Page 1

AN IRISH

STORY See ARTS FEATURE, page 22

Edward Abbey inspires a local hiker’s illegal campout at Lassen Park

JR. HIGH REALIGNMENT See NEWSLINES, page 8

BY ALLAN STELLAR

PAGE 18

FROM PARKING TO PARKLETS? See GREENWAYS, page 12

WINE

CITY See CHOW, page 26

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 37, Issue 11

Thursday, November 7, 2013


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President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Receptionist Kendra Gray Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

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Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

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Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them.

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From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . 39

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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

Let the ACA do its job The roll-out was a disaster. For more than a month, the enroll-

Looking for answers on armed guards Ipany, Armed Guard Private Protection, is allowed to patrol the streets of downtown Chico with no oversight or accountaam disturbed that a private armed-security com-

bility to anyone but some unnamed people from a new Chico group called R-Town Downtown Coalition. On the security company’s website is a picture of 15 white men in sunglasses—no women, no minorities—with a mission statement advocating for armed guards in communities “because of the rapid release of thousands of low-level state prisoners coupled with the local massive public-safety budget reductions coupled with our philosophies and beliefs implemented in the new age of by the private-security industry.” Molly Amick The site notes “patrol officers and guards have been through … firearms, The author has pepper spray, baton, investigations and worked in Chico for criminal-law courses.” The company’s the past 16 years as “officers are armed with a firearm, taser a family-practice and and pepper spray,” as well as “equipped psychiatric nurse with generation II night-vision monocupractitioner. lar goggles.” Training focuses on the use of force, and does not include de-escalation tactics or specialized training with the mentally ill. The company claims to have “proven over and over again to dramatically reduce crime on its clients’ properties,” but supplies no outcome data. It’s 4 CN&R November 7, 2013

unclear whether these guards have the right to detain and arrest citizens. The R-Town Coalition’s draft mission statement has a short-term goal of “removing drug offenders, transients, loiterers, vagrants and individuals exhibiting anti-social behavior from private property in the downtown area.” I’m fine if downtown businesses want to hire guns to protect their wares inside of their stores, but am not OK with their private guns patrolling community space for the purpose of intimidating people who don’t fit R-Town Coalition’s social, economic or cultural agendas. Since when does the privilege of renting downtown business space extend to the right to hire armed private guards—who are not regulated, evaluated or operated by community-hired and -elected officials—to enforce public laws? I do not feel safer in downtown Chico with a private paramilitary presence that answers to no one. To whom do citizens report abuses and complaints related to this company? Who’s liable in a court of law if the guards shoot a local kid perceived as a “vagrant”? Does this mean that I can get together my Chico neighbors and hire armed guards to patrol from house to house to help enforce the noise ordinance? Where do our city leaders and local lawenforcement agencies stand on this issue? Ω

ment website went offline, and when it was online it was unwieldy and riddled with problems. The Affordable Care Act? Well, yes, but the same was true in 2005, when the Bush administration tried to implement its new prescription-drug program, Medicare Part D. The difference is that in 2005 the many congressional Democrats who voted against the measure, instead of trying to block it once it had passed, began working to make sure their constituents could access the coverage it provided. Compare that with Republicans’ determination to do everything they can to make access to the ACA more difficult and to undermine President Obama’s effort to extend health insurance to millions of Americans currently without it. As regular CN&R readers know, we have long supported extending Medicare to all Americans as the best solution to the lack of health insurance. Unfortunately, that simple and highly efficient approach has lacked sufficient political support to get through Congress. Instead we’ve got this Rube Goldberg contraption called Obamacare. It’s complicated and confusing, but it also clearly has the potential to expand access to health care to millions of people and distribute the cost of that care more widely and evenly. This week, Marilyn Tavenner, head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, reported that around-the-clock website-repair efforts were having results. “Users can now successfully create an account [on HealthCare.gov] and continue through the full application and enrollment process,” she said, adding, “We are now able to process nearly 17,000 registrants per hour, or five per second, with almost no errors.” Some 45 million Americans lack health insurance. In its first 24 hours, HealthCare.gov logged 4.7 million unique visits, an indication of the need. The obstructionists should get out of the way and let Obamacare do its job. Ω

In defense of AB 109 The cooperative effort by the Butte County Sheriff’s Office and

the city of Chico to employ those serving out-of-jail sentences to help keep Caper Acres playground open presents a good argument for a state law that has been misleadingly—and mercilessly—criticized by local representatives, including state Sen. Jim Nielsen (R-Gerber). Assembly Bill 109—the Public Safety Realignment Act passed by the Legislature two years ago and triggered by order of the U.S. Supreme Court—has reduced the number of inmates in the state’s 33 prisons by about 28,000 since October 2011 by sending low-level felons to county jails rather than into state custody. There is a persistent misconception that the bill actually transferred those serving time in state prison to local jails, which is simply not true. According to a fact sheet from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, under AB 109, “newly convicted low-level offenders without current or prior serious or violent offenses stay in county jail to serve their sentence; this has reduced the annual admissions [to state prison] to less than 35,000 a year. Prior to realignment, there were approximately 55,000 to 65,000 new admissions.” Of course, that has put pressure on the Butte County Jail and, as such, there is a need to let some prisoners out before their sentences are finished. And that is where the Alternative Custody Supervision (ACS) program and the Sheriff’s Work Alternative Program come into play. They offer those under “house arrest,” which means wearing an electronic ankle detector and not leaving home without permission, to give their time and labor back to the community. The CN&R commends those involved in this effort, including Butte County Sheriff’s Capt. Andy Duch; Chico City Councilman Randall Stone, who introduced the idea; the rest of the council, which supported it unanimously; and especially those who are taking part in order to reduce their sentences and give back to their community. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Breakdown in civility Not everyone is adjusting well to the metropolitan problems occurring here. I get it. Chico used to be a small town with little traffic and crime. It was idyllic. In many ways it still is. Try driving down The Esplanade this week. The picturesque fall scenery is right out of a quaint-town-USA calendar. But not everything is so pretty. And what’s getting noticed most lately is the blight in downtown. And I’m not talking about a building or two in disrepair. I’m talking about the perception of human blight. I’m talking about the transient and homeless folks who spend much of their day in the downtown core—just like what is found in bigger cities. Business owners in the region think these people are driving away potential customers. I’ve heard from several people who won’t venture into downtown much anymore. Some people are genuinely afraid of the transient population. Others just don’t want to be confronted with homelessness. That’s because it’s unattractive. What’s also ugly is the behavior some of our community members have displayed during public discussions related to homelessness and transiency. Tuesday evening’s City Council meeting—a gathering during which the panel voted in favor of the so-called civil-sidewalks ordinance—was a prime example. Despite repeated calls for civility, there were a number of rude outbursts by people on both sides. In fact, a fight nearly broke out directly in front of me. Last month’s special study session on “downtown issues” also had undertones of hostility. The gathering was attended by an estimated 300 citizens, and all sorts of ideas were bandied about to mitigate the issues—loitering, trespassing, aggressive panhandling and camping—stemming from vagrancy. One of the ideas was to create a community day center—a place for people to go. But that idea went nowhere fast. Instead, at that meeting, Councilman Sean Morgan went straight for the low-hanging fruit by bringing back the civil-sidewalks (aka sit/lie) law. That came about despite it becoming clear that the ordinance doesn’t apply to the lawns at City Plaza or outside of City Hall—popular lounging spots. Councilman Randall Stone and District Attorney Mike Ramsey both made flippant comments about turning the sprinklers on as deterrents. Not funny. Also disturbing was the tone of the calls to stop feeding the homeless at the plaza. The way some people talked, it sounded like they were equating the needy to nuisance animals, rather than human beings. What the civil-sidewalks ordinance likely will succeed in doing is pushing these folks to those grassy regions in downtown or into nearby neighborhoods. In other words, the new law is nowhere near to being an overarching solution to downtown vagrancy. Mayor Scott Gruendl mentioned that he was going to form an ad-hoc committee that will provide an opportunity for stakeholders on both sides to come up with other ideas. Hopefully, by that time, good manners and compassion will prevail. As Gruendl pointed out, an overall sense of negativity has overshadowed many of the positive things happening around town.

The word on weird Re “Tedra Thomsen” (Cover feature, by Tom Gascoyne, Oct. 31): So, the liberal (progressive) Chico News & Review thinks that having a transgendered person in their community is “weird”? How homophobic is that? Liberals (progressives) need to decide whether transgendered people are a normal complement to our society or weird. We libertarians have no problems with the transgendered. Weird? I don’t think so. A free, individual life choice? Yes. Liberal and progressive newspapers and blogs are obsessed with gender and sexual-preference issues. DENNY ROYSTON Chico

Editor’s note: For the record, the CN&R thinks Tedra is awesome. We were happy she shared her story with us, giving the public the opportunity to get beyond the perception by some in the community that she is weird in a way that isn’t good. Re (Arts DEVO, by Jason Cassidy, Oct. 31): Many thanks to Arts Editor Jason Cassidy for listing me among Chico’s weirdos, a mantle I wear with great joy. Like one of the bumper stickers on my canoe states, “Normals are boring.” And isn’t it wonderful that “weird” is the one exception to I before E except after C? Speaking of weird, reviewing a freakin’ french fry? But, ah, they are good! It’s good to get paid to review, having written over 400 reviews for Library Journal and being named fiction reviewer of the year. I actually made more money from two reviews [in the CN&R] than I have made in royalties in the last year for my 2006 book, Where the Wild Books Are. If you want to be rich and famous, publish a scholarly work. I made 2 cents an hour off it! JIM DWYER Chico

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treat us all like we believed abortion was our primary birth-control method and that we should be horrified and ashamed for not agreeing with them. No one I have ever met thinks that abortion is a viable birth-control method; no one would willingly subject themselves to that kind of physical and emotional pain repeatedly. As a student, I wish that the college—if it is going to continue to allow these kinds of demonstrations on campus—would notify students of the details before they happen and that these demonstrators would be placed in an area that doesn’t see the foot traffic of so many small children. SAMANTHA ROPER Paradise

Rent-a-cops unwanted Re “Private security” (Newslines, by Tom Gascoyne, Oct. 31): This coalition of this R-Town group is starting to feel like bullies on the playground who have their own hired Gestapo to help patrol “their” town “their” way. What about my town, the town of love and tolerance, allowing people to live their lives the way they see fit? Part of my town, my Chico, is the homeless population downtown. I would rather come across any one of the homeless citizens downtown at night than an armed guard, or a gang member. (Yeah, they are here, too. Who is policing that?) This is getting ridiculous. Let’s get back to feeding and humanizing our citizens who are not living in structures. TRACEY STOGSDILL Chico

After last week’s article about District Attorney Mike Ramsey and friends coaching the Paradise Tea Party rednecks about how to shoot first and ask questions later, I was so relieved to find that the downtown Chico business owners feel it necessary to have armed security walking around downtown. After all, every interaction is surely improved with the addition of a gun. I’ll sure feel safer with cop wannabes like George Zimmerman walking around with loaded weapons. Of course, I’m an old white guy. Don’t know if I’d want to be a young black man or a homeless person in downtown Chico or Paradise. RICH MEYERS Oroville

6 CN&R November 7, 2013

Well done, Randall Stone Re “Convicts to clean park” (Downstroke, Oct. 31): The city of Chico has had to make many budget cuts recently. Because of that, it’s been a struggle to our keep Caper Acres open in Bidwell Park. Thanks to Randall Stone for his great idea to have convicts in the Alternative Custody Supervision program give their time to keep Caper Acres clean and open. Bidwell Park has been the heart of Chico for many years. Parents love taking their children there to play and run off all their bottled-up energy inside Caper Acres. It’s sad to see such a beautiful thing get taken away from our community. Using the convicts is a great way to continue to save money and keep the park open. This program can also teach some convicts to be productive, and giving them responsibilities can never hurt. Thanks for moving forward on this to keep our children and the community happy. ROSE CHASON Chico

Affordable for whom? What’s in a name? It’s called the Affordable Care Act, but perhaps it should be referred to as a suspense novel that none of the legislators bothered to read before voting it into law. We are one of the millions of American families who had an individual health policy that was affordable for our family until our current administration decided to dictate to insurers what we needed for medical care. Affordable care for whom? Our monthly premium has doubled thanks to the Affordable Care Act, and who actually knows what else is included in this behemoth act of legislation. I’m sure it will be one surprise after another. Perhaps it should be called “The Affordable Care Act—An American Horror Story.” TAMMY ANSELMENT Chico

Garbage franchises fishy Brian Nakamura recently discussed his plans for garbage franchise zones in Chico—customers would lose the right to choose their garbage company. Nakamura first claimed this would protect our streets from too many garbage trucks, and the enhanced fees would help to fix our streets. But the city already gets $200,000 per year from the

haulers, used to pay salaries and benefits downtown. Nakamura told a recent Chico Tea Party gathering that without such an agreement, the haulers would be using old trucks that aren’t legal in the Bay Area. That doesn’t make sense—we have the same air-quality standards as the rest of the state, the same vehicle code. Nakamura really wants the increased franchise fee—another $1.8 million—to pay down the gargantuan pension liability hanging over the city. The city’s consultant warns of higher fees for consumers and recommends, “If the potential for lower rates and lower administrative burden are of primary importance to the city, it should maintain and enforce its current regulated open-market permit system.” The consultant’s analysis lists “city administrative costs” as a “to-be-determined” portion of that $1.8 million. ’Nuff said? JUANITA SUMNER Chico

Letter clarification Re “Brainwash hogwash” (Letters, Oct. 31): To clarify things: I’ve taught every grade there is from preschool through graduate school (there’s not much difference between third-graders and grad students) and have known hundreds of educators. I also worked for free for my old high school (Red Bluff High) for six years to build them a $3 million performing-arts center; the year the center opened, the high-school dropout rate fell 15 percent. Ultimately, I’d like to see all our school campuses look like Disneyland, not like the current institutional bland architecture they are (but I suppose that’s a wild idea). And our American school system is based on the Prussian system, which emphasized obedience, submission and indoctrination—it was specifically designed for brainwashing. And folks should study the Frankfurt School to see how Communists have infiltrated our educational system. Alas, U.S. schools are currently ranked only No. 17 among the top 50 developed nations—Finland is No. 1. Lots of room for improvement. MIKE PETERS Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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MOTEL-ROOM MAYHEM

Police are searching for five suspects—and one victim—after a Monday morning (Nov. 4) armed robbery at a downtown Chico motel room. According to a Chico Police Department press release, five white men armed with handguns and rifles kicked in a door and assaulted an occupant at the Heritage Inn Express on the 700 block of Broadway shortly after 6:30 a.m. The assailants fired a shot as the victim fled to a nearby gas station. Another occupant of the motel room, who police say may have confronted the suspects in the parking lot, is refusing to speak to investigators. CPD suspects the targets of the robbery were marijuana and cash, the release states. The robbery occurred just three days after two women were robbed at the Holiday Inn on Manzanita Avenue. Three suspects from Red Bluff—two men and a teen boy— were arrested shortly after that incident.

TALKING TRASH

The Chico City Council deliberated Tuesday (Nov. 4) on moving away from the openmarket solid-waste collection system currently in place. On Aug. 6, the council authorized City Manager Brian Nakamura to hire R3 Consulting Group, Inc. to provide an assessment of the city’s management of solid-waste collection. At Tuesday’s meeting, Richard TagoreErwin of R3 outlined the inefficiencies of the current system, an open-market permit system in which two permit-holders—Waste Management and Recology—compete for both residential and commercial contracts. The open-market competition allows for multiple collection trucks to pick up waste on the same street, which has raised concerns of structural damage to Chico’s roadways. The council voted 6-1, with Councilman Randall Stone dissenting, for further evaluation of options should the city decide to adopt a franchise agreement for its solid-waste collection system.

BICYCLIST SUCCUMBS TO INJURIES

A Butte College student died at Enloe Medical Center Monday (Nov. 4) from injuries sustained when her bicycle was struck by a car two days earlier. Janee Nickerson (pictured), 20, of Chico, was hit near the intersection of East First and Oleander avenues at about 6:30 p.m. on Nov. 1. The driver, Amanda McClintock, 21, was arrested for driving on a suspended license. An investigation is ongoing, and McClintock could eventually face misdemeanor vehicular-manslaughter charges, Chico Police Lt. George Laver said Tuesday. Nickerson is the second recent fatality of a vehicle-versus-bicycle collision. Chico State University nursing student Kristina Chesterman, 21, was hit by a car allegedly driven by Riley Hoover, 19, on Sept. 22, and succumbed to injuries days later. Hoover left the scene, and pled not guilty Oct. 23 to related charges in Butte County Superior Court. 8 CN&R November 7, 2013

Class action Above: John Bohannon, CUSD’s director of secondary and alternative education. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO BREGLIA

Chico Junior High School is one of three local junior-high schools that will move to a middleschool configuration consisting of sixth through eighth grades. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

Parents of CUSD fourth-graders prepare for their children to attend newly configured middle schools in 2015

AUnified School District that moves sixthgraders out of elementary schools and into the structural change to the Chico

district’s junior-high schools has some parents upset over the way the news was announced and the school district a bit on the defensive. by Christine G.K. “The first I heard about it LaPadowas a ‘blip’ on the TV news on Breglia Friday [Nov. 1] that Chico Unified was changing to the middlechristinel@ newsreview.com school configuration,” said Mary Oliver, the mother of a boy in the fourth grade at Hooker Oak Elementary School. “It didn’t really strike me until the following day when I was watching the news, when they said that current fourth-graders would be affected.” Oliver said she did not like the “cloak-and-dagger” way that the Chico Unified School District handled the creation and passage of the reconfiguration plan, which calls for sixthgraders to start attending Chico, Bidwell and Marsh junior-high schools in the fall of 2015. While not necessarily opposed to having her son attend middle school when he is a sixth-grader, Oliver said she is not happy with the way she found out about the plan or with what she sees as her lack of opportunity for input. Common Core She said the district had connection: asked parents for input on what Go to www.core to do with the $78 million from standards.org to last year’s passage of Measure E learn more about the Common Core that is earmarked for repairs, State Standards upgrades and new construction Initiative. of CUSD schools.

“All previous meetings at Hooker Oak had to do with facilities,” she said. “We talked about computers, bathrooms, heating and air-conditioning, hot water—but never, ever was it anything about changing the configuration of the schools. … “I wasn’t ready for this,” she said. “All of a sudden, my kid’s going to be in junior high.” The message to parents sent

home with all CUSD elementary-school students on Monday, Nov. 4, reads: “We are pleased to inform you the CUSD School Board members voted at the October 23, 2013, meeting to restructure the district’s schools to a K-5, 6-8, 9-12 grade configuration.” Trouble is, a number of parents had already been apprised, days earlier, of the CUSD’s plan via both TV news and a Facebook page that actually scooped Action News, which reported at 4:43 p.m. on Oct. 31 that “[t]he Chico Unified School District has confirmed they will be switching to a ‘middle-school’ model beginning fall of 2015.” Minutes earlier, the Facebook page called “Life in Chico, CA” had posted a copy of a letter from CUSD Superintendent Kelly Staley to school-district staff announcing the district’s intention to “house students in K-5, 6-8 and 9-12 grade configurations” beginning with the 2015-16 school year. The letter also mentioned that the “Common Core Standards, adopted by California and 45 other states, identify learning connections in grade-level blocks of K-5, 6-8 and 9-12.” The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led initiative aimed at standardizing math and

English instruction nationwide, and is already being phased into CUSD schools. “Hey Chico, a little bird just passed along this letter written by school Superintendent Kelly Staley to the CUSD staff,” read the poster’s introduction to the letter. “We somehow missed this decision by the school board to create middle schools by moving 6th-graders to the junior-high locations.” Many commenters weighed in, both pro and con, including one who, like Oliver, wasn’t against the plan but was displeased at how it came about: “I don’t think it’s a bad decision, but I’m upset about how they got feedback. The only meeting I knew about was from a district auto-call two days before the [Oct. 23] meeting.” For its part, the school district

takes some blame for the way word was spread. “It’s probably partly our fault for not getting the letter out [to parents] before [the story] hit the news,” said John Bohannon, CUSD director of secondary and alternative education. “Somebody [within the CUSD] told [the local news media] and they decided to run with the story.” He defended the district’s actions leading up to the Oct. 23 meeting of the Board of Trustees, pointing out that the reconfiguration issue was listed on the agenda (which was available online the Friday preceding the meeting). “The background on this is that the idea emanated from discussions regarding our [2012] Facilities Master Plan, which started right after the passage of Measure E last November,” Bohannon said.


