical responders like Shaun Welsh (left) and Robbie Berge of First Responder Emergency Medical Services of Butte County are usually the first to arrive. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

Special delivery OBSTETRICS NURSE Obstetrics nurse Melissa FitzGerald and her fellow registered nurses at Feather River Hospital have a running joke about how well their bladders hold. That’s because they are so focused on their patients at The Birth Day Place—the hospital’s maternity ward—that they often forgo bathroom breaks. To say FitzGerald’s work can be fast-paced is an understatement. Depending on the day, and whether she’s scheduled as a relief charge nurse—in which case she may spend a lot of time working with outpatient expectant mothers—FitzGerald could tend to anywhere from one or two patients to up to a dozen or more. “It’s kind of like a contraction,” she said, using a birthing metaphor to describe her job. “Really intense at the peak, and we get breaks in between.” She further explained that the facility is the equivalent of an emergency room for pregnant people. One moment, a patient may be whisked away for an emergency cesarean section, and the next moment, three or four laboring women may arrive simultaneously. That certainly sounds stressful, and indeed it is at times. But FitzGerald has worked at The Birth Day Place for 16 years, which has prepared her for all sorts of scenarios. She started off as an obstetrics technician before becoming a licensed vocational nurse and then, about five years ago, a registered nurse. “I always knew I wanted to be a nurse … and working here as a tech, it just was home,” said FitzGerald, a mother of three. She recalled a few hectic moments over the years,

including rushing outside to “scoop up” patients into wheelchairs when their babies were “crowning,” which, in maternity vernacular, means starting to come out. One of her favorite delivery stories involved a Brazilian woman who came to the facility on the verge of birthing her child. She was crying out “ay-yi-yi” very loudly over and over. When the doctor arrived, he asked whether he had enough time to change out of his street clothes. Just after he walked out the door to do so, FitzGerald yelled for him to come back. It’s a good thing, too, since the baby was born within moments. “It was a beautiful birth,” she said, recalling how the mother’s cries of “ay-yi-yi” turned, upon the infant’s birth, to a joyous repetition of “my baby!” In addition to ensuring a safe delivery, FitzGerald said her focus is to provide a soothing, peaceful birthing atmosphere for the patients and their families. That means, as she put it, “helping them cope with labor, with the contractions. To me, there’s nothing greater.” To that end, she noted that The Birth Day Place itself, which offers large, homey rooms, is a comforting environment. “We’re kind of like a birthing center and a hospital wrapped into one,” she said. “We can give you that athome comfort, but give you everything a hospital can readily provide. I feel like it’s the best of both worlds.” —MELISSA DAUGHERTY melissad@newsreview.com

MEDICAL JOBS continued on page 20 January 9, 2014

CN&R 19


8 YEARS IN BUSINESS

At the heart of medicine

Dr. Vincent Commendatore is back at it, bringing experience and confidence to his new practice, Top Tier Chiropractic, located within Advanced Body Dynamics. Dr. Commendatore has been in practice for eight years and has performed over 40,000 chiropractic adjustments. Along with his 14 years’ experience as a registered nurse at Enloe Medical Center, Dr.Commendatore ties all this together to provide personalized, affordable, top notch care. During the past eight years, Dr. Commendatore has helped hundreds of local community members experience less pain and better health. He is committed to staying current with the most recent chiropractic science in order to bring his patients the latest in evidenced-based medicine. Dr. Commendatore is trained to provide non-invasive treatment for conditions such as sciatica, herniated discs, migraines, and whiplash. At Top

Tier Chiropractic he specializes in structural and functional rehabilitation of the spine which can provide lasting, if not permanent, relief. In 2014, Dr. Commendatore looks forward to helping even more people attain better health. Now Accepting New Patients! Make the call to change your health.

2201 Pillsbury Rd. Suite 138 // Chico 530.864.2249

40 YEARS IN BUSINESS

RAPE CRISIS INTERVENTION & PREVENTION The next time you’re in a room with 6 people, think about this: 1 in 3 teens experience sexual or physical abuse or threats from a boyfriend or girlfriend in one year. 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men were sexually abused before the age of 18. 1 in 5 men have experienced some form of sexual victimization in their lives. 1 in 3 women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime. Why should you care? These are not numbers. They’re your mothers, grandmothers, fathers, grandfathers, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins, girlfriends, boyfriends, co-workers, extended family, next-door neighbors, friends and children.

They’re the person you share your dreams with, the people in your church group, your teenager’s best friend, the guy on your soccer team, the friend you meet for coffee, your daughter or son. The silence and shame must end! Since 1974, Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention has been shedding light on this darkness. They are there to listen. Tell everyone you know: No. It is a complete sentence.

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530.342.RAPE (24-hour hotline. Collect calls accepted) www.rapecrisis.org 20 CN&R January 9, 2014

On the front line

CARDIOLOGIST

TOP TIER CHIROPRACTIC

Dr. Peter Wolk is a cardiologist who’s practiced his trade in Chico for the past 30 years. He works with Northstate Cardiology Consultants on Cohasset Road as well as Enloe Medical Center’s Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. Cardiologists specialize in heart disorders and diagnose and treat patients for congenital heart defects, heart failure and artery disease. When on call at Enloe, Wolk can work up to 100 hours in a week. “Yesterday I was on call, which means I have to cover all of my partners’ patients and my patients who are in the hospital,” Wolk said. “We had an extremely busy day. I had five acute heart attacks, so we had to go to surgery multiple times during the day and during the night. I worked from about 6:30 in the morning and I got home about 9:30 in the evening. Then I got called back in at 11 because we had two heart attacks come in. I didn’t get home until 2:30 this morning.” Cardiology, he said, is a multifaceted discipline, though the variety of the practice may be lessening in these days of modern medicine and technology. “It really crosses the lines of taking care of people on a chronic basis as well as being there under those tense moments when they need acute care,” Wolk explained. “That is one of the nice things about what I do—I get to step in during various times in a person’s life, and that is a really enjoyable way of servicing people. “Unfortunately, in medicine, there is so much specialization now that people end up doing just one thing,” he said. “I’m one of the old-school guys lucky enough to have done everything over my career, which I think is a real advantage, because most of the time the tough decisions that are being made are not whether or not you can do something, but whether or not you should do something.” The responsibility of having someone’s

26 Years In BusIness

ER TRIAGE NURSE life in your hands becomes less intimidating over the years, he said, and a doctor has to be confident in his or her medical decisions. “Everybody in this business has gone through trauma experiences not going well and has also had the experience of saving lives and making the right decisions,” he said. “After a period of time, you realize you’re only human. You’ve got skills and qualities you rely on, just like in any job. If you’re confident, then you are good at what you do and you accept that some-

From gunshot wounds, to babies turning blue, to fishhooks stuck in the strangest of places, Tammy Russell can never guess what manner of injuries and ailments she might encounter during a typical 12-hour shift in Oroville Hospital’s emergency

ences it differently,” she said. “You have to take each complaint at face value, and everyone’s description of their pain very seriously.” “That’s where the art and science of triage comes in,” added Debra Cox, a manager at the Oroville Hospital ER. “You can’t judge

Dr. Peter Wolk, a cardiologist with Enloe Medical Center and Northstate Cardiology Consultants, regularly bears the responsibility of life-and-death situations during surgery. PHOTO COURTESY OF ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER

Russ Kalen, DC, CsT Chiropractor and Craniosacral Therapist

Dr. Kalen has 26 years of experience using some of the most modern advancements in manual therapy. He practices a gentle style of chiropractic and treats the entire body. He is also among the handful of certified craniosacral therapists in northern California. Craniosacral therapy involves reading the rhythms of the body and the tension in the connective tissues to locate the source of your problem. Some conditions are caused by strain in the skull or around the organs. These strains are often overlooked by other therapies. Dr. Kalen then uses gentle stretches, mobilization and light chiropractic to restore function to areas of your body that have been injured or affected by chronic illness. Head injuries, migraines, chronic fatigue and chronic sciatica are just a few

of the conditions that can be effectively treated with these techniques. His frank approach to diagnosis and treatment helps you find relief and hope as well as the appropriate care.

Craniosacral Specialists

244 West 9th st. // Chico // 530.899.8863 www.drkalen.com

times you don’t do a perfect job, but your intentions are always to do the right thing. “That’s what really pulls you through when things don’t go right,” he reflected. “If you have the patient’s best interest at heart, you almost always are making the right decision.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

room. As a triage nurse, Russell is the first Emergency-room veterans Debra Cox (left) and Tammy Russell face some of the most dire medical face many ER patients—who are often the sickest of the sick, or suffering from recent- conditions imaginable on a daily basis. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH ly inflicted and life-threatening injuries— see at the hospital. “My job is to do a quick assessment of how someone else feels pain, but you still the patient to determine the severity of their have to determine who needs the most immecondition,” Russell explained. “The goal is diate care. Tammy is especially good at this.” to make sure that the sickest patients in the Russell said holidays at the ER can be greatest need are seen first.” particularly hectic, especially Halloween To do this, Russell takes many factors (“There are a lot of assaults, or some people into account—the nature of the complaint, if might have a little too much fun,” Russell they are having trouble breathing or speaksaid). Flu season is also a particularly busy ing, if their bodies show visible signs of time, but Russell said that any random day damage or bleeding, vital signs and much can be just as hectic. more. She then rates their needs on a five“You never know what to expect and it’s level triage scale, with one representing the always different,” Russell said. “That’s part most urgent need for care (“They usually of the reason why I love my job so much.” come in by ambulance,” she noted) and five Cox said it’s important for visitors to be for people seeking medication refills or folas polite and patient as possible to ensure the lowing up on a doctor’s visit. best ER visit, and both women stressed that an This is never a simple task. As anyone ounce of prevention can kill a pound of pain. who’s visited an emergency room knows, “The best thing to do is to avoid an they are rarely filled with happy, cooperaemergency-room visit altogether,” Cox tive people. Wait times can be difficult to said. “Keep your appointments with docendure, and patients may not understand tors, finish your prescriptions, wear your their conditions are relatively minor comseatbelt, exercise, and do whatever you can pared to others in need of more immediate to stay healthy and safe so an ER visit isn’t care. Regardless, Russell must treat all com- necessary.” plaints equally. —KEN SMITH “Pain is subjective, and everyone experikens@newsreview.com

MEDICAL JOBS continued on page 22

2 Years In BusIness

GentLe CoLon CLeAnSinG Betty Glasser Colon Hydrotherapist Betty is a certified colon hydrotherapist, trained by the American Institute of National Health. After getting her degree in mechanical engineering from California State University at Long Beach, she worked as an engineer for few years. She then met her loving husband and became a more-than-full-time mom. When her children left the house, she wanted to help people improve their health. Colon hydrotherapy may alleviate some digestive disorders such as inflammatory bowel syndrome, constipation, and bloating. It can also provide preventative care to anyone who is interested in having a healthy colon. Betty’s technique uses FDA-approved equipment and a combination of gravity and regulated water pressure. The system is

safe and provides even water distribution throughout the colon for maximum cleansing and Betty ensures her clients’ comfort during the entire treatment. Betty enjoys meeting new people and is more than happy to answer any questions regarding the treatment.

2251 Saint George Lane, Suite F // Chico CA 95926 (530) 513-1122 // www.gentlecoloncleansing.com gentlecoloncleansing@live.com January 9, 2014

CN&R 21


8 YEARS IN BUSINESS

At the heart of medicine

Dr. Vincent Commendatore is back at it, bringing experience and confidence to his new practice, Top Tier Chiropractic, located within Advanced Body Dynamics. Dr. Commendatore has been in practice for eight years and has performed over 40,000 chiropractic adjustments. Along with his 14 years’ experience as a registered nurse at Enloe Medical Center, Dr.Commendatore ties all this together to provide personalized, affordable, top notch care. During the past eight years, Dr. Commendatore has helped hundreds of local community members experience less pain and better health. He is committed to staying current with the most recent chiropractic science in order to bring his patients the latest in evidenced-based medicine. Dr. Commendatore is trained to provide non-invasive treatment for conditions such as sciatica, herniated discs, migraines, and whiplash. At Top

Tier Chiropractic he specializes in structural and functional rehabilitation of the spine which can provide lasting, if not permanent, relief. In 2014, Dr. Commendatore looks forward to helping even more people attain better health. Now Accepting New Patients! Make the call to change your health.

2201 Pillsbury Rd. Suite 138 // Chico 530.864.2249

40 YEARS IN BUSINESS

RAPE CRISIS INTERVENTION & PREVENTION The next time you’re in a room with 6 people, think about this: 1 in 3 teens experience sexual or physical abuse or threats from a boyfriend or girlfriend in one year. 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men were sexually abused before the age of 18. 1 in 5 men have experienced some form of sexual victimization in their lives. 1 in 3 women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime. Why should you care? These are not numbers. They’re your mothers, grandmothers, fathers, grandfathers, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins, girlfriends, boyfriends, co-workers, extended family, next-door neighbors, friends and children.

They’re the person you share your dreams with, the people in your church group, your teenager’s best friend, the guy on your soccer team, the friend you meet for coffee, your daughter or son. The silence and shame must end! Since 1974, Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention has been shedding light on this darkness. They are there to listen. Tell everyone you know: No. It is a complete sentence.

