Page 1

ART INVADES See ARTS FEATURE, page 24

CREWS

CONTROL See NEWSLINES, page 9

GALLS A-JUMPIN’! See GREENWAYS, page 12

John Lane continues his adventures in Papua New Guinea

BIRDS OF PLAY See SCENE, page 28

BY TOM GASCOYNE PAGE

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

20 Volume 36, Issue 48

Thursday, July 25, 2013


flash back 25 years

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1950 E. 20th Street, Chico, CA

What was your first ride? It was a purple banana seat with big colorful daisies on the seat. And today? I ride an XtraCycle 2 miles round trip to school twice a day with my girls and 4 miles round trip when I take it to the grocery store. What’s the best thing about your bike(s)? If we can’t ride to school in the morning, I can still ride there in the afternoon and have the girls hop on the back for a ride or grab their scooter and skates out of the cargo packs. What would you most like car drivers to know? Remember to give the bikes on the side of the road a bit of space! Why DO you ride? In my car, I’m in a separate little box, but on the bike I experience the wind, the birds, my body, and my little girls voices become my radio. It connects me to what’s important. Shelly Brandon, Chico bike-commuter

125 W. 3rd Street, Suite 210 | Chico, CA 95928 (530) 343–8356


CN&R Vol. 36, Issue 48 • July 25, 2013

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OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Associate Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom Gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Projects Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Karen Laslo, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Jesse Mills, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Alan Sheckter, Robert Speer, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Ryan Coletti, Katherine Green, Melanie MacTavish Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Design Melissa Arendt, Mary Key, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Sharon Conley, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Receptionist Kendra Gray Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2240 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them.

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Do no harm We’re glad to see the Butte County Sheriff’s Office and District

Attorney Mike Ramsey going after the pot growers who are destroying the foothills landscape (see Downstroke, page 8). For far too long, growers have been cutting down trees and other vegetation, and illegally grading wilderness properties in preparation for their growing operations. They’ve done so without consequence, as lawenforcement officials concentrated their oversight on the operations’ compliance with the Compassionate Use Act. But there are too many of these growers in the foothills, and the destruction they’ve reaped in the region can no longer be ignored. It’s simply too obvious. Illegal grading and excavation have numerous negative consequences, including pesticide and fertilizer runoff into watersheds. Ramsey has gone after other property owners who have conducted large-scale grading without the proper permits, mostly for construction projects. The district attorney should seek the maximum penalty against those who break the state’s environmental laws. California residents have every right to grow medical marijuana, but they also have the obligation—legally and morally—to do so without harming the environment. Ω

Victory for transparency First Amendment advocates are cheering a recent state appel-

The process behind the acquittal Uhad been acquitted in Sanford, Fla., I was initially outraged.

pon hearing the news that George Zimmerman

I still am upset at the verdict, but I also understand the process that freed the man who shot and killed Trayvon Martin. A few years ago, I was a jury member for the trial of a local teacher accused of theft. There are rules that strictly regulate a juror’s role in a criminal trial. The first rule: During the trial, you keep your thoughts to yourself. A juror cannot discuss the ongoing trial with other jurors, with by spouses, or anyone else. You are Ronald Angle asked to not develop a conclusive opinion until you have The author is retired heard all of the testimony and and currently presentations. coordinates Soup On I have always believed in the Sundays, a program judicial concept that one is “innocent that helps feed until proven guilty” and that the burden Chico’s homeless. of proof is on the prosecution. Most important, I believe in and support “reasonable doubt” as the standard of proof in a criminal trial. When we began deliberation, three charges fell so short of the burden of proof that we voted for acquittal in a few hours. The fourth charge required several more hours of careful deliberation before

we had a unanimous vote. All 12 of us gave serious thought to the issues. Ultimately, we reviewed a video of the defendant’s initial interrogation more than six times, sometimes repeatedly playing back segments of only two or three minutes in length, phrase by phrase. At the end of our deliberation, our conclusion was that by law the defendant’s own words gave us no choice but to find a verdict of guilty on the remaining charge. Had the defendant invoked his right to remain silent, he would have been acquitted for lack of evidence. I was very proud of the way we deliberated. We examined the facts and found that for three charges, those facts fell short of the burden of proof. It is my hope that the jurors in the George Zimmerman trial were able to impartially examine the facts and not base their judgment on emotional issues. I was not there. Had I been on the jury, I may have also voted for acquittal. Zimmerman was entitled to be considered innocent until he was proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. I still personally don’t like the verdict. Zimmerman had a gun and Martin had only his fists. Ω

Had I been on the jury, I may have also voted for acquittal.

4 CN&R July 25, 2013

late court ruling that strengthens the public’s right to access government documents. The decision—watched closely by newspapers in particular— stems from a case right in our back yard. Newspaperman Tim Crews, editor and publisher of the Sacramento Valley Mirror, has long been a champion of the California Public Records Act, as well as the Brown Act, the state’s open-meetings law. He’s well-versed in both, and has cited the laws on many occasions over the past 22 years to gather government documents and to make sure the public had access to the gatherings where public officials set public policy. For the most part, Glenn County agencies have learned to comply with the laws. It’s imperative for them to do so, as the Willows Unified School District found out last week, when the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento ruled that Crews did not owe the district reimbursement for attorneys’ fees. Back in 2009, Crews had filed a lawsuit against the district for dragging its feet in complying with his public-records request. The district indeed did not meet the deadline set forth by the law, but a Glenn County Superior Court judge ruled in favor of the agency anyway, and dismissed Crews’ case. In a controversial move, that judge, Peter Twede, also decided the lawsuit was frivolous and ordered Crews to pay the defendant’s attorneys’ fees. His ruling set a dangerous precedent that—if allowed to stand—would have undermined the whole intent of the Public Records Act. Fortunately for Crews, the First Amendment Coalition was on his side. The nonprofit rallied the support that ultimately led to a reversal of that monetary judgment. That means the public can litigate to enforce compliance with the law without the fear of being held liable for a defending party’s court fees. It also means WUSD is now on the hook for the costs of its defense, which is likely much more than the $56,000 Crews was ordered to pay. That doesn’t include the fees associated with the appellate case. We are sure the residents of Glenn County would rather have seen this money spent in classrooms. And of course, the fees could have been avoided altogether had the district complied with the records request from the start. It’s been an expensive lesson for WUSD, one we hope sticks with officials there as well as with other government officials around the North State. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Conspicuously absent On Monday morning, I headed to downtown Willows to meet with Tim Crews, publisher and editor of the Sacramento Valley Mirror. I’d met him once before, at former CN&R Editor Robert Speer’s retirement party back in May. There, he had congratulated me on being selected as editor-in-chief, and told me to call if I ever needed a hand. And Crews was sincere. A few days or so into my tenure, he phoned me to see if he could follow through on that offer. He didn’t have anything in mind, and I couldn’t think of anything, either. But I sure appreciated him taking the time to check in because, as he noted this week during an interview with me (see Newslines, “Muckraking goes on,” page 9), “None of us in this business are in it alone.” I visited the Mirror’s office to talk to Crews about his recent battle to overturn a local superior court’s order from two years ago that he pay court fees associated with a lawsuit he’d filed to gain access to public records from a local school district. A Glenn County Superior Court judge had ruled that the suit was frivolous and ordered him to pay the district’s attorneys’ fees, an amount that would have bankrupted the small newspaper. Crews appealed that decision with the support of a number of journalism advocates and news agencies, including MediaNews Group, owner of the Chico Enterprise-Record. That’s why it’s been so puzzling that the E-R has been mum on the appellate court ruling that, while dismissing the suit itself, determined the complaint was not frivolous. That higher court subsequently tossed out the order to pay $56,000. As noted by First Amendment advocates, the decision has far-reaching implications. Namely, it ensures that those seeking public information need not fear having to pay opposing-attorneys’ fees so long as the lawsuit is not frivolous. The decision is a huge win for California journalists and also for each and every citizen interested in government transparency, as the public has every right to access the same records. Speaking of conspicuously absent stories, I’d like to know how the paper also missed out on Robert Speer’s retirement. When I was a reporter at the E-R, we covered the comings and goings of CN&R editors over the years; then-Senior Editor Speer getting fired back in 2005, and then-Editor Tom Gascoyne’s exit about eight months later. Speer was a founding CN&R staffer, whose career spans more than 30 years. But when it comes to the paper-of-record, it’s as though he never left. Trust me, he’s not here. I sit at his old desk. Getting back to Crews, there again, not a single word was printed in the E-R about the recent appellate court ruling, though the paper had written earlier stories about the case. I guess the reporters were too busy last Wednesday on stories like that front-pager about Glenn County’s award-winning State Fair display. A special legal fund aided Crews’ appeal, but he’s still on the hook for thousands of dollars. Donations to help the muckraker carry on should be sent to Crews at 138 W. Sycamore St., Willows, CA, 95988.

Greenline under attack Re “Neighborhood feud” (Newslines, by Tom Gascoyne, July 18): The more significant story here is the push to weaken the agricultural Greenline in Butte County (see “The Greenline at 30,” Cover feature, July 19, 2012). This issue is much bigger than Creekhaven “Vineyard” Estates or any neighborhood feud. What’s really going on in this case is a sneak attack on the Greenline by Supervisor Larry Wahl via Tim Snellings and staff at the Butte County Department of Development Services, who have now proposed changes to the county code that would create huge loopholes allowing for commercial development in areas zoned for agriculture. Maureen Kirk is right: Tim Snellings and the staff of the Department of Development Services are “kind of doing this backwards.” Snellings has given Creekhaven the green light from the beginning, despite his responsibility to enforce existing ordinances and despite the unified objections by the Kennedy/Muir neighbors. Tim Snellings and Larry Wahl are both ideologues pushing an extreme political agenda. Snellings told us “government should get out of the way of business.” That’s sure funny to hear coming from a county staff member who works for the government—perhaps we should just eliminate Snelling’s job to save us all some money? Let’s replace Wahl, too. CURTIS PELDO Chico

I want to thank Mr. Gascoyne for his article. While the facts he presents are generally correct in sequence, there is much more to what the county planners are doing. I urge all who read this story to attend the July 25 Board of Supervisors meeting and get the whole picture. Land use is a very important and complex issue, and the county’s decisions have real and lasting impacts on the day-to-day lives of county residents. Those of us who have chosen to live in an ag zone are aware of the dust and machinery noise associated with ag business. We accept these things as a price for the peace and quiet that it brings to the area. The boisterous celebrations that are a natural part of weddings on 20 out of 52 Saturday evenings a year is not a reasonable use in an ag zone. Did the property owners and county really think that no one would object?

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continued from page 5

like kicking a beehive. After that, everything went down hill. I believe my sheep and horses are at risk. Because my property is only five acres, I don’t have the luxury of moving my animals to a safer location. In addition, the sound and the added traffic are unbearable. It is ruining the whole Kennedy/Muir way of life. This event center dilutes the Greenline and opens up the area to anything a developer wants to do. JOHN GAGER Chico

VA ineptitude no surprise Re “Dead ends” (Newslines, by Ken Smith, July 18): The plight of Army vet Joe Grossman getting the runaround from the VA is typical. I’m a Vietnam veteran and it took me 25 years to get a rating for my war injury—and then the VA refused to pay me my 25 years back pay. The VA is a huge, inert monolithic institution whose main job is sustaining its own cumbersome bureaucracy. Its modus operandi is to stall veterans until the veterans either die off or give up: the VA has a “culture of denial” that’s so ingrained that they even deny having a culture of denial. They’re playing veterans for suckers.

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personally reimburse any added costs incurred by—disabled people resulting from their acts. No sovereign immunity, no corporate veil! CHAD WOZNIAK Chico

Market isn’t in jeopardy Re “Preserve the farmers’ market” (Guest comment, by Karl Ory, July 11): Karl Ory is spreading inflammatory misinformation to make it sound like the city is going to abolish the farmers’ market. What a sham. If that were true, I’d join the bandwagon as I enjoy the farmers’ market and find it a great way to start a Saturday. From my understanding, what they are looking at is moving it to the Municipal Center parking lot. After looking at both places, I think it’s a terrific idea. Just what is your problem with moving there? Why do you have to spread lies and misinformation like this? What are you afraid of? Perhaps I don’t understand your concerns, and I’m willing to listen. What really irks me is that you make it sound as if the city of Chico and the City Council would do away with it, and that’s just hogwash. So, stop sending out misinformation just to get your way!

MIKE PETERS Chico

Sack the bag-ban Re “Laws and jobs” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, July 18): There is another dimension to discrimination against disabled persons: actions by governments which create difficulties and hazards for disabled persons, such as bans on disposable plastic grocery bags. Paper bags are difficult to impossible for people in wheelchairs or using a walker to handle. Reusable bags may carry foodborne diseases such as salmonella or E. coli, especially dangerous to people with compromised immune systems—another legally recognized disability. Admissions to hospital emergency rooms for foodborne diseases increased fivefold in San Francisco after that city adopted its ordinance banning plastic bags. Disabled persons are more likely to have lower incomes than the rest of the population, and are further harmed by the increased cost of alternatives to disposable bags. City Council members who vote for these bans (or other such arbitrary and needless regulations harming disabled people) should be fully personally financially liable for injury to—and should

DON WALKER Chico

Stop speculating Re “A life remembered” (Editorial, July 18): So you’re saying there is something wrong with George Zimmerman wanting to be a cop and putting his life on the line for your family? Or trying to keep these homes free of crime, so your kids could sleep secure? Zimmerman gave up his own time to help protect and serve, a notion lost on you. All you’re doing is speculating—and badly, at that. You’re trying the case as you wished it was, not as the real evidence shows. You are what’s wrong with the country. I suggest you get more fiber. ALLAN CLARK Paradise

Your editorial used so many assumptions, opinions, clichés, etc., to justify your condemnation of George Zimmerman. Given your print sensationalism, you probably are now able to insist that I, too, should be investigated by the Department of Justice for possible “civil-rights violations.” Had you ever considered that you were not a witness and neither was anyone else? Or considered that in our present legal system he

was found not guilty? Or do I expect to read a future editorial lambasting and denigrating the individual jurors for making a decision, but not the one you wanted? Finally, your statement that Mr. Zimmerman “is free to live his life” is in error. He may be totally free to live his life, but I am sure it will be a haunted one, by his own feelings and those in society who will never let him forget. Viva the 24/7 news cycle. If not for it, perhaps this situation would be discussed factually. DON CURTIS Chico

Hypocritical much? Re “Drop in the bucket” (Newslines, by Ken Smith, July 11): I find it ironic when people in the Chico area talk about doing as much as possible to help the needy in our community, whether it be the homeless transients downtown or people who just cannot afford to buy their own groceries. But as soon as it comes to helping our fellow Californians to the south with water—arguably the most important resource on Earth—those same people who preach sharing and equality instantly turn into selfish human beings. “They can’t take our water.” It’s funny how the mentality of “we’re all in this together” changes as soon as someone wants to take something away. You can’t tell people to share and care unless you do it yourself—that’s called hypocrisy. KEVIN O’LEARY Chico

Not a racist swampland Re “Injustice served” (Letters, by Jerry Harris, July 18): Thank goodness Jerry Harris came along to help broaden my “realm of perspective.” His insight is fascinating, especially when I factor in his short five years of residence here. If black people don’t go out at night, how do you see this pervasive racism? Some of the neighborhoods I lived in before I moved up here 15 years ago from Long Beach only had a couple of white guys living there. There, I lived mostly among Latinos and African-Americans. Let’s just say I wasn’t picked first for softball. Does that make it a “swampland of racism”? TOM GARRON Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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CN&R 7


Alfred Jones addresses a crowd of 70 who attended a “Justice for Trayvon Martin” gathering in downtown Chico.

POT SEASON IN FULL SWING

Marijuana harvest time has arrived for the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. On July 14, the Sheriff’s Special Enforcement Unit discovered 300 pounds of processed pot, 19 firearms and $22,482 in cash on Aureole Way in Concow. Two days later, the unit located 207 marijuana plants in a garden on Gold View Court in Oroville. Liding Chen of Oregon was arrested on charges of cultivation and possession. On July 18, the unit raided a garden off Purple Rock Road in Bangor and eradicated 1,087 plants. No arrests were made. On July 22, the unit located two gardens on Lower Wyandotte Road in Oroville with 425 plants. Ramiro Sanchez-Pineda of Mexico was arrested on charges of cultivation and possession for sale. The next day, the unit found 2,900 plants in Concow near Dogwood Creek, and 9,012 plants, fertilizer and rat poison were discovered near Feather Falls. No suspects were located in either raid.

WEDDING PLANS CHANGE

A couple who own a 6-acre ranch in the Greenline-protected agricultural lands west of Chico have withdrawn their application for a permit allowing wedding events on their property (see “Neighborhood feud,” Newslines, July 13). Those weddings have raised the hackles of a couple dozen neighbors who say the traffic and noise greatly disturb their Saturday evenings. Mark Medearis and Robin Flores Medearis have held five weddings on the property since May. The Butte County Planning Commission is looking to encourage the county’s tourism industry, according to a county report, via “agricultural activities associated with the wine, olive oil, fruit and nut, micro-brewery and micro-distillery industries.” The Medearises planted 800 grapevines on the property three years ago. Tim Snellings, director of the county’s Department of Development Services, sent an email noting that there are six weddings planned at the site through Oct. 5, despite the withdrawal of the application.

