Page 1

VOICE OF THE APOCALYPSE SACRED ACRES See MUSIC FEATURE, page 24

See NEWSLINES, page 8

FARM-FRESH JUICE BAR See CHOW, page 29

BY ROBERT SPEER PAGE 18

TREES IN TROUBLE See GREENWAYS, page 16

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 36, Issue 46

Thursday, July 11, 2013


SUPPORT YOUR NEIGHBOR: Off

All Art Glass in the Gallery

28 Years in Chico! 1985 to 2013 Gallery Hours 10am- 5pm Monday - Saturday

Tuesday, July 16 through Saturday, July 20 A Chico tradition for over 40 years

2 CN&R July 11, 2013

2161 Park Avenue Chico 95928 (530) 893-0373 www.orientandflume.com

698 Mangrove Ave. (In Safeway Plaza) 894–1110 • ChicoSportsLtd.net Mon–Sat 9:30–7p, Sun 10-6

www.newsreview.com

20%

When you buy from a mom or pop business, you are not helping a CEO buy a third vacation home. You are helping a little girl get dance lessons, a little boy get his team jersey, a mom or dad put food on the table, a family pay a mortgage, or a student pay for college. Our customers are our shareholders and they are the ones we strive to make happy. Thank you for supporting small businesses!


CN&R Vol. 36, Issue 46 • July 11, 2013

OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

17

NEWSLINES Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES The Pulse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . 17 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . 17

COVER STORY

18

ARTS & CULTURE Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . 25 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Scene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 In The Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

REAL ESTATE

35

CLASSIFIEDS

37

6

$

OIL CHANGE

OFF

✓ 15 – Point Service Check ✓ Drive Through Service ✓ No Appointment Necessary

NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY

LUBE, OILDESIGNER &VL FILE NAME FILTER SERVICE

ISSUE DATE

ACCT. EXEC.

07.11.13

AMB

2399 Esplanade,REV. Chico DATE MURPHYAUCTION071113R1 NEw 891-8212 with this coupon. Not good with

LocatedSELECTION) Directly in front of Bowling Alley. USP (BOLD PRICE / ATMOSPHERE EXPERT / UNIQUE Entrance /Off Esplanade

other offers. Exp. 7/4/13

Open Monday – Saturday PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES)

BACKSTOP From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . 39

27

All Seasons Heating & Air Conditioning SPELLING

NUMBERS & DATES

CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.)

Your one stop comfort shop

AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED APPROVED BY:

* $59 Tune Up * 10% OFF

ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF DAVID SISK BY MELANIE MACTAVISH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TINA FLYNN

General Manager Alec Binyon

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Associate Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom Gascoyne Asst. News Editor/Projects Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Calendar Assistant Mallory Russell Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Karen Laslo, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Jesse Mills, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Alan Sheckter, Robert Speer, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Ryan Coletti, Katherine Green, Melanie MacTavish Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Design Melissa Arendt, Mary Key, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Sharon Conley, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Receptionist Kendra Gray Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2240 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

all competitors coupons

Rolland Summers ~ President 20 years experience License #909575

530.899.7107

summer specials Complete Guaranteed Desktops $50 to $200 Laptops $150 to $250 Recycle + Reuse Center

Drop off your unwanted electronics (working or not) between 9am-5pm daily COMPUTERS FOR CLASSROOMS

530-895-4175

315 Huss Drive, Chico Open 9-5 Weekdays Seniors 65+ Open to low-income families such as Medi-Cal, Section 8 Housing, Healthy Families, Free or Reduced lunch qualified and SSDI. Cash sales only. CFC is Microsoft Registered Refurbisher and R2-Certified Recycler. All hard drives are wiped completely or destroyed.

July 11, 2013

CN&R 3


Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

Volunteerism could work Using volunteers to do cleanup at Caper Acres may not be the

way to keep Bidwell Park’s fairytale playground open, but employing their help elsewhere to free up city staff to do that work has the potential to keep the gates open. As reported in Newslines this week (see “Sacred acres,” by Tom Gascoyne), there is an effort afoot to organize a volunteer group. Bringing that effort from idea stage to execution will take some creativity over at City Hall, and also a dedicated pool of volunteers. But it can be done. Chicoans love Bidwell Park. Indeed, it’s one of the community’s biggest bragging points when touting the best things about living here. And parents of little kids are especially fond of Caper Acres, which is a one-ofa-kind play place. Now is the time for everyone who enjoys the park to step up. Volunteerism doesn’t address the layoffs of seven much-needed workers in the Street Trees and Parks divisions. That’s a separate issue altogether. The bottom line is that these workers are needed to keep the park operating smoothly, but their positions will remain unfilled until the city is financially solvent. Using volunteers is certainly not a long-term solution. They shouldn’t be responsible indefinitely for helping sustain park services. But as a stopgap measure—until the city gets control of the budget—this could be the way to keep Caper Acres open more than just three days a week. Ω

Now is the time for everyone who enjoys the park to step up.

Preserve the farmers’ market Thave built the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market will be evicted next year, a pawn of the City Hall bosses.

them. First, they should reject a committee packed with opponents with one purpose in mind: eviction. Instead of a “U-Haul” committee, the market can form its own citizens’ Downtown since 1980, the farmers, often working in rain committee and tell the uncomfortable facts or blistery heat, have created a thriving any town would envy: 12,000 shoppers Saturday farmers’ market at Second and attend the market each month and spill over Wall streets. Offering locally grown, into the downtown to the delight of healthful food at our and restaurants. downtown gateway, If the city bosses retailers The downtown Chico Saturday they are Chico’s human farmers’ market aspires to be the face of sustainability. won’t support best year-round farmers’ market in Last year, the farmthe farmers, Northern California, with amenities ers were encouraged by such as photovoltaic solar roof panthe city of Chico to the voters will. by els, additional space for a more make modest improveKarl Ory comfortable experience for all, dozens of ments: bathrooms to replace porta-potnew parking spaces with diagonal parking on ties, electricity and signage. The farmers The author is a Flume and First streets. And yes, bathoffered to pay for it all. Two months ago former Chico mayor rooms—it is sad to see the elderly, or a pregtheir plan was supported by three City (1983-85) and city nant woman with a 3-year-old child in tow, Council members, but lost on a tie vote. councilmember. struggle to get into a porta-potty. A fourth councilmember, Ann Schwab, He currently serves The best way to show your support for the has a downtown bicycle store, which on the Airport market at is to shop there every Saturday silences her vote and voice. With her Commission. vote, the changes would have passed, the morning and let our local farmers know you’re on their side. If you would like to be market would have been preserved. on our email list or volunteer, please email Then three weeks ago, literally at the 15th hour during the all-day City Council the friendsofthefarmersmarket@gmail.com. If the city bosses won’t support the farmmeeting, the franchise agreement was terers, the voters will. A market is a partnership minated effective next year. I know the farmers will fight the evic- between buyers and sellers. United they will not be moved. Ω tion. The people of Chico will support he nearly 100-strong farmers and artisans who

4 CN&R July 11, 2013

Keep an open mind The ad-hoc group tasked with deliberating on the future of the

Chico Certified Farmers’ Market is set to meet soon, and we’d like to urge all parties to be reasonable during the process. CCFM advocates appear to be balking at the makeup of the committee (see Newslines, “Farmers rebel,” by Tom Gascoyne). But to us, the list of representatives seems evenly weighted between market advocates and downtown-business advocates, including two representatives of the Downtown Chico Business Association. The issue here is that the CCFM wants to stay at its home of 20 years at the municipal lot at Second and Wall streets, while several nearby business owners would like to see it move elsewhere. For many years, a vocal minority of business owners, primarily those in or near the Garden Walk Mall, have lamented how the market takes away parking for their customers. This, they say, has hurt sales. However, other downtown business owners, especially restaurant and café owners, say that the market actually helps sales. Meanwhile, CCFM representatives charge that all of downtown benefits from the event’s presence at its current location. They cite a study out of Chico State with quantitative data backing up their claims that farmers’market attendees shop elsewhere downtown when visiting the market and that finding sufficient parking is not an issue. We’re not certain what the answer is to once and for all solve the conflict between the two factions, but we do know that viable solutions must begin with discussions. We’re sorry to see the beginning of the talks getting off on the wrong foot. CCFM representatives are understandably wary because, as it stands, their franchise agreement with the city for use of the parking lot will end in 17 months. But that’s assuming the outcome of the discussions leads to that decision. That has yet to be determined. We encourage all parties involved to come to the table with open minds. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

A needed shake-up

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Not that Melissa A few months ago, I got a really nice note from a retired local teacher who thought I’d been one of his junior-high students years ago. For some time, while reading my byline, he had a picture in his head of the girl he knew. It’s an easy mistake to make. Daugherty isn’t a very common name in the States, unless you live in Boston. I never knew a single non-relative Daugherty while growing up in the Bay Area, at least not with my spelling. There were a couple of Doughertys and a number of Dohertys in my hometown, however. A quick online search indicates there are just 94 Melissa Daughertys in the United States. Funny how I ended up living in a town where one of them grew up. I wonder if that Melissa is still in town and whether she gets asked about her job at the Chico News & Review all the time. I don’t know where the rest of these same-name Melissas live, but I have a general idea about a couple of them. That’s because I get emails intended for a few of them on a fairly regular basis at my personal account. One lives in the Washington, D.C., area. I know this because the D.C. Public Library sends me messages about what she’s checked out. This week it was The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The other Melissa is somewhere in Southern California. She and her husband, Sean, were recently invited to a craft-beer tasting event at the Los Angeles Zoo. Animals and beer? Yes, please. I have to say, both of these Melissas sound like my kind of gals. These aren’t the only wayward messages I’ve received. Most of the time, I send a reply saying “Wrong Melissa” or I unsubscribe from lists I accidentally get put on. But the emails just keep on coming. Not my pop. Every once in a while I’m asked if I’m the daughter of John Daugherty. I am, indeed. But not the one who’s a former city of Chico deputy assistant city manager. I hear he actually pronounces his name dockh-erti, which is closer to the Gaelic pronunciation (dockhhar-tay). My family goes by the more Americanized door-e-ti. My dad actually goes by the nickname Skip. Only telemarketers call him John. I don’t think I even knew his real name until I heard my great-grandmother call him Johnny when I was a little kid. She was the only one who did. My dad grew up in nearby Hamilton City and went to Chico State before moving to the Bay Area. He’s come full circle, retiring several years ago and returning, with my step-mom, Dona, to a farm that has been in our family for more than 40 years. I moved up here to go to Chico State. Fifteen years later, I pretty much consider myself a Chicoan. So, I may not be the Melissa some people had imagined. But maybe I’m not that far off the mark.

Re “The face of public art” (Scene, by Jason Cassidy, July 3): Over recent years, Chico’s public-art program had defaulted to internal gatekeeping of city staff. About 80 percent of public funds spent on art projects and the semantically retitled “aesthetic treatments” bypassed the originally adopted decision-making policies of site selection, artist selection, and approval authority of the Arts Commission. Commissioners resigned or were gradually demoted to cheerleading for projects they weren’t even involved with, after the fact. There’s an expression that says “Follow the money.” Somehow, the general-fund costs for salary and benefits of the unadvertised full-time arts-coordinator position increased to more than the entire combined annual arts-grant allocations. Little if anything trickled down to most local artists, and no money was left for required project maintenance. The recent changes to Chico’s arts program are a long-overdue blessing, and restore a rightful democratic power to the people and their representative arts commissioners. This new freedom offers a choice for the arts program to fly or to crash. Now is a great time for artists to rally and help build something more worthy of their support. Now is the commissioners’ time to represent the whole community, rise to the occasion, and lead. GREGG PAYNE Prescott, Ariz.

Summertime slashing Re “A plea for help” (Editorial, June 20): Is it not interesting that the current process of economic slash-and-burn is being carried out while so many people are out of town for the summer? Only a short time ago this was seen as an undemocratic way of doing things in this town. The true 800-pound gorilla is today’s inverted economic pyramid where the High Administrative Class continues to reward itself at the expense of those below them. Repeatedly, we have seen the loss of jobs that actually involve doing something. (I call this “the Actual Test.” For example: Just who is going to actually clean the bathrooms? Chico has windstorms—just who will be out in the rain actually cutting down the dangerous tree limbs?) May I suggest we adopt a version of the Maoist practice of having Chinese administrators and diplomats spend part of their day sweeping the steps of the consulate? I always thought this was by far the best idea that Mao came up with—certainly better than his namesake jacket. MICHAEL MULCAHY Chico

Financial fallout continues Re “Grand Jury dings Chico” (Newslines, by Tom Gascoyne, July 3): It seems to me that the city of Chico LETTERS continued on page 6

Chiropractic

20

$

offiCe visiT

no exam fees • friendly service • convenient hours “Back pain? Neck pain? Headaches? Muscle tightness? Stressed out? WE CAN HELP!”