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties since 1974

530.342.RAPE (24-hour hotline. Collect calls accepted) www.rapecrisis.org 20 CN&R January 9, 2014

On the front line

CARDIOLOGIST

TOP TIER CHIROPRACTIC

Dr. Peter Wolk is a cardiologist who’s practiced his trade in Chico for the past 30 years. He works with Northstate Cardiology Consultants on Cohasset Road as well as Enloe Medical Center’s Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. Cardiologists specialize in heart disorders and diagnose and treat patients for congenital heart defects, heart failure and artery disease. When on call at Enloe, Wolk can work up to 100 hours in a week. “Yesterday I was on call, which means I have to cover all of my partners’ patients and my patients who are in the hospital,” Wolk said. “We had an extremely busy day. I had five acute heart attacks, so we had to go to surgery multiple times during the day and during the night. I worked from about 6:30 in the morning and I got home about 9:30 in the evening. Then I got called back in at 11 because we had two heart attacks come in. I didn’t get home until 2:30 this morning.” Cardiology, he said, is a multifaceted discipline, though the variety of the practice may be lessening in these days of modern medicine and technology. “It really crosses the lines of taking care of people on a chronic basis as well as being there under those tense moments when they need acute care,” Wolk explained. “That is one of the nice things about what I do—I get to step in during various times in a person’s life, and that is a really enjoyable way of servicing people. “Unfortunately, in medicine, there is so much specialization now that people end up doing just one thing,” he said. “I’m one of the old-school guys lucky enough to have done everything over my career, which I think is a real advantage, because most of the time the tough decisions that are being made are not whether or not you can do something, but whether or not you should do something.” The responsibility of having someone’s

26 Years In BusIness

ER TRIAGE NURSE life in your hands becomes less intimidating over the years, he said, and a doctor has to be confident in his or her medical decisions. “Everybody in this business has gone through trauma experiences not going well and has also had the experience of saving lives and making the right decisions,” he said. “After a period of time, you realize you’re only human. You’ve got skills and qualities you rely on, just like in any job. If you’re confident, then you are good at what you do and you accept that some-

From gunshot wounds, to babies turning blue, to fishhooks stuck in the strangest of places, Tammy Russell can never guess what manner of injuries and ailments she might encounter during a typical 12-hour shift in Oroville Hospital’s emergency

ences it differently,” she said. “You have to take each complaint at face value, and everyone’s description of their pain very seriously.” “That’s where the art and science of triage comes in,” added Debra Cox, a manager at the Oroville Hospital ER. “You can’t judge

Dr. Peter Wolk, a cardiologist with Enloe Medical Center and Northstate Cardiology Consultants, regularly bears the responsibility of life-and-death situations during surgery. PHOTO COURTESY OF ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER

Russ Kalen, DC, CsT Chiropractor and Craniosacral Therapist

Dr. Kalen has 26 years of experience using some of the most modern advancements in manual therapy. He practices a gentle style of chiropractic and treats the entire body. He is also among the handful of certified craniosacral therapists in northern California. Craniosacral therapy involves reading the rhythms of the body and the tension in the connective tissues to locate the source of your problem. Some conditions are caused by strain in the skull or around the organs. These strains are often overlooked by other therapies. Dr. Kalen then uses gentle stretches, mobilization and light chiropractic to restore function to areas of your body that have been injured or affected by chronic illness. Head injuries, migraines, chronic fatigue and chronic sciatica are just a few

of the conditions that can be effectively treated with these techniques. His frank approach to diagnosis and treatment helps you find relief and hope as well as the appropriate care.

Craniosacral Specialists

244 West 9th st. // Chico // 530.899.8863 www.drkalen.com

times you don’t do a perfect job, but your intentions are always to do the right thing. “That’s what really pulls you through when things don’t go right,” he reflected. “If you have the patient’s best interest at heart, you almost always are making the right decision.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

room. As a triage nurse, Russell is the first Emergency-room veterans Debra Cox (left) and Tammy Russell face some of the most dire medical face many ER patients—who are often the sickest of the sick, or suffering from recent- conditions imaginable on a daily basis. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH ly inflicted and life-threatening injuries— see at the hospital. “My job is to do a quick assessment of how someone else feels pain, but you still the patient to determine the severity of their have to determine who needs the most immecondition,” Russell explained. “The goal is diate care. Tammy is especially good at this.” to make sure that the sickest patients in the Russell said holidays at the ER can be greatest need are seen first.” particularly hectic, especially Halloween To do this, Russell takes many factors (“There are a lot of assaults, or some people into account—the nature of the complaint, if might have a little too much fun,” Russell they are having trouble breathing or speaksaid). Flu season is also a particularly busy ing, if their bodies show visible signs of time, but Russell said that any random day damage or bleeding, vital signs and much can be just as hectic. more. She then rates their needs on a five“You never know what to expect and it’s level triage scale, with one representing the always different,” Russell said. “That’s part most urgent need for care (“They usually of the reason why I love my job so much.” come in by ambulance,” she noted) and five Cox said it’s important for visitors to be for people seeking medication refills or folas polite and patient as possible to ensure the lowing up on a doctor’s visit. best ER visit, and both women stressed that an This is never a simple task. As anyone ounce of prevention can kill a pound of pain. who’s visited an emergency room knows, “The best thing to do is to avoid an they are rarely filled with happy, cooperaemergency-room visit altogether,” Cox tive people. Wait times can be difficult to said. “Keep your appointments with docendure, and patients may not understand tors, finish your prescriptions, wear your their conditions are relatively minor comseatbelt, exercise, and do whatever you can pared to others in need of more immediate to stay healthy and safe so an ER visit isn’t care. Regardless, Russell must treat all com- necessary.” plaints equally. —KEN SMITH “Pain is subjective, and everyone experikens@newsreview.com

MEDICAL JOBS continued on page 22

2 Years In BusIness

GentLe CoLon CLeAnSinG Betty Glasser Colon Hydrotherapist Betty is a certified colon hydrotherapist, trained by the American Institute of National Health. After getting her degree in mechanical engineering from California State University at Long Beach, she worked as an engineer for few years. She then met her loving husband and became a more-than-full-time mom. When her children left the house, she wanted to help people improve their health. Colon hydrotherapy may alleviate some digestive disorders such as inflammatory bowel syndrome, constipation, and bloating. It can also provide preventative care to anyone who is interested in having a healthy colon. Betty’s technique uses FDA-approved equipment and a combination of gravity and regulated water pressure. The system is

safe and provides even water distribution throughout the colon for maximum cleansing and Betty ensures her clients’ comfort during the entire treatment. Betty enjoys meeting new people and is more than happy to answer any questions regarding the treatment.

2251 Saint George Lane, Suite F // Chico CA 95926 (530) 513-1122 // www.gentlecoloncleansing.com gentlecoloncleansing@live.com January 9, 2014

CN&R 21


Focused on the positive

22 Years In BusIness

HELICOPTER-AMBULANCE CREW

b. scott hood, dds orthodontics “I have been practicing orthodontics for 24 years, and love the chance to get to know my wonderful patients! I love seeing the dental changes in my patients, but also love watching the changes a beautiful smile can make in their lives!” -Dr. B. Scott Hood Dr. B. Scott Hood has proudly served the people and families of Chico since 1992 with efficient orthodontic treatments and gentle care. His practice has a family-friendly atmosphere with the highest quality services for all ages. Dr. Hood’s practice offers braces for children, teens and adults as well as Invisalign® clear aligners, Invisalign Teen™ and the Damon® System. Dr. Hood and his talented staff have the experience and knowledge needed to provide a truly gentle and comfortable visit, every time!

Come in and visit them for a complimentary consultation. Dr. Hood will sit with you to talk about your plans for treatment and which services best fit your needs. Contact either their Chico or Paradise orthodontic office today!

2755 Esplanade // chico // 530.343.7021 5657 clark Rd #5 // Paradise // 530.877.4951 www.hoodortho.com

1 YEAR IN BUSINESS

Enloe FlightCare nurse Eliza Anderson and paramedic Tom Stedman on the helipad on the roof of Enloe Medical Center.

WILD OAK CAFE Owned and operated by Tim and Amy Keating, Wild Oak Cafe is a local choice for all-natural meats with no fillers, nitrates and no hormones or growth stimulants. Fresh menu options include smoked California turkey sandwiches to wild Alaskan salmon burgers. It’s not just the food that makes you feel good, “The customers are fun to interact with”, says Andrew Jones, Manager. Wild Oak Cafe was recently voted 1st Place in the Chico News and Review’s 2013 Best of Chico’s Reader’s Choice Awards: “Place for Vegetarian Food”. From vegan and gluten-free options to the paleo diet Wild Oak Cafe serves to special dietary needs.

PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

The staff at Wild Oak Cafe are proud of their customer service and enjoy getting to know customers by name. “Our employees strive to deliver quality food and service,” notes Ashley Goodwin, Supervisor. “It’s a home away from home.”

Also try their breakfast for organic fair-trade coffee and grilled breakfast sandwiches. For a New Year detox cleanse, try Ultimate Cleanse juice or Green Monster smoothie.

The Garden Villa Complex, 196 Cohasset Rd. Suite 150 // Chico 530.343.4876// Find us on Facebook 22 CN&R January 9, 2013

“We deal with death and destruction— heart attacks, car wrecks—but a lot of what we deal with is really positive, like helping a stroke victim get treatment,” said Tom Stedman, paramedic for Enloe Medical Center’s helicopter-based FlightCare program. Stedman’s words are emblematic of the calm, compassionate attitudes displayed by both Stedman and registered nurse Eliza Anderson, a fellow FlightCare employee, during a recent interview. If one is looking for stories of blood and gore flowing easily from the mouths of two people immersed in a profession that deals with attending to and transporting the critically ill on a regular basis, one will perhaps be disappointed. Anderson and Stedman work on what is essentially an “air ambulance.” They are two of a dozen medical personnel that Enloe has tasked—along with four pilots—with the job of manning the hospital’s air-based medical program. Enloe FlightCare has transported more than 16,000 patients since the program’s inception in 1985. “Either we’re getting dispatched to a scene—the side of I-5, somebody’s field—to pick up someone injured or ill, or we are doing interfacility transport of patients,” Anderson said. Sometimes the work takes a FlightCare crew (consisting of three people: a pilot, a paramedic and a nurse) as far as Reno, Redding or San Francisco. Sometimes they have to fly at night, when night-vision goggles are worn by the flight nurse to help the crew navigate through darkness, perhaps challenging weather, and maybe some birds or ducks. “What I really like about [the work] is I’ve never done the same thing twice,” Sted-

man said. “When my alarm goes off at 4:30 [a.m.] to be at work at 6, I have no idea what the day is going to entail.” Anderson said that some of the most exciting FlightCare trips involve locating the scene of an accident that has occurred in a remote area, such as the time she was called out to an accident in the Bucks Lake area, near Quincy, involving an ATV that had run into a logging truck. The incident had been called in by someone on a cell phone who had not remained at the scene, forcing the FlightCare crew members to scour the area until they found what they were looking for. Often, though, they are equipped with GPS coordinates and are able to communicate with people on the ground, asking, “Do you see us?” until they find the location of the accident. Then there is the challenge of finding a place to land that is “flat, clear of trees,” as Anderson put it, and the issue of whether or not dust or snow is going to blow up, potentially causing difficulty seeing. And, of course, there is the life-or-death situation of giving emergency medical care to the victim of a debilitating accident or illness, and getting him or her into the helicopter and to the hospital. “I don’t think you can continue to do what we do without focusing on the positive,” Anderson said. “I’ve had a couple of situations that have affected me greatly. We have to learn to process them so they don’t take on too negative a role in our life.” “I really enjoy what I do, but going to see someone’s worst day is not what I want to see, but I am unfortunately really good at my job,” said Stedman, who said he has seen so many dead people that he “can picture every one, if I had to.” —CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA christinel@newsreview.com


School tours weekly through the first week of February Kindergarten Applications due February 12, 2014 at 4pm

K-8 WALDORF-METHODS PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL

450 W. East Ave • Chico (530) 879–7483 www.BlueOakCharterSchool.org

Snow Goose Festival

THINK FREE.

accepting applications for kindergarten 2014

15TH ANNUAL

WEDNESDAY – SUNDAY JANUARY 22 – 26 CHICO, CALIFORNIA WWW.SNOWGOOSEFESTIVAL.ORG THURSDAY, JANUARY 23 FIELD TRIPS 6am - 5pm 8am - 12noon 8am - 3pm 8am - 4pm 12:30pm - 6:30pm 1pm - 5:30pm 2pm - 6:30pm 5pm - 9pm 5pm - 9pm

Marathon Big Day Birding in Yuba Co. (NEW) SOLD OUT Rancho Esquon Winter Raptors (NEW) SOLD OUT Gray Lodge & Cordi Winery Sacramento Refuge Fly-Off Thermalito Afterbay & Surrounding Grasslands Llano Seco Rancho Wildlife & Habitat Conservation Owl Banding & Survey at BCCER SOLD OUT Owl Banding & Survey at BCEP SOLD OUT