BOOZE BATTLES RAGE ON

The city of Chico Internal Affairs Committee voted unanimously at a special meeting Wednesday morning (July 24) to recommend the City Council adopt conditional-use permits as part of the process to obtain an alcohol license. According to a report by Mark Wolfe, community-development director, these permits would increase the city’s ability to regulate establishments that sell alcohol. The committee also decided to further discuss a recommendation by Chico Police Chief Kirk Trostle (pictured) to adopt what he called “The Chico Conditions,” a set of rules regarding hours of operation and other stipulations on all future alcohollicense applicants. The committee meets again Tuesday, July 30, at 8 a.m., to further discuss alcohol issues. Rulings on two businesses trying to obtain licenses—Mangrove Mini Mart and The Winchester Goose—are expected at the Aug. 6 City Council meeting. 8 CN&R July 25, 2013

Looking for justice Trayvon Martin supporters rally against not-guilty verdict

DChico and Oroville last week, extending nationwide protests over the July 13 delivery of a

emonstrators took to the streets of

not-guilty verdict in the killing of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin into the North State. story and Two gatherings were held in photo by Chico last Saturday (July 20)—a Ken Smith midday vigil at the corner of Third and Main streets and a kens@ newsreview.com “Justice for Trayvon Martin” rally and march held that evening at Chico City Plaza. On Tuesday morning (July 23), the Butte County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People organized a march to the steps of the Butte County Superior Courthouse in Oroville. About 70 people attended the Saturday-evening event in Chico, with a similar number reported at the Oroville demonstration. “When Trayvon was shot, it was like there was a death in the family,” said Vince Haynie, who co-organized the Saturdayevening event with the Chico Peace and Justice Center. “It was Petition like another death in the family connection: when that verdict came down.” Go to Haynie is a pastor at Rhema www.naacp.org/ The-DOJ-Petition Word of Faith Empowerment to sign the Ministries church in ChapmanNAACP’s still- town, as well as founder of the open “Justice for Love Chapmantown CommuniTrayvon Martin” ty Coalition. “This march for me petition to the U.S. Department represents healing,” he said, of Justice. when asked what he hoped the

event could accomplish. “It’s not about protesting people, it’s about protesting an unjust system. We love people and pray for both sides, for both families, but the system is broken.” Haynie, like many others across the country, believes the Martin killing and subsequent acquittal of his shooter, George Zimmerman, needs to be a launching point for deeper dialogue regarding race relations, a conversation he said is sorely lacking. “We know there is racism in this country; we try to sweep it under the rug and say there’s no race problem, especially since we have a black president, but yes, there is a problem,” Haynie said. “And no one wants to talk honestly about it. “I’m a pastor, and I have white Christian friends and they don’t want to talk about it. A lot of people are sheltered from it and think it doesn’t exist, that everything is hunky-dory, but they need to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes.” A quick perusal of social-media

commentary in response to local protests lends credence to Haynie’s claim that dialogue is stifled. When Life in Chico, CA—a Facebook presence hosted by the Synthesis—asked if anyone planned to attend the Chico vigils, nearly a hundred mostly negative comments appeared within several hours. Many commenters accused protesters of being lazy, unemployed rabblerousers, and expressed their fear that the gatherings would lead to rioting. The sentiment, “Not guilty, get over it!” was echoed several times, and many defend-

ed the verdict or, even further, praised Zimmerman’s actions in shooting Martin, whom several contend was a drugaddled gang member, and the aggressor. Still more people blamed the media for aggravating the issue and criticized the playing of “the race card.” The initial post has since been removed. Similar commentary appeared in response to Action News’ Internet coverage of the Tuesday morning Oroville event. “Maybe if they had jobs there would be no protest! I say give Zimmerman an award [as] community watch man of the year!” one Oroville man said. Jack Lee, author of Post Scripts at the Chico Enterprise-Record-hosted NorCal Blogs, has been critical of Martin supporters since the shooting first made headlines in February 2012. On July 20, the same day as the Chico protests, he wrote a piece sarcastically titled “Cultural Awareness Follows Zimmerman Verdict,” focusing on acts of black-on-white violence that have allegedly occurred since the ruling. Below a picture of a number of African-Americans climbing on a moving vehicle, he added the caption “Numerous cultural activists attempt to open a dialogue with passing motorists in L.A.” There was none of the violence

suggested by Internet trolls at the Chico or Oroville events. Instead, at the City Plaza gathering, a racially mixed group met to commiserate over feelings that the ruling was unjust, symptomatic of a broken justice system and a society in which racism is still a factor. Local pas-


tors, peaceniks, students and other community members delivered sometimes solemn, sometimes fiery speeches before huddling together to bow their heads and pray for justice. The crowd joined together in singing “We Shall Overcome” and headed east down Fourth Street to circle City Hall several times. Among the speakers at the Chico evening event—and the primary organizer of the Oroville march—was Butte County NAACP President Irma Jordan. Jordan was present at the NAACP’s 104th annual National Convention in Orlando, Fla., when the Zimmerman verdict was handed down. “It was awful,” she recalled. “We were mostly scattered in different meetings and workshops at the time, but wherever you were, you could feel it— this shared shock and disbelief. It was like someone had ripped everyone’s hearts out.” Jordan said NAACP National President Benjamin Jealous called an emergency meeting of all members at the convention to immediately start gathering— in person and via the Internet—signatures for a petition calling on the U.S. Department of Justice to prosecute Zimmerman on civil-rights charges. The goal was to have a million signatures by the time U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder arrived to speak at the convention July 16, a goal the organization met. The Justice Department is weighing the case, and on Monday (July 22) collected all of the trial evidence from the state of Florida. Jordan said NAACP chapter presidents were given orders on how to proceed upon returning to their own communities in response to the ruling. She explained that much of their focus is on changing existing “stand-your-ground” laws and racial-profiling tactics through legislation. She returned to Butte County July 18 and began organizing the Oroville march and future events. “We want to let the community know we’ve got work to do and how we can do it, and start getting things accomplished,” Jordan said. “It has to be advocacy work that changes laws. It doesn’t do any good to take to the streets and burn stuff up, turn over police cars and break up people’s property.” To this end, attendees at Tuesday’s march were given a “toolkit”—a packet full of information on whom to contact and how to advocate legislative change. And though Jordan stresses the NAACP is all about nonviolence, community empowerment and a greater dialogue for all people, she also feels that people are entitled to a little righteous anger. “People need to hear that this is wrong,” she said. “They can’t expect people to stay calm, calm, calm all the time when they’re being dogged out, when they’re not being treated like everybody else.” Ω

Muckraking goes on Court ruling saves Willows publication from bankruptcy Tim Crews is sleeping far Newspaperman better these days. That turn of events took place following

the recent decision by a state Court of Appeal overturning a local judge’s order that Crews pay $56,000 to the Willows Unified School District, an amount that would have folded the Sacramento Valley Mirror newspaper. The hard-fought battle comes nearly two years after Glenn County Superior Court Judge Peter Twede dismissed Crews’ state Public Records Act lawsuit against the school district—filed when the agency failed to respond to a PRA request within the timeframe allotted by law—and ruled it as frivolous, ordering him to pay the school district’s attorneys’ fees. In its ruling last Wednesday, July 17, the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento agreed with the lower court’s dismissal of Crews’ PRA lawsuit, but it did not find the petition frivolous and thus overturned the monetary judgment. Crews’ partial victory at the appellate level means the twice-weekly paper will live on, but it also has larger implications in the realm of public information. Had Twede’s ruling held up, it would have set a precedent that would have deterred other newspapers and individuals—under fear of having to repay attorneys’ fees—from pressing for access to government records. “If Tim had lost, we would have seen the loss of all enforcement of the Public Records Act, and it would mean public agencies would have total impunity to stop complying with the law,” said attorney Peter Scheer, executive director of the First Amendment Coalition, an open-government advocacy group that greatly aided Crews’ appeal. The First Amendment Coalition was among the heavy hitters in the journalism world—including newspapers such as the L.A. Times; newspaper parent companies, such as McClatchy (owner of The Sacramento Bee) and MediaNews Group (owner of the Chico Enterprise-Record); along with newspaper group the California Newspaper Pub-

lishers Association; and nonprofit open-government advocacy group Californians Aware—that lent Crews support in the form of friend-of-the-court briefs. The coalition also financed 90 percent of his appeal through the Rebele Legal Fund, named after Rowland “Reb” Rebele, main contributor to the fund and former owner of the Paradise Post, where Crews once worked. “Without them, we would have been sunk,” Crews said. “None of us in this business are in it

alone. We stand on the shoulders of those who’ve come before,” said Crews, producing an invoice for more than $16,000 that he owes to San Francisco-based attorney Karl Olson, who he noted had given him a veryreduced rate. “This is by no means the last bill,” continued Crews, who is trying to raise donations to pay off the balance. But that will be easier said than done, as Crews is an old-school journalist who isn’t savvy to new media. “I don’t Faceplant, I don’t tweet, I don’t do any of that stuff,” quipped Crews, a practitioner of shoe-leather reporting, a dying art. In 2009, Crews, editor and publisher of the Mirror, had requested emails from district officials that he believed would have shown the then-superintendent had used public money illegally—for political purposes. In addition to not meeting the timeline under the PRA, when the school district did begin producing the information, the documents came in an electronically unsearchable format. Moreover, the agency omitted 2,300 pages, documents Twede later ruled were exempt from inspection. “That’s still a very big burr under my saddle,” Crews said Monday morning (July 22) from the Mirror’s office in downtown Willows. Crews, who reports on goings-on throughout Glenn County, started the Valley Mirror 22 years ago on a shoestring budget, and continues to run the publication at a loss. Investigative reporting based on the gathering of

SIFT|ER Profiling by the numbers About one in four African-American men under age 35 (24 percent) reported being treated unfairly by police within the last 30 days, according to a Gallup poll released July 16. The survey of 1,010 nonHispanic blacks was conducted between June 13 and July 5, prior to when George Zimmerman’s not-guilty verdict in the killing of Trayvon Martin pushed race relations back into the headlines. Numbers were significantly lower among black women and older black men. In a related poll, also before the verdict, 52 percent of blacks said they felt dissatisfied with the way blacks are treated in the United States. Dissatisfaction was much higher before 2008, peaking in 2007 at 68 percent.

Tim Crews behind the counter at his office in Willows. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

public documents is a hallmark of his work— as evidenced by the awards lining the front windows of his office in an old jewelry store. The 69-year-old muckraker recalled having taken a class on the Public Records Act back in 1989 taught by attorney and former newspaper editor Terry Franke, an expert in First Amendment rights and co-founder of Californians Aware. Thereafter, for his first PRA request, he asked the county for a list all holders of concealed-weapons permits. That move elicited quite a stir, but Crews eventually found about a half-dozen permits had been issued illegally, mostly to out-of-towners. These days, one his biggest watchdog projects is keeping tabs on school districts. Crews noted that most of the schools in the county are underperforming, and his goal is to keep them accountable. “I think we have to do that—find out what they’re using the money for,” he said. “The problem is most [school officials] don’t live [in their districts]. The danger is they never have to live with the decisions they make.” But the tens of thousands of dollars he was ordered to pay two years ago would have spelled the end of the Willows-based paper and all of the dirt regularly dug up. The longtime newspaperman believes that was actually the point. “I think the goal was to destroy this paper, because we are a big fucking annoyance,” said Crews, referring to his dogged insistence that government agencies follow the letter of the law when it comes to the California Public Records Act. Donna Settle, Crews’ longtime partner, in love and business, noted that until Twede’s ruling, Crews had never lost a PRA lawsuit. “Tim knows the law as well as any attorney and better than most,” she said. —MELISSA DAUGHERTY melissad@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 July 25, 2013

CN&R 9


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Briana Beaver needs financial help to battle illness that almost killed her hen I feel better, I just want “W to have some fun.” Those are the words of Briana

Beaver, who—in addition to having cerebral palsy—was diagnosed with a neurological disorder last summer that nearly killed her. She has made weekly trips to San Francisco with her mother, Faelin Klein, since last July to receive treatment for an ailment that’s caused her so much pain she couldn’t shower because the spray of water was too intense. The 25-year-old Chico State graduate, who was featured in a CN&R cover feature (see “Labeled disabled,” by Stacey Kennelly, July 21, 2011), began speaking again only a month ago, after not talking for about three months. She spoke recently by speakerphone from San Francisco, where she sees two specialists regularly— Sergio Azzolino, a chiropractic neurologist, and Dr. Ahvie Herskowitz, an internist who deals with her “metabolic problems.” “I couldn’t talk before. … I couldn’t think. I couldn’t cry, I was in so much pain,” Beaver said in her somewhat halting but articulate speech. Beaver said her body pain was so intense last June that, as she lay in bed at Stanford Hospital in the Bay Area, she “welcomed the thought of death,” as she wrote at GoFundMe.com. Beaver is making use of the crowdfunding website to raise $41,500 to help pay for her ongoing, “extremely expensive” medical treatment, which is not covered by her insurance (at press time, she had raised $3,990). “My health has been declining pretty rapidly over the past few years,” Beaver said. “Last year, everything came to a big crash.” That is when Beaver became “unable to eat or drink due to excruciating pain throughout my entire body.” She was admitted to Stanford last June. “[B]ut they couldn’t figure out what was going on,” she said. “I didn’t eat or drink for six weeks. I had a PICC line [peripherally inserted central catheter].” Her weight dropped from an already-low 95 pounds to 79 pounds during her hospital stay. She was referred to Azzolino after her early-

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Briana Beaver with her dog, Scout. PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIANA BEAVER

July discharge from Stanford. “The first time I saw him, he said that everything that was going on with me was neurological,” Beaver said. “Essentially what happened was that the entire right side of my brain wasn’t working. It hasn’t been working properly for my whole life. It took this long of not having [the correct] care and medical treatment for all this time for it to crash.” Beaver said there is no name or diagnosis for her neurological ailment, but that Azzolino told her he’s seen it in other patients, but not to the degree where it was killing them. “The first time I saw him,” she said, “he took my mom in the other room and told her I had two days to live.”

nauseous and throw up, or get dizzy and pass out, and have horrible pain.” She said it is too painful for her to look at a computer screen, read or watch television. “Every sensory input—touch, taste, visual—gave me excruciating pain, so no one could even touch me. [Azzolino] was the only one that was allowed to touch me in the first six months of treatment.”

Things are looking up for

She said the treatments need to continue, and both specialists say they are confident that she can make a full recovery. “I want to contribute to the world,” she said. “I want to be in love. I want to have kids.” Bill Brouhard is a family friend waging a campaign to encourage people to donate to Beaver’s GoFundMe site. “The thing that pulls at my heart is that kid will explain all these terrible health issues, all this terrible pain she has, with a smile,” said Brouhard, who’s known Beaver since she was 4 years old. “If that was me, I’d just be complaining to everyone that would listen.”

Beaver these days, but she needs financial help to continue her treatments. Some of the treatments Azzolino provides use “visual tools, with my eyes.” Others, she said, are physical manipulation of her body. “He’s essentially rewiring my brain through exercises targeting specific areas of my body,” she said. Some of the exercises she does on her own, while others are performed with Azzolino’s assistance during Beaver’s weekly visits, which take place two to three days in a row each week, for one to two hours at a time. “I wasn’t able to read or write or look at anything solid until a month ago,” she said. “I would get

To help Briana:

Go to www.gofundme.com/2iod8o to donate money toward Briana Beaver’s ongoing medical treatment. Call Beaver at 514-2659 to volunteer to help maintain her GoFundMe page.

—CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA christinel@newsreview.com


Deep in the red City officials paint bleak financial picture hris Constantin, Chico’s administrativeCNakamura services director, and City Manager Brian told the city Finance Committee

on Tuesday (July 23) that the city’s budget, despite cuts to services, remains on shaky ground. Nakamura and Constantin were each a bit defensive in the wake of criticism from the public over financial cuts they’ve recommended to department heads that have led to city-employee layoffs and cuts in city services. Even with the suggested cuts—to park and tree crews, and public safety—the city will not be able to plug the $4.8 million general-fund deficit by the end of the calendar year, as was hoped, they said. At the June 18 all-day City Council budget session, Constantin was asked to look into ways to hire six police officers. “I tell you now, there is no way that can be done,” he told the Finance Committee, which is made up of Councilmembers Mark Sorensen, Randall Stone and Scott Gruendl. Constantin said the city could bring on four police positions, which actually means hiring two rookie police officers at base pay and not laying off two community-service officers. Even so, he said, unless the cityemployee unions’ bargaining units agree to reduce the city’s share of employee healthcare costs and other benefits, the city will be able to pay those two new officers for only the next two years. He said the city paid all city employees a total of $50.4 million in 2012. “I get blasted by some of the bargaining units” for such suggestions, Constantin said. “It’s not the employees’ fault they cost so much. That’s not what I am communicating. It’s just that this is the only place we can look to cut.” He defended his annual salary of $160,000, considerably more than his predecessor Jennifer Hennessy, by pointing out that he has replaced three employees whose total salaries added up to $390,000. “I get blasted in everything I say,” Constantin said. “I’m trying to fight the good fight. The next six months present our last and best hope, and it’s got to involve bargaining [over city-employee] benefits.” He said the city can give, but has to

ask for something in return. When asked if the city should consider filing for bankruptcy, Constantin said that Chico is “not there yet.” He predicted that the courts would throw out a bankruptcy request, telling the city there were still places to cut spending. As for selling assets such as city-owned buildings at the Chico Municipal Airport, Constantin said all options are being considered, but selling assets is a short-term fix at best.

City-employee union negotiations begin in October, Constantin said, but can be dragged out with no resolution before an arbitrator is called in, and that arbitrator may well say the city has more services it could cut before going after employee pay and benefits. Nakamura lamented the tough situation the city finds itself in, and said that, in actuality, balancing the general fund is going to require another $7 million in spending cuts. “How do you cut another $7 million out of the budget?” he asked rhetorically. “You don’t. The community has certain expectation levels.”

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Chico Administrative Services Director Chris Constantin after delivering sobering economic news to the Finance Committee. PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

Nakamura said the city will be going through some rough times over the next several years. “I feel like I’m never delivering any good news,” he said. “I enjoyed going to the [grand] openings of Dick’s [Sporting Goods] and BevMo!,” he said. “That’s good news. But the deficit we’ve created is overwhelming.” He said he does not enjoy cutting public services and realizes that limiting access to parts of Bidwell Park is not going over well. “I know the public is really angry,” Nakamura said. “I can only hope they will be understanding.” He did say citizen volunteers are beginning to come forward to offer help, and that the city needs “to partner with anybody and everybody we can.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

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CN&R 11


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS

Jumpin’ galls!

BUTTERFLIES GOING BYE-BYE

Butterfly populations are continuing to decrease in the United States, thanks to the ongoing destruction of habitat—meadows and woods—to make room for housing developments, and the use of bug sprays, especially those for mosquito abatement. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced recently that in South Florida—considered “ground zero” because of the number of butterfly species “on the verge of annihilation,” as The Washington Post recently described it— the rockland grass skipper and the Zestos skipper are likely extinct. The rockland grass skipper has not been seen since 2000, and the Zestos skipper not since 2004. If butterflies are becoming extinct, “it’s a strong indicator that we’re messing up the environment around us,” said Robert K. Robbins, research entomologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of Natural History.