– Dr. Mark Tenenbaum, DC

Call our office OR visit our website to schedule an appointment today!

T e n e n b au M C h i r o p r a C T i C 1049 Village Lane • Chico • 530.680.8920

www.tenenbaumchiropractic.com • Mon-Fri 10a-1p & 3p-7p, Sat 10a-2p

15%

OFF

Tom Vo Owner

Exp 8/30/13

Professional Nail Care • Pedicure in Spa Chair • Walk-ins Welcome Clean & Friendly • No appointment necessary

Lucy Nails & Spa 973 East Ave, Suite I • 895-1673

Computer solutions business & home networking sales & services:

• virus+Malware reMoval $3995 • pc tune–up $1995 exp 07/31/13

Keeping IT Simple 1299 East avE #b 530.342.1223 www.ttLtechs.com info@ttltechs.com

rOyal flush Pays 1000 tO 1!

thrEE Card pokEr

Play ! Chico

Now Open !

Pure 21.5 / 6 tO 5

BlaCkjaCk $3 miNimum bets Come Enjoy Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner & Drinks at Angie’s Cafe! 175 E. 20th St | www.Casino99Chico.com | (530) 892–2282 Must be 21 and have a valid ID. Casino 99 supports responsible gambling. For help call 1.800.GAMBLER. State GEGA #s 000783, 000785, 003663, 003664. July 11, 2013

CN&R 5


continued from page 5

? p l e H d Nee

Home RepaiR Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical • Remodeling Evaporative Cooler Service • Weatherization

FREE EStimatES Call Carini Home Repair

343-0705

or

518-9384

General Contractor • License # 612806

Throwing cash in the trash ...

employee unions negotiated very generous pay-scales. City Finance Director Jennifer Hennessy gave incomplete and misleading information to the City Council as to whether it was affordable. And when the facts came out, she and many other city employees skipped town grasping their pensions, which are even more generous than their salaries were. Which leaves the rest of us to clean up the mess ... and pay their pensions for the rest of their lives. MICHAEL JONES Chico

In the old days, the great investigative reporting of the Chico News & Review would have left no stone unturned to get to the truth and ask questions and demand answers! But not this time … why? The progressive, liberal council members are involved and we wouldn’t want them to look inept, now would we? The CN&R wants us all to believe that Jennifer Hennessy pulled off, all by herself, the greatest “catch-me-if-you-can moving all these taxpayer monies from one city deficit fund to cover another city deficit fund” in order to make city finance reports look rosy? And it’s just so convenient she left for a new job in Temecula and—guess what?—she won’t talk! And what makes this all so astonishing is that the city of Temecula’s administrators, after reading the Butte County Grand Jury report, just can’t wait for the same bang-up good job she’ll do for them, being that she’s so accurate at her profession. How stupid do you think we are? Jennifer had help. I’d ask U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate, but he’s too busy searching for the missing FBI’s telephone number to investigate the IRS like President OLiar promised! Yeah, right! RICK CLEMENTS Paradise

Save the trees

FAIR STREET RECYCLING

• Paying top dollar • FREE EWASTE DROP-OFF SITE • Your money stays here and creates jobs! • Butte Co’s ONLY non-profit, full service buy-back center in Chico, Magalia & Oroville 2300 Fair St. • Chico • 343-8641 • Hours: M–F 8am–4pm, Sat. 8am–3:30pm 1245 Oro Dam Blvd. • Oroville • 533-5311 • Hours: Tues.–Sat. 8:30am–4pm 14559 Skyway • Magalia • 873-6000 • Hours: Tues.–Sat. 8:30am–3:30pm

6 CN&R July 11, 2013

Third and Chestnut streets is the site of the latest logging project planned by the city of Chico. On this corner you will find six magnificent, tall, shady old walnut trees. Arborist Scot Wineland says they were probably planted by John Bidwell. But to fix the sidewalk, the city’s plan is: Cut ’em all down. What a shame! Scot says maybe two could go, but four are in great shape. Let them stand. He will prune them at no charge to the city. Chico used to be called the City of Trees. After the recent removal of at least 66 healthy heritage-type

trees, the title may have to be changed to City of Chainsaws. Call your City Council person before the trees are all gone! Scot and I are going to pay the city fees to have those four officially declared Heritage Trees. Call us if you’d like to help: 3433152. CHARLES WITHUHN Chico

Chico News & Review and Quackers Lounge sponsored a wine-tasting benefit for our nonprofit organization, PawPrints Thrift Store Spay/Neuter Program. On the last Thursday evening of every month, these shining examples of community service hold a wine-tasting benefit for a lucky nonprofit organization in our community. The Chico Grocery Outlet provides five or six differ-

“After the recent removal of at least 66 healthy heritagetype trees, the title may have to be changed to City of Chainsaws.”

–Charles Withuhn

Park cuts let down many I recently found out about the upcoming closure of Caper Acres and several restrooms within the One-Mile Recreation Area, and am extremely concerned with these developments. One-Mile and Caper Acres are among the most visited attractions in Chico. Generations of children have grown up playing in this park, and to cut hours so that homemakers or parents who work non-traditional hours are unable to bring their children here is thoughtless and unfair, especially during the height of summer. Closing restrooms that are needed by scores of visitors is short-sighted and will only result in increased maintenance costs later on when less-scrupulous visitors to the park elect to use the bushes as a toilet. Furthermore, it is unfair to children, the elderly, and those with disabilities, as many have conditions which make it difficult to hold their bladders once they have to go. As you can see, closing Caper Acres and several restrooms is a poor choice which can only lead to trouble and unhappiness among the citizens of Chico. I believe we can find a way via volunteers and donations to keep the park open in its current capacity. Let’s work together and figure this out.

ent wines to sample along with snacks. The Chico News & Review publicizes the event, and Ed Burns, owner of Quackers Lounge, donates the use of the Crystal Room on East Avenue. Wine glasses, tables with tablecloths, chairs and—a necessity on this particular evening—air-conditioning were all provided, gratis. This fundraiser was a great success for our group. What a gracious and generous gesture on the part of these Chico businesses. All we can offer in return is a sincere and heartfelt thank you. INGRID CORDES PawPrints board member

Still missing Rob Blair I agree that KNVN/KHSL has made an epically terrible choice in firing Rob Blair. My husband and I always watched Wake Up!; Rob’s voice was my husband’s alarm clock. Cort Klopping is a fine young man, but I find myself either falling back asleep or changing the channel, and my husband doesn’t watch anymore. Rob’s joyous demeanor really made you wake up in a good mood. Now, Wake Up! is not what I need anymore, especially if the station does not have a valid reason for terminating his employment. ANGELA BARBER Chico

TANYA “ABIGAIL” LOPEZ Chico

A note of thanks I have never been more proud to be a member of the Chico community than on the evening of June 27, when Chico Grocery Outlet,

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


What are you looking forward to? Asked near Safeway on Mangrove Avenue

Delicious inDian FooD in Downtown Chico 5.95 1 Entree Bowl $ 7.95 2 Entree Plate

$ · Custom Made Jewelry · Quality Restorations · One of a Kind Pieces

Vegetarian & Vegan options available

246 West 3rd St. • Downtown Chico 530-891-0880 • KirksJewelry.com

230 Salem Street, Chico | 530.891.3570 | www.GogiesCafe.Webs.com

LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1975

Lunch | Dinner | Dine In | Take Out | Catering | Tea | Coffee | Daily Specials

Add some spice to your life!

Michele French freelance writer

The Only Law Firm to be Voted Best of Chico

I look forward to writing a blockbuster novel. It’s about hip-hop culture in Chapmantown. … If I can’t publish the book traditionally, then I’ll self-publish. The novel is very dirty and violent. Everybody needs to read it because the ending is very shocking.

Michael Shepard freelance writer

I’m getting married. It’s true love that started off as a casual acquaintance. It’s something I have been waiting for for a long time. I look forward to beginning my new life. We are going to be together forever.

• Reasonable Fees • Constant Communication • Aggressive, Responsive Representation • Free Initial Consultation

530-LAW-HELP • 530-529-4357

Supervising Attorney

Michael M. Rooney

Just Results • RooneyLawFirm.com

FREE ON MONDAY • Acupuncture •

HUGE SIDEWALK SALE NEW ARRIVALS

For new patients Sabrina Wertz yogurt-shop employee

15-35

$ Pay what you can

FRLEAESSES

SUNyGpurcha99se

Now open 7 days

an $ 49 over

2999

URBAN TRAIL

Was $4999 NOW 3999

Men’s & Women’s

100’S OF STYLES 10 COLORS

740 Flume St 345-5566 | PinwheelChico.com

KIDS

4 COLORS

$999

Hair • Wigs • Cosmetics

Dale Wingett retired

I’m looking forward to the cool weather. I go down to the west branch of the Feather River and just hike up the river. I plan to take the trip tomorrow and every week this summer. It’s one of my forms of exercise.

AS LOW AS

$

Regular fee

• Hair Care Products

I can’t wait for the next college semester. I also can’t wait for the cooler seasons because it’s too hot this summer. This will be my first year attending college. I don’t know what I want to do or major in, but I’m optimistic.

MANY STYLES

$49.99

Bottle Opener

WOMEN’S & KIDS

JUST ARRIVED

LOCKOUT

Reg $7999 NOW $4999

2175 Baldwin Ave Oroville 95966 (530) 533-7720

“HURRICANE”

DANUBE

Reg $7599 NOW $4999

XFLOWER

Reg $84 NOW $5999

CHANCE

CLEOPATRA

Reg $9899 NOW $5999 Reg $105 NOW $6999

HEEL & SOLE SHOE

708 Mangrove Ave. (in the Safeway Shopping Center) Chico 899-0780 Prices good thru 07/30/13 • While supplies last Open 7 Days, Mon.–Sat. 10am–8pm, Sun. 10am–6pm

We carry NARROWS & WIDES

www.heelandsoleshoes.com

July 11, 2013

CN&R 7


Park volunteer Sandra Barton and her grandsons Colten (right) and Ashton Kessler exiting Caper Acres the weekend before recent cuts to the playground’s open hours went into effect.

NOT-SO-HAPPY FOURTH

Three weaponless robberies within 24 hours beginning just before July 4 were reported by the Chico Police Department. At about 11 p.m. on July 3, a man suffering from Parkinson’s disease walked to Enloe Prompt Care on Cohasset Road to report he’d been robbed by two men while walking along Cohasset at the Highway 99 overpass. He said he was approached from behind and held by one suspect while the other removed money from his shirt pocket. The men ran away toward Mangrove Avenue. Two hours later, a 17-year-old girl walking with friends in Lower Bidwell Park was approached by a man and a woman. The woman engaged the girl in a verbal confrontation before grabbing her purse, physically assaulting her, and then running away with the man. The girl’s friends ran away during the assault. At about 11:30 p.m. on July 4, a man who’d recently had multiple surgeries was walking along Manzanita Avenue toward Flyers gas station on Cohasset Road when he stopped to rest. He was then contacted by two men who pushed him to the ground and removed medication and money from his pockets before fleeing.

HAPPY B’DAY, BIDWELL!

Just as Bidwell Park and its facilities take financial hits leading to reduced maintenance and access hours, a fundraiser is planned for Saturday morning, July 20, to mark the park’s 108th birthday. Events begin at 7:30 a.m. with a 5K run starting at One-Mile Recreation Area. Early registration—through July 13—is $15 for those 15 and under, and $20 for everyone else. Past that date, fees jump to $20 and $25, respectively. T-shirts with designs from local artist Jake Early will be on sale. Other events include a horse expo, a putting clinic, and star-gazing at the park’s observatory. The money raised will go toward fixing up Caper Acres and other park needs.

GOODBYE, MOUSTACHE PETE

Peter Boyle, aka “Moustache Pete,” died July 4 at an assisted-living home in north Chico. Boyle, 68, was well known among locals for his well-waxed-and-curled handlebar moustache and pleasant disposition. He worked for years as a doorman at Cabos restaurant and bar in south Chico and at Tower Books on Main Street. He was a fixture at Tower, wheeling boxes of just-delivered books on a dolly or standing out in front of the store, smoking a cigarette and greeting passersby. Boyle was a thoughtful man with a sly smile and a great sense of humor. Born in Alameda, he served in the Army during the Vietnam War and later came to Chico, where he attended Chico State. He stayed in town for the rest of his life, occasionally traveling abroad.

