Page 1

THREE

CLAWS UP See REEL WORLD, page 28

BOOZE

BOUNDARIES See NEWSLINES, page 8

BACK IN

THE ROUND See ARTS FEATURE, page 24

EATING EQUINE?

BY MICHAEL MAGLIARI PAGE

See STREETALK, page 7 and GREENWAYS, page 12

20

Revealing a dark chapter in local history Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 36, Issue 49

Thursday, August 1, 2013


BEST PRICES sale! summer clearance

ON NEW SOLID WOOD CABINETS, GRANITE & QUARTZ

10 –50 % off

SAVE UP TO 40%

12 month same as cash financing

compared to our competition

• dining BEAUTIFUL SHOWROOM SOUTH END OF PARK AVE

Bring in your quote to see how much you’ll save!

NEW AGAIN

• futons • sofas • unfinished • beds • rugs

K I TC H E N & B AT H

2502 PARK AVENUE, CHICO • 899–2888

the esplanade & 8th ave, chico

All work done by Rico Construction, Lic #908865

891-4788 • esplanade-furniture.com

2 CN&R August 1, 2013


09

CN&R

10

OPINION

10

09

NEWSLINES

HEALTHLINES The Pulse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

32

09

COVER STORY ARTS & CULTURE

Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . 25 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

REAL ESTATE

35

CLASSIFIEDS

37

All Seasons Heating & Air Conditioning 10

Interns Ryan Coletti, Katherine Green, Melanie MacTavish Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Design Melissa Arendt, Mary Key, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2240 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

10

* $59 Tune Up * 10% OFF 10

all competitors coupons

Rolland Summers ~ President 20 years experience License #909575

530.899.7107

BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL Desktops $50 - $200 with 1 Year Guarantee Senior Specials Recycle + Reuse Center

General Manager Alec Binyon Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Sharon Conley, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Receptionist Kendra Gray Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

10

Your one stop 09 comfort shop

ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF INDIAN CHILDREN COURTESY OF COLUSA COUNTY LIBRARY DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Associate Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom Gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Projects Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Karen Laslo, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Jesse Mills, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Alan Sheckter, Robert Speer, Evan Tuchinsky

www.thepriya.com • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 09 - 9:30pm Lunch: 11am - 09 2:30pm • Dinner: 5:00pm

09

20

From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . 39

Editor Melissa Daugherty

10

2574 Esplanade • 530-899-1055

BACKSTOP

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

10 Lamb & Pakoras, 10 Shrimp, Vegetarian & Non-vegetarian Curries, Tandoori & Biriyani Entrees

09

10

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . 14 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . 15

09

09

27

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

GREENWAYS

Authentic South Indian Cuisine

09

Vol. 36, Issue 49 • August 1, 2013

Drop off your unwanted electronics (working or not) between 9am-5pm daily COMPUTERS FOR CLASSROOMS

530-895-4175

315 Huss Drive, Chico Open 9-5 Weekdays Seniors 65+ Open to low-income families such as Medi-Cal, Section 8 Housing, Healthy Families, Free or Reduced lunch qualified and SSDI. Cash and credit cards accepted. CFC is Microsoft Registered Refurbisher and R2-Certified Recycler. All hard drives are wiped completely or destroyed.

6

$

OFF

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE with this coupon. Not good with other offers. Exp. 8/15/13

OIL CHANGE ✓ 15 – Point Service Check ✓ Drive Through Service ✓ No Appointment Necessary 2399 Esplanade, Chico 891-8212 Located Directly in front of Bowling Alley. Entrance Off Esplanade

Open Monday – Saturday August 1, 2013

CN&R 3

10


Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

A detriment to business The community’s concerns about the restrictive conditions for

Getting a leg up on college Ego to college. Neither of my parents made it very far in school, and I knew that if I wanted a better life I would have ver since I was a little girl, it was my dream to

to get a degree. It wouldn’t be easy. I didn’t know anything about college or how I would pay, but I knew that I would accomplish it somehow. I’m 17 years old and have lived in Chico my entire life. I’m going into my senior year at Chico High, and I have lived my whole life with one goal: to get good grades in high school so I can get into the college of my by choice. Getting good grades Consuelo isn’t as easy as most people Cromwellthink, and it seemed like a Villegas daunting task until I was introduced to the Upward The author is a Bound Program at Chico 17-year-old Chico State. High School senior Getting into the program and Upward Bound included going through an participant who is arduous application process: planning to attend San Jose State seven pages to fill out, a University. teacher recommendation, and an essay. It took a long time, but it was the best decision I’ve ever made, and one that has changed my life. Upward Bound, which has been active at Chico State for 48 years, is a

federal program that helps low-income and/or first-generation potential college students reach their college dreams. The program provides year-round tutoring and a sixweek summer program that gives students a taste of college life. Since I joined Upward Bound at the end of my sophomore year, my grades have been significantly higher. And the summer program has allowed me to experience college life—including living on campus in the dorms—so that the transition from high school to higher education won’t be as difficult. The days were exhausting: four hours of classes on subjects such as physics, collegeprep, English and pre-calculus; three hours of work-study; and mandatory studying. All of those classes have helped prepare me for my senior year this fall. The summer program ended last week. It wasn’t easy, but that’s what makes it worth it. The program has made me realize that I can accomplish anything in life, as long as I work hard enough. I am certain that with the help of Upward Bound, I will be able to make my college dreams a reality. Ω

The program has made me realize that I can accomplish anything in life, as long as I work hard enough.

4 CN&R August 1, 2013

operations of new restaurants and bars recommended to the city by Chico Police Chief Kirk Trostle are understandable. No live music? No dancing? No karaoke? No disc jockeys or fashion shows? Attempting to control alcohol-fueled crime is an important undertaking for the Police Department, since such activity stretches the resources of the department, which is already low in officer-to-population ratio. But the conditions put forth by Trostle crack down on several activities that keep businesses vibrant, and have virtually nothing to do with crime (See “Contentious conditions,” Newslines, by Ken Smith). What will be accomplished through many of these restrictions is the reduction of the ways that future entrepreneurs can make their businesses viable and competitive. City leaders should consider the conditions very carefully, and listen to the people who will be most affected by them. In our view, alcohol-fueled bad behavior has little if anything to do with live music and dancing—or even karaoke. We can only figure that Trostle is offering such draconian restrictions to establish an extreme starting point for an eventual compromise on the matter. At least we hope that is where he is coming from. City leaders must also be careful in addressing the efforts of those who were already in the process of starting alcohol-selling establishments. A couple of them—The Winchester Goose and the B Street Oyster Co.—understandably believed that the licenses they procured would receive the city’s OK. They both began the process well before Trostle and the City Council began discussions on how to curb alcohol abuse. Further, neither establishment will cater to the “bucknight” crowd. The owners of these would-be businesses were hit with new restrictions after dumping hundreds of thousands of dollars into remodeling projects. Now they remain in limbo. Perhaps the biggest loser in this effort thus far is Charanjiv Singh, the owner of the Mangrove Mini Mart, located at Fifth and Mangrove avenues. The City Council rejected his application to sell beer and wine several months back. Singh is in debt to the tune of $400,000 on the work to upgrade the store. He purchased it back in January 2012, taking that risk in good faith that he’d have no pushback on selling alcohol. After all, the previous owner had done so for decades prior in this residential neighborhood. The store does not cater to college students. So, why deny Singh? The official reason is because the store is located in one of the city’s 24 census tracts—as established by the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control—that is currently oversaturated with off-site licenses. (There are seven, rather than the recommended four.) But if the city has too many off-sale alcohol stores, why was the national chain BevMo! welcomed with such open arms? Even City Manager Brian Nakamura—who has signed onto many of the restrictions recommended by Trostle—attended BevMo!’s grand opening. The new liquor outlet is located in a tract that calls for five such stores, but currently has 13. The decision to approve a license for that big-box store smacks of hypocrisy. The City Council has had the good sense recently to reconsider Singh’s license, and we would urge the council members to give him the OK. Ω

What will be accomplished through many of these restrictions is the reduction of the ways that future entrepreneurs can make their businesses viable and competitive.


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Don’t eat it I will never try horse meat. I write that statement without reservation. If you have no idea why I’m bringing this up, flip to pages 7 and 12 to find out. In this week’s Streettalk question, we asked local citizens whether they would feast on horse. And in our environmental section, Greenways, contributing writer Meredith J. Graham delves into the subject of equines being used for human consumption. It’s a timely topic, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture has recently given approval for horse slaughtering to a couple of companies, one in New Mexico and one in Iowa. It’s been nearly six years since the last horse-processing facility in the United States shut its doors. Many horse lovers—myself included—had hoped the ban would remain in place indefinitely. And yes, I am biased. I got my first horse, a blue roan named Ginger, when I was about 11 years old. I’d been asking for a horse for as long as I could remember, and found an opportunity to lease Ginger in partial exchange for mucking stalls. Ginger’s owners put her up for sale about a year into the lease, and I spent every penny I’d ever earned or saved from birthdays and Christmases to buy her. I can see where someone would call me hypocritical for being against horse slaughter since, try as I might to be vegetarian, I eat other meat, though much more occasionally these days. But as someone who knows horses, I believe there’s a greater argument for keeping the ban in place. For starters, horses are companion animals as well as work animals. But that’s an emotional argument, and there are other, more logical reasons that horses shouldn’t be killed for food. One of the main reasons is that horses, unlike other herd animals, do not react well to being crammed together in confined spaces. They become aggressive, often flailing about. Horses do not stand quietly as a stranger points a bolt gun to their head. I’ll leave out the goriest details, and just note that slaughterhouse horse skulls are evidence of the horrendous end to these magnificent creatures’ lives. From a purely economic standpoint, horses are a poor investment compared to cattle. They take a lot more feed while producing much less flesh. Finally, since horses aren’t raised for human consumption, they aren’t raised cleanly. That is, they are routinely given drugs, such as oral deworming medication, antibiotics and vaccines— making their flesh unfit to eat. When slaughter was legal years ago, a majority of the tainted meat was shipped out of the country. That practice must be banned. The first step is to tell U.S. representatives to support legislation such as the Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act, which would put a stop to slaughter in the States and also ban the transport of live animals intended for slaughterhouses in other countries. A ban on horse slaughter doesn’t solve the overpopulation of unwanted equines, and some will argue that using the animals for food is sustainable. But there has to be a better, more humane way to deal with the issue.

AFSP Suicide Prevention Walk

Saturday September 14 | Downtown Chico Plaza

Clarifying vets services Re “VA ineptitude no surprise” (Letters, by Mike Peters, July 25): Butte County Veterans Service Office is a different entity than the Veterans Administration (VA), and BCVSO cannot guarantee that veterans applying for benefits through the VA will be determined to be eligible for the assistance they request, nor can we assure that they receive benefits in a timely fashion. What the BCVSO does is assist veterans in submitting accurate and complete claims, making it more likely for their claim to be successful and awarded as rapidly as possible. Recently, we introduced the Veterans ID card program for Butte County Veterans; this provides a photo ID that certifies the honorable service of the veteran for discounts by local vendors. While we cannot address the particulars of Joe Grossman’s story, we can say that, in addition to our work with VA benefits, we always respond to phone calls from veterans, follow up with veterans who contact us, refer veterans to other organizations that provide services needed by veterans, collaborate with other agencies in efforts to better meet the needs of veterans, and advocate for the needs of individual veterans and veterans in general. Our office is at 2445 Carmichael Drive in Chico; phone number is (530) 891-2759. The Veterans Service Office can also be contacted at vso@buttecounty.net. HANNAH WILLIAMSON Butte County Veterans Service Officer

Outpatient clinic more expensive Re “Less paperwork, more care” (Healthlines, by Evan Tuchinsky, July 18): As one who has had personal experience with this new rip-off, I think something must be said. The Feather River Hospital-based outpatient clinics are taking advantage of some quirk in the Medicare billing practices to charge about twice what two of our local doctors charge for a patient visit. When I called the billing department to question this, I was told the separate charge was for something like administrative services. Luckily we have insurance and Medicare, so the end result is a $10 or $20 difference in what we pay out of pocket. I pity the patients who don’t have insurance. Still, there has to be some reason Feather River is showing a $150-plus charge for that same, or lesser, service that our heart specialist is charging $77 for. Could it be in the write-offs?

9Am Onsite Registration 10Am - NOON Program and 9-block Walk Register Online:

www.afsp.org/chicowalk

Know the Signs:

SuicideIsPreventable.org (A CALMHSA site) Ad sponsored by: AlexProject.org

If you need help now text ANSWER to 839863 or call 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

$10 off your next

FULL SERVICE GROOM Highest Yelp Ratings Cleanest shop in town Sr. & Veteran discounts available *Limit one coupon per household

Coature Pet Spa

1411 Mangrove, Chico 530-899-8433

A Great Way to Give Give to your favorite charities Aug. 1st - Sept. 30th

and the Community Foundation will add money to your donation www.nvcf.org/donate or Call 891-1150 x28

RICH MEYERS Oroville

Protect our park Bidwell Park in our new era of Civic Austerity: fire the maintenance people, lock the toilets, turn around and contract with a private porta-potty company. Lay off the park crew and pay a commercial tree service. Meanwhile, spotted in Lower Park this morning: the usual bottles and cans; a toiLETTERS continued on page 6

"Annie B's is our way of encouraging local giving to ensure the quality of life we cherish in the North State. Whether donors choose to give to the Arts or local education; public safety or healthcare - Annie B's is here to help!"

3120 Cohasset Rd. Ste. 8 Chico, CA 95973 530.891.1150 WWW.nvCf.oRG

Alexa valavanis, CEo north valley Community foundation

August 1, 2013

CN&R 5


continued from page 5

Samples of our low prices. Includes installation Chevy/GMC PU 73-87...$99 Honda Accord 4DR 90-97...$139 Honda Civic 4DR 92-00......$139 Chevy/GMC PU 88-92...$139 Toy Tacoma PU 95-02.........$119 Chevy/GMC PU 94-08...$149 Toy Tacoma PU 03-11.........$129 Chevy S10 PU 82-05.....$129 Toy Corolla 4DR 03-08....... $139 Dodge Ram PU 04-07....$145 Ford Taurus 4DR 96-07.......$139 Ford F-150 PU 80-96.....$129 Nissan PU 86.5-97..............$139 Ford F-150 PU 97-05.....$139 Nissan Frontier 99-13..........$139 Ford Ranger PU 93-11...$139

891-8988 2961 Hwy. 32 #14, Chico

· Custom Made Jewelry · Quality Restorations · One of a Kind Pieces 246 West 3rd St. • Downtown Chico 530-891-0880 • KirksJewelry.com

LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1975

Dr. Scott Mellum is pleased to announce Jennifer Hopkins RN, FNP

is accepting new patients After graduating from CSUC with her RN, Jennifer attended Sonoma State and received her FNP in 1989. In 1996, she returned to Chico to raise her three children and soon began working at Enloe. Jennifer says, “I am excited to help women in the Chico area by providing excellent medical care and an open ear to discuss issues in a confidential and comfortable atmosphere.”

101 West 2nd Ave, Chico | 5 3 0 . 8 9 4 . 8 9 4 4 | Most Insurance Accepted

CHICO MOVIE BLOOD DRIVE FRIDAY, August 2, 16, 23, 30 + tHuRsDAY, August 8

+

2 – 6 PM

Donate Blood with Shasta Blood Center and receive a FREE Pint of Baskin Robbins Ice Cream + a free movie pass. Blood mobile located in the Tinseltown Parking Lot.

To donate at our other locations please call for times and locations.

FREE MOVIE

Walk-ins welcome | Appts strongly recommended SHaSta BLOOD CEntER of Blood Centers of the Pacific

530.221.0600 | BloodCenters.org

Last ChanCe to enroLL!

Esthetician & Manicurist Training Esthetics classes begin November 5, 2013 Manicuring classes begin August 13, 2013 Limited Enrollment – Sign up now! Special Pricing – Call for information.

Open to the General Public Tuesday thru Saturday All work done by Students supervised by Licensed, Credentialed Instructors. Affilliated with Butte College. Financial Aid available to those who qualify through Butte College. Partnership in training with Dermalogica + OPI

6 CN&R August 1, 2013

(530) 343-4201 • 1356 Longfellow Ave.

Longfellow Shopping Center, across from In Motion Fitness

let-paper-bedecked alfresco latrine 10 feet from the creek; another squat-spot in the walnut orchard; and, happily, a gorgeous gray fox in a spectacular woodland—a reminder that maintaining the beauty of Bidwell Park is quality-of-life civic-boosterism 101. We’re turning our most attractive amenity into an attractive nuisance. One of the poorest cities in the nation, Newark, N.J., is spending millions on a project to beautify its riverfront, hoping to attract economic development. We’ve already got what other cities can only dream about. Let’s not squander it. Tell that to our new six-figure economic-development leader. ALICIA SPRINGER THOMAS Chico

Spare us your pity party Re “Injustice served” (Letters, by Jerry Harris, July 18): Response to Jerry Harris: While it is true there is racism in Chico, I feel your problems do not stem from racism, but from your inability to get along well with others. It’s unfortunate you chose to drag Anthony Peyton Porter into your negative fantasy. He is a wonderful human being who is writing from the heart regarding his grieving process, and through him many others are coming to terms with their own losses as well. It is also unfortunate that you took the bigger issue of the Trayvon Martin case and made it into a pity party for yourself. It is not all about you. I have been reading your letters for many years now, and this is an all-time low, even for you. LEE DENT III Chico

Consider universal care On July 30, the Medicare program marked its 48th birthday. Medicare is the national singlepayer health-insurance plan that covers the elderly and disabled. It was enacted to ensure financial stability as people aged. Today, Medicare guarantees health care to more than 50 million Americans. A study from the journal Health Affairs found that those enrolled in Medicare had fewer problems obtaining affordable medical care and higher satisfaction scores than those in private plans. They were also less likely to file bankruptcy due to medical expenses. Overall, Medicare patients report greater satisfaction and security than those enrolled in pri-

vate plans. A universal Medicarefor-all plan could guarantee these benefits to everyone. Learn more at www.pnhp.org. ALDEBRA SCHROLL Chico

City manager sing-a-long (Sung to the tune of “That’s Amore”) When the moon hits your eye Like a big piece of pie … Nak-a-mura When your city’s in the red And you can’t get ahead … Nak-a-mura When the parks all get closed If they’ll open no one knows … Nak-a-mura When you’re taxed to the max And the workers get the ax … Nak-a-mura When the assets all get sold And Chico’s out of gold … Nak-a-mura When the jobs all get cut You’ll find one that is not … Nak-a-mura Please feel free to add a verse It won’t even hurt your purse… That’s amore LINDA HATHORN Chico

An unbelievable gaffe I have flown Asiana Airlines numerous times. Specifically, once a month from September 1994 to December 1998. The service was always excellent, the departure and landing times were always accurate. I flew the Saturday “red eye” home many times. I am bemused to learn that KTVU Channel 2 (my hometown TV station as I was growing up) actually made the following gaffe listing the names of the flight crew for Asiana flight 214 as Captains Sum Ting Wong, Wi Tu Low, Ho Lee Fuk and Bang Ding Ow. First of all, how can the news anchor of a reputable local station get on the air and cite these names with a straight face without any idea of what she (Cleory I.M. Kluless) is talking about? None of the above captains’ surnames are Korean (in fact, I believe only Ho is a proper family name). The intern at the NTSB who released the flight-crew names to the media must be getting a lot of guffaws as at least one major media organization fell for it. Lesson learned? Make sure you know what you are talking about before getting in front of a news camera (Fox News and Rush Limbaugh will disagree, but oh well). MIKE WIEDEMAN Capay


Summer Necessities

Delicious inDian FooD in Downtown Chico

Would you ever try horse meat?

5.95 1 Entree Bowl $ 7.95 2 Entree Plate

$

Vegetarian & Vegan options available

downtown

chinatown

338 Broadway • Chico •

530.893.1794

Asked at the Almond Orchard Shopping Center

230 Salem Street, Chico | 530.891.3570 | www.GogiesCafe.Webs.com Lunch | Dinner | Dine In | Take Out | Catering | Tea | Coffee | Daily Specials

Add some spice to your life!

The Only Law Firm to be Voted Best of Chico • Reasonable Fees • Constant Communication • Aggressive, Responsive Representation • Free Initial Consultation

Michael Wiggins recycler

I have never eaten horse meat before. I like animals, so it would be difficult to eat a horse. … It would depend on how hungry I was. Horses are a very beautiful and spiritual animal. When you have animals, they become your best friend.

Paul Blanyer carpenter

I haven’t. But, yeah, I would. We eat cows and they are dumber. Horses have meat, but it might be a little tougher. It would be good if the horses were raised specifically for the meat.

Michael M. Rooney

I would rather ride the horse, but if it came down to it, I’d do it. The Indians used to do it. I once ate dog in the Philippines. I grew up on a farm and we used [horses] and they’re a companion.

Dylan Brownie unemployed

I wouldn’t eat a horse unless I was starving. They can get you farther traveling than eating [them].

Just Results • RooneyLawFirm.com

Style Your Summer with Savings

50% off Your Next Purchase

huge summer sale FRLEAESSES

SUNyGpurcha99se

Tommy Mark certified diesel mechanic

530-LAW-HELP • 530-529-4357

Supervising Attorney

Anika Burke

an $ 49 over

Bottle Opener SOfAlA

Reg $59 NOW $3999

eArtHkeePerS

Reg $119 NOW $6999

fun new StyleS

211 main street (next to plutos)

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL • Acupuncture • Tue & Wed 10am – Noon

Now open 7 days 740 Flume St 345-5566 | PinwheelChico.com

Men’s & Women’s $49.99

Overrun DMx

Reg $5499 NOW $2999

many StyleS as lOw as

29

$

99

100’S of StyleS 10 colorS color

new arrivalS arrival

women’S & kidS

Regular fee

15-35

100’S S of StyleS & colorS

mens, wOmens & kids

“HurriCAne”

Only $10! $ Pay what you can

SkylAke

Reg $89 NOW $5999

Heel & Sole SHoe S

708 Mangrove Ave. (in the Safeway Shopping Center) Chico 899-0780 Prices good thru 08/31/13 • While supplies last Open 7 Days, Mon.–Sat. 10am–8pm, Sun. 10am–6pm

We carry nArrOWS & WiDeS

www.heelandsoleshoes.com

August 1, 2013

CN&R 7


Left: Robert Rasner (left) and Will Brady (right) are awaiting City Council approval to open their respective businesses, The Winchester Goose and B Street Oyster Co. Below: Chico Police Chief Kirk Trostle (left) and Sgt. George Laver (right) took flak at a recent Internal Affairs Committee meeting over proposed conditions affecting new alcohol licenses.

THEY GOT POT

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office Special Enforcement Unit continued its efforts to weed illegal marijuana gardens out of the county with search-warrant busts on July 25 in Oroville and Berry Creek. The first was on Chinese Wall Road, where deputies located 510 plants, a butane honey oil lab, an unregistered handgun and two rifles. Michael Tran of El Cajon and Damien Grall of Orange were each arrested on charges of cultivation of marijuana and possession for sale, and being armed in the commission of a felony. Grall was also charged with manufacturing a controlled substance. The unit then went to Galen Ridge Road in Berry Creek, where deputies found 241 plants and arrested Jody Cook and Angelia Davey, both of Fortuna. Neither reportedly had a doctor’s recommendation for medical marijuana; each was charged with cultivation and possession for sale.