Chico State biology professor studies the California jumping gall wasp

RADIATION SPIKE AT FUKUSHIMA PLANT

On the heels of the news that Japan may restart, in about a year, nuclear reactors shut down in the aftermath of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, it was announced that radiation levels in the groundwater at the damaged nuclear plant recently soared. In early July, Tokyo Electric Power Co.— known as Tepco—announced its detection of a level of cesium-134 150 times higher than Japan’s safety standard at a well that is a little more than 80 feet from the Pacific Ocean, according to The Huffington Post. The level of radioactive cesium detected in the area’s groundwater in June was considerably lower. In related news, photographs of seriously deformed vegetables from Fukushima appeared on photo-sharing website imgur.com, the International Science Times reported, raising the issue of whether radiation-contaminated groundwater is to blame.

EU BAN TO HELP HONEY BEES

A widely used insecticide—an insect nerve agent called fipronil—will be banned from use on certain crops in the European Union in an effort to protect a declining honey-bee population. On July 16, EU member states approved a proposal to ban the use of fipronil—which is manufactured by German chemical company BASF—on corn and sunflowers starting Dec. 31, 2013, according to the UK’s Guardian newspaper. The pesticide is used in more than 70 countries, including the United States. Determined a “high acute risk” to honey bees by the European Food Safety Authority, fipronil joins a list of three other bee-threatening insecticides banned by the EU in May. “The company remains convinced that the decline in bee populations is caused by multiple and complex factors and that the restriction of fipronil will not contribute to protecting bees,” said a statement on BASF’s website following the European Commission’s decision. Send your eco-related news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R July 25, 2013

Don Miller holds a vial of jumping galls. Inset: A valley oak leaf is covered in jumping galls, before they fall off and jump around on the ground.

story and photos by

Claire Hutkins Seda

Ostreets stands a healthy valley oak tree with something very peculiar happening n the corner of Fifth and Orient

beneath it. Don Miller, an entomologist and professor of biological studies at Chico State, recently took a visit to the tree carrying a handful of tiny vials. Below his feet, the hot July pavement was in motion with tiny poppy-seed-sized galls, each containing a wasp larva that caused it to jump around. Many galls—those oddly shaped outgrowths of plant tissues caused by insects, fungi and other parasites—often go unnoticed; but this time of year, these particularly strange galls that look like minuscule brownish pebbles catch the attention of Chicoans when they fall from the leaves. “They are truly dinky. I mean, they’re probably about a millimeter long,” Miller said of the diminutive galls that can be found jumping under some trees in the thousands, coating the pavement or ground, creating a faint sound reminiscent of a muffled rainstick. Each tiny gall contains the larva of the California jumping gall wasp, Neuroterus saltatorius, a cynipid-wasp larva which will emerge in the spring as an equally tiny and inconspicuous adult cynipid wasp. (All oak-gall wasps are members of the Cynipidae family, and are

smaller and generally harmless to humans, compared to their cousins, the picnicplaguing vespid wasps with their annoying stings.) Miller collects some of the jumping galls to chill them in his refrigerator, halting their development until he pulls them out for his animal-behavior class at Chico State in the fall, when they will begin to jump anew. He poses to his students the inevitable question on everyone’s mind: Why do they jump? “By jumping around, they move into cracks and crevices [in the ground], and they’re better hidden, and they’re a little bit more protected from the sun—I think that’s a very good hypothesis,” Miller said, referring to the answers he’s gotten from students. The fact is, jumping gall wasps haven’t been sufficiently studied to give a conclusive answer. Miller’s own hypothesis? “It’s kind of like a box of cereal,” he said, referring to the usual warning on the box that its contents may have settled. “If I scrape off the top layer of duff—the leaves and sticks [under the oak]—I’ll find vast numbers [of galls] underneath. These larvae inside these little tiny galls are settling down and protecting

More information:

Visit www.bidwellpark.org/ page/nature/nature.php, Chico Creek Nature Center’s webpage on the galls of Bidwell Park.

themselves a little bit more” by moving themselves down through the leaf litter to the ground through their odd jumping. “Among the half-dozen or so oak species we have here, there are upward of 100 galling wasps found,” Miller said, although this is the only type that jumps. In addition to the jumping gall, the most noticeable galls are those produced by the oak apple gall wasp. The golf-ballsized (and larger) oak-apple galls can be found growing on valley oaks across Chico. But plenty of others can be found: “There are flat ones. There are spangled galls that look like something Janis Joplin would’ve worn. There’s one that looks like cotton candy. There are little tiny pompoms. There are some that are just mere swellings on the stems. There are some that look like little tiny [sea] urchins— they’re called urchin galls. There are others that look like red Hershey’s Kisses. “As soon as you start looking carefully at the leaves and stems of the valley oak, you’ll start to see—wow, look at all the different galls on this plant! And each type of gall is made by a different gall-maker,” Miller noted. In addition to certain wasps and aphids, some species of midges, beetles, moths and thrips produce galls. Miller, who primarily studies galling aphids on manzanita trees, pointed out that many different plants act as hosts besides GREENWAYS continued on page 14


July 25, 2013

CN&R 13


DESIGNER

JEN_PU

ECO EVENT

GREENWAYS continued from page 12

NO.

IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE

BEARS AT LYON

oaks, including members of the rose family (Rosaceae), the heather family (Ericaceae), and the sunflower family (Asteraceae).

Come to this free July 25 presentation and book-signing at Lyon Books (135 Main St.) by local author Steven T. Callan, a former longtime wildlife-protection officer for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. The event, which runs from 7 to 8 p.m., is focused on Callan’s new book, Badges, Bears and Eagles: The True-Life Adventures of California Fish and Game Warden.

As if the jumping isn’t bizarre

enough, the rest of the jumping gall wasps’ two-year life cycle is as weird as an alien sci-fi movie. One year, the wasps make jumping galls, and the next year, the same Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties wasps make non-jumping galls that look very different. The adult24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) female jumping gall wasps—the www.rapecrisis.org ones that emerged from jumping galls the previous year—inject REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. &eggs PREV.into the plant tissue of the oak tree, which can be either the valley oak or blue oak, another common oak tree found in the foothills around Chico. The wasps are “probably pro~ SLIDING SCALE ~ ducing chemical compounds,” said Private & Community Miller, compounds that he refers to Walk-ins Welcome as “plant-hormone analogues.” Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. “They cause the plant to grow Bill Nichols L.Ac. in weird ways that it wouldn’t

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[normally] grow,” he explained. In this case, the oak will create a flattened-out tiny brown gall on the leaf. That flattened gall doesn’t jump. It stays on the leaf and is part of the wasp’s “bisexual generation,” Miller explained, and it’s not how it sounds. “Bisexual in this context means that there are two sexes—there are male and female [larvae],” explained Miller. The larvae in the non-jumping galls emerge as adults and mate. The females then lay eggs in the oaks for the next year’s galls. But this time, all the larvae will end up being female. This “unisexual-generation” gall— the tiny round gall that drops to the

ground and jumps—is vastly different, despite being the offspring of the same type of insect laying eggs in the same type of host tree. This all-female unisexual generation will drop from the trees (as larvae inside their galls) and do their pavement dance in July, ending sometime in August before emerging as adults in the spring. Those unisexual female jumping-gall wasps then lay the next— bisexual—generation without fertilization in a process called parthenogenesis, or virgin birth, and the peculiar two-year cycle begins again. As for the concern that all this gall-making activity might hurt the trees, Miller said “it’s pretty much of no consequence. It is such a small, aggregate effect—I just don’t think it matters very much for the tree.” Ω

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reen HOUSE

by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

POST-GROWTH ECONOMICS I am about halfway through reading The End

of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality, by Richard Heinberg, and I am moved to share some salient passages from the excellent book with GreenHouse readers. Heinberg, as some will remember, was brought to Chico State by the university’s Institute for Sustainable Development on April 24 of last year to deliver a talk with the very same name as this book (see The GreenHouse, April 19, 2012). He is senior fellow-in-residence at Santa Rosa’s Post-Carbon Institute and “a leading educator on peak oil,” as his website, richardheinberg.com, aptly puts it. Here’s Heinberg: “Here is economic history compressed into one sentence. As societies have grown more complex, larger, more far-flung and diverse, the tribebased gift economy has shrunk in importance, while the trade economy has grown to dominate most aspects of people’s lives, and has expanded in scope to encompass the entire planet. Is this progress or a process of moral decline? Philosophers have debated the question for centuries. Approve or disapprove, it is what we have done.” And: “The subsuming of land within the category of capital by nearly all post-classical economists had amounted to a declaration that Nature is merely a subset of the human economy—an endless pile of resources to be transformed into wealth.” As well as: “The massive worldwide economic growth of the past two centuries was enabled by humanity’s newfound ability to exploit cheap, abundant energy of fossil fuels.” On the oil industry: “Despite its habitual use of the terms ‘produce’ and ‘production,’ the industry doesn’t make oil, it Life after peak oil. merely extracts the stuff from finite stores in the earth’s crust.” On water use in Kern County, in California’s Central Valley: “The local agriculture is highly water-intensive: For Kern County farmers to produce a single orange requires 55 gallons of water, while each peach takes 142 gallons. As a result of the drought, tens of thousands of acres of Kern County farmland were idled.” More on water: “As snowpack disappears, farmers, ranchers, and cities make up for the loss of running surface water by pumping more from wells. But in many cases this just trades one long-term problem for another: depleting aquifers.” The financial sector: “Perhaps the meteoric rise of the finance economy in the past couple of decades resulted from a semi-conscious strategy on the part of society’s managerial elites to leverage the last possible increments of growth from a physical, resource-based economy that was nearing its capacity. In any case, the implications of the current economic crisis cannot be captured by unemployment statistics and real estate prices. Attempts to restart growth will inevitably collide with natural limits that simply don’t respond to stimulus packages or bailouts.” I look forward to upcoming chapters (not with glee, but more in a forewarned-is-forearmed sense): “Shrinking Pie: Competition and Relative Growth,” “Managing Contraction, Redefining Progress” and “Life after Growth.” Get yourself a copy and let’s have a conversation. No one deserves to live in a world built upon the degradation of human beings, forests, waters, and the rest of our living planet. Speaking to our brethren on Wall Street: No one deserves to spend their lives playing with numbers while the world burns. —Charles Eisenstein

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CN&R 15


THE PULSE TEENS HAVING FEWER BABIES

California’s teen birth rate continues to drop, reaching its lowest point since peaking in 1991. The state’s current teen birth rate is 28 births per every 1,000 girls between 15 and 19 years old, down from an all-time high of 70.9 births per 1,000, according to a California Department of Public Health press release. Teen birth rates dropped across all ethnic groups, including a 42 percent decrease for Hispanic teens since 2001. Early childbearing is connected to poor academic achievement and diminished earningpotential for the mother and father, and is viewed as a hindrance to early-childhood development. State officials pointed to school and community education programs as key components of the multi-faceted approach to lowering the teen birth rate. “California’s innovative strategies and community partnerships aimed at lowering teen pregnancy are helping young women and men make responsible choices,” said Dr. Ron Chapman, director of the CDPH. “We must not be complacent; we must continue to promote teen-pregnancy-prevention programs and strategies.”

HEALTHLINES

Trauma season Summer is prime time for trauma cases at Enloe Medical Center

ROBOT, SURGEONS TEAM UP

Surgeons at Oroville Hospital performed their first cholecystectomy using the facility’s new da Vinci robotic-surgery system. Using the da Vinci’s high-tech three-dimensional visualization system, surgeons removed a patient’s gallbladder through a one-inch incision in the belly button, according to an Oroville Hospital press release. Such surgeries take about an hour—with a hospital stay of less than 24 hours—and result in minimal pain, scarring and blood loss. Oroville Hospital surgeon Randell Skau is one of a handful of physicians in the country trained to perform da Vinci cholecystectomies. “Neither robotic surgery nor single-incision surgery is new, but combining the two to remove a gallbladder requires additional training and special equipment,” Skau said.

DIET SODA POOR ALTERNATIVE

Diet soda may not be the relatively healthful alternative to regular soda that many believe it to be, research suggests. A study, in which researchers at Purdue University used animal test subjects, concluded that diet soda is similar to regular soda in its connection to heart disease, obesity and diabetes, according to USA Today. Separate studies have linked artificial sweeteners like those found in diet soft drinks to overeating, which Susan Swithers of Purdue’s Ingestive Behavior Research Center suggests is the result of the body expecting calories and sugar to accompany something sweet. When someone drinks a diet soda, those calories aren’t delivered, triggering cravings for sugary food or drinks. “Are diet sodas worse for you than regular sodas? I think that’s the wrong question,” Swithers said. “It’s, ‘What good are sodas for you in the first place?’” Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R July 25, 2013

by

Evan Tuchinsky

S just a prime time for outdoor activities. As staff at Enloe Medical Center’s Trauma ummer in the North State isn’t

Services department attest, it’s also peak season for serious injuries. Compared to the rest of the year, Enloe’s trauma team treats an average of nine more serious cases a month in the summer and receives 20 percent more calls. While some accidents and injuries are unavoidable, the majority could be prevented or made less serious by using safety equipment and practicing sensible behavior. In fact, Dr. Eugene Cleek, medical director of Trauma Services, estimates roughly 95 percent of the department’s cases are avoidable injuries. Judy Cline, chief flight nurse and trauma coordinator at Enloe, finds that figure disturbing. “It definitely takes a toll when you know a simple action might have prevented something traumatic,” Cline said. However, Cleek doesn’t expect people to stay indoors, protected by a plastic bubble. “Wouldn’t it be a shame to die at 115 years old and have never done anything?” he said. “It’s about taking acceptable risk and trying to minimize the problems that may occur.” Cline and Cleek preach safety to anyone who will listen; Cline regularly does so through outreach programs for schools and community groups. In separate interviews, they shared some tips with the CN&R in

hopes of preventing emergency-room visits for local outdoor enthusiasts.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends people under age 16 avoid riding ATVs altogether.

• Sober is safer. This may seem obvious, but Cline estimates that 30 percent of trauma patients’ accidents occur while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, not counting patients who are injured by other impaired individuals. “Sober is good,” Cline said. “There’s more of a tendency, I think, for people to drink alcohol when it’s hot outside.” Such behavior increases the likelihood of poor decision-making, she said. Butte County has a particularly high level of substance abuse. According to data collected by Enloe, 18 percent of county adults binge drink (compared to 16 percent statewide), 19 percent consume alcohol heavily (compared to 17 percent statewide), and the county experiences more than triple the drug-poisoning deaths than the state average.

Inset: Judy Cline, chief flight nurse and trauma coordinator at Enloe Medical Center, educating local school children about traumatic-injury prevention.

PHOTO BY ISTOCKPHOTO

PHOTO COURTESY OF ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER

• Helmets help. California has experienced a drop in traumatic head injuries from motorcycle accidents since helmets became mandatory by law in 1992, but that requirement doesn’t extend to all-terrain vehicles or horses, and only bicyclists under the age of 18 must wear helmets. Cleek says Enloe sees “a significant number” of ATV-accident victims, and Cline recommends helmets for all riders and cyclists. In addition, Cline said, “once you’ve been in an accident, your helmet can no longer be considered good anyHEALTHLINES continued on page 19

APPOINTMENT DIOXINS, DISCUSSED A public forum regarding potentially dangerous dioxin levels in the Oroville area will be held on Wednesday, July 31, at the Oroville branch of the Butte County Library (1820 Mitchell Ave.), beginning at 6 p.m. A film-clip about waste incineration and dioxins from the documentary film Trashed, along with a short video discussing the negative health-impacts of dioxins, will be followed by an opportunity for community input. Call Julia Murphy at 891-6424 for more information.


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living your life. www.OrovilleHospital.com/Robotics July 25, 2013

CN&R 17


Same Day and Walk-in Appointments Available

Feather River Health Center OVER 8000 ADULTS AND CHILDREN visit the Feather River Health Center every year. The center is certified as a Rural Health Clinic, there to provide services for patients with Medi-Cal and Medicare Insurance. Located at 5125 Skyway in Paradise, the Feather River Health Center is an outpatient facility designed for non-emergency medical care. Like the hospital, it is a place to get care form multi-specialty physicians and other health practitioners like physical therapists, nurse practitioners, physician assistant, psychologists and Licensed Clinical Social Workers. New to the Center is the Intregrated Pain Management Program. There is a difference between pain relief and pain management and our program is based on giving you the tools to focus on different aspects of your life and

wellness, to help you manage your pain better. We may not have the ability to take your pain away completely, but we provide support, an environment of trust, compassion and understanding. The non-emergency care provided at the Feather River Health Center helps to keep area Emergency Rooms for emergencies only. Individuals who are not participants in Medicare or Medi-Cal programs are welcome to use the Feather River Health Center but will need to arrange for payment before scheduling an appoint. Feather River Health Center provides a variety of services, including: • Primary Care • Internal Medicine • A Call-in Clinic

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18 CN&R July 25, 2013

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HEALTHLINES

continued from page 16

more, because it may have tiny stress fractures [and it may not prevent injury in a future accident].” • Stay aware of your surroundings. Cline calls this “situational awareness”; others call it defensive driving. Whatever the term, the concept is the same—keeping an eye out for likely hazards when operating a motor vehicle. Many car-on-motorcycle and car-onbicycle accidents occur when automobile drivers “aren’t aware of who’s sharing the road,” she said. Moreover, you’re more likely to find pedestrians in and along the roadway during the summer. • Twilight is the witching hour. Sunset can be a particularly dangerous time to be on the road. Drivers headed westbound find sunlight shining directly into their windshields, making it harder to see pedestrians and cyclists. Once night falls, make sure to wear bright clothes and mount a light on your bike. Cline also says to avoid riding ATVs at night or on roadways. • ATVs are adult vehicles. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends people under age 16 avoid riding ATVs altogether. Cline acknowledges that may be hard in rural areas of the North State, where ATVs are often used as farm transportation, so she advises riders not to carry passengers, especially small children. “We’ve seen that even at low, low speeds, just hitting a small bump will send a toddler flying,” she said, “and without any protective equipment on, they often end up with some serious head trauma.” • Jump in feet first. “If you want to dive into a body of water, you want to know what’s under the surface,” Cline said, “and that’s very difficult to do in a lot of our fast-moving creeks around here. Sometimes people underestimate or overes-

Trauma surge:

The average number of times the Enloe trauma team gets called into action in each of the summer months (June through August) compared to the yearly average: 2010 Summer 50 Full year 41.8 *through June

2011 48 39

2012 47.7 38.8

2013 TBD 34.2*

timate the depth of the water. We always say never dive into the water [head first]—we always say feet first.” • Know your boat. Whether operating a ski boat or personal watercraft, nautical skills are critical. “Many of these watercraft can get up to 70 miles per hour,” Cline said, adding that hitting the water with one’s body at such a high speed can lead to serious injury. Cline emphasized the importance of knowing the capabilities of your vehicle, taking boat-safety classes, and—to stress an earlier point—never operating watercraft under the influence of drugs or alcohol. • Don’t go it alone. Bring a buddy along on your hiking, biking or boating trip. If you can’t take someone, let friends or family know the specifics of your plan, because, as Cline points out, “There are a lot of areas here—when you go out in the valley or up in the foothills or out on the lake—where there’s no cell-phone coverage whatsoever.” Though the tips above are good guidelines for staying safe this summer, Cleek recognizes that even extremely cautious people may suffer serious accidents from time to time. “Normal people have bad things happen to them,” Cleek said, “and when that happens, we’ll be here and do our best for you.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Friday, August 2nd

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Eggs: Good for you? Eggs have long suffered from a bad reputation, mostly due to their high cholesterol content (the American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol a day, a limit exceeded by eating two eggs). But studies suggest the ADA’s recommendation—based on the assumption that eating foods high in cholesterol raises cholesterol levels in your blood—might be misguided. In fact, a 2006 study conducted by the University of Connecticut found a lack of connection between the risk of coronary heart disease from consuming eggs, and that regularly eating eggs actually “may have multiple beneficial effects.”