8 CN&R July 11, 2013

Sacred acres

On the following Monday (July 8), a group of Caper Acres regulars ponders the closure.

Park-goers lobby for volunteer efforts to keep Bidwell Park fairytale playground open

Sin Chico, including, of course, Bidwell Park. Last week’s announcement that hours and access ome things are just downright sacred

to the park were getting reduced due to budget cuts triggered a strong reaction, particularly in response to the four-day-a-week closure of the story and photos by Caper Acres kids’ playground in Tom Lower Bidwell Park. Gascoyne Public Works Director Ruben tomg@ Martinez is the contact name on newsreview.com the press release announcing the reduced hours and access. He said his office has received many emails expressing disappointment and frustration, and while there are talks in the works regarding whether volunteers could be used to help keep Caper Acres open, Martinez said those efforts aren’t as simple as one might think. “I talked with some lead staff this morning and said that maybe Caper Acres is not where we put volunteers because it’s going to be nasty work,” he said. “Maybe we could look at our work altogether and say, ‘What can we shave off that’s frankly easier for volunteers to do, so we can focus Petition on the nastier stuff?’” connection: The city’s efforts to balance Go to its $4.8 million budget deficit www.tinyurl.com/ led to the recent reduction in capersave to sign the Help Save park services. The Parks and Caper Acres! Street Trees divisions’ budgets petition. took a hit of $500,000. Accord-

ing to the city, the cuts resulted in the elimination of three park workers and four tree workers, as well as the elimination of a seasonal park-ranger position. “With less people,” a press release says, “the Parks Division unfortunately will not have the resources to provide the high-quality level of service to maintain all of the many Bidwell Park facilities (cleaning, repairing the permanent restrooms, repairing irrigation systems, mowing, and inspecting Caper Acres playground apparatus, etc.) on a sevenday-a-week basis.” “We looked at the services that we could guarantee on a daily basis—that is, day in and day out,” Martinez said. “People say we could have phased it in or reduced it slowly over summer. Unfortunately, our [laid-off] staff goes away as of today [Monday, July 8]. “People asked, ‘Why in the middle of summer?’ Well, that is when the new budget kicks in, and it doesn’t include [funding for] all those employees or additional funding for a contract to maybe deal with a private firm [for park maintenance].” Martinez said he is not surprised by the reaction from the public. “It’s important to acknowledge that there is a lot of disappointment all the way around for both the public and the city employees,” he said. “We just don’t have the staff to be there as we have been in the past.” As a result, the reduced staff must focus its attention on days of peak usage,

which are Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The overall park will remain open seven days a week with access by car limited to the Upper Park entrance at Wildwood Avenue, and the Fourth Street entrance to Lower Park. Entrances for pedestrians, equestrians and bicyclists will stay open all week. In the wake of the announcement,

an online petition titled “Help Save Caper Acres!” had attracted 2,578 signatures by late Tuesday (July 9). Of course, the signatures carry no legal weight and act only as a show of support for a cause. Verifying the validity of the signatures is not an option. The second name on the list is “Dr. toby schindelbeck, CA.” That is the name of the former Chico business owner and one-time City Council candidate who moved to Idaho earlier this year. Most who include comments on the petition lament the closing of Caper Acres and recall memories of playing in the park. Some point fingers at the City Council, whose only role in the closure was adopting a budget with the financial cuts recommended by the city manager and administrative-services director. Still, the online petition says, “At this point the most overwhelming issue being addressed is that the Chico City Council made a decision that is not taking into consideration the needs & wants of their constituents by whom they were elected. They also made the decision without obviously thinking that Caper Acres is


HEAVILY used during the summer.” Martinez explained the scope of the work city employees must do during peak summer hours to keep the facility open. He said they spend anywhere between three to six hours each day in the Caper Acres area alone. “The first thing they have to do is go in and run out the night campers—any hangers-on still in the park who have jumped the fence, been there overnight and are using the facilities. Then we have to do cleanup around the outside, and then a give safety inspection on all the equipment. Then we go in and clean the restrooms and make repairs.” The reduced staff cannot devote that much time to maintaining Caper Acres, he said. As such, community support and volunteer efforts are going to be important going forward. A Facebook page called “Caper Acres Volunteers” has been created by a woman named Abigail Lopez. She and Martinez have plans to meet once she gets her volunteer group together. On the Sunday before the reduced

hours went into effect, Sandra Barton and her two grandchildren, Colten and Ashton Kessler, visited Caper Acres. It was their second visit to the park that week. Barton said she is a volunteer for Park Watch, which, according to the city of Chico website, is made up of citizens who “work for the benefit of Bidwell Park, the visitors, wildlife and trails. Park Watchers act as ambassadors of the park by providing visitors with information and advising park staff about damage, hazards, vandalism, and any concerns they encounter while in the park.” During her time volunteering, Barton noted how she’s seen some of the nastier park activities. “The young families that use the park are being displaced by transients,” she said. “We give our time and are contributing members of society. The transients and homeless make it unsafe. Closing the park is not going to help. It’s a safety issue, and we see extreme vandalism. There is no one-sentence solution. It’s a larger problem, and we need more staff to handle the volunteers.” Martinez said options will remain open for future park operations. “We’re going to continue to analyze our routines and change them if needed,” he said. “We’ve sketched out a routine, but it’s a draft plan that we can always make work better as we move forward.” Martinez realizes the public is skeptical in these times of reduced services via department budget cuts. “One of the sentiments out there is that this is grandstanding,” he said. “It isn’t. It was just a strategic cut in the overall scheme of all of the park facilities, and all the work that needs to be done to get Caper Acres ready by Friday.” Ω

Drop in the bucket? Feds say water transfers have no significant impact despite warnings from watchdog groups reports recently released by the Tcludehough U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) conthat proposed 2013 water sales will not

affect the hydrological and environmental health of the Sacramento Valley north of the Delta, North State water advocates disagree. The USBR released a final environmental assessment and a “finding of no significant impact” (FONSI), regarding eight sales totaling 37,505 acre-feet worth of water from eight Central Valley Project contractors in the North State to numerous buyers in the San Luis & Delta-Mendota Water Authority south of the Sacramento Delta, on June 22 (go to www.tinyurl.com/cvpsouth to read the documents). A draft report was released by the USBR on May 6, with public comment on the report accepted through May 21. The final documents acknowledge comments received from concerned government agencies (California Department of Fish and Wildlife; the city of Chico’s Mayor, Mary Goloff; and Butte County Water and Resource Conservation), water watchdogs (AquAlliance, Valley Water Protection Association, Sacramento River Preservation Trust), and two private citizens, Tony St. Amant and Jill Brunak. Included are the USBR’s counter-arguments, which in some instances specifically address several complaints by Chico-based AquAlliance. Among those complaints are allegations that the USBR did not properly analyze cumulative environmental effects, encourages “double-dipping” to replace the sold surface water with groundwater, doesn’t account for scientific uncertainties about how water sources are replenished, and relies on inadequate monitoring and mitigation practices. Critics, including AquAlliance, also said the report doesn’t account for North State water sales overseen by state agencies and private sellers outside of the

USBR’s jurisdiction. “This is the game that gets played between federal and state agencies,” said Barbara Vlamis, executive director of AquAlliance, who noted the USBR’s own document acknowledges there will be an unknown amount of further water sales—she estimates more than 160—from other sources. “The state agency doesn’t do cumulative-impact analysis.” If past years are a good indicator—and they likely will be with this year’s climate conditions—the 37,505 acre-feet are just a drop in the bucket of the total through-Delta transfers. Last year, more than 260,000 acrefeet of water were moved, according to the State Water Resources Control Board; transfers in the last decade peaked in 2010, with 303,000 acre-feet sold from north of the Delta to the San Joaquin Valley. While the USBR’s FONSI document addresses some of the commentary in depth, it dismisses other criticisms outright. For example, AquAlliance’s assertion that the action doesn’t comply with requirements established by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) is rebutted with the statement that “Reclamation actions are not subject to CEQA, and Reclamation is not addressing these concerns.” The USBR also declines an offer by California Fish and Wildlife to analyze each of the proposed sales individually. The environmental assessment alone doesn’t guarantee that the sales definitely will take place, however, as each must now be approved individually to make sure it meets state laws and other requirements. The proposed water transfers would tap Glenn and Colusa counties the hardest, with 13,275 acre-feet sold by the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, Eastside Mutual Water Company, and Reclamation District 1004. Other sellers hail from Sutter, Yolo and Shasta counties.

SIFT|ER Proud, but … Leading up to last week’s Independence Day holiday, a Gallup poll asked: “How proud are you to be an American?” Overall, 85 percent of the respondents said they were “extremely/very proud,” which is roughly where the sentiment has hovered since 2005, when the swell of national pride in the wake of 9/11 subsided. Gallup also asked if the signers of the Declaration of Independence would be pleased with how the country has turned out, revealing that despite their love of country, many—especially conservative—Americans aren’t happy with its direction.

Conservatives

Moderates

Liberals

%

%

%

93 12

81 24

85 42

Extremely/very proud to be American Founding Fathers would be pleased with U.S. today

Chico water activist Tony St. Amant called for a moratorium on water transfers until summer 2014, citing lack of information on cumulative water losses and a cohesive management plan. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

In addition to the organizations and

individuals who commented on the USBR’s draft environmental review, there is more local opposition to water transfers. In May, the aforementioned St. Amant, an activist who became interested in water issues while working for Butte County 20 years ago, submitted a proposal urging a moratorium on all water transfers until July 1, 2014, to the Board of the Northern Sacramento Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (NSV IRWMP). The Butte Environmental Council and Chico-based Citizens Water Watch supported his effort. The NSV IRWMP is a collaborative effort between agencies and stakeholders with water interests from six North State counties, formed in 2011 to complete a comprehensive regional water plan. It is overseen by a board consisting of three representatives from each of the six counties involved. Chico City Councilwoman Ann Schwab is the chair of the board; Butte County’s other representatives are Supervisor Bill Connelly and Greg Johnson of the Western Canal Water District. The NSV IRWMP declined St. Amant’s moratorium proposal, as well as his suggestion to expedite guidelines for future water transfers. St. Amant said he thinks the group’s lack of action indicates they’re more concerned with protecting the interests of agencies that sell water. “There are many platitudes throughout their plan that would lead you to believe they want to protect North State water, but I don’t believe that’s the case,” he said. “They’ve taken a vow of chastity from leadership.” As for the USBR report, St. Amant echoed Vlamis’ concerns that it falls short in measuring cumulative effects, and offered an analogy: “If you throw a toad in hot water he’ll jump right out, but if you heat it up slowly enough he’ll just sit in there and cook. That’s what’s happening here.” —KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 July 11, 2013

CN&R 9


$5 OFF

continued from page 9

any purchase of $15 or more Chico Fire Chief James Beery, 52, is stepping down from his position on July 26 to devote more time to raising his teenage daughter.

Good at both arc StoreS

www.thearcstore.org chico 2020 Park Ave.

oroville 2745 Oro Dam Blvd. open 7 dayS a Week!

PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

Worthy Goods

Expires 8/11/13

Fire chief signs off James Beery chooses family over fires Fire Chief James Beery Cface,hico acknowledges that on the surhis July 3 retirement

announcement may appear to be related to the city’s ongoing reorganization process. “I get the timing and how that looks,” Beery said during a recent interview at Chico Fire Station 1 on Salem Street. But Beery, 52, insisted that after a 34-year career in firesafety services—five of those years guiding Chico Fire Department, which was operating on a reduced budget following the national recession beginning in 2008—he isn’t the slightest bit daunted by “the reorganization, or managing the difficulty of this fiscal mess.” In fact, if his personal circumstances were different, he would welcome the challenge. “You sit down, sharpen your pencil, figure out a plan and make it happen,” he said. “I like that. How can we become more efficient, more effective, and still provide the best possible service to the community?” But as a single father with a teenage daughter attending Pleasant Valley High School, the 48hour shifts associated with serving as one of the department’s battalion chiefs have proved too much of a strain on Beery’s home life. “Most people know my wife died a year and a half ago,” Beery said. “I used to have a spouse who could help around the house and with my daughter, and that’s no longer the case. [My daughter] has been through a lot this last year and a half, and I’m not going to make her put up with it any more. “[Retiring] is strictly so I can go spend more time with my daughter,” he continued. “It has nothing

10 CN&R July 11, 2013

to do with the reorganization.” Division Chief Keith Carter— who served as interim fire chief prior to Berry’s tenure—will fill the position on an interim basis for a second time while City Manager Brian Nakamura begins the process of hiring Beery’s permanent replacement. Beery’s last day leading the department will be July 26. Nakamura said in a phone

interview that he was shocked to learn of Beery’s decision to step down, adding that “Chico was very lucky to have Beery.” “To have someone of his caliber not just as chief, but as a working chief where he’s actually on duty, is just tremendous,” Nakamura said. “It really helped [members of the Fire Department] understand where they need to go, how to address critical issues and to maintain a level of professionalism expected of them by the citizens of this community.” Nakamura, with guidance from the City Council and the humanresources division of the Administrative Services Department, will look both within the Fire Department and outside the city for a new chief. Nakamura noted that Beery, a transplant from Portland, Ore., is an example of a successful outside hire. “His legacy is that he’s a great fire chief. He’s led the department through some difficult times, and those lessons we’ve learned from him will help us endure and get through the remaining difficult years,” Nakamura said. Beery suggested the city already has a qualified candidate in Carter, who has been with Chico Fire Department for nearly 27 years.