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24 FIELD TRIPS 6:30am - 5pm 7am - 2pm 7:30am - 4pm 8am - 12noon 8am - 12noon 8am - 3pm 8am - 4pm 8:30am-10:30am 8:30am-12:30pm 8:30am - 2pm 9am - 12:30pm 9am - 2pm 9am - 2:30pm 12:30pm-6:30pm 1pm - 4pm 7pm - 8:30pm

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26 PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS 11am - 12:30pm 1pm - 2:30pm

Following Your Feet (NEW) Chico Backyard Birds

Marathon Big Day Birding SOLD OUT Anderson River Park (NEW) Sutter Buttes Hike – Dean Ranch Digiscoping Workshop /Field Trip So. Butte County Raptors & Waterfowl (NEW) SOLD OUT Paskenta’s C & R Ranch (includes lunch) SOLD OUT Sutter Buttes Hike –State Park’s Peace Valley Bidwell Park Bird Walk Feather River Birds & Fish Hatchery Tour (NEW) Colusa National Wildlife Refuge Birds & Rice Growers SOLD OUT Foothill Birding & LaRocca Vineyards (NEW) SOLD OUT Dye Creek Preserve Sacramento Refuge Fly-Off SOLD OUT Raptor Run thru Butte County (NEW) SOLD OUT Family Owl Prowl

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24 PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS 9am - 11am 11am - 4pm 1pm - 3:30pm 3pm - 4:30pm

Photographing Birds & Nature – Where to Go in California Bird Carving Seminar for Beginners SOLD OUT Geese of the Pacific Flyway Photography Workshop with John Hendrickson (NEW)

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 FIELD TRIPS 6:30am - 4:30pm 7am - 5pm 7:30am - 3pm 8am - 12noon 8am - 1:30pm 8am - 4pm 8am - 4pm 8:30am-10:30am 8:30am-12:30pm 8:30am - 1pm 8:30am - 2pm 9am - 12:30pm 9am - 12:30pm 10am - 12noon 10am - 3pm 12pm - 4:30pm 12:30pm - 4 pm 12:30pm-4:30pm 1pm - 3:30pm

Valley Wetlands & Wintering Waterbirds Refuge to Refuge – Snow Geese Galore! Tehama Bird Trek (NEW) SOLD OUT Llano Seco Viewing Platform Tundra Swan Viewing – District 10 SOLD OUT Sutter Buttes Hike – Dean Ranch Sutter Buttes Hike – State Park’s Peace Valley Bidwell Park Bird Walk SOLD OUT Vina Plains to Pine Creek & the River Photo Field Trip with John Hendrickson (NEW) SOLD OUT Birding & Brunch in Paradise SOLD OUT Bidwell Park – Bird & Ecological Diversity Feather River Region & Nature Trail Family Hike at Verbena Fields Wings & Wine Tasting in Vina SOLD OUT Raptor Run Birds & Native Plants in Upper Bidwell Park Butte College Wildlife Refuge & Natural Area Youth Nature Photography Field Trip (NEW)

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS 9am - 10:30am 9am - 11:30am 1pm - 2:30pm 1pm - 2:30pm 1pm - 4pm 2pm - 3:30pm 3pm - 4:30pm 3pm - 4:30pm

Soundscapes of California (NEW) Basic Nature & Wildlife Photo Workshop The Elusive Wood Duck Who Toots in the Dark? Northern Saw-Whet Owls (NEW) Project Flying WILD Educator Training Workshop (NEW) Photography “Just for Fun” Less Lawn More Wildlife Secrets of the Sutter Buttes

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 BANQUET 5:30pm - 10pm

“Gathering of Wings” Banquet & Silent Auction

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26 FIELD TRIPS 7:30am - 12noon 7:30am - 1:30pm 7:30am - 3pm 7:30am - 4pm 7:30am - 4pm 7:30am - 4pm 8am - 12noon 8am - 12noon 8am - 2:30pm 8:30am-10:30am 8:30am-12:30pm 8:30am-12:30pm 8:30am - 2pm 9am - 11am 9am - 12noon 10am - 2pm 1:30pm - 5pm 2pm - 5:30pm

Oxidation Ponds & Indian Fishery Raptor Field Study (NEW) Bird the Shores of Black Butte Lake NTMER Birds & Waterfalls (NEW) SOLD OUT Sutter Buttes – Mid Mountain Sutter Buttes – Summit Ascent Photography at Sac Refuge Birds & Trees of Butte Creek Ecological Preserve Rio Vista, Woodson Bridge & Olive Tour Bidwell Park Bird Walk Llano Seco Viewing Platform Rancho Esquon SOLD OUT Birding & Brunch in Paradise SOLD OUT Falcons & Falconry Beginning Birding by Ear First Annual Chico CBC 4 Kids in January (NEW) Wing-It to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Private Lives of Sandhill Cranes WS/FT SOLD OUT

Events, Trips & Workshop fees range from $5 – $45. Some events sell-out early, so please check our website or call the Snow Goose office to receive updates on closed events:

REGISTER NOW AT www.snowgoosefestival.org (530) 345-1865 January 9, 2014

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture Déjà re-vu

More robotic movie-making in 2014.

Reviewing the previews for Hollywood’s mixed bag of early 2014 releases

THIS WEEK 9

THURS

O for the Hollywood output has waned considerably. Seems like every movie I see is based on the

ver the past couple of years, my taste

same handful of templates: vigilantes running around in spandex fighting crime; stoner by comedians ad-libbing until they have Craig enough footage to cut a movie for Blamer other stoners; ex-special forces/CIA/ cops drawn back in the game to avenge a dead lover/mentor with all sorts of big guns; families sticking around in haunted houses despite common sense; two-hour toy commercials; and sequels, reboots and remakes (see RoboCop, Feb. 12). And so it goes. Even the beats are the same from movie to movie. I can easily predict at which points I can duck out for a ciggie and know that I won’t miss anything of narrative importance. Of course, it doesn’t help that the trailers for these films are essentially the entire movie condensed into a two-minute cut using all the best parts or jokes. Two hours later, I’m usually left with the feeling that I could have saved myself eight bucks and reviewed the movie based on the trailer. So, that that’s exactly what I’m going to do—preview/review the first few weeks of major releases by trailers alone. (Ratings are based on a one-to-five-popcorn-boxes scale.)

• The Legend of Hercules (Jan. 10): Gawd, this looks awful, like some straight-to-DVD knockoff of Gladiator and 300, without the talent that made those two movies work. Throw in crappy CGI and plumy dialects straight off the boards of a communitycollege Shakespeare production, and you have what looks like two hours of intolerable. I’ll give it a solid score of two, because while director Renny Harlin is a hack, Deep Blue Sea and Die Hard 2 showed he has potential to be an entertaining hack. • One Chance (Jan. 10): Well, it’s produced by the Weinsteins (among others, including Simon Cowell)—loathsome human beings, from what I understand, but they have a reliable eye for solid entertainment (although they have this unholy tendency to trim down foreign films and homogenize them for middle-American tastes—see Shaolin Soccer). This one is about some fat kid who grows up to be validated by Britain’s Got Talent (one of the American Idol knockoffs, right?). Definitely not my bag, but looks 24 CN&R January 9, 2014

like it’ll deliver with its endearing underdog story. Looks like a score of three. • Ride Along (Jan. 17): I’m sort of poleaxed by the fact that this mismatched buddy film looks like the pick of the litter, but on the other hand, it’s really nice to see Ice Cube pulled back from the kiddie-film abyss. A sad-sack mall cop goes on a ride-along with a real cop to prove himself worthy of marrying the dude’s sister. The gags in the trailer deliver and the mayhem seems polished. This looks like a solid three. • Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (Jan. 17): More special-op nonsense with a new mouth-breather (Chris Pine) taking on Tom Clancy’s iconic character. The trailer at least conveys that no trope will remain untouched. On the other hand, it’s directed by Kenneth Branagh, so it’ll at least look like a real movie. Unfortunately, I’ve seen this movie plenty of times in the wake of The Bourne Identity. Score: two. • Devil’s Due (Jan. 17): Rosemary’s Baby gets the found-footage treatment. A couple of dudes from the cult-sleeper horror anthology V/H/S get a shot at making a feature, and this one looks to hold some potential. An easy three. • The Nut Job (Jan. 17): It’s an animated family film (Ice Age-style, but more Blu-ray friendly) about a squirrel and loopy friends joining forces for a heist of a nut store … or something. Doesn’t matter if it’s good or bad, it’s a kid’s film. That’s the price you pay for having kids. Sucker. Two popcorn boxes. • I, Frankenstein (Jan. 24): So, the fairly basic concept of Frankenstein’s monster is given the CGIhappy superhero origin-story approach. But it is by the usually reliable Lakeshore Entertainment, the folks behind the stupid-but-fun Underworld franchise, and features Aaron Eckhart and Bill Effin’ Nighy, so I’m getting the vibe that this one will probably deliver. Three popcorn boxes. • Labor Day (Jan. 31): While this one looks like nothing more than a high-gloss Lifetime movie, it’s also from Jason Reitman (Juno, Thank You for Smoking) and features Josh Brolin and Kate Winslet. A single mom and her son are coerced into sheltering an escaped con and, along the way, learn his true being. Seems like a safe three. • That Awkward Moment (Jan. 31): Zac Efron and his douchebag friends try to figure out who they’re gonna hook up with. One crushed popcorn box. Ω

Music ANOTHONY B: The Jamaican-born MC will bring his spiritual brand of reggae to Chico. Locals Dylan’s Dharma open. Also: DJ PhG and DJ Ras Nebru. Th, 1/9, 9pm. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

10

FRI

Special Events ART ABOUT: A monthly art walk coordinated by the Chico Visual Arts Alliance (ChiVAA). Each second Friday a different area of Chico is featured. This week: downtown. F, 1/10, 5-8pm. Free. Call or visit website for details, Chico, www.chivaa.org/artabout.

LEGENDS OF THE CELTIC HARP: Three premier Celtic harpists—Patrick Ball, Lisa Lynne and Aryeh Frankfurter—perform at this eclectic concert experience. F, 1/10, 7:30pm. $18-$20. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Chico, 1289 Filbert Ave.

11

SAT

Theater GREASE: Danny and Sandy reunite after a summer of love as the Pink Ladies and T-Birds dance and sing their way through the school year. Opens Sa, 1/11, & shows Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 2/9, & Su, 1/19, 1/26 & 2/9, 2pm. $12$20. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheater company.com.

Music EBONY AND IVORY SERIES: Celebrate the first event of the series this year with local musical guests and pianist Dr. Robert Bowman performing on the club’s newly restored 1911 Steinway grand piano. F, 1/10, 6:30pm. $12. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 8941978.

GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS: CIRQUE ZIVA Wednesday, Jan. 15 Laxson Auditorium

SEE WEDNESDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave., (530) 321-5607.

ART ABOUT Friday, Jan. 10 Downtown Chico

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

BUTTE IONS: The local chapter of the Institute of Noetic Sciences. This month’s topic: “Crop Circles”. Second Su of every month, 2pm. The Center for Spiritual Living, 789 Bille Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5673.

CHICO CONTRA DANCE: Traditional contra dance

with music by the Pub Scouts. Second Sa of every month, 6:30-10pm. $4-$8. Chico Grange,

Art Receptions LENN GOLDMANN ARTIST TALK: Artist Lenn Goldmann speaks about his abstract landscape paintings from his current show, New California Abstracts . Sa, 1/11, 3pm. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

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Special Events GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS: CIRQUE ZIVA: The 21-member company combines physicality and dexterity in choreographed acts with a musical score. W, 1/15, 7:30pm. $19-$33.

Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 8986333, www.chicoperformances.com.

Music BOGG EP RELEASE PARTY: Local jazz quartet releases its new EP, plus Aubrey Debauchery and the Broken Bones kick off their 2014 tour. W, 1/15, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafe coda.com.

RED MOLLY: The all-female Americana trio from the East Coast kicks off their 2014 tour. Boston-area singer/songwriter Antje Duvekot opens. W, 1/15, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

2775 Nord Ave., (530) 877-2930.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

CHICO POLICE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD: Monthly meeting hosted by the Chico Police Chief to discuss community issues. Third W of every month, 5:30-7pm. Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1877 Hooker Oak Ave., (530) 342-7777.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for more info. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with the elements. F, 6-8pm. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 32

EVENING DANCE JAM: A weekly meditative dance

session. F, 7:15pm. $10. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 150, (530) 342-0100.

FINE ARTS

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced

Art

Museums

1078 GALLERY: Places I’ve Never Been, artist

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by

Philip Hartigan’s printmaking showcases half-remembered narrative moments and the collection of photographs from Patricia McNair create community memoirs. 1/9-2/1. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: New California

Abstracts, new abstract landscape paintings by Lenn Goldmann. Through 1/11. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9 gallery.com.