Source: The Huffington Post

July 25, 2013

CN&R 19


The adventure continues

J

ohn Lane, Chico’s intrepid adventurer, recently completed his eighth trip to Papua New Guinea, going back to retrieve the specimens of plants, insects and animals collected two years ago with Chico State biology professor Don Miller. The specimens provide a way to measure and track the environmental health and stability of the rainforests of New Britain, an island off Papua New Guinea. Lane has made it his mission to help protect the pristine environment of the island, which sits just north of Australia. Much of the New Britain’s forestland has been clear-cut by logging companies and replaced by palm-oil plantations. Palm oil is used in a number of products, ranging from cereal and crackers, to cosmetics and biofuel.

Local researcher’s work may help preserve Papua New Guinea island BY TOM GASCOYNE

tomg@newsreview.com photos courtesy of

John Lane

John Lane (left) pretends to eat a spider specimen during an expedition to the island of New Britain in 2007. Other specimens collected include a frog (top) gathered while researching a fungus that kills frogs, and a Birdwing butterfly (center), one of the largest butterflies in the world. Above, a young villager, wearing a T-shirt featuring Britney Spears, holds up a bat he caught in a cave.

20 CN&R July 25, 2013

For years, Lane had partnered on the expeditions with Chico State’s College of Natural Sciences, where he serves as an adjunct professor. The financial support Lane raised —much of it from Ken Grossman, owner of the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.— would go into a fund at the University Foundation and then get dispersed as the expedition grew near. But two years ago, Lane’s relationship with the university soured (see sidebar, page 23). And though the campus is no longer involved in his overseas adventures, Lane is determined to continue his work on the island, efforts he hopes will lead to long-term conservation of its unique environment. Lane is not driven by money or the promise of fame. His motivation, it seems, is primal: human curiosity and the thirst for adventure. But he tells his stories of adventure—like getting attacked by a cassowary, the world’s third-largest flightless bird, or waking to find a leech stuck to his eyeball—with the calm detachment of a guy describing a weekend barbecue. For example, there is the story of the local villagers asking Lane and his party for $70,000 in exchange for access to land, and then accepting cans of tuna, a tarp and a chair in lieu of the money. He notes that there are more than 850 languages spoken in Papua New Guinea and that the locals refer to white visitors as “dim-dims.” Lane returned from his latest trip last month. “We collected butterflies, moths, spiders, frogs, snakes and geckos,” he said. “My sole objective was to get this collection. Otherwise, the whole project is done and all the effort, time and money just would be dissipated.” He worked with the Papua New Guinea Department of Environment and Conservation to reclaim the samples, not an easy task in a developing country. “That department does not have working email or working telephones,” he said. “I’m talking to other scientists in Papua New Guinea who are getting their collections or doing work for oil-palm plantations, and I’m

asking them, ‘I need to get these collections and I also need to get these permits, can you help me out?’” He finally got word that the specimens were in good condition, which was a great relief. “Initially they were going to send them to me six or seven months after the expedition,” he explained. “But they didn’t show up. It turns out the guy who was supposed to send them didn’t have any money to do so. I realized I had to go get them.”

There is a lot of planning, obviously, that goes into such an expedition. Lane said he approaches the Papua New Guinea government six months in advance to submit all the paperwork that explains the mission. “First, we get permission from the landowners and from the palm-oil plantation and we submit that,” he explained. “They say, ‘OK, you’re good to go,’ and we send our passports to the New Guinea Embassy in Washington, D.C. We are granted permission, and we travel there to get our permits to do our study and make

our collections. “In most countries, you would have the permit prior to going. But with Papua New Guinea, you actually have to be there in person and stand by as they go through the process. The last thing you want to do is take the specimens and not have a proper permit. If you get caught doing that, you can go to jail and you can lose the entire collection.” The expedition two years ago cost about $25,000 and included 10 members—three students and seven instructors from Chico State—and about 25 villagers all camping in the jungle. “Generally, there are about three or four villagers helping us out by collecting,” Lane said. “The rest are just hanging out and eating our food. They are there out of curiosity, and it’s fun. They stay awake all night telling stories or playing music, and there is a lot of interaction between us.” One story connected to Lane’s adventures is particularly fascinating. “ADVENTURE” continued on page 22

Fred Hargesheimer (below) is carried by villagers to the site of the airplane (inset at left) he was flying when shot down over New Britain by Japanese pilots during World War II.

July 25, 2013

CN&R 21


The adventure continues

J

ohn Lane, Chico’s intrepid adventurer, recently completed his eighth trip to Papua New Guinea, going back to retrieve the specimens of plants, insects and animals collected two years ago with Chico State biology professor Don Miller. The specimens provide a way to measure and track the environmental health and stability of the rainforests of New Britain, an island off Papua New Guinea. Lane has made it his mission to help protect the pristine environment of the island, which sits just north of Australia. Much of the New Britain’s forestland has been clear-cut by logging companies and replaced by palm-oil plantations. Palm oil is used in a number of products, ranging from cereal and crackers, to cosmetics and biofuel.

Local researcher’s work may help preserve Papua New Guinea island BY TOM GASCOYNE

tomg@newsreview.com photos courtesy of

John Lane

John Lane (left) pretends to eat a spider specimen during an expedition to the island of New Britain in 2007. Other specimens collected include a frog (top) gathered while researching a fungus that kills frogs, and a Birdwing butterfly (center), one of the largest butterflies in the world. Above, a young villager, wearing a T-shirt featuring Britney Spears, holds up a bat he caught in a cave.

20 CN&R July 25, 2013

For years, Lane had partnered on the expeditions with Chico State’s College of Natural Sciences, where he serves as an adjunct professor. The financial support Lane raised —much of it from Ken Grossman, owner of the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.— would go into a fund at the University Foundation and then get dispersed as the expedition grew near. But two years ago, Lane’s relationship with the university soured (see sidebar, page 23). And though the campus is no longer involved in his overseas adventures, Lane is determined to continue his work on the island, efforts he hopes will lead to long-term conservation of its unique environment. Lane is not driven by money or the promise of fame. His motivation, it seems, is primal: human curiosity and the thirst for adventure. But he tells his stories of adventure—like getting attacked by a cassowary, the world’s third-largest flightless bird, or waking to find a leech stuck to his eyeball—with the calm detachment of a guy describing a weekend barbecue. For example, there is the story of the local villagers asking Lane and his party for $70,000 in exchange for access to land, and then accepting cans of tuna, a tarp and a chair in lieu of the money. He notes that there are more than 850 languages spoken in Papua New Guinea and that the locals refer to white visitors as “dim-dims.” Lane returned from his latest trip last month. “We collected butterflies, moths, spiders, frogs, snakes and geckos,” he said. “My sole objective was to get this collection. Otherwise, the whole project is done and all the effort, time and money just would be dissipated.” He worked with the Papua New Guinea Department of Environment and Conservation to reclaim the samples, not an easy task in a developing country. “That department does not have working email or working telephones,” he said. “I’m talking to other scientists in Papua New Guinea who are getting their collections or doing work for oil-palm plantations, and I’m

asking them, ‘I need to get these collections and I also need to get these permits, can you help me out?’” He finally got word that the specimens were in good condition, which was a great relief. “Initially they were going to send them to me six or seven months after the expedition,” he explained. “But they didn’t show up. It turns out the guy who was supposed to send them didn’t have any money to do so. I realized I had to go get them.”

There is a lot of planning, obviously, that goes into such an expedition. Lane said he approaches the Papua New Guinea government six months in advance to submit all the paperwork that explains the mission. “First, we get permission from the landowners and from the palm-oil plantation and we submit that,” he explained. “They say, ‘OK, you’re good to go,’ and we send our passports to the New Guinea Embassy in Washington, D.C. We are granted permission, and we travel there to get our permits to do our study and make

our collections. “In most countries, you would have the permit prior to going. But with Papua New Guinea, you actually have to be there in person and stand by as they go through the process. The last thing you want to do is take the specimens and not have a proper permit. If you get caught doing that, you can go to jail and you can lose the entire collection.” The expedition two years ago cost about $25,000 and included 10 members—three students and seven instructors from Chico State—and about 25 villagers all camping in the jungle. “Generally, there are about three or four villagers helping us out by collecting,” Lane said. “The rest are just hanging out and eating our food. They are there out of curiosity, and it’s fun. They stay awake all night telling stories or playing music, and there is a lot of interaction between us.” One story connected to Lane’s adventures is particularly fascinating. “ADVENTURE” continued on page 22

Fred Hargesheimer (below) is carried by villagers to the site of the airplane (inset at left) he was flying when shot down over New Britain by Japanese pilots during World War II.

July 25, 2013

CN&R 21


“ADVENTURE” continued from page 21

Top: A young villager dressed as a warrior during a traditional Sing Sing tribal celebration. Center: Mount Ivy sits on the far shore of Lake Hargy. Bottom: Villagers who helped build a dock on the shore of Lake Hargy.

22 CN&R July 25, 2013

There is a palm-oil company, a lake and a territory on New Britain all called “Hargy.” That name comes from Fred Hargesheimer, an American pilot shot down during World War II while doing photographic reconnaissance over the island. He survived for 30 days on chocolate bars from his knapsack and snails fished from the streams before being taken in by the villagers who hid him from Japanese soldiers until he was rescued by the crew of an Australian submarine. Twenty years later, in 1963, Hargesheimer returned to the island and provided money to build the Airmen’s Memorial School for the local children. Hargesheimer wrote a book about his experience called The School That Fell From the Sky. And in 2006, he accompanied Lane to the island after his plane had been found by villagers near Lake Hargy. Hargesheimer, who lived in Grass Valley and died in 2010, gave the majority of his estate to help maintain and operate the school, which is administered by Hargy Oil Palms, Ltd. Lane said the popularity of palm oil presents a continuing threat to the region, though Hargy Oil Palms is cooperating with Lane’s effort by allowing him access to its plantations for survey work. “The oil’s production is infesting tropical lands and is really in the forefront of environmental activism,” he said. “The poster child is the orangutan that lives where oil is throughout the tropics. The palm-oil plantations are killing

the orangutans [by reducing their natural habitat].” Lane said that Conservation International, a nonprofit environmental organization headquartered in Arlington, Va., has developed a monitoring system called “rapidbio assessment.” “You collect specific organisms that tell a greater story about the local environment,” he said. “That’s what we’ve been doing— trying to collect primarily butterflies because they are very large indicators of biodiversity.”

Another veteran of the expedi-

tions is Chico State professor Randy Senock, who’s gone twice, in 2009 and 2010. Senock teaches environmental science and applied ecology. He arrived in Chico in 2004 after teaching at the University of Hawaii, and met Lane through the university. He said such projects are good for a number of reasons, including expanded opportunities for students to have international experiences. It reflects well on the local community and on philanthropists like Grossman, of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., a financial backer. When Lane returns from an expedition, he presents a slide show and verbal report at the Sierra Nevada Big Room. Lane met Grossman at the suggestion of a Sierra Nevada employee who’d seen Lane on a National Geographic special wearing a Sierra Nevada baseball cap. Lane’s earliest trips were funded by local environmentalist Kelly Meagher. In New Britain, Senock surveyed the forest to document the types of trees within. That information, he said, serves as the base study, which is followed by future surveys to get a growth rate over time. “We do have a significant amount of data,” he said. “We have collected and reported plant species that have never been reported from that location before. And we’ve documented some of the fauna—in

Above: Chico State students Emily Ramsey and Alan Rhoades collect insects during a 2011 survey on New Britain.

particular, salt-water crocodiles found in a freshwater lake. So all of a sudden, we have not only plants, but a variety of animals that inhabit the area as well.” He did not, however, go on the 2011 expedition that created friction with the university. “I sent in my place a student named Heidi Rogers,” he said. “She did a project on the trees that we are now working on publishing. She thought it was wonderful and wants to go back. She said she connected well with many of the women over there. Apparently, they all had a pretty good time.” Senock said many of the villagers actually wanted Chico State involved. “They had the impression that President Zingg was an actual president in the context of a government president, so they were actually looking forward to being officially connected with Chico State University,” he said. The last time he was there, Senock said, the landowners asked for compensation to allow access to their land. “They have a right to ask for compensation, which I believe is reasonable,” he said. “But sometimes the demands are bit unreasonable. And in this case, they said they were going to hold me hostage until President Zingg sent them money. I told them it was highly unlikely that President Zingg was going to send them any money for me, and that they were going to have to feed me three times a day for a long time. Then they realized it was best to let me go.” Senock noted the environmental-preservation goal as his main interest in taking part in the trips. “It seems like a real good possibility to establish both a national and an internationally recognized conservation site,” he said. Ω


The falling out

Chico State biology professor Randy Senock (left) says he’d like to see Chico State back on board with the expeditions to Papua New Guinea.

Chico State distances itself from John Lane’s adventures

U

p until two years ago, Chico State had partnered with John Lane and his exploratory expeditions to Papua New Guinea. Students and professors would go along for the ride and help conduct studies and document species to measure the rainforests’ relative health and environmental direction. But in 2011, all of that changed. “Two days before we were to leave, the [Chico State] Risk Management office called me in for a meeting,” Lane recalled. “They told me it was no big deal, that we just needed these forms signed. The next evening they said, ‘Oh, the trip’s been canceled.’” Two students who had paid for their flights but had not signed off on the required liability paperwork or gone through the orientation process were on their way to Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea. Since it was summer, Lane said, the students figured they were going on their own, but school officials did not agree. “I went into [Chico State President Paul Zingg’s] office on the day I was leaving and basically told him those students were going to arrive in Port Moresby and I was going to be there to get them,” Lane said. “He told me that it was a high-risk country, but I think that there was some new rule process with international travel. “Prior to that, all I had to do was get clearance from the dean of [the] College of Natural Sciences, who would just sign off. No big deal. This time, all of a sudden, the president has to sign off on it, and it becomes this big deal and Risk Management is involved.” Chico State Risk Manager Mike Thorpe confirmed a new process was indeed underway. “At the time, we were forming a

new study-abroad advisory committee,” Thorpe said. “And this was very last-minute when we were made aware that two students were already on their way. We were trying to do what we could to make the program work.” Thorpe said his office didn’t find out about the pending trip until two weeks before it was slated to launch. A memorandum from the California State University system says that travel requests to high-hazard countries “must be reported as soon as practical, but no less than 30 days prior to the planned departure date.” Lane said he initially went to get the students, who had landed in Port Moresby, and bring them home. But he decided along the way that he could not afford to purchase the new flight tickets necessary to alter the trip and come home early. So the expedition went forward as planned, but without the approval of the university. On the lead-up to the trip in 2011, Lane said, the College of Natural Sciences was working with one of the palm-oil plantations and landowners on the island to develop a memo of understanding and set up a long-term relationship to continue studies monitoring the environment. “But what happened was pretty much the nail in the coffin on that project,” he said. When asked about the matter, Zingg said the issue goes beyond Chico State. “What I can tell you is that the California State University (not just Chico Chico State student Heidi Rogers and a local villager measure a tree trunk as part of a forest survey conducted in 2011.

State) has strict guidelines prohibiting student travel to areas on the [U.S.] State Department’s travel watch and warning list,” Zingg wrote via email. “Papua New Guinea is on that list. I cannot approve student travel to such areas. John Lane knows that.” However, neither the list issued by the State Department nor the one used by the CSU for the 2012-2013 school year currently includes Papua New Guinea. Thorpe, the Chico State risk manager, said he is not sure, but Papua New Guinea may have been on the list two years ago. His office, he said, does

not keep records of the list and is much more interested in what is current. He said the alarm in this case sounded when Risk Management learned of the two students who did not go through proper orientation procedures or sign up for foreign travel insurance. Rebecca Skidmore, spokeswoman for the CSU Risk Management System, also doesn’t know if the country was on the 2011 list. “I don’t have any way of finding out. Our focus is what’s on the current list.” The U.S State Department’s website, updated at the beginning of this

year, includes the following concerning threats to safety and security in Papua New Guinea: “Tensions between communal or clan groups may lead to localized conflicts involving bush knives, machetes or firearms. Always consult with your tour operator, the U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby, or with Papuan authorities for current information on areas where you intend to travel.” A spokeswoman for the State Department referred to a link on the department’s website that offers messages to U.S. citizens, but the only one related to Papua New Guinea—from October 2011—warned travelers that Airlines PNG had suffered two airline crashes in the previous two years resulting in 41 deaths. Lane says he will go forward with or without the university’s support, because his is a continuing body of work. He plans to return in 2015. “As these collections get larger and larger, we discover connections about this unique environment,” he said. “The overriding purpose is for conservation.” For his part, Chico State professor Randy Senock, who has taken part in two of the trips, hopes the university rejoins the effort. In 2011, he helped student Heidi Rogers go through the preparations and paperwork so she could go in his place. “Her paperwork was signed off and approved. But there were other students involved who chose to go along more or less on a private venture. The students didn’t realize they were still considered [to be] representing the university. There was a lot of miscommunication, and even non-communication, initially. “Projects like this are complicated, but can be worked through as long as the administration is willing to support them,” continued Senock. “That doesn’t mean that it’s always smooth sailing, especially when you travel to other countries. But for the most part, in all the projects that have been run overseas internationally by American universities, very few students have been injured or suffered fatalities. “We have set up all the necessary precautions and safeguards. At this point, I’m not exactly sure why the project is not being encouraged to develop any further for both faculty and students.” —Tom Gascoyne tomg@newsreview.com

July 25, 2013

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture Erin Wade works on attaching a temporary skirt of Himalayan blackberry branches to one of Bidwell Park’s giant oaks.