“He’s been through the ranks and knows the department inside and out,” Beery said. “He’s a go-to person and he certainly has the respect of the men and women in this department.” Whomever his successor, Beery said, he or she will face a challenge he’s grown accustomed to as fire chief—receiving more calls for service with fewer bodies available to respond. In his five years of leading the department, calls for service have increased by 30 percent while staffing has decreased by 14 percent. Further, the department likely will lose another three positions this year as part of the city’s sweeping budget cuts. “We’re doing more and more with less and less,” he said. “We’re not yet broken, but we’re getting to that point.” That point, he said, would involve no longer responding to medical calls in order to focus on fire-related incidents. “I think that’s bad for the citizens; it’s bad for the community if we don’t [respond to medical calls],” he said. “But we have to be available for the fires.” So, with challenges surely ahead for the Fire Department, what would Beery’s best advice be for Chico’s next fire chief? “For me—and it has hurt my career at times—I just don’t care about the politics,” he said. “It’s not a popularity contest. If you know what’s the right thing to do, do it. Don’t get caught up in the politics, just do what’s right for the community. That’s why we raise our right hand and take that oath.” —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com


Farmers rebel Saturday farmers’-market resolutions hit a bump he Chico Certified Farmers Market has Tticipate given notice to the city that it will not parin a recently formed commission to

address issues surrounding the Saturdaymorning downtown farmers’ market. For years, some downtown business owners have cited the market as a detriment to their Saturday business because, they say, its location on the city parking lot at Wall and Second streets between 7:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. denies parking opportunities for potential business customers. At the June 18 City Council meeting, the matter was discussed and it was determined that a group would be formed to find solutions to the conflict. The council, at the suggestion of City Manager Brian Nakamura, also considered passing a motion to not renew the market’s yearly franchise agreement when it expired at the end of the year in an effort to get the matter resolved quickly. After two hours of input from the public, Councilman Scott Gruendl made a motion to form an adhoc group, and the council extended the franchise agreement to Dec. 31, 2014. On July 2, Richard Coon, chairman of the CCFM’s Board of Directors, wrote an email to Nakamura asking him about the group. “Perhaps I’m overly optimistic (especially in this heat!), but I think that the sooner we start forming our ‘Downtown Working Group’ and start working, the better,� Coon wrote. “I am still hopeful that with good communication between all of the concerned parties we can actually reach some mutually satisfactory conclusions.� Nakamura responded the same day with a list of suggested members for the group. “We have put a list together and I was going to contact you early next week, after the 4th of July, to ask if you thought there might be others who should and would participate,� he wrote. “At this point, the list consists of Farmers’ Market representatives, parking advocates, downtown business owners, Chamber and DCBA representatives and others.� The actual list comprises: Coon, chair of the CCFM board; Katie Simmons, president and CEO of the Chico Chamber of Commerce; Melanie Bassett, director of the Downtown Chico Business Association; Mike Trolinder, a local business owner who often weighs in on parking matters at public meetings; Nancy Lindahl, owner of Zucchini & Vine and longtime critic of the market; Tom Hall, owner of the Garden Walk Mall, which houses of a number of businesses whose owners have also voiced opposition to the market’s current location; Greg Massa, owner of Massa Organics; Jamie Johansson, owner of Lodestar Farms; Kurt Albrecht of Chaffin Family Orchards; and LaDona Knigge, an associate professor at Chico State who, with students, conducted an economic and parking survey in 2009 with results indicating downtown businesses are not negatively impacted by the market’s location.

Nakamura wrote in his email that time was of the essence in the matter: “City staff agrees that this effort needs to start now as a deadline of December 2014 sounds like it’s far off, but it really is not and we look forward to very rewarding and positive outcomes.� But Satuday-market supporters, including a group called Friends of the Farmers’ Market, are now questioning the process. The market’s Board of Directors sent a letter on July 9 addressed to Mayor Mary Goloff and Nakamura that basically said the market would not take part in discussions under the proposed conditions. With the franchise agreement set to expire at the end of next year, the letter says, there’s nothing to keep the group members who oppose the market from stalling on any action until the lease runs out.

6(5,(67,&.(7612:216$/(

A SERIES IS ONE TICKET TO SIX DIFFERENT PERFORMANCES

AUGUST



Chico Community Ballet

Tower of Power Funk & Soul Icons

JANUARY

SEPTEMBER

Golden Dragon Acrobats Fabulous Chinese Acrobats

Peter Rowan

Pink Martini

Big Twang Theory

Global Cabaret

Jake Shimabukuro

Ukulele Wizard Chico World Music Festival

Stunt Dog Experience

Beauty and the Beast JR.

Tommy Emmanuel

Crazy Doggy Antics

with special guest Martin Taylor

Blue Room Young Company

OCTOBER

FEBRUARY BĂŠla Fleck & Brooklyn Rider

Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell

Banjo Quintet

Country Legends

TAO: Phoenix Rising

Eve Ensler

Japanese Taiko Drumming

Author, Playwright, TED Speaker

Lonestar

Bonnie Raitt

Country Rock

Ten-Time Grammy Award Winner

True Blues History of the Blues

SFJAZZ Collective

Corey Harris, Guy Davis & Alvin Youngblood Hart

Jazz Masters  

STOMP

The Graduate

Theatrical Percussion!

Live Radio Theatre

Ari Shapiro

Carlos NuĂąez

NPR White House Correspondent

Power Packed Celtic Music

Momix: Botanica Alton Brown

FILE PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

“Quite frankly,� the letter says, “the ‘commission’ that you have proposed seems simply like a ‘U-Haul’ commission formed to provide an air of legitimacy for the Mayor’s previously stated desire to evict the CCFM from its current location. Regretfully, as it now stands, the CCFM can have no part whatsoever in such a mockery, and will not be able to participate in your current ‘commission.’� The letter asks that the city rescind the City Council motion to end the franchise agreement at the end of next year, form a commission based on applicants chosen by the council, and pledge to respect the findings of the group regardless of the outcome. Goloff said she was surprised by the letter. “We are not proposing we outlaw the farmers’ market,� she said, “We’re looking for a willingness on everybody’s part to enter into a discussion on what is best overall.� She said she does not think the council should be involved in picking who is in the group: “It sounds like [the market supporters] are not willing to engage in civil discourse.� —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

The Manhattan Transfer

Multimedia Dance, Puppets & Fantasy

Richard Coon, chairman of the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market Board of Directors.

Cinderella

The Edible Inevitable Tour

Van Cliburn Gold Medal Winner Classical Piano

NOVEMBER Jack Hanna

Into the Wild Live

Jazz/Pop Superstars

MARCH  

Keeping Dance Alive! Eclectic Dance Concert

Chamber Orchestra Kremlin Dynamic String Orchestra

Wynton Marsalis

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra

Whose Live Anyway?

Elvin Bishop, James Cotton, & Paul Thorn

Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt

Diavolo

Comedy Improv

An Acoustic Evening

Andrew Bird

Multi-Instrumentalist & Musical Innovator

Ballet Folklorico Quetzalli de Veracruz The Music & Dance of Mexico

DECEMBER The Onion Live! Live

NCEL T CA The Second City tLED

An Irish Christmas

Rock, Blues & Barroom Boogie Thrilling Gymnastics & Dance

APRIL San Francisco Scottish Fiddlers

High Energy Fiddle Ensemble

Arlo Guthrie Folk Music Icon

MAY Aladdin JR.

Playhouse Youth Theatre

Celebrate the Holidays! Scan for more info:

For tickets & more information visit :::&+,&23(5)250$1&(6&20 or call (530) 898-6333 July 11, 2013

CN&R 11


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES Left: Local author and former behavioral-health employee Heidi McNally, who writes under the pen name of Thatcher C. Nalley.

FEVER PROMPTS INMATE TRANSFER

State officials have agreed to “fully comply” with a federal order to relocate up to 2,600 state prisoners considered at risk of contracting valley fever. Late in June, U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson ordered California to move the prisoners out of the San Joaquin Valley’s Avenal and Pleasant Valley state prisons and into other state prisons, according to California Healthline. Henderson gave California seven days to begin moving inmates and 90 days to complete the transfer, also mandating that no new prisoners considered at risk of contracting valley fever be sent to either prison. The order followed a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigation into the deaths of more than three dozen prisoners who contracted the fungal disease. California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation officials said they will begin “the complicated logistics” of moving the prisoners.

PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

Inset: McNally’s new e-book, Letters from the Looney Bin

In their own voice Chico author sheds light on mental illness with e-novel, Letters from the Looney Bin

CROWD-FUNDING MEDICAL COSTS

Medical patients are increasingly using crowdfunding websites to help cover medical expenses. Several fundraising websites similar to business-fundraising site Kickstarter—such as GoFundMe.com, FundRazr.com and Indiegogo.com, and medical-focused YouCaring.com—have launched in the last several years and are used to crowd-fund medical costs, according to iHealthBeat.org. Just this year, medical-fundraising site GiveForward.com raised more than $20 million for more than 15,000 campaigns, compared to $225,000 for 359 campaigns in all of 2008. Medical groups are using online fundraising methods, too. Rare Genomics Institute has used medical-fundraising sites for two years to help families pay for gene sequencing of patients with rare genetic diseases, an expensive procedure typically not covered by insurers. Concerns have been raised about privacy and fraud issues, among other things.

ELECTRONIC SLEEP INTERFERENCE

Using an electronic device before bed may make it more difficult to fall or stay asleep, new research finds. Scientists from the Mayo Clinic have found that holding a smart phone or tablet on its brightest visual setting close to the face disrupts the body’s production of melatonin, a hormone released by the brain when lighting is low, according to SFGate.com. However, users who switched their device to a medium or low brightness setting and held it at least 14 inches away from their face did not have trouble getting to sleep. A separate study published in the journal Applied Ergonomics found that people who spent two hours in a dark room before a fully lit screen had melatonin levels 23 percent lower than those who viewed the tablet through goggles designed to filter out melatonin-suppressing light. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newreview.com.

12 CN&R July 11, 2013

by

Evan Tuchinsky

DButte County’s Department of Behavioral Health, Heidi McNally met a

uring her six years working at

lot of people with mental illnesses. She saw their torment as they dealt not only with their affliction but also the stigma that a psychiatric or psychological condition can carry. “People who have depression and stuff can’t talk about it,” she said. “It’s like, ‘Oh, yeah, you’re one of those.’ It’s an embarrassment, and it shouldn’t be that way. “They’re not their diagnosis—they’re people. It’s just something they have to live with.” Hoping to demystify mental illness, and perhaps cast aside the stigma, McNally wrote Letters from the Looney Bin. It’s an e-book that came out June 12 for Amazon Kindle, which she released under the pseudonym Thatcher C. Nalley. (Thatcher is her maiden name as well as a nickname people use for her; C is the first initial of her mother’s maiden name.) The book took about seven years to write, predating her start at Behavioral Health. While she did not base the fictional book on experiences there, her work validated her writing.