Call for Artists EVERYTHING BLUE: How will you portray this pervasive hue? All mediums accepted, must be wall-hanging. Call for more info. Through 1/18, 12-5pm. $5. Manas Artspace & Gallery, 1441-C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Chico in Black and White, an exhibit featuring historical photos from the John Nopel collection. Ongoing. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

LENN GOLDMAN ARTIST TALK

dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:30pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMERS’ MARKET: CHAPMAN: A year-round Certified Farmers’ Market serving as a community forum for healthful-lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

FARMERS’ MARKET: SATURDAY: Chico’s weekly community gathering, with fresh produce, crafts, baked goods and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second & Wall streets.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 1-4pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave., (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

HAPPY HEALING: Experience a variety of healing modalities. F, 7pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

INFINITE RHYTHMS ECSTATIC DANCE: A shoe-free, food-free, drug-free, smoke-free dance for you and yours with DJ Clay. Th, 7:30-9:30pm through 5/8. $8-$10. Manas Artspace & Gallery, 1441-C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

PARADISE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE:

Used book sale. Every other Sa, 10am-3pm. Prices vary. Butte County Library, Paradise Branch, 5922 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8726320, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary/ Paradise.htm.

BUTTE IONS: CROP CIRCLES Sunday, Jan. 12 The Center for Spiritual Living, Paradise SEE COMMUNITY

RELAY FOR LIFE RALLY - PARADISE: Get involved in your local Relay For Life as a team, sponsor, donor, survivor, caregiver, or volunteer in the fight against cancer. Tu, 1/14, 6:30pm. Paradise Ridge Senior Center, 877 Nunneley Rd. in Paradise, (530) 895-9661, www.relayforlife.org/ paradiseca.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 872-7085.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chico rec.com.

SOUNDS OF THE VALLEY CHORUS: Women singers welcome to sing in four-part harmony barbershop style. Call for more info. W, 7pm. Marigold Elementary School, 2446 Marigold Ave., (530) 343-5183.

SQUARE-DANCE CLUB: Square-dancing classes for beginners and advanced-level dancers. Call for more info. Th, 7-10pm. Veterans Memorial Hall, 6550 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1962.

TRADITIONAL WEST-AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of

drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:30-7pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (808) 757-0076.

WALK IN THE PARK: Stonewall Alliance Chico’s dog-friendly, 3-mile walk in Bidwell Park. Second Su of every month. One Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park.

WILD WINTER WORKOUT WALK: An 8-mile power hike in Upper Bidwell Park. Meet at Horseshoe Lake parking lot with water and stamina for a fast-paced hike on the North Rim, and B and Yahi trails for great views, conversation and exercise. Su, 1/12, 9am. Bidwell Park.

For Kids CHILDREN’S CHOIR OF CHICO SINGERS: Begin rehearsals and register for the 13th choir season. Learn to read and write music and sing in various languages. 1/13-1/31. Children’s Choir of Chico, 295 E. Washington Ave., (530) 342-2774.

SLITHERING SNAKES PRESCHOOL PROGRAM: Learn all about snakes, make snake crafts, take a walk with a CCNC naturalist and meet a friendly snake. Ages 3-5. Call to register. Sa, 1/11, 11am-noon. $12. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive-plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water-quality testing and more. Check Friends of Bidwell Park website for dates and locations. Ongoing. Bidwell Park, www.friendsofbidwell park.org.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, (530) 514-3903.

Saturday, Jan. 11 Avenue 9 Gallery

SEE SATURDAY, ART RECEPTIONS

Grease is the word When it comes to love stories born on the stage, the only characters who come close to rivaling Romeo and Juliet are Danny and Sandy, the star-crossed summer lovers from EDITOR’S PICK Grease. Though this is largely due to the enduring popularity of the 1978 film and accompanying soundtrack, Grease also remains a staple at community theaters across the country. This Saturday, Jan. 11, the Chico Theater Company premieres the latest local version of the classic musical, which is guaranteed to work lyrics like “Chang chang, changitty chang sha-bop” so deeply into your skull that it’ll take months to fully recover. The production runs through Feb. 9.

January 9, 2014

CN&R 25


26 CN&R January 9, 2014


Grilled cheese with red onion, tomato and pesto. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Tasty and healthful “Fresh, local and homemade” is motto at Wild Oak Café

I salad at Wild Oak Café. Say you want a heaping bowl of spring greens topped with tabouli, chopped

t is entirely possible to make one’s dream

boiled egg, pieces of raw broccoli, strawberries, sunflower-seed kernels and Dijon-balsamic dressing. No problem. Or maybe you have a craving for a by little side salad made with fresh Christine G.K. spinach leaves, chopped raw kale, LaPadoBreglia grape tomatoes, grated beets, bleucheese crumbles, kalamata olives, christinel@ roasted pumpkin-seed kernels (pepinewsreview.com tas) and shiitake-sesame dressing, maybe with a little spoonful of quinoa-walnut salad tucked into the bowl as well. Equally doable. That is the dream salad for the day that I created at Wild Oak’s vast salad bar (sold by weight, at $9.25 per pound) for lunch the day after New Year’s Day. It was to accompany the BBQ Tofu sandwich on multigrain sourdough bread that I ordered. Actually, ★★★★ I opted for a half sandwich for $6.99 Wild Oak Café (the whole version was $10.70). I 196 Cohasset also ordered one of the juices feaRoad, Ste. 150 tured on the eatery’s standing white 343-4876 board, a perfect juice for ringing in a new year: a 16-ounce Ultimate Cleanse, made with celery, spinach, kale, parsley, lemon, apple and ginger ($8.87 for the 16-ounce size, $7.48 for 12 ounces). I took the number-on-a-stand I was handed by the friendly woman who rang up my order and headed ★★★★★ outside the busy café with my salad EPIC on what was a sunny, clear winter ★★★★ day to take a seat at a table on the AUTHORITATIVE eatery’s roomy front patio, right next ★★★ to the soothing sounds of the large, APPEALING lovely fountain. ★★ In short order, my juice arrived in HAS MOMENTS all its chartreuse-colored splendor. Its ★ FLAWED look alone was bursting with life.

And its taste—oh, its divine taste—was equally refreshing and invigorating. A certain lightness of flavor was imparted to the drink by the addition of lemon and apple juices and ginger. This green juice was (unlike some healthful green drinks) not thick nor heavy, and was the sort of beverage that even a newcomer to green juice-drinks would not have to steel herself to swallow (as, say, a wheat-grass newbie might). My sandwich arrived after not much time: a warm, grilled comestible featuring slices of tofu slathered in house-made barbecue sauce, tomato, avocado, red onion and jack cheese. It was accompanied by the carrot and celery sticks with house-made hummus that I chose as my side (white corn chips with hummus were my other option). My BBQ Tofu sandwich was delicious and comforting, and left me feeling clean, as well-prepared healthful food should. It capped off an altogether pleasant dining experience. Wild Oak was voted by CN&R readers as Best Place for Vegetarian Food in last year’s Best of Chico contest, but its menu offers an array of meatbased items as well, such the Thai Tuna sandwich, the Chipotle Chicken sandwich, and a range of burgers featuring either a veggie patty or, for an extra charge of 75 cents, a grass-fed-bison patty. The restaurant also makes a Wild Alaskan Salmon burger and offers a nitrate-free bison hot dog. The restaurant offers an array of soup choices daily and its menu’s Daily Entrees section announces three veggie-based offerings: vegetarian lasagna, vegan meatloaf and a steamed-veggie bowl featuring either organic brown rice or soba noodles, and an option of adding tofu or chicken for an extra charge. Breakfast burritos and grilled breakfast sandwiches (such as the egg, spinach, feta, tomato and jack cheese sandwich) are also available, as is a variety of fairtrade coffees and teas, and other drinks, including beer and wine. Wild Oak Café’s varied menu, relaxing ambiance, accommodating hours and commitment to using healthful ingredients (“We strive to use organic and locally grown ingredients whenever possible,” says the menu) make it a go-to spot for anyone desiring a truly rewarding dining experience. Ω

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FRIDAY 1/10 – WEDNESDAY 1/15 AMERICAN HUSTLE (Digital) ( R) 1:00PM 4:05PM 7:10PM 10:15PM

LEGEND OF HERCULES, THE (3D) (PG-13) 3:10PM 5:35PM 8:00PM

ANCHORMAN 2 (Digital) (PG-13) 11:25AM 2:10PM 4:55PM 7:40PM 10:25PM

LEGEND OF HERCULES, THE (Digital) (PG13)12:40PM 10:25PM

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY (Digital) ( R) 1:30PM 4:15PM 7:00PM 9:45PM FROZEN (2013) (Digital) (PG) 11:05AM 12:20PM 1:40PM 3:00PM 4:20PM 5:40PM 7:00PM 9:40PM HER (Digital) ( R) 1:20PM 4:15PM 7:15PM 10:10PM HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG, THE (3D) (PG-13) 4:10PM HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 12:40PM 7:50PM HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 12:35PM 3:50PM 7:05PM 10:20PM

LONE SURVIVOR (Digital) ( R)11:00AM 1:50PM 4:40PM 7:30PM 10:30PM PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES (Digital) ( R) 12:45PM 2:55PM 5:05PM 7:15PM 8:20PM 9:25PM 10:30PM SAVING MR BANKS (Digital) (PG-13) 11:00AM 1:50PM 4:40PM 7:30PM 10:20PM SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY, THE (Digital) (PG) 1:55PM 4:35PM 7:20PM 10:00PM WALKING WITH DINOSAURS (Digital) (PG) 11:20AM WOLF OF WALL STREET, THE (Digital) ( R) 12:15PM 4:00PM 8:00PM

GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS Fabulous Chinese Acrobats (1/15)

PINK MARTINI Global Cabaret (1/26)

STUNT DOG EXPERIENCE

Crazy Doggy Antics (1/28)

TOMMY EMMANUEL

with special guest Martin Taylor (1/30)

BÉLA FLECK & BROOKLYN RIDER Banjo Quintet (2/6)

TAO: PHOENIX RISING Japanese Taiko Drumming (2/7)

LONESTAR Country Rock (2/9)

All shows at Laxson Auditorium California State University, Chico (530) 898-6333

WWW.CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM 28 CN&R January 9, 2014

B sage boards were crackling with anticipation over a couple of found-footage entries awaiting a distribuack in early 2007, the horror-film mes-

tor: an American haunted-house chiller called Paranormal Activity and a Spanish zombie thriller called [Rec]. Both were by described by independent festival viewCraig ers as the scariest damned things they’d Blamer seen in years. Later that year, the former (a $15,000 freshman effort by Oren Peli) hit the big screen and delivered back to Paramount almost $200 million in international box-office sales. Its release also revealed that the movie was mostly a ho-hum affair, with an annoying yuppie couple sitting in front of a couple of static cameras yapping at each other over the course of an hour and a half; freaking out over weird noises in their new digs; ignoring comParanormal mon sense to get the futz out; and doing Activity: The boneheaded things like pulling out a Marked Ones Starring Andrew Ouija board—until finally the thing is Jacobs, Jorge wrapped up with a fairly decent jolt. Diaz and While I admire that Peli took Gabrielle Walsh. 15 grand and got a better return than his Directed by multimillion-dollar competitors, it just Christopher wasn’t a very good horror film. Landon. [Rec] turned out to be vastly superior Cinemark 14 and Feather River in every aspect but warranted only a Cinemas. DVD release in the States, and a pissRated R. poor American remake for the subtitleaverse called Quarantine. And so it goes. A handful of cash-in sequels later, we end up with a spinoff for the Paranormal Activity franchise called The Marked Ones. While it is marginally more interesting than the first entry, it’s still not a good horror movie. It’s not a Poor total wash, though. It is nice to see a horror film with a Latino cast, even though the characters are mostly Fair defined by The Big Book of Ethnic Stereotypes. Despite that, they are mostly endearing, as here we have a camera Good dropped in the laps of young Jesse and his friends just as their neighborhood bruja (for those too lazy to Google, that’s “witch” in Spanish) is gunned Very Good down by a possessed schoolmate downstairs. So off they go with the camera to investigate—which leads to more than a Excellent few occasions when real people would

have dropped the camera and left dust in their tracks. There is an uptick in the paranormal activity here, but current franchise shepherd Christopher Landon has a woeful eye for narrative, continuity and especially for maintaining the vérité aspect of the foundfootage aesthetic. The story here is ill-suited for that approach anyway, as it becomes increasingly absurd that the characters keep rolling tape. Storywise, Landon cribs from better found-footage movies (mostly Chronicle) but doesn’t find an interesting way to tie it all together. Ultimately, The Marked Ones delivers with a couple of good jolts, but isn’t particularly scary. And with a $5 million budget for this installment, one wonders where all that money went. It looks just as cheap as its $15,000 antecedent. Ω

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Reviewers: Craig Blamer and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week August: Osage County

Tracey Letts’ Pulitzer Prize-winning dark comedy about a far-flung family reconvening at the toxic family homestead in Oklahoma upon the death of the patriarch gets the big-screen treatment, with a bunch of big-screen stars: Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Chris Cooper, Ewan McGregor, Dermot Mulroney, Juliette Lewis and Sam Shepard. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Her

The latest from Spike Jonze (Adaptation, Being John Malkovich) stars Joaquin Phoenix as a lonely man who falls for the female-sounding operating system (voiced by Scarlett Johansson) that learns about and interacts with him as he struggles with love in the “real” world. Also starring Amy Adams. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Legend of Hercules

There are not one, but two Hercules-based fantasy flicks coming out of Hollywood this year (Hercules: The Thracian Wars, starring The Rock, arrives this summer). First up is this origin story, with Twilight alum Kellan Lutz playing the half-mortal/half-God son of Zeus as he battles his way up from slavery to his rightful kingdom. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Lone Survivor

Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights) directs this true story about a failed Navy SEALS mission to capture a Taliban leader in Afghanistan in 2005. Starring Mark Wahlberg. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

Released less than a week before Nelson Mandela died, this biopic is based on the anti-apartheid revolutionary and former South African president’s 1995 autobiography. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Re-opening this week The Book Thief

Against the backdrop of Nazi Germany during WWII, a young girl risks all to seek out books and share them with others, including a Jewish refuge hiding in her foster parents’ basement. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.