Part of the process leading up to the decision to create middle schools comprising grades six through eight—an idea, incidentally, that the CUSD had tossed around in 2004 (see “Middle management,” CN&R, Aug. 26, 2004)— involved the district’s hiring of “planners and architects, as a team to evaluate the needs of the district,” Bohannon said. “They literally walked through every room on every campus. At that point— last spring—we had not discussed moving sixth grade.” Next, the CUSD “went to a process where[by] educators and parents met with the planning team and they all had a chance to give input on site needs. … Two things came to the surface: One, the elementary schools are overfull and continue to grow, and two, all of the schools [in the CUSD] have a lot of facilities needs.” A “visioning group” that included the principals of all CUSD schools “would go to schools and get input from teachers and parents” and report back to the planning team, which would in turn offer information to be relayed back to parents and teachers, he said. An open-to-the-public Measure E workshop was held at the Sept. 4 schoolboard meeting, Bohannon said. “No decisions were made, except some board members took off [the list] some options [on ways to spend Measure E funding] that didn’t seem financially reasonable,” such as converting Marsh Junior High to a K-6 school. At an Oct. 2 board workshop, options for spending the $15 million of Measure E money currently available to the district, which include the cost-prohibitive option of building a new elementary school, were narrowed down. By the Oct. 23 board meeting, three options remained, and two of them included creating middle schools made up of grades six to eight. Between the Oct. 2 workshop and the board’s Oct. 23 meeting, the CUSD conducted “facilities community-input meetings,” on Oct. 8, 9 and 10, Bohannon said. “Fliers were sent out to all the schools; ‘dialers’ [auto-calls] as well.” The reconfiguration plan “wasn’t a backroom deal,” he said. “It seemed like the needs of facilities and the needs of our new curriculum aligned and made it appropriate for us to make this decision,” Bohannon said. “We are the only district in Butte County that does a [grade] seven-eight configuration. I would say the trend in California for a while is to go to six-eight middle schools.” For her part, Oliver is still wary: “It makes me feel like I can’t trust the district. I mean, is there anything else in their pipeline that they’re not telling us about?” Ω

Clear the sidewalks

Tim Brennan poses a question to members of the Chico City Council. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

City leaders move forward on sit/lie ordinance Mary Goloff was rolled in a CCityouncilwoman wheelchair down the center aisle of the Council chambers in the moments lead-

ing up to the panel’s regular meeting on Tuesday evening (Nov. 5), a dramatic entrance into what turned out to be an emotionally charged gathering. Goloff had surgery last Monday and had planned to miss the meeting, but she rallied to take on one of the most controversial decisions city leaders voted on this year: the socalled civil-sidewalks ordinance. Another surprise for some was learning that Councilwoman Ann Schwab would be able to deliberate on the issue. As a downtown business owner with a lease-hold interest in property in the area, she previously was unable to take part in discussions on that proposed municipal law. But this was round two of deliberations on the civil-sidewalks ordinance (an initial draft was voted down in August), and the new draft law had been revised to encompass not only downtown, but also the rest of the city. That meant Schwab could participate. Another change in the revised municipal code—also called a sit/lie ordinance—eliminated a requirement that law-enforcement personnel issue warnings prior to citations. In short, the ordinance would make it illegal to sit or lie in pedestrian paths of travel adjacent to commercial properties. The law is modeled on a similar one in Seattle, Wash., and is applicable only from the hours of 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., said City Attorney Lori Barker. “That’s pretty much the standard for the sit/lie ordinances. They generally are intended to apply when businesses are open, for the

purpose of ensuring that the sidewalks are free for passage by the pedestrians who are patronizing the businesses,” she explained. Councilman Randall Stone interjected to say that those hours are typically set to make cities less susceptible to litigation, and Barker followed up by indicating that camping ordinances would be the way to address the vagrancy on public sidewalks during the hours not covered by the civil-sidewalks law. Because nearly 40 citizens signed up to weigh in on the matter, each was allotted only a minute to speak, rather than the typical three minutes. However, many of those present were also there to discuss the armed security guards hired by a private-sector coalition of downtown business owners. Chuck Greenwood, speaking for the Chico Peace Vigil, for example, pointed to the fact that a security guard in California may be as young as 18 years old, and licensing by the state Department of Consumer Affairs is issued after only eight hours of training. “Eighteen-year-olds trained for eight hours should not make life-and-death decisions,” he said. Putting a face to the homeless

community was Jennifer Stava, a collegeeducated woman who asked the city to work with those living on the streets. Stava said she’d made a mistake in life and lost everything. She’s been homeless for about a year.

SIFT|ER Not making the grade The Chico Unified School District “has not met all requirements for 2013 Adequate Yearly Progress as determined by the California Department of Education,” according to a recent report from Ed-Data. The report noted that CUSD student “subgroups”—based on disability, English-language status, ethnicity and socioeconomic disadvantage—did not meet the required participation rate of 95 percent in English/languagearts; nor did they meet “annual measurable objectives” in English/language arts. Subgroups “must have a 95 percent participation in both English/language arts and math in order to make Adequate Yearly Progress,” the report pointed out. The CUSD, which receives Title I funding, is now in its third year of Program Improvement (PI). According to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, if a school district does not improve adequately after two years of PI, it faces such sanctions as staff replacement, new curriculum and/or public supervision of schools.

Source: www.ed-data.k12.ca.us

Her suggestion to the city was to remove the clutter—the bikes, trailers and animals—rather than the people on the sidewalks. “I think the city should work with us,” she said. “There’s a lot of addiction out there. There are a lot of people who need help out there. There are a lot of people who need homes out there. I don’t have a home. We don’t have anywhere to go.” Another member of the homeless community was James Moody, who lost a roof over his head when the rent on the residential motel he and his wife lived in skyrocketed. Moody wanted to know what would happen to him should he be arrested for sleeping on the streets because he has no other place to go. “What do you plan on doing with me?” he asked the council. In one of the most disrespectful outbursts of the evening, Moody’s query was met with a couple of shouts from members of the gallery, including “Take a hike!” Minutes later, Goloff spoke up about that snide comment and asked Gruendl to remind the audience to keep things civil. Among the supporters of the ordinance was Chico Tea Party member Sue Hubbard, who didn’t mince words. She said there was no reason to be homeless in America today, because there are myriad services available for the needy. “So why do we still have street people? My answer is because we make it too easy for them. We actually enable this behavior,” she said. Hubbard was followed by Doug Guillon, owner of Crush restaurant and a spokesman for the R-Town Downtown Coalition, the group behind the downtown armed guards. Guillon said private security was needed due to vandalism, and that it should be a shortterm effort. He was the target of an outburst as well, which prompted Gruendl to again call for a certain level of decorum. One of the final speakers was Redding homeless advocate Chris Solberg. He said the sit/lie law is challengeable because Chico doesn’t have a day center—nor are there enough beds—to accommodate the local homeless population. Two months ago, a similar law was shot down in Redding, he said. (Solberg and downtown business owner Wayne Cook very nearly had a physical confrontation after a vote on the ordinance.) In the end, Council members Tami Ritter and Stone—who both cited the failure of the Seattle law the Chico ordinance is based on—were the dissenters in a 5-2 vote approving the ordinance. —MELISSA DAUGHERTY melissad@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 November 7, 2013

CN&R 9


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Doing time Convicts help keep Caper Acres open ate Monday morning (Nov. 4), Lworked workers in bright-green shirts within and directly outside

Lower Bidwell Park’s Caper Acres, clearing brush and weeds, raking leaves, mowing and picking up trash at the heralded kids’ playground. The 15-person crew was working under the supervision of four Butte County Sheriff’s Office employees because they are Alternative Custody Supervision (ACS) inmates who otherwise would be sitting at home under house arrest. Instead, they will be working in Bidwell Park two times a week for an indefinite period of time, helping keep Caper Acres open. Butte County Sheriff’s Capt. Andy Duch was in an upbeat mood as he moved among the workers during this first day of the program, exchanging pleasantries and encouraging them. He said there may be a bit of a misconception about the program, which is understandable on the surface, since prisoners are helping maintain a children’s playground. “They are not Cool Hand Luke out there,” Duch said, referring to the character played by Paul Newman in the 1967 prison-drama film of the same name. “There is a good rapport between the [sheriff’s] crew and the inmates. It is a positive environment.” The arrangement came about after the Chico City Council voted last month on a suggestion by

Councilman Randall Stone to work thing that is important, and they are with the Sheriff’s Office to help proud of it.” keep Caper Acres open in the wake During a lunch break, Ashley of the city laying off of a number Phillips of Oroville sat on a bench of park workers earlier this year. inside Caper Acres, eating sandLocal maintenance company wiches with two other ACS workServPro stepped in initially and ers. All three had been convicted of offered its services, which ended drug-related offenses, and wore recently. ankle monitors. This is a way for those serving “I think it’s nice that we are their sentences out of custody to doing something for the park,” gain experience and find a job, Phillips said. “We celebrated my Duch said. The ACS crews also daughter’s first birthday here at work with the Paradise-based Fire Caper Acres. Safe Council to help reduce fire “We’ve got so much done,” she fuel, such as brush, in the county. said. “It’s a super cool day to be “This is good for the inmates,” Duch said. “We lose guys from the out doing this, and a good opportunity to work off our brush crews who get time. And it’s a chance jobs with private to socialize with other companies. When people and not be Sierra Landscape [& cooped up all day. Plus, Maintenance] needs a “[N]obody is coming it gives people a chance laborer, they call me. here from jail.” to get jobs.” Did you ever think a –Andy Duch Dan Efseaff, the cop would vouch for city’s parks and naturala convicted felon? resources manager, said The answer is ‘yes,’ he too was impressed with the because they don’t go back to jail crew working the playground, and if they have a job.” that the program will continue The ACS “inmates” are those indefinitely. convicted in Butte County Superi“What I’ve been telling folks is or Court of nonviolent, nonsexual that even if these were good times and nonserious crimes (such drug and we had full staffing, I would possession), and because of the passage two years ago of Assembly still look at this program and find usage for it,” he said. “We have a Bill 109, serve their time in the backlog of several decades of work local jail rather than a state prison. in the park, and if this works out, The ACS folks have been released from the jail to help make room for we’ll continue to use it.” The word “inmates,” he added, those more recently convicted and is a bit misleading and may give sentenced. the wrong impression to concerned “They are all wearing ankle parents and park users. monitors and nobody is coming “We need a new word,” he said. here from jail,” Duch said. “They “How about ‘outmates’?” get 30 percent off of their sentencing [time]. Plus they like the feel—TOM GASCOYNE ing of giving back, of doing sometomg@newsreview.com

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10 CN&R November 7, 2013

Butte County Sheriff’s Capt. Andy Duch (above) and ACS workers (left to right) Michael Lewis, Ashley Phillips and Nathan Wright. PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE


Memories of China Star Push for food-safety rating calls for public input bout seven years after local police stumAconditions bled upon nightmarish food preparation at a Chico restaurant, Butte Coun-

ty is making a push to increase accountability and transparency in the local retail-food industry. But the soonest a possible county ordinance will begin enforcing a publicly visible food-safety rating system is 2015, nearly a decade after a 12-year-old girl eating at the now-defunct China Star Super Buffet found a dead cockroach in her chow mein. In 2006, the Chico Enterprise-Record reported the cockroach incident at the restaurant on the corner of Esplanade and East Avenue. Chico Police Officer Melody Davidson responded to a false burglar alarm at China Star that same day and discovered a food-preparation area so putrid that she was forced to “hold her breath to keep from becoming sickened.” Davidson’s written account of what she saw is still enough to turn one’s stomach: “About 20 mouse traps were in the kitchen; half were full of dead mice. About five traps were on the stove and grill. A trap on the open grill had a dead mouse in it. Mouse and rat feces was everywhere. Large pots containing foul water and cooking utensils were stacked on the counters in the kitchen next to mouse traps. Cockroaches were everywhere.” Subsequent public outcry forced China Star to close, and prompted Butte County Public Health to increase access to disclosures of health-code violations, requiring restaurants to post a notification that the latest inspection report is available. (Not all restaurants post such a notification, but all inspection reports can be found on Butte County Public Health’s website). In a CN&R article (“Clean Up Your Act!,” March 20, 2008), this paper implored the county to go a step further, pointing to Sacramento County’s restaurant safety-rating system in which a green, yellow or red placard is issued following an unannounced inspection. The placards, on display in the restaurant’s front window, reflect the number of violations found at the establishment during the most recent inspection. A green card means the facility had one or no major violations. A yellow card is a conditional pass issued if two or more major

Weigh in:

The public is invited to provide input on Butte County Public Health’s proposed food-safety rating system in Chico on Nov. 12 at the CARD Center (545 Vallombrosa Ave.), and in Oroville on Nov. 13 at Oroville City Hall (1735 Montgomery St.). Both meetings start at 4 p.m.

Katie’s Corner II at Chico Mall Feature of the Week “Pink” An example of the placards that could be posted in the windows of Butte County restaurants within a couple of years. PHOTO COURTESY OF BUTTE COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH

violations are identified, in which case a second inspection must be conducted within three days; if the problems are addressed, the restaurant is issued a green card. If the inspection identifies an imminent health hazard—like sewage overflow or a rodent infestation—a red card is issued and the restaurant is shut down.

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Now, Butte County health officials

are taking steps toward drafting a county ordinance that would enforce a health-rating system similar to Sacramento County’s. During a public workshop at Paradise Town Hall on Monday, Nov. 4, Brad Banner, the county’s environmental-health director, outlined a timeframe for possible implementation. “If everything went ideally, the very earliest an ordinance would be in full effect would be 2015,” Banner told a handful of concerned citizens, explaining that before drafting begins, direction from the Butte County Board of Supervisors is required. Further, the process will include a sixmonth pilot program during which no placards will be posted, allowing restaurant owners a chance to become familiar with the new system. “At the same time, we’ll be making sure our inspections are as consistent and uniform as possible,” Banner said. In August, the county hosted similar workshops to gather input from local restaurant owners, some of whom voiced concern about increased cost to business, Banner said. However, most were in favor of the proposed placarding system. From a consumer standpoint, Banner said the placards will “give the public a sense of confidence when they go out and eat,” noting that there has been a documented decrease in instances of foodborne illness and the number of food-safety violations at restaurants in California counties that enforce a food safety-rating program. —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com November 7, 2013

CN&R 11


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Left: The author’s son in a whimsical parklet on 22nd Street in San Francisco. Below: The popular parklet in front of the Blue Fig restaurant, in San Francisco’s Mission District.

GET READY FOR GRIDEX II

Nov. 13-14, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) will conduct a large-scale drill aimed at determining how well the nation’s electricity grid is able to cope with a significant level of disruption. The grid-security exercise is dubbed GridEx II (the first of such biennial exercises—GridEx 2011—took place Nov. 16-17, 2011). More than 150 companies and organizations are scheduled to participate. As The New York Times reported in August, “thousands of utility workers, business executives, National Guard officers, F.B.I. antiterrorism experts and officials from government agencies in the United States, Canada and Mexico are preparing for an emergency drill in November that will simulate physical attacks and cyberattacks that could take down large sections of the power grid.” A goal of GridEx II is “to explore how governments would react as the loss of the grid crippled the supply chain for everyday necessities,” the article said.

WEST COAST LEADERS SIGN CLIMATE PACT

Gov. Jerry Brown joined the governors of Oregon and Washington, and the environment minister of the Canadian province of British Columbia, in signing a climate-change agreement on Oct. 28. Included in the actions that the West Coast states and province—which combined comprise the fifth largest economy in the world— have promised to take are “streamlining permits for solar and wind projects, better integrating the electric power grid, supporting more research on ocean acidification and expanding government purchases of electric vehicles,” according to the San Jose Mercury News. Also, those signing the pact agree to new rules on carbon emissions from new power plants, effectively making it impossible to build plants that are coal-fired. “Along the West Coast, we have collectively recognized that a clean economy, energy efficiency and green building provides probably the only path that we have to a sustainable future,” said Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber.

PARK TO HONOR LABOR LEADER

The U.S. National Park Service announced on Oct. 24 a proposal to create the César Chávez National Historic Park, which would comprise sites in both California—where Chávez (pictured) became famous as a labor leader and nonviolent human-rights advocate—and Arizona, where he was born. The proposed park honoring Chávez, who passed away in 1993, would consist of the Forty Acres National Historic Landmark and the Filipino Community Hall in the Central Valley city of Delano, the César E. Chávez National Monument at Nuestra Señora Reina de la Paz in Keene, where Chávez is buried, as well as the Santa Rita Center in Phoenix, Ariz., according to the Los Angeles Times. Send your eco-friendly news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R November 7, 2013

Street life Could “parklets” catch on in Chico as they have elsewhere?

story and photos by

Emiliano Garcia-Sarnoff

“L Summerville, senior planner with the city of Chico, when asked if he’s heard ike a cutlet?” asked Bob

of the new urban design trend called “parklets.” “That’s a new one to me.” Summerville might be hearing a lot more about parklets in the near future, though. Parklets were first rolled out—quite literally—in 2005, as an art-activist project by the San Francisco based Rebar Art & Design Studio. By simply feeding the meter and then rolling out sod and putting out a bench and a potted tree, the Rebar folks transformed a single parking space into a temporary public park. It was a twohour slot, and at the end of this very shortterm lease, they simply rolled their park back up. They dubbed the project “Park(ing) Day,” and the date—always the third Friday in September—has since become an open-source New Urbanist holiday of sorts, during which people in cities across the world implement people-, plant- and bikecentric designs in public spaces previously dedicated to cars. Park(ing) Days have seen metered parking spots morphed into art installations, free clinics, bike-repair shops, yoga classes, and even a place to have a wedding. Rebar’s project was intended to question why so much of San Francisco’s public space was dedicated to the storage of

private vehicles, and to help reimagine the possibilities of these tiny spaces that, if one thinks about it, add up to a considerable fraction of the commons. Instead of issuing Rebar some sort of infraction, the forward-thinking city of San Francisco paid attention. In 2009, the city launched its innovative Pavement to Parks program, and in 2010, unveiled the first officially sanctioned parklet. In the intervening years since Rebar’s original prank, the concept of parklets grew into a vision of semi-permanent spaces with considerable investment in design and construction. Parklets have since taken off. There are now some 40 in San Francisco alone, and hundreds in cities and towns around the world. On Oct. 22, the Sacramento City Council approved its own parklet program. Could Chico be next? “I think there are places where

they would work well in Chico,” said Ruben Martinez, the city of Chico’s general services director. Martinez said that if a business wants to develop a parklet, the city will begin to look at how to implement them. “We’d just have to figure out what the process would be.” (San Francisco’s Pavement to Parks website includes a spiffy “Parklet-O-Matic” infographic and a manual that “also serves as a resource for those outside of San Francisco working to estab-

More information:

Go to sfpavementtoparks.sfplanning.org to learn more about San Francisco’s innovative (and contagious!) parklets program, Pavement to Parks.

lish parklet programs in their own cities.”) Martinez, who has been familiar with parklets for some time, is particularly drawn to their private sponsorship. Parklets typically are built and maintained by the businesses they are in front of—frequently cafés or restaurants—which often also pay a small fee to use the space. “We favor reducing maintenance [by the city], because maintenance costs go to the taxpayer,” he said. “But parklets can add to the walkable downtown without any large infrastructure changes and with minimal costs, so they may have their place in Chico. I like the idea.” Of course, converting parking spaces to public parks brings its controversies, too. The idea poses fundamental questions about what our public spaces are for and who should control them. “We also need outdoor toilets in the parklets and cooking facilities for the homeless,” one antiparklet poster wrote in the comment section of an otherwise glowing article about parklets online at neighborhoods/realestate blog Curbed SF. Some worry about the impact of parklets on the availability of parking. But in San Francisco, several owners of restaurants with parklets out front, as well as people sitting in the parklets themselves, shared opinions that verged on the messianic, the lapel-grabbing. They talked about sales going up immediately after installation of a parklet in front of their businesses, and about increased community spirit and pedestrian traffic. “It’s kind of like advertising,” said GREENWAYS continued on page 14


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CN&R 13


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GREENWAYS continued from page 12

Shirene Massarweh, owner of the Blue Fig, a restaurant on Valencia Street, in San Francisco’s Mission District. “They see the parklet and they wonder what this really cool space is, and they look to the business that it’s in front of. It’s added a sense of community for everybody here. … And they’re packed when the weather is nice.” “The streets are the vital

civic organs of the city,” Claudia Stuart said, paraphrasing a quote by urban-studies author and activist Jane Jacobs (who wrote the influential book The Death and Life of Great American Cities). Stuart—now a principal planner with Butte County’s Department of Development Services and a professor of community and rural planning at Chico State—first got interested in parklets about eight years ago while doing online research for her then-job: managing the Downtown Access Plan as a senior planner for the city of Chico. “They need to serve this multiple purpose,” she said of city streets. “Not just for people in their cars, but for people on foot. For people to meet with other people, for people to get to know new people, for people to be part of civic life. [Parklets] are a great opportunity to envision how to use this space that really belongs to all of us.” And, let’s face it, parklets are cool. Early adopters have included Portland, Ore., and Olympia, Wash., and these places get a combined total of approximately 32 minutes of sunshine a year (all right—an exaggeration, but not by

ECO EVENT

GET FUNKY WITH BEC Catch the third (and final) installment—on Thursday, Nov. 14, at 7:30 p.m.—of the Land Air Water concert series put on by the Butte Environmental Council at the Chico Women’s Club (592 E. Third St.). Featuring funk/jam group The Bumptet, acoustic musician Brian Rogers, and local music collective Jiving Beard, the concert is a benefit to help support BEC’s environmental advocacy work. Ticket info at www.becnet.org.

much). Parklets are precisely the sort of thing that attract and retain today’s young creative, entrepreneurial class, that make people think, “This town is awesome.” “The students I’m teaching now are not going to want to be using the streets in a way that people are today or yesterday,” Stuart noted along those lines. “They want social spaces.” She plans on designing and implementing a parklet with her students next semester. This writer, for one, hopes to be celebrating next Park(ing) Day in a Chico parklet, solitarily enjoying the new social space by tweeting on a smartphone: “I’m in a parklet! #parklets #socool.” Ω

UNCOMMON SENSE No more tomatoes! Well, we’ve officially headed out of tomato season in the North State. It’s time to move on from those delicious fruits, plus many of the other summertime crops. To eat with the season, and thus sustainably, here’s a list of some fall-harvested produce. (For a full list, visit www.cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts/vegetables.)