LOW WAGES IN BUTTE COUNTY

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported July 30 that the average weekly wage in Butte County ($748) doesn’t stack up so well to the state average ($1,186) or the national average ($1,000). There are 72,488 people working in Butte County, compared to 15,216,293 in the state and 133,726,808 nationwide. San Mateo County boasts the highest average weekly wage in California and the nation at $3,240, while Mariposa County’s $647 comes in the lowest, at least in the state. Glenn County has 8,189 employed people earning an average of $697 a week and Tehama County weighs in with 15,648 people earning a weekly average of $699. There are 16,255 workers in Yuba County earning an average of $830 a week and Shasta County has 59,111 workers getting paid an average of $759 per week. The numbers were tallied in December of 2012.

GREAT GIGS FOR ORION DESIGNER

A Chico State student is scheduled to attend and help cover two prominent journalism conferences, the university has announced. Senior Tercius Bufete (pictured), who’s worked on the student newspaper, The Orion, as a news designer and art director, is headed to New York City in late August and Atlanta, Ga., in October. His first gig will be the Asian American Journalists Association’s (AAJA) VOICES program, where he and 13 other students will work in a newsroom covering the three-day event, which is expected to attract 850 journalists, professors and news executives discussing matters important to Asian American journalists. In Atlanta, he’ll take part in the Online News Association’s (ONA) Student Newsroom to cover that group’s conference. The AAJA boasts more than 1,600 Asian American and Pacific Islander journalists, while the ONA is the world’s largest association of digital journalists. 8 CN&R August 1, 2013

Contentious conditions Proposed rules on new alcohol licenses fuel booze battle

Tto cope with community alcohol woes grew stickier this week as Chico Police Chief Kirk he already messy situation of how

Trostle’s proposed conditions on new alcohol licenses—dubbed “The Chico Conditions”—were released to story and the public. photos by Three sets of conditions Ken Smith addressing six separate types of alcohol licenses included such kens@ newsreview.com items as prohibiting “happy hours” and other cheap-drink promotions, requiring security for entertainment at some establishments, and banning entertainment outright at others. There are 32 conditions altogether for bars and tasting rooms (Type 42 and Type 48 licenses), 31 for off-sale markets (Types 20 and 21), and 17 for restaurants (Types 41 and 47). These proposed regulations were one topic addressed at a Learn more: pair of Internal Affairs CommitGo to tee (IAC) meetings on July 24 www.tinyurl.com/ offsalebooze, and 30 focused on alcoholwww.tinyurl.com/ licensing issues. Trostle introstdbooze and duced them at the July 24 IAC www.tinyurl.com/ meeting, but discussion was onsalebooze to tabled until the latter meeting so read the Chico Police that the public had an opportunity Department’s to view the conditions. “The reason for these recomproposed Police Standard mendations is we must have a Operating discussion about what we’re Conditions going to do to resolve the chalregarding all new alcohol lenges we have in our commuestablishments in nity,” Trostle said of the rules at the city of Chico. Tuesday’s meeting. “We have

kids dying. We had six kids die in eight months last year, and back in the ’90s we had four kids die in five years, and no one seems to care. “We have fights, destruction of property, sexual assaults; the list goes on and on, and we need to have a public discussion about what we’re going to do about it.” Trostle said the CPD spends upward of $1.5 million annually policing the small downtown and south-of-campus area (“an area where a lot of alcohol is sold,” he emphasized), compared to $260,000 for the rest of Chico. Trostle recently submitted a 500plus-page report to the IAC about the effects of alcohol abuse and public drunkenness on the community. As The Chico Conditions were continuously questioned at Tuesday’s meeting, he referred to the report, a copy of which sat in a large three-ring binder on the table before him. “The proposals come from the research,” he said. If Trostle’s reasoning for such a

strict set of rules were, as he said, to promote discussion, then he succeeded at Tuesday’s meeting. One particular rule regarding restaurants states: “There shall be no live entertainment of any type, including but not limited to live music, disc jockey, karaoke, topless entertainment, male or female performers or fashion shows.” This stipulation invoked the ire of the local music scene, heretofore largely unheard from in ongoing alcohol debates. Several people showed up for Tuesday’s meeting to address that

particular condition. “I keep having to ask the question, ‘Why is live music under attack in Chico?’” asked local musician and record-label owner Josh Indar, citing past city controversies like 2008’s disorderly-events-ordinance debacle and more recent arguments over a city noise ordinance passed last year. “What does live music and entertainment have to do with kids dying?” Indar continued. “What does it even have to do with alcohol? You’re banning dance floors in restaurants? This is nuts.” To some degree, City Councilwoman and IAC member Ann Schwab had empathy for the public’s concerns about rules regarding live entertainment at restaurants: “I’ve been to many dinners at nice establishments where there’s been music,” she said, mentioning her own fondness for the piano at Turandot North China Gourmet Cuisine. Schwab explained that Trostle’s report includes a section on restaurants that “morph” into nightclubs after 10 p.m., something the police department hopes to avoid in future establishments. She also reiterated that the conditions were merely proposals, and the basis for an ongoing discussion. “Our goal is to find which items are acceptable, which will help, which need to be modified, and which we can reject,” Schwab said. “We have to understand this is a lot of ideas, and we need to figure out which ones work for us as a community.” Much of the meeting was focused on how to continue the discussion. Councilman Sean Morgan, though he admitted


his dislike of continuing discussions, agreed that the conversation needs to go on, and entertained suggestions from the audience about how to make sure everyone’s voice was heard. Several audience members mentioned groups that are stakeholders in any decisions regarding alcohol licensing. Morgan summarized the list of people the public had suggested: “Musicians, bar owners, other merchants, people from the [Chico State] alcohol Task Force, downtown people, Respect Chico, the university, restaurant owners, hospitals and Butte College.” He handed the responsibility of gathering together such a group to Katie Simmons of Respect Chico, because the organization—a coalition of local bar and restaurant owners and business advocates formed as a proactive answer to Chico’s alcohol issues—has already been serving as a liaison between some of the parties mentioned. Simmons, president and CEO of the Chico Chamber of Commerce, was charged with reporting on her progress at the next scheduled IAC meeting at 8 p.m. on Aug. 14. Meanwhile, a trio of business

owners caught in the alcohol-licensing crossfire continue to await the City Council’s approval. B Street Oyster Co., The Winchester Goose, and Mangrove Mini Mart all began their applications for alcohol licenses before the current alcohol turmoil, and the council will vote on whether to approve their licenses next Tuesday (Aug. 6). In addition to that hurdle, the owner of The Winchester Goose, a would-be craft-beer bar, just learned that the Chico Municipal Code may include an item— related to past efforts to curb an overabundance of downtown drinking establishments—prohibiting the sale of alcohol at that property. Mark Wolfe, director of Chico’s Planning Services Department, announced his office recently discovered the Title 19 (the part of the municipal code dealing with land use and development) issue. He said sales of alcohol there are contingent on whether the business that occupied the address at 800 Broadway Street held a liquor license on Jan. 1, 1996. If not, the city would have to try to change the code to accommodate the bar, a process Wolfe said could begin in midAugust. “I’m already two months out and broke as it all gets,” said Robert Rasner, the business’ owner, in response to the latest development. “I can’t stress enough that I’m almost at the point where I’m not going to have the option to open this business in Chico, and I will never sink another dime in this town. “People sitting in this room now are trying to revitalize this town, and if I can’t get some kind of compromise or help or expediency in dealing with these issues, this is a lost cause for me and so many other people involved.” Ω

No stamp of approval

Rep. Doug LaMalfa talks about frivolous law suits during a press conference in Chico last month. FILE PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

Congressman takes heat for farm bill vote ep. Doug LaMalfa (R-Richvale) is one of R 14 Republican members of Congress sharply criticized last week by Rep. George

Miller (D-Martinez) for taking, among them, $7.2 million in crop subsidies over the last 10 years as provided by farm bills and then voting July 11 to adopt a farm bill that does not include funding for the nation’s food-stamp program. That program, now called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), was first folded into the farm bill that passed in 1973 as a way to attract urban political support to help pass legislation for rural parts of the country such as subsidized farm crops. Food stamps have been included in the farm bill in each of its seven updates since. In June, the House Agricultural Committee moved to increase farm subsidies and cut $20 billion from SNAP over the next 10 years. That was rejected by the full House of Representatives, who on July 11 passed H.R. 2642, the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management (FARRM) bill that eliminates all food-stamp funding. The bill passed on a vote of 216 to 208, with 196 Democrats joined by 12 Republicans in voting against it. Six Republicans and five Democrats did not vote. The effort to boot food stamps from the bill may have been signaled back in May, when a LaMalfasponsored amendment to the bill was passed. Apparently the rookie U.S. lawmaker, whose Richvale family rice farm has collected $5.1 million in subsidies since 1995, harbors suspicions about the food-stamp program and how it is administered. A press release announced the passage of the amend-

ment “that requires electronic fraud-prevention measures and eliminates bonus pay for signing up new recipients.” In the release LaMalfa says, “Modernizing the program to ensure that assistance goes only to those who need it means that we can spend less while continuing to help friends and neighbors who have fallen on hard times.” At a number of candidate debates

over the years, LaMalfa has used the same retort on those who question crop subsidies: “Don’t criticize farmers when your mouth is full.” Miller’s report on the farm-bill vote is titled “Pork Barrel Politics.” “It’s outrageous that some members of Congress feel it is OK to vote for their own taxpayer subsidies but against critical nutrition assistance for 47 million Americans,” Miller writes. “It’s bad enough that the House of Representatives didn’t pass a farm bill that included authorization for sorely needed nutrition programs, but to see members of Congress approving their own benefits at the expense of the working poor is a new low, even for this Congress.” And in a scathing column referencing the

SIFT|ER Depression hurts the bottom line A new survey indicates that depressionrelated absenteeism in the workforce is responsible for more than $23 billion in lost productivity. According to a Gallup poll of 237,615 full-time and 66,010 parttime workers, the roughly 18 million people who have had a diagnosis of depression at some point in their lives missed an estimated 68 million more days collectively than their non-depressed colleagues. Here’s a look at the rate of clinical depression among the U.S. workforce: % with depression at any point

% currently treated for depression

All workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.1% Full-time workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11%. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.6% Part-time workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.5%. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5%

report, the Los Angeles Times’ Michael Hiltzik writes that the vote by the 14 to not include food stamps “amounts to taking the food out of the mouths of children of the unemployed and working poor, while lining their own suit coats with bacon.” However, House Agriculture Committee Chairman Frank Lucas of Oklahoma had a far different take in a statement issued the day the bill was passed: “Today was an important step toward enacting a five-year farm bill this year that gives our farmers and ranchers certainty, provides regulatory relief to small businesses across the country, significantly reduces spending, and makes common-sense, market-oriented reforms to agricultural policy. I look forward to continuing conversations with my House colleagues and starting conversations with my Senate colleagues on a path forward that ultimately gets a farm bill to the President’s desk in the coming months.” A call to LaMalfa’s Washington, D.C., office asking for the congressman’s reaction to Miller’s report was not returned by press time. Kevin Eastman, LaMalfa’s communications and legislative director, took exception to the report. “Mr. Miller is mischaracterizing the house farm bill because it did not include food stamps,” he said. “That’s different. Nothing could further from the truth. The ag policy expires at the end of September. The food-stamp program will not expire. It will continue.” In other words, the food-stamp program needs to be passed in a separate bill that the Republican-controlled House and the Democratic-controlled Senate can somehow agree on. And that elusive agreement is what now awaits the fate of the House’s farm bill just as the members of Congress embark on their August leave. In his L.A. Times column, Hiltzik said LaMalfa was his favorite character in Miller’s report, noting that at the May 15 hearing on the farm bill, the local congressman “embarked on a lengthy discourse about the Bible, the church, godliness, and Congress’ responsibility for the poor.” In that address, LaMalfa said, “I think we’re all pretty loving people here that want to help the poor. But government has not provided those solutions. It’s failing. And to think that we can’t retract just a little bit of the spending [on food stamps] over something that’s grown exponentially in the last three or four years to try to get this reform in place.” Hiltzik points out that there are 27,457 people on food stamps in LaMalfa’s district in Butte County alone. “That’s 11 percent of his neighbors who would go without,” Hiltzik writes, “thanks to LaMalfa’s vote to eliminate benefits. Hope he eats well at dinnertime.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 August 1, 2013

CN&R 9


$5.00 off

continued from page 9

MassagE

Condensed news Two Glenn County papers merge operations

Family Law | Criminal | Juvenile

touch of china

2261 St. George Ln., Ste. G

(Behind Best Western Heritage Inn and Kmart)

530.966.4019 Open 7 days

Chiropractic

20

$

offiCe visiT

no exam fees • friendly service • convenient hours “Back pain? Neck pain? Headaches? Muscle tightness? Stressed out? WE CAN HELP!”

– Dr. Mark Tenenbaum, DC

Call our office OR visit our website to schedule an appointment today!

T e n e n bau M C h i r o p r aC T i C 1049 Village Lane • Chico • 530.680.8920

www.tenenbaumchiropractic.com • Mon-Fri 10a-1p & 3p-7p, Sat 10a-2p

It's a good time to buy precious metals. NEW PRICES Gold

$1327

Silver

$19.85

Platinum $1440

SCOTT HATHORN

Precious Metals Expert

Traditionally, when multi-year lows are reached, the prices tend to swing back and begin increasing in value at a rapid pace. This is a general stabilizing effect that we have experienced many times in our 26 years in the bullion business. Come on in to take advantage of this summer buying opportunity.

CHICO COIN & JEWELRY 894–5436 1414 Park Ave Suite 108 Chico, CA 95928

www.ChicoCoin.com

10 CN&R August 1, 2013

MON-FRI 10AM-5PM

SINCE 1987 WE DO ESTATE APPRAISALS SE HABLA ESPAÑOL

eginning Aug. 8, the Orland B Press-Register and the Willows Journal are scheduled to be com-

pacted into a single paper called the Glenn Transcript. Those papers currently come out twice weekly, but the Transcript will be published only on Wednesdays. The move follows the purchase of the papers in May by Vista California News Media, Inc. from Freedom Communications Inc. The two papers, along with the Colusa County Sun-Herald and the Corning Observer in Tehama County, are collectively known as the Tri-County Newspapers. “There is no longer a strong enough advertising base to merit publishing as many days per week,” said Owen Van Essen, president of New Mexico-based newspaper merger and acquisition company Dirks, Van Essen & Murray, which facilitated the purchase. “It’s better to have one strong newspaper than two weak singles.” Tim Crews, publisher of the competing Sacramento Valley Mirror, offered a possible explanation for the lack of local advertising dollars. “When most big-shot Glenn County officials and teachers leave work, they go home to Chico where they shop and spend their money,” he said. Staffers for the Willows and Orland papers would not comment on the merger, and their publisher, Paula Patton, confirmed the change without going into detail about possible staffing changes. The new parent group, Vista, which could not be reached for comment, is affiliated with Illinois-based Horizon Publications, publisher of several dozen community newspapers in the United States and Canada. While the circulation for both papers is relatively small—Patton said the Orland Press-Register prints 909 papers and the Willows Journal prints 1,102—the impact on readers in Glenn County will be immediately apparent, with fewer issues being printed and coming from a single source. Crews, whose Sacramento Valley Mirror also covers both cities, said he was saddened by the news. “We need the competition,” he said, lamenting the reduction in print frequency of the new publication. “When newspapers lower their coverage, it’s not good for the communities or the readers,”

Crews said. “It was bad enough that they each only came out twice a week. This stuff gets stale.” However, Crews said merging the two papers will not be a significant change. “They have both been fundamentally the same paper for 20 years,” he said. “They just have a few different local stories in places like their front pages or the sports sections.” Each paper will retain its

respective website on which to update news in between the Wednesday print days at www.orland-press-register.com and www.willows-journal.com, as reported in the Orland Press-Register on July 24. That same issue said the Glenn Transcript will create a “community news” page with local events and notices such as weddings, anniversaries, clubs and church events submitted by readers. Vista’s May buyout also included the Marysville Appeal-Democrat newspaper, which has a circulation of 16,000 and is California’s oldest daily newspaper. It was formed in 1926 with the merger of The Orland Press-Register and The Willows Journal will be combined into one weekly paper called the Glenn Transcript. IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY MIRROR

the Marysville Appeal (founded in 1860) and the Marysville Evening Democrat (founded in 1884). Patton, who is also the publisher of the Appeal-Democrat, was quoted in that paper on May 31 as having a positive outlook on the merger. “We look forward to continuing to serve our markets as leading sources of news and advertising in print and online,” she said. “It will largely be business as usual for Appeal-Democrat and [TriCounties Newspapers] customers and employees.” The other two Tri-County Newspapers, the Colusa County Sun-Herald and the Corning Observer, will likewise be reduced from a twice-weekly to a once-aweek printing. The new Glenn Transcript will be produced and printed at the Appeal-Democrat offices in Marysville, as were the Orland and Willows papers. Van Essen, who helped with the merger, speculated that the union of the two papers may also be related to the rise of the Internet. “If people can access the paper online, do they really need a printed sheet?” he asked. Van Essen said that even though many rural readers of both papers may be older, it’s still likely they are frequent users of the Internet. “My 90-year-old mother still reads the newspaper, but she also has an iPad and gets much of her news from it,” he said. —VIC CANTU


The art of business Local artist to aid Chico Natural Foods’ reinvention he late artist Andy Warhol once said, Tnating “Being good in business is the most fascikind of art.�

Warhol’s words come to mind when it comes to Dylan Tellesen, a longtime local artist and former gallery director who has taught graphic design at Butte College for the past decade. Tellesen recently took over as marketing and ownership manager of the Chico Natural Foods Cooperative. He succeeds Janae Lloyd, whose final day on the job was last Thursday (July 25). Lloyd left the post, which she occupied since 2009, in part because she is “going on a European tripâ€? until the end of the year, Tellesen explained; she will spend part of that time with her brother, an artist living in Germany, taking in some art festivals, including the famous Venice Bienniale. In his new position, Tellesen is a crucial piece in the store’s plans for expansion, slated to begin in the late winter or early spring. While the naturalfoods cooperative will remain in its current building in Chico’s SOPO (South of Post Office) neighborhood, it will maximize the space it inhabits by doing such things as moving the kitchen—currently in the center of the store—to a rear corner, and moving upstairs offices downstairs, making room for the raising of the current ceiling. Chico Natural Foods is also working out the final details with Meline Photographics for use of its parking lot on the corner of Main and E. Ninth streets for co-op customers. “The co-op’s growing,â€? Tellesen said, pointing out that the store’s sales have risen over the past three years. “The whole inside of the building will be gutted. ‌ Basically, I think the impulse is to increase the amount of inventory and food production,â€? which will include new freezers and a hot-food steam table similar to those in Whole Foods Markets around the country. “Natural organic food is becoming more popular,â€? he noted. “People are starting to understand that natural, health[ful], local, sustainable, organic food is for everyone, not just for environmental extremists.â€?

Part of the cooperative’s recent

business growth has come from the addition, in 2006, of “fresh local meat� to the previously vegetarian store, said General Manager Liza Tedesco. The “grab-and-go� sec-

tion—featuring deli items and fresh salads from the co-op’s kitchen—has also taken off. She said she is confident that Tellesen has the people, business and creative skills to lead the growing co-op successfully into the future. “I think Dylan brings a strong understanding of the organization, and can help to continue to build its image and help translate to the community what we do,â€? Tedesco said. “It’s like any artistic venture—it’s a collaboration. It’s an opportunity to grow and change. Moving forward, Dylan’s going to continue what Janae has developed ‌ connecting our [member-]owners and our community with farmers and food, and with the cooperative ideals.â€?

,1',9,'8$/7,&.(76216$/(021'$<$8*8677+ AUGUST



Chico Community Ballet

Tower of Power Funk & Soul Icons

JANUARY

SEPTEMBER

Golden Dragon Acrobats Fabulous Chinese Acrobats

Peter Rowan

Pink Martini

Big Twang Theory

Global Cabaret

Jake Shimabukuro

Ukulele Wizard Chico World Music Festival

Stunt Dog Experience

Beauty and the Beast JR.

Tommy Emmanuel

Crazy Doggy Antics

with special guest Martin Taylor

Blue Room Young Company

OCTOBER

FEBRUARY BĂŠla Fleck & Brooklyn Rider

Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell

Banjo Quintet

Country Legends

TAO: Phoenix Rising

Eve Ensler

Japanese Taiko Drumming

Author, Playwright, TED Speaker

Lonestar

Bonnie Raitt

Country Rock

Ten-Time Grammy Award Winner

True Blues History of the Blues

SFJAZZ Collective

Corey Harris, Guy Davis & Alvin Youngblood Hart

Jazz Masters  

STOMP

The Graduate

Theatrical Percussion!

Live Radio Theatre

Ari Shapiro

Carlos NuĂąez

NPR White House Correspondent

Power Packed Celtic Music

Momix: Botanica

The Manhattan Transfer

Multimedia Dance, Puppets & Fantasy

Alton Brown Dylan Tellesen recently took over as marketing and ownership manager of the Chico Natural Foods Cooperative.

The Edible Inevitable Tour

PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

Classical Piano

When asked about the use of the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;rebrandingâ&#x20AC;? to describe the co-opâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s metamorphosis (as some people have labeled the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s push for change), Tedesco said it â&#x20AC;&#x153;falls flat.â&#x20AC;? She opts instead for â&#x20AC;&#x153;accessibilityâ&#x20AC;?: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to keep the environment as open and welcoming as possible, moving away from any sense that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;club,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? as some have perceived it to be in the past. Along those lines, she discourages the use of the nickname â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chico Nattyâ&#x20AC;? for the Chico Natural Foods Cooperative, a nickname that â&#x20AC;&#x153;represents an era of being sort of exclusive.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;A co-op is what we areâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our organizational structure,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really trying to reinforce that language.â&#x20AC;? For his part, Tellesen said he is â&#x20AC;&#x153;intriguedâ&#x20AC;? by his new role. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been of multiple minds,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m atypical of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;artland,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; but I find the business side [of things] interesting. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creative problem-solvingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;artists have a skill set in problem-solving.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA christinel@newsreview.com

Cinderella

Van Cliburn Gold Medal Winner

NOVEMBER Jack Hanna

Into the Wild Live

Jazz/Pop Superstars

MARCH  

Keeping Dance Alive! Eclectic Dance Concert

Chamber Orchestra Kremlin Dynamic String Orchestra

Wynton Marsalis

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra

Whose Live Anyway?

Elvin Bishop, James Cotton, & Paul Thorn

Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt

Diavolo

Comedy Improv

An Acoustic Evening

Andrew Bird

Multi-Instrumentalist & Musical Innovator

Ballet Folklorico Quetzalli de Veracruz The Music & Dance of Mexico

DECEMBER The Onion Live! Live e!

NCEL T CA The Second City tLED

An Irish Christmas

Rock, Blues & Barroom Boogie Thrilling Gymnastics & Dance

APRIL San Francisco Scottish Fiddlers

High Energy Fiddle Ensemble

Arlo Guthrie Folk Music Icon

MAY Aladdin JR.