McNally is the first to say she’s not an expert. She is not a licensed therapist, or a clinician. She worked as an educator for Rape Crisis in Chico for a year, then for the Child Abuse Prevention Council, before joining Behavioral Health in the business office. She soon started handling intakes for the youth center and then for the crisis unit. Nonetheless, to ensure she was on the right path, she ran her writing by clinician colleagues, including licensed therapist Steve Haws. “My first impression was, ‘Wow, she really captured the essence of this,’” said Haws, who worked for Behavioral Health for 21 years before going into private practice in Roseville. “She really has nailed it. I

think she’s done a really amazing job of getting inside the head of a patient, which a layperson may try to do but very seldom is accurate in any way.” McNally strove for authenticity without becoming too technical. “My book isn’t a textbook,” she said. “I have family [members] who have bipolar disorders and depression disorders; I have friends, and I worked with amazing clinicians. I just got the people side of it, and I like having that.” McNally set her novel in the 1970s, in a mental institution. As the title implies, the book contains letters from patients there,

APPOINTMENT LORD’S GRAND OPENING Lord’s Gym (at 2120 Bird St. in Oroville) will celebrate its grand opening on Saturday, July 13, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The nonprofit gym emphasizes youth activity and revitalizing downtown Oroville. Festivities will include an autograph signing with Anderson Davis—a model, actor and Oroville High School graduate—along with games, food, music, educational booths and more. Call 301-5206 or go to www.lordsgymoroville.org for more info.

HEALTHLINES continued on page 15


Innovation You Can Trust.

The most advanced robotic surgery center is now open at Oroville Hospital. Now, you’re just a short drive from personal care you can trust. Minimally invasive surgery using the latest da Vinci® Si System is now available for residents north of Sacramento at the region’s only Robotic Surgery Center… at Oroville Hospital. The most advanced technology available provides an alternative to traditional open surgery and conventional laparoscopy, putting a surgeon’s hands at the controls of a state-of-the-art robotic platform. The newest da Vinci® Si may provide even faster recovery, less pain and scarring, and a shorter hospital stay. The Oroville Hospital Robotic Surgery Center, caring staff, a healing environment and powerful technology. All so you can get back to

living your life. www.OrovilleHospital.com/Robotics July 11, 2013

CN&R 13


You may be just the person we’re looking for to help improve our care... VOLUNTEERING AT FEATHER RIVER Hospital is a rewarding experience and our volunteers are a very important part of the care we provide. Our volunteers not only provide service to patients and families, but with this new opportunity our volunteers will help insure that Feather River Hospital provides the highest level of care possible.

The Feather River Hospital Patient & Family Advisory Council needs you!

Feather River Hospital values our patients as well as their family members and caregivers, and we are always looking for ways that we can improve our care for you.

As part of these efforts, we are creating a Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC), which will be comprised of patients and family members/caregivers as well as Feather River Hospital staff. No medical education background or experience is required of PFAC members. The only requirements are: • You must be 18 years of age or older • You or a family member must have received “in-patient” care (overnight stay) at Feather River Hospital within the past two years The PFAC will be meeting quarterly to provide input and offer advice meant to improve

5 9 7 4 P E N T Z R O A D PA R A D I S E , C A 9 5 9 6 9 / ( 5 3 0 ) 8 7 7 - 9 3 6 1 / W W W. F R H O S P. O R G

14 CN&R July 11, 2013

the overall patient and family experience at Feather River Hospital. PFAC will serve as an advisory council to help us personalize and humanize the healthcare experience. PFAC will help to promote and create new and unique opportunities for communication and collaboration for our staff and our patients, caregivers and family members. If you meet the requirements and are interested in serving on the Feather River Hospital PFAC, please contact Rebecca Williams at 530-876-2134 or e-mail rebecca. williams@ah.org


HEALTHLINES

continued from page 12

letters that tell the story not only of the asylum but also of the people themselves. A common thread connecting the characters is the impact of childhood on adulthood. That is one of the realizations she hopes to convey to readers. “There are a lot of different dynamics behind behaviors that we don’t understand,” McNally said. “Some people are born with mental illness; some develop it after severe abuse. The brain doesn’t develop, [there’s a] lack of nutrition, the body doesn’t develop, and socially you’re not developing—all because at one point there were these parents who did some type of abuse, because of some type of abuse they had. It’s a vicious cycle. “From my experience and passion about child abuse, and wanting people to understand what happens when they become adults, I think this book was just meant to be.” The “domino effect” of child-

hood abuse and adult mental illness is “a lightbulb I wanted to share with the world,” McNally said. She came up with her book’s title a year before joining Behavioral Health, then spent years honing the letters. “It wasn’t easy,” she said. “I had 12 different [characters] who’ve gone through some pretty hellacious stuff, and I had to embrace that. It was exhausting. It was emotionally draining at times, just taking on their stuff, but I couldn’t tell their story without being their story. “I did each one individually—I took each one, one at a time, and completely submersed myself in that character. It was almost like 12 different books at that point.”

More information:

Go to www.thatchercnalley.com to connect with the Letters from the Looney Bin author and get the link to order the e-book.

McNally went on a hiatus in 2009 after getting diagnosed with breast cancer. Two and a half years later, she resumed writing Letters from the Looney Bin and began shopping it around to literary agents. None accepted her work, so she decided to release the book on her own electronically. It’s actually the third book she’s released this way—she’s also written The Lunatic Memoirs and Scorched: A Wicked Collection of Wise Tales. With Letters, McNally hopes to reach readers through their hearts as well as their heads. “There are a lot of groups that do go around and in a factual way present this kind of stuff,” she said. “So I feel that’s already out there; that’s not an avenue I needed to take. I feel like I can be another way to help with that, rather than adding to what’s already there. “I’m hoping that readers will see it at that level. Maybe not; maybe they’ll just read it as fiction and move on. But maybe they’ll read it and the next time they encounter somebody who has depression or any of the other issues I have going on [in the book], they’ll stop and think and be more empathetic to that person instead of turning away from them. “If I can do that with just one person, then I’ve done a lifetime’s worth of accomplishment.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Low Cost Acupuncture

OBAMACARE

QUESTIONS ANSWERED

~ SLIDING SCALE ~ Private & Community Walk-ins Welcome Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Bill Nichols L.Ac.

Health Insurance Specialist with 12 years experience and a law degree.

Most insurance accepted Massage available

It will be mandatory to carry health insurance by January 2014. Insurance & Financial Services

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 (corner of West 2nd Ave) 530.342.2895 • 10am–4pm M–F or by Appt AmericanChi.net

Bruce A. Jenkins, Esq. | CA License #0B86680 530.781.3592 | www.BruceJenkinsInsurance.com

CHICO MOVIE BLOOD DRIVE FRIDAY, JULY 5, 12, 26 + THURSDAY, JULY 18

2 – 6 PM

Donate Blood with Shasta Blood Center and receive an exclusive Giants T-shirt + a free movie pass. Blood mobile located in the Tinseltown Parking Lot. To donate at our other locations please call for times and locations.

FREE MOVIE

Walk-ins welcome | Appts strongly recommended SHASTA BLOOD CENTER of Blood Centers of the Pacific

530.221.0600 | BloodCenters.org

Dr. Scott Mellum is pleased to announce Jennifer Hopkins RN, FNP

is accepting new patients After graduating from CSUC with her RN, Jennifer attended Sonoma State and received her FNP in 1989. In 1996, she returned to Chico to raise her three children and soon began working at Enloe. Jennifer says, “I am excited to help women in the Chico area by providing excellent medical care and an open ear to discuss issues in a confidential and comfortable atmosphere.”

101 West 2nd Ave, Chico | 5 3 0 . 8 9 4 . 8 9 4 4 | Most Insurance Accepted

Need ideas? Kill the lights Turning down the lights can lead to bursts of creativity, according to a German study recently published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology. Small groups of university students were placed in dim, normal and brightly lit rooms and given a series of problems to test their creativity. Those in the dark were significantly more successful, and reported they felt freer from constraints and had less inhibitions, enabling them to think outside the box.

Source: Pacific Standard magazine, www.psmag.com

State of the art, PerSonalized Care providing a safe & confidential environment and leading edge treatments no needle, no SCalPel vaSeCtomy • • • •

miCrodot vaSeCtomy reverSal

Eliminates pain during procedure Improved recovery time Decreases complications & infection No Anxiety, 15-20 minute in-office procedure

• Provides highest success rate • Minimizes complications • No Anxiety, procedure

24 Hanover Lane, Chico 895–0428 • www.drsterzer.com Most insurance accepted July 11, 2013

CN&R 15


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS

MORE MONSTER FIRES LIKELY

There is evidence to suggest wildfires in the West are becoming more ferocious and commonplace, experts say. While scientists have emphasized that no individual fire can be linked to climate change, there are indications that fires are bigger, more unpredictable and more intense, according to The Associated Press. Federal records indicate that, compared to the average 40 years ago, more recent wildfires are burning through twice as much acreage per year. The fire outside the Arizona mountain town of Yarnell that recently killed 19 members of a firefighting team is an example of the type of intense blaze that has become increasingly common, said University of Arizona fire-history expert Don Falk. “Twenty years ago, I would have said this was a highly unusual, fast-moving, dangerous fire,” he said. “Now, unfortunately, it’s not unusual at all.”

Certified arborist Scott Gregory. PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

PROTECTION AT EARTH’S END

Two proposed Antarctic marine protected areas would become the largest marine reserves on the planet if approved. One proposal, submitted by the United States and New Zealand, would cover a 600,000-square-mile patchwork of ocean around the Ross Sea, while the other, submitted by Australia, France and the European Union, would cover another 600,000 square miles in East Antarctica. Combined, the reserves would cover an area roughly the size of India, according to National Geographic News. However, the protections would have expiration dates—the East Antarctic reserve would have to be renewed in 2043, while the Ross Sea reserve would have until 2064. The proposals must be approved by a group of 24 nations and the European Union in a meeting from July 11 to 16 in Bremerhaven, Germany.

NO COLD WATER FOR SALMON?

The rapid diminishing of the “cold water pool” in Shasta Lake could be detrimental to salmon populations in the Sacramento River. Due to California’s dry winter, Shasta Lake could run out of cold water before salmon migrate up the Sacramento River for the fall and winter spawning runs, according to The Sacramento Bee. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which owns Shasta Lake, is mandated under the Endangered Species Act to regulate the release of the reservoir’s cold-water supply. On May 29, the State Water Resources Board loosened water regulations to allow the bureau to shorten the river’s official cold-water area— where a critical 56-degree temperature must be maintained— by about seven miles closer to the lake than usual. The move will reduce the amount of water leaving Shasta Lake, in the hope that the cold-water supply will stretch through the summer and into the fall. Send your eco-related news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R July 11, 2013

Maintaining the urban forest City cutbacks and departure of tree manager raise concern by

Evan Tuchinsky

S may be known as the “City of Trees,” but the future health of the urban forest is cott Gregory is worried. Chico

very much in question. First, last month, the City Council approved a budget that eliminates the fourworker tree crew; going forward, the city will contract with outside services. Then, last week, the city lost its urban-forest manager, Denice Britton. Britton, whose last day at work was July 3, is leaving the area. Her position is funded in the 2013-14 city budget. Public Works Director Ruben Martinez told the CN&R that he’s planning to replace her, “assuming there aren’t any ideas that are much better for the community at large.” Gregory, a local field biologist who worked with Britton on a street-tree inventory as his master’s degree thesis, fears what these developments will mean for the tens of thousands of trees within the city. “It’s looking very likely that the city is at a turning point that could be reflected in the future years with a big change in our urban forest, particularly with our city’s street trees and the trees in Bidwell Park,” Gregory said. “If there’s no tree crew to do preventative maintenance and watering and formative pruning of young trees—all of

those are crucial in an urban forest—we’re going to see big effects.” Britton, too, has “some real concerns” about how trees will fare. “People seem to think that trees will just take care of themselves, and they do— they continue to grow,” she said. “But if they’re not cared for on a regular basis, they also break branches and decline and have issues. So we can’t just leave them unmanaged.” The city budget allots $100,000 for tree work. Britton estimates the amount needed at $300,000 minimum. “I know that times are tough,” she continued, “but I hope that as things improve in the future, they will realize the value of the resource.” Gregory has determined a value. According to his research, Chico’s population of street trees—nearly 35,000—translates into an economic benefit of $3.1 million a year. That number comes from a USDA Forest Service computer program called i-Tree Streets. It takes into account a range of attributes: energy savings from shade and Urban-forest info:

For 29 years, Chico has been recognized as a Tree City USA community; go to www.tinyurl.com/treeecity for more information. Go to www.tinyurl.com/sttreees for info on taking care of street trees.

wind protection; air-quality improvements from trees’ carbon-dioxide sequestration and oxygen production; stormwater buffering; commercial impacts, aesthetics and increased property values. “All these factors culminate in the sense of place we see in Chico,” Gregory said. “Those who like Chico have their own reasons for liking Chico, but it is a city of trees and people recognize the nice canopy and tree population in the city. It’s the urban forest that has such a profound impact on the quality of life in Chico.” What effects can Chico expect?