Art invades

PHOTOS BY JASON CASSIDY

Temporary sculptures pay tribute to environmental artist and raise awareness of non-native plants in Bidwell Park

W pitch for one of the city of Chico’s public-art minigrants, she simply wanted to pay tribute to British environmenhen Chico artist Erin Wade first made her

tal artist Andy Goldsworthy by creating sculptures in Bidwell Park inspired by his work. by Goldsworthy is famous for his unique, Jason Cassidy meticulous and often temporary sculptures using natural materials. In Rivers and Tides, jasonc@ newsreview.com the acclaimed documentary film on his work, he balances rocks in seemingly impossible configurations; reshapes icicles (biting off pieces as he goes) into curved shapes that light up in the sun; and creates intricate, creekside arrangements of sticks into geometric shapes that float away with the current. He talks about PARK ART: tapping the flow that runs through nature (and A reception for through him). Being open to each site’s flow is Invasive Nature(s) at the center of his unplanned approach: “I will take place Friday, July 26, take the opportunity each day offers.” Wade was awarded the $2,000 grant for from 6 to 8 p.m., on the north side of what would become her Invasive Nature(s) Sycamore Field in site-specific installation—which will be on Lower Bidwell Park. display along the walkway at the north end of The installation will be on display the Sycamore playing fields in Lower Park through Aug. 4. Visit through Aug. 4—but she said her pitch had to www.erinwade.com be much more specific than Goldsworthy’s for more info. flowing approach. The members of the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission understandably wanted to talk specifics when it came to using the park’s natural resources for an art project, so Wade narrowed her focus to repurposing the park’s invasive plants into pieces of art that would also act as tools for raising awareness of the problems caused by non-native plants. There are hundreds of non-native plants in Bidwell Park, and if Goldsworthy himself were to set foot almost anywhere in the park, it’s almost certain that invasive plants would naturally flow his way. “They’re just kind of another little sign of our human impact on the world,” Wade said of Bidwell Park’s “introduced” plants. In 2008, working on a similar theme of humans’ impact on the park, Wade created a site-specific installation—Fruits of Refuse—shaping 50-or-so pounds of garbage into 24 CN&R July 25, 2013

mushrooms and other sculptures. “As an artist, limitations are good,” Wade said, talking about her plans during a walk-though of the current project’s site— along the path running from the Sycamore Pool to the Caper Acres playground on the north side of the Sycamore playing fields. On the eve of embarking on the week-long creation of her pieces, Wade said that, while she was looking forward to creating spontaneous pieces based on what the site offered during the week, she did have a couple of initial ideas to get started: She planned to repurpose the thorny branches from Himalayan blackberry plants into a skirt around the trunk of a giant oak tree, as well as create a giant, tangled ball from some of the English and Algerian ivy overrunning much of Lower Park. “I’m not using any hardware—it’s entirely the natural materials,” she explained. Wade and her crew of local-artist helpers concentrated primarily on pulling those natural materials from the current Sycamore Restoration Area just north of Caper Acres. In preparation for the project, Wade spent time on a volunteer work session with Friends of Bidwell Park’s invasive expert, Susan Mason, learning which invasive plants she should use and which she should avoid. “I’m not working with things that have millions of tiny seeds that will blow all over,” Wade said. As she progressed through the sweltering heat of the summer (she actually had to take one day off due to heat exhaustion), and with the blackberry-branch skirt and ivy ball mostly complete, Wade had wanted to make something out of the berries of the American pokeweed, but found that Mason and her fellow volunteers had done such a good job attacking the invasive plant that she couldn’t find any at the site. After a wildgoose chase around the park in search of pokeweed, Wade decided she was getting off track as far as how Goldsworthy would approach things. “I’m just going to have to go to the place that I’m working and see what’s there,” she decided. “[It] was a reminder to get back in the flow of the place, [use] what was actually there.” What she found there were long catalpabean pods. “I picked a bunch of those yesterday, and today they’re quite brown,” she said of the new material that she was getting the feel of, and that likely would continue to change all the way up to the official unveiling on Friday (July 26). As Goldsworthy says in the opening of Rivers and Tides: “There’s an intangible thing that is here and then gone.” Ω Wade’s ball of ivy begins to take shape.

THIS WEEK 25

THURS

Special Events THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace

with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. Th, 6-9pm through 9/26. Downtown Chico, www.downtownchico.net.

Theater MY SON PINOCCHIO JR: A musical fractured fairy tale in which Geppetto discovers what it means to be a real father, presented by the youth actors of Theatre on the Ridge. 7/25-7/27, 7pm. $7-$10. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

A DAY IN THE LIFE Saturday, July 27 1078 Gallery

SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS Aubrey Debauchery, Bogg, Lish Bills and more. Sa, 7/27, 8pm. $10. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

Special Events SUMMER FOOD & BEER PAIRING DINNER: The

SUMMER FOOD-AND-BEER PAIRING Saturday, July 27 Sierra Nevada Big Room

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

brewery’s series of food-and-beer pairing dinners continues with a lineup of Ovila, pale ale and more. See website for more info. Sa, 7/27, 6:30pm. $50. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierra nevada.com.

Art Receptions ABSTRACT ART RECEPTION: A reception for an exhibition of works by artist Donna Gauthier in which each piece is based on a character in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Sa, 7/27, 5:30pm. Free. Empire Coffee, 434 Orange St., (530) 899-8267.

ERIN BANWELL RECEPTION: An opening reception

THE SHADOW BOX: A Black and White Productions play following three terminally ill patients who live in cabins on the outskirts of a hospital’s grounds. 7/25-7/27, 7:30pm. $10-$12. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 592-9998, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

Art Receptions INVASIVE NATURE(S) RECEPTION: A reception for Erin Wade’s site-specific temporary sculptures. On the north side of Sycamore Field. F, 7/26, 6-8pm. Lower Bidwell Park.

for the exhibition of mixed-media art created through an array of techniques and technologies signature to the “modern maker” movement. Sa, 7/27, 3-6pm. Free. Idea Fabrication Labs, 603 Orange St., (530) 5920609, www.ideafablabs.com.

Theater ANYTHING GOES: A musical following two unlikely

Poetry/Literature

Theater

BOOK SIGNING: Local author Steven Callan pres-

MY SON PINOCCHIO JR: See Thursday. Theatre on

ents his new book Badges, Bears, and Eagles: The True-Life Adventures of a California Fish and Game Warden. Th, 7/25, 7pm. Free. Lyon Books, 135 Main St., (530) 891-3338, www.lyon books.com.

CHICO STORY SLAM: Names go in a hat and 10 “tellers” share their unscripted stories, with applause determining the winner. Th, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 W. Fifth St.

26

FRI

Music

the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE SHADOW BOX: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 592-9998, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

27

SAT

Music A DAY IN THE LIFE: A tribute to Sgt. Pepper’s

Lonely Hearts Club Band with each song performed by a different local artist. Featuring

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with classic rock covers from Stranger. F, 7-8:30pm. Opens 7/26. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 345-6500, www.down townchico.net.

THE WOODEN REVOLT: A dynamic acoustic rock band featuring members of Jackie Greene’s band plays to celebrate KZFR Community Radio’s 23rd birthday. Proceeds benefit KZFR. F, 7/26, 8pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 895-0788 ext. 102, www.kzfr.org.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

ANYTHING GOES PREMIERE Saturday, July 27 Chico Theatre Co.

SEE SATURDAY, THEATER

couples on the high seas aboard the S.S. American. Sa, 7:30pm. $12-$20. Chico Theater Co., 166 Eaton Rd., (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

MY SON PINOCCHIO JR: See Thursday. Theater on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE SHADOW BOX: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St., (530) 592-9998, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

28

SUN

Music THE BOXCARS: A traditional bluegrass band made up of five individually acclaimed string musicians. Su, 7/28, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 32

Art 1078 GALLERY: 2(D) for the Entire Gallery

Show, group show featuring eight artists in 2(D) for the Entire Gallery show. Through 7/27. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

ALL FIRED UP: Pottery and multi-media

exhibit. Ongoing. 830 Broadway, (530) 8945227, www.allfiredupchico.com.

ANGELO’S CUCINA TRINACRIA: A Garden

Bouquet, featuring watercolor paintings by Cynthia Sexton. Through 8/31. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

MANAS ART SPACE & GALLERY: Birds of a

Feather Exhibition, Open entry exhibit exploring human nature in any medium. Through 8/23. 1441-C Park Ave., (530) 5885183.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Figure Drawing

Group Show, featuring work from the Sally Dimas figure drawing group. Through 7/27. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 345-3063.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: Sisko Goes

Public, Explore the images and thoughts of a local artist who has hung his art from the bottom of the sky in and around Chico. Through 7/31, 5-7pm. 130 Main St., (530) 8953866.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Outside Edge, Burning Man photographs by Michele Miller and “alternate lifestyle” photographs from Camille de Ganon. Through 8/3. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

BIDWELL PARK: Invasive Nature(s), Erin Wade’s site-specific temporary sculptures that pays tribute to the work of Andy Goldsworthy while raising awareness of invasive plants in Bidwell Park. Along the north side of Sycamore Field. 7/25-8/4. Lower Bidwell Park.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Shutterbugs, the

second Discovery Series exhibit of 2013, featuring works from the Shutterbug Photography Group. Through 8/2. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Northern California Gold, local artist Jake Early’s new six-piece series featuring scenes in rice fields, olive groves, vineyards, almond orchards and more. Through 8/30.Landscapes Amplified, a series of landscape paintings focusing on Northern California by Cynthia Schildhauer. Through 7/31. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

EMPIRE COFFEE: Mid Summer Night’s Dream, 20 abstract works Donna Gauthier, each named with quotes and characters of Shakespeare’s play. Through 7/31. 434 Orange St., (530) 899-8267.

IDEA FABRICATION LABS: Erin Banwell

Exhibition, an exhibition of works created through an array of techniques and technologies signature to the “modern maker” movement. Ongoing. Opens 7/27. 603 Orange St., (530) 592-0609.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Branding

Irons, A new display of over 200 branding irons. M-Sa, 10am-3:45pm; Su, 11:45am3:45pm. $2 adults/kids free. 1650 Broderick St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497, www.bolts antiquetools.com.

CHICO AIR MUSEUM: An outdoor aircraft display, as well as an indoor display of interesting and historic aviation artifacts. 170 Convair Ave., (530) 345-6468.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: Chico: Our Story in Pictures, an exhibit featuring photos from the John Nopel collection. Through 1/1, 2014. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Secrets of

Circles, an exhibition exploring the properties of a simple shape with powerful applications. Through 9/1. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

PARADISE DEPOT MUSEUM: Paradise’s railroad and logging museum. Sa, Su, 12-4pm. 5570 Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 877-1919.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Infinity & Beyond, an exhibit tracing early human celestial observation to modern space endeavors with a Russian Sokol Space suit, a moon rock and brand-new footage of deep space on display. Ongoing. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS: Ruth Rippner: Fantasy and Family, a retrospective of family and fantasy expressed in paintings and drawings from Ruth Rippner. Through 8/31. 254 E Fourth St., corner 4th st. & Wall, (530) 343-2930.

Welcome to the future of art In May, a collective of five artists and “makers” opened Idea Fabrication Labs, Chico’s first “digital-fabrication facility.” The 7,000-square-foot workshop and gallery offers locals access to high-tech tools such as a laser cutter, router and more, as well as instruction in the use of these technologies, for the price of membership. Some of the the works created there by one of the Lab’s founders, Erin Banwell, will be featured in an exhibit EDITOR’S PICK titled Somnambulism, Noctambulism and The Parasomnia Experience, on Saturday, July 27. The event is family-friendly and will also feature refreshments by Empire Coffee and music by local “sound-sculptor” Logan 5. Banwell’s past work includes a Burning Man installation called “The Pyrosphere.”

July 25, 2013

CN&R 25


BULLETIN BOARD

Upsize your new bed

Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave. North off of Hwy 32 and East Ave, (530) 321-5607.

FOR FREE!

AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

CHAPMAN FARMERS’ MARKET: A year-round Certified Farmers Market serving as a community forum for healthful lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave. Next to Chapman Elementary & Community Park, (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DIOXIN PANEL DISCUSSION: A public forum for Oroville residents regarding potentially hazardous dioxin levels in the area. W, 7/31, 6pm. Free. Butte County Library, Oroville Branch, 1820 Mitchell Ave. in Oroville, (530) 538-7642, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

Geoethic Mattresses by Magniflex offer the most eco-friendly sleep experience. Made in collaboration with nature, Geoethhic mattresses are produced with organic – all natural materials such as linen, cotton & bamboo as well as a soy based memory foam to help you get the support and comfort you need at night.

FARMERS’ MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods,

THINK FREE.

Buy a Queen get a KING Buy a Full get a QUEEN Plus 20% OFF all Magniflex Geoethic Pillows HURRY IN Offer ends July 28!

honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers’ Market, Municipal Parking Lot No. 1, Second & Wall streets, (530) 893-3276.

FARMERS’ MARKET: NORTH CHICO: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. W, 7:30am-noon through 11/22. North Valley Plaza, 801 East Ave.

FARMERS’ MARKET: PARADISE: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Tu, 7:30am-noon through 10/15. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7069.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor

medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave. Corner of Downing and E. 1st Ave, (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

HEALING LIGHT MEDITATION: A weekly meditation session for centering, insight and awakening. M, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St., (530) 343-0704, www.100thmon keycafeandbooks.com.

LIFE LINE SCREENINGS: Screenings for individuals 50 and older to identify risk of stroke, vascular diseases and osteoperosis. Call or go online for a discounted rate using code PENL-001. Th, 7/25, 9am-4pm. Enloe Conference Center, 1528 Esplanade, (866) 9645850, www.lifelinescreening.com.

LIFE LINE SCREENINGS: Screenings for individuals 50 and older to identify risk of stroke, vascular diseases and osteoperosis. Call or go online for a discounted rate using code PENL-001. Sa, 7/27, 9am-4pm. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St., (866) 9645850, www.lifelinescreening.com.

ORGANIC VEGETABLE PROJECT: Chico State’s University farm is a grant-funded, studentrun project selling produce on campus. W, 11am-2pm through 8/31. Opens 7/24. Bell Memorial Union (BMU), 400 W First St. CSU, Chico, (530) 898-4696, www.aschico.com.

PARADISE FARMERS MARKET IN THE PARK: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Th, 5-8pm through 9/5. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-6291.

PEMA CHODRON Saturday, July 27 Sky Creek Dharma Center SEE COMMUNITY

7/27, 2-4pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 781-3991, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 8727085.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

TRADITIONAL WEST AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, E. Third and Pine, (808) 757-0076.

YOUTH ACTION MEETING: A monthly counter-

recruitment meeting for youth. Fourth Th of every month, 3:30pm. Free. Chico Peace and Justice Center, 526 Broadway, (530) 343-3152, www.chico-peace.org.

For Kids CAMP CHICO CREEK: An environmental education camp for children ages 5 to 11 with a different theme each week. This week: Marvelous Mammals. Call for more info. M-F through 8/16. $85-$135. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

FOSTER YOUTH PRESENTATIONS ON ISSUES: California Youth Connection-empowered foster youth to advocate for themselves through policy recommendations. Come hear them present their ideas. M, 7/29, 10:30am2:30pm. Free (limited number of tickets). Chico State, 400 W. First St. Colusa Hall room 100A, (415) 857-9871, www.calyouthconn.org.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME: Th, 10am. Butte County Library, Durham Branch, 2545 DurhamDayton Hwy in Durham, (530) 879-3835.

SUMMER DAY CAMP FOR KIDS: A summer camp emphasizing outdoor activity helping youth develop social and decision-making skills. Call or go online for more info. Through 8/14, 6:30am-6pm. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St. in Oroville, (553) 533-9622, www.oroville ymca.org.

PEMA CHODRON: A video presentation of Pema

talks followed by discussion and tea. Sa, 9amnoon. Donations. Sky Creek Dharma Center, 120 Three Oaks Ct., (530) 893-8088, wwww.skycreekdharmacenter.org.

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READINGS IN SCIENCE FICTION: An open mic in which participants read excerpts from their favorite books. Call to reserve a spot. Sa,

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


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SCENE

The MANAS menagerie Open-submission showcase valuable for artists of all levels

L MANAS Artspace, a folk-art-like horned bovine of some sort—flames spilling

ast Friday (July 19), in the foyer of the

from his nose—seemed to peer curiously from his canvas at the wondrous by menagerie of creatures assemKen Smith bled around him. kens@ On another wall, an acrylic newsreview.com representation of a raven-headed humanoid clutched onto a cross atop a steeple, surrounded by dark, billowing clouds lit by a full moon. In Art for all: Birds of a Feather: one corner stood a Styrofoam birdAngels, Humans, man covered in newsprint, letters Animals, Beasts , assembled ransom-note-style across on display at an inverted funnel on his head MANAS through spelling the word “elucidate,” next to Aug. 23. Submissions for a rack of earrings made from natural the gallery’s next and unnatural materials representing open-invitation feathers. show, Planting the The range of work, styles and Seeds of Your media at this and other recent Intention , will be accepted MANAS exhibits is quite striking, Sept. 4-7. largely due to the open-submission format the space has embraced. MANAS Artspace Based on no criteria other than a 1441 Park Ave., willingness to create and to pay a Ste. C www.facebook.com nominal entry fee to receive the pre/manasartspace packaged prompt, artists of all levels are welcome to show their work. MANAS’ latest open-submission show—on display until Aug. 23—is titled Birds of a Feather: Angels, Humans, Animals, Beasts. For a mere $5, entrants picked an old-school animal flashcard (like those some may remember from elementary-school science studies) and used it to prompt their artistic attempt. Or, they were welcome to toss the card out the window altogether and find their own inspiration from the exhibit’s theme. The folks at MANAS aren’t rigid sticklers; these rules exist only to help get the creative juices flowing. The prompts for MANAS’ previous open-entry show were one old record and the fortune from a fortune cookie, which dozens of artists used in more ways than a person might have imagined. David “Dragonboy” Sutherland, head art freak among the space’s loose collection of art freaks, said he likes the format and plans to keep doing it more. “It’s a good opportunity for people who may have never even thought of themselves as artists to get involved and have their work shown, even if they never have before,” he 28 CN&R July 25, 2013

MANAS merry-maker David “Dragonboy” Sutherland. Below: “Elucidator,” sculpture by Norma Lyons at Birds of a Feather show. PHOTOS BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

said. “And for working artists, it’s an opportunity to be inspired by a theme. “You’re given this prompt, which is kind of like a problem to work on that may take you outside of what you normally do.” Sutherland said he also appreciates the range of work that comes together from this group approach. And, on the financial side, the $5 entry fees help keep the rent paid and the lights on. MANAS’ next open-submission art project,

Planting the Seeds of Your Intention, is scheduled for September. Sutherland explained that MANAS partnered with artist Joan Bosque, who also works with the newly formed Chico Seed Lending Library, for the next installation. For $5, artists (and those who aspire to be artists) will receive a box filled with a seed ball and several Post-it-sized squares of colored paper. As it is even more vague than some of the previous prompts, the package comes with some suggestions for projects, such as putting the seeds beneath one’s pillow at night and writing a dream journal. At MANAS, anything goes. Rather than detracting from the overall quality of the show, the mix of new and veteran artists tends to coalesce into an altogether nice body of work. It’s fun to pick through the collection and try to trace the thought processes that inspired each piece, as well as find the common ground that exists. MANAS is always well worth a walkthrough, especially on reception nights. Get down there to check it out, or better yet, pick up some seeds and see where they Ω take you.