Playhouse Youth Theatre

Celebrate the Holidays! Scan for more info:

For tickets & more information visit :::&+,&23(5)250$1&(6&20 or call (530) 898-6333 August 1, 2013

CN&R 11


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS

ARCTIC TIME-BOMB

The release of large amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from thawing Arctic permafrost could result in a huge global economic impact of about $60 trillion, a new study reveals. Developing countries in particular are poised to take a massive hit financially as a result of the climate-related effects of these increased methane releases, such as sea-level rise, flooding, and damage to human health and agriculture, according to BBC News, citing research published in the journal Nature. While the thawing of the Arctic is seen by some as an economic boon—as much as 30 percent of the world’s undiscovered gas, for instance, lies beneath its waters—the potential costs of methane emissions would far outweigh the benefits. “That’s an economic time-bomb that at this stage has not been recognized on the world stage,” said Gail Whiteman, a professor at Erasmus University in the Netherlands, and one of the study’s authors.

EMPIRE STATE BANS SHARK-FIN SALES

In a significant win for sharks, the state of New York has banned the sale of shark fins beginning July 1, 2014. Shark fins have long been used in Chinese cuisine to make shark-fin soup, according to The Huffington Post. “Finning”—whereby fishermen catch sharks, cut off their fins and throw the fish back into the water to die—is already against the law in the U.S. “Not only is the process inhumane, but it also affects the natural balance of the oceanic system,” said Andrew Cuomo, New York’s governor. A lack of sufficient sharks in the food chain results in the overpopulation of other fish, resulting in damage to marine ecosystems. Two species of dogfish, the most abundant North Atlantic shark, are not covered by the ban.

FASHION VICTIMS, LITERALLY SPEAKING

Wildlife species living in the highest places in the world are in jeopardy, thanks to the steady reduction of the grasses necessary to support them and, by extension, their predators, new research shows. Wild yaks, snow leopards (pictured) and other iconic high-altitude-dwelling animals “are becoming ‘fashion victims’ of the surging global trade in cashmere,” according to the UK’s Guardian newspaper. The goats that produce the soft, indemand wool are devouring mountain and steppe vegetation to the detriment of other species that have long depended on such food being in reasonable abundance. “In the absence of commitment across global and local scales, this iconic wildlife will cease to persist as they have for millennia,” researchers were quoted as saying in the journal Conservation Biology. Send your eco-related news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R August 1, 2013

Tawnee Preisner, co-founder and vice president of Horse Plus Humane Society in Oroville, looks through the fence at the Valley Meat Co. slaughter facility in Roswell, N.M., which is hoping to begin processing horse meat sometime this summer.

To the slaughter?

PHOTO COURTESY OF HORSE PLUS HUMANE SOCIETY

Local equine advocate speaks out on federal approval to open a horse-meat processing facility by

Meredith J. Graham

Wthe perimeter of the Valley Meat Co. slaughterhouse in Roswell, N.M., last

hen Tawnee Preisner circled

month, she could hardly believe her eyes. Cow carcasses—or the remnants thereof— scattered the landscape, skulls clearly visible from the fence line. “He was not operating a very clean business there when it was operating as a slaughterhouse for cows,” Preisner said recently by phone, referring to plant owner Ricardo De Los Santos. “Is anything going to change just because it’s horses?” Preisner, co-founder and vice president of Horse Plus Humane Society in Oroville, visited Roswell’s Valley Meat Co. facility to see firsthand where horses could be sent if the slaughterhouse is allowed to reopen. Valley Meat—previously called Pecos Valley Meat Packing Co., a beef-processing plant— closed down for economic reasons, its owners have told the media, though it had been fined for improper carcass disposal, according to a recent New York Times article. Preisner wasn’t happy with what she saw in New Mexico, and she isn’t happy about a recent federal decision to allow Valley Meat (and another company, Responsible Transportation of Sigourney, Iowa) to kill horses for human consumption. That meat likely will be exported to countries in Asia, South America or Europe, where people eat horse in restaurants and at home. (It is illegal to sell horse meat for human consumption in the state of California, but not in all states, such as Florida.) Horse slaughter was halted in 2007, about two years after federal funding was revoked for inspecting those facilities,

which processed an estimated 138,000 equines each year. The majority of that meat was destined for human consumption in other countries. That funding was reinstated in 2011, but Valley Meat Co. is the first plant to receive U.S. Department of Agriculture approval to operate. That happened at the end of June. Those in favor of horse slaughter, including the American Quarter Horse Association, argue that it offers owners of unwanted horses an option they wouldn’t have otherwise. A study in 2009 by the Unwanted Horse Coalition, an alliance of equine organizations whose goal is to reduce the number of horses euthanized or sent to slaughter, noted four key reasons for the high number of unwanted horses: the economic downturn, the high cost of euthanasia, a change in breed-demand—and the closure of the nation’s slaughter facilities. “Horse owners and stakeholders agree closing of processing facilities is a major contributor to the problem,” the study concluded. So why are people like Preisner—

she is by no means alone in her opposition—so up in arms about the possibility of reintroducing horse slaughter to the American landscape? For one, horses are considered companion animals much like cats and dogs here in the United States. Then there’s the issue of humane handling. “The whole slaughter industry is causing a huge problem,” Preisner said. “It’s a torturous thing for these horses to endure.

When they cross over into Mexico, the conditions get even worse. “But opening slaughterhouses in the United States won’t fix that—they’ll still endure the same amount of horror being transported.” Her point is one shared by many horse advocates, but it’s debatable, according to several sources at the USDA and its Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), which oversees the transport of slaughter animals. With so many more equines being sent across the border and a lack of funding for inspections because of the closure of domestic slaughter facilities, the welfare of slaughter horses is likely much worse now than it was when they were being processed here in the States. “[N]early the same number of U.S. horses was transported to Canada and Mexico for slaughter in 2010—nearly 138,000—as was slaughtered before domestic slaughter ceased,” reads a Government Accountability Office report to Congress looking at unintended consequences of closing domestic slaughterhouses. “Horses are by nature fight-orflight animals, and when grouped in confinement, they tend to sort out dominance. In the tight quarters of a conveyance, weaker horses are unable to escape from more dominant and aggressive animals and, thus, are more prone to sustaining injuries. … Moreover, once a shipment of U.S. horses has crossed the border into Canada or Mexico, APHIS no longer has authority to oversee their welfare.” The more humane way to handle

Get help:

Horse Plus Humane Society offers help to horse owners who can no longer care for their animals. Log onto www.horseplus.org for more information.

unwanted horses, Preisner said, involves educating people about the problem and

GREENWAYS continued on page 14


August 1, 2013

CN&R 13


Step back in time to 1929

GREENWAYS continued from page 12

offering gelding (castration) programs, a huge part of the Unwanted Horse Coalition’s mission. Horse Plus has rescued nearly 3,000 equines in its 10-year existence. Of those rescued, a portion have been euthanized, Preisner admitted. “Whenever anyone signs a horse over to us, we explain our policies. Bi-Plane Flights If it’s deemed unadoptable, it will Experience the thrill with a friend. be humanely euthanized,” she said. Gift Certificates available After euthanizing a horse, the Schooler Flying Co. organization sends it to a rendering Call for details (530) 899–0110 plant. “They [people who surrender their horses] get so upset about that sometimes, but when we picked up that horse, they were going to have to take it to auction.” Rather than euthanizing a former pet, owners often send their animals to auction, where so-called “killer buyers”—representatives of slaughterhouses or middlemen, according to the Humane Society IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE of the United States—purchase them and ship them to Canada or Mexico to be slaughtered. Since horses in the United States aren’t considered food aniServing Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties mals, they are treated with medication, including antibiotics, Preisner said, making them 24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org unsuitable for human consumption. “Because of the drugs that REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE are in the horses, there’s really no JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. & PREV. way to make it a safe meat for humans to eat,” she said. But those killer buyers are successfully sending horses from U.S. auctions off to be killed, processed and, in many cases, eaten by humans. People in severSPECIALIZING IN: al countries, including Japan, PEST CONTROL • WEED CONTROL France, China and Mexico, conTREES • LAWNS • ORNAMENTALS sider horse a viable source of proResidential / Commercial tein. The USDA acknowledges Bruce “Moose” Davi, Owner this problem.

NO.

342-RAPE

DESIGNER

JEN_PU

FOURIER PEST & WEED

La Dolce Piazza 3217 Cohasset #120 Corner of Cohasset & Lassen 891-3582 furniturechico.com Monday - Saturday 10 - 6

Eric DeGarmo, Technician (530) 899-9776 Lic# OPR10596 / PR4259 FREE ESTIMATES

ECO EVENT ALL ABOUT BEES Come to this bee-centric event— “Understanding Bees and the Benefits of Them”— for children ages 7 through 12 and their parents at 11 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 3, at the Patrick Ranch Museum (10381 Midway). Make a nesting box, and learn about the life cycle of bees, and how to react to and feed bees in your garden. Workshop is free (entry to Patrick Ranch is $5; children under 5 free). For more info, call 342-4359.

“FSIS [the Food Safety and Inspection Service] recognizes that most equines presented for slaughter will likely not have been raised for human consumption,” reads the service’s document on usda.gov outlining the inspection of slaughter facilities. “Therefore, FSIS has concerns regarding the potential presence of chemical residues from drugs not previously approved for use in all food animals including equine.” Valley Meat Co. is still facing several obstacles in its efforts to convert its cattle facility into one that will process horses. Recently, The Associated Press reported that the state of New Mexico denied the plant’s wastewater permit. It also faces opposition by way of a federal lawsuit filed by the Humane Society of the United States, in conjunction with several other agencies. “It would be nice if we could fix everything overnight,” Preisner said. “Owning an animal is a responsibility.” Ω

UNCOMMON SENSE

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1967

Help save the park Yo u a r e co r d i a l lY i n v i t e d

Grand Opening Ceremony date: Thursday, August 15th time: 5:30pm - 7:00pm location: Ampla Health | Chico Medical and Pediatrics 680 Cohasset Road, Chico CA 95926 rSvP: 530-751-3761 | cconley@amplahealth.org Ampla Health will provide Hors d’oeuvres, music, and gift bags for the first 100 participants ages 16 and over. The first 100 children will receive reading books and a picture with Ampla Health Mascots Able, Brushy, and Smiley. another waY amPla health iS leading the waY!

www.amplahealth.org 14 CN&R August 1, 2013

Local cleaning company ServPro recently offered its services to the city of Chico to help keep Bidwell Park’s Caper Acres (pictured) open six days a week for the next few months. Now the Bidwell Park Foundation is seeking donations through the North Valley Community Foundation (go to www.ncvf.org for more info) for general park maintenance. Formerly known as the Bidwell Park Endowment Fund, Bidwell Park Foundation’s set-up was changed to allow for more flexibility in conducting fundraising efforts and managing the PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY donated funds. The foundation needs volunteers to get the fund up and running. If interested, contact Tom Barrett at 345-7265 or by email: ptombarrett@sbcglobal.net.


G

THE

reen HOUSE

by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

1 cup rose water 1/4 cup vegetable glycerin 20 drops lavender oil 1 tbsp. honey

Mmm—lavender and honey.

Mix ingredients together and store in a glass jar with a screw top. Shelf life? “Indefinite.”

HEADS UP, Y’ALL! It is not too early to think about getting your tickets for

the third annual National Heirloom Exposition, which will be held Sept. 10-12 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa. I just got my brochure and media passes for the huge, popular event in the mail the other day. As the publicity for the three-day anti-GMO, “pure-food” expo points out, more than 100 “top food, farm and garden speakers” will be in attendance, including widely known anti-GMO activist Jeffrey Smith, who founded the Institute for Responsible Technology; Andrew Kimbrell, executive director of the Center for Food Safety; and Vandana Shiva (pictured), India’s “foremost seed saver” and “leading supporter of the pure-food movement.” “I will be coming to the National Heirloom Exposition, because it is defending our future,” Shiva is quoted as saying on the brochure. Also included in the festivities are “thousands of varieties of incredible produce,” more than 300 “like-minded vendors Famous seed-saver (and Monsanto and exhibitors,” a “world-class giantopponent) Vandana Shiva will pumpkin show,” a heritage livestock and speak at the third annual National Heirloom Exposition in Santa Rosa poultry show, a children’s area featuring old-fashioned games, chef demonstrations, in September. a farmers’ market and an heirloom art PHOTO COURTESY OF CONSCIOUS AGRICULTURE.ORG show. Hours of the exposition are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. Admission is $10 per day; $25 for all three days (kids ages 17 and under are free). Buy tickets online at www.theheirloomexpo.com. For more information, contact Paul Wallace at info@theheirloomexpo.com or (707) 773-1336.

THINK FREE.

MAKING LOTION On a recent weekend, my 12-year-old daughter Lydia and I decided to make our own lotion. I’d never made lotion before, so I consulted a book of mine, Better Basics for the Home: Simple Solutions for Less Toxic Living, by Annie Berthold-Bond (which I picked up at Lyon Books). In addition to containing numerous recipes for skin-care products, Berthold-Bond’s useful book is packed with information on how to make all sorts of eco-friendly products, from dishwashing liquid, floor soap (including a flea-killing version) and toilet-bowl cleaner, to garden-pest repellents and pet shampoo, to shoe polish, car-windshield cleaner and “non-petroleum oil-based artists’ paint.” Anyway, we decided on a simple recipe for glycerin-water body lotion, calling for three ingredients: water or rose water, vegetable glycerin and an essential oil of our choice. We chose lavender oil and rose water to mix with our glycerin (we got all three ingredients at the Chico Natural Foods Cooperative). We also decided to make the “honeyed glycerin” variation of the recipe, which called for the addition of honey, “a good moisturizer and humectant.” Here is the recipe for what turned out to be a nice, light, nourishing (and fragrant) lotion that I now use regularly:

Come dressed in your most bodacious 80s gear for the costume contest (there will be prizes!) • Costume contests • Chico School of Rock & Hype Dance Studio performances • Pac Man arcade ...and way more awesome 80s themed activities!

1950 E. 20th Street, Chico, CA

Nature shrinks as capital grows. The growth of the market cannot solve the very crisis it creates. –Vandana Shiva EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

August 1, 2013

CN&R 15


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES Mark Mesku believes his business is addressing an important consumer health issue.

MORE HEAT FOR SILVER STATE HOSPITAL

The Nevada-based mental-health hospital accused of busing psychiatric patients to California and other states could lose accreditation. In February, a confused and suicidal patient arrived at a homeless-services facility in Sacramento, without identification or medication, according to The Sacramento Bee. A subsequent Sac Bee investigative report revealed Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital in Las Vegas had purchased about 1,500 Greyhound tickets for psychiatric patients since 2008, sending them to every state in the continental U.S. Roughly a third of those patients were sent to California. The Joint Commission launched an investigation of the hospital in April, according to California Healthline. During an inspection, the commission found that Rawson-Neal failed to meet 23 standards, including ensuring the competency of staff, educating patients about follow-up care during discharge, and providing information to other health-care providers after a patient’s discharge. On July 25, the commission issued a preliminary denial of accreditation.

ACA ADS TO COST MILLIONS

Promotion of the Affordable Care Act, Medi-Cal expansion, and the state’s health-insurance exchange could cost California more than $300 million. Under the ACA, Medi-Cal will allow coverage for individuals with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level ($15,416) to gain coverage, while the exchange—called Covered California and set to open for registration in October—will allow users to compare various health-care plans online, according to The Associated Press. Federal officials have targeted California as a particularly important front for the implementation of the ACA, as the state has the nation’s largest health-insurance market and six million uninsured residents. Of the $684 million earmarked for ACA advertising in the United States, California is expected to receive $174 million; additionally, The California Endowment plans to spend roughly $130 million on enrollment and advertising aimed at the Hispanic population.

ARSENIC AND APPLE JUICE

After more than a year of pressure from consumer groups, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is tightening limits for the amount of arsenic allowed in apple juice. For decades, the FDA has acknowledged that most apple juice—second to orange juice as the most popular juice drink in the nation—contains traces of arsenic, a carcinogen found in water, soil and pesticides, according to SFGate.com. The FDA has long maintained the arsenic in apple juice is at levels too low to be harmful, but is now setting the limit at the same amount allowed in drinking water. Under the new guidelines, apple juice containing more than 10 parts per billion could be removed from stores. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R August 1, 2013

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Denture detox Local dental technician’s business makes “biocompatible” dentures and detoxifies existing ones by

Evan Tuchinsky

Msionate about polymers. He knows they can be useful, when used in the right ark Emerson Mesku is pas-

place. He also knows that not every formulation is the same. The latter information is especially important when it comes to things you put in your body—specifically, in your mouth. He’s learned the hard way that not all dentures are made equally, and that a common polymer can make wearers and manufacturers ill. Mesku is a dental technician who moved from Southern California to Paradise in 2003. A decade earlier, he was working for a company that operated a large group of dental labs—seemingly at the peak of his career—when he started a health decline that hit rock bottom in 1996. Over the course of the next few years, he found a connection between his ailing health and exposure to a resin used in many dentures. He began to share what he’d learned with other dental technicians, in the hope they’d adopt safer manufacturing practices. He also sought ways to make things safer for denture-wearers. Mesku’s work culminated in Pure Cure Denture Detox, a venture he runs out of his Skyway dental lab with the help of his two adult daughters, Melissa and Merinne. The business not only manufactures “biocompatible” resin-based dentures, but also has a patent-pending process for detoxifying existing dentures. Mesku works with about a dozen Butte

County dentists, and he’s about to make a push to broaden his network of providers. Meanwhile, Brooklyn-based Melissa is working Wall Street to find venture-capital investors for their passion project. “It’s definitely a family affair, a longstanding family issue of the toxicity of the chemicals that are in dentures,” Melissa said in a phone interview from New York City. “It’s been a personal trial for him, and I’ve always thought of him as a bit of a vigilante. This is one way of seeking justice. … “He’s coming at this business not from the stance of, ‘This is a great idea, let’s make some money,’ but coming at it from a stance of, ‘This is an issue that needs to be solved,’ and taking a product to market that’s better than what exists already is a way to solve this problem.” Indeed, Mark Mesku has intentions that go beyond his firm. As he explained in a phone interview from Paradise, “We’re right on the cutting edge of trying to bring accountability to a largely unregulated

industry. There is no certification in most states for a dental technician to fabricate a denture; it’s not even like a cosmetologist’s license or a barber’s license. … The denture-[wearing] population isn’t told who’s making their dentures. “So, we have kind of taken on a Goliath here in the scope of trying to bring some credibility to this industry that I believe is responsible for making Americans ill, and they don’t even know it.” Mesku cites his own situation as exhibit A. Twenty years ago, he began to experience symptoms he first chalked up to the stress of a high-production job: peripheral neuropathy (pain and tingling in the extremities), anxiety attacks and moodiness. His condition continued to worsen, so his doctor referred him to a toxicologist, who determined that Mesku had high levels of polymethyl methacrylate, or PMMA, HEALTHLINES continued on page 18

APPOINTMENT STUDENT-GROWN VEGGIES The Saturday-morning and Thursday-night farmers’ markets draw big crowds, but the small, student-run Organic Vegetable Project, held every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in front of the Bell Memorial Union building on Chico State’s campus, is worth checking out, too. Students from the University Farm will be on-hand to sell farm-fresh produce. Email organicvegetableproject@gmail.com for more info.


dr. Brandon stark of argyll Medical group WelcoMes

Dara McKinley, FNP Dara is a Family Nurse Practitioner certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practioners. Her undergraduate degree is from Chico State and her graduate degree in nursing from Sonoma State University. She specializes in chronic disease management and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health. Dara is a local, grew up in Chico and has lived here for 23 years.

Argyll Medical Group 100 independence circle | chico, cA 95973 530-899-2107 | www.ArgyllmedicAl.com

Convenient And Fast Ask your doctor to have your prescription filled with us or stop by with your order. We are conveniently located at the Feather River Health Center on the Skyway in Paradise. We accept all prescriptions and most insurances. We can also help you transfer other prescriptions to us so they are all in the same place.

Feather River Hospital

Outpatient Pharmacy Inside the Feather River Health Center â&#x20AC;˘ 5125 Skyway Visit our website for more information www.frhosp.org

(530) 876-2525 to speak with a pharmacist or Call (530) 876-2527 for our automated refill line Call

August 1, 2013

CN&R 17


OBAMACARE

QUESTIONS ANSWERED Health Insurance Specialist with 12 years experience and a law degree. It will be mandatory to carry health insurance by January 2014.

Low Cost Acupuncture ~ SLIDING SCALE ~ Private & Community Walk-ins Welcome Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Bill Nichols L.Ac. Most insurance accepted Massage available

Insurance & Financial Services Bruce A. Jenkins, Esq. | CA License #0B86680 530.781.3592 | www.BruceJenkinsInsurance.com

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 (corner of West 2nd Ave) 530.342.2895 • 10am–4pm M–F or by Appt AmericanChi.net

HEALTHLINES

continued from page 16

in his bloodstream. PMMA is a common ingredient in dentures. Mesku spent the next three years on disability, during which time he visited university libraries across Southern California to research his condition. He found “a mountain of evidence” connecting exposure to denture resin to health problems. “These are very toxic petrochemicals that most technicians are told to look out for, for symptoms of overexposure,” he said. “When I started talking with technicians and said, ‘Let me give you these studies from all over the world,’ the light went on.” Mesku became concerned not

LEGAL SERVICES OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA PRESENTS

Domestic Violence & Fair Housing a WorKsHoP For tenants & Housing ProViDers: Learn about fair housing laws, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), and the relationship between domestic violence and housing

August 7, 2013 • 2:00pm – 4:00pm North Valley Property Owners Association 984 East Ave., Suite B-1 • Chico, CA 95926 Presenters:

Catherine Bishop, Attorney, and Renee Williams • National Housing Law Project Melody Proebstel, MSW, Program Coordinator • Catalyst Domestic Violence Services

SPONSOrEd By:

City of Chico (Community Development Block Grant funded) Legal Services of Northern California

For FurtHer inFormation contact: Legal Services of Northern California (530) 345-9491

18 CN&R August 1, 2013

only for his colleagues, but for their customers as well. “What we’ve found is that dentures are not inert; they have a tendency to biodegrade because of acids in the mouth as well as acidic foods,” he explained. “This causes myriad problems for denture wearers that in many cases get dismissed by doctors as just symptoms of old age.” In 1999, Mesku opened his own “mom-and-pop” lab in Loma Linda and began manufacturing dentures with “what I believed were the safest acrylics in the world”—materials he imported from the United Kingdom and had tested at FDAaccredited laboratories. “We’re still searching for the purest formulas in the world,” he said, “and I’ve contacted virtually every chemical manufacturer on the planet.” Mesku continued to make dentures after moving to Paradise and

More information:

Go to www.purecuredenture detox.com to learn more about the Meskus’ business, Pure Cure Denture Detox, and to find a dentist offering Pure Cure Denture Detox services.

opening a new lab. In 2010, he began working to find a way to detoxify dentures made by others, and through “trial and error” discovered the process his lab has used over the past year. He has applied for a patent for Pure Cure Denture Detox. Looking ahead, Melissa said, “There are a number of directions that this company can go. We can stay small and just grow it small, but we can do a lot of other things if we had larger capital to work with.” She’s exploring the option of expansion from her East Coast base of operations. “We would not be a traditional investment,” Melissa said. “Venture capital is a non-traditional investment in the first place, but we wouldn’t even be a traditional investment in that alternative space. That doesn’t mean that it’s not something to try to pursue.” In the meantime, Mark Mesku is ramping up an outreach effort to North State dental offices. Through the firm’s website, www.purecure denturedetox.com, he’s received inquiries from a far wider radius. “Forty-five million Americans wear some form of dentures,” he said. “This is something that goes beyond state lines and economic lines.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Keep bugs at bay With insect-transmitted maladies like West Nile virus and Lyme disease lurking, it’s a darned good idea to use some type of bug repellent when one goes outdoors, especially in grassy or wooded wilderness areas. Thanks to Environmental Working Group’s new Guide to Better Bug Repellents, one can find an insect repellent that both effectively repels pests while offering low toxicity. Downloadable at www.tinyurl.com/bugsafe, EWG’s guide offers the lowdown on Picaridin, IR3535, DEET and lemon-eucalyptus oil, as well as useful tips, such as “Don’t use any bug repellents on children under 6 months,” and a list of diseases carried by ticks and mosquitoes.