Gregory, a certified arborist, sees many. First, he expects more tree limbs dropping on streets and cars. He says pruning young trees can help prevent “structural failures down the road,” but fears that this bit of prevention may go by the wayside. “I’m afraid we’ll see more dead streettrees,” he continued, “and they’ll eventually be removed, but I’m hoping that won’t result in stumps remaining in place.” Gregory also wonders about tree replacement. That, too, requires funding, as well as the expertise to select “the right trees in the right place.” Different species have different soil, water and space requirements. Have you ever seen a tree with branches that extend into power lines? How about a tree whose roots uplift sidewalk cement? Those are just two examples of how a tree


ADVENTURE IN LAVENDER The eighth annual Lavender Festival at Tuscan Heights Lavender Gardens (at 12757 Fern Road in Whitmore, a small town east of Redding) will be held on Saturday, July 13, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Festivities will include lavender crafts, a tea party, wine tastings, live music, food vendors and more. Festival entry is $2.50; call 472-3066 for more info.

that’s going to be our biggest focus.” Martinez says the city is moving forward with its Urban Forest Management Plan. The city’s website has a street-trees page (go to www.tinyurl.com/treeecomment to look at it) with a link to the draft of the plan, as well as the way to give comments on it to the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission. Meanwhile, Britton points out that the city has a free permit for homeowners who wish to contract with a tree service on their own to make sure street trees by their properties remain properly maintained. But whether or not Chicoans take money out of their own pockets to care for trees, Gregory hopes they’ll keep the urban forest in mind. “Really consider what it is you enjoy about the city and use your imagination as to what The Esplanade and the Avenues would look like without those trees, what downtown would look like without trees lining the streets,” Gregory said. “Chico would be a very different place. “I don’t want to seem like doom-and-gloom—it’s not like all the city’s trees are going to suddenly disappear. But we’re not just thinking of the short-term, but the legacy we leave for 20 years from now, 50 years from now.” City Hall hasn’t forgotten the trees, Martinez said, calling them “a huge benefit to the community, and certainly a big attraction.” He added: “Obviously we’re going to have to do less with less at this point. But we’re going to make sure that we do exactly what needs to be done to hold us over until we get to better times.” Ω

UNCOMMON SENSE Don’t just dump it Each week, the Butte Regional Household Hazardous Waste Facility (1101 Marauder St.) offers county residents two opportunities to dispose of household hazardous waste for free—on Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. All you need is a utility bill to verify county residence. The facility accepts: • antifreeze, motor oil, gasoline and oil filters • pesticides, herbicides and chemical fertilizers • aerosols, bleaches, solvents and pool chemicals • televisions and electronic waste The facility does not accept ammunition, explosives, radioactive waste, garbage or appliances. Go to www.tinyurl.com/94ov2t6 for a complete list of accepted materials, or call (866) 429-2288.

reen HOUSE by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@ newsreview.com

15-$35

$

Sliding Scale Olivia Peters-lazarO, l.a.C.

GOT OUTTA TOWN This past weekend, while my wildland-firefighter hubby

was working on the Dean Peak Fire in northwest Arizona, my 12-year-old daughter Lydia and I rented a car and escaped the Chico heat. We headed down to the much-cooler East Bay community of Pinole to spend time with my brother Greg and his wife, Kim. After going to the small-but-definitely-sufficient Pinole Farmers’ Market on Saturday morning (where I ran into an ex-Chicoan I knew), we took a scenic drive out to Half Moon Bay, on the Pacific coast, via the wooded communities of Woodside and La Honda. We stopped in Woodside at the Skywood Trading Post & Delicatessen on Skyline Boulevard, where I bought a bottle of kombucha and a yummy gluten-free brownie (ah— healthful road food, for a change!) and hung out for a while with my family in the cool breeze at a shaded picnic table outside, next to a dusty, rustic saw-sharpening shop in a former gas station, Elephant garlic’s towering lavender flowers are chatting and watching/hearinteresting to look at, even in black-and-white. ing the usual (for that particular spot) assortment of Harley riders and drivers of very expensive automobiles loudly rev their engines as they drove by or pulled out of the parking lot. In Half Moon Bay, we made the all-too-logical discovery that every beach in town was crowded (it was the weekend after the Fourth ofDESIGNER July), JEN_PU with parking lots full to capacity, so we were forced to drive a little farther north to the refreshingly quirky waterside area at which we ended up spending some time—a funky little part-industrial/part-residential neighborhood off Capistrano Road (which is actually part of the unincorporated community of Princeton-by-the-Sea, I found out later, though we thought we were still in Half Moon Bay). It was there that we ran into a tall, friendly, weathered guy named David, who showed us around the huge vegetable-and-fruit garden he had created on a formerly ice-plant-infested lot tucked in between what looked like two abandoned warehouses and a possibly abandoned nouveau-industrial-style condominium. David’s lovely, rather untamed garden—loaded with tall, flowering elephant-garlic plants; gooseberry and blackberry bushes; kales of all types, not planted in rows; Asian pepper plants, lemon mint and a plum tree, among other things— Princeton-by-the-Sea was spectacular. After a lengthy PHOTO BY JACK SUTTON VIA FLICKR conversation, he declared that I was a “food-head,” gave me tips on propagating chili-pepper plants from cuttings, and told me I could come back any time I wanted to “poach” some lemon mint to make tea. He also said I could pick as much of his purple-and-green Russian kale as I wanted that day, that particular variety not being as high on his list as some of his other kales (some of that Russian kale went into Lydia’s noodle soup the next morning). And if we hadn’t ended up in this particular area, we wouldn’t have found Caffé Mezzaluna (240 Capistrano Road), where I had some very delicious house-made gelato (a scoop each of lemon, chocolate and pistachio) and a cappuccino.

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime. –Mark Twain EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

1057 Village Lane, Chico

530.345.5300

Info@ChicoCommunityAcupuncture.com

open tuesdAy through sAturdAy

NO.

IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org REP

CNR ISSUE

FILE NAME

jewelry 10.23.08 • radios • blankets antiques JLD RAPE •CRISIS INTERV.

1/2 Off

SALE

Monday July 15th

Thursday July 18th

Furniture • Clothing Electronic Items and more!

Thrifty

Bargain

2432 Esplanade • Chico Store’s Hours: Mon. through Sat. 9 am to 8 pm Sunday 10 am to 6 pm

knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls• knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls

can impact its surroundings, he said, and those considerations are significant. “Trees have their place as living infrastructure,” Gregory said. “The variables that go into selecting the right species of tree for the right location are numerous.” Such a big-picture view is one reason Martinez wants the city to fill Britton’s job. He plans to have the new urban-forest manager work with General Services Field Supervisor David Bettencourt, an arborist, who in turn will work with city maintenance worker Greg Nicholas on “day-to-day calls” and overseeing the work of tree-service contractors. “We’re keeping key staff to make sure that the review of the urban forest is done—that we have good people keeping an eye on it so that we’re making the wisest choices for strategic pruning,” Martinez said. “I’m confident they’ll be ahead of the curve as far as any public-safety issues are concerned;

G

THE

knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls• knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls

ECO EVENT

jewelry • radios • blankets • antiques July 11, 2013

CN&R 17

& PREV.


o t g n i d r o c c a d l r o w The

David Sisk’s art is quirky and humorous but also has a lot to say BY ROBERT SPEER

See more of Sisk:

David Sisk has an exhibit of recent prints and other artwork up through July at the Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery in downtown Chico. And look for his latest billboard, on the Skyway just before the Honey Run Road turnoff. 18 CN&R July 11, 2013

I

f you’ve walked past the long-empty lot at First and Main streets in Chico, you may have noticed a metal pole, about 8 inches wide and 12 feet high, at the corner where the chain-link fences that separate the lot from the sidewalk meet. Specifically, you may have noticed that perched on the top of this pole is a cartoonish figure reminiscent of a Smurf or a character out of an R. Crumb comic. You have to look closely because at this time of year it’s obscured by the foliage of nearby trees. But if you do so, you’ll find a funny little man cut from plywood and sitting cross-legged among the tree branches as if meditating, like some comical bodhisattva or Burmese forest monk. People familiar with the art of David Sisk will recognize it as one of his whimsical “Sisko” figures, those odd little round and nearly featureless characters that seem to pop up everywhere in his eclectic work—on billboards, T-shirts and bolo ties, on cutout wall pieces and posters, and on furniture, paintings, postcards, pins and photographic assemblages. They are Sisk’s signature image, the imaginary alter ego of Sisko the artist, and they are emblematic of what makes his otherwise politically charged and spiritually challenging art so accessible and enjoyable. His friend and fellow artist Bruce Ertle calls it “sort of an activist guerrilla type of art, but one he makes lots of fun, which enables him to slip in his message. It’s so harmless and appealing you don’t realize you’re being told something—to stop and think and reconsider. … “I’m not an art scholar, and there’s a lot I don’t know,” Ertle continued, “but with him I think we have an original.” When I asked another local artist, Cynthia Schildhauer, about Sisk, her first words were: “He’s a genius.” In 2008 Schildhauer, who is also an art therapist, partnered with Sisk and the late Janice Porter on a summer project called Shatter2Matter sponsored by the now-defunct Community Collaborative for Youth. Working with about a dozen at-risk teenagers, they disassembled, or

“shattered,” old pieces of furniture and then reassembled them, with the help of Sisk’s power tools, into expressive artistic takes on the table as a metaphor for life. Sisk, who for 25 years painted billboards for the Jay B. Stott Co., also enabled the teens to put up their own billboard, one showing a photo of the group with the statement, “Alone we can’t, together we can.” As Schildhauer put it, “The kids actually had a voice.” Schildhauer is convinced Sisk could find an audience outside of Chico, and she has told him that he should take his art elsewhere, especially his billboard art. “David is one of the quirkiest and most talented people I know. He’s really smart and authentic. … As an artist and fan of his, I would really like him to find an audience. Here in Chico, he’s preaching to the choir.” On the other hand, she acknowledged, “he might not care.”

She’s right about that.

Sometimes Sisk muses about breaking out of Chico and distributing his work elsewhere and making more money, but his heart’s not in it. Like many artists, he prefers making art to selling it. “Money is not a great motivating factor in my life,” he said during a recent interview at his cozy, art-filled, well-lived-in home in the Hell-


Far left: This plywood cutout figure is one of several that dot Sisko’s property in Butte Creek Canyon. It’s based on one of the drawings he found in his father’s sketchbook. Near left: This Sisko character, an example of his “chimp art,” sits atop a pole at the corner of First and Main streets downtown. PHOTOS BY ROBERT SPEER

town area o Creek Ca f Butte nyon. Although h elementary e has an -s teaching c chool redential, he’s neve ru except to sed it, substi teach, and had a regu lar paych in fact ha tuteto trust th e s never c k in his life at I’ll Or, as Sch make my way,” h . “I’ve learned thinks he’s ildhauer said, “S e said. om that he do got something imp ething in him ortant eno esn’t have ugh to say to have a Sisk ma jo other prod rkets his art locally b or a career.” u b posters, th cts, such as T-shir y transferring it to ts, at he then one-of-a-k sells, as w postcards and in e lished pie d paintings, sculp ll as by selling ces of furn tures or a rt-embelholds occ iture such as a on June 1 ional “fun-raisers,” s mirrors. He also 6. as he did this year Even thou g h it w people turn as Father’ s and paid $ ed out at the Chico Day, about 150 Women’s 10 to $15 played by C e Sisk’s frie ach—to listen to m lub— usic food prep nds in the are J Sierra, an d by Sisk’s wife, ohn Seid Trio, eat d family fr Beth, their iends, and entation o daughter, f som watc The show e 200 of the artist’ h a slide press pieces was a re audience was aware velation. Everyon . e in the work, the of the inc lu m humor an any media he used siveness of Sisk’s d , Earth. Bu serious concerns a his quirky sense of bout life o t few were n planet body of w aware of ju o sionate its rk is, how far it’s ra st how large his nged, and messages are. how pas-

David Sis

talent from k got much o f draw cart his father, Marcus his artistic oon figure Sisk, who s. Indeed, into his ow loved to Sis he got fro n work some of the k has incorporate d m s from the 1 his father’s sketch tyles and images books, wh 930s and ’40s. ich date His fath his entire er died young, at ju ad s that he “d ult life for PG&E. t 53, after working idn’t wan T his convin ta from me. ... I didn’t career that sucked ced Sisk want to w the life And he ait family ha has no desire to lea to make art.” s lived sin ve the are a ce grew up a nd went to the 1870s and wh where his e State), an re he s c h o o l (Ch d for their 9 where he and his s ico High, Chico is 5 te ter, Olive -year-old mother. H r, Claudia, care Ayres Sis is son Jeb k ’s of Sisks in , re Chico, an presents the fifth daughgeneration d on her m other’s sid e is also

SISKO continued on page 22 July 11, 2013

CN&R 19


Style Your Summer with Savings

50% off Your Next Purchase

SELECTED STYLES ON SALE SALE STARTS FRIDAY

Anika Burke

...and more

211 main street (next to plutos)

Downtown Chico•345-4880

Est.1938

A True Chico Tradition

2013! BARGAINS E TH , M 9A AT G IN N N GI BE , ON SATURDAY, JULY 13TH TOWN CHICO! N W DO IN ’ IN CK PI E TH R WILL BE RIPE FO IDAY, JULY 12TH TOO!!!