Family Law | Criminal | Juvenile

14 CN&R November 7, 2013

Beets Bok choy Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Chard Kale Parsnips Spinach


reen HOUSE

by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

SHEDDING LIGHT ON LEDS Local sustainable architect Hyland Fisher, who periodically sends me sustainable-home tips (see “Eco-friendly window glass: Bird-safe and more,” The GreenHouse, June 6, for instance), recently sent a link to an Oct. 17 piece he wrote on his blog, titled “LED lights not as efficient as touted.” “[A] recent study by the U.S. Department of Energy may lead you to reconsider replacing your fluorescent lamps with LEDs,” Fisher wrote. “This is very important for people who LED efficiency: Fisher says think again. have been paying the high retail price for LED lamps. When LEDs first came out it was said by environmental leaders and even by Popular Mechanics [magazine] that they had a much longer life than fluorescent lamps. “Not so.” According to the study, Fisher pointed out, “LEDs do not last as long as initially advertised [and] ‘the average life-cycle energy consumption of LED lamps and CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) are similar.’” Go to www.hylandfisherarchitect.com to learn more about Fisher and to keep up with his useful blog. HARVEST THE RAIN Nani Teves, the Butte Environmental Council’s Code Blue water-outreach coordinator, reminded me that on Sunday, Nov. 10, from 10-11 a.m., BEC is hosting a free rainwater-harvesting workshop. “If you’ve ever wanted to put your roofs and gutters to work collecting rain for you, this event is a must,” says the BEC website (www.becnet.org) of this informative event. “Learn how to safely and sensibly collect and store water for use in your garden.” The workshop—which will also offer healthful, organic snacks—is being held at a private home; contact Teves at nanibay@hotmail.com or 891-6424 for more information and to register.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

G

THE

Save rain for a nonrainy day.

Ethical behavior is doing the right thing when no one else is watching— even when doing the wrong thing is legal. —Aldo Leopold The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. —Martin Luther King, Jr. So many indigenous people have said to me that the fundamental difference between Western and indigenous ways of being is that even the most open-minded westerners generally view listening to the natural world as a metaphor, as opposed to the way the world really is. Trees and rocks and rivers really do have things to say to us. —Derrick Jensen EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

TREK ON DOWN TO THE WOMEN’S CLUB One of my favorite places in town, the Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology at Chico State, is hosting Lessons from a Pilgrimage, a free “World Explorations Special Event” on Sunday, Nov. 10, from 4-6:15 p.m., at the Chico Women’s Club (592 E. Third St.). Northstate Public Radio’s Nancy Wiegman, who hosts Nancy’s Bookshelf, will share stories of her time in France, when she walked the Voie d’Arles, part of the famed Camino de Santiago (Way of St. James) pilgrimage route to the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. After her talk, local classical guitarist Warren Haskell will provide French-themed music, and Bacio Catering & Carry Out will provide scrumptious, good-for-you food. (In the spirit of Wiegman’s walk/talk, leave your car at home and walk or bike to this event.) Call 898-5397 or send an email to anthromuseum@csuchico.edu for more info.

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CN&R 15


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES Left: Multiple sclerosis patient and awareness advocate Amy Clark, of Paradise.

VACCINATIONS OPTIONAL

PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

Back on two feet

California health officials released a Personal Belief Exemption form on Oct. 30 that places new requirements on parents or guardians who want to opt out of vaccinating their school-age children due to personal beliefs. Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 2109 (which goes into effect Jan. 1). The law mandates that parents or guardians must indicate to their child’s school in writing that immunizations are contrary to their personal beliefs, in addition to completing a form signed by a licensed health-care practitioner who has explained the potential benefits and risks of immunization, according to a California Department of Public Health press release. There is now a separate section on the form for families adhering to a religion that does not permit members to get medical care or advice from a health-care practitioner.

Below: An MRI scan of an MS patient’s brain, with noticeable white lesions where the nerve cells have been damaged.

HEALTH INSURANCE LOST

Millions of Americans will lose—or have already lost—their private health insurance plans due to the Affordable Care Act. The White House has repeatedly assured the public that people who liked their health plans would be able to keep them, but four sources who helped develop the ACA said 50 to 75 percent of the roughly 14 million people who opted for private insurance will receive cancellation notices over the next year because the plans do not meet coverage requirements under the federal health-reform law, according to NBC News. White House press secretary Jay Carney said it is “correct that substandard plans … are no longer allowed because the [ACA] is built on the premise that health care is not a privilege, it’s a right and there should be minimum standards for the plans available to Americans across the country.”

DISARMING THE MENTALLY ILL

Dozens of California superior courts have failed to adequately report individuals who should be prohibited from owning a firearm due to mental illness, an audit finds. California is the only state with a database tracking citizens disqualified from owning firearms due to mental illness, criminal convictions or restraining orders, according to The Sacramento Bee. But lawenforcement staffing shortages and budget cuts have slowed the process of seizing weapons from those not approved to own them; there are more than 20,800 such individuals statewide. State law requires courts report to the state Department of Justice when they deem an individual unfit to bear arms; the report by the Bureau of State Audits found that of the 34 courts examined by the state auditor, 29 said they were unaware of the reporting requirement. Superior courts failed to report at least 2,300 firearm-prohibition reports from 2010 to 2012. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R November 7, 2013

A local multiple sclerosis patient’s path from debilitation back to high functionality by

Howard Hardee howardh@ newsreview.com

A going numb in 2002, when she was a 23-year-old college student in Tacoma, my Clark’s legs first started

Wash. During a recent interview in Chico, the Paradise woman compared the sensation to a limb falling asleep—a “prickly, weird feeling” from the waist down. Gradually, the numbness began to affect her ability to walk or even balance on two feet. Equally disturbing, she began having difficulty with her vision as well. Clark didn’t know it at the time, but those symptoms were the initial manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease that would, in a few years’ time, hinder her everyday function and cast doubt on her professional and personal aspirations. MS is an incurable autoimmune disease in which the body attacks nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, damaging the myelin sheath (an electrically insulating coat around the axon of a nerve cell). The nervous system’s ability to communicate with the rest of the body is subsequently disrupted, resulting in a wide range of physical, mental and psychiatric problems. The disease takes several different forms, manifesting either as isolated “attacks” or more consistent symptoms. Clark’s disease is of the former variety. At times, her symptoms would disappear entirely, but they would always come back—often worse than before.

Clark was formally diagnosed in 2003, when a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed white lesions on her brain and spinal cord (a telltale sign of her body attacking the myelin around her nerve cells), and the results of a spinal tap left her physician with “no choice but to diagnose me with MS.” But she found her doctor less than helpful in deciding how to proceed. “I was told, ‘You have MS. Here’s all the propaganda from the different drug companies; read through it and pick [a medication],’” she recalled. “I was illequipped to make that decision, as are most people in that position. “I didn’t want to accept it: I went from being fine to all of a sudden having a debilitating disease.” At the time, treatment options were limited to injections of two drugs—interferon and glatiramer acetate. Over the next few years, Clark would try both, to no significant effect. Her MS symptoms persisted

and she averaged one full-on attack per year. Much of the time, one side of her body would become partially paralyzed, forcing her to “drag her foot along” because it simply wouldn’t move the way she wanted it to. “With MS, each day can be a different day, and that was very much the case at the time,” Clark said. “Sometimes I was walking with a cane, sometimes I was using a wheelchair; other times I was using a walker. I couldn’t go to the grocery store and walk down the aisle; I had to use one of their motorized carts. I just couldn’t do it—I couldn’t walk.” As her disease got progressively worse, she came to terms with the fact that her life likely was changed forever. “Because of the nature of this disease, you can imagine what you’re thinking,” Clark reflected. “You’ve heard the horror stories; you can see what it’s doing to your body. You’re clearly suffering from something that’s changing

APPOINTMENT RIO COMES TO CHICO You don’t have to be a member of In Motion Fitness to take part in One Night in Rio, a Zumba class featuring live African drumming from Bruno Faria and led by the lovely Aline Vannucci on Tuesday, Nov. 12, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., at the club’s Gold Studio. Zumba is an aerobic fitness program disguised as a dance party. Call 343-5678 for more information.


feather river outpatient surgery center

Party for MS awareness:

Originally from Arnold,

Clark returned to California in 2010, moving to Paradise, where she enjoys hiking with her husband along the Feather River and Butte Creek, boating, and going to the gym for Zumba and aerobics classes. “Now, I can walk just fine,” she said. “I can do whatever anybody else can do.” Aside from her full-time job with Medflow, an East Coast-based electronic-health-record software company for optometry, Clark is a

MS support group:

The Chico National Multiple Sclerosis Society Support Group meets the first Monday of every month at the Enloe Rehabilitation Center (340 W. East Ave.) at 5:30 p.m. Call Amy at 863-7818 for more information.

spokeswoman for Tysabri. She also leads a monthly support group for Butte County MS patients, backed by the Northern California Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, an organization aimed at raising awareness and helping patients deal with the physical, social and financial obstacles they encounter as their disease progresses. Her email list for the group includes about 35 people, but she said there are between 200 and 250 MS patients in the county. Now that she’s back on her feet, Clark takes nothing for granted. She still feels the disease in her body, in the background. “I try to be as active as I can,” she said. “I’m making hay while the sun shines, because I’m not cured. I respond to this medication now, but it could come to an end.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Manly fruits These are the top eight fruits that contribute to men’s health, according to Men’s Fitness magazine: • Apples contain soluble fiber (good for colon health), and provide vitamin C. • Blackberries help lower the risk of prostate cancer and support testosterone production. • Cherries ease the pain associated with inflammation from injury. • Grapefruits suppress the appetite to help lose weight. • Grapes provide vitamins A, B6 and C, and essential minerals. • Lemons help reduce body fat and cholesterol, and support liver and gall bladder function. • Papayas relieve gas from indigestion and reduce inflammation. • Pomegranates are dubbed “natural Viagra.”

Source: www.mensfitness.com

THINK FREE.

your ability to function, and you imagine the worst: ‘I’m going to need to use a wheelchair the rest of my life. We’re going to have to sell the house. My life is turned upside down.’” In 2006, Clark had another MRI, which revealed even more white lesions than before. “My brain lit up like a Christmas tree,” she said. “It was clear that I had a very active disease.” Later that year, a doctor in Seattle recommended a new MS drug called Tysabri, which had been on the market for only a few months. Having explored her other treatment options, and with the potential for permanent neurological damage looming, Clark decided it was “time to pull out the big guns.” The drug—administered intravenously once a month, rather than a self-administered daily injection, as she had done with previous drugs—was almost immediately effective. Clark’s symptoms have been in remission for the past seven years without a single attack.

On Friday, Nov. 8, the Chico Women’s Club (592 E. Third St.) will host the Chico MS Soiree, a benefit for the Northern California Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The party starts at 7 p.m. and includes live tunes, food, beer and wine, a raffle and more. Tickets are $10; go to www.chicomssoiree.com for more information.

open house & ribbon cutting nov 14 | 5 – 7pm

Taking down the “Yellow Tape” and cutting through the “Red Tape”!

5 9 7 4 P e n t z R o a d Pa R a d i s e , C a 9 5 9 6 9 ( 5 3 0 ) 8 7 7 - 9 3 6 1 / w w w. f R h o s P. o R g November 7, 2013

CN&R 17


Lassen Solitaire Rediscovering the wilderness atop a deserted mountain during the government shutdown story and photos by

Allan Stellar

I

’ve never had a national park to myself before. But here I am, carrying my backpack on a road in a closed-to-the-public Lassen Volcanic National Park, illegally, with absolutely no other human souls present, on my way to spend the night on top of a mountain usually off limits to backpackers without a special permit, even when the park is open. Earlier, my wife dropped me off at a gated, little-used entrance to the park. She then drove away, so no car would be left at the gate to arouse suspicion of illegal backpacking. We are being stealthy. She will pick me up at the same gate tomorrow, giving me 24 hours to complete my task. I walk a couple of miles on the road to Juniper Lake campground. Like some Discovery Channel episode of Life After People, I stroll through a campground without tents, cars, campers, dogs, campfires—no scent of camp coffee or wood smoke, no sounds of wood-chopping or slamming outhouse doors. No ranger at the ranger station. It’s exciting, yet eerie. Why am I engaged in this illegal activity? Because of a passage I read out of the journals of the late environmental author Edward Abbey: Sept. 5, 1966: Lassen Volcanic National Park. Mount Harkness Fire Lookout. “Finished Desert Solitaire two weeks ago; sent it to [agent].”

18 CN&R November 7, 2013

Before the government shutdown, I was trying to do all of this legally, as “experiential research” for a story about this fire lookout in Lassen Park and its connection to a hell of an environmental writer and the best essayist, I’d argue, this country has thus far produced: Edward Abbey. I’d completed a three-page special-use permit application stating my purpose for wanting to sleep atop a mountain with a fire-lookout tower. It’s the same form as the one required for a mass demonstration at the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall, but instead of hundreds of thousands of protesters assembling at Lassen Park’s Mount Harkness, it would be just me.

And my sleeping bag. As in all government requests, mine needed approval by a committee, including the park superintendent, maybe the lookout ranger, and lord knows who else. They promised to have the meeting as soon as possible and, if approved, to rush to get the permit done. Many of the rangers in the park were reading Abbey over the summer and wanted the Lassen-Abbey connection to be better known. Should the committee approve, a kindly ranger promised to spend half a day processing my permit, so I could have it before snow made it moot. Then, Congressman Doug LaMalfa and


About the author:

Allan Stellar is a psychiatric nurse who lives in Concow. He is the author of the Feb. 28 CN&R cover feature titled “The coyote hunt.” Follow him on Twitter at @AllanStellar.

the federal government still shut down. But I feel like I’ve been gifted with a once-in-alifetime opportunity—to hike and camp in a national park devoid of humanoids. Is it worth the risk? What is the risk? Before leaving home, I Google that question. The answer: The penalty for trespassing in a national park is a $500 fine and six months in jail. I leave a voice mail with the ranger: “I hope I have permission to visit the park and the lookout.” However, knowing this is likely not going to be the case, I decide a little civil disobedience on my part is warranted. I will visit the lookout—spend the night without the blessing of the U.S. government. Edward Abbey would approve. Well-known environmental writer

Allan Stellar atop Mount Harkness in Lassen Volcanic National Park in October during the government shutdown. Inset: Stellar hiked all the way up the mountain on some rugged roads.

and 350.org creator Bill McKibben visited Abbey at his home in Moab, Utah, back in the early 1980s. The two decided to visit Arches National Park, where Abbey had spent a few seasons as a ranger. But Abbey wasn’t keen on paying admission to a park. He made McKibben trample through the backcountry several miles to avoid paying the admission fees. Many years before, in the summer season of 1966, Abbey was the fire lookout at Mount Harkness. At 39 years of age, he had worked seasonally in several parks in Arizona and Utah, as a ranger and a fire lookout. With a master’s degree in philosophy and anarchist tendencies, Abbey fancied himself a writer. Despite some minor successes writing fiction, by the mid-’60s, Abbey had hit a wall. During lunch with a publisher, he was encouraged to write about what he loved: “Go write about your camping trips.” Abbey had worked as a National Park Service ranger in 1957 and 1958 in Arches National Park, in the red rock country of Utah. So, in doing what his agent advised, he dusted off his journals of that experience and wrote what became one of the finest examples of environmental literature, Desert Solitaire. Published in 1968, Desert Solitaire eventually established Abbey as a western writer of importance. He was dubbed the “Thoreau of the West.” He wrote the book while stationed at Mount Harkness. Being a fire lookout is a good occupation for a writer: plenty of solitude; work not arduous; many miles on foot from distractions like beer, gambling or women (some of Abbey’s vices). A good place to get some writing done. Gary Snyder, Norman McLean, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg each served brief stints as fire lookouts. Abbey was part of this tradition.

Edward Abbey at his typewriter in the Aztec Peak Lookout Tower, in Arizona’s Sierra Ancha Mountains, circa 1979. PHOTO COURTESY OF HERMITARY.COM

Inset: Desert Solitaire, the famous book Abbey completed at Mount Harkness.