WE LOVE

BEER ChiCo neWS & revieW PreSentS

ChiCo Beer Week A loCAl CeleBrAtion of CrAft Beer Aug. 8-Aug. 17

PiCk uP the Cn&r Beer iSSue, Aug. 8 for detAilS.

August 1, 2013

CN&R 19


A shameful past

About the author:

Michael Magliari is a history professor at Chico State. He (with the late Michael J. Gillis, also a Chico State history professor) is the author of a book on Chico’s founder, John Bidwell and California: The Life and Writings of a Pioneer, 1841-1900 (2003). Last spring, Magliari received the Pacific Historical Review’s Louis Knott Koontz Memorial Award for his article shedding light on the little-known history of Native American slavery in Northern California. He is currently working on a book tentatively titled Free State Slavery: Bound Indian Labor in California, 1850-1867 .

How bloody raids and slave trade led to California’s rise as an ag powerhouse Access to bound Indian labor proved

BY MICHAEL MAGLIARI

O

pening a dark chapter of his memoirs published in 1897, Colusa County pioneer Henry Clay Bailey casually observed that “Not many of the present generation of Californians know that in the early ’50’s a regular slave trade was carried on in the mountains bordering the upper Sacramento Valley, from Clear Lake to Stony Creek.”

According to Bailey, “Vicious and desperate characters, for the ready gain to be obtained by the trade, would locate a small band of Indians, make a sudden dash upon the camp, revolvers in hand, shoot as many of the men as possible, and sometimes the women, too, and scatter the rest of the band. The raiders would then catch all the boys and girls between eight and fourteen years of age who had remained near the camp. Then they would start out for a market, perhaps to fill orders they had already obtained. These men would stop at nothing in their greed for gain, and in their eyes their captives were legitimate merchandise.” The 67-year-old Bailey was not telling any western “tall tales.” On the contrary, Bailey accurately portrayed the essentials of the brutal human commerce that flourished in the ostensibly free state of California during the Gold Rush and Civil War eras. As little remembered today as it was in the 1890s, the frontier Indian slave trade recollected in Bailey’s memoirs was the illegal outgrowth of the quite legal system of unfree Native American labor authorized by the notorious Act for the Government and Protection of Indians. Enacted by the first state legislature in April 1850, five months prior to California’s admission to the Union as a free state, the far-reaching statute was deliberately designed to help white employers cope with the high cost and uncontrollable mobility of free labor during the chaotic years of the Gold Rush. It did so by formalizing the regime of bound Native American labor established earlier under Mexico, a nation that had, like the new

American state of California, officially outlawed chattel slavery. Preserving Mexico’s arrangements in full, the Indian Act of 1850 enabled white employers to procure unfree Indian workers through a system of local government convict-leasing or to ensnare free Indian laborers contractually in what amounted to legalized debt peonage. Meanwhile, labor could be extracted from Indian children taken into private homes as custodial wards under a popular provision that, in 1860, was replaced by an expanded program of indentured servitude or “apprenticeship” applicable to adults as well as children. The illegal slave trade, so vividly recalled by Bailey, quickly emerged to furnish the market for Indian wards and apprentices, who were sought primarily as household domestics or farm workers. Although the world of unfree Indian labor in California remains a shadowy place, the survival of a small but valuable cache of Indian indentures in Bailey’s Colusa County affords a rare opportunity to examine the Golden State’s “peculiar institution” at unusually close range. As one of California’s original 27 counties, Colusa County initially comprised all of presentday Glenn and Colusa counties, along with portions of Tehama County. Consequently, early Colusa County covered most of the western half of the flat and fertile Sacramento Valley. Although lacking in precious metals, the county grew up with the Gold Rush as a flourishing commercial supplier of grain, wool and beef. Significantly for the shaping of local antebel-

This is an abridged version of a much longer article published last year: Michael F. Magliari, “Free State Slavery: Bound Indian Labor and Slave Trafficking in California’s Sacramento Valley, 1850-1864,” Pacific Historical Review , vol. 81 (May 2012), pages 155-192. The Pacific Historical Review is the official journal of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association and is published quarterly by the University of California Press.

20 CN&R August 1, 2013

Judge Cornelius J. Diefendorff administered the Indian indenture system in Colusa County during 1861 and 1862. PHOTOGRAPH REPRODUCED FROM JUSTUS H. ROGERS, COLUSA COUNTY: ITS HISTORY RETRACED (ORLAND, CA: 1891), P. 378.

critical given Gold Rush California’s costly wage labor market. Even after the initial wave of gold fever subsided, farm wages remained remarkably high throughout the rest of the 1850s and on into the 1860s, hovering around $35 per month until each harvest season, when they jumped to anywhere from $40 to $75, and when daily rates ranged from $2 to $2.50 or more. Such prohibitive costs fueled Colusa County’s demand for bound Indian workers and drove the brutal slave trafficking that Bailey later described in his memoirs. Considering the roles they were cast to fill, it is no surprise that most of the Indians bound to labor in Colusa County were captive women and children who were legally confined under the child custody and apprenticeship provisions contained in Section 3 of the 1850 Indian Act. Between 1850 and 1860, Section 3 enabled employers to gain hold of Native American children and keep them until they reached the age of majority, which the law defined as 18 years for males and 15 for females. The code required employers to secure the consent of a child’s “parents or friends” and to appear with them before a justice of the peace, who would then issue a certificate of custody. In 1860, the legislature amended Section 3 and expanded its scope by transforming the custodial arrangement for Indian minors into a system of indentured servitude that, under the guise of “apprenticeship,” included not only Native American children but also adult Indians “held as prisoners of war” or determined by the courts to be vagrants. Transferring supervision from justices of the peace to county and district court judges, the revised statute required that employers train their Indian charges as apprentices “to trades, husbandry, or other employments.” In the case of apprenticed minors, indentures could now be obtained by employers without the actual presence of “the parents or friends of the child” in court. The amended statute also permitted employers to retain Indian minors beyond the age of majority and well into adulthood. The actual functioning of Section 3 is revealed quite clearly by the Indian indentures preserved at the Colusa County courthouse. These obscure and obsolete government records permit a fascinating,

albeit incomplete, snapshot of bound Indian labor as it existed in the Sacramento Valley. Documenting the names of 19 white employers and 32 Indian “apprentices,” the 18 extant indentures, recorded between March 1861 and May 1862, strongly suggest some larger patterns. Most striking, perhaps, is the fact that just one of the indentures involved more than one or two Indians. On March 18, 1861, John Boggs appeared before County Judge Cornelius J. Diefendorff and secured an indenture apprenticing 13 young Indian males ranging from 4 to 20 years of age. This appears to have been the only attempt made in the county to use indenture for the purpose of binding a substantial agricultural work force to personal service, and it is not surprising that the initiative came from Boggs. A native of Missouri and the son of a wealthy slave owner, the shrewd and ambitious Boggs had only recently begun what proved to be a spectacularly successful career in local agriculture, finance, real estate and politics. A Forty-Niner who first made it big trading horses and mules, Boggs came to Colusa County in 1855 and purchased 6,000 acres along the west bank of the Sacramento River surrounding the home site he located near Princeton. By 1860, the 31-year-old rancher owned over $25,000 worth of real and personal property consisting mostly of land, cattle and horses. He was also in the midst of a nine-year stint on the county Board of Supervisors, the first stop in a distinguished public career that would include three terms in the California state Senate and a prestigious seat on the Stanford University Board of Trustees. Unlike the wealthy and influential Boggs, the 13 young Indians bound to his service remained virtually anonymous figures. Neither the petition for indenture filed by Boggs nor the actual indenture granted by Judge Diefendorff gives their Indian names or tribal affiliations. Instead, each simply lists their adopted English or Spanish names and estimated ages. The documents also fail to shed much light on the circumstances surrounding their original acquisition. Boggs merely assured Diefendorff that the seven boys “under the ages of fifteen years … have been placed under my care

Section 3 of the 1850 Indian Act enabled employers to gain hold of Native American children and keep them until they reached the age of majority ...

California Sen. John Boggs held at least 13 young male Indian workers as bound “apprentices” on his Sacramento River estate near Princeton. PHOTOGRAPH REPRODUCED FROM JUSTUS H. ROGERS, COLUSA COUNTY: ITS HISTORY RETRACED (ORLAND, CA: 1891), P. 36.

A Wintun man and his two children in early Glenn County, formerly part of Colusa County. PHOTO COURTESY OF COLUSA COUNTY LIBRARY

The original records of Indian indentures in the mid-19th century are preserved at the historic Colusa County Courthouse (pictured circa 1908) in the city of Colusa. PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

lum politics and debates over secession and slavery, a disproportionately large percentage of Colusa County’s pioneer settlers were southern Democrats who hailed from Missouri, Kentucky, and other slave states. For many of its white denizens, much of Indian servitude’s appeal undoubtedly lay in the opportunity it afforded them to replicate, on free soil, the small-scale slaveholding culture that typified the upcountry counties of the Upper South and Border states, and particularly those of Missouri’s Little Dixie region.

“SLAVE” continued on page 22 August 1, 2013

CN&R 21


A shameful past

About the author:

Michael Magliari is a history professor at Chico State. He (with the late Michael J. Gillis, also a Chico State history professor) is the author of a book on Chico’s founder, John Bidwell and California: The Life and Writings of a Pioneer, 1841-1900 (2003). Last spring, Magliari received the Pacific Historical Review’s Louis Knott Koontz Memorial Award for his article shedding light on the little-known history of Native American slavery in Northern California. He is currently working on a book tentatively titled Free State Slavery: Bound Indian Labor in California, 1850-1867 .

How bloody raids and slave trade led to California’s rise as an ag powerhouse Access to bound Indian labor proved

BY MICHAEL MAGLIARI

O

pening a dark chapter of his memoirs published in 1897, Colusa County pioneer Henry Clay Bailey casually observed that “Not many of the present generation of Californians know that in the early ’50’s a regular slave trade was carried on in the mountains bordering the upper Sacramento Valley, from Clear Lake to Stony Creek.”

According to Bailey, “Vicious and desperate characters, for the ready gain to be obtained by the trade, would locate a small band of Indians, make a sudden dash upon the camp, revolvers in hand, shoot as many of the men as possible, and sometimes the women, too, and scatter the rest of the band. The raiders would then catch all the boys and girls between eight and fourteen years of age who had remained near the camp. Then they would start out for a market, perhaps to fill orders they had already obtained. These men would stop at nothing in their greed for gain, and in their eyes their captives were legitimate merchandise.” The 67-year-old Bailey was not telling any western “tall tales.” On the contrary, Bailey accurately portrayed the essentials of the brutal human commerce that flourished in the ostensibly free state of California during the Gold Rush and Civil War eras. As little remembered today as it was in the 1890s, the frontier Indian slave trade recollected in Bailey’s memoirs was the illegal outgrowth of the quite legal system of unfree Native American labor authorized by the notorious Act for the Government and Protection of Indians. Enacted by the first state legislature in April 1850, five months prior to California’s admission to the Union as a free state, the far-reaching statute was deliberately designed to help white employers cope with the high cost and uncontrollable mobility of free labor during the chaotic years of the Gold Rush. It did so by formalizing the regime of bound Native American labor established earlier under Mexico, a nation that had, like the new

American state of California, officially outlawed chattel slavery. Preserving Mexico’s arrangements in full, the Indian Act of 1850 enabled white employers to procure unfree Indian workers through a system of local government convict-leasing or to ensnare free Indian laborers contractually in what amounted to legalized debt peonage. Meanwhile, labor could be extracted from Indian children taken into private homes as custodial wards under a popular provision that, in 1860, was replaced by an expanded program of indentured servitude or “apprenticeship” applicable to adults as well as children. The illegal slave trade, so vividly recalled by Bailey, quickly emerged to furnish the market for Indian wards and apprentices, who were sought primarily as household domestics or farm workers. Although the world of unfree Indian labor in California remains a shadowy place, the survival of a small but valuable cache of Indian indentures in Bailey’s Colusa County affords a rare opportunity to examine the Golden State’s “peculiar institution” at unusually close range. As one of California’s original 27 counties, Colusa County initially comprised all of presentday Glenn and Colusa counties, along with portions of Tehama County. Consequently, early Colusa County covered most of the western half of the flat and fertile Sacramento Valley. Although lacking in precious metals, the county grew up with the Gold Rush as a flourishing commercial supplier of grain, wool and beef. Significantly for the shaping of local antebel-

This is an abridged version of a much longer article published last year: Michael F. Magliari, “Free State Slavery: Bound Indian Labor and Slave Trafficking in California’s Sacramento Valley, 1850-1864,” Pacific Historical Review , vol. 81 (May 2012), pages 155-192. The Pacific Historical Review is the official journal of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association and is published quarterly by the University of California Press.

20 CN&R August 1, 2013

Judge Cornelius J. Diefendorff administered the Indian indenture system in Colusa County during 1861 and 1862. PHOTOGRAPH REPRODUCED FROM JUSTUS H. ROGERS, COLUSA COUNTY: ITS HISTORY RETRACED (ORLAND, CA: 1891), P. 378.

critical given Gold Rush California’s costly wage labor market. Even after the initial wave of gold fever subsided, farm wages remained remarkably high throughout the rest of the 1850s and on into the 1860s, hovering around $35 per month until each harvest season, when they jumped to anywhere from $40 to $75, and when daily rates ranged from $2 to $2.50 or more. Such prohibitive costs fueled Colusa County’s demand for bound Indian workers and drove the brutal slave trafficking that Bailey later described in his memoirs. Considering the roles they were cast to fill, it is no surprise that most of the Indians bound to labor in Colusa County were captive women and children who were legally confined under the child custody and apprenticeship provisions contained in Section 3 of the 1850 Indian Act. Between 1850 and 1860, Section 3 enabled employers to gain hold of Native American children and keep them until they reached the age of majority, which the law defined as 18 years for males and 15 for females. The code required employers to secure the consent of a child’s “parents or friends” and to appear with them before a justice of the peace, who would then issue a certificate of custody. In 1860, the legislature amended Section 3 and expanded its scope by transforming the custodial arrangement for Indian minors into a system of indentured servitude that, under the guise of “apprenticeship,” included not only Native American children but also adult Indians “held as prisoners of war” or determined by the courts to be vagrants. Transferring supervision from justices of the peace to county and district court judges, the revised statute required that employers train their Indian charges as apprentices “to trades, husbandry, or other employments.” In the case of apprenticed minors, indentures could now be obtained by employers without the actual presence of “the parents or friends of the child” in court. The amended statute also permitted employers to retain Indian minors beyond the age of majority and well into adulthood. The actual functioning of Section 3 is revealed quite clearly by the Indian indentures preserved at the Colusa County courthouse. These obscure and obsolete government records permit a fascinating,

albeit incomplete, snapshot of bound Indian labor as it existed in the Sacramento Valley. Documenting the names of 19 white employers and 32 Indian “apprentices,” the 18 extant indentures, recorded between March 1861 and May 1862, strongly suggest some larger patterns. Most striking, perhaps, is the fact that just one of the indentures involved more than one or two Indians. On March 18, 1861, John Boggs appeared before County Judge Cornelius J. Diefendorff and secured an indenture apprenticing 13 young Indian males ranging from 4 to 20 years of age. This appears to have been the only attempt made in the county to use indenture for the purpose of binding a substantial agricultural work force to personal service, and it is not surprising that the initiative came from Boggs. A native of Missouri and the son of a wealthy slave owner, the shrewd and ambitious Boggs had only recently begun what proved to be a spectacularly successful career in local agriculture, finance, real estate and politics. A Forty-Niner who first made it big trading horses and mules, Boggs came to Colusa County in 1855 and purchased 6,000 acres along the west bank of the Sacramento River surrounding the home site he located near Princeton. By 1860, the 31-year-old rancher owned over $25,000 worth of real and personal property consisting mostly of land, cattle and horses. He was also in the midst of a nine-year stint on the county Board of Supervisors, the first stop in a distinguished public career that would include three terms in the California state Senate and a prestigious seat on the Stanford University Board of Trustees. Unlike the wealthy and influential Boggs, the 13 young Indians bound to his service remained virtually anonymous figures. Neither the petition for indenture filed by Boggs nor the actual indenture granted by Judge Diefendorff gives their Indian names or tribal affiliations. Instead, each simply lists their adopted English or Spanish names and estimated ages. The documents also fail to shed much light on the circumstances surrounding their original acquisition. Boggs merely assured Diefendorff that the seven boys “under the ages of fifteen years … have been placed under my care

Section 3 of the 1850 Indian Act enabled employers to gain hold of Native American children and keep them until they reached the age of majority ...

California Sen. John Boggs held at least 13 young male Indian workers as bound “apprentices” on his Sacramento River estate near Princeton. PHOTOGRAPH REPRODUCED FROM JUSTUS H. ROGERS, COLUSA COUNTY: ITS HISTORY RETRACED (ORLAND, CA: 1891), P. 36.

A Wintun man and his two children in early Glenn County, formerly part of Colusa County. PHOTO COURTESY OF COLUSA COUNTY LIBRARY

The original records of Indian indentures in the mid-19th century are preserved at the historic Colusa County Courthouse (pictured circa 1908) in the city of Colusa. PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

lum politics and debates over secession and slavery, a disproportionately large percentage of Colusa County’s pioneer settlers were southern Democrats who hailed from Missouri, Kentucky, and other slave states. For many of its white denizens, much of Indian servitude’s appeal undoubtedly lay in the opportunity it afforded them to replicate, on free soil, the small-scale slaveholding culture that typified the upcountry counties of the Upper South and Border states, and particularly those of Missouri’s Little Dixie region.

“SLAVE” continued on page 22 August 1, 2013

CN&R 21


“SLAVE” continued from page 21

Those [captives] distributed to settlers in Colusa and surrounding Sacramento Valley counties usually fetched f ifty dollars. That, claimed Bailey, “was the standard price for the young redskins,” and anxious farmers “gladly paid it.”

A Yuki Indian baby on the Round Valley Reservation in early Mendocino County. PHOTO COURTESY OF COLUSA COUNTY LIBRARY

and control by the parents of said Indians.” As for the rest, Boggs claimed that they “have placed themselves under my care and control at their own instance and request.” Evidently taking Boggs at his word, Diefendorff approved his petition. In exchange for Boggs’ pledge to “clothe and suitably provide the necessaries of life” for his young servants, and to “instruct said Indians in the various branches of husbandry,” Diefendorff awarded Boggs the full “care, custody, control and earnings” of each one of them “until they shall attain the respective ages as provided” by the law, “according to their supposed ages herein stated.”

While exceptional in terms of the

large number of Indians bound, the indenture granted to Boggs was nearly identical in all other respects to those awarded to applicants seeking just one or two Indian servants. These included not only farmers and ranchers but also merchants and professionals living in the county seat town of Colusa where, according to the Colusa Sun, labor remained “a scarce article.” Wealthy storeowner James Suydam, for instance, bound 7-year-old Lena to labor in his home as a domestic servant until she turned 21. In a similar agreement, former County Judge James Laing gained custody of 3-year-old Ella, who was to be held until age 21 and instructed in the duties of a domestic servant. Laing claimed to have the approval of Ella’s mother, “whose consent to the execution of this Indenture has been freely given.” Most petitioners offered no such assurances to the court, and judges seemed quite content not to press the matter of parental consent. Declaring that “His parents being unknown,” County Judge John F. Wilkins bound 6-year-old Jack to a 19-year appren22 CN&R August 1, 2013

ticeship with rancher Maberry Davis. Justice Diefendorff apparently made no inquiries at all regarding parental whereabouts when binding Charley and Billy to the service of local cattlemen James and Simeon P. Willson, observing merely that the Willsons had held the boys in their custody for several years already. He then bound both until the age of 25. Similarly bound “to household and farm work” was 7-year-old Bob, whom Diefendorff consigned in April 1862 to Agnes Liening, the only white female among Colusa County’s indenture holders. The wife of local farmer and businessman John H. Liening, Agnes Liening had temporarily taken charge of the household after her husband had volunteered for duty in the Union Army. Her indenture of young Bob underscored the important fact that adult white women contributed significantly to the local demand for unfree Indian labor in California. In fact, standing beside more than half of Colusa County’s male indenture holders, including Suydam, Laing, and Davis, was a recently married wife caring for at least one newborn child, if not several others as well. Schoolteacher Rosaline Durst had given birth to her first child just a year before her husband, county physician and newly elected state Assemblyman Daniel P. Durst, acquired an Indian servant girl for their home. On Oct. 8, 1861, Dr. “Indian fighters” like the notorious Harmon “Hi” Good (left) and his friend Alexander “Sandy” Young hunted down Indians and delivered them into bound servitude to white settlers in California. PHOTO COURTESY OF LARRY V. RICHARDSON COLLECTION AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DEPT., MERIAM LIBRARY, CSU, CHICO

Durst took custody of 5-year-old Agnes, who was ordered by Judge Diefendorff to “serve her master faithfully, honestly, and industriously, and all his lawful commands readily and cheerfully obey.” Specifically, Agnes was bound to aid Dr. Durst as a medical nurse, and to serve as a “general household assistant” to his wife. Rosaline Durst undoubtedly encouraged her husband’s indenture of little Agnes since, like most of Colusa County’s pioneer white homemakers, she had much to gain from the compulsory labor of Indian children. As Bailey later admitted, “All the early female settlers of California were overworked” and found little respite “from the never-ending household cares and grind of cooking, washing, scouring, milking, churning and all the other tread-wheel attachments of the times.” Indeed, “the women on the

ranches were confronted with about twice as much work as they could do, and to get hired help, even Chinese, in that part of the state was well nigh impossible.” As Bailey lamented, “The result was overworked wives and unamiable husbands, for it did not improve the temper of the men to be half rancher and half domestic.” Consequently, Harriet Bailey was just as eager as her husband to acquire an Indian servant. This they did in the fall of 1855, when they obtained custody of Lopez, an Indian boy “seven or eight years old.” According to Henry Bailey, Lopez was an orphan living in a nearby rancheria on Grand Island under the care of “his guardians, old Lewis and Sue,” who, when asked, “were only too glad” simply to “give him to us.” Thus, that easily, “We went home an Indian richer.” While it is difficult to fully accept Bailey’s breezy account of how Lopez came into their possession, it is not hard at all to believe that the Baileys now felt richer, since Lopez quickly demonstrated the great value of unfree Indian labor. Indeed, the young couple did not take long to decide that “We were well pleased with him, as he soon learned to wash the dishes and do chores around the house” to Harriet Bailey’s great relief. And certainly she needed assistance, since by then she already had two children and would go on eventually to bear 10 more. Overall, Lopez’s household utility led Henry Bailey to conclude that, “as a rule, fair success attended the experiment” of binding Indian children to domestic labor. “The young Indians were adept in caring for and amusing children; they were clever in inventing amusements and enjoyed the sport almost as much as their young charges,” although, “when it came to washing dishes or clothes or doing other household drudgery, there were usually protests, particularly from the boys.” Nevertheless, “the young servants materially lightened the burdens of the women of the house.” They also provided essential “assistance to the man in the fields,” and Bailey made sure to extract direct personal benefits from Lopez’s toil.