ERVING NOW S MELON WATER AM! E ICE CR

Chico’s Only Homemade Ice Cream & Candy Store

178 East 7th St. Chico • 342-7163 www.shuberts.com 9:30am-10pm Mon - Fri 11am-10pm Sat - Sun

random awesomeness

Modern Home Accessories | Vintage Inspired Designs

natural contemporary clothing & accessories

EARLY BIRDS SHOP FR

KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE COMMUNITY

as a summertime tradition, Slice of Chico draws thousands into downtown for some refreshment and good, old-fashioned customer service!

Downtown Chico’s merchants invite the community downtown for a day filled with great shopping, hot prices, and FREE slices of ice-cold watermelon, courtesy of Pro Pacific Fresh. Sidewalks and storefronts are bursting with bargains and merchandise ranging from clothing, shoes, and jewelry to home furnishings, art supplies, and hardware. Enjoy more than 200 unique shops and restaurants!

celebrating 28 years in downtown chico

To give you an idea, Made in Chico will be showcasing Woof & Poof and local artist items, and Fleet Feet will be having a half-off shoe sale. Diamond W Western Wear will be offering up to 80% sale racks, sale coupons for anything not on sale, and a storewide sale that day only. Bird and Hand is a must-stop during the Slice of Chico, where they will be providing countless bargains in the shade.

231 Main St 343-5686 home, gifts & random awesomeness

337 broadway open everyday

Pick up a slice of ice-cold watermelon from the event headquarters on 3rd Street between Main & Broadway. Or, enjoy an ice-cold fresh watermelon margarita at Tres Hombres, proud sponsor of Slice of Chico.

MEDIA PARTNERS: FOX20, KRCR NEWS CHANNEL 7, 92.7 BOB FM, POWER 102 COMMUNITY SPONSORS: PRO PACIFIC FRESH AND TRES HOMBRES 20 CN&R July 11, 2013

July 11, 2013

CN&R 21


Style Your Summer with Savings

50% off Your Next Purchase

SELECTED STYLES ON SALE SALE STARTS FRIDAY

Anika Burke

...and more

211 main street (next to plutos)

Downtown Chico•345-4880

Est.1938

A True Chico Tradition

2013! BARGAINS E TH , M 9A AT G IN N N GI BE , ON SATURDAY, JULY 13TH TOWN CHICO! N W DO IN ’ IN CK PI E TH R WILL BE RIPE FO IDAY, JULY 12TH TOO!!!

ERVING NOW S MELON WATER AM! E ICE CR

Chico’s Only Homemade Ice Cream & Candy Store

178 East 7th St. Chico • 342-7163 www.shuberts.com 9:30am-10pm Mon - Fri 11am-10pm Sat - Sun

random awesomeness

Modern Home Accessories | Vintage Inspired Designs

natural contemporary clothing & accessories

EARLY BIRDS SHOP FR

KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE COMMUNITY

as a summertime tradition, Slice of Chico draws thousands into downtown for some refreshment and good, old-fashioned customer service!

Downtown Chico’s merchants invite the community downtown for a day filled with great shopping, hot prices, and FREE slices of ice-cold watermelon, courtesy of Pro Pacific Fresh. Sidewalks and storefronts are bursting with bargains and merchandise ranging from clothing, shoes, and jewelry to home furnishings, art supplies, and hardware. Enjoy more than 200 unique shops and restaurants!

celebrating 28 years in downtown chico

To give you an idea, Made in Chico will be showcasing Woof & Poof and local artist items, and Fleet Feet will be having a half-off shoe sale. Diamond W Western Wear will be offering up to 80% sale racks, sale coupons for anything not on sale, and a storewide sale that day only. Bird and Hand is a must-stop during the Slice of Chico, where they will be providing countless bargains in the shade.

231 Main St 343-5686 home, gifts & random awesomeness

337 broadway open everyday

Pick up a slice of ice-cold watermelon from the event headquarters on 3rd Street between Main & Broadway. Or, enjoy an ice-cold fresh watermelon margarita at Tres Hombres, proud sponsor of Slice of Chico.

MEDIA PARTNERS: FOX20, KRCR NEWS CHANNEL 7, 92.7 BOB FM, POWER 102 COMMUNITY SPONSORS: PRO PACIFIC FRESH AND TRES HOMBRES 20 CN&R July 11, 2013

July 11, 2013

CN&R 21


SISKO continued from page 19

the Ayres, Art n h o J tate late of the f the Chico S l is t n e d n l a desce e chairman o om Ayres Ha h m i t w . g r p n e e t o e f l ts go d ment a ery Depart The Sisk roo , he would v ard o . d named he other han e of his billb ly t m o n O it’s n e so e to se ities, even if city sites k i l h c igrc mu tos of b rnet, ch othe art rea . Using pho rom the Inte xy f l l j d a , virtu downloade rd images u e a that he in his billbo e hyperactiv t th u o c h t t i s , ’ s w e o t h g them at he pho taposin pictured in t t suggest wh a e a f h i t l n i s t y e t k ci rin look li large p create oards would b his bill . in New y t i c h taken udes a g i p b a r g o A phot xample, incl Red ea or e York, f illboard abov ith a b w Sisko restaurant, assing on r Lobste Yellow cab p rd reiterd e boa r r u bl he bill vorite truT . t e e r s fa the st f Sisk’ a man holdo e n o ing ates large) y show isms b cket of (very , u ilds ing a b and claiming ir own buck ften bu are “Notho e s d h t n m t a r s as go wo maxim other, body’s emade ossible” is an “Every rms.” m o h p ch o a coun Naas, ple not et of w is fond of su Anything is lease.” n e K “ Sisk them. Judge and re by his friend sible for peo let go “ d around o os his art t sacred” and was suggeste ter. It’s imp ant thing is t e n t ’ k , r e i n s l o s C y i p a ing Career ounded The im st, he s The la Chico State ce told him. o Sisk that s axim “Judge the le. T em s on selor in others, Naa oon as possib e adopted th h e s g d s d n a u a ature. ,” ent to j ual in n ter, judgm h and release isms. t t p a e h c t n f o n o ru c c ted pai ’s “cat o of his t argely fishing ase” as one isk’s art is l r is he a devo hnical skill t S e c o l , e e n s t e r t , r t s a n d n e an sugg fficie ftsma lately, As this imarily a dra paint with su , especially far— r s d p k n a d an or ot He’s n he can draw ost of his w ed from near m his own m r o though s needs. But es he’s gathe sculptures fr puter. There This sculpture of an eet hi es of imag wings and nto his com s purposes, m oddball cactus can do hi lag dra di assemb g paintings, and then fe them to suit in the form double duty as a hat n s t — i includ earlier work he rearrange rporating tex rack. nco PHOTO BY ROBERT SPEER often i us maxims. iguing piece o tr i of var especially in e a photoe o n t O rs b moon t appea g one of the t a h w s use urin n astronau taken d a graph that shows zon and, ri gs o n h i d rth s ’ n n a l moo k sky, the Ea e h t g facin in the dar prinkled g -s loomin through star s cut in an a g h n i wn t k s a i o fl is, S , plunked do h t o T . d e a r c a g a o n p i b s ll e, show of a bi image oon’s surfac h like the m c e on the ho looks mu is cap, whil h w g e n y r i l u v p g a fi im w imself ds, “I s artist h n caption rea e mayfly their th o that in mate. a ballo ss the bus to s t c e s n i i to can’t m ion.” winged enough only the prese r a , e t s g s conven lies, of cour an a day, lon s absurd, as i piece ni o i Mayf live less th t ce the nd, n e onv st glan ed out of ha k c e r i g f y a l t t f s y A t a s . s in n i m h o t m a adul o s i tion of top and n the m ’t be d The no a billboard o e, but it can the viewer s here, but he d ns f at ence o make no se rtle said, th hing profoun en a laugh, in E o t t v e s e s seem demands, a saying som un, maybe f It is either. nsider. Sisk t—and have u o o c e t i r e and gur us to fi wants ess. c the pro 22 CN&R July 11, 2013

Clockwise from upper left: One of Sisko’s “catch and release” series; a politically edgy piece based on a historic photo taken by Edward Curtis; a virtual Sisko billboard in New York City. PHOTO OF “JUDGE AND RELEASE” PAINTING BY MELANIE MACTAVISH OTHER IMAGES COURTESY OF DAVID SISK


Sisk was influenced by the Surrealists and has long wished he could have been among them, so he inserted an image of himself as a younger man (far left) into this historic photo. IMAGE COURTESY OF DAVID SISK

If you re

irectly to e his art d “funk ta to rt o ff so was his a similar e oards are ve-by Gallery, and es. At various lb il b ’s k is ri S eD ly on not the on ,” a term . So was th the people month. But they’re he calls “chimp art uerrilla art t t a s f h o la rm g in w raiser” o engaged r, less aggressive, fo ed activist group ls a ’s e h s ghte -bas time r gorilla New York uggest a li meant to s cticed by, say, the ale artists who wea ra m than that p irls, anonymous fe world. p art.” in the art G m la is il this “chim did it, x f e rr s o g le n Gue p ti s m a an ex ile prote He just masks wh man on the pole is t him on the pole. re has been le u p tt g li fi to The The u sion sk permis body has objected. a ’t n id d jSisk . No itious pro ool’s Day more amb de dozens a on April F ree years. d e h c n lau ma there for th er of years ago Sisk r’s sketchbook, he h and, with e b ig th m h fa u t n e is A om h nd ight fe images fr night arou t four to e ect. Using figures from abou em in the dead of screens th d n of plywoo friends, distributed to the wrought-iro ing hunf rn m o o e m th lp t e g x ckin the h he ne n Chico, lo sidewalk trees. T ith a piece of Sisk gw to n w o d fi w tect young about the ncounters used to pro icoans had close e ’t especially happy h n dreds of C ity officials were oved them.) scribed . (C m rt a re y ly il k e once de phrase m ic H u . fa q rt e d v n o a tr t,” a n in ever, ures, how re, Sisk says, he’s a phobic exhibitionis out as e io tu m c a a o n c s “ y it B as a e, rint a reporter ly accurately. (In p y.) He says his wif e to lf e s im a n ir h o m fa e is d th im , ’s h y mil bes Sisk that descri exhibitionist,” to e extrovert in the fa me out of ic th “sociopath ssage therapist, is h people. “She gets arly 40 a it m w a g er ne is in g o a h g w ys en een togeth way, but now b jo e n e ’v y y e ll a h e T . who re ts along th ,” he said the house hit some rough spo e rt is so years, hav r “like old shoes.” e reasons Sisk’s a d e th th f o o one guy,” an fit each e thought not an egocentric id is a very h id a s le Ert “he’s “Dav Sisk is saying something work, but is because nest, accessible dlike quality to his . … He’s a very ho il g h there’s a c d guy in his thinkin profound here, but he ” is a te sophistica ing every moment. e put it, “the world ut he v h b li s , a y th u t, u g a tr th at open wants us to figure it out— tely aware ntion to th ering? Sisk is acu e wants to call atte hy add to the suff nd rse. W ego a ce.” H gnarly pla t to make things wo g of both his alter Ω and have fun, maybe even in n a k .” a e w e it p a resp doesn’t said, s ’s e e h H ,” . o d k e art Sis he asks. “ artist, “is light-he a laugh, in the process. e th , lf e s him

probably cognize David be S or so art b cause you’ve seen isk’s work, it’s illboards one or mo h re of the 4 e’s painte He starte d 0 mid-1970 d working for the over the years. s, painting Jay B. Sto tt Co. in th never com commerc ia e fo one thing rtable for him. He l billboards, but it , and even was ’s afraid o tually, in 2 f heights, breathing for 000, pain Some yea t fumes and had to he became sick fro rs q m u la it . te r, from Stott the man w , got the no Jim Moravec, saw ho bought the com pa ti so good venu on that his unused me of Sisk’s artwo ny billboards e for it. Sis rk and wo ing soon a k’s artistic fter. billboards uld make a began app At the ti earby Gallery me, Sisk was opera ti o n n g S th e e v e n n o While exh th Street b w-closed D ib e and other iting artwork in th tween Broadway a rivend Main. artists—in e gallery’s ter—were cluding, a large win t d u hot in the sing the rest of the times, his son and ows, he d summer a g augha ll e ry as s n dripped fr om the ce d freezing in the w tudio space. It was in iling whe I ever had n it rained ter, he said, and w .” , but “it w a Sisk had lo as the bes ter ng taken u t s tudio his work. nconve H a major in e cites the late New ntional approaches fl to simple fig uence, not only on York street artist K distributing eith Harin ures rende his style— g as take big s red with a especially ub ss his means jects and make the ertive lines, and h the use of is m easy to of re understan ability “to Operating aching viewers. d”—but a o u tside lso Haring w ent directl the established ga llery and y to the p of the adv mu eop e unused an rtising panels in the le. Early on, he no seum system, ticed that d were co c it y ’s subw m v chalk, he began to c ered by black matt ay stations were g any e paper. U oing reate draw subway sy sin in s ’85, some tem, producing hu gs on these panels g white ndreds of times as m them betw throughout the any as 40 Accordin een 1980 in g a to d a y H . ari and became fa miliar to N ng’s website, “This to engage seamless ew York c fl th o This piece is typical of way beca e artist when they mmuters, who oft ow of images me, as Ha en would e n Sisk’s idiosyncratic but c o u n te re rin sto ideas and engaging way of juxtaexperime g said, a ‘laborato d him at work. The p nting with ry’ for wo s posing images for effect. rking out ubhis simple his lines.” IMAGE COURTESY OF DAVID SISK