Monterey. Why not visit Abbey’s Mount Harkness? Open summers, it’s only a couple of miles from Juniper Lake. Often, the lookout staffer can provide a tour, and the views—wow! At the trailhead to the mountain, with my pack containing a couple of Snickers bars, warm layers of clothes, a sleeping bag and pad, a journal, 3 liters of water, of course a copy of Desert Solitaire, plus a tiny bottle of whiskey, I start hoofing it up the mountain— a steep 2 miles. Nobody is around. The spookiest part is the lack of footprints of prior hikers. Recent rains have wiped away all evidence. If I hear a loud crash, the crasher will not be human, I think to myself. Near the top of Mount Harkness, my cell A desk and chair within the Mount Harkness firelookout station may have been the spot where Edward Abbey typed out his first draft of Desert Solitaire.

phone announces a voice mail from the ranger I contacted earlier. The ranger’s reply message clearly states, “You by no means have permission of the U.S. government to visit or stay at Mount Harkness.” But there’s no turning back now. I’m almost at the top. Desert Solitaire is an environmental

classic. It sits prominently beside A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold and My First Summer in the Sierra by John Muir. A list of environmental works more influential would be short, limited to Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Henry David Thoreau’s

“LASSEN” continued on page 20

In a sense, my solo trip to Lassen

his tea party cohorts shut down the government, including one of the most popular tourist attractions in this district: Lassen Park. Permit process derailed. The weekend of my visit arrives; the weather is perfect. Yet the park is still closed,

Park is a visit to an important writer’s home—an activity not all that unusual in America. Jack London’s home and farm is a state park in Sonoma County. You can visit several of Mark Twain’s residences throughout the nation. John Steinbeck’s and poet Robinson Jeffers’ abodes can be visited near November 7, 2013

CN&R 19


“LASSEN” continued from page 19

Walden, and Wendell Berry’s The Unsettling of America: Culture & Agriculture. Abbey said, “To be a good writer, you have to have something to say and say it well.” Simple enough. And that’s what he did. The strength of Desert Solitaire is Abbey’s voice. He writes with guts, a real “cowboy anarchist.” Far beyond praising nature, Abbey introduces a critique of industrialism as an unsustainable economic system, and he abandons an anthropocentric world view: “Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.” “Capitalism: Nothing so mean could be right. Greed is the ugliest of the capital sins.” Even Abbey’s “praise” of nature was filled with wry grit: “Why wilderness? Because we like the taste of freedom; because we like the smell of danger.” “If my decomposing carcass helps nourish the roots of a juniper tree or the wings of a vulture—that is immortality enough for me. And as much as anyone deserves.” I summit. The lookout is a piece of

art. Built of rock and logs hauled up in 1930, it stands as a testament to sturdy natural construction. Outside, the lookout needs a paint job. Years of financial neglect of our national parks is evident. Overhead flies a large jet, four engines spewing out smoke—looks military. Our national priorities favor empire. Not parks. I climb the steps to the catwalk and find

20 CN&R November 7, 2013

$5.00 off

compete with the stars. The Milky Way spills across the sky. Venus, bright as a headlamp, is off to the west. I watch Venus turn orange and set, just like the sun. Falling stars every few minutes add excitement. The stars are so bright, I can actually see by starlight when I need to go answer nature’s call. I am lying in this bag, on top of a mountain, during a time when bears eat as much as possible to fatten up for winter, and the mountain lion—a beautiful, elusive creature—rarely attacks humans, except maybe tonight, I think. I feel awfully alone in this bag with nary a human within miles. Lions. Bears. Oh, shit. It’s cold. Warm in the bag, I sleep fitfully, awakening to notice that the Milky Way is now off to my right and the Pleiades—the Seven Sisters—are above my head. I fall

The lookout was “built of rock and logs hauled up in 1930.”

back asleep and awaken again to find the Milky Way has set. The Pleiades are to my right and now Orion is overhead. Drifting off again, I awaken to the early brightening of the eastern sky, quite a while before the sun rises. I watch the day break from the warmth of my sleeping bag, thankful neither ursine nor large feline critters made a starlit snack of me. Doug Peacock, a friend of Edward Abbey, once said: “It’s not wilderness if there isn’t something in it that can eat you.” I admire the light on Mount Lassen

as the sun rises and I watch Mount Shasta come into view—powerful snowy mountain to the north. I crawl out of my bag and put on all the clothes I brought with me for warmth. Sitting on the steps of the lookout in the sun, I pull out Desert Solitaire and begin to read. The words sing on the page; it’s as though Abbey is right there, talking to me. Listen. I can almost hear his typewriter clacking away above me, in the lookout, as I sit and read the words he wrote. I see how a person could be inspired to write a classic nature book here. The altitude, the 100-mile views, the beauty, the solitude, the perspective only a mountaintop can give—all contribute to the clarity and the whimsy of a best seller. Abbey inspired a no-compromise, Earth First! anarchist movement that used civil disobedience and creative acts in defense of nature. One of them, Redwood Summer in 1990, protected some of the last ancient redwood groves in Humboldt County. The Burger King boycott in the 1980s, protesting beef from clear-cut forests in Central America, prompted Costa Rica to protect much of its remaining forests (25 percent of Costa Rica’s land mass is protected by either parks or preserves), leading to a thriving ecotourist economy. The influence and the legacy of Abbey partly inspired the global protest efforts to creatively pull this off. There were excesses, too: Trees spiked

with nails to prevent loggers from cutting them down—a very controversial, dangerous practice. Actions that threatened harm to people mostly harmed the environmental movement. Many activists—even peaceful demonstrators—were labeled eco-terrorists. Abbey saw it differently: “The most common form of terrorism in the U.S.A. is that carried on by bulldozers and chain saws.” Terrorism, by Abbey’s definition, consists of threats to life as we know it. Destruction of living, thriving ecosystems in the name of “progress” was especially egregious to him: “At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, ‘thus far and no further.’” My time on Mount Harkness

is nearly complete. It’s an experience I will never forget—an unexpected gift from a government in crisis. I know what it must feel like to be a fire lookout, to live with a close-up view of Mount Lassen and off in the distance, Shasta. Sitting up here alone, one starts feeling ownership of this beauty, along with a crying ache to preserve it— to preserve unspoiled as much as possible of this finite planet that we share with so many other threatened beings. Descending the mountain, distant clear-cuts outside the park’s boundaries appear as lesions on the lungs of the earth, the forests. Ugly, cancerous pockmarks. What would Abbey say? End industrial logging, and utilize sustainable methods that enhance forests and all the life within. I recall the axiom: When environmentalists win a battle—save some habitat from logging, mining or being “developed”—it is always temporary. Every generation needs new defenders to take up the cause. Butte County is blessed with two colleges—Chico State and Butte College—where new cadres of activists are learning the ways of sustainability. But is it enough? As Abbey put it:“Wilderness needs no defense, just more defenders.”

Hiking Mount Harkness:

Go to www.tinyurl.com/abbeylookout for information on hiking up to the fire lookout on Mount Harkness in Lassen Volcanic National Park.

Author and journalist Richard Louv calls it nature-deficit disorder. We have become indoor people— urbanized and suburbanized to a fault. But how to entice new generations to get outside, when their whole world is palm-sized, with earplugs? As Abbey said: “Our suicidal poets … spent too much of their lives inside rooms and classrooms when they should have been trudging up mountains, slogging through swamps, rowing down rivers. The indoor life is the next best thing to premature burial.” A new breed of activist is

emerging. In 2008, Tim DeChristopher—“Bidder 70”—with nothing but sheer outrage and guts, managed to stop a whole sale of oil and gas-drilling leases in some of the most pristine parts of Utah—some next to Abbey’s beloved Arches National Park—by bidding $1.8 million to purchase them. Only he had no money. DeChristopher paid a price: 21 months in prison. He became an environmental folk hero. Who does DeChristopher credit as inspiration for his brave act? Edward Abbey. Born in 1927, Abbey died in March of 1989, just after CO2 stepped across the 350 parts-permillion threshold, the saturation point beyond which life as we know it becomes threatened, the biosphere profoundly affected. Abbey passed away as the planet lurched out of the Holocene epoch. Which of Abbey’s words might speak to us now, as we move beyond 400 ppm CO2 and climbing? “Though men now possess the power to dominate and exploit every corner of the natural world, nothing in that fact implies that they have the right or the need to do so.” The year Abbey died, Bill McKibben published the first popular book on climate change, The End of Nature. If the climate scientists are right, nothing we do to protect habitat, ecosystems or oceans will be of lasting significance if we cannot reduce the burning of carbon. Down the mountain I trudge, still alone. The only footprints are mine. Through the deserted campground, I continue three more miles. Beyond the gate, a friendly looking, light-green Toyota rattles on the washboard road toward me. My spouse arrives, happy I’m safe. Above, just beyond the treetops, a turkey vulture soars. A Steller’s jay cackles at me from the branches of a pine. Abbey lives! Ω

MassagE

walk-ins welcome!

touch of china

2261 St. George Ln., Ste. G

(Behind Best Western Heritage Inn and Kmart)

530.966.4019 Open 7 days

Step back in time to 1929

free

first wax new guest

free bikini line, eyebrow or under arM. free eyebrow, ear or nose like it bare? upgrade to a brazilian for only $14!

530.852.0337 • urbanwaxca.com 1380 longfellow • chico 95926 • Mon-sat 11aM to 7pM

Bi-Plane Flights

Experience the thrill with a friend. Gift Certificates available

Schooler Flying Co.

Call for details (530) 899–0110

www.newsreview.com

Spectacular views from the fire lookout at Mount Harkness include Mount Lassen (highest peak in photo), Juniper Lake, and the distant snowy Mount Shasta.

the lookout is locked. The top of the structure is like a ship-captain’s bridge, with windows facing so that one has a clear view 100 miles in all directions. I peer in the windows. It looks like the staffer left in a hurry—the log book is visible. The last entries are from Sept. 29. The lookout attendant kept a clean ship. Tidy. There is an old gas stove, which could be 50 years old (maybe Abbey used it), with clean enamel as though the thing is scrubbed clean daily. On a bookshelf, I can see a copy of The Monkey Wrench Gang, by Edward Abbey. I can also see a desk and a chair, old in appearance. Is this where Abbey typed out his masterpiece? I think so. I brought a bit of whiskey with me: Maker’s Mark. Abbey hiked with Jim Beam or Wild Turkey. Snob that I am, I prefer something a bit smoother. Something that won’t tear out my innards. I wait until the sun starts to set behind Mount Lassen and tip the bottle in salute to my writer hero. I take a swallow and immediately feel dizzy with an urge to wretch. Damn altitude. No more for me. It is dark now. I look out over the town of Chester and see a few small lights. Looking into the belly of the park, there are no lights at all. The darkness is enthralling. It’s comforting to know there are places where you can look out to the horizon and see no evidence of human electronic conquest. Places like that are fewer and fewer. At an altitude of 8,000 feet in October, the temperature immediately takes a dive when the sun goes down. The forecast calls for it to dip to 25 degrees. As darkness deepens, cold creeps into my bones. It’s time for bed. At 7:30 p.m., I throw down a pad and my sleeping bag, and crawl in to watch the show. A new moon tonight means no moonlight to

FALL INTO SAVINGS From now until January 5th, you can get any Magniflex mattress* for 20% off the regular price. Hurry now and start sleeping on Italian luxury tonight...and at lower prices.

SLEEP IS LIFE’S GREATEST PLEASURE.

*All custom sizes, Vita and Mattino models excluded. Magniflex USA, Ltd. 1000 5th St. Suite 220 Miami Beach, FL 33139 p. 646.330.5483 f. 646.607.9190 infousa@magniflex.com

BEST SELECTION – BEST SERVICE – BEST PRICE La Dolce Piazza 3217 Cohasset #120 (Corner of Cohasset & Lassen) QUALITY FURNISHINGS & MATTRESSES

530.891.3582 | furniturechico.com Monday thru Saturday 10–6

November 7, 2013

CN&R 21


“LASSEN” continued from page 19

Walden, and Wendell Berry’s The Unsettling of America: Culture & Agriculture. Abbey said, “To be a good writer, you have to have something to say and say it well.” Simple enough. And that’s what he did. The strength of Desert Solitaire is Abbey’s voice. He writes with guts, a real “cowboy anarchist.” Far beyond praising nature, Abbey introduces a critique of industrialism as an unsustainable economic system, and he abandons an anthropocentric world view: “Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.” “Capitalism: Nothing so mean could be right. Greed is the ugliest of the capital sins.” Even Abbey’s “praise” of nature was filled with wry grit: “Why wilderness? Because we like the taste of freedom; because we like the smell of danger.” “If my decomposing carcass helps nourish the roots of a juniper tree or the wings of a vulture—that is immortality enough for me. And as much as anyone deserves.” I summit. The lookout is a piece of

art. Built of rock and logs hauled up in 1930, it stands as a testament to sturdy natural construction. Outside, the lookout needs a paint job. Years of financial neglect of our national parks is evident. Overhead flies a large jet, four engines spewing out smoke—looks military. Our national priorities favor empire. Not parks. I climb the steps to the catwalk and find

20 CN&R November 7, 2013

$5.00 off

compete with the stars. The Milky Way spills across the sky. Venus, bright as a headlamp, is off to the west. I watch Venus turn orange and set, just like the sun. Falling stars every few minutes add excitement. The stars are so bright, I can actually see by starlight when I need to go answer nature’s call. I am lying in this bag, on top of a mountain, during a time when bears eat as much as possible to fatten up for winter, and the mountain lion—a beautiful, elusive creature—rarely attacks humans, except maybe tonight, I think. I feel awfully alone in this bag with nary a human within miles. Lions. Bears. Oh, shit. It’s cold. Warm in the bag, I sleep fitfully, awakening to notice that the Milky Way is now off to my right and the Pleiades—the Seven Sisters—are above my head. I fall

The lookout was “built of rock and logs hauled up in 1930.”

back asleep and awaken again to find the Milky Way has set. The Pleiades are to my right and now Orion is overhead. Drifting off again, I awaken to the early brightening of the eastern sky, quite a while before the sun rises. I watch the day break from the warmth of my sleeping bag, thankful neither ursine nor large feline critters made a starlit snack of me. Doug Peacock, a friend of Edward Abbey, once said: “It’s not wilderness if there isn’t something in it that can eat you.” I admire the light on Mount Lassen

as the sun rises and I watch Mount Shasta come into view—powerful snowy mountain to the north. I crawl out of my bag and put on all the clothes I brought with me for warmth. Sitting on the steps of the lookout in the sun, I pull out Desert Solitaire and begin to read. The words sing on the page; it’s as though Abbey is right there, talking to me. Listen. I can almost hear his typewriter clacking away above me, in the lookout, as I sit and read the words he wrote. I see how a person could be inspired to write a classic nature book here. The altitude, the 100-mile views, the beauty, the solitude, the perspective only a mountaintop can give—all contribute to the clarity and the whimsy of a best seller. Abbey inspired a no-compromise, Earth First! anarchist movement that used civil disobedience and creative acts in defense of nature. One of them, Redwood Summer in 1990, protected some of the last ancient redwood groves in Humboldt County. The Burger King boycott in the 1980s, protesting beef from clear-cut forests in Central America, prompted Costa Rica to protect much of its remaining forests (25 percent of Costa Rica’s land mass is protected by either parks or preserves), leading to a thriving ecotourist economy. The influence and the legacy of Abbey partly inspired the global protest efforts to creatively pull this off. There were excesses, too: Trees spiked

with nails to prevent loggers from cutting them down—a very controversial, dangerous practice. Actions that threatened harm to people mostly harmed the environmental movement. Many activists—even peaceful demonstrators—were labeled eco-terrorists. Abbey saw it differently: “The most common form of terrorism in the U.S.A. is that carried on by bulldozers and chain saws.” Terrorism, by Abbey’s definition, consists of threats to life as we know it. Destruction of living, thriving ecosystems in the name of “progress” was especially egregious to him: “At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, ‘thus far and no further.’” My time on Mount Harkness

is nearly complete. It’s an experience I will never forget—an unexpected gift from a government in crisis. I know what it must feel like to be a fire lookout, to live with a close-up view of Mount Lassen and off in the distance, Shasta. Sitting up here alone, one starts feeling ownership of this beauty, along with a crying ache to preserve it— to preserve unspoiled as much as possible of this finite planet that we share with so many other threatened beings. Descending the mountain, distant clear-cuts outside the park’s boundaries appear as lesions on the lungs of the earth, the forests. Ugly, cancerous pockmarks. What would Abbey say? End industrial logging, and utilize sustainable methods that enhance forests and all the life within. I recall the axiom: When environmentalists win a battle—save some habitat from logging, mining or being “developed”—it is always temporary. Every generation needs new defenders to take up the cause. Butte County is blessed with two colleges—Chico State and Butte College—where new cadres of activists are learning the ways of sustainability. But is it enough? As Abbey put it:“Wilderness needs no defense, just more defenders.”

Hiking Mount Harkness:

Go to www.tinyurl.com/abbeylookout for information on hiking up to the fire lookout on Mount Harkness in Lassen Volcanic National Park.

Author and journalist Richard Louv calls it nature-deficit disorder. We have become indoor people— urbanized and suburbanized to a fault. But how to entice new generations to get outside, when their whole world is palm-sized, with earplugs? As Abbey said: “Our suicidal poets … spent too much of their lives inside rooms and classrooms when they should have been trudging up mountains, slogging through swamps, rowing down rivers. The indoor life is the next best thing to premature burial.” A new breed of activist is

emerging. In 2008, Tim DeChristopher—“Bidder 70”—with nothing but sheer outrage and guts, managed to stop a whole sale of oil and gas-drilling leases in some of the most pristine parts of Utah—some next to Abbey’s beloved Arches National Park—by bidding $1.8 million to purchase them. Only he had no money. DeChristopher paid a price: 21 months in prison. He became an environmental folk hero. Who does DeChristopher credit as inspiration for his brave act? Edward Abbey. Born in 1927, Abbey died in March of 1989, just after CO2 stepped across the 350 parts-permillion threshold, the saturation point beyond which life as we know it becomes threatened, the biosphere profoundly affected. Abbey passed away as the planet lurched out of the Holocene epoch. Which of Abbey’s words might speak to us now, as we move beyond 400 ppm CO2 and climbing? “Though men now possess the power to dominate and exploit every corner of the natural world, nothing in that fact implies that they have the right or the need to do so.” The year Abbey died, Bill McKibben published the first popular book on climate change, The End of Nature. If the climate scientists are right, nothing we do to protect habitat, ecosystems or oceans will be of lasting significance if we cannot reduce the burning of carbon. Down the mountain I trudge, still alone. The only footprints are mine. Through the deserted campground, I continue three more miles. Beyond the gate, a friendly looking, light-green Toyota rattles on the washboard road toward me. My spouse arrives, happy I’m safe. Above, just beyond the treetops, a turkey vulture soars. A Steller’s jay cackles at me from the branches of a pine. Abbey lives! Ω

MassagE

walk-ins welcome!

touch of china

2261 St. George Ln., Ste. G

(Behind Best Western Heritage Inn and Kmart)

530.966.4019 Open 7 days

Step back in time to 1929

free

first wax new guest

free bikini line, eyebrow or under arM. free eyebrow, ear or nose like it bare? upgrade to a brazilian for only $14!

530.852.0337 • urbanwaxca.com 1380 longfellow • chico 95926 • Mon-sat 11aM to 7pM

Bi-Plane Flights

Experience the thrill with a friend. Gift Certificates available

Schooler Flying Co.

Call for details (530) 899–0110

www.newsreview.com

Spectacular views from the fire lookout at Mount Harkness include Mount Lassen (highest peak in photo), Juniper Lake, and the distant snowy Mount Shasta.

the lookout is locked. The top of the structure is like a ship-captain’s bridge, with windows facing so that one has a clear view 100 miles in all directions. I peer in the windows. It looks like the staffer left in a hurry—the log book is visible. The last entries are from Sept. 29. The lookout attendant kept a clean ship. Tidy. There is an old gas stove, which could be 50 years old (maybe Abbey used it), with clean enamel as though the thing is scrubbed clean daily. On a bookshelf, I can see a copy of The Monkey Wrench Gang, by Edward Abbey. I can also see a desk and a chair, old in appearance. Is this where Abbey typed out his masterpiece? I think so. I brought a bit of whiskey with me: Maker’s Mark. Abbey hiked with Jim Beam or Wild Turkey. Snob that I am, I prefer something a bit smoother. Something that won’t tear out my innards. I wait until the sun starts to set behind Mount Lassen and tip the bottle in salute to my writer hero. I take a swallow and immediately feel dizzy with an urge to wretch. Damn altitude. No more for me. It is dark now. I look out over the town of Chester and see a few small lights. Looking into the belly of the park, there are no lights at all. The darkness is enthralling. It’s comforting to know there are places where you can look out to the horizon and see no evidence of human electronic conquest. Places like that are fewer and fewer. At an altitude of 8,000 feet in October, the temperature immediately takes a dive when the sun goes down. The forecast calls for it to dip to 25 degrees. As darkness deepens, cold creeps into my bones. It’s time for bed. At 7:30 p.m., I throw down a pad and my sleeping bag, and crawl in to watch the show. A new moon tonight means no moonlight to

FALL INTO SAVINGS From now until January 5th, you can get any Magniflex mattress* for 20% off the regular price. Hurry now and start sleeping on Italian luxury tonight...and at lower prices.

SLEEP IS LIFE’S GREATEST PLEASURE.

*All custom sizes, Vita and Mattino models excluded. Magniflex USA, Ltd. 1000 5th St. Suite 220 Miami Beach, FL 33139 p. 646.330.5483 f. 646.607.9190 infousa@magniflex.com

BEST SELECTION – BEST SERVICE – BEST PRICE La Dolce Piazza 3217 Cohasset #120 (Corner of Cohasset & Lassen) QUALITY FURNISHINGS & MATTRESSES

530.891.3582 | furniturechico.com Monday thru Saturday 10–6

November 7, 2013

CN&R 21


Arts & Culture Pub life with Jack (Roger Montalbano) and Valerie (Hilary Tellesen).