“The second winter I put him to plowing” and soon “I was congratulating my self on my acquisition, as he was worth about twenty dollars a month.”

The high cash-value Bailey placed

on Lopez’s unpaid labor helps explain the early and swift emergence of Northern California’s illegal but lucrative Indian slave trade. There was, as Bailey recalled, “an almost unlimited demand” for Indian children and young adults seized in murderous raids that primarily targeted the populous mountain tribes inhabiting the Coastal Range, particularly in Lake, Mendocino, and Humboldt counties immediately west of Colusa. Captives “were sold all over Sacramento County, and in some instances were taken as far as San Francisco.” Those distributed to settlers in Colusa and surrounding Sacramento Valley counties usually fetched fifty dollars. That, claimed Bailey, “was the standard price for the young redskins,” and anxious farmers “gladly paid it.” Such prices proved irresistible to men like Milton Richardson and his brother, who worked a government land claim on Stony Creek while tending a commercial vegetable garden on the Sacramento River three miles from the Bailey farm. Although they “made considerable money,” the Richardsons “wanted to get cash quicker and easier,” so in 1853 they “went into the slave traffic.” With several collaborators, they established a base camp in the Coastal Range about 60 miles from Colusa and went “out on the hunt for small Indians.” At first successful, their plans for easy money went awry the following year when Milton Richardson, left behind at the camp to guard two young captive boys, was overpowered by his prisoners who seized an ax and decapitated him before making their escape. Despite such risks, however, plenty of others willingly took Richardson’s place in the trade, as Lawrence “Sharkey” Moore related. A native of the Wintu and Salt Pomo rancheria at Stony Ford (now Stonyford) in the Coast Range foothills, Moore, born in 1901, learned from his parents and grandparents that “White men took a lot of Indian children” from the area “and took them away to sell them as slaves.” They “took the young girls and boys someplace in the valley” and “would find some family with [very young] children and have them take a boy to work on the ranch and have a girl help with the housework and take care of the children. They would get the Indian children and sell them. There was money in it.” Throughout the turbulent 1850s and 1860s, slave raiding was both a major cause and effect of the chronic warfare waged between white settlers and Native Americans along the mining and agricultural frontiers of the Coastal, Cascade, and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges. Many Indian captives thus entered the slave trade as “prisoners of war,” and it often became difficult to distinguish between “slave hunters” like the Richardson brothers and the civilian “Indian fighters” who joined volunteer posses sent out to retaliate against local Indian attacks or, more

Colusa County pioneer Jubal Weston acquired the captive Indian girl Nellie from Harmon Good in 1862. PHOTOGRAPH REPRODUCED FROM JUSTUS H. ROGERS, COLUSA COUNTY: ITS HISTORY RETRACED (ORLAND, CA: 1891), P. 386.

Taken captive in 1862 by Harmon Good, young Nellie Weston labored as a domestic servant for Colusa County pioneers Jubal and Sarah Weston until her death in 1875. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CHERYL (WESTON) SANDERSON

frequently, alleged livestock thefts. Among the best-known Indian fighters who at least occasionally supplied Colusa County and other Sacramento Valley communities with Indian captives was the notorious Harmon “Hi” Good. A homesteader living in eastern Tehama County’s Deer Creek Canyon, Good participated in several punitive expeditions against the Yana and other Indians residing along the western flanks of Mount Lassen, always returning with both scalps and captives. During the particularly violent summer of 1862, Good led a 16-man posse of settlers on a two-month campaign against the Yana. Hoping to have his expenses reimbursed by the California treasury, Good penned several letters to Adj.-Gen. William Kibbe requesting a commission for his band as an official unit of the state militia. In one missive written on Aug. 8, 1862, Good informed Kibbe that he had recently attacked “a camp of about one hundred” Indians, killing 17 and capturing “six children—3 Boys and three Girls ranging from one to 8 years old.” Testifying bluntly to frontier California’s high demand for bound Indian labor, Good told

Kibbe that two of the children, one boy and one girl, had already been delivered to white “families who wish to adopt them.” Good had no doubts about finding homes for the rest since “applicants are numerous who would take all I have or expect to bring in hereafter.” Two of the settlers to whom Good distributed Indian children were Jubal and Sarah Weston, who had married in 1854 and begun raising a family in Colusa County near Monroeville, where they managed a hotel and ran livestock. Between 1861 and 1863, they relocated to the high Sierra town of Prattville where, according to the memoir later published by their son Frank, “my mother was given a young orphan Deer Creek Indian girl by Hi Good, an Indian fighter. This girl, Nellie, took care of me while I was young.” When the Westons returned to Colusa County and purchased a farm at St. Johns, they brought Nellie with them, and she remained in the Weston household until her death from consumption in 1875. As long as pro-slavery Southern Democrats dominated local government, efforts to

suppress the Indian slave trade remained sporadic and half-hearted. As Bailey conceded, “Few if any arrests were made” of kidnapping traffickers throughout the course of the 1850s. That quickly began to change, however, following the outbreak of the Civil War and the advent of the Republican Party in state and national politics. With the Republicans suddenly ascendant in Sacramento and Washington, anti-slavery state legislators teamed up with reforming federal Indian agents to eradicate California’s illicit human-trafficking. Their efforts culminated in April 1863, when, in the wake of Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, the California Legislature abolished Indian indenture and “apprenticeship.” Although Bailey would eventually acknowledge the critical role that bound Indian labor played in Colusa’s early development, most local whites chose to forget all about it as they entered the final two decades of the 19th century. In the verbose and triumphalist county histories penned by local newspaper editors Will Green and Justus Rogers, not a single mention appeared in regard to Indian indenture or kidnapping. Instead, prominent white pioneers emerged as hardworking and virtuous men who single-handedly built the farms and towns that transformed a once-wild frontier. Chief among the builders stood Boggs, whose name, according to Green’s compilation, “is a synonyme of energy, enterprise, public-spirit, business integrity, large-hearted generosity, and loyalty to friendship.” Indeed, as Rogers went on to claim, “John Boggs has never been termed a selfish man; far from it; he is generous and obliging to a fault.” Bailey, however, knew better, and so too did Norri, Charley, Pico, and the 10 other Indian boys whose adopted names, though omitted by Rogers and Green, survive nonetheless on the Boggs indenture filed at the Colusa County courthouse. Ω August 1, 2013

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture Director Matt Hammons prepares for Shakespeare’s return to Bidwell Park’s Campfire Council Ring. PHOTOS BY ALAN SHECKTER

THIS WEEK

Bard to Bidwell Shakespeare in the park is not dead yet

Special Events

STheatre Festival (formerly Shakespeare in the Park) Jerry Miller announced his retirement last summer, no one has stepped ince longtime director of the Chico Summer

up to take his place. And though the summer-stock production as we’ve come to know it in recent years is still in limbo, Chicoans who love Shakespeare as part by of their summer still have reason to rejoice. Alan Sheckter Thanks to local theater vets Matt Hammons and Davis Carlson—and their newly formed Bidwell Theatre Company—the 23-year tradiPREVIEW: tion of summertime Shakespeare will continue. William The appropriately named troupe will be Shakespeare’s Timon of Athens staging a relatively brief run—two performancshows Friday and es (Aug. 2 and 3)—of Shakespeare’s Timon of Saturday, Aug. 2-3, Athens at the spot where Shakespeare in the 7:30 p.m., at Park made its debut, the Campfire Council the Campfire Ring in Lower Bidwell Park. The return to the Council Ring. Tickets: $10, campfire ring closes a circle that has followed available at the summer Shakespeare festival from its Lyon Books 17-year run at two Bidwell Park venues— (135 Main St.) including Cedar Grove—to stops at the Chico City Plaza, El Rey Theatre, and finally, the Campfire Council Ring Chico Women’s Club for the past four summers. Director Hammons, a Chico theater mainLower Bidwell Park (between stay who has appeared in several of the sumCaper Acres and mer festival’s productions in recent years, Big Chico Creek) including Romeo and Juliet and Marie Antoinette: The Color of Flesh, is pleased to be using the original venue—a small, semi-circular amphitheater with permanent benches just a few steps from Big Chico Creek. “The stage is in the circle and the audience [is] all around them,” Hammons said. “It’s very minimal, no backdrops. Bidwell Park itself is the backdrop.” Hammons, now 34, soaked up quite a bit of the festival during its years in the park and recognizes the significance of perpetuating the tradition. “As a high-school student I hadn’t cut my teeth yet, but I was a big fan of those great productions that we got to see,” he said. Carlson, who has been living in Brooklyn pursuing acting, music and comedy since earning a post-graduate credential from the Birmingham School of Acting in England, returned to Chico temporarily to produce this show. “I heard how Shakespeare in the Park might not happen and I didn’t think Chico should go without summer theater,” he said. The duo chose one of Shakespeare’s most obscure titles in 24 CN&R August 1, 2013

1

THURS

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. This week: finger-style acoustic guitar with Sean Thompson, “cowgirl blues” with Regina Terry, and magic from Andy Whiteley. Th, 6-9pm through 9/26. Downtown Chico, www.downtownchico.net.

Art Receptions FAMILY & FANTASY RECEPTION: A reception for the ongoing retrospective exhibition of paintings and drawings by Ruth Rippner.

Th, 8/1, 5-8pm. Free. James Snidle Fine Arts & Appraisals, 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.jamessnidlefinearts.com.

Timon of Athens, which deals with the timeless theme of humans getting into trouble by living beyond their means. “This show has some nice parallels to the recent financial crisis,” Hammons said. Local actor John Duncan, a gentle giant with the thespian pedigree and skills to handle the task, assumes the starring role of Timon, an altruistic aristocrat who is a little loose with his riches. “He’s great; I hoped he would do it,” said Hammons of Duncan, who has shined in a wide variety of local productions, including playing Banquo in Rogue Theatre’s 2010 production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. “Timon is an overgenerous nouveau-riche lord who tries to buy his friends with mock credit. … John is such a nice guy and has such a big voice; he can play both sides of the character.” Hammons has whittled down the 400-year-old script into a 90-minute, two-act play featuring eight characters who will be played by some of the area’s most respected actors, including, among others: Sean Green as Flavius, the bookkeeper and righthand man who sticks by Timon’s side; Joe Hilsee as surly philosopher Apemantus; and Shawn Galloway playing the Senator of Athens. Hammons had plenty of kind words for Miller, who has been synonymous with Chico’s summer Shakespeare productions for the last 16 years. “He kind of had to walk away from it,” said Hammons, noting Miller’s full schedule as artistic director for Theatre on the Ridge in Paradise and theater instructor at Butte College. Hammons said he sought out Miller beforehand, not necessarily for an endorsement, but to show respect for the brand, to make sure that no one else was doing it, and to pick Miller’s brain for what he described as “invaluable pointers.” Hammons and Carlson don’t yet know if they’ll return to Shakespeare in summer of 2014. For his part, Hammons is not looking past Timon of Athens. “Let’s just put on a show,” he said. Ω

Theater ANYTHING GOES: A musical following two unlikely couples on the high seas aboard the S.S. American. Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, (530) 8943282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

Music MAMUSE: The beloved local folk favorites perform as part of their

Full Bloom Tour. Folk quartet Sirenz opens. Th, 8/1, 8pm. $10-$15. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

MAMUSE

Tonight, Aug. 1 1078 Gallery SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS Music SUMMERTIME BLUES WEEKEND: ERIC SARDINAS: The second night of Feather Falls Casino’s two-night International Blues Day celebration featuring Eric Sardinas and Big Motor. Sa, 8/3, 9:30pm. $10-$15. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

Theater ANYTHING GOES: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

TIMON OF ATHENS: See Friday. $10. Bidwell Park Campfire Circle, Lower Bidwell Park, (530) 5217821.

4

SUN

2

FRI

Special Events

FAMILY & FANTASY RECEPTION Tonight, Aug. 1 James Snidle Fine Arts

SEE THURSDAY, ART RECEPTIONS

COMEDY NIGHT: Stand-up comedians Michael Mancini and Derek Richards hit the Rolling Hills comedy stage. F, 8/2, 7:30pm. $10. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning, (877) 840-0457, www.rollinghillscasino.com.

FIRST FRIDAY COMEDY SERIES: Colusa Casino’s monthly comedy series continues with standup comedian Dom Irrera. F, 8/2, 8-10pm. $20. Colusa Casino Resort, 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa, (530) 458-8844; www.colusacasino.com.

Art Reception SUMMER STOCK 3 RECEPTION: An opening reception for the photography exhibit featuring seven local and regional artists. Music provided by Ender and Seven Mills. F, 8/2, 6-8pm. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 3431973, www.1078gallery.org.

Music FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with the R&B/blues of Sapphire Soul. F, 7-8:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 345-6500, www.downtownchico.net.

TIMON OF ATHENS: The Bidwell Theatre Company conitinues the summer tradition of performing Shakespeare works in the park. F & Sa, 7:30pm. $10. Bidwell Park Campfire Circle, Lower Bidwell Park, (530) 521-7821.

3

SAT

Special Events COHASSET BAZAAR & MUSIC FESTIVAL: The annual bazaar featuring a parade, live music, raffle prizes, a BBQ, food vendors, arts and crafts booths, children’s activities and more. Sa, 8/3, 10am-5pm. $5 admission. 11 miles past Chico Airport in Cohasset, (530) 898-8197, www.cohassetcommunity.org.

FORBESTOWN DAZE: Interactive gold-milling and panning exhibits, a baked-good sale, music, and a robbery of the Wells Fargo office. Sa, 8/3, 9am-4pm. Free. Yuba Feather Museum/ Gold Trader Flat, 19096 New York Flat Rd. in Forbestown, (530) 675-1025, www.yubafeather museum.org.

SUMMERTIME BLUES WEEKEND: SHANE DWIGHT: The first night of Feather Falls Casino’s twonight International Blues Day celebration features Northern California native Shane Dwight. F, 8/2, 9:30pm. $10-$15. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 5333885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

Theater ANYTHING GOES: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Eaton and Esplanade, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheater company.com.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

COHASSET BAZAAR & MUSIC FESTIVAL Saturday, Aug. 3 Cohasset

Special Events SUMMER ON THE SIERRA ORO FARM TRAIL: Selfguided or charted van tours of participating farms and wineries on the Sierra Oro Farm Trail. Su, 8/4, 12-5pm. Call or visit website for details, locations vary. (530) 891-5556, www.sierraoro.org.

Theater ANYTHING GOES: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

5

MON

Music

Art 1078 GALLERY: Summer Stock 3, a photography exhibit featuring seven local and regional artists. 8/1-8/17. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

ALL FIRED UP: Pottery and multi-media

exhibit, Ongoing. 830 Broadway, (530) 8945227, www.allfiredupchico.com.

ANGELO’S CUCINA TRINACRIA: A Garden

Bouquet, featuring watercolor paintings by Cynthia Sexton. Through 8/31. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Outside Edge, Burning Man photographs by Michele Miller and “alternate lifestyle” photographs from Camille de Ganon. Through 8/3. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

BIDWELL PARK: Invasive Nature(s), Erin Wade’s site-specific temporary sculptures that pay tribute to the work of Andy Goldsworthy while raising awareness of invasive plants in Bidwell Park. Along the north side of Sycamore Field. Through 8/4. Bidwell Park.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Shutterbugs, the Chico Art Center presents its latest Discovery Series show, featuring works from the Shutterbug Photography Group. Through 8/2. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 8958726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Northern California Gold, local artist Jake Early’s new six-piece series featuring scenes in rice fields, olive groves, vineyards, almond orchards and more. Through 8/30. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

ELLIS ART & ENGINEERING SUPPLIES: Window

Gallery, non-traditional watercolor compositions by Dean Evans and oil and acrylic pieces by Christine Muratore. 8/1-8/31. 122 Broadway St., (530) 891-0335, www.ellishas it.com.

IDEA FABRICATION LABS: Erin Banwell

Exhibition, an exhibition of works created through an array of techniques and technologies signature to the “modern maker” movement. Ongoing. 603 Orange St., (530) 592-0609.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS: Fantasy and Family, a retrospective of family and fantasy expressed in paintings and drawings from Ruth Rippner. Through 8/31; Th, 8/1, 5-8pm. 254 E Fourth St., (530) 343-2930.

MANAS ART SPACE & GALLERY: Birds of a

Feather exhibition, open-entry exhibit exploring human nature in any medium. Through 8/23. 1441-C Park Ave., (530) 5885183.

Museums CHICO AIR MUSEUM: an ongoing display highlighting local aviation history. Ongoing. 170 Convair Ave., (530) 345-6468.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds sponsored by the Altaeal Audubon Society. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Chico: Our Story in Pictures, an exhibit featuring photos from the John Nopel collection. Through 1/1, 2014. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Secrets of

Circles, an exhibition exploring the properties of a simple shape with powerful applications. Through 9/1. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Infinity & Beyond, an exhibit tracing early human celestial observation to modern space endeavors with a Russian Sokol Space suit, a moon rock and brand-new footage of deep space on display. Ongoing. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

DONNA THE BUFFALO: A groove-centric mix of Cajun zydeco, rock, folk, reggae, and country. M, 8/5, 7:30-9:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com.

7

WED

Theater SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD: A work of musical theater performed by the Chico Troupers. 8/7-8/9, 7:30pm. $10-$17. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 32

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Happy Blues Day Feather Falls Brewing Co. doesn’t normally need an excuse to celebrate the blues, but give the Oroville casino’s music-showroom organizers a bona fide holiday celebrating the music and they’ll really put together a big party. In honor of Aug. 3 being International Blues Music Day, the brewery is hosting the Summertime Blues Weekend, featuring two nights’ EDITOR’S PICK worth of touring blues acts. Saturday, Aug. 2, Nashvillebased (Bay Area born-and-raised) Shane Dwight returns to the area, and Sunday, Aug. 3, Eric Sardinas and his electric resonator guitar will hit the stage backed by the Florida frontman’s crew, Big Motor.

August 1, 2013

CN&R 25


BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave. North off of Hwy 32 and East Ave, (530) 321-5607.

AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

PARADISE FARMERS’ MARKET IN THE PARK: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Th, 5-8pm through 9/5. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-6291.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-7085.

BIDWELL MANSION PLANNING MEETING: A Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park community planning meeting. Call for more info. W, 8/7, 7pm. Bidwell Mansion, 525 Esplanade, (530) 8956144.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

Business Owners Get your CASH now! We W can n provide pr id you with ith working rkin capital, no need to wait. Increase your inventory, advertise, remodel your shop . . . whatever you need. SEVERAL MERCHANT OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Call Scotty 894-2436

Office of Alois Scott Jr.

redit carD C 1600 M A processing store ANGROVE

VE STE 135

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.butte county.net.

CHAPMAN FARMERS’ MARKET: A year-round Certified Farmers Market serving as a community forum for healthy lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. F, 6-8pm. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:3010pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMERS’ MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods, honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers’ Market, Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second and Wall streets, (530) 893-3276.

FARMERS’ MARKET: NORTH CHICO: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. W, 7:30am-noon through 11/22. North Valley Plaza, 801 East Ave.

FARMERS’ MARKET: OROVILLE: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertain-

ment. First Sa of every month, 7:30am-noon through 10/26. Oroville Municipal Auditorium, 1200 Myers St. in Oroville, (530) 589-0735.

FARMERS’ MARKET: PARADISE: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Tu, 7:30am-noon through 10/15. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7069.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First

Ave., (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfree clinic.org.

GUITAR WORKSHOP WITH ALI HANDAL: An educational workshop with acclaimed female guitarist and author Ali Handal. Th, 8/1, 6pm. Free. Guitar Center, 2027 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr Pkwy., (530) 879-1731.

HEALING LIGHT MEDITATION: A weekly meditation session for centering, insight and awakening. M, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St., (530) 343-0704, www.100thmon keycafeandbooks.com.

ORGANIC VEGETABLE PROJECT: Chico State’s University Farm is a grant-funded, studentrun project selling produce on campus. W, 11am-2pm through 8/31. Bell Memorial Union (BMU), 400 W First St. CSU, Chico, (530) 8984696, www.aschico.com.

26 CN&R August 1, 2013

BIDWELL MANSION PLANNING MEETING Wednesday, Aug. 7 Bidwell Mansion SEE COMMUNITY

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

TRADITIONAL WEST AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, E. Third And Pine, (808) 757-0076.

For Kids CAMP CHICO CREEK: An environmental-education camp for children ages 5 to 11 with a different theme each week. This week: Marvelous Mammals. Call for more info. M-F through 8/16. $85-$135. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

SUMMER DAY CAMP FOR KIDS: A summer camp emphasizing outdoor activity helping youth develop social and decision-making skills. Call or go online for more info. Through 8/14, 6:30am-6pm. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St. in Oroville, (530) 533-9622, www.oroville ymca.org.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive-plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water quality testing and more. Check Friends of Bidwell Park web site for dates and locations. Ongoing. www.friendsofbidwell park.org.

CHICO PERFORMANCES VOLUNTEERS: Chico Performances needs volunteers to deliver posters to set places and routes. Ongoing. Contact for info, (530) 898-6785.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Chico Halfway between Chico and Durham, (530) 514-3903.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


CHOW

Sweet flesh of summer. PHOTO BY STEVEN DEPOLO

Sugar below It’s summer, and the ground is sweet with melons

S above, to dangle from the branches of peach trees, fig trees and grapevines. But some of the sweetest ummer’s sweetness tends to come from

summer fruits of all dwell in the dirt, as meek and humble as winter squash but as dazzling and juicy as the best stone by fruits: muskmelons (which include Alastair Bland cantaloupes and honeydews) and watermelons. Two separate species in the Cucurbitaceae—or gourd— family, these heavy, sugary orbs have long presented a challenge to Americans trying to hunt up good ones, which is usually a matter of solid hit or total miss. You know how it goes: One watermelon knocks you over with its juice and sweetness, while another is a flabby, rubbery, tasteless dud. Speaking from personal experience, I know how good muskmelons and watermelons should be. A few summers ago, I traveled for more than two months in Turkey and the Republic of Georgia, nations where myriad varieties of muskmelons are cherished as among the highest delights of summer. They are sold by vendors who stack them in vast yellow and green heaps in town squares, along highways, and in marketplaces. Downwind, the fruits can be smelled from half a block away at times, and the colorful variety I found was marvelous; every melon I cut open seemed to offer a surprise, either with its unexpected flesh color or its variance in texture. Nearly all were extravagantly sweet, and I ate almost every one with ceremonial respect and reverence. Only two or three out of the 100 or so I ate were disappointing. The watermelons, too, were exceptional, though my carrying capacity as a traveler prevented me from thoroughly exploring the opportunities.