Now playing 47 Ronin

Keanu Reeves stars as the leader of 47 samurai in this update of the 18th-century Japanese tale of the group of warriors’ quest for revenge and defense of the honor of their slain master. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

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American Hustle

American Hustle is a sardonically comical caper movie, a semipicaresque period piece set among con artists, influence peddlers, political fixers, etc., in the late 1970s. Banking scams, FBI stings, Mafia politics, governmental corruption, fashion excesses, and elaborate double-crosses all have roles to play. It’s a beguiling tale, with a nicely timed set of surprise twists laid out along the way. But what makes this one of the best films of the year is mostly a matter of superb, beautifully directed performances from a fine cast, including especially its four leading players. The key figures here are a sleazy entrepreneur/con man (Christian Bale), a frenetically ambitious young FBI agent (Bradley Cooper), a gifted quickchange artist (Amy Adams), and the Bale character’s hilariously erratic wife (Jennifer Lawrence). Bale is especially brilliant—giving unexpected shades of emotion and intelligence to a character who at first seems merely a mild comic grotesque. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues

Still classy a decade later, Ron Burgundy (Will Farrell) and the rest of the news team (Steve Carell, Paul Rudd and David Koechner) rise from the ashes of their failed careers and join the ranks of a new 24-hour news network. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Frozen

The new Disney computer-animated feature is an adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytale, The Snow Queen. In the film, a young princess embarks on an epic journey to find her sister—the Snow Queen— whose magical powers have buried the kingdom in a never-ending winter. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

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The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

The action picks up from where we left off in part one of director Peter Jackson’s threefilm adaptation of The Hobbit, with Gandolf (Ian McKellen), Bilbo (Martin Freeman) and the dwarf posse setting off to the evil woods of Mirkwood and a confrontation with the foul dragon Smaug in the hall of the former mountain king. But first they have to confront giant spiders, rampaging orcs and

4

Nebraska

The new picture from Alexander Payne (The Descendants, Sideways, Citizen Ruth) is filmed in widescreen black-and-white, and most of it has the bleakness of the central plains in late winter. Story-wise, much of it is a sort of start-and-stop (and start again) road movie in which an unhappy young man (Will Forte) indulges the wishes of his aged father to travel from Billings, Mont., to Lincoln, Neb., for an in-person submission of what he assumes to be the prize-winning number in the lottery run by a mail-order subscription service. The quixotic nature of this endeavor is essential to the pathos and contrasting charms of father and son alike, but that fool’s errand also puts both men on paths toward tentative regeneration—modest but real—for their respective stalled lives. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

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Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones

See review this issue. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —C.B.

Saving Mr. Banks

A comedy/drama directed by John Lee Hancock (The Blind Side) and loosely based on the negotiations between Australian author P.L. Travers (played by Emma Thompson) and Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) over screen rights to her Mary Poppins novels. Cinemark 14 and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

Ben Stiller directs an stars in this adaptation of James Thurber’s famous short story about the heroic daydreamer Walter Mitty. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

Lanky Ron Woodroof was a macho bullrider and full-time party animal from Texas. When doctors told him he was HIV-positive, he went into very angry denial. When his AIDS symptoms became overwhelmingly obvious, he began a headlong battle looking for cures—mainstream or otherwise—and becoming a kind of outlaw advocate for AIDS patients. Dallas Buyers Club charts Woodroof’s journey from macho, homophobic bon vivant to swashbuckling purveyor of medical alternatives. A big part of Woodroof’s story comes off here as a darkhumored picaresque escapade, a furiously rambunctious bootlegging caper in the midst of life-and-death emergencies. That makes for an intriguing narrative hook, but Dallas Buyers Club earns its deepest interest by way of two remarkable performances— Matthew McConaughey, in a devilishly engaging turn as the rough-edged Woodroof, and a floridly sashaying Jared Leto as transvestite Rayon. The screenplay, however, is very uneven. Director Jean-Marc Vallée and McConaughey make the most of its stronger points, but the scripted mixture of didacticism and entertainment sometimes falls flat. Paradise Cinema 7 —J.C.S.

cranky elves before barrel-riding on down into the degraded village of Laketown. As the second entry in the sprawling narrative, it’s mostly setting up the characters who will serve their function in the conclusion next year. When Bilbo and crew arrive to confront Smaug, the film settles down into a finetuned hum. Obviously, as an epic, it’s not as subtextually satisfying as the The Lord of the Rings trilogy, because it wasn’t intended to be an epic. But one feels that when this trilogy is completed, it’ll serve nicely as the runup to Jackson’s true masterwork. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

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Walking with Dinosaurs

Realistic-looking CGI-animated dinosaurs are set against a live-action backdrop in this tale of a young, awkward pachyrhinosaurus who grows up to lead his herd on an epic adventure. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

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The Wolf of Wall Street

This film has a lot going for it—a lot to like, and a lot to see. But most of its lively virtues and strengths are in the details and on the margins. At its heart, this three-hour extravaganza rings rather hollow. The sources of its greatest appeal include a supercharged lead performance from Leonardo DiCaprio; stylishly frenzied direction by Martin Scorsese; a penchant for bravura scenes and eccentric set pieces; a distinctly contemporary topicality (Wall Street scammers); and a large and quirky supporting cast, with particularly pungent contributions from Matthew McConaughey, Jonah Hill and Joanna Lumley. McConaughey’s early “tutorial” scene with DiCaprio is a darkly comical tour de force that just might be the single best moment in the entire film, but the intense articulation of character and theme of this scene goes unmatched through the film’s final two-thirds. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

3269 Esplanade, Chico | 530-864-2525 w w w. c h i c o r e n d e z vo u s . c o m

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Still here

3

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com January 9, 2014

CN&R 29


CHICO’S MOST LIKED LOCAL COFFEEHOUSE!! (ACCORDING TO FACEBOOK, WHICH IS COOL, BUT WE’RE NOT SURE IT MEANS MUCH.)

MUSIC

KISS off !

KISS: still on top of the world.

13

118 W 2ND ST | FACEBOOK.COM/NLCHICO

On the heels of the release of a fine new biography, the four men in makeup are (finally!) being recognized by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Wleather-clad marauders, kid-friendly superheroes, poodle-haired power-balladeers or soulless, hether they were seen as dangerous

cash-grabbing businessmen, KISS always seemed to be rubbing someone the wrong way by (figuratively and probably literally). Mark Lore OK, so some of it is true. But the crime being committed here (most notably by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which has dissed the band every year since it first became eligible for induction in 1999) is that a lot of people get hung up on the periphery and have probably never listened to anything aside from “Rock and Roll All Nite,” and maybe “Beth” and “Detroit Rock City.” I’m going to put this out there right now: If you don’t own a copy of Alive! or Destroyer, your rock fandom is as wobbly as Ace Frehley in a pair of seveninch heels. Things get a bit contentious within the ranks of the KISS Army as well. Four decades is a long time to keep a band together, and KISS has gone through its share of eras, styles, personnel, wigs. The current incarnation has guitarist Tommy Thayer and drummer Eric Singer playing the roles of Ace Frehley and Peter Criss, which has many fans’ codpieces in a bind. Of course, the original lineup consisting of Frehley, Criss, Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley is what most fans gravitate toward (aside from those freaky Vinnie Vincent freaks). My favorite period of KISS goes back to the band’s earliest days—pre-lunchboxes—when the members were young and hungry, and killing themselves to make the rest of the world believe in what they did. That’s the focus of the new book Nothin’ to Lose: The Making of KISS (1972-1975), an excellent oral history by author Ken Sharp, who interviewed (and dug up old interviews from) an extensive cast of characters, including fans that caught the band in its infancy, roadies, label folks, producers, music writers, and the many bands that played gigs with the four seven-foot monsters from New York. The book offers a good overview of KISS’ steady ascent, while also satiating the fanboys and ’girls with fantastic anecdotes and minutiae that go beyond the 30 CN&R January 9, 2014

usual trivia—like Frehley showing up to his KISS audition wearing one red sneaker and one orange sneaker, or Simmons’ encyclopedic knowledge of horror flicks. There are lots of goodies: pyrotechnic mishaps, the fact that Frehley designed Stanley’s makeup, the band playing gymnasiums and lunchrooms in Canada. But the real takeaway here is how KISS and their support system (people like manager Bill Aucoin, roadie/choreographer/songwriter Sean Delaney, label owner Neil Bogart, and many more) fearlessly went for it from day one to see their vision through, while their upstart label, Casablanca Records, was on the verge of going bankrupt and radio was avoiding the band like the plague (it was the release of 1975’s Alive! that finally shored things up for the label and the band). Nothin’ to Lose not only captures KISS, but the New York music scene in the early ’70s as well, with loads of stories from bands like the Brats, The Planets and the New York Dolls. You also get acts deemed “credible”—the Ramones, Black Sabbath, Rush, Iggy and the Stooges—singing the praises of KISS’ music and work ethic. As Iggy Pop recalls: “I saw KISS come out onstage, and from above them lowered the most gi-fucking-normous neon-light-bulb-adorned sign that said ‘KISS.’ It did look cool—in a crude and very vulgar way. It was the largest piece of production I have ever seen used by a third-bill act in a rundown theater in my entire career.” Now I could give a shit about credibility (take it from someone who’s defended KISS for the better part of 35 years), but the band’s influence is undeniable. I’d even become comfortable with, and even relished, the fact that they weren’t in the Hall of Fame (the original lineup will finally be inducted on April 10). But I do find it criminal that KISS sometimes doesn’t get recognition at a very basic level. As pompous as Simmons can be, even he misses the point of how good this was. KISS turned out to be an incredibly well-executed piece of art—it ain’t high art, but it’s art. If you don’t get it, you’re missing out (it could also just mean you’re joyless and stuffy). Deep down, even high-minded folks wanna rock and roll all nite. Ω


IN THE MIX

14 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Happy Hour in Hell DAW The second installment in the Bobby Dollar series finds the less-than-perfect angel wings-deep in the fires of Hell on a mission to rescue his demon girlfriend, Casimira, Countess of Cold Hands. As a follow-up to Tad Williams’ series opener—The Dirty Streets of Heaven, an urban-noir mystery peppered with the crooked politics of Heaven and Hell—volume two comes across like a devilish detour. Here, Dollar is put through the ringer à la Die Hard’s John McClane, with the action colored by Williams’ imaginative take on Hell, its citizens and the endless torture therein. As Hell creeps under Dollar’s skin, it finds its way into the reader as well—a credit to the author’s subversive sadism—but the torture lasts for close to 300 pages, and before long, we want the Hell out. At a third of the pages, Dollar’s Hell quest would have been just as effective, and there would’ve been room for Williams to dive deeper into what we loved about The Dirty Streets, such as the minor characters— especially Casimira, who goes from a doomed soul with a haunting backstory to a demon in distress. Let’s hope the next book answers our burning questions, because if Williams decides to put Dollar on a detour through Heaven, the ride may be just as hellish.

BOOK

—Matthew Craggs

Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm: A New English Version Philip Pullman Penguin Classics On the 200th anniversary of the collected fairy tales, Philip Pullman gave us the Grimm we know and the Grimm we don’t know—50 tales in all, and purportedly the complete works. Half the book (now in paperback) features the standards; the other features the more obscure but equally delightful and powerful tales. I particularly enjoyed “The Cat and the Mouse Set up House,” “The Riddle,” “The Singing Bone,” and “The Donkey Cabbage.” Pullman’s translation is lyrical and economical in style, rather similar to his writing in the His Dark Materials trilogy. He tells them less sensationally (few “Boos!” here), but with more depth of feeling and psychological undertones. Each selection includes copious revelatory end-notes with sources (citations to similar stories from Aesop and European writers, particularly the great Italo Calvino) and brief analyses. In the introduction, Pullman notes that, “Like jazz, storytelling is an art of performance, and writing is a performance, too.” Pullman performs at the very highest level, and at this point has established himself as a veritable 21st-century Tolkien. —Jim Dwyer

www.newsreview.com

Tad Williams

VAPOLUTION INC. The Original Glass on Glass Vaporizer

Vapolution Inc. was founded in 2000 by two engineers that shared a vision for a healthier way to enjoy their favorite herbs. Vapolution’s popularity quickly spread, which allowed the company to offer their products in retail shops and to customers across the globe. Their glass on glass technology provides the purest, best tasting and cleanest vapor on the market today. The company prides itself on being locally owned and operated and also as an earth friendly business that uses recycled materials for packaging and 100% bio diesel for local deliveries. Vaporization is a technique for avoiding irritating repertory toxins in smoke by heating tobacco/herbs to a temperature where the desired ingredients vaporize without causing combustion. Carcinogens, tar, carbon-monoxide, and

heavy particulate matter are known to cause irritation of the throat and respiratory track. Vaporizers allow the extraction of the active ingredients in an assortment of herbs and tobaccos, without damaging ones health the way smoking does. By not burning the plant fiber, almost all toxins are eliminated. The plant material left behind, once the vaporizer has extracted the oils, is brown whereas smoking would leave behind black carcinogenic ash.