THIS WEEK

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROGUE THEATRE

Ghost Ghost stories stories

7

THURS Strong performances in Rogue production of fine Irish play

Iduction of Conor McPherson’s The Weir opened here on Halloween weekend, for this touchingly bitt’s fitting that Rogue Theatre’s pro-

tersweet play from 1997 is loaded with ghost stories. Set in a rural Irish pub and unfolding in real time—an hour by and 40 minutes—the play opens Robert Speer when Jack (Roger Montalbano), a crusty old-timer who owns an autorepair shop, enters the pub and, seeing nobody behind the bar, helps REVIEW: himself to a beer. Brendan (Sean Rogue Theatre Green), the pub’s owner, soon presents The Weir , enters, as does Jim (Joe Hilsee), Thursday- whose only job seems to be caring Saturday, for his aged and ailing mother. 7:30 p.m., at These men are inveterate bachethe Southside Playhouse. lors, and the pub serves them as a Tickets: $10 second home, a place where they can step away from their isolation Southside and loneliness, if only for a while. Playhouse 2145 Park Ave., They hide their sadness from each Ste. 13 other and, indeed, from themselves www.chico by cracking jokes and swapping rogue.com yarns and, above all, by drinking copious amounts of beer and whiskey. Enter Finbar (Shawn Galloway), a successful businessman (at least by local standards) who is squiring around Valerie (Hilary Tellesen), an attractive young woman who for unknown reasons has moved down from Dublin and rented a house locally. It’s rare for a woman, especially a pretty woman, to enter the pub, and the men soon begin competing for her attention, mostly by conjuring the fantastical ghost stories for which Ireland is justly famous. Jack tells one about faeries that haunted a local house that was built right on their migration path, not realizing that it’s the very house Valerie has rented. Jim tells a doozy about being drunk and feverish 22 CN&R November 7, 2013

with the flu while at work in a cemetery, digging a grave. When a man appears to tell him he’s digging in the wrong place, Jim recognizes him as the man who had died. And so it goes, until Valerie tells her own haunting tale, but one that is heartbreakingly true. At first the men don’t know what to do with it and stumble over each other, trying to deny its truth even as they sympathize deeply with Valerie. It’s as if her tale cracks them open somehow, and now they can start telling the truth about themselves. And so Jack tells yet another story, this one about a woman he loved when he was young but let get away because he was too timid to follow her to Dublin. Montalbano handles it beautifully, never becoming maudlin, but allowing his pain and loneliness to be visible, no doubt for the first time. The actors, all veterans of local theater, were uniformly excellent. They’d incorporated just enough Irish accent to sound realistic, they understood their characters fully, and they played off each other like a well-seasoned team. Tellesen is deserving of special mention. The story Valerie tells, unlike the others told that night, is deeply personal and moving. It asks her to bare some extremely painful emotions. I found it hard to watch her; she was so raw and hurting in the scene. There is no great resolution in The Weir, just as there is rarely resolution in life. The play ends when everybody goes home and Brendan turns off the last light and closes the door behind him. But the viewer is left with the sense that, though these people might be back in the pub tomorrow night, their lives will never be the same. End note: The Weir was directed, most impressively, by Amber Miller, who also did the economical-but-effective set and scenic design. My only complaint is that the staging lacked the sound of the wind blowing outside the pub. It’s an important element of the play, often mentioned by the characters, and we should have been able to hear it. Ω

Special Events BEER RELEASE PARTY: Celebrate the holidays with the release of the Seasons Cranberry Ale. Th, 11/7, 6pm. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

Theater THE GRAND GUIGNOL: THEATRE OF TERROR: A night of extreme horror and racy comedy, in traditional Grand Guignol fashion. The evening includes several gruesome and sordid tales: “The System,” “Orgy in the Lighthouse,” “Le Pussy” and more. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 11/9. $10-$15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

RADIOLAND’S HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA: Listen to the hits, forgotten classics and yuletide favorites, and follow the adventures of Scarlet Ranger and Zap Flanagan. (No show on Thanksgiving.) Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 12/8. Su, 2pm, 11/17-12/8. $16. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8775760, www.totr.org.

RUMORS: Complications ensue at an affluent dinner party after the host mysteriously shoots himself and the hostess goes missing in Neil Simon’s classic farce. Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm through 11/17. $20. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.bird cagetheatre.net.

THE WEIR: Rogue Theatre presents Irish playwright Conor McPherson’s story of four men and a female stranger whose arrival spurs them to impress her with their story-telling ... but one story is more chilling than any of them could have foreseen. Directed by Amber Miller. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 11/16. $10. Southside Playhouse, 2145 Park Ave., Ste. 13.

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN: Follow young Dr. Frankenstein as he attempts to complete his grandfather’s work, with helpers Igor and Inga, in Mel Brooks’ signature comedy. Th-Sa,

7:30pm, Su, 2pm through

CHICO MS SOIREE Friday, Nov. 8 Chico Women’s Club

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

11/10. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

Art Receptions DREAM WITH US: A BFA culminating exhibition reception presented by Serenity Manufacturing and Kate Adams featuring new products to help you create the perfect day dream, wherever you are. Th, 11/7, 5pm. B-So Space, Ayres Hall, room 107, Chico State, (530) 898-5331.

MOMENTS BETWEEN RECEPTION: A reception for Erika Navarrete’s paintings commenting on issues surrounding our most intimate relationships, our own inner dialogue and self-evaluation. Th, 11/7, 5-7pm. University Art Gallery, Trinity Hall, Chico State, (530) 8985864.

8

FRI

Special Events ART ABOUT: A monthly art walk coordinated by the Chico Visual Arts Alliance (ChiVAA). Each second Friday a different area of Chico is featured. Visit site for details. F, 11/8, 5-8pm. www.chivaa.org/artabout.

CHICO MS SOIREE: The MS Society hosts a benefit with music by Perpetual Drifters, Dick & Jane, The Amblers and JP Gutierrez. Featuring Sierra Nevada beer, Counterpunch wines and food from Chico Chuckwagon. F, 11/8, 7pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 8941978, www.chicomssoiree.com.

FORK IN THE ROAD: More than a dozen of Chico’s best food trucks gather for monthly rally. Live music, beer booth and a playground for the kids. F, 11/8, 4:30-7:30pm. Free. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave., (530) 345-6783.


FINE ARTS NOR CAL ROLLER GIRLS: Nor Cal Roller Girls will take on the Santa Cruz Derby Girls. Sa, 11/9, 79:30pm. $12. Cal Skate, 2465 Carmichael Dr., (530) 343-1601, www.norcalrollergirls.org.

Music DEATH BY DISCO: California Regional Theatre hosts a murder-mystery dinner/disco-dance contest. Music by DJ Boogie Man. Sa, 11/9, 7:30pm. $30. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 8933520, www.sierranevada.com.

SYMPHONIC WINDS: BAND CLASSICS: The Chico State Wind

WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY? Friday, Nov. 8 Laxson Auditorium

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Ensemble will perform music of legends such as Holst, Vaughan Williams, Creston, Grainger, and the March King himself, John Philip Sousa. Sa, 11/9, 7:30pm. $6-15. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State.

show, featuring Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops, Chip Esten and Jeff B. Davis. F, 11/8, 7:30pm. $35$48. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.chicoperformances.com.

Theater THE GRAND GUIGNOL: THEATRE OF TERROR: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

RADIOLAND’S HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

RUMORS: See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.bird cagetheatre.net.

THE WEIR: See Thursday. Southside Playhouse, 2145 Park Ave. Ste. 13.

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 8943282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

9

SAT

Special Events

Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.bird cagetheatre.net.

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 8943282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

12

TUES

Special Events UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES: A weekly presentation

of international films. This week: Stealing Beauty (France, Italy, UK., 1996) Directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. Tu, 7:30pm. $3. Ayres Hall 106, Chico State, (530) 899-7921, www.csu chico.edu/hfa/hc/filmseries.html.

Music GAELIC STORM: The chart-topping world artists

Theater THE GRAND GUIGNOL: THEATRE OF TERROR: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY?: The live improv-comedy

RUMORS: See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740

RADIOLAND’S HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

RUMORS: See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.bird cagetheatre.net.

THE WEIR: See Thursday. Southside Playhouse, 2145 Park Ave. Ste. 13.

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd., (530) 8943282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

10

SUN

Music THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME: New Orleans/Brooklyn “Janxta”-funksters bring the real funk to the dance floor. Su, 11/10, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520, www.sierranevada.com.

blend indie-folk and world grooves with Celtic traditions, and they blow into Chico on the wave of their latest album, The Boathouse, featuring traditional songs of the sea. Tu, 11/12, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520, www.sierra nevada.com.

13

WED

Music THANK YOU CONCERT: The concert band and Jazz II presents an evening of overtures, marches, big-band swing and fusion. W, 11/13, 7:30pm. Free. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, (530) 898-6333.

Art 1078 GALLERY: Placing, new images by Chico State painting and sculpture professors James Kuiper and Sheri Simons, exploring maps and mark-making. Through 11/23. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078 gallery.org.

ARTISANS GALLERIA: Artisan Displays, showcasing sculptures, paintings, ceramics, jewelry, stone art and more by Larry Lefner and other local artists. Through 12/31. 25 Lost Dutchman Dr.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Words and Birds, Chico birds by watercolorist Candy Matthews, writer Naty Osa and illustrator Javier Dura.

Through 11/30. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 8791821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

B-SO SPACE: Dream With Us, a BFA culminating exhibition presented by Serenity Manufacturing and Kate Adams featuring new products to help you create the perfect daydream, wherever you are. Through 11/8, 8am-5pm. Ayres Hall, room 107, Chico State, (530) 898-5331.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Color, Magic, featuring painters, woodworkers, blown glass and jewelry. Through 11/30. 493 East Ave., (530) 345-3063.

THE JANET TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Girl

Speak: Shojo Manga & Women’s Prints, prints by women or depicting women, including pieces from traveling Shojo Manga exhibit. Curated by Masami Toku. 11/1112/14. Chico State, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

THIRD FLOOR GALLERY: Girl Tuesday’s Pick and Pull, a BFA culminating exhibition featuring screen prints, pop-ups, cast bronze and clothing by Lindsey Slater. Through 11/18. third floor of BMU, Chico State, (530) 8985489.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: Bucking

Complacency: A Show About Women, a mixed-media show by Lori Stevens and Leslie Mahon-Russo focusing on the sexual and political abuse of women in contemporary culture. Through 11/30. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

Call for Artists CALL FOR ARTISTS: Established and emerging artists of all media are welcome to apply for a guest-artist exhibit this summer. Call for more info. Through 12/2. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

IMPERMANENCE: BIG PLANS FOR LITTLE FRANKIE: Pick up architectural plans and “Frankies,” then drop off art Nov. 6-9. $5. Manas Art Space & Gallery, 1441-C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

PACIFIC FLYWAY WILDLIFE AND HABITAT: An allmedia juried exhibit going up during the Snow Goose Festival in January. Through 11/16. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

Museums CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Chico in Black and White, an exhibit featuring historical photos from the John Nopel collection. Ongoing. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Keys to the

Kingdom: Fungi. Learn the varieties and importance of mushrooms and fungi via interactive displays. Through 1/5, 2014. $6. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

TIN ROOF BAKERY & CAFE: A Hazy Shade of

Theater SPRING AWAKENING: The 2007 Tony Award-winning musical was adapted from Frank Wedekind’s 1891 German play and chronicles the struggles of teens coming of age in a repressive society. 11/13-11/16, 7:30pm, 11/1611/17, 2pm, 11/19-11/21, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Wismer Theatre, Chico State, (530) 898-6333, www.schoolofthearts-csuchico.com.

Winter, fall fades into winter all around Chico in the photography of Karen Kolb. 11/7-11/30. 627 Broadway, (530) 345-1362.

UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Pushing

Bounderies: Expanding Horizons, paintings by Erika Navarrete, exploring issues surrounding our most intimate relationships, inner dialogues and self-evaluation. Through 12/13, 9am-5pm. Trinity Hall Chico State, (530) 898-5864.

Art Receptions GIRL TUESDAY’S PICK AND PULL: A BFA culminat-

Theater THE GRAND GUIGNOL: THEATRE OF TERROR: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

ing exhibition reception featuring screenprints, pop-ups, cast bronze and clothing by Lindsey Slater. W, 11/13, 5pm. Third Floor Gallery, third floor of BMU, Chico State, (530) 898-5489.

GIRLS ON THE RUN: A 5K fundraising event to support Girls on the Run of Butte County, a local, positive-youth development program for young girls. Starts at One-Mile. See website for more info. Sa, 11/9, 8:30am. $10- $30. Bidwell Park, Bidwell Park, www.gotrbutte county.org.

FORK IN THE ROAD Friday, Nov. 8 Manzanita Place

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 30

Art-school confidential As the school year winds down, graduating Chico State art students (several undoubtedly stricken with severe cases of senioritis) are scrambling to finish their last classes and leap through the final hoop en route to a diploma: the BFA culminating exhibition. These free events (the receptions even sometimes include snacks and live entertainment!) are a great way to see some cutting-edge art from fresh, young minds. You can EDITOR’S PICK also buy art and contribute to the artists’ student-loan repayment funds. This week features several ongoing exhibits and receptions for two shows—Dream With Us, by Serenity Manufacturing and Kate Adams (Thursday, Nov. 7, B-So Space) and Girl Tuesday’s Pick and Pull, by Lindsey Slater (Wednesday, Nov. 13, Third Floor Gallery). For a complete list of events, check out www.csuchico.edu/art.

November 7, 2013

CN&R 23


THIS SATURDAY NOV 9

the Black Lillies DOROTHY F. JOHNSON CENTER

775 E. 16TH ST. CHICO SHOW 7:30PM (DOORS 6:30PM) $18 ADV. $4 EXTRA AT DOOR Tickets: Diamond W. Western Wear, Lyons Books, the Music Connection

THURSDAY DEC 5 AN EVENING WITH AWARD WINNING

wailin’ jennys

PARADISE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

SHOW 7:30PM (DOORS 6:30PM) $35 VIP $30 GENERAL RESERVED $4 EXTRA AT DOOR Tickets: CHICO – Diamond W Western Wear, Lyons Books, the Music Connection PARADISE – Postnet, Trailhead Adventures

FRIDAY DEC 6

the California Honeydrops GRAND OPENING

3269 ESPLANADE SUITE #142 – CHICO’S NORTH-SIDE SHOW 7:30PM (DOORS 6:30PM) | $18 ADV. $4 EXTRA AT DOOR Tickets: Diamond W. Western Wear, Lyons Books, the Music Connection

THURSDAY FEB 6

john gorka

W/ SPECIAL GUEST – ANTJE

3269 ESPLANADE SUITE #142 – CHICO’S NORTH-SIDE SHOW 7:30PM (DOORS 6:30PM) | $20 ADV. $4 EXTRA AT DOOR Tickets: Diamond W. Western Wear, Lyons Books, the Music Connection

SATURDAY FEB 15

alo

3269 ESPLANADE SUITE #142 – CHICO’S NORTH-SIDE SHOW 7:30PM (DOORS 6:30PM) | $25 ADV. $4 EXTRA AT DOOR Tickets: Diamond W. Western Wear, Lyons Books, the Music Connection

SUNDAY FEB 23

judy collins PARADISE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

SHOW 7:30PM (DOORS 6:30PM) $40 VIP $32 GENERAL RESERVED $4 EXTRA AT DOOR Tickets: CHICO – Diamond W Western Wear, Lyons Books, the Music Connection PARADISE – Postnet, Trailhead Adventures

For more info: 345–8136 or www.chicotickets.com 24 CN&R November 7, 2013

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

NORTH VALLEY PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS:

BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave., (530) 321-5607.

AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.butte county.net.

A BRUSH WITH KINDNESS: Habitat for Humanity of Butte County will be hosting an orientation meeting for low-income homeowners who are interested in receiving services from Habitat’s exterior-home-improvement program. Tu, 11/12, 6-8pm. Free. Bidwell Presbyterian Church, 208 W. First St., (530) 343-7423, www.buttehabitat.org.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 872-7085.

SECOND SATURDAYS YOUTH ART WORKSHOP: A monthly hands-on workshop series encouraging the community’s youth to engage in artistic expression. This session will highlight photography. Second Sa of every month, 12:30-5pm. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

SOUNDS OF THE VALLEY CHORUS: Women singers welcome to sing in four-part harmony barbershop style. Call for more info. W, 7pm. Marigold Elementary School, 2446 Marigold Ave., (530) 343-5183.

CHICO CONTRA DANCE: Traditional contra dance with music by the Pub Scouts. Second Sa of every month, 6:30-10pm. $4-$8. Chico Grange, 2775 Nord Ave., (530) 877-2930.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:1511:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.butte county.net/bclibrary.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for more info. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 8916524.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. F, 6-8pm. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

DEATH CAFÉ: A place to come and chat about death over a cup of tea, in a respectful and confidential space. Th, 7pm. 100th Monkey Books & Café, 642 W. Fifth St.

FARMERS’ MARKET: CHAPMAN: A year-round Certified Farmers’ Market serving as a community forum for healthful-lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

FARMERS’ MARKET: NORTH CHICO: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. W, 7:30am-noon through 11/22. North Valley Plaza, 801 East Ave.

FARMERS’ MARKET: SATURDAY: Chico’s weekly community gathering, with fresh produce, crafts, baked goods and more. Sa, 7:30am1pm. Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second & Wall Streets.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave., (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfree clinic.org.

HAPPY HEALING: Experience a variety of healing modalities. F, 7pm. 100th Monkey Books & Café, 642 W. Fifth St.

SQUARE DANCE CLUB Today, Nov. 7 Paradise Veterans Memorial Hall SEE COMMUNITY

SQUARE DANCE CLUB: Square-dancing classes for beginners and advanced level dancers. Call for more info. Th, 7-10pm. Veterans Memorial Hall, 6550 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1962.

TRADITIONAL WEST AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of

drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (808) 757-0076.

WALK IN THE PARK: Stonewall Alliance Chico’s dog-friendly, three-mile walk in Bidwell Park, which will take place monthly. Second Su of every month. One-Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water-quality testing and more. Check Friends of Bidwell Park website for dates and locations. Ongoing. www.friendsofbidwell park.org.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, (530) 514-3903.

INFINITE RHYTHMS ECSTATIC DANCE: A shoefree, food-free, drug-free, smoke-free dance

for you and yours with DJ Clay. Th, 8-10pm through 5/8. $8-$12. Manas Art Space & Gallery, 1441-C Park Ave., (831) 331-4051.

ISRAEL/PALESTINE DISCUSSION: A film and dis-

cussion series. Second Tu of every month, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Café, 642 W. Fifth St.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


November 7, 2013

CN&R 25


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26 CN&R November 7, 2013

Anecia Johnson enjoys a glass at the LaRocca Vineyards winetasting room in downtown Chico.