In Northern California, buying Cucur-

bitaceae fruits is more of a gamble. Though the climate is warm enough to produce them in perfect form, most muskmelons and watermelons are harvested too early and entered into the joyless, semisweet realms of

the national supermarket industry. At Bordin-Huitt Ranch in Durham, however, ripeness is par for the course in Marie and Terry Bordin’s melon plot. The Bordins are growing just two types of melons this year—Crimson Sweet watermelons and Best Jumbo cantaloupes—among many other ground crops. Terry said they were a little late in planting this year, and that the first watermelons—usually a Fourth of July favorite—are are beginning to swell to size and ripeness. Ripeness in a watermelon, said Marie, can be determined by knocking on the fruit and listening; a hollow-sounding ring that resonates within the sugary density of the fruit is an indicator of excellence, while a dead thud indicates a dud—or, if it’s still on the vine, that it may need another week of sun. On striped watermelon varieties, too, a sharp—rather than blurry—delineation between the green and white lines means the fruit has spent sufficient time ripening. “You can also look for the watermelons with a ‘sugar spot,’ Marie advised. “It looks like a bee sting that’s oozing juice. Those ones are the sweetest.” For muskmelons, meanwhile, finding the best is all about aroma, she said; if it doesn’t smell like perfume, keep searching. The Bordins work seven farmers’ markets in the region, including all those in Chico, and sell their produce within a day of harvest. Their Crimson Sweets are a round melon, between eight and 10 pounds, with intensely red flesh. One may find still more varieties at local markets, especially of muskmelons. Good ones include the charentais, the Passport galia, the Diplomat galia, the piel de sapo (aka Santa Claus or Christmas melon), and the Rayyan, a five-pound, super-juicy whitefleshed melon that is among the best cultivars that grow. Remember, when it comes to melons, always inspect for that aroma, and hold off for the best, for the prize is worth the pursuit. Ω August 1, 2013

CN&R 27


FINAL WEEK JOSS WHEDON’S

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

THURS-SAT 6PM; SUNDAY MATINEE 3:45PM MON-THURS (8/8) 7:45PM STARTS FRIDAY!

“A FILM THAT MAY BE THE HAPPIEST TIME YOU’LL HAVE AT THE MOVIES ALL SUMMER..” -BOSTON GLOBE

99% ON ROTTEN TOMATOES

TWENTY FEET FROM STARDOM FRI/SAT 8PM; SUNDAY MATINEE 2PM MON-THURS 6PM

Call 343-0663 or visit www.PageantChico.com

We Want to Help! Chico Cash Exchange

• Collateral Loans / Pawns • Cash for Gold • Check Cashing • Payday Advance

20th & Park • 892–2222 CA Lic # 04020994 / Permit # 11233001 Licensed by Dept. of Corps under the CA Deferred Deposit Transaction Law

X-tra butter, please Latest X-Men installment delivers the popcorn, but not much else

Sabout a movie than: “It’s OK.” The Wolverine is one of those movies. It achieves “OK” largely by not ometimes it’s hard to say anything more

iew.com

srev www.new

being as bad as the abysmal last attempt to franchise the titular character, which just underscores how awful the last Wolverine picture was. by

Craig Blamer

Mariko is boring, in that her only narrative function is to look pretty and give Wolverine someone to protect. And she does need protection, since her father is in league with the Japanese underworld. So we end up with Wolverine doing that stabby/slashy thing with his metal claws to ninjas and gangsters over and over and over and ...

2 GUNS (DIGITAL)

(R) 11:30AM 12:50PM 2:10PM 3:30PM 4:50PM 6:10PM 7:30PM 8:50PM 10:15PM

CONJURING, THE

(DIGITAL) (R) 11:50AM 2:30PM 5:10PM 7:50PM 10:30PM

DESPICABLE ME 2

(DIGITAL) (PG) 11:50AM 2:15PM 4:40PM

RED 2 (DIGITAL) (PG13) 11:15AM 2:00PM 4:45PM 7:35PM 10:25PM

SMURFS 2 (3D) (PG) 10:15AM 12:45PM 3:15PM 5:45PM 8:15PM

SMURFS 2 (DIGITAL)

(PG) 11:30AM 2:00PM 4:30PM 7:00PM 9:30PM

FRUITVALE STATION

TURBO (DIGITAL) (PG) 10:00AM 12:25PM 2:50PM 5:15PM 7:40PM 10:05PM

GROWN UPS 2

WAY, WAY BACK, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-

(DIGITAL) (R) 1:00PM 3:10PM 5:20PM 7:30PM 9:40PM (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 11:55AM 2:25PM 4:55PM 7:25PM 9:55PM

HEAT, THE (DIGITAL) (R) 2:40PM 8:40PM

PACIFIC RIM (DIGITAL) (PG-13) 1:15PM 7:15PM

R.I.P.D. (DIGITAL) (PG-

13) 12:30PM 3:00PM 5:30PM 8:00PM 10:30PM

WOLVERINE, THE

(3D) (PG-13)11:40AM 5:40PM

WOLVERINE, THE

(DIGITAL) (PG-13) 10:05AM 1:10PM 4:10PM 7:10PM 10:10PM

13) 10:30AM 4:15PM 10:20PM

28 CN&R August 1, 2013

The Wolverine

Starring Hugh Jackman, Tao Okamoto, Svetlana Khodchenkova and Rila Fukushima. Directed by James Mangold. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

FRIDAY 8/02 – MONDAY 8/05

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

3

1

Poor

2

Fair

3

Good

4

Very Good

5

Excellent

The Wolverine is saved again by his mutant biceps.

It’s a shame really, especially since The Wolverine doesn’t deliver on what is a promising first act. We join Logan/Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) in a hole in a Japanese POW camp just across from Nagasaki during the endgame of World War II. He saves one of his captors from the ensuing nuclear holocaust and 50 years later is summoned to the man’s deathbed for an “Arigato gozaimasu.” The former officer has done well in the world, going on to enjoy a full life as founder of the most successful electronics corporation in Japan. But now he’s dying of the deadly seed planted by “Fat Man” and thinks our hero’s mutant regenerative abilities might extend his life. Sorry, Wolverine says, it doesn’t work that way, and so the old dude exits, honking off his son by leaving all his wealth to granddaughter Mariko (Tao Okamoto). He also leaves her to Wolverine as a romantic interest, because that’s the way the template works. This is the point where any promise dies on the vine.

It starts getting old fast. OK, there’s a lively setpiece involving Tokyo’s bullet train that’s fun, but otherwise it’s pretty much just the same ol’ Marvel Comics repetition from opening to closing credits (although there’s a post-credits scene that offers more potential than the movie itself). Fortunately, Wolvie has picked up a sidekick along the way in the refreshingly mysterious Yukio (Rila Fukushima), one of those ass-kicking chicks who sport the tall boots, short skirt and deadly eyes that action directors love to fondle with their camera lenses. Unfortunately, that’s pretty much the only function Yukio serves. There’s also a sexy/creepy mutant named Viper (Svetlana Khodchenkova) slinking about, sapping Wolverine’s ability to regenerate properly, which complicates things as Yakuza thugs keep pumping bullets into him over the course of the movie. The film has seemingly no destination in mind other than the inevitable boss fight, and it’s not even a surprise when we find out who is behind all the nefarious machinations. At least The Wolverine serves its purpose as a mildly diverting excuse to sit in an air-conditioned theater eating popcorn that costs more than the movie itself. But don’t expect much more than that. Ω


a y u B Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week 2 Guns

An action-comedy starring Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg as a DEA agent and a Navy Seal/NCIS agent, respectively, who are forced to partner up and go on the run after realizing they were set up during an undercover investigation of a drug cartel. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

20 Feet from Stardom

The universally acclaimed documentary about the backup singers at the heart of some of the most memorable songs in popmusic history. Featuring conversations with Bruce Springsteen, Bette Midler, Mick Jagger, among others. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

The Smurfs 2

Another CGI-animation/real-life mash-up featuring the Smurfs. This time, the little blue mushroom-dwellers are running around Paris looking for Smurfette, who has been kidnapped by Gargamel and his Smurf clones, the Naughties. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Now playing

2

The Conjuring

There’s a creeping sense of familiarity with each run at the haunted-house premise, and with The Conjuring, the latest from James Wan (Saw, Insidious), that familiarity is amped to the nth degree with an indulgence of homages to the touchstones of the genre, with the film’s structure of acts obviously: The Amityville Horror, Poltergeist, The Exorcist, wrapping up with The Evil Dead. But the end result is more of a homogenized Scooby-Doo episode padded to feature length and played straight. There are some spooky moments to be found—a couple of decent chills and one good jump scare. And one clever approach is having the focus be more on the ghost hunters themselves (Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson, playing real-life paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren). Unfortunately, Ed and Lorraine aren’t very interesting. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —C.B.

3

Despicable Me 2

Super-villain Gru (Steve Carell) turned straight in the original Despicable Me, so what’s left for him to do in round two? Fall in love. He’s also trying to stop an evil-doer who has stolen a chemical that turns any living creature into a killing machine. But the romantic subplot, involving flirtations between Gru and his detective partner Lucy (Kristen Wiig), proves more entertaining than the mediocre storyline about the search for criminal suspect Eduardo (Benjamin Bratt, in exaggerated Latino-stereotype mode). Whatever magic is lost from the original film is recovered by Gru’s tiny minions: His helpers look like aliens but possess the charm of babbling babies—a weird combination that’s onscreen gold (as was proven by the booming laughs from every child in the theater). Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —R.B.

Fruitvale Station

A bio-pic telling the real-life story of the murder of Oscar Grant by a BART police officer at Oakland’s Fruitvale Station on New Year’s Day 2009. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Grown Ups 2

Adam Sandler and his grown-up childhood friends—David Spade, Chris Rock, Kevin

James—reunite once again, this time in their sleepy hometown where Sandler’s character has returned to raise his family only to find that the place is a constant source of wacky shenanigans. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

the sequel, scanning the globe in order to find and defuse a nuclear bomb. Also starring Catherine Zeta-Jones, Anthony Hopkins, Mary-Louise Parker and Lee Byunghun. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

The Heat

2

An odd-couple buddy-cop comedy with Sandra Bullock as an uptight FBI agent forced to partner up with a rough-around-the-edges Boston detective (Melissa McCarthy) in order to bring down a Russian drug lord. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

3

The Lone Ranger

At the very least, this wildly erratic production deserves a measure of credit for maintaining some kind of oddball comic momentum over the long haul of its mockepic Western-movie action. The story is disposable and inconsequential. Most of the best stuff in the film is bizarre action, exuberant grotesquerie, cartoonish sight-gags and stunts, FX action involving vintage trains, etc. Johnny Depp plays Tonto here, and with his dead-bird headgear and assorted mystical and mythical trappings, his can seem like a rather Hunter S. Thompsonized version of the character. But in his most elaborate action scenes, he seems to be channeling the deadpan stunts and intrepid spirit of Buster Keaton. Revisionist farce shows a less pungent side with the film’s Lone Ranger (Armie Hammer), a neurotic and somewhat narcissistic do-gooder who is little more than a mock-heroic accessory for the action sequences. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Man of Steel

Henry Cavill is the latest in a long line of actors to don the famous blue-and-red costume in this reboot of the Superman movie franchise. The film focuses on the origin of the eponymous character, from a young Clark Kent’s discovery of his alien heritage and superhuman powers to donning the familiar “S” crest to save Earth from other, less friendly Kryptonian refugees. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

4

Much Ado About Nothing

Joss Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Avengers) delivers with a wonderfully clever update of the classic Shakespeare romantic-comedy, making it accessible to a contemporary audience without debasing the material, and delivering an adaptation that stays true to the populist spirit of the piece. Shot in black-and-white over the course of two weeks at the director’s own house with chump change, Whedon’s film maintains the integrity of the Bard’s language without drowning in it. With his cast of regulars obviously having a blast (Firefly alumnus Nathan Fillion damn near steals the show as Dogberry), Whedon’s Much Ado of Nothing is really something. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

4

Pacific Rim

This is the rare summer blockbuster that lives up to the hype. In the film, a tunnel has opened up from the Earth’s core and is spitting out giant Kaiju that have nothing better to do than pull the spitting high-tension wires down, with a purposeful grimace and a terrible sound, before wading through the buildings toward the center of the city. I would have been happy with just that, but the movie isn’t just for me. So writer/director Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth) throws in the Jaegers, giant robots, each manned by a pair of human co-pilots holding hands with their minds, or something like that. Once things get rolling—and they get rolling fast—we have giant robots beating up on giant monsters, and vice versa. While it’s loud and noisy, it’s also clever, as a blockbuster ideally should be. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

RED 2

The gang of retired spies—Bruce Willis, Helen Mirren, John Malkovich—is back for

D ! e U H om h

UD Hom Save Thousandesand

of $$

Please call or visit our website today for complete details and a FREE HUD photo list of all available HUD HOMES in California.

R.I.P.D.

While blatantly a knock off of Men in Black, the latest paranormal buddy movie is a surprisingly fun popcorner in its own right. The basic premise: A murdered cop (Ryan Reynolds) wakes up on the other side and finds himself drafted into the afterlife version of the Justice Department. He’s teamed with a long-dead loose cannon of a lawman (Jeff Bridges, chewing the scenery), and the two try to track down the rookie’s killer while keeping the fabric of the cosmos from being RIP’D apart. Before it settles into formula in the second half there’s some potential, but it’s not anything memorable. Even so, it moves fast and is consistently entertaining. As a matinees go, you could do worse. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

DON’T

Interest Rates arW A I T ! e Climbing! Own a H

remaxofparadise.com | (530) 872-5880

1-800-897-3629 | 6635 Clark Rd. Paradise CA 95969

remaxofparadise.com

1/2 off Entree Buy 1 Entree + 2 drinks and receive the 2nd Entree of equal or lesser value 1/2 off (Not valid with delivery. Exp 08/28/13)

Turbo

A 3-D computer-animated feature based on the convoluted premise of a snail who, thanks to freak accident, becomes super fast and wants to race against cars in the Indianapolis 500. Starring the voices of Ryan Reynolds, Paul Giamatti, Samuel L. Jackson, Maya Rudolph and Snoop Dogg. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

The Way, Way Back

The Descendants screenwriters Nat Faxon and Jim Rash wrote and directed this story about a young teen boy (Liam James) who, while on a summer vacation with his mom (Toni Collette) and her jerk of boyfriend (Steve Carell), comes into his own with a little help from the free-spirited manager (Sam Rockwell) of a water park. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

We Deliver!

Authentic Chinese Cuisine 2201 Pillsbury RD. Suite 100, Chico, CA 95926 (In Almond Orchard Shopping Center)

530.345.8862 • 530.345.3927

4

White House Down

The very least you can say about director Roland Emmerich’s latest is that no matter how goofy it gets (and it gets pretty goofy), it’s still remarkably coherent. It’s also remarkably entertaining. Channing Tatum plays a D.C. cop who shows up at the White House for an interview with the Secret Service. A job protecting the POTUS (Jamie Foxx) ostensibly will redeem him in his disappointed daughter’s eyes, but the interview doesn’t go that well. Soon enough, peckerwood terrorists blow up the Capitol as a diversion to storm the White House and grab the president, and Tatum’s character is suddenly given a second interview … this time with the president himself. The script is clever and the banter is witty. Sure, it’s big, dumb fun—but it’s clever big, dumb fun. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

3

The Wolverine

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

2

World War Z

World War Z is a barely capable thriller in zombie drag, with shaky-cam and muddy editing to keep you confused when the shit hits the fan. Brad Pitt plays a retired UN spook who reluctantly re-ups to do something about all the damned zombies. He does so in a handful of noisy set-pieces loosely linked together to serve as story, but those pieces are just variations of “Shit! Someone just made a noise and here come the zombies! Run!” And here the infected come arunnin’, as director Marc Forster emphasizes the swarming aspect of insects or even the disease itself. It’s a neat approach, one that aims for adrenaline over dread. There’s not much in the way of suspense, because that would slow down the action. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

August 1, 2013

CN&R 29


TEST RIDE TODAY! ELECTRIC BICYCLES! • Up to 40 miles of distance per charge • REAL Transportation Speeds up to 20 mph • No licensing or registration required

455 E. 20th St. (20th & Mullberry) | Chico (530) 899-7270 | redmountaingreencycyle.com facebook.com/rmgreencycle

Words landing well Oregon-based Landon Wordswell raps under the radar

B Wordswell and moved to the West Coast, Anthony Short was a teenage “battle rapper” based in St. efore he settled on the stage name Landon

Louis performing under the name Youngs. As Wordswell acknowledged during a recent interview in downtown Chico by (also attended by his backing guiHoward Hardee tarist Tim Hoke), the largely improvised and insult-focused exercise of howardh@ battle-rapping and the discipline of newsreview.com writing songs each involve entirely different approaches. “My friend in Chicago said, ‘You should write more, because battle rappers tend to unlearn how to LISTEN TO write—battle rappers don’t make LANDON: good songs,’” Wordswell said. Hear The Mourning While on-air during a Chicago-area After Pill at www.tinyurl.com/ radio show, the same friend urged wordswell and him to adopt a new moniker, Fountain of Youth because “Youngs was vague.” II at “So, he’s like, ‘Look, man, you www.landonwords just land on words really well. Then well.band he said, ‘Landon Wordswell,’ and camp.com. that was it.” Since the ensuing name change, Wordswell has relocated to Eugene, Ore., recruited a full-time touring back-up musician in Hoke, released an album and a mixtape (The Mourning After Pill, and Fountain of Youth II, respectively) via Cult Classic Records, toured Europe, and shared a stage with Gift of Gab of Blackalicious. And though Wordswell, now 25, remains well below the radar of the national hip-hop scene, touring has provided an opportunity to hone his stage act by figuring out what evokes strong audience responses and incorporating those elements when writing new material. Along the way, he has purposely avoided what has become commonplace during hip-hop performances—rapping alongside a pre-recorded vocal track. “Entertaining people is a craft; it’s an art,” he said. “I can adjust my voice and bring it to a certain level in order to get the desired response. If [other rappers] don’t do it right, it makes me upset, because it takes a lot of work. “I failed a lot when I started performing, but I got back on the horse.” Perhaps the best introduction to his artful, selfcontemplative flows, often laid over dreamy instrumental tracks, is the single “Land on Words Well” (featuring DJ FlipFlop) from Fountain of Youth II. The track immediately takes off with: “He wakes up in the morning with the sun as his alarm/ and every day’s a little different because he’s living in the 30 CN&R August 1, 2013

Landon Wordswell— there’s a lot in a name. PHOTO COURTESY OF CULT CLASSIC RECORDS

moment” and proceeds to provide a quick (and I mean quick) overview of his first steps in the hip-hop world: “Got into the zone, stopped rockin’ his phone/ started touring all the time, leaving problems at home/ home, home, where the heart is and his soul is alone.” On “Can’t Change Alone” (featuring Sammy Faze), another standout track (originally recorded when he was 19) on Fountain of Youth II, Wordswell said he drew inspiration from three personal—yet very different—sources: A crumbling relationship with his girlfriend, a desire for companionship on his looming international tour, and a drinking problem that had begun to interfere with his family life. In his verses, Wordswell makes no distinction between the three issues, alluding to them all at once. It’s an ambiguous writing style that leaves the listener with an impression of someone looking for support (“I can’t change alone”), which the rapper seems to be doing within the song itself: “I zone out with my songs and my microphone … I need this microphone.” “When I was younger, I would go through something significant and I would write,” Wordswell said of his early songs. “Now that I’m older, I’ve started noticing that from a different person’s perspective, [the songs make] no sense.” Though it wasn’t intentional, the ambiguity and confusion in “Can’t Change Alone” makes the subject matter universally identifiable, evoking emotions a world away from that of gaudy and empty mainstream rap. And thanks to a sparse, head-nodding backdrop and an ultra-catchy “I can’t change alone” refrain sung by Faze, the track is an ear-worm. Wordswell and Hoke will begin recording their next album this fall, with plans for release by the end of the year. Though Hoke has served only as Wordswell’s stage accompaniment thus far, he will arrange and perform all of the new album’s instrumental work. “For this next album, [Cult Classic Records] has put a lot of money and promotion into it,” Wordswell said, adding that he and Hoke have plenty of emotional investment tied to the project as well. “It makes me nervous. If it fails, it’s like, ‘Well, shit.’” Ω


“... the perfect combination of AN ATTRACTIVE AD

Revocation

AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE that actually works to

Revocation Relapse Revocation plays metal that’s complex and brutal—riffs that slice and dice, drumming that defies logic, larynx-shredding vocals—and memorable. The Boston, Mass., four-piece’s self-titled second album for Relapse continues the melodic-thrash onslaught that began with 2008’s Empire of the Obscene—that is, the band still operates with a surgeon’s precision while allowing lots of blood to spill. The band doesn’t dick around with atmosphere, instead going full-speed throughout the album’s 10 cuts. But within that speed-freak intensity there are plenty of knotty twists and turns. “Arch Fiend” finds groove and death metal lurking on the same corner, while “The Gift You Gave” delivers the chugs and gallops of classic American thrash. There’s even banjo on “Invidious,” which pairs well with the song’s shoutalong chorus. And guitarist/vocalist David Davidson unleashes some truly godless vocals atop the mayhem. The fact that Revocation can fold familiar metal tricks into something new is a testament to how good these guys really are. Being technical is one thing. Carving your own name (preferably in virgin skin) is what makes metal sharp. —Mark Lore

bring in new customers ” My name is Scott Hathorn. I have owned and operated Chico Coin and Jewelry at West 15th St and Park Ave for the last 25 years. Throughout all of those years in Chico, I have had the opportunity to test many different forms of advertising available to business owners in the Butte county area. I have implemented ad campaigns on Television, and Radio, as well as print ads in daily newspapers and the Yellow pages. Time and time again I have found my best results as far as the most bang for my advertising dollars to be in the form of a weekly News and Review display ad. It is the perfect combination of an attractive ad at an affordable price that actually works to bring in new customers in addition to reminding current ones to revisit when they can.

MUSIC

Monaco: What’s Yours is Mine Pocketwatch Games PC, Mac, Xbox 360 There’s an old-school sense of co-op gameplay in Monaco that’s missing from the modern use of that label. The top-down stealth-action game features eight characters that up to four players may use to pull off heists. Each character has a unique ability that, as a group, offers a variety of gameplay styles. The Hacker shuts down security systems, The Cleaner knocks out guards, and The Locksmith is, well, a locksmith. While being stealthy is a defining aspect of the game, there’s a variety of ways to react to detection and this opens up the game to players who normally hate “stealth missions.” No level requires that players choose a specific character or even work together to overcome a puzzle or obstacle, but Monaco embraces a true co-op experience. By using a simple format—avoid detection, reach objective—and offering a variety in character selection, Pocketwatch Games gives players the tools to make the game their own. This allows strategies to be born from not only character selection but player selection as well. Beneath its straightforward surface, Monaco is a game of limited definition and carefully chosen variables that create near infinite play possibilities. —Matthew Craggs

-SCOTT HATHORN OWNER OF CHICO COIN & JEWELRY

GAME

Duke at the Roadhouse: Live in Santa Fe Eddie Daniels & Roger Kellaway

NEED ATTENTION?