VAPOLUTION INC.

1-888-738-VAPO // 530-894-8148 www.vapolution.com

BOOK

The Southerner’s Handbook Editors of Garden & Gun HarperWave In many ways, The Southerner’s Handbook: A Guide to Living the Good Life reminds me of Conn and Hal Iggulden’s The Dangerous Book for Boys—both are fun collections of essays and activities, which aren’t strictly limited to the titular audience. This collection of more than 100 essays—curated by the editors of Garden & Gun magazine—sets about dissecting a Southerner’s good life. The short entries offer insight into a variety of topics—from hosting a dinner party to alligator wrestling—and bounce between practical knowledge and storytelling, each piece dripping with Southern charm and humor. The collection doubles as a travel, etiquette, fashion and culinary guide but avoids the hotel and restaurant ratings, while still providing a few obligatory recipes for iconic menu items such as fried chicken and sweet tea. Instead, through personal stories and historical anecdotes, the authors cover topics that include: breaking in cowboy boots; dealing with game wardens; “The Art of Goodbye”; and polishing silver. By the end, the slowly forming collage of ideas and views begins to reveal shared experiences of a culture heavily influenced by social interaction, the land and traditions. It’s a delightful look through someone else’s eyes, even if you never have cause to stare down an alligator.

BOOK

Chico’s guide to food and nightlife advertisers:

Coming February 13

To be included in this dining guide, contact your CN&R ad rep today.

530-894-2300

—Matthew Craggs January 9, 2014

CN&R 31


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 1/9—WEDNESDAY 1|15 traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

ANTHONY B Thursday, Jan. 9 Lost On Main SEE THURSDAY

LEGENDS OF THE CELTIC HARP: Three premier Celtic harpists—Patrick Ball, Lisa Lynne and Aryeh Frankfurter— perform at this eclectic concert experience. F, 1/10, 7:30pm. $18-$20. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Chico, 1289 Filbert Ave.

MOM & DAD/DUMPSTAR: A new split EP

9THURSDAY ANTHONY B: The Jamaican-born MC will bring his spiritual brand of reggae to Chico. Locals Dylan’s Dharma open. Also: DJ PhG and DJ Ras Nebru. Th, 1/9, 9pm. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

JOHN SEID DUO: John Seid and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 69pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

10FRIDAY ACES UP: Blue-collar country music

meets Pacific Northwest rock. F, 1/10, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE: A night of local acoustic singer/songwriters with Thomas Fogg, Sean Harrasser, Bran Crown, Lisa Marie, Sir Francis Lee Howard and Fera. F, 1/10, 9pm. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

BASSMINT: A (mostly) weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. Check with venue for details. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4, (530) 895-3888.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: A collection of Chico jazz musicians playing music from the ’20s and ’30s through today. Former Chico resident and NYU jazz bassist Nate Furgason opens. F, 1/10, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

EBONY AND IVORY SERIES: Celebrate the first event of the series this year with local musical guests and pianist Dr. Robert Bowman performing on the club’s newly restored 1911 Steinway grand piano. F, 1/10, 6:30pm. $12. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978.

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradi-

from local grind-noisemakers Mom & Dad and DumpStar, plus groove-metal aces Aberrance, and Camerin Kelly. F, 1/10, 8pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

MONKEY MUSIC SHOWCASE: Spotlighting local acoustic singer/songwriters and musicians. F, 7:30pm. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

11SATURDAY BLACK FONG: Get the lowdown with local

butt funk. Sa, 1/11, 9pm. Maltese Bar & Tap Room, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 3434915.

COLD BLUE MOUNTAIN: Tour kick-off for Cold Blue Mountain with help from friends Armed For Apocalypse. Sa, 1/11, 8pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

HARDCORE HARPISTS

Why are harps like elderly parents? Both are unforgiving and hard to get into and out of cars. Ba-da-bump-crash! Yes, there are apparently whole websites dedicated to harp humor, with about 95 percent of the jokes focusing on how hard it is to keep the instrument in tune. That hopefully won’t be a problem this Friday, Jan. 10, when three world-renowned harpists—Patrick Ball, Lisa Lynne and Aryeh Frankfurter—unite onstage at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. “Legends of the Celtic Harp” will also focus on the “myths, magic and fabled history” of the heavenly instrument.

tion: Friday-night happy hour with a

COLLEGE STUDENTS:

BUT ENOUGH ABOUT US.

Got the write stuff? WHO ARE YOU? Attention, students: The Chico News & Review is looking for interns with reporting and writing experience. The CN&R is interested in telling stories that get to the heart of a matter, and making a difference in our community. Here, you’ll find an opportunity to take college skills to a professional level. We are seeking writers who are currently enrolled in college. Applicants don’t need to be journalism majors, but must have some experience in the form of published work. Interns are paid per assignment.

For application information, contact CN&R Editor Melissa Daugherty at melissad@newsreview.com with “internship” in the subject line.

32 CN&R January 9, 2014

TAKE OUR ONLINE SURVEY AND YOU COULD WIN! 6 lucky respondents will win either: * A $50 gift certificate to The Bookstore * A free pass to the movies Take the survey online at www.research.net/s/013547 or scan the QR code with your smart phone.


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

13MONDAY JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: Live jazz happy hour with Carey Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Free. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

14TUESDAY OPEN MIC: Open-mic night with Aaron

and Friends. Tu, 7-10pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with key-

FAN HALEN: Van Halen tribute band. Sa, 1/11, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino

Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

MANDOLIN JAZZ: The Bob Kirkland Trio

boardist Shigemi Minetaka and rotating accompaniment. Tu, 6:308:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farm starpizza.com.

RED MOLLY

Wednesday, Jan. 15 Sierra Nevada Big Room

WINTER BEER PAIRING DINNER: A seasonal

SEE WEDNESDAY

with Tyler Mansfield and special guest Nate Furgason. Sa, 1/11, 7-9pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Dr., (530) 8999250, www.winetimechico.com.

specialty and other craft-beer samples, plus a five course meal. Music by Chico Strings. Tu, 1/14, 6pm. $35. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/ brewing-co.

15WEDNESDAY BOGG EP RELEASE PARTY: Local jazz quartet releases their new EP, plus Aubrey Debauchery and the Broken Bones kick of their 2014 tour. W, 1/15, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more.

W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St.

OLD-TIME SLOW JAM: Bring your blue-

MOVING THE MOUNTAIN

According to the band’s website, local doom-sludge-metal band Cold Blue Mountain intends to kick off 2014 the way they did 2013: “by utterly and completely dominating the Pacific Northwest.” The domination begins this Saturday, Jan. 11, with a tour kickoff show at the 1078 Gallery, before the band’s departure on a whirlwind jaunt around Washington, Oregon and Northern California. Armed for Apocalypse is also playing, allowing show-goers to see two of Chico’s finest metal outfits while helping CBM fill its war chest with gas and burrito money for the campaign.

grass instruments and song suggestions for this jam hosted by Jim Meyers. Third W of every month, 7-9pm. Free. Sid Lewis’ Acoustic College, 932 W. Eighth Ave., (530) 876-8629.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Café & Books, 642 W. Fifth St.

RED MOLLY: The all-female Americana trio from the East Coast kicks off their 2014 tour. Boston-area singer/songwriter Antje Duvekot opens. W, 1/15, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

cheaper than a

www.newsreview.com

DUI

remember this number

898-1776 Liberty Cab

January 9, 2014

CN&R 33


ARTS DEVO

&

by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

Present ANOTHER YEAR OF ANNIVERSARIES Flipping through the CN&R archives

Talent Show

Saturday, Feb. 1 7:30 p.m. (doors 7 p.m.) El Rey Theatre 230 W. Second Street

A celebration of weirdness of all stripes, with two dozen of the most fun, creative and funky local musicians, performance artists, fire dancers, burlesque dancers, regular dancers, queens & drag kings, comedians, thespians, harmonic ritualists, hula-hoopers and at least one guy playing a saw all competing for prizes. Winning acts will receive a sweet trophy, a bag of swag and an invitation to perform at Feather Feather Falls Casino or during the CAMMIES Awards Show!

Featured performances by: Celebrity judges!

CHIKOKO fashion/art collective

Brandon Squyres, local metal head (Amarok, Cold Blue Mountain) and one of The Beards from The Amazing Race | Wake Up! Action News Now host Megan McMann Dragonboy, artist and director of Manas Artspace BRANDON SQUYRES

Hosted by Arts DEVO

DRAGONBOY

MEGAN MCMANN

& featuring the debut of the impossibly handsome DJ-Crew, the iPhone DJ Trophy presentation by the King and Queen of the New Wave Prom

Tickets: $10 in advance (online via Sweet Deals at www.newsreview. com/chico and at JMax Productions ticket outlets) and $12 at the door

Sponsored by:

last week, I came upon a Jan. 15, 2004, interview with Avenue 9 Gallery founders Maria Phillips and Dolores Mitchell on the eve of the opening of their first exhibit—Openings—and it dawned on me that that was 10 years ago this week. And it turns out the gallery is celebrating with the 10 Years: P.S. We Love You group exhibit. Opening reception/party on Feb. 7. And there are two other local institutions celebrating twice as many years as Avenue 9 in the coming year. The Blue Room Theatre kicks off its 20th season of black-box theater with a collaboration with the Rogue Theatre folks on David Ives’ sexy, dark comedy, Venus in Fur, opening Jan. 16. And the Synthesis (the Synthesis!) is turning 20 as well. I’ve had many interactions over the years with the little newspaper that was born in founder Bill Fishkin’s apartment in 1994, but I am going to repress my usual Back to the Grotto, at the Blue Room (1994). snarky instincts and just say, “Congratulations!” and also share my personal favorite Synthesis memory: I believe it was during the paper’s maiden year that a onetime band I was in—Pep Rally—was scheduled to be featured in the Syn. When the interviewer—the lovely Anita Ingrao (now a documentary filmmaker and a tireless docent at the Chico Community Observatory)—showed up at my apartment, she came bearing a six-pack of Sierra Nevada and a bag of Doritos! I don’t remember how the story turned out, but I’ll never forget that interview and that rad reporter. Seriously badass.

STILL TIME TO GET WEIRD Hey there, Freako! Today (Jan. 9) is the last day to send your submissions for the CN&R’s inaugural Keep Chico Weird Talent Show. We have a ton of great acts in line already, but you can still make the list of potential performers. Send us a description of your three-minute act (plus any photos, videos or links, if you have ’em) to keepchicoweird@gmail.com right now. Visual artists are invited to take part as well—works will be shown at an art gallery in the lobby during the show (and we’ll probably let visual-art submissions trickle in past deadline, but space is limited). We’ve also announced our featured performers and judges for the night! All the weird talent is coming out. Joining the fashion freaks of Chikoko will be Chico’s lone purveyors of Western skiffle, the Michelin Embers (and we’ll probably announce one more soon—a theatrical act). Our eclectic selection of judges will include Amarok/Cold Blue Mountain frontman—and one half of The Beards from The Amazing Race—Brandon Squyres; KNVN/KHSL’s Megan McMann, co-host of Wake Up! Action News; and Dragonboy local artist, musician and director of Manas Artspace. And, yours truly will be hosting the proceedings with assistance from the impossibly handsome DJ-Crew, the iPhone DJ. And last, in case you didn’t already notice, we switched the date of the show! It is now on Saturday, Feb. 1, at 7:30 p.m., at the El Rey Theatre— so dance your brains out at the New Wave Prom the night before (Jan. 31, at the Chico Women’s Club) and join us the following evening as we celebrate weirdness of all stripes and the spirit of individualism in the face of mass homogenization. A PROGRAMMING NOTE The season of the reality show Alaska Fish Wars

Thank You: 34 CN&R January 9, 2014

that stars Chico salmon fisherman Lance Alldrin—of Alldrin & Sons Alaska Salmon—and his son Luke is now airing Mondays, at 7 p.m., on Nat Geo Wild.