CHOW

Vine to stein DESIGNER

Wine is the latest ingredient in the craftbrewer’s pantry

Wand that’s it. Besides grapes, they cannot use any other ingredients—fruit, vegetable, animal or inemakers are faithful to the vine—

spice—in their product and still be allowed to call it wine. Well, they have a few hundred organic and chemical addiby tives at their disposal, but you get Alastair the point: Wine, at its heart, is wine, Bland and nothing more. But for brewers of beer, the world is their pantry and playground. They can add just about anything they want to the stuff they make and still sell it as “beer.” Honey, figs, bacon, coriander, bull testicles, oysters, bananas, tree bark—you name it. All these and more find their way into batches of commercially made beers, which proudly feature such specialty ingredients on their respective labels. While winemakers have been excluded from this creative process, more and more brewers are now, in a way, inviting them into the game by doing something novel—adding wine to their beer. “Ten years ago, nobody would have thought about combining beer and wine,” said Steve Dresler, brewmaster at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. “Now, if a brewer can do something, he’ll probably try it.” While adding varietal grape juice to a fermenting beer is a relatively tame trick compared to other craftbrewing techniques involving barrels, strange fruits, and animal parts, beer-wine hybrids have appeared only recently in the craft-brewing revolution—almost as though such a simple marriage was largely overlooked throughout the height of early 2000s brewing creativity. In the past half-decade though, Dogfish Head, Allagash, Wynkoop, and several other brewing companies have added grapes or grape juice to their brews. But Blue Moon Brewing Co., one label of the beer giant MillerCoors, took an exploratory stab at the technique 20 years ago, when the Colorado-based facility released a blonde ale with chardonnay juice in the blend. Craft-beer craziness was not yet in full throttle, and the beer, only lukewarmly received, went on hiatus before being reinstated into Blue Moon’s

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lineup in 2012 (as Vintage Blonde Ale). More recently, Blue Moon released two red-wine ales called Impulse and Crimson Crossing, and a pair of white-wine renditions, called Proximity and Golden Knot. Allagash has made a pair of similar concoctions since 2006, one with chardonnay, the other with cabernet franc. Called Victoria and Victor ales, respectively, these beers appear each spring on store shelves. Dogfish Head, the East Coast’s biggest weird-beer brewery (making “off-centered ales for off-centered people”) has made Red & White—a Belgian-style witbier fermented with juice of pinot noir, since 2007. More recently, Dogfish Head’s Noble Rot paid homage to the sweet Sauternes wines of France, made using grapes smoldering with a type of fungus called Botrytis cinerea. In Colorado, Wynkoop Brewing released a beer called Brewjolais Nouveau in the autumn of 2011 on Beaujolais Nouveau Day. The beer was a 50-50 blend of cabernet sauvignon grapes and a brown ale, according to Wynkoop’s brewmaster Andy Brown. The grapes were added after they had begun to ferment. “We didn’t even add brewer’s yeast,” Brown noted. “It was basically a cabernet with some beer in it.” Wynkoop made another rendition of the same beer in 2012—a Brewjolais Nouveau using gewürztraminer grapes. At Sierra Nevada, the closest to a beer-wine blend that the brewery has released is the Ovila Barrel-Aged Dubbel, now available in the brewery’s gift shop. The beer was aged for more than a year in unwashed redwine barrels, says Dresler, which gave the Belgianstyle ale a “winey character” and some subtle tartness. Dresler notes that brewers, only loosely restricted by industry regulations, are free to explore and expand the boundaries of what we know to be beer. “In the craft-beer industry, more so than in almost any other beverage industry, there is a phenomenal level of creativity,” he said. “There is so much you can do with beer, and so many things you can add. Wine is such a narrow band in comparison, and there is only so far you can go.” Ω July 25, 2013

CN&R 29


Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

modern setting. Filmed in black-and-white, the film stars Amy Acker as Beatrice and Alexis Denisof as Benedick. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

Opening this week

5

Fruitvale Station

A bio-pic telling the real-life story of the murder of Oscar Grant by a BART police officer at Oakland’s Fruitvale Station on New Year’s Day 2009. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Way, Way Back

I caught the ghost!

The Descendants screenwriters Nat Faxon and Jim Rash wrote and directed this story about a young teen boy (Liam James) who, while on a summer vacation with his mom (Toni Collette) and her jerk of boyfriend (Steve Carell), comes into his own with a little help from the free-spirited manager (Sam Rockwell) of a water park. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Wolverine

Scare me once Going down the dark, well-worn road to another haunted-house flick

Tcan do with the haunted-house template. Pretty much every one runs like this: here’s really not a whole lot you

A family moves into a house they bought for a steal; the kids start experiencing some creepy by goings-on; the parents laugh Craig it off until beds start banging Blamer and things start flying around. And the people generally can’t move away because they have put all their resources into the dump, so they call in the experts to uncover the secret past. The Conjuring Things get hairy. Lather, Starring Vera rinse and repeat. Farmiga, Lili And so there’s a creeping Taylor and sense of familiarity with Patrick Wilson. each run at the premise, and Directed by James Wan. with The Conjuring, the latCinemark 14, est from James Wan (Saw, Feather River Insidious), that familiarity is Cinemas and amped to the nth degree Paradise Cinema with an indulgence of 7. Rated R. homages to the touchstones of the genre, with the film’s structure of acts obviously: The Amityville Horror, Poltergeist, The Exorcist, wrapPoor ping up with The Evil Dead. But the end result is more of a homogenized Scooby-Doo Fair episode padded to feature length and played straight. The Conjuring weirdly plays like a spoof of hauntGood ed-house movies, without the comedy. But there are some spooky Very Good moments to be found—a couple of decent chills and one good jump scare (maybe even a few more if you’re skittish). Excellent

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30 CN&R July 25, 2013

And one clever approach is having the focus be more on the ghost hunters themselves (Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson, playing real-life paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren). Unfortunately, Ed and Lorraine aren’t very interesting. Ed is kind of a goof and Lorraine is one of those Christians who wears her martyrdom like a disapproving crucifix. And there’s a lot of crucifixing going down. The Conjuring comes across as a haunted-house movie for Christians, with all of the devil’s work being traced back to a witch trying to curry favor with the horned one. But for all the power-of-Christ-ing going on in The Conjuring, I didn’t find it very compelling. The dialogue is fundamental and “on-the-nose” (lacking subtlety) and I wasn’t sure if Wan was deliberately trying to go meta and homage the old stale-and-talky (and not-so-scary) made-for-television horror films that came out on the heels of The Exorcist. Wan really nails that soft-focus 1970s vibe, but even that affectation is undermined by a persistent hand-held, first-person-shooter point-of-view. And the subplot involving a possessed doll seems shoehorned in so as to indulge Wan’s damned creepy-doll fetish (which one might have hoped had been exorcised with his creepy-doll movie, Dead Silence), and provide a way to open the movie with a bang. Problem is, between the opening bang and The Evil Dead-like closing bang, there are more whispers than screams. If the subplot about the doll and another story thread (about the Warrens’ daughter) had been cut, trimming the film from nearly two hours to 90 minutes, Wan might have really delivered. As it is, The Conjuring isn’t particularly bad. There are some touches of humor and the beast is perhaps even fun if you have never seen any of the movies Wan exhumes here. Ω

Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) gets a second solo feature feature away from his fellow X-Men, this one featuring a promising-looking story (based on a Frank Miller/Chris Claremont comic series) that has Wolverine traveling to Japan and facing off against a sword-wielding Yakuza crime boss (Hiroyuki Sanada). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing The Bling Ring

The latest film from writer/director Sofia Coppola is based on the real-life Bling Ring, a group of teens/young-adults who tracked the movements of celebrities like Paris Hilton and Orlando Bloom via social media and then burgled their Hollywood homes. Starring Emma Watson. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

2

The Conjuring

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —C.B.

3

Despicable Me 2

Super-villain Gru (Steve Carell) turned straight in the original Despicable Me, so what’s left for him to do in round two? Fall in love. He’s also trying to stop an evil-doer who has stolen a chemical that turns any living creature into a killing machine. But the romantic subplot, involving flirtations between Gru and his detective partner Lucy (Kristen Wiig), proves more entertaining than the mediocre storyline about the search for criminal suspect Eduardo (Benjamin Bratt, in exaggerated Latino-stereotype mode). Whatever magic is lost from the original film is recovered by Gru’s tiny minions: His helpers look like aliens but possess the charm of babbling babies—a weird combination that’s onscreen gold (as was proven by the booming laughs from every child in the theater). Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —R.B.

Grown Ups 2

Adam Sandler and his grown-up childhood friends— David Spade, Chris Rock, Kevin James—reunite once again, this time in their sleepy hometown where Sandler’s character has returned to raise his family only to find that the place is a constant source of wacky shenanigans. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

3

The Lone Ranger

At the very least, this wildly erratic production deserves a measure of credit for maintaining some kind of oddball comic momentum over the long haul of its mock-epic Western-movie action. The story is disposable and inconsequential. Most of the best stuff in the film is bizarre action, exuberant grotesquerie, cartoonish sight-gags and stunts, FX action involving vintage trains, etc. Johnny Depp plays Tonto here, and with his dead-bird headgear and assorted mystical and mythical trappings, his can seem like a rather Hunter S. Thompsonized version of the character. But in his most elaborate action scenes, he seems to be channeling the deadpan stunts and intrepid spirit of Buster Keaton. Revisionist farce shows a less pungent side with the film’s Lone Ranger (Armie Hammer), a neurotic and somewhat narcissistic do-gooder who is little more than a mock-heroic accessory for the action sequences. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Much Ado About Nothing

Josh Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Avengers) directs Shakespeare’s classic comedy in a

Mud

With river rats young and old haunted by misadventures and illusory romance on the Arkansas side of the Mississippi River, the latest film from Jeff Nichols (Take Shelter) feels a little like a modern-day Huckleberry Finn. A kid named Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and his pal Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) go prowling for a boat wedged in the treetops of a wilderness island and cross paths there with a scraggly fugitive named Mud (Matthew McConaughey). Mud’s obsession with erratic dream-girl Juniper (Reese Witherspoon) brings tattered romance and other troubles into the action. Mud, a battle-scarred neighbor (Sam Shepard), and Ellis’ uncle (Michael Shannon) are all variously compromised alternatives to the kid’s parents who are in the process of breaking up. A vengeful patriarch (Joe Don Baker) from nearby eventually forces a climactic shoot-out, but the movie’s real interest resides in the oddly tender tragicomedy that emerges from the characters’ heedless low-rent dreaming. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

4

Pacific Rim

This is the rare summer blockbuster that lives up to the hype. In the film, a tunnel has opened up from the Earth’s core and is spitting out giant Kaiju that have nothing better to do than pull the spitting high-tension wires down, with a purposeful grimace and a terrible sound, before wading through the buildings toward the center of the city. I would have been happy with just that, but the movie isn’t just for me. So writer/director Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth) throws in the Jaegers, giant robots, each manned by a pair of human co-pilots holding hands with their minds, or something like that. Once things get rolling—and they get rolling fast—we have giant robots beating up on giant monsters, and vice versa. While it’s loud and noisy, it’s also clever, as a blockbuster ideally should be. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

RED 2

The gang of retired spies—Bruce Willis, Helen Mirren, John Malkovich—is back for the sequel, scanning the globe in order to find and defuse a nuclear bomb. Also starring Catherine Zeta-Jones, Anthony Hopkins, Mary-Louise Parker and Lee Byung-hun. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

2

R.I.P.D.

While blatantly a knock-off of Men in Black, the latest paranormal buddy movie is a surprisingly fun popcorner in its own right. The basic premise: A murdered cop (Ryan Reynolds) wakes up on the other side and finds himself drafted into the afterlife version of the Justice Department. He’s teamed with a long-dead loose cannon of a lawman (Jeff Bridges, chewing the scenery), and the two try to track down the rookie’s killer while keeping the fabric of the cosmos from being RIP’D apart. Before it settles into formula in the second half, there’s some potential, but it’s not anything memorable. Even so, it moves fast and is consistently entertaining. As a matinees go, you could do worse. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

Turbo

A 3-D computer-animated feature based on the convoluted premise of a snail who, thanks to freak accident, becomes super fast and wants to race against cars in the Indianapolis 500. Starring the voices of Ryan Reynolds, Paul Giamatti, Samuel L. Jackson, Maya Rudolph and Snoop Dogg. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Still here The Heat

Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Man of Steel

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

4 2

White House Down

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

World War Z

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.


Avalon & Just for Today

JOSS WHEDON’S

Rory Block & Ronnie Earl

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

New Owners - New Menu

Stony Plain Records Stony Plain Records is based in Edmonton, Canada, and specializes in roots music, with Canadian cowboy/folk artist Ian Tyson the label’s best seller. The label’s 300-disc catalog has a raft of U.S. musicians as well, including guitarists Rory Block and Ronnie Earl. Avalon is yet another in Block’s “Mentor Series” and is dedicated to Mississippi John Hurt, whom she met during the folk/blues renaissance of the 1960s. Block is an accomplished guitarist and gives Hurt’s music a terrific workout. The highlights include a sprightly “Candy Man,” a driving version of “Frankie & Albert”—à la Hurt, with overdubbed slide (so tasty!)—and a lovely rendition of “Richland Woman Blues” (more slide!) about a hooker who reminds us that while a “rooster says ‘cock-a-doodle-do,’ a Richland woman says ‘any dude’ll do.’” On Just for Today, Earl celebrates his 25th year with his band, the Broadcasters. During the 80-minute concert recording he, too, pays tribute to some of his influences, among them a stunningly slow “Blues for Hubert Sumlin” and a rare (for him) uptempo “Robert Nighthawk Stomp.” His 8-minute version of John Coltrane’s “Equinox” and Broadcasters pianist Dave Limina’s “Vernice’s Boogie” are just two more of the disc’s many treats. —Miles Jordan

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There are a couple of interesting local coincidences that come with this album, both of them traceable to recent bang-up shows at the Sierra Nevada Big Room. Randy Scott, a fast-emerging guitar wizard, is joined here on two tracks by Albert Lee, an elder in the guitarist tribe who set the woods on fire at a sold-out Big Room show last year. Lee says Scott is “one of the best blues guitarists I’ve heard come along in a long time.” High praise from a high priest. Listening to Scott’s album made a believer out of me, too. Also lending support here is keyboardist Jeff Babko, who was at the Big Room as part of guitarist Larry Carlton’s ensemble when Carlton cast a magic spell over a rapt audience of guitar worshippers earlier this month. Musicians of this caliber don’t often turn up on debut albums unless the musician making his debut is pretty damned impressive. And Scott—who won Guitar Center’s King of the Blues competition in 2010—is impressive indeed, giving ample assurance that the future of blues guitar is in good hands. The title track is a showcase of Scott’s guitar chops, and the album features a range of styles from blues to ballads to jazz, to good ol’ rock ’n’ roll. Scott definitely has the goods.

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CN&R 31


NIGHTLIFE BATTLEHOOCH

THURSDAY 7/25—WEDNESDAY 7|31

26FRIDAY

Friday, July 26 Cafe Coda SEE FRIDAY

AUDIOBOXX: Rock, metal and pop music in the lounge. F, 7/26, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.gold countrycasino.com.

BASSMINT: A weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4, (530) 895-3888.

BATTLEHOOCH: San Fransisco-based band

25THURSDAY CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

FLO IN THE BLUES: Live blues music for

the blue at heart. Th, 7/25, 7-10pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Steve Cook and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 7/25, 6-9pm. Free. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

LANDON WORDSWELL: The Eugene, Ore.,

rapper returns to Chico, this time with collaborator Tim Hoke. Also on the bill: J Ras (Nevada City), Cali Kidd of Mystic Roots, Girls Drink Free, and more. Sorry for the wait on the info! Call for times. Dex, 167 E. Third St. Below the Crazy Horse Saloon, (530) 327-8706.

OFF THE RECORD: Live rock ’n’ roll on the

back patio. Th, 7/25, 6-9pm. Free. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

THE SAD BASTARDS CD RELEASE: Local folk quartet The Sad Bastards’ album release is also their final show. Aubrey Debauchery (backed by Bogg) and Lish Bills open. Th, 7/25, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

Battlehooch performs. Local progrockers Clouds on Strings and Gavin Fitzgerald open. F, 7/26, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

EVERYTHING DOPE: A hip-hop showcase featuring North State MCs Mattsuuii, Rillz, Himp-C, Foola, Willdy Diamond, Mikey Stacks, Da Pushah and Big Slim. F, 7/26, 8pm. Dex, 167 E. Third St. Next to the Crazy Horse Saloon, (530) 3278706.

FLO SESSIONS: Flo’s weekly local music showcase continues with performances by Michael Fair and Friends. F, 7-10pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.wee bly.com.