IPO Recordings Jazz clarinetist Eddie Daniels’ latest collaboration with pianist Roger Kellaway is a fabulous tribute to late, great pianist/composer/bandleader Duke Ellington. Daniels—who also plays tenor saxophone on this stellar album—and Kellaway are joined by cellist James Holland. The CD opens with a 7-plus-minute version of “I’m Beginning to See the Light,” co-written by Ellington (and Don George, Johnny Hodges and Harry James). Kellaway and Daniels carry the tune to improvisationally creative heights, foreshadowing the captivating, quirky creativity they bust out on later tunes such as the coolest version of the Ellington standard (written by Juan Tizol) “Perdido” I’ve ever heard (featuring Holland’s skillful, beautiful cello-playing holding down the bottom, and a wonderful mid-song cadenza from Daniels). “Sophisticated Lady,” with Daniels featured on tenor sax, is highlighted by Kellaway’s sensitive, spare playing providing the perfect support. On “Creole Love Call” one can hear Daniels’ classical training shine through in the repeated low-to-high leaps he easily makes over the course of a string of notes. Daniels’ original, “Duke at the Roadhouse,” is a fun romp, and Kellaway’s “Duke in Ojai” showcases his very fine piano chops. An excellent reimagining of Ellington for a 21st-century audience.

THERE MUST BE A BETTER WAY.

MUSIC

—Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia (530) 894-2300

ADVERTISE WITH (530) 894-2300 August 1, 2013

CN&R 31


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 8/1—WEDNESDAY 8|7 OPEN MIC NIGHT: Th, 9-11:30pm. Woodstock’s Pizza, 166 E. Second St., (530) 893-1500.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to share your music, poetry, comedy, or other

talents in a 10-minute slot. First and Third Th of every month, 7pm. $1.

DONNA THE BUFFALO

Monday, Aug. 5 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE MONDAY

Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise, (530) 873-1370.

THURSDAY NIGHT CONCERTS IN THE PARK: Oroville’s weekly concert series continues with Driver. Th, 8/1, 6:30-8pm. Free. Riverbend Park, 1 Salmon Run Rd. in Oroville, (530) 533-2011.

2FRIDAY ALL-LOCAL SHOWCASE: An all-local lineup

1THURSDAY BLACK TIE HERO: A metal band with progressive elements. Blood Cabana, SMAK City and Christian O’dea open. Th, 8/1, 8pm. Dex, 167 E. Third St. Below the Crazy Horse Saloon, (530) 3278706.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

IMPROV JAM: A weekly open jam session. Th, 5-7pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.wee bly.com.

LOW FLYING BIRDS: The jam-grass outfit

performs. Th, 8/1, 7pm. Free. Johnnie’s Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St. inside Hotel Diamond, (530) 895-1515, www.johnniesrestaurant.com.

MAMUSE: The beloved local folk favorites perform as part of their Full Bloom Tour. Folk quartet Sirenz opens. Th, 8/1, 8pm. $10-$15. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078 gallery.org.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

with Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise, Furlough Fridays, solo artist Sam Watroba, and the debut performance by Mirage. F, 8/2, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

BASSMINT: A weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4, (530) 895-3888.

BESO NEGRO: A gypsy-swing outfit out of Fairfax. Local finger-style guitarist Sean Thompson opens. F, 8/2, 7-10pm. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

FLO SESSIONS: Flo’s weekly local music showcase continues with performances by Michael Fair and Friends. F, 7-10pm. Free. Café Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.wee bly.com.

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with the R&B/blues of Sapphire Soul. F, 7-8:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 345-6500, www.downtownchico.net.

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Steve Cook and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. F, 8/2, 6-9pm. Free. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St., (530) 891-9044.

TOUCH FUZZY GET DIZZY: Ambient instrumental math rock. Into the Open Earth, Cascabel, and Sloths open. F, 8/2, 7pm. $8. Dex, 167 E. Third St. Below

the Crazy Horse Saloon, (530) 3278706.

THE LIZARD KING LIVES

There are a few figures in rock ’n’ roll history who are so beloved that true believers fail to accept they’re gone, which is why we still get occasional reports of an alive-and-well Elvis running a Waffle House in Culleoka, Tenn., or calling in for late-night chats on all-night radio shows. The Doors’ Jim Morrison is another of these. Maybe Mr. Mojo Risin’ didn’t bite it in a Parisian bathtub after all, and is now fronting Sroodway’s Ghost, a tribute to Morrison coming to Café Flo on Saturday, Aug. 3. The three-piece (a vocalist channeling the man, snare drum and acoustic bass) do stripped-down Doors’ covers coupled with spoken word. Hopefully, everyone’s shirts stay on, though.

LOS CABALLITOS DE LA CANCIÓN: F, 8/2,

4:30-7:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

SUMMERTIME BLUES WEEKEND: SHANE DWIGHT: The first night of Feather Falls Casino’s two-night International Blues Day celebration features Northern California native Shane Dwight. F, 8/2, 9:30pm. $10-$15. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

Medical Marijuana

S p e c i a L i S t e at

O n e Ye a r a

Leg

im

$50 off new patients any doctor

Chico Only Not Valid With Other Offer Exp 08/08/13

pp

r aL Ov

it

Alternative Health Care for Chronic Conditions

Highland Springs Wellness center Immediate Appointments Available

(530)274–2274

www.highlandspringswellness.com

Natural Wellness

50OFF

$

32 CN&R August 1, 2013

With this ad. Not good with other offers


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24

MICHAEL MARTIN MURPHEY

Saturday, Aug. 3 Gold Country Casino SEE SATURDAY

3SATURDAY ACOUSTIC MUSIC JAM: A jam hosted by Butte Folk Music Society and led by local musician Steve Johnson. First Sa of every month, 2-5pm. Free. Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery, 130 Main St., (530) 345-4128.

HOT ROD CARL: A mix of punk rock, alternative country and rockabilly out of Portland. Locals Michelin Embers and The Devil’s Train out of Grass Valley open. Sa, 8/3, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 345-7672.

MICHAEL MARTIN MURPHEY: The Grammy-nominated, gold-album-selling country-western singer performs in the showroom. Sa, 8/3, 8pm. $20. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.gold countrycasino.com.

MOKSHA: A danceable jam band out of

Las Vegas. Sa, 8/3, 8pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

SROODWAYS GHOST: Sa, 8/3, 7-10pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

SUMMERTIME BLUES WEEKEND: ERIC SARDINAS: The second night of Feather Falls Casino’s two-night International Blues Day celebration featuring Eric Sardinas and Big Motor. Sa, 8/3, 9:30pm. $10-$15. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

6TUESDAY

4SUNDAY

AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

CONCERT ON THE RIDGE: A community BBQ accompanied by music from Sweet Dreams. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Su, 8/4, 4:30-6pm. $5. Lake Oroville Golf and Event Center, 5131 Royal Oaks Dr. in Oroville, (530) 5890777.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and stand-up bassist Christine LaPadoBreglia. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farmstarpizza.com.

5MONDAY

7WEDNESDAY

1ST MONDAY JAZZ SERIES: JAZZ IS DEAD: The monthly jazz series celebrates the music of the Grateful Dead with Bruce MacMillan, Joshua Hegg, Jonathan Stoyanoff and Calvin Daley. M, 8/5, 78:30pm. $10. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafe coda.com.

DONNA THE BUFFALO: A groove-centric mix of Cajun zydeco, rock, folk, reggae, and country. M, 8/5, 7:30-9:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierra nevada.com.

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

NEED ATTENTION?

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

SUSTITUTOS ESPECTACULARES

The Pub Scouts deserve some sort of attendance award for their long-running residency at Duffy’s, having played every Friday evening for 50 weeks a year for more than two decades. They do take the rare break though—two weeks every summer for the supergroup to pursue other interests. This week, the watering hole will be filled with the sounds of Latin rather than Irish music, as the Scouts have tapped Los Caballitos de la Canción to stand in Friday, Aug. 2. The group—which, like the Pub Scouts is made up of some of Chico’s most talented and seasoned musicians—play traditional to modern music from all over Latin America.

Robinson Trio. W, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, Tin Pan Alley, jazz and more. W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St., upstairs from The Beach.

MIDNIGHT BLUES SOCIETY: An open blues jam—bring your own axe. First W of every month, 7pm. Free. Nash’s

Restaurant, 1717 Esplanade, (530) 8961147, www.nashsrestaurantchico.com.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country-music

showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 79:30pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

"The boisTerous sea of liberTy is never wiThouT a wave."

Voted Chico’s Best Bar

11 times.

—Thomas Jefferson

(Call us when things get too wavey)

LET’S NOT GO TO EXTREMES. ADVERTISE WITH (530) 894-2300

Liberty Cab

898-1776

$150 to the Sacramento Airport!

- Award Winning Bloody Mary’s - Best Juke Box - Best Conversations

Open daily · 337 Main St · 343-7718

August 1, 2013

CN&R 33


ARTS DEVO

COMING IN AUGUST 2013

Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

If our Lord wasn’t testing us, how would you account for the proliferation, these days, of this obscene rock and roll music, with its gospel of easy sexuality and relaxed morality?—Rev. Shaw Moore, Footloose.

KICK OFF THE SUNDAY SHOES Ugh. Arts DEVO understands that there

The Chico Wedding Planner is your guide to help organize that perfect day. This FREE publication will include valuable information and local resources for the bride and anyone involved in planning a wedding for this coming year. Look for the Wedding Planner inserted inside the Chico News & Review on August 15. It will also be available on August 18 at the Chico Bridal Show, organized by Coolidge Public Relations.

ADVERTISERS:

Contact your CN&R representative today to be included in the Wedding Planner. 530-894-2300 34 CN&R August 1, 2013

are problems associated with drinking in Chico, and I appreciate all the well-intentioned people who want to make changes that hopefully will prevent further alcohol-related deaths. But prohibiting live music in restaurants that serve alcohol? What’s the police chief been drinking? Chief Kirk Trostle’s recently released proposal for new “Standard Operating Conditions” for businesses that serve alcohol, includes a condition intended specifically for restaurants that states (for any new restaurants serving Rev. Trostle is watching you, Ren. alcohol) “there shall be no live entertainment of any type, including but not limited to live music, disc jockey, karaoke, topless entertainment, male or female performers or fashion shows.” This would mean any future Café Coda, Grana, or Turandot wouldn’t be allowed to provide rock bands, jazz duos or piano players as accompaniment to your pale ale, cabernet or sake. Is there anyone other than book-burning preachers who actually believes this will have any result other than destroying art and business? I hope the Internal Affairs Committee considering the chief’s plan has enough sense to not waste any brain cells or Chico’s time on even discussing such a repressive proposal.

I THOUGHT THIS WAS A PARTY. LET’S DANCE! Speaking of alcohol, who’s

ready for a cold craft beer?! All responsible adults 21 and older, mark your calendars for the week (plus three days) of Aug. 8-17 in big bold letters with: Chico Beer Week. The Chico News & Review is going to be sponsoring 10 days of local craft-beer appreciation with a calendar full of craft-beer-related events—from tastings and tap takeovers, to local beer-release parties and craft-brew specials. Check the CN&R’s special Beer Issue coming Aug. 8 for all the details. And while you’re marking your calendar, save some ink for some more summer fun coming in the month of August: Ninkasi smiles upon us.

• Aug. 3, 8 p.m.: Mettle, a documentary by Butte County native Andy Arrow about the consequences for those who break the New York City law against collecting recyclable materials off of the street, premieres at Oroville’s State Theatre. • Aug. 7-Sept. 7: Chico Icons: Neighborhood at Avenue 9 Gallery. Reception: Aug. 16, 5-8 p.m. • Aug. 10-11: Shortz! Film Fest: Third edition of the locally produced shortfilm fest, at the El Rey Theatre. Visit www.shortzfilmfest.com for info on tickets and schedule. • Aug. 17, noon-6 p.m.: Chikoko’s Yart Sale, an art, craft and fashion blowout with entertainment and refreshments, outside behind The Bookstore. • Aug. 18, 7 p.m.: Everyone In Outer Space Wants To Go To Japan, a themed burlesque show presented by Chico artist Eva Blanshei and featuring live music by Bogg at the Chico Women’s Club. • Aug. 31-Sept. 1: The Butcher Shop: The annual gathering of Chico’s theater avant-garde (past and present) for a festival of original short plays, live music, a tableau, bocce-ball tournament and more in an orchard at the end of Estes Road.


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

NEED ATTENTION?

190 FAIRGATE LANE • CHICO Well maintained and squeaky clean best describes this beautiful Westside home. It is suited for either student parent investor or a homeowner. Located in the popular Holly Brook subdivision, the owners have lovingly replaced the following items since 2008: new 30 year comp roof, kitchen and bathroom sinks, carpeting, added floor tile in the kitchen and dining area, all of the kitchen appliances were replaced and the vent hood too, upgraded high efficiency windows, water heater, central heat and air, insulated garage door and freshly laid sod in the back yard. The property shows well and is ready for the new owner.

LET’S NOT GO TO EXTREMES. ADVERTISE WITH

LIsTEd AT: $235,500

(530) 894-2300

Steve KaSprzyK | Century 21 Jeffries Lydon | realtor 530-899-5932 | c21falconer@gmail.com

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Great home close to campus.

Attend a FREE workshop for home buyers. Educate and prepare for today’s competitive market. Every Sunday in July. RSVP Seats are limited. 530-828-4597 • 1101 El Monte Ave.

Realtor

brandonsiewert.com • 828-4597

Large price reduction on this 4 bedroom house at 224 Windrose CT in the desirable Eaton Village neighborhood. New roof! Asking price: $278,000

4/2 over 2,200 sq.ft Charming home on a large lot. 3/1 on a large lot in Chico

$185,000

Brandon Siewert

coming soon!

HOT OPPORTUNITY!

530-228-1305

Cabins in Jonesville!

Call for more info. www.AtoZchico.com

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

GarrettFrenchHomes.com Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in chico, Orland, Willows.

Homes Sold Last Week SQ. FT.

creek front property. Huge wood shop, sauna, 2007 custom built home. absolutely breathtaking!

Garrett French

EmmEtt Jacobi

Cell 530.519.6333 • emmettjacobi.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

3131 Willow Bend Dr

Chico

$620,000.00

4/ 3

3624

2864 Upland Dr

Chico

$239,000.00

4/ 2

SQ. FT. 1407

172 E Lincoln Ave

Chico

$400,000.00

3/ 2

1871

3 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$238,000.00

4/ 1.5

1305

1000 Adlar Ct

Chico

$370,000.00

3/ 2

2029

33 Dean Way

Chico

$230,000.00

3/ 1.5

1218

721 Hastings St

Chico

$367,500.00

4/ 3

2263

2245 Moyer Way

Chico

$219,000.00

3/ 2

1252

9 Lily Way

Chico

$367,000.00

3/ 2.5

1907

160 Cavalier Way

Chico

$207,500.00

3/ 2

1213

2637 Lakewest Dr

Chico

$355,000.00

3/ 2.5

2081

2582 E 20th St

Chico

$200,000.00

2/ 2

1081

5 Luckie Way

Chico

$347,000.00

4/ 1.5

1794

39 Dean Way

Chico

$200,000.00

3/ 1.5

1217

747 Hastings St

Chico

$320,000.00

4/ 3

2332

2740 San Jose St

Chico

$195,000.00

3/ 1.5

1220

4338 Keith Ln

Chico

$300,000.00

4/ 2

2328

9590 Lott Rd

Durham

$492,000.00

3/ 2.5

2683

1509 Ridgebrook Way

Chico

$292,000.00

4/ 2.5

1994

9474 Lott Rd

Durham

$283,000.00

3/ 2.5

1678

240 Estates Dr #2

Chico

$267,000.00

3/ 2.5

2041

4625 Cody Ln

Forest Ranch

$285,000.00

3/ 2

1751

1502 Sunset Ave

Chico

$250,000.00

3/ 2

1763

15465 Summerwind Trl

Forest Ranch

$205,000.00

2/ 1

1008

2151 Ceres Ave

Chico

$245,000.00

2/ 1.5

1883

15170 Jack Pine Way

Magalia

$199,500.00

2/ 3

1868

August 1, 2013

CN&R 35


Upper

Bidwell Park Bringing You To 1120 SF+/$6,000 Ad #457

3BR/2BA Unique Dome Home

1,372 SF+/$149,900 Ad #530

2BR/2BA+Bonus Pond, Privacy, 3 AC

1360 SF+/$185,000 Ad #508

3BR/2BA Custom Home

1,494 SF+/$244,000 Ad #486

Sun. 11-1, 2-4 2270 N. Lindo Ave (X St. Hwy 32) 5 Bd / 3 Ba, 3221 sq.ft. $699,000 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

4084 Guntren Dr (X St: Garner Ln) 5 Bd / 3 Ba, 3045 sq.ft. $585,000 Johnny Klinger 864-3398 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

3/bd 2/ba 1,426 sq. ft. newer roof | rv parking cUl-de-sac | lots of frUit trees located by wildwood park!

(530) 872-7653

Paradise@C21SelectGroup.com www.C21Skyway.com 1-800-785-7654

chicodiscoUntrealty.com lic #1031554

Horse property 4/3, 2319 sq ft home w/ year-round creek

Cool off in the pool this summer! This great 3/2 is located on a quiet street not in the city limits. Large living room and office area with a 2 car garage!

$425,000

Beautiful home in the pines, 3/3, 3964 sq ft on 2.5 acres

$250,000

$329,000

Dana W. Miller

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

Kathy Kelly 530-570-7403

438 Black Oak Dr (X St: W. Lindo) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1846 sq.ft. $349,000 Paul Champlin 828-2902 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837

DRE# 01860319

KathyKellyC21@gmail.com

12 Hillsboro Ct (X St: Dan Bury Way) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1464 sq.ft. $275,000 John Wallace 514-2405

1630 Harvest Glen (X St: Springfield/ Auburn Oak) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1544 sq.ft. $269,000 John Wallace 514-2405

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1270 Marvin Way ( X St: Moss Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1289 sq.ft. $255,000 Johnny Klinger 864-3398 Justin Jewett 518-4089 Sherry Landis 514-4855

Sun. 11-1

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 9 River Wood Loop (X St: Glenwood) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1915 sq.ft. $314,000 Brandon Siewert 828-4597 Ed Galvez 990-2054

923 Christi Ln. (X St: Cohasset Rd.) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1608 sq.ft. $250,000 Frankie Dean 717-3884

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 2-4 190 Fairgate Ln (X St: W. Sacramento) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1198 sq.ft. $235,500 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

13 Luciano Ct (X St: Peninsula Dr) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1570 sq.ft. $309,500 Russ Hammer 566-3540

ChiCo DisCount Realty

923 Christi Lane

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 2-4

steve valencia | 530 343-5111

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

only $263,000 5350 Skyway, Paradise

house Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

Paradise 2 BR/2BA Just Reduced

open

926 Eaton Rd (X: St Johnny Ln) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1167 sq.ft. $225,000 Dustin Wenner 624-9125

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-2 1256 Orchard Ln ( X St: Floral Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1992 sq.ft. $299,000 Laura Ortland 321-1567

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 2-4 1730 Laburnum Ave (X St: E. 7th Ave) 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 896 sq.ft. $179,900 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

224 Windrose Court (X St: Avondale/Legacy) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1741 sq. ft. $278,000 Garrett French 228-1305

NG 1.13 acs, 2,685 sq ft, RV $489,000 DIDurham • Mother PEinNlaw, • Quality custom 3 bd/4 ba, 1.66a acs, pool $668,000 • 2 homes 1 lot, 1.1 acrs, Nord $325,000 • 12.64 acrs, walnuts, 5 bd/3 ba, 3,221 sq ft home $699,000 • 5.27 acrs, almonds, 3 bd/2 ba, 1,950 sq ft home $365,000 G ba, 1,700+ sqft, granite +more! $282,000 • Mission NDI3Nbd/2.5 PERanch, • Awesome 3 bd/2 ba, 1,600+ sq ft, Little Chico Creek! $319,900 • Updated beautifully 3 bd/2 ba, 1,100+ sq ft $224,000 G w/quality 2 bd/1 ba, 1,606 sq ft $249,300 • Avenues charmer DINloaded PEN • Wow, .23 of an ac, 3 bed/2 bth, 1,167 sq ft $225,000 • Clean 3 bed/2 bth, 1,544 sq ft $269,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

mountain Getaway This older cabin is situated on just under 6 gently sloping acres, newer detached 2 car garage and a couple other outbuildings, seller is motivated, asking $135,000

mark reaman 530-228-2229 Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

Jeffries Lydon

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of July 15, 2013 – July 22, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

13783 Andover Dr

Magalia

$118,000.00

2/ 2

SQ. FT. 1152

6565 Rosewood Dr

Magalia

$107,500.00

3/ 1

1129

5233 Honey Rock Ct

Oroville

$235,000.00

4/ 3.5

3112

133 Mono Ave

Oroville

$199,000.00

8/ 4

2800

10 Quick Silver Ct

Oroville

$160,000.00

3/ 2

1380

1740 Tehama Ave

Oroville

$143,000.00

3/ 2

1080

19 Orangewood Way

Oroville

$130,000.00

3/ 1.5

1064

1660 Leta Ln

Oroville

$124,000.00

3/ 2

1116

868 Bird St

Oroville

$115,000.00

3/ 2.5

2061

1926 Stark Ln

Paradise

$260,500.00

2/ 2.5

2399

5890 Crestmoor Dr

Paradise

$255,000.00

3/ 2

2185

1466 Tobie Ln

Paradise

$248,500.00

4/ 2

1632

356 Circlewood Dr

Paradise

$230,000.00

3/ 1.5

1734

36 CN&R August 1, 2013

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

6280 Graham Rd

ADDRESS

Paradise

$187,500.00

2/ 2

SQ. FT. 1414

6236 Oak Way

Paradise

$176,000.00

2/ 1.5

1388

580 Crestwood Dr

Paradise

$159,000.00

2/ 1

962

1780 Drendel Cir

Paradise

$155,000.00

3/ 1.5

1333

6643 Whittall Ln

Paradise

$150,000.00

2/ 2

1229

611 Sunset Dr

Paradise

$150,000.00

3/ 2

1260

806 Savannah Way

Paradise

$150,000.00

2/ 2

1352

5471 Scottwood Rd

Paradise

$150,000.00

3/ 2

1573

5805 Sawmill Rd

Paradise

$130,000.00

3/ 2

1389

5682 Scottwood Rd

Paradise

$110,000.00

2/ 2

1094


Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

WELLNESS SUPPLIES VIAGRA 100MG 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800-374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN)

GENERAL Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN)

MUSICIAN SERVICES Record your own album on CD at a quality home studio. Call Steve 530-824-8540

EDUCATION/ INSTRUCTION

GENERAL $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing & Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) Drivers Wanted Must have good economical vehicle. Call Juan Mendoza 661-309-7389 Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) Independent Sales Con-­ sultant Mountain Valley Living Magazine needs an Independent Sales Consultant for the Chico Area. Join our team and be a part of the Fastest Growing Magazine in Northern California. Sales Experience Needed. Email your resume to mvlsuzanne@yahoo.com

INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900

August 1, 2013

1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRO NAILS AND SPA at 1950 East 20th Street Suitei 907 Chico, CA 95928. BIHN T TRAN 1290 Notre Dame BLVD APT# 69 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: B TRAN Dated: July 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000897 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2013. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

CLASSICS

GENERAL LAND 20 ACRES FREE Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/ payment. $0 down, $198/month. Money back guarantee, no credit checks. Beautiful views, West Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.TexasLandBuys.com (AAN CAN)

APARTMENT RENTALS ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE A Beautiful Massage

in a warm tranquil studio. w/ Shower, $35 deal. Appts. 10am-7pm

530-893-0263

Therapeutic Massage Luxurious far infrared heat & purifying ionic therapy gives you complete satisfaction with every treatment! First treatment $35/hour, normal fees $50. 530-343-5102 Bill Gochenour MindBody Connection Have worked with chiropractors, 23 years est.