H late Etienne Bourride, had little in common save for our love

enri and his father, the

of all things culinary and oenological—readers by may remember Henri his moving Bourride back to the south of France, then dying of a heart attack in April of 2004, a glass of Bordeaux in hand, two violet de Provence artichokes from his beloved fields steaming on the stove. And, I guess, we were both a couple of misfits, though in very different ways: he a Catholic and a scholar of French film, raising eyebrows in a conservative, largely Lutheran Midwestern community; moi with my proclivity for the exotic, propensity for the dramatic, and penchant for the alternative— growing up in the same friendly but immutably disapproving milieu. One of his ongoing frustrations was his inability to find wine— not just good wine but any wine— in our little town, though I have long suspected that his friendship with Monsignor O’Reilly in the Twin Cities area—and his frequent hundred-mile drives to visit him—was motivated at least in part by its potential to provide access to the Sacristy of St. Theresa of the Walleyes and to the sacramental wine stored therein. So of course, he’s been on my mind lately as I’ve watched Chico and the surrounding area experience a veritable wine renaissance. There are now 12 wineries in Butte County, plus New Clairvaux in nearby Vina, and three new wine bars in Chico (five total). How he would have loved drinking it all in, particularly stopping at the wine bars to taste and talk wine. Papa,

rest assured that your faithful daughter et moi have been dutifully researching them in your stead. Creekside Cellars: Chico’s oldest wine bar (1998) offers a pleasant patio as well as indoor seating for tasting selected wines ($4-$6 for a half-pour, $4-$12 for a glass). The inventory is extensive, with a wide range of imported and domestic bottles, many under $15. Creekside also sells wine “accessories,” including glassware, cheeseboards and picnic baskets, as well as truffles and a large selection of gourmet cheeses. Recently, Colette was quite taken by the Rusack chardonnay, while I thought the Primal Roots red blend was very good. We did think that the cheese tray—five tiny pieces of gourmet cheese, a few thin slices of baguette, with olives and grapes— was overpriced at $9.50, though the cheese was very tasty. It’s located at 250 Vallombrosa Ave., Ste. 500, behind T. Tea Bar & Fusion Café. Visit www.creek sidecellars.com for information. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room: This little wine bar, at 222 W. Second St. in downtown Chico, offers tastings and bottles of the Forest Ranch vineyard’s organic and sulfite-free wines. The tasting room and Jim, our server, were both unpretentious and welcoming: Colette loved LaRocca’s 2009 chardonnay and bought a bottle; I was impressed with the 2008 zinfandel (both $6 a glass). We were also impressed with the complimentary plate of Parmesan cheese and Tin Roof Bakery bread. Visit www.larocca vineyards.com for information. Monks Wine Lounge & Bistro: The popular Monks, just a block from LaRocca at 128 W. Second St., offers more than

40 wines by the glass and a full dinner menu, with entrees and a range of small plates, including meatballs, and bacon-wrapped dates stuffed with bleu cheese. Only in Chico: One night after dinner, Colette asked for an espresso, and our waiter nodded, then disappeared out the front door only to return a couple of minutes later with her coffee, fresh from the Naked Lounge Tea & Coffeehouse a couple of doors down. Visit www.monkswine lounge.com for information. Tannins Wine Bar & Bistro: Located at 234 W. Third St., in downtown Chico, Tannins specializes in dishes with local and seasonal ingredients. The menu features small plates running $7-$12, as well as soups, salads and desserts ($6-$7). The wine list includes a wide range of reds and whites, with glasses for $5-$9, and bottles starting at $20 and topping out at $65 (for a Rodney Strong cabernet). Visit www.tannins chico.com for information. Wine Time: Also specializing in small plates, made with local seasonal ingredients, Wine Time is located on the north end of The Esplanade at 26 Lost Dutchman Drive, in a gorgeously remodeled pig barn, built in 1901 and once owned by John Bidwell. The main dining room is lit partially by two huge chandeliers, originally made for Reno’s Crystal Palace in 1951. Wine Time offers appetizers, flatbreads, salads, meat plates and desserts, with recommended wine or beer pairings. The 80-plus wines include locals New Clairvaux, Odyssey, Bertagna and Gale, as well as many from Napa and the central California coast and Europe. Visit www.winetimechico.com for information. Ω


IN THE MIX

You’ve Done So Much For Us

A Good Death

Let Us Do Something For You

Christopher R. Cox Minotaur Books The author is a journalist who has traveled throughout Southeast Asia for more than 20 years. He has used his experiences to good effect in this debut novel, which combines an exotic murder mystery, a compelling love story and a Heart of Darkness-like journey into the jungles of Laos. At its center is Sebastian Damon, a private investigator hired by a Boston insurance company to find out the truth about the death in a Bangkok flop house of an up-and-coming Southeast Asian refugee who recently purchased a half-million-dollar life-insurance policy. Is it a scam, or is she really dead? The chase leads Damon through the seamy streets of Bangkok, a world he knows well and describes vividly, and then into the jungle along the Laos-Vietnam border to find the xenophobic, violent tribe from which the woman came. Like all great mystery tales, this novel is about much more than solving a crime: It’s about stepping into a dangerous unknown from which one might not emerge alive.

This Veteran’s Day, Monday, November 11, Canyon Oaks Country Club, Chico’s private club of choice, will be offering all active duty military complimentary green fees, and half off green fees for all other veterans. Call the Pro Shop at 343-1116 to make a tee time. Must provide proper identification.

BOOK

—Robert Speer

All Frequencies MonkeyJunk Stony Plain Records According to their PR, the three lads who compose the group (all Canadians, eh?) got their name from “a chance remark by legendary blues man Son House: ‘I’m talkin’ ’bout the blues. I ain’t talkin’ about monkey junk.’” What began as an Ottawa blues trio five years ago has morphed into a group of “blues/root rockers.” With Steve Marriner on harmonica, baritone guitar, keys and vocals; Tony D, lead guitar and vocals; and Matt Sobb on drums, they deliver the goods. Among the disc’s 10 songs is a terrific version of Louisiana songwriter Bobby Charles’ “Why Are People Like That?” which, after a series of unfortunate incidents, prompts Marriner to ask the title’s question. Tony D’s slide guitar enlivens a few songs (e.g.,“Sirens in the Night,” “What I Got to Give”) as does Marriner’s keyboard action on the uptempo “Say What?” The phonetically spelled “Je Nah Say Kwah” is Marriner’s only response after singing “I can’t explain just what she’s got,” while on the highly danceable groove of “Yearnin’ for Yesterday,” she’s got him craving an earlier time. The CD’s title refers to its analog recording process, which included the use of vintage mics, making this a very satisfying sonic experience. Look up their version of Muddy Waters’ “Tiger in Your Tank” on YouTube.

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The Kinfolk Table: Recipes for Small Gatherings Nathan Williams Artisan Somewhere between whipping up a meal for unexpected guests and a formal dinner party lies The Kinfolk Table. This new cookbook from Kinfolk magazine’s founding editor Nathan Williams explores that sweet spot: the gathering as more than a meal. The Kinfolk Table spends as much time and photography on its 45 contributors— from restaurateurs, food writers and cheesemakers to financial analysts, haberdashers and calligraphers—as it does their recipes. Through this personal angle, we see the book is not about easy recipes, but about simple ones. It’s easy to drive to Safeway and buy plasticwrapped bread and mussels, but it’s also simple to bake breakfast bread or wade into the Oregon surf and pry bivalves off a rock. This simplistic but engaging way of cooking and living carries over into the beautiful photography—a mixture of American Gothic, Mason jars, and antique wood tables with a splash of artisan hipster—that makes this as much an art book as it is a cookbook. The recipes are diverse—from sweet potato-mushroom tacos with spiced almond sauce to apple crisp— but with a unique and ubiquitous style flowing between the pages, the message becomes less about the dish or the farm-to-table approach, and more about the how, why and who of sharing a meal.

BOOK

—Matthew Craggs November 7, 2013

CN&R 27


COMING SO ON CN&R Is LookINg FoR AN AdveRtIsINg CoNsuLtANt Do you love Chico? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. The CN&R is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses.

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AS AS PROUD PROUD GRADUATES GRADUATES OF OF MARIGOLD MARIGOLD AND AND DURHAM DURHAM 1 3 Elementary Schools, the owners of the Naked Lounge have applied the lessons they learned in the aforementioned public institutions to the operation of their coffeehouse: Be nice to people, say thank you, surround yourself with awesome people (see picture), use proper punctuation, don’t pretend you’re something you’re not, play hard at recess, making things is fun, break the rules sometimes, play to win, and ride your bike often. Thank you for noticing our hard work. We look forward to serving you soon.

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28 CN&R November 7, 2013


Mangrove Bottle Shop

MUSIC

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13

We are Honored & Appreciate your Business “Major” Nick Powers, flanked by his Lo-Fi Symphony, (from left) Ken and Dylan Gautschi.

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13

PHOTO COURTESY OF MP&TLFS

Adventures in rock The magical mystery of Major Powers & The Lo-Fi Symphony

Amight suggest, Major Powers & The Lo-Fi Symphony are not the sort of band one can sum up with a s the unwieldiness of their band name

general categorization along the lines of “rock band” or “pop band.” The 13 tracks making up the band’s debut full-length, by We Became Monsters, released last Daniel year on Bay Area indie label AmazTaylor ing Pony Records, certainly drips with classic-rock bombast, and the band even coined its own genre descriptor— “adventure rock”— to PREVIEW: describe its music. But the heavyMajor Powers & handed piano and showman vocals The Lo-Fi of frontman Nicholas Jarvis PowSymphony ers—often joined for spot-on threeperform Saturday, part harmonies by brothers Kevin Nov. 16, 8 p.m., at Café Coda. and Dylan Gautschi (guitar and Big Tree drums, respectively)—give Major Fall Down, Powers & The Lo-Fi Symphony a Bandmaster bizarre Broadway show-tune vibe. Ruckus and Add an upbeat, tongue-in-cheek Jeremy Crossley open. comedic bent, and you get a sound Cost: $5 that, perhaps purposefully, defies easy placement in the rock/pop specCafé Coda trum. 265 Humboldt Ave. “I’ve never considered myself a 566-9476 www.cafe rocker, nor have I listened to much coda.com rock,” confessed Powers, who acts as the group’s primary songsmith. Nevertheless, among the trio’s “cesspool of influences”—including Mary Poppins, Vallejo rapper E-40 and West Side Story—Powers names rock mainstays Superdrag, The Rolling Stones and The Beatles. “Oddly enough, we get tons of rock-band comparisons,” said Powers, tongue firmly in cheek, “because we sound like a fucking rock band.” The trio met in high school in the East Bay outpost of Crockett, eventually ending up playing in the same band. Despite their polished chops and professed appreciation for classical music, none of the Lo-Fi Symphony players have any real musical training.

“We figured it out, literally, in dirty basements on broken equipment. I can’t read music at more than a snail’s pace,” said Powers. “I think Kevin and Dylan picked up music because Nirvana and Metallica were blowing their minds when they were kids. So you get a guitar and start trying to become radical.” The trio began playing their way up through the ranks of the Bay Area scene, one show at a time—the old-fashioned way, some might say. But in a decidedly new-fashioned way, it was the band’s YouTube video for its song “93,000,000 Miles” that caught the eye of notorious online music- and movie-sharing site The Pirate Bay. “We sent them a song a year or more ago, and nothing happened. Then we made a video and sent that. They Facebooked us and were like, ‘We’ve been watching you.’” The Pirate Bay posted the video on the front page of its heavily trafficked site, garnering the video more than 100,000 views and earning the band some much-, or at least semi-appreciated exposure. “It immediately vaulted us from Level 1 to Level 2 in the 100 Levels of Band Fame,” joked Powers. “In seriousness, it opened up some opportunities all over the world, made us a little cash, and it was overall a very exciting and positive experience. But whatever it ultimately means is all in our hands; how hard we try is all that matters.” To that end, the band remains committed to earning its keep in the live setting, recently wrapping up a multiweek residency at San Francisco nightspot Amnesia and taking the show on the road, including returning to Chico, Nov. 16, at Café Coda. Despite their over-the-top musical style and zany online persona, The Lo-Fi Symphony live is somewhat more demure than one might expect, Powers said. “We’re not flashy stage bros. We try to talk with the music.” But don’t mistake this for modesty; Powers has grand plans for his namesake symphony’s continued adventures: “In 2014, our plans are to win a Grammy.” Ω November 7, 2013

CN&R 29


NIGHTLIFE SAMVEGA

THURSDAY 11|7—WEDNESDAY 11/13 singer/songwriter. Th, 11/7. $15. Chico School of Rock, 932 E. Eighth Ave. Ste. A, (530) 894-2526.

Tuesday, Nov. 12 1078 Gallery

8FRIDAY

SEE TUESDAY

AUBREY DEBAUCHERY & THE BROKEN BONES: Local singer-songwriter and

JACKIE DAUM: The former KZFR

7THURSDAY AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music round-robin. Third and First Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

ALLI BATTAGLIA & THE MUSICAL BREWING CO EP-RELEASE PARTY: Th, 11/7, 7:30pm. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

FLO IN THE BLUES: Live blues music for the blue at heart featuring Steven Truskol and friends. Th, 11/7, 7-10pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

Celebration of the Song winner returns with her soulful tunes. Genna and Jesse duo, and Aamir Malik open. Th, 11/7, 7:30pm. $8. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Steve Cook and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 11/7, 6-9pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

band perform tunes from their newly released album. Plus, appearances by SF’s Battlehooch, and locals Gentlemen’s Coup and Disco Church. F, 11/8, 7:30pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

BASSMINT: A weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4, (530) 895-3888.

DRIVER: Classsic rock from Paradise. F,

11/8, 9pm. Free. Tackle Box Bar & Grill,

375 E. Park Ave., (530) 345-7499.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians

DYLAN’S DHARMA: Local faves combine

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to share

FLO SESSIONS: Flo’s weekly local music

welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

your music, poetry, comedy, or other talents in a 10-minute slot. First and Third Th of every month, 7pm. $1. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise, (530) 873-1370.

STEVE SPURGIN: An intimate solo performance from the renown bluegrass

rock and reggae and folk and pop influences. F, 11/8, 9pm. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave., (530) 345-7499.

showcase continues with host Zack Black and guests. F, 7-10pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café

JAKE NOLAN & BAND: Debut of Nolan and

Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

band, with Strange Habits and Sean Martin opening. Sa, 11/9, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

HAPPY JAZZ: Jazz on the patio with

Shigemi Minetaka on keyboard and Christine LaPado-Breglia on upright bass. Every other F, 6:30-8:30pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St., (530) 891-9044.

LOCAL GROOVE-MAKERS: Local originals: Selente, Playboy Smooth, Roxy Doll and Olove. Sa, 11/9, 8pm. $5. 1078 Gallery,

820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

IRISH-MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

SLAYERS FROM SUNNY SAN DIEGO

In a genre now dominated by sludgy riffs and rabid pit-bull vocalizations, speed-metal-demons Skelator—who hail from Seattle by way of San Diego—instead takes things back to the Golden Age of metal, evoking everything from Iron Maiden to Master of Puppets-era Metallica. Skelator play Saturday, Nov. 9, at Monstro’s Pizza and Subs with Severance Package, Born In To This and Scrolls. Not only is it a great line-up, but it’s also for a good cause, with proceeds dedicated to the 6th Street Center for Youth.

NIGHT MOVES: Bob Seger tribute band. F, 11/8, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

9SATURDAY DEATH BY DISCO: California Regional Theatre hosts a murder-mystery dinner/disco-dance contest. Music by DJ Boogie Man. Sa, 11/9, 7:30pm. $30. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 893-3520, www.sierra nevada.com.

HUNTER & THE DIRTY JACKS: Los Angeles-based, blues/roots-rock band perform both covers and original music. Sa, 11/9, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feath erfallscasino.com/brewing-co.

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22 RED, WHITE AND BLUES FESTIVAL: A daylong celebration with Tommy Castro and the Painkillers, Nick Moss Band, Guitar Shorty and Candye Kane. Su, 11/10, noon. $30. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co., 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com/brewing-co.

SAMVEGA: Psychedelic experimental circus-rock from wine country. Birdie Fielder (of The Shimmies) opens. Tu, 11/12, 8pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country music showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 7:30-9:30pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.,

(530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo. weebly.com.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and

11MONDAY

rotating accompaniment. Tu, 6:308:30pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farm starpizza.com.

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Free. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.com.

THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME Sunday, Nov. 10 Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. SEE SUNDAY

SKELATOR: Sa, 11/9, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 345-7672.

AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.com.

GAELIC STORM: The chart-topping world

SYMPHONIC WINDS: BAND CLASSICS: The Chico State Wind Ensemble will perform music of legends such as Holst, Vaughan Williams, Creston, Grainger, and the March King himself, John Philip Sousa. Sa, 11/9, 7:30pm. $6-15. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State.

12TUESDAY

10SUNDAY THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME: New Orleans/Brooklyn “Janxta”-funksters bring the real funk to the dance floor. Su, 11/10, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 8933520, www.sierranevada.com.

unfortunately this best friend can't be a dd Liberty Cab | 898-1776

artists blend indie-folk and world grooves with Celtic traditions, and they blow into Chico on the wave of their latest album, The Boathouse, featuring traditional songs of the sea. Tu, 11/12, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 8933520, www.sierranevada.com.

OPEN MIC: Open-mic night with Aaron

and Friends. Tu, 7-10pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

13WEDNESDAY JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. W, 5-7pm. Free. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more. W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Café, 642 W. Fifth St.

THANK YOU CONCERT: The concert band and Jazz II presents an evening of overtures, marches, big-band swing and fusion. W, 11/13, 7:30pm. Free. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State, (530) 898-6333.

FRESH-BREWED TUNES

Alli Battaglia and the Musical Brewing Co.—winners of the 2012 CAMMIE for Best Funk/Jam Act—are pulling out all the stops for their EP-release party on Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Chico Women’s Club. They’ve invited a slew of musical friends including Daniel Vera, Mandalyn May, The Resonators, Julian Ruck, Christian Gabriel and Justin Carmack, as well as tummy-shakin’ troupe Tribal Belly Dance to celebrate in style and raise some funds for community radio station KZFR 90.1 FM.

friday nights dj dance party saturday nights molly gunn’s revival 70’s & 80’s – disco dancing • • • •

tues nights – salsa dancing/lessons thurs nights – karaoke nightly drink specials extended happy hour 5pM–9pM

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November 7, 2013

CN&R 31


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Lost in space Sci-fi war-game novel doesn’t hold up in film version

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A ing same-sex relationships/marriage indicate, author Orson Scott Card appears to be some sort of

s some of his public comments denounc-

pigheaded loser. That doesn’t keep his 1985 novel Ender’s Game and its sequels from being fairly prophetic and intuitive when it by comes to modern technology—it just Bob Grimm makes him kind of a big dick in the now. OK, now the movie review: In the film version of Card’s story, the protagonist is Ender Wiggin (Asa Butterfield), a genius boy and master of futuristic video games and strategies.

super condensed, and rushed. The character of Ender is required to switch emotional modes in a way that is too quick, and it feels false. Card’s “One who can save us all!” premise, besides its biblical ramifications, also acted as a definitive prelude to such current phenomena as the Harry Potter series and The Matrix. The mastergamer aspect of Ender was conceptualized when modern man was just saying goodbye to Coleco Vision and ushering in the age of Nintendo. The first PlayStation was nearly a decade away. So, I’m not denying that Ender’s Game was a masterfully intuitive notion as a novel. I’m just not impressed with

FRE

FRIDAY 11/8 – tuesDAY 11/12 About time (Digital) (R) (11:00AM*) 1:50PM 4:40PM 7:35PM 10:25PM CAptAin phillips (Digital) (PG-13) (10:05AM*) 1:05PM 4:05PM 7:05PM 10:05PM CArrie (2013) (Digital) (R) 10:10PM Cloudy With A ChAnCe of meAtbAlls 2 (Digital) (PG) (10:20AM*) 12:40PM 3:00PM 5:20PM 7:40PM 10:00PM ender’s GAme (Digital) (PG-13) (10:10AM*) 11:15AM 12:50PM 2:00PM 3:30PM 4:45PM 6:10PM 7:30PM 8:50PM 10:15PM free birds (3D) (PG) 5:00PM 9:40PM free birds (Digital) (PG) (10:00AM*) 12:20PM 2:40PM 7:20PM GrAvity (3D) (PG-13) (10:15AM*) 2:55PM 5:15PM 7:35PM 9:55PM

GrAvity (Digital) (PG-13) 12:35PM JACkAss presents: bAd GrAndpA (Digital) (R) 11:50AM 1:00PM 2:10PM 3:20PM 4:30PM 5:40PM 6:50PM 8:00PM 9:10PM 10:30PM lAst veGAs (Digital) (PG-13) (10:30AM*) 11:45AM 1:00PM 2:15PM 3:30PM 4:45PM 6:05PM 7:15PM 9:45PM thor: the dArk World (3D) (PG-13) (10:50AM*) 12:40PM 1:35PM 3:25PM 4:20PM 6:10PM 7:05PM 9:00PM 9:50PM thor: the dArk World (Digital) (PG-13) 11:30AM 2:15PM 5:00PM 7:45PM 10:30PM (speCiAl shoWinG) - met operA: tosCA (2013) (Digital) (NR) 9:55AM Sat. 11/9

Showtimes listed with (*) NOT shown Tues 11/12

32 CN&R November 7, 2013

2

Game Boy.