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café

Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with classic-rock covers from Stranger. F, 7-8:30pm. Opens 7/26. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 345-6500, www.down townchico.net.

HAPPY JAZZ: Jazz with Shigemi Minetaka on keyboard and Christine LaPadoBreglia on upright bass. Every other F, 6:30-8:30pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St., (530) 891-9044.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

ROCKIN THE MIC: A monthly open mic

THE WOODEN REVOLT: A dynamic acoustic

open to performers young and old.

rock band featuring members of Jackie Greene’s band plays to celebrate KZFR Community Radio’s 23rd birthday. Proceeds benefit KZFR. F, 7/26, 8pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 895-0788 ext. 102, www.kzfr.org.

Fourth F of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Chico School of Rock, 932 E. Eighth Ave. A, (530) 894-2526, www.chicoschoolof rock.com.

PARTING IS SUCH SWEET SORROW

The Sad Bastards’ appearance at Café Coda on Thursday, July 25, promises—like the music they play—to be bittersweet. On one hand, the local jazzy, downtempo folk quartet is releasing its first album, Sad Songs for the Common Man, but it also marks the end of a two-year stint of, as the band puts it, “overdramatizing heartbreak and doing their beast to bum people out.” Also playing are Aubrey Debauchery (backed by Bogg) and Lish Bills.

THE LITTLEST BIRDS: Dance and holler along with cello and banjo duo The Littlest Birds. Chico’s own The SuzukiBrobeck band opens. F, 7/26, 7-10pm. $5. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 5214880, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

MICHAEL BECK BAND: A country singersongwriter backed by a full band. F, 7/26, 9pm. $3. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave., (530) 345-7499, www.tackleboxchico.com.

RENEGADE: A Styx tribute band in the

brewery. F, 7/26, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com.

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32 CN&R July 25, 2013


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

NORTHERN HEAT: Classic rock and coun-

THE BOXCARS

Sunday, July 28 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE SUNDAY

try in the nightclub. Sa, 7/27, 9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning, (530) 528-3500, www.rollinghillscasino.com.

OLD-TIME FIDDLER JAM: An open jam hosted by the California Old-Time Fiddler’s Association. Fourth Sa of every month, 1-5pm. Free. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Myers St. in Oroville, (530) 533-8370.

QUEEN NATION: A Queen tribute band in

27SATURDAY

KENNY FRYE BAND: An original country

act out of Sacramento. Sa, 7/27, 9pm. $2. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave., (530) 345-7499, www.tacklebox chico.com.

AMANDA GRAY & WHISKEY SAVAGE: Live country, southern rock and rockabilly. Sa, 7/27, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort, 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa, (530) 458-8844, www.colusacasino.com.

LUAU PARTY WITH LANAKILAS: A Luau Party in the showroom featuring Lanakilas Polynesian entertainment with a buffet dinner and musical guest California Beach Party. Sa, 7/27, 5:30pm. $30. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.goldcountrycasino.com.

AUDIOBOXX: Rock, metal and pop music in the lounge. Sa, 7/27, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.gold countrycasino.com.

THE MONDEGREENS: An acoustic rock band made up of three singer-songwriters. Jack Knight and Run On Sentence open. Sa, 7/27, 7-10pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

A DAY IN THE LIFE: A tribute to Sgt.

Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band with each song performed by a different local artist. Featuring Aubrey Debauchery, Bogg, Lish Bills and more. Sa, 7/27, 8pm. $10. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and

the brewery. Sa, 7/27, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com.

RETROTONES: Live classic rock in the

lounge. Sa, 7/27, 9pm. Free. The Hub, 685 Manzanita Ct. Inside the Holiday Inn, Chico, (530) 345-2491.

THREE FINGERS WHISKEY: Boot-stompin’ honky-tonk and Americana. Sa, 7/27, 9pm. $5. Lost On Main, 319 Main St., (530) 891-1853.

28SUNDAY THE BOXCARS: A traditional bluegrass band made up of five individually acclaimed string musicians. Su, 7/28, 7:30pm. $20. Sierra Nevada Big Room,

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W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St. Upstairs from The Beach.

1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musi-

29MONDAY JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Opens 7/22. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

30TUESDAY AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country music

showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 79:30pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

cians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 W. Fifth St.

HIP-HOP HOORAY

Though not as apparent as some other facets of the local music scene, rap and hip-hop are alive and well in Northern California. Dex is offering a good primer on what Chico and its surroundings have to offer with an all-hip-hop showcase on Friday, July 26, called Everything Dope, featuring North State MCs Mattsuuii, Rillz, Himp-C, Foola, Willdy Diamond, Mikey Stacks, Da Pushah and Big Slim.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and stand-up bassist Christine LaPadoBreglia. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farmstarpizza.com.

31WEDNESDAY JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. W, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, tin pan alley, jazz and more.

Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses, yearning to go home.

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Open daily · 337 Main St · 343-7718

July 25, 2013

CN&R 33


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COMING IN AUGUST 2013 The Chico Wedding Planner is your guide to help organize that perfect day.

When the ancients first observed Sirius emerging as it were from the sun so as to become visible to the naked eye, they usually sacrificed a brown dog to appease its rage considering that this star was the cause of the hot sultry weather usually experienced at its appearance, and they would seem to have believed its power of heat conjoined with that of the sun to have been so excessive that on the morning of its first rising the sea boiled, the wine turned sour, dogs grew mad, and all other creatures became languid, causing to man, among other diseases, burning fevers, hysterics, and phrensies. —John Henry Brady, Clavis Calendaria

SIRIUS RISING Even though the rumble and clang of the machines

being used on the road work for the roundabout in front of CN&R HQ is at times overwhelming, it’s only a few hours of the day that we have to contend with the big noise. Once the workers shut down in mid-afternoon, it’s actually eerily quiet at this normally very-busy entry point into downtown Chico. During the late-afternoon/early evening—with the road blocked off, no students in sight, and the locals hunkered down indoors to escape the heat—it’s so still that it feels like an episode of The Twilight Zone, and everyone has just mysteriously disappeared. It’s an appropriately dry, dead, abandonedlooking backdrop for the dog days of summer I am Sirius. through which we are currently sweating. Even though there are typically less things going on in town at this time, and the heat makes doing anything less appealing, things aren’t nearly as bad as our friend Mr. Brady—the early 19th-century British clerk who wrote the “compendious analysis of the calendar” quoted above—makes the time of year out to be. (No need to go hunting the streets for dogs.) In fact, it’s Chico’s slow, hot days that I think I like best. Without the (normally welcome) distractions of Chico’s constant calendar of fun, I love nothing more than to spend a long day joining my fellow overheated neighbors in enjoying the simple pleasures that Chico has to offer. And with Mrs. DEVO’s siblings reuniting in their hometown of Chico this week, I’m looking forward to filling a couple days alternating between hot and cool at a Don’t blame the dogs. leisurely pace: coffee in the garden; hike Upper Bidwell Park; soak in Bear Hole; visit Erin Wade’s Invasive Nature(s) temporary-sculpture exhibit in Lower Park; walk downtown; look in on Chico Museum’s Chico in Black & White historical-photo exhibit; walk home; nap under a good book; fire up the barbecue; bottle of Sierra Nevada Old Chico under the glow of the dog star.

BITE OF CHICO Arts and Mrs. DEVO checked out the debut of the Fork

This FREE publication will include valuable information and local resources for the bride and anyone involved in planning a wedding for this coming year. Look for the Wedding Planner inserted inside the Chico News & Review on August 15. It will also be available on August 18 at the Chico Bridal Show, organized by Coolidge Public Relations.

ADVERTISERS: 530-894-2300

www.newsreview.com

Contact your CN&R representative today to be included in the Wedding Planner.

in the Road food-truck rally on the grounds of Manzanita Place last Wednesday (July 17), and we had a great time. Even though it was hot, the scene was really fun, there was a large shaded seating area, the kids were going nuts on the playground, and there were lots of great food choices (Taco Smash and Key lime pie from The Hunter & The Farmer for him, pepperoni pizza from Pop’s Pizza for her). And there were tons of people, so many that we heard some far-less-glowing reports (long waits, trucks sold out) from those who came for the second half of the evening. With so many people willing to crowd together in the hot sun on a Wednesday night, it would appear that the food-truck scene has struck a local nerve—and the organizers are determined to iron out the wrinkles (with more food trucks and more food per truck, hopefully) for the next edition. Keep an eye on the Facebook pages for Fork in the Road and Street Food, Chico for updates. Ryan Smith takes comfort in a street-food classic.

34 CN&R July 25, 2013


Find Us Online At:

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Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com CHECK THESE NEW LISTINGS! 2637 Ceanothus. 3 bd U 2 ba, D sq ft CE1407 $235,000 RED 1129 Stewart, 2 bed 1 bath charmer, 972 sq ft full basement, $189,000 170 Honey Run 3 bedN3Dbath 2221 sq ft ING on 2.34 acre PE WATCH FOR NEW LISTINGS!

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ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2 Knotts Glen Ct

Chico

$529,000

3/ 2

1494

14216 Kansas Ln

Chico

$235,000

3/ 2.5

SQ. FT. 2463

17 Luciano Ct

Chico

$441,500

3/ 2

1654

2074 Mansfield Ct

Chico

$226,000

4/ 2

1407

212 Denali Dr

Chico

$400,000

4/ 3

2172

1155 Ceres Manor Ct

Chico

$225,000

4/ 2

1500

443 Middle Creek Dr

Chico

$390,000

4/ 3

2172

20 New Dawn Cir

Chico

$215,000

3/ 2

1396

60 Cinder Cone Loop

Chico

$367,500

3/ 2

1960

2854 Lovell Ave

Chico

$204,000

3/ 2

1306

34 Sparrow Hawk Ln

Chico

$351,000

4/ 2.5

2467

1 Wyndham Ct

Chico

$200,000

3/ 2

1213

923 Karen Dr

Chico

$347,500

3/ 1.5

1270

1354 Jackson St

Chico

$170,000

2/ 1

991

70 Jillian Ln

Chico

$320,000

3/ 1

2392

1215 Elmer St

Chico

$160,000

3/ 1

1105

1207 Windecker Dr

Chico

$310,000

4/ 3.5

3174

1935 Normal Ave

Chico

$142,500

2/ 2

768

115 Zinnia Way

Chico

$275,000

4/ 3

2167

3478 Konning Ave

Chico

$125,000

3/ 1

1473

514 Mission Santa Fe Cir

Chico

$259,500

3/ 2

1493

1516 E Lassen Ave

Chico

$110,000

3/ 2

1248

602 Reed Park Dr

Chico

$258,000

3/ 1.5

1627

9278 Stanford Ln

Durham

$400,000

2/ 2

1008

22 Highland Cir

Chico

$257,000

4/ 2

2147

1732 Almond View Ct

Durham

$192,000

4/ 1.5

2062

July 25, 2013

CN&R 35


open

house

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4 4084 Guntren Dr ( X St: Garner Ln) 5 Bd / 3 Ba, 3045 sq.ft. $585,000 Anita Miller 321-1174 Lindsey Ginno 570-5261 Sherry Landis 514-4855

Sat. 2-4 1461 Rim Rock ( X St: Oakridge Dr) 5 Bd / 4.5 Ba, 4675 Sq.Ft, Off Skyway! $535,000 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837

Sat. 11-1 2031 Honey Run Rd ( Eves Ln ) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 1769 sq.ft. $499,000 Mark Reaman 228-2229

Sun. 11-1

Sun. 2-4

Sat. 2-4

13 Luciano Ct (X St: Peninsula Dr) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1570 sq.ft. $309,500 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

218 Mission Sierra Terrace ( X St: Mission Ranch Blvd) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1734 sq.ft. $282,000 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

1962 Belgium (X St: 20th St.) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1406 sq.ft. $239,900 Sandy Stoner 514-5555

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

2177 Talbert Dr (X St: Forest Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1678 sq.ft. $309,000 Shane Collins 518-1413 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

12 Hillsboro Ct ( X St: Dan Bury Way) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1464 sq.ft. $275,000 Chris Martinez 680-4404

190 Fairgate Ln ( X St: W. Sacramento) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1198 sq.ft. $235,500 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Sat. 2-4, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4, 2-4

Sat. 11-1

1630 Harvest Glen (X St: Springfield/ Auburn Oak) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1544 sq.ft. $269,000 Johnny Klinger 864-3398 Justin Jewett 518-4089

1290 Parque Dr ( X St: Mariposa) 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 1266 sq.ft. $229,000 Effie Khaki 514-3334

Sat. 11-1, Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 2-4, 720 Grand Teton Way ( X St. Godman Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1652 Sq.Ft, $299,900 Sandy Stoner 514-5555 Matt Kleimann 521-8064 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 2-4 2570 Durham Dayton (X St: Teal), Durham 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2473 Sq.Ft, $485,000 Mark Reaman 228-2229

224 Windrose Court (X St: Avondale/Legacy) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1741 sq. ft. $299,500 Garrett French 228-1305

7 Woodcrest Ln ( X St: Vallombrosa) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1800 sq.ft. $329,000 Effie Khaki 514-3334

Sat. 2-4

Sun. 11-1, 2-4

356 St. Augustine (X St. Potter Rd) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1781 Sq.Ft, $319,900 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329 Paul Champlin 828-2902

9 River Wood Loop (X St: Glenwood) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1915 sq. ft. $314,000 Ed Galvez 990-2054

Sat. 11-1 2385 Campbell St ( X St: Godspeed St), Durham 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 1225 Sq.Ft, $160,000 John Spain 519-5726

Sat. 11-1,

Sun. 11-1 1255 Parque Dr ( X St: Mariposa) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1240 sq.ft. $119,900 Effie Khaki 514-3334

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 2-4, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4, 2-4

1730 Laburnum Ave ( X St: E. 7th Ave) 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 896 sq.ft. $179,900 Effie Khaki 514-3334

923 Christi Ln. ( X St: Cohasset Rd.) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1608 sq.ft. $250,000 Frankie Dean 717-3884 Dana Miller 570-1184

1260 Ravenshoe Way ( X St: Floral Ave) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 1532 sq.ft. $250,000 Lindsey Ginno 570-5261

1256 Orchard Ln ( X St: Floral Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1992 sq.ft. $299,000 Laura Ortland 321-1567

Sat. 2-4, 2-4

Sun. 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

1375 Peaceful Oaks ( X St. South Libby), Paradise 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1762 Sq.Ft, $299,500 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 2-4

1518 Sherman Ave ( X St: E. 5th Ave) 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 1602 Sq.Ft, Updated! $239,300 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329 Chris Martinez 680-4404

1810 Roth St ( X St: E. 20th) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 1743 sq.ft. $291,000 Summer Hughes 227-5729 Brandi Laffins 321-9562

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 2649 Waverly Ct ( X St: Abbey/ Cussick) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1386 sq.ft. $185,000 Kathy Kelly 570-7403

3676 Durham Dayton Hwy (X St: Dayton Hwy) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 2558 sq. ft. $264,800 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837

Sun. 11-1 2050 Springfield Dr #107 ( X St: Springfield Dr) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1820 sq.ft. $120,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Ask the Professionals at Century 21 — 345-6618 Wondering what your home is worth today?

Great home close to campus. 4/2 over 2,200 sq.ft Charming home on a large lot.

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Russ Hammer 530.894.4503

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HAMMERSELLS@SBCGLOBAL.NET

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of July 8, 2013 – July 12, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Forest Ranch

$170,000

3/ 2

2304

1614 Gate Ln

Paradise

$295,000

3/ 2

1554

6332 Glendale Dr

Magalia

$210,000

3/ 2

1668

194 Valley Ridge Dr

Paradise

$289,500

3/ 2

2023

14806 Nimshew Rd

Magalia

$179,000

2/ 2

1248

434 Circlewood Dr

Paradise

$219,000

2/ 2

2117

14884 Del Oro Dr

Magalia

$153,000

2/ 2.5

1473

6000 Acorn Ct

Paradise

$206,500

3/ 2

1846

14974 Trails End Rd

Magalia

$147,500

3/ 1.5

1459

980 Bella Vista Ave

Paradise

$181,000

2/ 2

1065

40 Pinedale Ct

Oroville

$192,500

3/ 2

1450

20 Northview Dr

Oroville

$132,000

3/ 2

1152

1323 Brill Rd

Paradise

$179,000

3/ 2.5

2364

1182 Glen Cir

Paradise

$176,000

3/ 2

1510

5883 Fickett Ln

Paradise

$175,000

3/ 2

1936

Paradise

$170,000

3/ 2.5

2268

4537 R F J Way

SQ. FT.

1014 Mt Ida Rd

Oroville

$120,000

2/ 2.5

1745

1895 Mt Ida Rd

Oroville

$117,000

2/ 2

1840

ADDRESS

SQ. FT.