Massage By John

$25 special. Full-body Massage for Men. In-Calls. Located in Orland. By Appointment. CMT, 530-680-1032

REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! A whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST. Programming starting at $19.99/mo. New Callers receive FREE HD/DVR upgrade! CALL: 1-877-342-0363 (AAN CAN)

BULLETIN BOARD Butte County Surplus Sale 14 County Center Dr. Oroville, CA Friday, Aug 2, 2013 9 am-2 pm. Items include: Rolling A/V Carts, Music Instruments, Retail Display Counter, Water dispenser, metal shelving, file cabinets, $60 computers. $5 desks, $10 office chair and tons of office goods. Open to the public. Next sale Oct. 04, 2013

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

ITEMS FOR SALE KILL ROACHES! Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Eliminate Roaches-Guaranteed. No Mess, Odorless, Long Lasting. Available at Ace Hardware, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN)

AUTOS 1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer.All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. $6000 530-895-8171

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DANCING DAISIES BOTANICALS at 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. MARIROSE DUNBAR 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. GEORGE FREDSON 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MARIROSE DUNBAR Dated: June 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000798 Published: July 11,18,25, Au-­ gust 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JUST JUMP IT, INC at 4345 Hedstrom Lane Chico, CA 95973. JUST JUMP IT, INC 4345 Hedstrom Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: MICHELLE KALBERER, CO - OWNER Dated: June 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000830 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO HOUSE CALLS at 2220 St. George Lane #3 Chico, CA 95926. VICTORIA LEE OTA 312 Orient St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VICTORIA OTA Dated: June 3, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000773 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO CHUCKWAGON at 1564 Citrus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL JANOSZ 1564 Citrus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Indivudal. Signed: MICHAEL JANOSX Dated: June 25, 2013 FBN: Number: 2013-0000866 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KATHRYN DANIELS at 49 Kemre RD Forbestown, CA 95941. KATHERINE WHITBY 49 Kemre RD Forbestown, CA 95941. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHERINE WHITBY Dated: June 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000828 Published: July 11,18,25,

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name: PRO NAILS AND SPA at 1950 E 20th Street STE I 907 Chico, Ca 95928. HNERY VAN TRUONG 1450 Springfield Drive #27 Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: HENRY VAN TRUONG Dated: July 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0000770 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIG CHICO CREEK LANDSCAPE AND MAINTENANCE at 2171 Huntington Dr Chico, CA 95928. CARMEN GARCIA 2171 Huntington Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CARMEN GARCIA Dated: June 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000800 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HONEYDOS at 2214 Robailey Dr Chico, CA 95928. MATTHEW A CONNER 2214 Robailey Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATTHEW A. CONNER Dated: June 25, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000868 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE BARBER MOBILE at 2154 Bar Triangle St Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL FOSTER 2154 Bar Triangle St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: Michael Foster Dated: July 8, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000922 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING A FIT LIFE at 101 Risa Wat #16 Chico, CA 95973. ERIC MARTIN 101 Risa Way #16 Chico, Ca 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ERIC MARTIN Dated: July 12, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000950 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESSS NAME STATEMEMT The following person is doing business as CITY OF TREES REALTY at 120 Amber Grove Drive, Suite 124 Chico, CA 95973. LAURA LYNN BURGHARDT 14 Turnbridge Welles Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LAURA LYNN BURGHARDT Dated: July 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000937 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DISCOVERY HOMES at 4061 Port Chicago Highway, Suite H Concord, CA 94520. DISCOVERY BUILDERS INC 4061 Port Chicago Highway, Suite H Concord, CA 94520. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEANNE C. PAVAO, SECRETARY Dated: July 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000928 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVERCLEAN SOLAR at 1080 E. Lassen Avenue Chico, CA 95973. STEVE KOLU 1080 E. Lassen Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEVE KOLU Dated: July 16, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000965 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTH VALLEY PET AND HOUSE SITTING at 3 Cheshire Court Chico, CA 95926. DIANA LYNN HALVORSEN 3 Cheshire Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DIANA HALVORSEN Dated: July 22, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000992 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUSH CATERING at 121 W 21 Street Chico, CA 95928. WOODY GUZZETTI 121 W 21 Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WOODY GUZZETTI Dated: July 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000933 Published: July 25, August 1,8,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MB RANCH at 142 Big Oak Lane Berry Creek, CA 95916. MATTHEW BURWELL 151 Tipsoo Peak Road Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT BURWELL Dated: June 27, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000877 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE DENTAL CONNECTION at 2863 Pennyroyal Drive Chico, CA 95928. JOSIE T WHITEHURST 2863 Pennyroyal Drive Chico, CA 95928. NORMAN WHITEHURST 2863 Pennyroyal Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JOSIE T WHITEHURST Dated: July 5, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000910 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CASCADE EMERGENCY MEDICINE INC at 640 Coyote Way Chico, CA 95928. CASCADE EMERGENCY MEDICINE INC 640 Coyote Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: AARON SHUTZ, MD, DIRECTOR Dated: July 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000972 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NAKED LOUNGE TEA AND COFFEEHOUSE at 118 West 2nd Street Chico, CA 95928. BIDWELL NATIVE, LLC 9787 Esquon Rd Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ALEC BINYON MEMBER Dated: June 7, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000792 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADVENTURELIFE at 141 W 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL DORE 464 Cimarron Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MIKE DORE Dated: July 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000944 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A-1-MINI STORAGE at 5630 Mallan Lane Paradise, CA 95969. JAMES ROBERT HOENIG 5589 Mallan Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JAMES R. HOENIG Dated: July 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000961 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ALMOND BLOSSOM SENIOR CARE at 1036 Blackmuir Court Chico, CA 95926. DRAGONFLY INCORPORATED 1473 Lucy Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CORY WILLIAMS Dated: July 18, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000978 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DAHLIN AND ASSOCIATES at 670 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. PETER DAHLIN 670 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. JEF INSLEE 670 Sheridan Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JEF INSLEE Dated: July 5, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000913 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RICKERS at 952 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95926. JAIVIRPAL S. RANDHAWA 25 Ewing Drive Chico, CA 95973. MANJIT RANDHAWA 25 Ewing Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JAIVIRPAL S. RANDHAWA Dated: July 24, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0001006 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name(s) SUNSHINE DESIGNS, PETALS at 901 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. JO ANNA TAUSCHER BIRDSALL 901 Wagstaff Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JO ANNA TAUSCHER BIRDSALL Dated: June 28, 2013 FBN Number: 2010-0000562 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REFOUND at 901 Wagstaff RD. Paradise, CA 95969. JO ANNA TAUSCHER BIRDSALL 901 Wagstaff RD Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JO ANNA TAUSCHER BIRDSALL Dated: June 28, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000886 Published: August 1,8,15,22,2013

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California business code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following unit contains: A go kart, old wood stove, small engines, tools, furniture, misc boxes, wheel chairs, and 2 electric scooters. The unit number and names are: Unit 101: JOEY NORMAN, JOSYLN NORMAN The contents will be sold to the highest bidder on: August 15, 2013 Beginning at 10:00am Sale to be held at: South Chico Mini Storage

classifieds

CONTINUED ON 38

August 1, 2013

CN&R 37


426 Southgate Ct Chico, CA 95928. Published: July 25, August 1, 2013 NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA BUTTE COUNTY Case Number: PR-40719 (PROBATE CODE SECTION 19040) In re: THE RAYMOND PATRICK GARCIA REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST Created May 24, 2013, by RAYMOND PATRICK GARCIA, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named decedent that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court at 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926, and mail or deliver a copy to H.F. LAYTON Attorney for DENNIS GARCIA, as trustee of the trust dated May 24, 2013, of which the decedent was the settlor. Notice may be mailed or delivered to 191 Sand Creek Road, Suite 220, Brentwood, California, 94513, within the later of four (4) months after Thursday, July 25, 2013 ( the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally deliv-­ ered to you, sixty (60) days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with receipt requested. Date: July 17, 2013 H.F. LAYTON LAW OFFICE H.F. LAYTON Attorney for DENNIS GARCIA, Trustee Published: July 25, August 1,8, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MOHAMMED ALTALIB, EMAN ALSHIHAB filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RENAD MOHAMMED ALTALIB Proposed name: RANA MOHAMMED ALTALIB THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 9, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 20, 2013 Case Number: 159797 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LYNN MARIE OTT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LYNN MARIE OTT Proposed name:

this Legal Notice continues

38 CN&R August 1, 2013

LYNN MARIE RIVERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 6, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: June 5, 2013 Case Number: 159919 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner QUINTANA LEEANN DOCKENDORF filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: QUINTANA LEEANN DOCKENDORF Proposed name: QUINTANA LEEANN SOUZA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: June 12, 2013 Case Number: 159724 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DESIREE SCHMITZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NOAH RUSHTON KURTIS MATTINGLY, LABAN DAVID KURTIS MATTINGLY, MICAH JAMES KURTIS MATTINGLY Proposed name: NOAH RUSHTON THATCHER, LABAN DAVID THATCHER, MICAH JAMES THATCHER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to

this Legal Notice continues

show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 6, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: July 2, 2013 Case Number: 159913 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: STEVE DUTTER AKA STEVE P DUTTER YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY DBA ACCOUNT RESOLUTION ASSOCIATES NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alaine Patti - Jelsvik 194748 9301 Winnetka Avenue Ste. B, Chatsworth, CA 91311. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 155122 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: YVONNE MARIE HOAG AKA YVONNE MARIE HICKEY AKA MARIE HOAG YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP

this Legal Notice continues

NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Joseph L Selby Law Offices of Leverenz, Ferris & Selby 515 Wall Street Chico, Ca 95928. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158082 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CRYSTAL WILLIAMS-ARCILLA AND THE TESTATE AND IN-­ TESTATE SUCCESSORS TO ROBERT LEE WILLIANS, DE-­ CEASED ABD ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH OR UNDER SUCH DECENDENT AND DOES 1-20 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BILLY DURBIN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask

this Legal Notice continues

the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: James E. Reed P.O. Box 857 Fall River Mills, CA 96028. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158601 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

To place an adult ad, call (530)894-2300 ext.5 ENTERTAINMENT SUNNY’S!

We have moved! BIGGER BETTER More parking, very private, working air conditioner, quieter rooms. The North State’s Largest Selection of HOT, Sexy Ladies! More ROOMS! More Privacy! More Fun! Shower Shows, Sensual Massage, Private Shows, Lap Dances, Double Trouble, and MUCH More! (Chico) See Our Awesome Website www.sunnysgirls.com

343-3594

MARQUISE GIRLS

17 yrs Of Top Quality Hottest Girls Guaranteed Bachelor/B-day/Any Last Minute Strip Parties! Double Trouble Shows XXX Intro Chico Suave MALE DANCERS We are Hiring We Bring the Show to You!

899-7173

New Website: www.marquisegirls.com

ESCORTS Your Candy Girl Voluptuous vixen. Your pleasure is my poison. Absolute satisfaction. Get what you want. Katt 530-513-2390

SENSUAL TOUCH Magical Massage

Men, come feel the magic of all new magical hands. Ladies, we have Rico for your pleasure. Here for a short time! Call for an appt. now. 530-354-0341 NEW SPECIALS ALWAYS HIRING

PHONE ENTERTAINMENT CALL SEXY SINGLES ON QUEST! Live Local Chat Try us FREE! 18+ 916-282-2300 530-760-1010 www.questchat.com

AFTERNOON DELIGHTS

Cold air conditioning & hot massage. **SUMMER TIME SPECIAL!** 11am-7pm. Daily 588-4474

www.newsreview.com


ARIES (March 21-April 19): To

add zest to mealtime, you might choose food that has been seasoned with red chili peppers, cumin or other piquant flavors. Some chimpanzees have a similar inclination, which is why they like to snack on red fire ants. Judging from the astrological omens, I’m guessing you are currently in a phase when your attraction to spicy things is at a peak—not just for dinner but in other areas of your life, as well. I have a suggestion: Pursue rowdy fun with adventures that have metaphorical resemblances to red chili peppers, but stay away from those that are like red fire ants.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The 19thcentury English artist John Constable specialized in painting landscapes. The countryside near his home especially excited him. He said, “The sound of water escaping from mill dams, willows, old rotten planks, slimy posts, and brickwork, I love such things. They made me a painter, and I am grateful.” Take a cue from Constable, Taurus. Spend quality time appreciating the simple scenes and earthy pleasures that nourish your creative spirit. Give your senses the joy of getting filled up with vivid impressions. Immerse yourself in experiences that thrill your animal intelligence. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): This is

Grand Unification Week for you Geminis. If your left hand has been at war with your right hand, it’s a perfect moment to declare a truce. If your head and heart have not been seeing eye to eye, they are ready to find common ground and start conspiring together for your greater glory. Are there any rips or rifts in your life? You will generate good fortune for yourself if you get to work on healing them. Have you been alienated from an ally or at odds with a beloved dream or separated from a valuable resource? You have a lot of power to fix glitches like those.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In an

episode of the TV show Twin Peaks, special agent Dale Cooper gives the following advice to his colleague Harry: “I’m going to let you in on a little secret. Every day, once a day, give yourself a present. Don’t plan it, don’t wait for it, just let it happen.” Now I’m passing on this advice to you, Cancerian. It’s a perfect time for you to try out this fun game. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when you’ll be wise to intensify your commitment to self-care—and deepen your devotion to making yourself feel good—and increase your artistry at providing yourself with everything you need to thrive.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Sergei Diaghilev

was a Russian ballet impresario who founded Ballets Russes, one of the 20th century’s great ballet companies. At one point in his career, he met French playwright Jean Cocteau. Diaghilev dared Cocteau to write a piece for a future Ballets Russes production. “Astonish me!” he said. It took seven years, but Cocteau met the challenge. He created Parade, a ballet that also featured music by Eric Satie and sets by Pablo Picasso. Now, let’s pretend I’m Diaghilev, and you’re Cocteau. Imagine that I’ve just told you, “Astonish me!” How will you respond? What surprising beauty will you come up with? What marvels will you unleash?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Since 1948, the

chemical known as warfarin has been used as a pesticide to poison rats. Beginning in 1954, it also became a medicine prescribed to treat thrombosis and other blood ailments in humans. Is there anything in your own life that resembles warfarin? A person or an asset or an activity that can either be destructive or constructive, depending on the situation? The time will soon be right for you to employ that metaphorical version of warfarin in both capacities. Make sure you’re very clear about which is which.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “My heart was a hysterical, unreliable organ,” wrote Vladimir Nabokov in his novel Lolita. We have

Pet paradise

by Rob Brezsny all gone through phases when we could have uttered a similar statement. But I doubt that this is one of those times for you, Libra. On the contrary. I suspect your heart is very smart right now¡ªpoised and lucid and gracious. In fact, I suggest you regard the messages coming from your heart as more trustworthy than any other part of you¡ªwiser than your head and your gut and your genitals put together.

story and photo by

Vic Cantu

Valerie Johnson has always loved animals. The 59-year-old is one of the founding members of the Chico Cat Coalition, and three months ago she and her friend Cheri Lovell started a unique boarding, care and pet rescue in Paradise called Chez Pooche: Bed & Biscuit Boutique (5610 Skyway). Chez Pooche offers dogs and cats the run of a small, quaint, converted home and back yard, along with much pampering, gourmet food, massages, aromatherapy and a selection of high-end pet products (such as a dog tuxedo by “Fursace”). Call 353-5728 for more info.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The holy

grail of skateboarding tricks is called the 1080. To pull it off, a skateboarder has to do three complete 360-degree revolutions in midair and land cleanly. No one had ever pulled it off until 12-year-old Tom Schaar did it in 2012. Since then, two other teenage boys have managed the same feat. But I predict that a Scorpio skateboarder will break the record sometime soon, managing a 1260, or three-and-a-half full revolutions. Why? First, because your tribe is unusually geared to accomplish peak performances right now. And second, you have a knack for doing complex maneuvers that require a lot of concentration.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Can you think of ways that you have been colonized? Have any powerful institutions filled up your brain with ideas and desires that aren’t in alignment with your highest values? For instance, has your imagination gotten imprinted with conditioning that makes you worry that your body’s not beautiful enough or your bank account’s not big enough or your style isn’t cool enough? If so, Sagittarius, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to get uncolonized. There has rarely been a better time than now to purge any brainwashing that puts you at odds with your deepest self.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): An old Chinese poem tells us that “the true measure of a mountain’s greatness is not its height but whether it is charming enough to attract dragons.” You and I know there are no such things as dragons, so we can’t take this literally. But what if we treat it as we might a fairy tale? I suggest we draw a metaphorical meaning from it and apply it to your life. Let’s say that you shouldn’t be impressed with how big and strong anything is; you shouldn’t give your mojo to people or institutions simply because they have worldly power. Rather, you will be best served by aligning yourself with what’s mysterious and fabulous. You’re more likely to have fun and generate good fortune for yourself by seeking out stories that appeal to your soul instead of your ego. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

questions you have been asking aren’t terrible. But they could be formulated better. They might be framed in such a way as to encourage life to give you crisp insights you can really use rather than what you’ve been getting lately, which are fuzzy conjectures that are only partially relevant. Would you like some inspiration? See if any of these inquiries help hone your spirit of inquiry. 1. What kind of teacher or teaching do you need the most right now? 2. What part of you is too tame, and what can you do about it? 3. What could you do to make yourself even more attractive and interesting to people than you already are? 4. What is the pain that potentially has the most power to awaken your dormant intelligence?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “There are

some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness is the true method.” So says Ishmael, the hero of Herman Melville’s 19thcentury novel Moby Dick. He is ostensibly referring to whale hunting, which is his job, but some modern critics suggest he’s also talking about the art of storytelling. I suspect his statement applies to a certain enterprise you are currently engaged in as well. Can you wrap your mind and heart around the phrase “careful disorderliness,” Pisces? I hope so, because I think it’s the true method. Here are some other terms to describe it: benevolent chaos, strategic messiness, purposeful improvisation, playful experiments.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

What’s unique about Chez Pooche?

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of August 1, 2013

This is not a kennel. This is a totally loving environment for dogs and cats. They wander in and out as they please with beds and blankets throughout. We have safety pens and a room for senior dogs that are more frail. We can even care for your pet in your home. Plus we offer high-class products like custom doggie treats from Tin Roof Bakery and special shampoo you can’t get just anywhere. Our doggie massages use top ingredients like coconut oil, lemon juice, Epsom salts and aloe vera.

Have you ever tasted the doggie treats? Yes, we’ve actually eaten them and they’re really good! We asked people where the best bakery was and everyone said, “Tin Roof Bakery,” so we hired them. The treats are all-natural, wheat-free with ingredients like turkey, bacon, spinach and carrots.

Why else might people bring their pets in? Most [pet owners] are going away for one or

more days to visit or go on vacation. Some bring their dogs [here] to be socialized from their fear or aggression. I love to bring them out of it with gentle tones and handling. Dogs get all excited and love to come here. One owner who just dropped her dog off has been following me since 2005 when I had a dog boutique in Roseville’s Galleria mall.

What brought you to Paradise? I had my dog boutiques and doggie day care in Roseville and Rocklin from 2005 to 2009, but it was too stressful and I couldn’t enjoy the dogs. I have family and grandkids in this area, so it made sense to come here.

You also rescue animals? Yes, I’ve rescued cats and dogs since I was 4, and helped start the Chico Cat Coalition in the 1990s. We now rescue abandoned cats and dogs and work with Paws of Chico to spay and neuter them. We have two rescued cats that live here which we call “hotel kitties,” and a Chihuahua we found in Chico.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Distraction I spend a lot of time online, some of it poking around for editing work and the rest distracting myself from my life, which is mostly my thoughts. I know that presence—being here now—allows me to experience reality without thought. Practically, though, I’m nearly always thinking, usually about stuff that’s none of my business. My thoughts vary only slightly, and they’re often negative, or at best no help at all. Like a lot of us apparently, I put most of my mental and psychic energy on stuff I don’t like. As much as I’ve heard in various ways that we get what we think about, focusing on what I want eludes me. I believe that we get what we focus upon because it explains a lot and sounds right. I can’t prove a damn thing, but it makes sense to me, so I keep trying. Every morning I sit in my driveway looking out at the garden, and I think slightly less for an hour or so. Sometimes I focus on my breath and sometimes I think about the bills or a son or a friend or a vacation or the bills. Sometimes I just notice a thought and release it to the wild. It usually finds its way back to

me, sometimes in a minute or two, and I note-andrelease again. Often a down thought leads me to another and another, none of them related to reality, even the little I’m aware of. As I was working on this essay, I saw my son turn on a hose in the back yard. To my horror, within seconds he was watering a hanging spider plant. I was alarmed because all our hoses are black, and the water inside gets almighty hot lying in the Chico sun. To keep him from poaching the poor thing’s roots, my impulse was quickly to open the window and tell him. By the time I realized what he was doing, it was about a half-gallon too late. He’d be done by the time I got the window open. So I did nothing. I stood there and let that innocent plant’s innocent roots suffer a scalding trauma, but first I had to think all that stuff about what I thought was a safe temperature for a spider plant’s roots based on my supposition that there is a temperature past which a spider plant’s roots would cease to function, and that the water in that hose has been there maybe five hours and in the sun for the last four. That’s one thought. So I watch a lot of YouTube.

August 1, 2013

CN&R 39


August 23 & 24 • 6pm

August 23 & 24 • 8:30pm

September 7 • 8pm

EARN G IN DRAWETS TICK ! NOW

F Friday, August 2nd – Saturday, August 31st Sa 6pm to 11pm 3 Prizes In Each Division 1st $1000 • 2nd $500 • 3rd $300 Nightly Winners Earn

3 “Punch Out” Punches To win CASH and a chance for BONUS CASH!

September 20 & 21 • 7pm

October 4 • 8pm

Management reserves all rights • See Players Club for details

August 3 • 8pm

Join Us! Micheal Martin Murphy

August 17 • 5:30pm

Tickets Available in our Box Office

1-800-803-1911 1-800-803-19 911

www.GoldCountryCasino.com • 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville, California • 800.334.9400


C 2013 08 01  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you