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

RECYCLE

THIS PAPER. YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

LOVE’S REAL ESTATE Short Gift

S

hort-sale sellers received a Christmas present this season from their former antagonists, the Internal Revenue Service and the California Franchise Tax Board (FTB). The IRS and the FTB gave short-sale sellers the gift of: Nothing. As in, “You owe us nothing.” That’s the kind of nothing short-sale sellers needed. Before receiving this gift, short-sale sellers could be taxed on “phantom income.” Example: Frank and Laura Wilson owed more on their house than it was worth. Frank is a firefighter, and Laura is a health counselor. Frank’s department cut back his hours, and cut his income. Then Laura lost her job through government cutbacks. “Here we were,” said Laura, “up to our necks in debt and underwater in our house.” The Wilsons called the bank that had the loan on their house and were told they were legitimate candidates for a short sale, whereby the bank agrees to take less than it is owed upon the sale of the house. The Wilsons put their house on the market, received an offer, and began the process of the short sale. “It was brutal,” said Frank. “The person at

the bank, our ‘short-sale negotiator,’ was like an evil slave driver. I’ve never been inflicted with so much paperwork or heard so many demands. If you ever need someone tortured, hire a short-sale negotiator.” The Wilsons did close their sale, and the bank agreed to receive $50,000 less than it was owed. “Then came the surprise we weren’t prepared for,” said Laura. “The Tax Man,” said Frank. The Wilsons had no idea they could be taxed on the $50,000 the bank agreed not to take. That’s because the forgiven debt was treated as “phantom income” by the IRS and FTB. “The Tax Man wanted $10,000, and the Tax Man is relentless,” said Frank. “The short-sale negotiator is like Mary Poppins compared to the Tax Man.” Just in time, Frank and Laura received their gift. As of December 2013, the IRS and the FTB no longer treat unpaid debt as phantom income. “It’s strange but true,” said Laura, “we’re overjoyed that we don’t owe money for taxes on income we never received.” “We got the perfect Christmas gift,” said Frank. “Nothing.”

DOUG LOVE is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530.680.0817

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com WHY LEASE WHEN YOU CAN OWN !!

10 Smith Bros Ct Beautiful custome home at end of culde-sac, minutes from Enloe & CSUC. Please check for the open houses this coming weekend. $294,500

NEW PRICE!

3060 Thorn Tree 2614 sq. ft. warehouse w/ glass front door & awning. Office area, restroom & 2 roll up doors plus a fenced in back storage area with reinforced concrete pad for large trucks or heavy equipment.

3 bedroom 2 bath, pool, great neighborhood!

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Call or TEXT for more info.

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

Gated Communities • Canyon Oaks, w/ stunning view! 3 bd/3 ba, 3,381 sq ft, private. $699,000 • Minutes from Chico, 3 bd/2.5 ba, 2,782 sq ft w/ lot’s of custom features! $419,000 • Spanish Garden, Canyon view w/ access to Butte Creek, 2,642 sq ft upgrades! $549,950

PENDING

Homes With Land • 18 ACS, Forest Ranch, 3 bd/1 ba, 1,550 sq ft, cash only $225,000 • 1.66 ACS Chico, stunning 3 bd/4 ba, 2 offices, 3,930 sq ft $668,000 • Short sale, 3bd/2ba 2,499 sq ft 7.7 acres, Butte Creek $500,100 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 • www.ChicoListings.com chiconativ@aol.com • License #01177950

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

3906 Spyglass Rd

Chico

$649,000

3/ 3

2993

1516 Gilbert Ln

ADDRESS

Chico

$257,500

3/ 1.5

1592

862 Muir Ave

Chico

$490,000

3/ 3

2474

2605 Sedona Ave

Chico

$255,000

3/ 2

1471

4135 Rio Grande Dr

Chico

$439,000

4/ 2

1972

3 Maddie Ct

Chico

$237,500

3/ 2

1389

4491 Wookey Rd

Chico

$375,000

3/ 2

1584

16 Wysong Ct

Chico

$209,000

3/ 2

1302

1015 Carlos Pl

Chico

$325,000

4/ 2

2068

898 Colorado St

Chico

$136,000

2/ 1

864

172 E Washington Ave

Chico

$315,000

2/ 1

963

555 Vallombrosa Ave 85 Chico

$110,000

1/ 1

702

926 Yosemite Dr

Chico

$310,000

3/ 3

1871

1564 Gilstrap Ave

$225,000

4/ 3

2266

Gridley

January 9, 2014

CN&R 35


Treat yourself to gift certificates up to

75% OFF! 7 FireFly Court • ChiCo Seller just recently upgraded this lovely home with laminated maple flooring, new baseboards, fresh exterior paint, gas insert fireplace. This is a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,833 sq ft home tucked down a cul de sac, near the park and along Lindo Channel.

listed at: $325,000. Teresa Larson | Realtor | Century 21 Jeffries Lydon | (530) 899-5925

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SMILES ALWAYS JOYCE TURNER

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

• Amber Grove, culGde sac, 3bd/2ba, 1,966 sq ft $334,500 DIN PEN • Affordable 3bd/2ba, PENDING 1,519 sq ft near CSUC with in-ground pool! $205,000 • LIVE IN ONE, rent the other in this Bidwell Park location home w/ studio. Great rental history! $299,900 • IMPRESSIVE, CalG Park 4 bd/3 ba, living/dining, family room, 2,233 sq ft, PENDIN 3-car garage! Motivated! $374,500 • Recent upgrades, 3bd/2ba, 1833 sq ft NICE! $325,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of December 23, 2013 – December 27, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

220 Sycamore St

ADDRESS

Gridley

$106,000

2/ 1

1535

6565 Buena Vista Dr

Magalia

$225,000

4/ 2

2322

6361 Columbine Rd

Magalia

$212,000

2/ 2

1829

6564 Perry Rd

Magalia

$145,000

2/ 2

1676

6085 Upper Palermo Rd Oroville

$175,000

2/ 2

1749

12 Orangewood Way

Oroville

$140,000

3/ 2

1203

1 La Media Dr

Oroville

$118,000

3/ 1

884

36 CN&R January 9, 2014

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

215 Lost Horizon Dr

ADDRESS

Oroville

$112,000

3/ 2

1344

5880 Cameron Ln

Paradise

$364,000

3/ 2.5

2232

5099 Malibu Dr

Paradise

$315,000

3/ 2

2408

1682 Paradisewood Dr Paradise

$210,000

3/ 2

1734


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95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE SCILIGO Dated: November 26, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001517 Published: December 19,26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

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1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer.All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. $6000 530-895-8171 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

FICTITIous BusIness FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE NATURALLY BALANCED DOG at 747 Lawn Drive Chico, CA 95973. KIM LOUISE GROOM 747 Lawn Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KIM LOUISE GROOM Dated: November 27, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001521 Published: December 19,26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AWARDS COMPANY at 424 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JOE SCILIGO 1457 Keri Lane Chico, CA

this Legal notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OMPT, ONE MEDIA PLAYER PER TEACHER, POLDER INC at 1350 East 9th Street Chico, CA 95928. POLDER INC P.O. Box 3320 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MATTHEW YORK, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dated: December 5, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001548 Published: December 19, 26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TRICOGENT BEHAVIORAL CONSULTING at 2931 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. LYNN MARIE BAKER 2931 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYNN M. BAKER Dated: December 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001552 Published: December 19,26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have

this Legal notice continues

abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: AWARDS COMPANY at 424 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. J UJIKI INC 424 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEAN UJIKI-WALKER, GENERAL MANAGING PARTNER Dated: December 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2009-0000828 Published: December 19,26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CRYSTAL RAINBOW BAND, LILLY DIAMOND, LILLY DIAMOND BAND at 1510 10th Street Oroville, CA 95965. MARGARET D. O’DONNELL 1510 10th Street Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Singed: MARGARET D. O’DONNELL Dated: December 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001570 Published: December 19,26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COMFORT ZONE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING at 12152 River Road Chico, CA 95973. DONALD R WILEY 12152 River Road Chico, CA

CLassIFIeds

CONTINUED ON 38

open

house Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

3171 Sandstone Lane (X St: Shallow Springs Ter.) 5 Bd / 4 Bas, 4,430 Sq.Ft. $1,100,000 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508 Sherry Landis 514-4855 Justin Jewett 518-4089 Becky Williams 636-0936

Sun. 2-4

10082 Jones Avenue (X St: Midway) 4 Bd / 3.5 Bas, 2,926 Sq.Ft. $675,000 Sandy Stoner 514-5555

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 155 Spanish Garden (X St: Skyway) 4 Bd / 2.5 Bas, 2,642 Sq.Ft. $549,950 Johnny Klinger 864-3398 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

Sat. 11-1

68 Eagle Nest Drive (X St: Lava Rock) 4 Bd / 3.5 Bas, 3,582 Sq.Ft. $539,900 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

Sun. 2-4

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1

4084 Guntren Road (X St: Garner) 5 Bd / 3 Bas, 3,045 Sq.Ft. $535,000 Sherry Landis 514-4855

1325 Kentfield Rd. (X St: East 1st) 3 Bd / 3 Bas, 2,522Sq.Ft. $485,000 Justin Jewett, 518-4089 Kimberley Tonge, 518-5508 Brandi Laffins, 321-9562 Ronnie Owen, 518-0911

273 Autumn Gold (X St: Henshaw) Bd / 2.5 Ba, 2,081 Sq.Ft. $329,000 Anita Miller, 321-1174

7 Firefly Ct (X St: Manzanita Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1833 Sq.Ft. $325,000 Johnny Klinger, 864-3398 Paul Champlin, 828-2902 Ronnie Owen, 518-0911 Lindsey Ginno, 570-5261

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 1-3

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 11-1

1461 Rim Rock Road (X St: Oakridge Dr) 5 Bd / 4.5 Bas, 4,675 Sq.Ft. $475,000 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837

91 Eagle Nest Drive (X St: Skyway) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 3,024 Sq.Ft. $439,000 Summer Hughes 227-5729

2714 North Avenue (X St: La Mesa) 5 Bd / 4 Ba, 2,396 Sq.Ft. $347,000 Heather DeLuca 228-1480

182 Picholine Way (X St: Bruce) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, + Bonus Room, 1815 Sq.Ft. $315,000 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

25 La Casa Court (X St: Paseo haciendas Ct) 3 Bd / 2.5 Bas, 2,023 Sq. Ft. $299,900 Frank ‘Speedy’ Condon 864-7726

10 Smith Bros ( X St: W 6th Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1762 Sq.Ft. $294,500 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

2602 Sedona Avenue (X St: Archway) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,603 Sq. Ft. $274,900 John Spain 519-5726

1193 Olive Street (X St: E. 12th St) Nicely updated home 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,512 Sq.Ft. $245,000 Brian Bernedo 624-2118

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

17 Dean Way (X St: Neal Dow) 4 Bd / 2 Bas, 1,569 Sq.Ft. $245,000 Brenda Stryker 519-8338 Erin Schmidt 575-7431

Sat. 11-1

885 Lorinda Lane (X St: Cohasset) 3 Bd / 1 Ba, 1,288 Sq.Ft. $239,400 Paul Champlin 828-2902

Sat. 12:30-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1296 Glenshire Lane (X St: Mariposa) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1,121 Sq.Ft. $219,500 Emmett Jacobi 519-6333

January 9, 2014

CN&R 37


95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DONALD R WILEY Dated: December 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001578 Published: December 19,26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SERVICE MASTER SELECT at 3881 Benater Way #B Chico, CA 95928. RESTORATION GROUP INCORPORATED 2662 Tarmac Road Redding, CA 96003. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ROBERT CRONIC, PRES Dated: November 22, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001503 Published” December 19,26, January 2,9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE GHOST LIFE, THE VISIONARY ARTS at 122 Peak View Drive Oroville, CA 95966. BRIAN SANCHEZ 122 Peak View Drive Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIAN SANCHEZ Dated: December 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001559 Published: December 26, 2013, January 2,9,16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GREEN ENERGY CONSTRUCTION at 2654 HWY 32 STE 1300 Chico, CA 95973. MICHAEL THOMAS GROSBERG 3168 Aloha Ln Chico, CA 95973 This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MIKE GROSBERG Dated: December 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001600 Published: December 26, 2013, January 2,9,16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: GREEN ENERGY CONSTRUCTION at 2954 Hwy 32, Suite 1300 Chico, CA 95973. STEPHEN M MCNULTY 3075 Coronado Road Chico, CA 95973. MICHAEL T GROSBERG 3168 Aloha Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MIKE GROSBERG Dated: December 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000748 Published: December 26, 2013, January 2,9,16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STREAMLINE DESIGN at 890 East 9th Street #14 Chico, CA 95928. JENEANNE CHATOFF 890 East 9th Street #14 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENEANNE CHATOFF Dated: November 22, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001505 Published: December 26, 2013, January 2,9,16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DJ PHG at 433 Cherry Street #2 Chico, CA 95926. GRANT C. PARKS

this Legal Notice continues

433 Cherry Street #2 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GRANT C. PARKS Dated: November 21, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001501 Published: December 26, 2013, January 2,9,16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LAKE OROVILLE GOLD COUNTRY RV COMMUNITY at 3864 Olive Hwy Oroville, CA 95966. WAY OUT WEST COMMUNITIES CORPORATION P.O. Box 689 Fallon, NV 89407. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: NICOLE ADAMS, SECRETARY/CFO Dated: December 12, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001588 Published: December 26, 2013, January 2,9,16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ECLECTIC MARKETING at 1074 San Ramon Dr Chico, CA 95973. SHELBY SANDERS 1074 San Ramon Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHELBY SANDERS Dated: December 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001556 Published: January 2,9,16,23, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SKZ PHOTOGRAPHY at 851 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. SHIANNE ZERLANG 851 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHIANNE ZERLANG Dated: December 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001574 Published: January 2,9,16,23, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CITIZENS ACTION NETWORK, FRACK-FREE BUTTE COUNTY at 2965 Madre De Oro Pl Oroville, CA 95965. KAREN DUNCANWOOD 6656 Pentz Rd #56 Paradise, CA 95969. DAVE GARCIA 128 Via Las Lupes Yankee Hill, CA 95965. CHARLES GREENWOOD 128 Grimy Gulch Bangor, CA 95914. JONI STELLAR 2965 Madre De Oro Pl Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: JONI STELLAR Dated: December 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001594 Published: January 2,9,16,23, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: PCMD PC TREATMENT CENTER at 2117 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. NICOLETTE BATTENFIELD 355 E Lassen Ave #5 Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: NICOLETTE BATTENFIELD Dated: December 23, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000782 Published: January 2,9,16,23, 2013