Ender’s Game He’s targeted by a colonel (crusty and

Starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford and Hailee Steinfeld. Directed by Gavin Hood. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

1

Poor

2

Fair

3

Good

4

Very Good

5

Excellent

craggy Harrison Ford) as the savior of the human race, somebody who can save Earth from a second attack by an alien insect species called the Formics. Ender enters into a training program in which he is secretly fast-tracked to the point of commanding his own ragtag group of teens, including Petra Arkanian (True Grit’s Hailee Steinfeld), through elaborate exercises. One involves a zero-gravity room where they get to play laser tag with paralyzing rays, and the other is a large video game where they perform alien-species-annihilation scenarios. The movie has some impressive special effects and some great ideas at its core. What it doesn’t have is an engaging performance by its central actor. Butterfield just doesn’t cut it as Ender, opting for a mostly quiet intensity that results in boring stretches. Steinfeld acts circles around him. Also, something about the film feels abbreviated. I can’t help but think this franchise would’ve fared better as an HBO series, or some other network miniseries. The finale feels tacked on,

the muddled effort director Gavin Hood hath wrought. The movie, although visually breathtaking at times, is a flat, joyless affair. I couldn’t help but think of Paul Verhoeven’s Starship Troopers—another avenue for bug-like aliens attacking Earth—and how much fun that was. Ender’s Game has a lot of moping and routine teen angst in it. Ford is actually my favorite thing about the movie. He manages to mix in an occasionally warm—even funny—moment as the determined engineer of Ender’s fate. There’s plenty of that old, raspy late-career Ford, but also just a touch of Han Solo. (Watching him here, I found myself rooting for a deal with J.J. Abrams soon that would have Ford reprise his Star Wars role in the upcoming trilogy. His work here would act as a nice bridge back to that franchise.) On the more confusing side, Viola Davis is on hand as Major Gwen Anderson, some sort of counselor/protector of Ender, constantly at Ford’s side and telling him his plan sucks. It seems like Hood (and even Davis) wasn’t quite sure of the arc for this character who virtually disappears for long stretches of the film. Ender’s Game is not a bad movie. It has many respectable aspects, but it is a movie marbled with dullness. It’s supposed to be the start of a franchise, but I have a sinking feeling the franchise ends here for now. Ω


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Opening this week About Time

A British sci-fi comedy by writer/director Richard Curtis (Love Actually) about a young man (Domhnall Gleeson) who uses his newfound ability to travel back in time to put himself in position to win the heart of a pretty woman (Rachel McAdams). Cinemark 14. Rated R.

4

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints

Writer/director David Lowery’s film is a darkly romantic outlaw love ballad set in the harsh, flat, scrubby landscapes of the Texas outback. A small-time thief (Casey Affleck) imprisoned for a crime he didn’t commit escapes in hopes of rejoining his beloved (Rooney Mara) and the baby daughter he’s never seen. A sternly supportive father figure (Keith Carradine) and an unexpectedly sympathetic deputy (Ben Foster) get involved in the increasingly convoluted chase that results. Smoothly understated performances, bursts of flashing memories in montage, fragments of deglamorized violence, and music tracks that sound homemade all make signal contributions to the film’s richly evocative atmosphere—the gloom and glow of tragic farce somewhere out in the underbrush. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Muscle Shoals

A documentary on the history of the Alabama studio where songs like Percy Sledge’s “When a Man Loves a Woman” and Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” were recorded, and where that funky, soulful “Muscle Shoals sound” was born. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Thor: The Dark World

Chris Hemsworth is back as the god/superhero with the all-powerful hammer, reuniting with Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) and reluctantly teaming up with his scheming adoptive brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) on a journey that will “force him to sacrifice everything to save us all.” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Bad Grandpa

The original jackass is back, as Johnny Knoxville dons his old-man getup and pranks America during a road trip across the country with his “grandson.” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

5

Captain Phillips

Director Paul Greengrass and screenwriter Billy Ray keep the central focus on Capt. Phillips (Tom Hanks), but never lose sight of what’s going on with the Maersk Alabama’s 20-man crew or with the scrawny quartet of Somali youths who first try to take over the ship and then later try to take flight with Phillips as hostage. A key drama within the larger one comes from the keenly nuanced battle of wits, male pride and allround know-how that develops between Phillips and the gaunt, rail-thin pirate called Muse (a haunting Barkhad Abdi). The film rises to its most impressive levels when we begin to see that the simplistic good

guys/bad guys outlook that usually prevails in such stories gets deflected here in some very interesting and even moving ways. The screenplay and direction combine with Hanks’ quietly multifaceted performance to portray Phillips as a genuine hero, but also as one deeply marked by the devastating cost of victory. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Carrie

A second big-screen adaptation of Stephen King’s novel about a psychologically abused and bullied teen who eventually exacts revenge on her tormentors with her telekinetic powers. Chloë Grace Moretz (who played Hit-Girl in Kick-Ass) takes on the title role made famous by Sissy Spacek in the 1976 classic. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

www.newsreview.com

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

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A documentary about the deadliest day of climbing—August 1, 2008—on Pakistan’s K2, when 11 climbers perished on the second highest mountain in the world. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER

16 CHICO

17 REDDING

LAXSON AUDITORIUM 7:30 PM

CASCADE THEATRE 2:00 PM

Free pre-concert talk at 6:30 PMSUNDAY, SATURDAY, Saturday, SuNday, Free pre-concert talk at 1:00 NOVEMBER NOVEMBER November November in Rowland-Taylor RecitalHall in the Cascade Theatre

16 17 16 17 CHICO reddiNg For tickets,ChiCo call the University REDDING For tickets, call the Cascade The

Gravity

The Summit

ChiCo

ChiCo GUeSt artiSt SPonSorS Chris navarrete: rupert and Joan McDowell; Dennis letcher and victoria Simone-letcher Kira Weiss: CSU, Chico alumni association

ConduCted by Kyle Wiley PiCKett

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

When the last remainging single guy in a group of friends gets engaged, the four senior citizens head to Vegas for a bachelor party. Starting Morgan Freeman, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas and Kevin Kline. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

U n i v e r S i t y,

New Americ n AmericA Portraits

Ender’s Game

Last Vegas

State

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The new film by Alfonso Cuarón is a dazzling piece of artful entertainment. It’s a sci-fi adventure, with a pair of stranded astronauts played by George Clooney and Sandra Bullock trying to survive a spacestation calamity, and it packs a great deal of unexpected interest into what might sound like a relatively simple story. Scarcity of oxygen, suspension of the law of gravity, extreme physical isolation—they all heighten the stakes in the characters’ efforts to improvise self-rescue via the increasingly disabled remnants of their elaborate spacetravel technology. Cuarón and company make wonderfully expressive use of the 3D format on behalf of all of its main concerns. Both visually and dramatically, Gravity is about human beings struggling to get their bearings, in several senses of that word. Spatial and psychological disorientation recurs, but the screenplay by Alfonso and his brother Jonás Cuarón also nudges us toward perspectives on the dimensions of human identity, of purpose and self, and locale. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

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In part two of the computer-animated film series, the overactive food-making machine made popular in Judi and Ron Barrett’s celebrated book of the same name is back, this time turning out hybrid food/animal creatures that threaten to take over the world. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

An animated feature about two turkeys (voiced by Woody Harrelson and Owen Wilson) who travel back in time to try to alter history in a way that keeps their kind from ending up on the Thanksgiving table every year. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

h a i r

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Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2

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Kira Weiss,Cello Cello Kira Weiss,

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Free pre-concert at 1:00 Free pre-concert talktalk at 1:00 PM PM in theCascade Cascade Theatre in the theatre

Márquez,Danzón No. 2Lalo, | Cello Concerto, Mvt. 1 Fortickets, tickets,call callthe the University For tickets,call callthe the Cascade Theatre For University For tickets, Cascade theatre Boxoffice, Office,530.898.6333 530.898.6333 Box 530.243.8877 Box Box Office, office, 530.243.8877 Neruda,Trumpet Concerto Copland, | Symphony No. 3 Chris Navarrete,trumpet Trumpet Chris navarrete,

Márquez, Danzón Danzón No. lalo, Cello Concerto, Mvt. 1 1 Márquez, No.2 |2Lalo, | Cello Concerto, Mvt. neruda,www.northstatesymphony.org Trumpet Concerto | Copland, Copland, Symphony No. 3 3 Neruda, Trumpet Concerto | Symphony No. www.northstatesymphony.org www.northstatesymphony.org

Featured painting by Shane Grammer Featured painting by Shane Grammer

CHICO CONCERT SPONSORS

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Chris Navarrete: Rupert and Joan McDowell; Dennis Letcher and Victoria Simone-Letcher Kira Weiss: CSU, Chico Alumni Association

DINE AT CHILI’S ON NOV. 12 AND SUPPORT THE SYMPHONY. See www.northstatesymphony.org for details. November 7, 2013

CN&R 33


Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

ART CRIME By now, Arts DEVO’s fellow arts lovers have probably heard

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER. BUT ENOUGH ABOUT US.

ARTS DEVO

WHO ARE YOU? TAKE OUR ONLINE SURVEY AND YOU COULD WIN! 6 lucky respondents will win either: * A $50 gift certificate to The Bookstore * A free pass to the movies Take the survey online at www.research.net/s/013547 or scan the QR code with your smart phone.

the big art-world news: Some jerk has vandalized the beautiful Chico News & Review newspaper box that local artist Seamonster painted for us. The box—which sits in front of CN&R HQ—now features the words “rape culture” across the chest of the blue-lipped protector of our weekly expression of free speech. I hate tagging. It’s usually just anonymous artless doodles or hastily scribbled words that mess up something that was way more interesting looking before the uninvited collaboration. Of course, by saying anything about his particular tag, I give this Sharpie-wielding activist way more exposure than he or she deserves, but in the interest of considering all forms of expression and then commenting, I’ve put it here for discussion. My take? It’s a wrongheaded attempt at social comment that makes the simTag, you’re a jerk. pleminded implication that merely showing female breasts is objectification (it should be noted that, the breasts in the painting are behind a thin tank top). I don’t believe that to be true, but I do think that being told to cover up painted breasts is pretty damn repressive.

SPEAKING OF ART NAZIS In really important art news that you likely

have heard, it was announced this week that a huge collection of fine-art paintings and prints stolen by Nazis during World War II has been found in Munich, Germany, according to a story first reported in the German magazine Focus. The apartment where the stash of nearly 1,400 works by the likes of Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and many others was uncovered was home to Cornelius Gurlitt, son of a Nazi-employed art broker named Hildebrand Gurlitt. The works, many of which had been assumed destroyed during the war, are estimated to be worth approximately $1.4 billion. Some of the pieces found were previously unknown paintings by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. As incredible and infuriating as the story is, the most amazing thing might be the fact that the discovery is likely only “the tip of the iceberg,” according to Robert Edsel, author of The Monuments Men. Edsel’s book about the efforts of the Allies’ Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives program to protect European art from the Nazis during WWII has been made into a movie (directed by George Clooney, and starring Clooney, John Goodman, Bill Murray and Matt Damon) coming out in February. In an interview in the Los Angeles Times, Edsel said that “there are still hundreds of thousands of missing cultural objects” looted by Nazis. His hope is that the film will raise awareness of the lost treasures, and he is working with the filmmakers on a project that, as the story puts it, “will engage the public in helping to expedite the recovery of still-missing artworks.”

DEVOtions

• Pageant Theatre reminder: The local art-house theater’s Go Digital or Go Dark crowdfunding campaign begins this week. Starting Friday, visit www.pageantchico.com and follow the link to the Indiegogo page and a nifty video featuring a song about The Pageant by Jonathan Richman: “The obtuse and the strange/ It has the whole range.”

Jonathan says: Help The Pageant!

• Kage will set you free: The Kyle Gass Band is coming to Chico! One half of the cock-rocking comedy duo Tenacious D will be hitting The Maltese Bar & Tap Room stage with his band on Nov. 20, and locals the Pageant Dads will be opening. Presale has already begun and more than half the 100 tickets have sold in less than a week. Go to www.brownpaper tickets.com and reserve your spot while you can. 34 CN&R November 7, 2013


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING

Love’s ReAL estAte Aunt Ruthie

Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

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Gated Communities • Canyon Oaks, w/ stunning view! 3 bd/3 ba, 3,381 sq ft, private. $699,000 • Minutes from Chico, 3 bd/2.5 ba, 2,782 sq ft w/ lot’s of custom features! $419,000 • Spanish Garden, Canyon view w/ access to Butte Creek, 2,642 sq ft upgrades! $565,000

Homes With Land

“We love the hardwood floors, Aunt Ruthie,” said Julie, “and isn’t the kitchen cute?”

• 4.89 ACS, Forest Ranch, custom 4 bd/3 ba, 2,168 sq ft $329,000 • 18 ACS, Forest Ranch, 3 bd/1 ba, 1,550 sq ft, cash only $225,000 • 12.64 ACS, Chico w/ $$ Walnuts, 5 bd/3 ba, 3,221 sq ft $699,000 • 1.66 ACS Chico, stunning 3 bd/4 ba, 2 offices, 3,930 sq ft $668,000

Aunt Ruthie stumped around the place wagging her head, muttering “No; no; no.” We cancelled escrow that day.

My mentor, the wise old KDV, commiserated with me later. “Ah, yes, my son,” he said, “you’ve been done in by the family deal-killer syndrome. That, my friend, is a force for which we in the sales world have no defense. Matters of blood relations are stronger than the surging tides, babe.” Two months later, it was time again to implement the Aunt Ruthie Factor. Randy and Julie fell in love with another home, a neglected two-story Queen Ann Victorian. We were silent as Aunt Ruthie inspected. Julie clasped her hands under her chin. Aunt Ruthie stood in the center of the empty living room, and a shadow appeared from the carpet, rising up her legs. I noticed the same shadow crawling up my own legs; and Randy’s; and Julie’s. “FLEAS!” A passerby on the street might have perceived us as an odd Irish step-dancing quartet, except without timing or syncopation, as we highstepped out the front door and pranced about the front yard. “Should I draft the cancellation-of-sale papers?” I asked. Aunt Ruthie wagged her head. “No; no; no,” she said. Julie said, “So that means yes? Yes! Oh yes!” The Aunt Ruthie Factor works in strange ways.

Doug LovE is Sales Manager at Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Email escrowgo@aol.com or call 530.680.0817

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 • www.ChicoListings.com chiconativ@aol.com • License #01177950

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com TOTALLY REMODELED

new roof, carpet, paint

$219,000

Large yard, hardwood floor, dual pane windows & many other upgrades

Brandon Siewert Realtor

brandonsiewert.com • 828-4597

This property has been completely transformed - looks brand new! 4 spacious bedrooms with 2 updated bathrooms, all on over half an acre with a pool. Come and take a look! 4338 Keith Lane.

$179,000

Just listed 3 bed/2 ba

ADDRESS

$219,500!

GARRETT FRENCH

530-228-1305

GarrettFrenchHomes.com Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in Chico, Orland, Willows.

Homes Sold Last Week 9 Zink Rd 420 B St 57 Temperance Way 714 Burnt Ranch Way 1452 Creekhaven Pl 438 Black Oak Dr 3018 Coach Lite Dr 1004 Bryant Ave 356 St Augustine Dr 27 Via Verona Cir 1698 Oak Vista Ave 655 E 5th St

1777 E 8th St 4 bed 2 bath near the Park

ASKING PRICE: $434,000

Call & see today!

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

SOLD IN 4 DAYS multiple offers!

NEW LISTING!

Charming Home

The market is still moving

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Cell 530.519.6333 • emmettjacobi.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Berry Creek Biggs Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$125,000 $107,000 $409,000 $350,000 $340,000 $335,000 $325,000 $325,000 $315,000 $291,000 $284,000 $280,000

3/ 2 4/ 1 4/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 3 3/ 1.5 3/ 2 4/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 1.5 2/ 1

1456 2054 1910 1859 2814 1846 1679 1760 1781 1841 1707 1149

8 Noyo Ct 576 El Reno Dr 134 W 12th St 1113 Olive St 1267 Calla Ln 27 Sierra Lakeside Ln 2719 Monterey St 1014 Rushmore Ave 1319 W Sacramento Ave 2127 Moyer Way 837 Glenn St 2802 Ceres Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$258,000 $230,000 $229,000 $225,000 $225,000 $225,000 $220,000 $216,000 $200,000 $195,000 $190,000 $175,000

3/ 1.5 3/ 1.5 2/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 1 2/ 2 4/ 1.5 3/ 2 3/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 1.5

1364 1259 1024 1535 1196 1146 1501 1170 1568 1342 1140 1039

November 7, 2013

CN&R 35


Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Presents:

A Humane society Fundraiser

Bringing You To

Paradise 2BR/2BA + Bonus Pond, Privacy, 3AC

1360 SF+/$175,000 Ad #508

3BR/2BA + Large Garage 1504 Fox Rd.

$180,000 Ad #540

Great 3BR/2.5BA Next to Golf Course

$187,000 Ad #544

10BR/5BA Spectacular Opportunity

6805 SF+/$299,000 Ad #562

Saturday November 9th, 2013 11am – 2pm 1101 El Monte Ave. Chico, Ca Century 21, Jeffries Lydon is proud to partner with the Butte Humane Society for a fundraiser!

WE Will BE ACCEptiNg:

Monetary donations, canned cat & dog food, litter pans & lit-ter, heavy-duty dog chew toys, adjustable fabric & nylon dog & cat collars, dry dog & cat food (Science Diet or Compara-ble), easy walk harnesses, puppy potty pads, & disposable cardboard scratching pads. Please come by and support this very worthy cause!

house Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sun. 2-4

155 Spanish Gardens (X St: Skyway) 4 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 2,642 Sq.Ft. $565,000 Emmett Jacobi 519-6333

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 2-4 885 Lorinda Ln (X St: Cohassett) 3 Bd / 1 Ba, 1,288 Sq.Ft. $239,900 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 11-1

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 11-1 388 Newport Dr (X St. Prarie) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 2,116 Sq.Ft. $394,000 Paul Champlin 828-2902 Heather DeLuca 228-1480

562 White Ave (X St: Tom Polk) 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 1,004 Sq.Ft. $179,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sun. 2-4

555 Vallombrosa Ave #85 (X St: Mangrove) Sat. 2-4 1 Bd, 1 Ba, 702 Sq.Ft. 956 Lupin Ave (X St: Cohasset) $124,900 4 Bd / 3.5 Ba, 1,950 Sq.Ft. Paul Champlin 828-2902 $299,950 Mark Reaman 228-2229

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1

4216 Rancho Road (X St. Garner) 3 Bd / 1.5 Ba, 1558 Sq.Ft. $299,500 Mark Reaman 228-2229

5350 Skyway, Paradise

(530) 872-7653

Paradise@C21SelectGroup.com www.C21Skyway.com 1-800-785-7654

REDUCED!!!

2 2 bed 2 bath,1386 sq ft, single story condo located in well kept condominium community in Chico

G

PENDIN

Pool! 3/2 Great Neighborhood. Why pay rent when you can purchase for your student? $247,500

$183,000

Dana W. Miller

Contact me for similar listings

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

open

KATHY KELLY 530-570-7403

DRE# 01860319

KathyKellyC21@gmail.com

• Very nice 4 bd/3 ba, 2,233 sq ft, Cal Park. $380,000 • Bidwell Park, 2 bd/1 ba, (1,404 sq ft) plus 1 bd/1 ba, 500 sq ft! $299,900 • Beautiful Kitchen, large yard, cul de sac, 2 bd/2 ba, office space, 1,126 sq ft $230k • Priced below others! Amber Grove 3 bd plus den, 2 th, 1,966 sq ft $334,900 • Heritage Oaks, beautiful 3bd/2ba, 1,284 sq ft on cul de sac $255,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

MOVE IN READY Two master suites on opposite sides of home! In addition this home features a large open living room, 2 more bedrooms and a good sized back yard. Newer windows, roof, HVAC system and city sewer hookup make this a complete package.