1002 Maple Park Dr

Paradise

$399,000

2/ 2

1525

5032 Lago Vista Way

461 Tigertail Ln

Paradise

$390,000

3/ 2

2683

1872 Salida Way

Paradise

$128,000

3/ 2

1385

552 Boquest Blvd

Paradise

$375,000

2/ 2

1414

5524 Clark Rd A-b

Paradise

$126,000

2/ 1.5

2133

12257 S Stoneridge Cir

Paradise

$335,000

2/ 2

1250

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as POWELL’S SWEET SHOPPE-CHICO at 121 W. 3rd Street Chico, CA 95928. HAROLD CARLSON 120 Copperfield Dr. Chico, CA 95928. NANCY M CARLSON 120 Copperfield Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: NANCY CARLSON Dated: June 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000842 Published; July 3,11,18,25, 20131 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DANCING DAISIES BOTANICALS at 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. MARIROSE DUNBAR 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. GEORGE FREDSON 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MARIROSE DUNBAR Dated: June 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000798 Published: July 11,18,25, Au-­ gust 1, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ISADORA’S FOLLY at 3 Casita Terrace Chico, CA 95926. ROSELLE DIANE PETERS 3 Casita Terrace Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: R. DIANE PETERS Dated: May 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000753 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JUST JUMP IT, INC at 4345 Hedstrom Lane Chico, CA 95973. JUST JUMP IT, INC 4345 Hedstrom Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: MICHELLE KALBERER, CO - OWNER Dated: June 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000830 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALL AMERICAN REAL ESTATE at 1600 A Feather River BLVD Oroville, CA 95965. PATRICIA BOGGS 133 Grand Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PATRICIA BOGGS Dated: June 20, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000849 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO HOUSE CALLS at 2220 St. George Lane #3 Chico, CA 95926. VICTORIA LEE OTA 312 Orient St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VICTORIA OTA Dated: June 3, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000773 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DIRT DUDE at 2252 Cindy CT Oroville, CA 95966. TRAVIS BYRAM 2252 Cindy CT Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TRAVIS BYRAM Dated: June 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000843 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing buinsess as THE ARGUS at 212 W. 2nd St Chico, CA 95928. GAUTAM AND SCOTT, INC. 687 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SCOTT BALDWIN, PRESIDENT Dated: June 27, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000880 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO CHUCKWAGON at 1564 Citrus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL JANOSZ 1564 Citrus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Indivudal. Signed: MICHAEL JANOSX Dated: June 25, 2013 FBN: Number: 2013-0000866 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KATHRYN DANIELS at 49 Kemre RD Forbestown, CA 95941. KATHERINE WHITBY 49 Kemre RD Forbestown, CA 95941. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHERINE WHITBY Dated: June 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000828 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRO NAILS AND SPA at 1950 East 20th Street Suitei 907 Chico, CA 95928. BIHN T TRAN 1290 Notre Dame BLVD APT# 69 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: B TRAN Dated: July 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000897 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name: PRO NAILS AND SPA at 1950 E 20th Street STE I 907 Chico, Ca 95928. HNERY VAN TRUONG 1450 Springfield Drive #27 Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: HENRY VAN TRUONG Dated: July 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0000770 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIG CHICO CREEK LANDSCAPE AND MAINTENANCE at 2171 Huntington Dr Chico, CA 95928. CARMEN GARCIA 2171 Huntington Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CARMEN GARCIA Dated: June 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000800 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HONEYDOS at 2214 Robailey Dr Chico, CA 95928. MATTHEW A CONNER 2214 Robailey Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATTHEW A. CONNER Dated: June 25, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000868 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE BARBER MOBILE at 2154 Bar Triangle St Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL FOSTER 2154 Bar Triangle St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: Michael Foster Dated: July 8, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000922 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013

REALTY at 120 Amber Grove Drive, Suite 124 Chico, CA 95973. LAURA LYNN BURGHARDT 14 Turnbridge Welles Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LAURA LYNN BURGHARDT Dated: July 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000937 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVERCLEAN SOLAR at 1080 E. Lassen Avenue Chico, CA 95973. STEVE KOLU 1080 E. Lassen Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEVE KOLU Dated: July 16, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000965 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUSH CATERING at 121 W 21 Street Chico, CA 95928. WOODY GUZZETTI 121 W 21 Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WOODY GUZZETTI Dated: July 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000933 Published: July 25, August 1,8,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MB RANCH at 142 Big Oak Lane Berry Creek, CA 95916. MATTHEW BURWELL 151 Tipsoo Peak Road Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT BURWELL Dated: June 27, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000877 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE DENTAL CONNECTION at 2863 Pennyroyal Drive Chico, CA 95928. JOSIE T WHITEHURST 2863 Pennyroyal Drive Chico, CA 95928. NORMAN WHITEHURST 2863 Pennyroyal Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JOSIE T WHITEHURST Dated: July 5, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000910 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING A FIT LIFE at 101 Risa Wat #16 Chico, CA 95973. ERIC MARTIN 101 Risa Way #16 Chico, Ca 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ERIC MARTIN Dated: July 12, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000950 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CASCADE EMERGENCY MEDICINE INC at 640 Coyote Way Chico, CA 95928. CASCADE EMERGENCY MEDICINE INC 640 Coyote Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: AARON SHUTZ, MD, DIRECTOR Dated: July 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000972 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESSS NAME STATEMEMT The following person is doing business as CITY OF TREES

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DISCOVERY

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HOMES at 4061 Port Chicago Highway, Suite H Concord, CA 94520. DISCOVERY BUILDERS INC 4061 Port Chicago Highway, Suite H Concord, CA 94520. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEANNE C. PAVAO, SECRETARY Dated: July 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000928 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California business code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contains clothes, furniture, boxes, ect. The unit numbers and names are: 078ss: Shelly Byrd 066cc: James Hansen 151cc: Janice Konno The contents will be sold to the highest bidder on: July 27, 2013 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Ln, Chico, CA 95926. Published: July 18,25, 2013 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 1974 STARF Vessel HIN# SRF00271M73L74 CA CF# 2743FL 1993 PACIF Trailer VIN # 40R1KMX2XPAK05746 CA Lic# 4GC2663 Lien Sale August 15, 2013 10:00am at South Chico Mini Storage 426 Southgate Ct Chico, CA 95928. Published: July 25, 2013 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California business code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following unit contains: A go kart, old wood stove, small engines, tools, furniture, misc boxes, wheelchairs, and 2 electric scooters. The unit number and names are: Unit 101: JOEY NORMAN, JOSYLN NORMAN The contents will be sold to the highest bidder on: August 15, 2013 Beginning at 10:00am Sale to be held at: South Chico Mini Storage 426 Southgate Ct Chico, CA 95928. Published: July 25, August 1, 2013 NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA BUTTE COUNTY Case Number: PR-40719 (PROBATE CODE SECTION 19040) In re: THE RAYMOND PATRICK GARCIA REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST Created May 24, 2013, by RAYMOND PATRICK GARCIA, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named decedent that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court at 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926, and mail or deliver a copy to H.F. LAYTON Attorney for DENNIS GARCIA, as trustee of the trust dated May 24, 2013, of which the decedent was the settlor. Notice may be mailed or delivered to 191 Sand Creek

classifieds

CONTINUED ON 38

July 25, 2013

CN&R 37


Road, Suite 220, Brentwood, California, 94513, within the later of four (4) months after Thursday, July 25, 2013 ( the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, sixty (60) days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with receipt requested. Date: July 17, 2013 H.F. LAYTON LAW OFFICE H.F. LAYTON Attorney for DENNIS GARCIA, Trustee ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CYNTHIA L. CALDERON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CYNTHIA L. CALDERON Proposed name: CYNTHIA L. WOLF THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 30, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 25, 2013 Case Number: 159850 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MATTHEW JORDAN WOMER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MATTHEW JORDAN WOMER Proposed name: MATTHEW JORDAN MAYFIELD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 8, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 27, 2013 Case Number: 159905 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED

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38 CN&R July 25, 2013

PERSONS: Petitioner SHERI ADELL DOCKENDORF BROWN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SHERI ADELL DOCKENDORF BROWN Proposed name: SHERI ADELL SOUZA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 24, 2013 Case Number: 159696 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINE ALICIA STOLP NAKAO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTINE ALICIA STOLP NAKAO NAKYLA KUMA STOLP NAKAO Proposed name: ALICIA NARYCE NAKYLA STOLP NAKYLA KUMA NAKAO STOLP THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 29, 2013 Case Number: 159522 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MOHAMMED ALTALIB, EMAN ALSHIHAB filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RENAD MOHAMMED ALTALIB Proposed name: RANA MOHAMMED ALTALIB THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the

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name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 9, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 20, 2013 Case Number: 159797 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LYNN MARIE OTT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LYNN MARIE OTT Proposed name: LYNN MARIE RIVERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 6, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: June 5, 2013 Case Number: 159919 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner QUINTANA LEEANN DOCKENDORF filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: QUINTANA LEEANN DOCKENDORF Proposed name: QUINTANA LEEANN SOUZA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: June 12, 2013 Case Number: 159724 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DESIREE SCHMITZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NOAH RUSHTON KURTIS MATTINGLY, LABAN DAVID KURTIS MATTINGLY, MICAH JAMES KURTIS MATTINGLY Proposed name: NOAH RUSHTON THATCHER, LABAN DAVID THATCHER, MICAH JAMES THATCHER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 6, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: July 2, 2013 Case Number: 159913 Published: July 25, August 1,8,15, 2013

NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alaine Patti - Jelsvik 194748 9301 Winnetka Avenue Ste. B, Chatsworth, CA 91311. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 155122 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: YVONNE MARIE HOAG AKA YVONNE MARIE HICKEY AKA MARIE HOAG YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can

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SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: STEVE DUTTER AKA STEVE P DUTTER YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY DBA ACCOUNT RESOLUTION ASSOCIATES NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association.

use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Joseph L Selby

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Law Offices of Leverenz, Ferris & Selby 515 Wall Street Chico, Ca 95928. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158082 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CRYSTAL WILLIAMS-ARCILLA AND THE TESTATE AND IN-­ TESTATE SUCCESSORS TO ROBERT LEE WILLIANS, DE-­ CEASED ABD ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH OR UNDER SUCH DECENDENT AND DOES 1-20 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BILLY DURBIN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver

this Legal Notice continues

form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: James E. Reed P.O. Box 857 Fall River Mills, CA 96028. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158601 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I

have tried in my way to be free,” sings Leonard Cohen in his song “Bird on the Wire.” In other words, he has done the best he can to liberate himself from his unconscious patterns, bad habits and self-delusions. He hasn’t been perfect in his efforts, but the work he has done has earned him a measure of deliverance from his suffering. I recommend you follow his lead, Aries. Do your best to bring more relief and release into your life. Get rid of things that hold you back. Overthrow a pinched expectation and ignore a so-called limitation or two. By this time next week, I hope you will be able to say sincerely, “I have tried in my way to be free.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “There are some things you learn best in calm, and some in storm,” wrote the novelist Willa Cather. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Taurus, you’re in a phase of your cycle when storm learning isn’t your priority. The educational experiences you need most will unfold when you’re exploring the mysteries of peace and serenity. In fact, I suspect that the deeper you relax, the more likely it is that you will attract lifechanging teachings¡ªlessons that can transform your life for the better and fuel you for a long time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Is there a

message you’ve wanted to deliver for a long time but haven’t been able to? Are you bursting with thoughts or feelings that you’ve been longing to express but can’t find the right way to do so? Have you spent months carrying around a poignant truth that you have felt wasn’t ripe enough to be revealed? If your answer to any of those questions is yes, I believe the time will soon be at hand to make a move. But it’s important that you’re not impulsive or melodramatic as you initiate your breakthrough communications. For best results, be full of grace and balance.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Bees and

offered a gush of revelations about who you are, how you can heal and what strategies will best serve your quest to minimize your anxiety. Are you prepared to absorb some intense teachings? For best results, make yourself extra receptive. world’s best race-car teams is McLaren. It wins about 25 percent of the events in which it competes. Its skilled drivers account for much of its success, but its technicians are also pretty sensational. During a pit stop in the middle of a race, they can change all four tires on the car in less than three seconds. Do you have helpers like that, Libra? If you don’t, it’s time to intensify your efforts to get them. And if you do, it’s time to call on them to give you an extra boost.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Let’s try an experiment. It’s risky, but I’m hoping you will do it with such flair that there will be no karmic blowback. What I propose, Scorpio, is that you have fun expressing more confidence than usual. I invite you to strut a bit, even swagger, as you demonstrate your command over your circumstances. Enjoy acting as if the world is your plaything ... as if everyone around you secretly needs you to rise up and be a bigger, bolder version of yourself. The trick, of course, will be to avoid getting puffed up with grandiose delusions. Your challenge is to be more wildly devoted to embodying your soul’s code without lapsing into arrogance. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I

suspect that you are longing to take a quantum leap of faith, but you are also afraid to take that quantum leap of faith. You sense the potential of experiencing a very cool expansion, while at the same time you hesitate to leave your comfort zone and give up your familiar pain. In light of the conflict, which may not be entirely conscious, I suggest you hold off on making a gigantic quantum leap of faith. Instead, experiment with a few bunny hops of faith. Build up your courage with some playful skips and skitters and bounces that incrementally extend your possibilities.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Hoaxes exposed! Bluffs called! Secrets revealed! Whitewashes uncovered! Curses banished! Taboos broken! Those are the headlines I expect to see emblazoned in your book of life during the coming weeks. Can you handle that many holy disruptions? Will you be able to deal with the stress that might come from having so much raucous success? These are important questions, because if you’re not up to the challenge, you may scare away the transformations. So, steel your resolve, Capricorn. Mobilize your will. Do what’s necessary to harvest the unruly blessings.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I was six years old

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Dear Astrol-

ogy Guy: Please tell me why I have to work so hard¡ªmeditate, reflect, read, analyze, poke, prod, investigate—to discover truths about myself that must be obvious to others. Why is it so hard for me to see where I need healing and where I need to let go? Why is it such an ordeal to grasp what is interfering with my wholeness when I can quickly pinpoint what other people’s issues are? ¨COverworked Virgo.” Dear Overworked: I’m happy to report that you Virgos will soon be

story and photo by

Shannon Rooney

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): One of the

other insects can see ultraviolet light, which is invisible to humans. When they look at flowers, they detect designs on the petals that you and I cannot. For example, the evening primrose appears completely yellow to us, but it calls seductively to bees with a flashy star pattern at its center. Many of the secret signs that flowers offer the pollinators are meant to guide them to where the pollen and nectar are. Let’s use this as our metaphor of the week, Cancerian. I am not predicting that you will be able to perceive a broader spectrum of light. But I do believe you will discern cues and clues that are hidden from most people and that have been imperceptible to you in the past. when my parents told me that there was a small, dark jewel inside my skull, learning to be me,” so said the Leo science-fiction writer Greg Egan in his story “Learning to Be Me.” Let’s pretend that you, too, have a small, dark jewel inside your skull that’s learning to be you. It’s a good metaphor for what I believe has been happening all these years: You have been gradually mastering the art of being the best Leo you can be. It hasn’t been easy. You weren’t born knowing how to be your beautiful, radiant, courageous self, but have had to work hard to activate your potentials. Now you’re moving into an especially critical phase of the process: a time when you have the chance to learn how to love yourself with greater ingenuity.

Open-door healer

by Rob Brezsny

French novelist Gustave Flaubert declared that if you hope to write a book, you should first read 1,500 books. A Roman author named Petronius believed that the imagination does not work at its peak power unless it is inundated with reading material. I suggest you adopt their advice and apply it to your own field, Aquarius. Whatever skill or subject you want to master, expose yourself lavishly to the efforts of other people who have already mastered it. Flood yourself with well-crafted inspiration.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Should you

be worried that a venomous spider has crawled into your shoe while you were sleeping? Just in case, should you flip your shoe upside-down before putting it on each morning? My studied opinion: hell, no. The chances of you being bitten on the foot by a venomous spider lurking in your shoe are even less than the possibility that you will be abducted by an alien who looks like Elvis Presley and forced to sing a karaoke version of Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” at an extraterrestrial bar. And if you are going around filled with delusional anxieties like that, you will definitely interfere with life’s current predilection, which is to give you a cleansing respite from your fears as well as immunity from harm.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of July 25, 2013

Paradise resident Marleau Peterson has always been passionate about “helping people,” so she decided to leave a career in merchandising and realize her passion by becoming a certified massage therapist. She continued learning other therapeutic modalities as well, including Bowen technique and reiki (“adding to my toolbox,” she said), and eventually opened Marleau Peterson’s Healing Arts Center (562 Manzanita Ave., Ste. 10), a unique and peaceful Chico-based home for her work and that of other healing-arts practitioners. Sharing the space makes it an affordable option for practitioners, and offers clients a wide variety of options under one roof for improving their health and well-being. Currently, there are approximately 40 healing artists— specializing in everything from chakra-balancing to intuitive readings—who use the facility. The common area includes a store with books by local healing practitioners, and there’s a lending library as well. Visit www.chicohealingartscenter.com or call 345-6300 for more info.

What’s the arrangement with practitioners? Practitioners pay a by-the-hour fee for the rooms they rent. I wanted to have a space where practitioners could come and not necessarily have the stress of what the overhead is. I’ve noticed in the healing arts that it’s a different mindset. A lot of practitioners feel they can’t charge for what they do, but they have to. By taking off the table what their overhead is, they can focus on the client.

Do you have a philosophy? My philosophy is everything is a flow and

there’s enough for everyone. There’s more than enough for everybody in that way. If you have a client you’re working on and they’re stuck, and if you have the mentality that there’s enough for everybody, then it’s a lot freer for people to refer them to another practitioner who might be of more benefit to them. There’s no way one practitioner can touch or heal everybody in Chico. … The more you include everybody’s modalities, the more the community will benefit. We’re here for wellness. It’s not a competition—it’s what’s best for the client.

What kinds of practitioners can use your center? I’m open to anything that will forward people. And I’m all about educating clients and getting them involved in their own health. … There are lots of alternatives to medicine and surgery. We are whole people and need to look at the whole about us—our jobs, our families, and what the positive things are and what the things are that we need to let go of. When people open the door to healing, the changes can be profound.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Mementos Thanks to Cynthia Schildhauer, getting rid of Janice’s clothes was easy—I gave them to Cindy, and she and her friends divvied them up. The rest is harder. I think I know what I’m gonna do with her art library and art supplies and easels and canvas stretchers and whatnot. Actually I’ve thought of what I could do with everything she left, mostly giving with some selling around the edges. I know what to do; I don’t know how to do it. Things that I know are just things, and that Janice thought little of, have become mementos of my dead wife. That phrase looked a little odd at first when I thought that a dead wife, or a late wife for that matter, is not a wife at all, since wifing often requires breathing deeply. We said till death do us part, so you’d think it’d be all over now, but no. My second thought was that a wife is a wife is still a wife, dead or alive. That feels right. A friend who lost a partner 10 years ago still has boxes of her stuff in his apartment, labeled and familiar. He senses the energy her things still have for him, and trying to deal with them scrambles his emotions

while the stuff itself puts women off. I feel him. Some of Janice’s things I can’t even touch. For three and a half years, until we went on Enloe’s hospice program, Janice looked for ways not to die, generally avoiding corporate approaches and otherwise keeping an open mind. She did a lot of research and accumulated stacks and folders full of paper. I suppose I should pitch the lot as a bad job, but I bet somewhere in there is information that could be useful to somebody. I don’t know where or who, though, so I’ve still got all of it. I recently found letters to her mother she wrote while she was at the Rhode Island School of Design in the early ’70’s, and she already sounds like my wife. I can’t get rid of them. I also found a journal from late 2010, one of scads of journals, and read about her experiences with the treatment she was trying then and remembered what things were like with all of us. I can’t get rid of that either. Impossible to think about even giving as presents are the little things—rocks and shells and treen and feathers and beautiful ceramic bowls and crystals and ornate cloth bags. I’ve figured out exactly what to do with her earrings—I wear them. July 25, 2013

CN&R 39


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