38 CN&R January 9, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as POETRY DIVINE, RAINCLOUD PRESS at 807 Moss Ave Chico, CA 95926. ERIKA LUNDER 807 Moss Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ERIKA LUNDER Dated: December 30, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001629 Published: January 9,16,23,30, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as INDIAN HEAD VENDING at 1584 Montgomery St. Apt. B Oroville, CA 95965 BRANDON MICHAEL HILL 1584 Montgomery St. Apt. B Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRANDON HILL Dated: December 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001590 Published: January 9,16,23,30, 2014

Proposed name: AIDEN JOSEPH SORRELS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 29, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: December 9, 2013 Case Number: 161034 Published: December 19,26, 2013, January 2,9, 2014

NOTICES

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KATHLEEN V STARR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AAREN INLOW STARR Proposed name: AAREN INLOW THOMAS STARR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 26, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: December 17, 2013 Case Number: 161100 Published: January 2,9,16,23, 2014

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KEVIN SORRELS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AIDEN JOSEPH MINTON

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARGARET DOLORES (DELORES) O’DONNELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows:

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PC-MD at 2117 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. KYLE SILLIMAN 3465 Hackamore Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KYLE SILLIMAN Dated: December 23, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001615 Published: January 9,16,23,30, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SALON VOGUE at 101 Salem Street Suite 140 Chico, CA 95928 HALEIGH BETTENCOURT 1583 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. MEGAN KATHLEEN WARREN 400 Hideaway Park Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MEGAN WARREN Dated: December 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001610 Published: January 9,16,23,30, 2014

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

Present name: MARGARET DOLORES (DELORES) O’DONNELL Proposed name: LADY MARGARET WATTS SCHNEIDER VALLIER MARKS O’DONNELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 19, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: December 24, 2013 Case Number: 161154 Published: January 2,9,16,23, 2014

LEANDRA RASH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BLAKELY KALYNN RASH Proposed name: BLAKELY KALYNN FARRELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition

this Legal Notice continues

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JENNIFER LYNN ANTONE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JENNIFER LYNN ANTONE Proposed name: JENNIFER LYNN HUTCHINSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 26, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: December 17, 2013 Case Number: 161052 Published: January 9,16,23,30 2014

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KURTIS LEE BROWN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KURTIS LEE BROWN Proposed name: KURTIS LEE MENDONCA

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 19, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: December 24, 2013 Case Number: 161141 Published: January 9,16,23,30 2014

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner

this Legal Notice continues

without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 29, 2014 Time: 8:30am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: December 9, 2013 Case Number: 160875 Published: January 9,16,23,30 2014

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can blame it on the coming full moon. You can blame it on the gorgeous storm or the epic dream or the haunting song or the suffering you’re struggling to vanquish. All I ask is that you don’t blame it on the alcohol. OK? If you’re going to do wild and brave and unexpected things, make sure they are rooted in your vigorous response to primal rhythms, not in a drunken surrender to weakness or ignorance. I’m all for you losing your oppressive self-control, but not the healthy kind of self-control.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When is the last time you did an experiment? I’m not talking about scientific tests and trials that take place in a laboratory. I’m referring to real-life experiments, like when you try out an unfamiliar experience to see if it appeals to you, or when you instigate a change in your routine to attract unpredictable blessings into your sphere. Now would be an excellent time to expose yourself to a few what-ifs like that. You’re overdue to have your eyes opened, your limits stretched and your mind blown. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): To help take

the edge off the darkness you have been wrestling with, I offer you these lines from a poem by Kay Ryan: “The day misspent, / the love misplaced, / has inside it / the seed of redemption. / Nothing is exempt from resurrection.” In other words, Gemini, whatever has disappeared from your life will probably return later in a new form. The wrong turns you made may lead you to a fresh possibility. Is that what you want? Or would you prefer that the lost things stay lost, the dead things stay dead? Make a decision soon.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Human

beings are often unable to receive because we do not know what to ask for,” says the writer Malidoma Patrice Somé in his book Of Water and the Spirit. “We are sometimes unable to get what we need because we do not know what we want.” With that in mind, Cancerian, hear my two pleas: First, that in the next six weeks, you will work diligently to identify the goodies you want most; and second, that you will cultivate your capacity to receive the goodies you want most by refining your skill at asking for them.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Julia Morgan (1872-

1957) was the first woman licensed as an architect in California. She designed more than 700 buildings over the course of her brilliant career, and thrived both financially and artistically. One key to her success was her humility. “Don’t ever turn down a job because it’s beneath you,” she advised. That’s a helpful message for you to hear, Leo. It applies to the work-related opportunities you may be invited to take on, as well as the tasks that your friends, associates and loved ones ask you to consider. You can’t possibly know ahead of time how important it might ultimately be to apply yourself conscientiously to a seemingly small assignment.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One of

Beethoven’s music teachers said, “As a composer, he is hopeless.” When Thomas Edison was a kid, a teacher told him he was “too stupid to learn anything.” Walt Disney worked at a newspaper when he was young, but his editor fired him because “he lacked imagination and had no good ideas.” I’m sure there was a person like that in your past— someone who disparaged and discouraged you. But I’m happy to report that 2014 will be the best year ever for neutralizing and overcoming that naysayer’s curse. If you have not yet launched your holy crusade, begin now.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): As a child,

French philosopher and writer Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) loved math. But his father, who homeschooled him, forced him to forgo math and concentrate on studying the humanities. Blaise rebelled. When he was 12 years old, he locked himself in his room for days and immersed himself in mathematical investiga-

Art-wine pairing

tions. When he emerged, he had figured out on his own some of Euclid’s fundamental theorems about geometry. Eventually, he became a noted mathematician. I see the coming weeks as prime time to do something like the young Pascal did: Seal yourself away from other people’s opinions about who you’re supposed to be, and explore the themes that will be crucial for the person you are becoming.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1609, sea explorer Henry Hudson sailed to America and came upon what we now call Coney Island. Back then, it was a barren spit of sand whose main inhabitants were rabbits. But it was eventually turned into a dazzling resort—an “extravagant playground,” according to the documentary film Coney Island. By the early 20th century, there were three sprawling amusement parks packed into its 2 square miles of land, plus “a forest of glittering electric towers, historical displays, freak shows, a simulated trip to the moon, the largest herd of elephants in the world, and panoramas showing the Creation, the End of the World, and Hell.” I mention this, Scorpio, because 2014 could feature your very own Henry Hudson moment: a time when you will discover virgin territory that will ultimately become an extravagant playground. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “If

men had wings and bore black feathers, few of them would be clever enough to be crows,” said 19th-century social reformer Henry Ward Beecher. That might be an accurate assessment for most people, but I don’t think it will be true for you Sagittarians in the foreseeable future. Your animal intelligence will be working even better than usual. Your instinctual inclinations are likely to serve as reliable guides to wise action. Trust what your body tells you! You will definitely be clever enough to be a crow.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Can you guess what combination of colors makes the most vivid visual impact? Psychologists say it’s black on yellow. Together they arrest the eye. They command attention. They activate a readiness to respond. According to my reading of the astrological omens, this is the effect you can and should have in the coming weeks. It’s time for you to draw the best kind of attention to yourself. You have a right and a duty to galvanize people with the power of your presence. Whether you actually wear yellow clothes with black highlights is optional as long as you cultivate a similar potency. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’m

guessing that in a metaphorical sense, you’ve been swallowed by a whale. Now you’re biding your time in the beast’s belly. Here’s my prediction: You will be like the biblical Jonah, who underwent a more literal version of your experience. The whale eventually expelled him, allowing him to return to his life safe and sound—and your story will have the same outcome. What should you do in the meantime? Here’s the advice that Dan Albergotti gives in his poem “Things to Do in the Belly of the Whale.” “Count the ribs,” he says. “Look up for blue sky through the spout. Make small fires with the broken hulls of fishing boats. Practice smoke signals. Call old friends. ... Organize your calendar. Dream of the beach. ... Review each of your life’s ten million choices. ... Find the evidence of those before you. ... Listen for the sound of your heart. Be thankful that you are here, swallowed with all hope, where you can rest and wait.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): How do you

like your tests? Short, intense and dramatic? Or leisurely, drawn-out and low-pressure? Here’s another question: Do you prefer to pick out the tests you take, making sure they’re good fits for the precise lessons you want to master? Or do you find it more exciting and adventurous to let fate determine what unpredictable tests get sent your way? Ruminate about these matters, Pisces. You’re due for a nice big test sometime soon, and it’s in your interest to help shape and define how everything unfolds.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

by

Katherine Green Erika Noriega moved to Chico to be with her fiancé Jason Pigg (aka J. Pigg of local rap crew The Hooliganz), and in an effort to meet new people and connect with the community, the couple started hosting painting and winedrinking events this past September. Painted Vino is now a business and a regular happening—once or twice per week—and each session includes instruction from a professional artist, painting supplies and a complimentary glass of wine. The images to be painted are pre-selected, and can be found on their website at www.paint edvino.com ahead of time. They can also be hired for private parties and soon will be expanding into Sonoma County.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PAINTED VINO

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You

by Rob Brezsny

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of January 9, 2014

Balcom is a Chico State alum who will be teaching her first class in January. We’re going to be hiring one more person as well.

How does Painted Vino work?

Were you looking to start a business?

It’s a paint class paired with wine, and you can come with a group of friends, or you can come by yourself. By the end of the event, you pretty much leave with a group of friends. So it’s building a community within a community. For $40, we set you up with everything you need for the paint class, [plus you receive] one complimentary glass of wine. You get instruction from a professional artist; all the artists are local to the area. We are not licensed to sell wine, but we have a really nice partnership with Wine Time, and other venues. They provide the wine, and after the first glass you can continue ordering from their menu.

It started off as what I believed would be a hobby, maybe once or twice a month. Now we’re averaging anywhere between one and two times a week, and we’ve been really wellreceived. It’s turned into this small business, which is a learning process for me.

Who are your art instructors? We have Gary Baugh, who sat on the Arts Commission here in Chico; Brandon Simpson, who’s been commissioned for a couple of murals since his work with our company; and Brittany

How do you choose the images for each class? We purposely choose images to set up our guests for success. We don’t want to overwhelm them. The point is not to walk out a professional artist; the point is to have a good time, and walk out with something you’re proud of. I can say, almost 100 percent of the time, everyone’s really happy with their painting. It’s a really good time to see their process—walking in and feeling a little anxious, saying things like “I’ve never done this before,” to walking out and saying, “I really created this!”

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Pete While Anthony takes a break this week, enjoy this vintage From the Edge column from 2006. I called my father “Pete.” His name was John Peyton Porter, but everybody called him Pete. I’m an only child—it’s a chronic condition, like having children—and since I never heard anybody call him anything but Pete, I called him Pete, too. That’s my theory. My mother tried to get me to call him “Daddy,” but I wasn’t having any. When I was little, Pete worked for the Chicago & Northwestern Railway as a redcap, schlepping baggage for passengers. He made good tips, and when he worked on Sunday after we got a car, my mother and I would drive downtown to the Northwestern station to get him. He’d buy me a Green River pop at the saloon next door, and we’d all go home to dinner. For much of my childhood, Pete took me fishing on summer Saturdays. We didn’t go far, just out to Saganashkee Slough or Maple Lake, where we could be together and not talk. At home, my mother seemed to talk all the time. I don’t suppose she did really. He took me to racetracks and card games and never to church, so we got along fine.

At home, Pete was a second-class citizen, littleappreciated and ill-treated by my mother and much too fond of Gordon’s gin to defend himself against the likes of her. He was a nice guy and a lousy role model. I wonder how I’ll fail my sons. I think I’m bound to, and I don’t think the specifics are predictable, so I don’t sweat it. Good luck to them. I mean well. I spent a lot of years resenting my father. I wanted him to run interference between me and my mother. I used to want him to hit her, but he didn’t. Then I acquired a wife and children, and he started to seem like a hero for not decking her. My perceptions are growing up. I don’t know what makes a parent harangue a child or bring up their children’s gaffes in front of other people, as though a little more humiliation will teach the little buggers what experience couldn’t. And I don’t know why a parent thinks just one more nag or backhand will make the crucial difference and tip little Emma over into eager obedience and a flawless memory. What I do know is that some things run in families, and what runs in mine is up to me. What runs in yours is up to you. The hard part is something Albert Schweitzer said: “Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.” Just our luck. January 9, 2014

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