MARK REAMAN 530-228-2229

Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

Jeffries Lydon

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of October 21, 2013 – October 25, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 2573 El Paso Way 2853 Pennyroyal Dr 9 Shimmering Oak Ct 9741 Midway 264 Bamford Way 14932 Woodland Park Dr 920 Vermont St 6564 Drake Ct 6283 Hartnell Ct 6360 Glendale Dr 14056 Pineland Cir 1801 Feather Ave 36 CN&R November 7, 2013

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

Chico Chico Chico Durham Forbestown Forest Ranch Gridley Magalia Magalia Magalia Magalia Oroville

$154,000 $128,000 $125,000 $420,000 $224,000 $559,000 $122,000 $212,000 $185,000 $130,000 $120,000 $214,000

3/ 2 2/ 1.5 5/ 3.5 4/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2.5 2/ 1.5 3/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 2

1227 904 2719 2239 1560 3053 1192 1856 1566 1600 1104 1521

64 Pacific Heights Dr 116 Grand Ave 1255 Bonnie Ln 2262 Las Plumas Ave 3975 Hildale Ave 30 Regent Loop 3455 Hwy 70 6635 Quail Way 6252 Posey Ln 1860 Drendel Cir 6319 Lucky John Rd 5688 Woodglen Dr

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Palermo Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$145,000 $140,000 $129,000 $119,000 $115,000 $115,000 $135,000 $265,000 $169,000 $163,000 $135,000 $120,000

4/ 1.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 3 4/ 1.5 2/ 1 2/ 2 2/ 1 3/ 1 2/ 1 2/ 1

1475 1175 1140 1423 2629 1266 1176 1313 1487 1357 882 1173


Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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an Individual. Signed: ARTHUR V MARTINEZ Dated: October 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001336 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LUNATIC FRINGE BELLY DANCE ESSENTIALS at 163 E. Third St. Chico, CA 95928. MICHELLE PALOMA-HUDKINS 2610 Oro Quincy Hwy Oroville, CA 95966. Signed: M. PALOMA HUDKINS Dated: October 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001320 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TONY’S SMOKE SHOP at 175 Cohasset Road, Suite 2 Chico, CA 95926 MTANIOUS SAMAAN 1749 Eaton Road #39 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MTANIOUS SAMAAN Dated: October 7, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001293 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GET SHARP at 635 Riverview Ct Oroville, CA 95966. RUSSELL LOOMIS FELDER 635 Riverview Ct Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RUSSELL FELDER Dated: October 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001319 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE BLACK KETTLE at 2659 Monterey St Chico, CA 95973. KAMI GRIMES 2659 Monterey St Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAMI GRIMES Dated: October 8, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001302 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS A Beautiful Massage

a Unincorporated Association. Signed: LYNN FLOWERS Dated: October 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001315 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PARADISE COMMUNITY WELLNESS CONNECTION at 8093 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. PARADISE COMMUNITY WELLNESS CONNECTION P.O. Box 1488 Paradise, CA 95967. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LYNN COSTA, TREASURER Dated: September 25, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001263 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELIZABETH’S at 225 Main St Chico, CA 95928. MEGAN GRANDFIELD 1286 Howard Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MEGAN GRANDFIELD Dated: October 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-00001318 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BLOOM at 1163 East Avenue, Suite 103 Chico, CA 95926. SUNNY FITZWATER 1730 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95928. LYNN FLOWERS 130 Secluded Oaks Ct Chico, CA 95928. MOLLIE HOUSTON 75 Plumwood Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by

FITITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the ficti-­ tious business name: THE BLACK KETTLE at 2727 Monterey Street Chico, CA 95973. KAMI GRIMES 2659 Monterey Street Chico, CA 95973. LORI RICE 2727 Monterey Street Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a General Part-­ nership. Signed: KAMI GRIMES Dated: October 8, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0001661 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ENLOE NEUROSURGICAL AND SPINE CLINIC at 251 Cohasset Road, Suite 370 Chico, CA 95926. ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER 1531 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MYRON E. MACHULA, VP/CFO Dated: August 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001121 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WORK OF ART PHOTOGRAPHY at 4139 Hildale Ave Oroville, CA 95966. ARTHUR V MARTINEZ 4139 Hildale Ave Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: RED TAVERN at 1250 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. MIKELL, INC 901 Bruce Road Suite #270 Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHAEL VADNEY, PRESIDENT Dated: October 21, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0001072 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BUDCO, HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INC at 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INCORPORATED 7 Laguna Point Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: GARY NOTTINGHAM, PRESIDENT Dated: October 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001350 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LONE WOLF ATTORNEY SERVICE at 135 W. 22nd St. Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT DAVID QUAM 135 W.22nd St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT QUAM Dated: October 24, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001374 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTER FETAL ALCOHOL SYNDROME DISORDERS at 7 Commerce Court #130 Chico, CA 95928 BUTTE COUNTY CHILD ABUSE COUNCIL P.O. Box 569 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARGIE RUEGGER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dated: October 30, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001400 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LASER EXPRESSIONS, WOOD UNIQUE at 609 Entler Ave Suite 3 Chico,

CA 95928. NORTHEASTERN SCALE MODELS INCORPORATED 609 Entler Ave Suite 3 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: NANCY E. ORIOL, CLERK Dated: October 18, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001356 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOS ARCOS RESTAURANT at 2454 Notre Dame Blvd #100 Chico, CA 95928. TERESA MARTINEZ 2580 Floral Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERESA MARTINEZ Dated: October 2, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001283 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COALITION OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA RECOVERY RESIDENCES at 40 Landing Circle Chico, CA 95973. MICHAEL ANDERSON 3114 Myers St Oroville, CA 95966. JENNIFER CARVALHO 40 Landing Circle Chico, CA 95973. STACY JOHNSON 2697 White Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: STACY JOHNSON Dated: October 25, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001372 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PERFORMANCE AUTO SERVICE at 906 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SHAWN SMITH 652 Luds Way Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAWN SMITH Dated: September 23, 2013 FBN number: 2013-0001252 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO WEBSITES, CHICOWEBSITES.COM, ECHICO, ECHICO.COM, NORCAL WEBSITES, NORCALWEBSITES.COM at P.O. Box 795 Chico, CA 95927. DANIEL LUTGE 1265 E. 9TH St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL LUTGE Dated: November 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001405 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOUNGE A-GOGO at 1224 Spruce Avenue Chico, CA 95926. CAROLYN S ENGSTROM 1224 Spruce Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAROLYN S. ENGSTROM Dated: November 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001406 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013

NOTICES NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA BUTTE COUNTY Case Number: PR-40849 (PROBATE CODE SECTION 19040) In re: THE JAMES CARTER 2012 TRUST Created February 12, 2012, by JAMES CRAIG CARTER, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named decedent that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, California, and mail or deliver a copy to Jenny C. Marr, as trustee of the trust dated February 12, 2012, of which the Decedent was the settlor, c/o Richard S. Matson, Attorney at Law, 1342 The Esplanade, Suite A, Chico, California 95926, within the later of 4 months after October 31, 2013, or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code Section 19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Dated: October 30, 2013 Richard S. Matson Attorney for JENNY C. MARR, TRUSTEE Published: November 7,14,21, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE NANCY SUSAN TAYLOR, AKA NANCY S. TAYLOR, AKA NANCY TAYLOR To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NANCY SUSAN TAYLOR AKA, NANCY S. TAYLOR, AKA NANCY TAYLOR A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARY E. MCCLINTOCK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: MARY E. MCCLINTOCK personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representa-­ tive to take many actions with-­ out obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consent-­ ed to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 21, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept:McLean Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the

decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal repre-­ sentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-­ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and le-­ gal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40842 Attorney for Petitioner: Jane E. Stansell 901 Bruce Road, Suite 170 Chico, CA 95928 Published: October 31, November 7,14, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CHRISTINE ELIZABETH COX ADAMS, AKA CHRISTINE C. ADAMS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHRISTINE ELIZABETH COX ADAMS, AKA CHRISTINE C. ADAMS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BARBARA COX in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: BARBARA COX personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representa-­ tive to take many actions with-­ out obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consent-­ ed to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 5, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept:TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal repre-­ sentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in

classifieds

CONTINUED ON 38

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

➡ November 7, 2013

CN&R 37


section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-­ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and le-­ gal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40848 Petitioner: Barbara Cox 445 Sacramento Street Rio Vista, CA 94571-1600 Published: November 7,14,21, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KRISTEN ANN DRISH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KRISTEN ANN DRISH Proposed name: SOPHIA ANN DRISH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and

this Legal Notice continues

must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 22, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: October 03, 2013 Case Number: 160576 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013

Dated: October 09, 2013 Case Number: 160578 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner YANTI IBRAHIM filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: YANTI IBRAHIM, MICHAEL LEUICA BEATRICE IGNACIA LEUICA JENNIFER RAPPORT Proposed name: JANE WALTER MICHAEL WALTER BEATRICE IGNACIA WALTER JENNIFER BIRGITA WALTER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 20, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: October 18, 2013 Case Number: 160650 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NIKKI JO SCHLAISHUNT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NIKKI JO SCHLAISHUNT Proposed name: NIKKI JO HUNT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 6, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN

this Legal Notice continues

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

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TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JAIMIE MICHELLE STEINBAUER WHITE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAIMIE MICHELLE STEINBAUER WHITE Proposed name: JAMIE MICHELLE WHITE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 20, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: October 23, 2013 Case Number: 160672 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2013

SUMMONS

(form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make or-­ ders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Avenue Chico, CA 95926. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Joseph L. Selby #249546 Law Office of Leverenz, Ferris & Selby 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928 Signed: Kimberly Flener, T. MORGAN Dated: May 24, 2013 Case Number: 159641 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT CASEY CAULFIELD, DORINDA A CAULFIELD AKA DORIE CAULFIELD You are being sued by plaintiff: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT VALERIE R UNDERWOOD You are being sued by plaintiff: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123)

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make or-­ ders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Avenue Chico, CA 95926. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Joseph L. Selby #249546 Law Office of Leverenz, Ferris & Selby 515 Wall Street Chico, CA 95928 Signed: Kimberly Flener, M. McCall Dated: May 17, 2013 Case Number: 159541 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT FRANCIS BUZBEE AND DOES 1-20 You are being sued by plaintiff: GREGORY KENDALL You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy

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served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make or-­ ders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Avenue Chico, CA 95926. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: ANDREW MARRER (BAR # 210139) Law Office of Andrew Marrer, 166 Cohasset Road, Suite 1, Chico, CA 95926. Signed: Kimberly Flener, K. DOANE Dated: February 26, 2013 Case Number: 159004 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CRYSTYL WILLIAMS-ARCILLA AND THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS TO ROBERT LEE WILLIAMS, DECEASED AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH OR UNDER SUCH DECEDENT AND DOES 1-20 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BILLY DURBIN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30

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days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: James E. Reed P.O. Box 857 Fall River Mills, CA 96028. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158601 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2013

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): I’m

not a big fan of fear. It gets far more attention than it deserves. The media and entertainment industries practically worship it, and many of us allow ourselves to be riddled with toxic amounts of the stuff. Having said that, though, I do want to put in a good word for fear. Now and then, it keeps us from doing stupid things. It prods us to be wiser and act with more integrity. It forces us to see the truth when we might prefer to wallow in delusion. Now is one of those times for you, Aries. Thank your fear for helping to wake you up.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Poetry might be defined as the clear expression of mixed feelings,” wrote W.H. Auden. If that’s true, then your job is to be a poet right now. You seem to be awash in a hubbub of paradoxical inclinations, complete with conflicting desires and mismatched truths. There’s no shame or blame in that. But you do have a responsibility to communicate your complexity with honesty and precision. If you can manage that, people will treat you with affection and give you extra slack. They might even thank you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What can

you do to improve your flow? Are there obstructions in your environment that keep you from having a more fluid rhythm? Do you harbor negative beliefs that make it harder for life to bestow its natural blessings on you? Now is the time to take care of glitches like these, Gemini. You have more power than usual to eliminate constrictions and dissolve fixations. Your intuition will be strong when you use it to drum up graceful luck for your personal use. Be aggressive. Be bold. Be lyrical. It’s high time for you to slip into a smooth groove.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the

beginning of his novel The White Castle, Orhan Pamuk offers this meditation [[[from Marcel Proust?]]]: “To imagine that a person who intrigues us has access to a way of life unknown and all the more attractive for its mystery, to believe that we will begin to live only through the love of that person¡ªwhat else is this but the birth of great passion?” How do you respond to this provocative statement, Cancerian? Here are my thoughts: On the one hand, maybe it’s not healthy for you to fantasize that a special someone can give you what you can’t give yourself. On the other hand, believing this is true may inspire you to take an intriguing risk that would catalyze invigorating transformations. Which is it? Now is a good time to ruminate on these matters.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Canadians Tommy

Larkin and Stephen Goosney are biological brothers, but they were adopted by different families when they were young. But once they began looking for each other, it didn’t take long to be reunited. Nor did they have to travel far to celebrate. It turns out that they were living across the street from each other in the same small town in Newfoundland. I foresee a metaphorically similar experience in your future, Leo. When you get reconnected to your past, you will find that it has been closer than you realized.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This will be an

excellent week for you to talk with yourself— or rather, with yourselves. I’m envisioning indepth conversations between your inner saint and your inner evil twin, between the hard worker and the lover of creature comforts, between the eager-to-please servant of the greater good and the self-sufficient smarty who’s dedicated to personal success. I think that in at least some of these confabs, you should speak every word out loud. You should gesture with your hands and express colorful body language. It’s prime time for your different sub-personalities to get to know each other better.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the coming

week, you will probably have more luck than usual if you play keno, craps, blackjack, bingo

Driving with scissors

by Rob Brezsny or roulette. People who owe you money will be inclined to pay you back, so you might want to give them a nudge. I won’t be surprised if you find a $20 bill lying on the sidewalk, or if a store cashier accidentally gives you way too much change. In the wake of these tendencies, your main assignment is to be alert for opportunities to increase your cash flow. For example, if you wake up in the middle of the night with an idea for boosting your financial fortunes, I hope you will have a pen and notebook by the bed to write it down.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Not for all the whiskey in heaven,” begins a poem by Charles Bernstein. “Not for all the flies in Vermont / Not for all the tears in the basement / Not for a million trips to Mars / ¡K Not for all the fire in hell / Not for all the blue in the sky.” Can you guess what he’s driving at? Those are the things he will gladly do without in order to serve his passion. “No, never, I’ll never stop loving you,” he concludes. According to my understanding of your astrological cycle, Scorpio, now is a good time for you to make a comparable pledge. What is the one passion you promise to devote yourself to above all others? And what are you willing to live without in order to focus on that passion? Be extravagant, pure, wild and explicit. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Dmitri Razumikhin is a character in Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel Crime and Punishment. His surname is derived from the Russian word for “reason.” At one point, he makes a drunken speech that includes these observations: “It’s by talking nonsense that one gets to the truth! ¡K Not one single truth has ever been arrived at without people first having talked a dozen reams of nonsense, even ten dozen reams of it.” Let’s make this a centerpiece of your current strategy, Sagittarius. Just assume that in order to ferret out the core insights that will fuel your next transformations, you may need to speak and hear a lot of babble.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): At the

2013 Grammy Awards, actor Neil Patrick Harris introduced the band Fun. this way: “As legendary gangster-rap icon Katharine Hepburn once said, ‘If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun.’” Everything about that vignette is a template for the approach you can use now with great success. You should gravitate toward festive events and convivial gatherings. Whenever possible, you should sponsor, activate and pave the way for fun. Toward that end, it’s totally permissible for you to tell amusing stories that aren’t exactly factual and that bend the rules not quite to the breaking point.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Some

spiritual traditions regard the ego as a bad thing. They imply it’s the source of suffering¡ªa chronically infected pustule that must be regularly lanced and drained. I understand this argument. The ego has probably been the single most destructive force in the history of civilization. But I also think it’s our sacred duty to redeem and rehabilitate it. After all, we often need our egos in order to get important things done. Our egos give us the confidence to push through difficulties. They motivate us to work hard to achieve our dreams. Your assignment, Aquarius, is to beautify your ego as you strengthen it. Build your self-esteem without stirring up arrogance. Love yourself brilliantly, not neurotically. Express your talents in ways that stimulate others to express their talents.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Dr. Seuss

wrote his children’s books in English, but he liked to stretch the limits of his native tongue. “You’ll be surprised what there is to be found once you go beyond ‘Z’ and start poking around,” he said. One of the extra letters he found out there was “yuzz,” which he used to spell the made-up word “yuzz-ama-tuzz.” I recommend that you take after Seuss¡ªnot only in the way you speak, but also in the ways you work, play, love, dream and seek adventure. It’s time to explore the territory beyond your comfort zone.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

story and photo by

Vic Cantu

“Y go 2 the shop when the shop can come to u?” That’s the tagline for The Barber Mobile, the 30-foot RV that 47-year-old Mike Foster (aka “Mike the Barber,” formerly with In the Cut Hair & Nail Salon) customized into his personal mobile barbershop. The award-winning barber who specializes in precisely cut hair designs— stars, sports-team logos, faces—currently works weekdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is on call weekends 24/7. He parks at various locations around Chico, Oroville and Corning. Find “The Barber Mobile” on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the day’s location. Call 591-7581 for an appointment.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of November 7, 2013

Why go “mobile”? I’ve been cutting hair 14 years. Not a lot of people have the luxury of getting around, like seniors, single moms, disabled vets, even harried businessmen. So I thought it would be great to come to them or their event. I’ve also cut the hair of well-known musicians and artists coming through town.

Who were some of your celebrity clients? I’ve done Snoop Dogg and the entire Dogg Pound—Warren G, Daz and Kurupt. Many have heard of me since I won ninth place for design cuts at the Las Vegas Super Barber Battle.

What do like best about your job? I get instant satisfaction when the customer likes my work. Plus, I meet really good people. Everyone has tales and a past, and since I’m a good listener, people can get things off their chest to get a release.

What kind of cuts do you give? I’m a perfectionist, and do everything from standard to fancy color designs. My prices are from $10 to $30. Either way, it only takes about 15 minutes. A little more if you want me to do a face pattern. For designs, you can bring in a photo, drawing or just describe it to me. I talk to you and get a good feel for your personality. The designs stay visible for one-and-a-half to two weeks depending on how fast your hair grows. The color ones last until you shampoo.

Did you design the shop’s cool waiting room? I revamped it with couches, a flat-screen TV and surround-sound stereo. It’s also got a full bath. But I don’t allow drinking. I want people to relax, but I don’t want it to be a hangout. Plus, detail precision cuts can be appreciated only when you’re sober.

What are your plans for the business? I’ll soon start a contest where customers post their photos on my Facebook, Twitter and Instagram sites. The one who gets the most “likes” gets their next cut free. I’d also like to franchise one for women’s hair, nails and waxing.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Surrender When I try to write From the Edge the challenge for a long time now has been to think of something to write about that might interest me long enough to fill my box on the back page, the catch being that the something not have anything to do with Janice Lee Porter, nor my sorry ass since she vanished and left that corpse in our bed. I could write about my grief and mourning at any moment—and I obviously have—but I didn’t figure anybody else would necessarily want to read about it. It turns out I was wrong, and I’m no longer surprised to hear now and then from yet another Gentle Reader who knows what I’m talking about from experience— apparently the only way to know—and appreciates me waving mine around in public. I love hearing from people who have managed to find something in what I’ve done that made sense to them and was maybe helpful, because otherwise I don’t know about any of that. In regard to From the Edge, my experience is generally like kissing a battleship—no detectable response. I never expected to be useful, and now that I know, I can be grateful for the gift, so I am. If I didn’t know I was useful, I wouldn’t be

grateful for it, and I love being grateful. I think spilling my guts in public like this has done wonders for my ego and its relegation to the outskirts of my psyche. Now that I’ve surrendered all hope of healthy self-esteem, I feel much better. I’ve accepted missing Janice one way and another forever, and I don’t think about whether I ought to be feeling and thinking something else that’d be better for me or the planet. Too damn bad. This is it now. My understanding is that grief is what we feel when we’ve been bereaved, and mourning is the expression of that grief. Now I mourn consciously, so as not to let that grief build up and fester. I go to an open-ended bereavement group that gets the occasional newbie, which gives the rest of us a chance to see how far we’ve come, sometimes imperceptibly until we see a freshly bereaved soul and remember that breathless pain and appreciate ourselves and what we’ve lived. The remnants of my Enloe bereavement group still meet for dinner once a month, and by now I’d miss them if we didn’t. We’re getting used to each other, which I like, because we’re good people. We also prefer good food, so there’s that, too. Next month we’re going Chinese. November 7, 2013

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