July 11, 2013

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture The Armed for Apocalypse wrecking crew: (from left) Corey Vaspra, Kirk Williams, Cayle Hunter and Nick Harris. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

You will be punished Local metal heavyweights Armed for Apocalypse reload for further destruction

O in north Chico, I was granted a frontand-center preview of local metal-act

n a recent sweltering evening

Armed for Apocalypse’s forthcoming album, The Road Will End, from a vantage by point on a grimy couch Howard Hardee in their warehouse prachowardh@ tice space. There has newsreview.com likely never been a more complementary environment in which to experiCD-RELEASES: Two shows: Tonight, ence the band’s punishJuly 11, 8 p.m., at ing brand of heavy metal. The Road Will End— Café Coda (with Death Valley High, to be released officially Horseneck and on July 23 via Ironclad Sorin); and Friday, July 19, 8:30 p.m., Recordings in the U.S., at LaSalles (with and Candlelight Records The Shimmies and in the U.K., and locally Cities). at CD-release shows on www.a4aband.com July 11 (Café Coda) and Tickets: $8 July 19 (LaSalles)—is (each show) Armed for Apocalypse’s Café Coda follow-up to their debut 265 Humboldt Ave. full-length album, 2009’s 566-9476 Defeat, an effort that www.cafecoda.com reinforced a strong local LaSalles fan-base and led to a suc229 Broadway cessful tour of Europe 893-1891 following its release. www.lasalles Already dripping bar.com sweat before playing a note, the group—made up of guitarist/vocalist Kirk Williams, guitarist/vocalist Cayle Hunter, bassist/vocalist Corey Vaspra and drummer Nick Harris—let their amps get hot, cooked up some sizzling guitar feedback, and with a click-click-click of Harris’s drum sticks, launched into the first four 24 CN&R July 11, 2013

songs of their new record. As is their reputation, the guys played all-out. The exertion of screaming like a banshee was etched in Williams’ face, and in the background, Harris’ dreadlocks flailed wildly with each monstrous drum fill. Catching the band in the confines of Café Coda or LaSalles might be brutal, but facing them while clinging to a warehouse couch positioned directly in front of their farcically massive Van Halen-sized wall of guitar amps on one of the hottest days of the summer feels—appropriately enough—apocalyptic. Even with toilet paper stuffed in my ears (to keep the blood inside), each ludicrously heavy, drop-G guitar riff had the clout of a wrecking ball to the brain. Unlike many modern metal bands, Armed for Apocalypse’s new songs place little emphasis on over-the-top, shred-style guitar solos or progressive rock elements; rather, much of the music consisted of colossal end-of-the-world sludge-metal riffage. Of note was a particularly sludgy number, “The Well.” About three minutes in, a clean, melodic chord progression leads to an extensive vamping section, which builds into an ultra-powerful reiteration of the same melody made about 10 times heavier the second time around. The band members insist The Road Will End represents a significant step forward as they’ve better defined their sound—and the songs are simply “way better,” Harris said. “These songs are so much better [than those of Defeat] because we’ve gotten better at life and knowing how to interact together,” Harris said. “We’re in a van together a lot of the time, sleeping in ran-

dom, uncomfortable places. You just get better at being together, and that also comes across in there,” he said, gesturing to their warehouse practice space. “We know what we’re going for more, what our roles are, and what sort of band we are,” Williams agreed. Having taken a considerable amount of time off from shows and touring for the recording process, Vaspra said there were periods of inactivity the group found discouraging. “How many times have we been in one of those periods where there’s just not much going on?” Vaspra asked his bandmates. “It’s just like, ‘What’re we doing? Where are we going?’ But once we’re putting out an album, the ball starts rolling down the hill, getting bigger and bigger.” “There were months when nobody would contact us for anything—maybe [just] to play the occasional show,” Hunter said, adding that with the July 23 release date fast approaching, “all of a sudden, it’s like, there’s always a new album review, a new press release, a new interview.” Ultimately, the group hopes to quit their day jobs in favor of becoming fulltime metal dudes, though they acknowledge a few breaks are needed in order for that to happen. “That’s the goal for any band,” Hunter said. “You have to take it in stages. Our first goal is to get the record out, get it heard, then to get the best shows and tours we possibly can. You have to re-evaluate where you are at every step. We’d love to be a working band, but it’s extremely hard. “We’re closer now than we ever have been before.” Ω

THIS WEEK 11

THURS

Special Events BEER RELEASE PARTY: Feather Falls Casino presents its latest release, Emperor’s Mandarin Wheat Beer, a collaboration with Morse Mandarin Farms. Th, 7/11, 6pm. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Company, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. This week: Jeff Pershing Band, Origin Tribal Bellydance, and Sean Thompson. Th, 6-9pm through 9/26. Downtown Chico; www.downtownchico.net.

PARADISE PARTY IN THE PARK: Paradise’s weekly marketplace and concert series continues with music from Paisani & Post-Apologetik. Th, 7/11, 5:30pm. Free. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-6291, www.paradisechamber.com.

OUTSIDE EDGE RECEPTION Friday, July 12 Avenue 9 Gallery

SEE FRIDAY, ART RECEPTIONS


FINE ARTS Art

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Figure Drawing

Group Show, featuring work from the Sally Dimas figure drawing group. Through 7/27. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 345-3063.

1078 GALLERY: 2(D) for the Entire Gallery

CRUZ’N CLASSICS CAR AND MOTORCYCLE SHOW Saturday, July 13 Durham Community Park

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Show, group show featuring eight artists randomly drawn for the exhibit. Through 7/27. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Outside Edge, Burning Man photographs by Michele Miller and “alternate lifestyle” photographs from Camille de Ganon. Through 8/3. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

Call for Artists BIRDS OF A FEATHER EXHIBITION: An openentry exhibit inviting artists to explore human nature in any medium. Submit work from July 10 to 13. Call or go online for more info. Through 7/13. $5-$10. Manas Art Space & Gallery, 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183, www.manasartspace.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Shutterbugs, The Chico Art Center presents its second Discovery Series exhibit of 2013, this one featuring works from the Shutterbug Photography Group. 7/13-8/2. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

Museums BUTTE COUNTY PIONEER MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Antique Firearms Display, an exhibition of firearms designed and manufactured before the beginning of the 20th century. Ongoing. 2332 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497.

CHICO MUNICIPAL BUILDING: Camera Club

Exhibit, works by the Chico Camera Club on display. Through 7/12. 411 Main St., (530) 8967214.

12

FRI

Art Receptions 2(D) FOR THE ENTIRE GALLERY SHOW RECEPTION: Reception for the group show featuring eight artists from the random 2(D) for the Entire Gallery drawing. F, 7/12, 5:30-7:30pm. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

OUTSIDE EDGE RECEPTION: An opening reception for the ongoing exhibition of photography from Michele Miller and Camille de Ganon. F, 7/12, 5-8pm. Free. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9 gallery.com.

Music FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with a performance from Dylan’s Dharma. F, 7-8:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway, (530) 345-6500, www.downtownchico.net.

Poetry/Literature

CHICO PAPER CO.: Landscapes Amplified, a series of landscape paintings focusing on Northern California by Cynthia Schildhauer. Through 7/31.Northern California Gold, local artist Jake Early’s new six-piece series featuring scenes in rice fields, olive groves, vineyards, almond orchards and more. Through 8/30. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

SLICE OF CHICO: The annual downtown-merchant summer sidewalk sale and watermelon giveaway. Sa, 7/13, 9am. Downtown Chico.

Art Receptions

HEALING ART GALLERY: Raymond Eastman, oil

THE SHUTTERBUGS RECEPTION: Reception for the Chico Art Center’s second Discovery Series exhibit of 2013, this one featuring works from the Shutterbug Photography Group. Sa, 7/13, 7-9pm. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chico artcenter.com.

SECOND SATURDAYS YOUTH ART WORKSHOP: A monthly hands-on workshop series encouraging the community’s youth to engage in artistic expression. This session will highlight photography. Sa, 12:30-5pm. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

Music CONVERGENCE CD-RELEASE: 18 musicians, 12 songs, and one weekend of collaboration. The Electric Canyon Convergence compilation will be performed in its entirety with local musi-

paintings by Raymond Eastman on display.

cians from Alli Battaglia & the Musical Brewing Co., Soul Butter, The Resonators, Not Dead Yet, Gravybrain, Mandalyn May, Deedee Vest, The Party, One-Up and more. Sa, 7/13, 8pm. $8. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

15

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Secrets of

Circles, an exhibition exploring the properties of a simple shape with powerful applications. Through 9/1. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY:

Through 7/18. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS: Ruth Rippner:

Fantasy and Family, a retrospective of family and fantasy expressed in paintings and drawings from Ruth Rippner. Through 8/31. 254 E Fourth St. corner 4th st. & Wall, (530) 343-2930.

Infinity & Beyond, an exhibit tracing early human celestial observation to modern space endeavors with a Russian Sokol Space suit, a moon rock and brand-new footage of deep space on display. Ongoing. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

MON

Poetry/Literature WORD PLAY: A freestyle poetry reading open mic ending in a two-round slam. Third and First M of every month, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

POETRY READING: Local poets share their work. F, 7/12, 6:30pm. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

13

SAT

WORD PLAY

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 32

Monday, July 15 Cafe Flo

SEE MONDAY, POETRY/ LITERATURE

Special Events CRUZ’N CLASSICS CAR & MOTORCYCLE SHOW: A classic car and motorcycle show with awards, breakfast, BBQ lunch, raffle, poker walk, craft vendors and music. Sa, 7/13, 7am3pm. $20-$25. Durham Community Park on Durham-Dayton Hwy, (530) 624-5310, www.drifterscarshow.org.

Hot days, cool melons FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

There are a few things as refreshing as biting into a nice, ice-cold slice of watermelon on a scorching Northern California summer day, which is exactly what the Downtown Chico Business Association invites everyone to do at its annual Slice of Chico event, happening this year on Saturday, July 13, beginat 9 a.m. Downtown businesses will also be having EDITOR’S PICK ning sidewalk sales and special bargains, but the real draw is the more than 2,000 pounds of watermelon donated by ProPacific Fresh and distributed free to attendees. The event’s other lead sponsor, Tres Hombres, will be selling special watermelon margaritas.

July 11, 2013

CN&R 25


BULLETIN BOARD Community

ENDS SUNDAY

MUD

NIGHTLY THRU SAT 7:45 SUNDAY 3:30PM (FINAL SHOW)

BEFORE MIDNIGHT FRI/ SAT 5:45PM SUNDAY 1:30PM MON-THURS 7PM

Call 343-0663 or visit www.PageantChico.com

New Owners - New Menu Full bar | IntImate DInIng | OutDOOr PatIO | banquet FacIlItIes

• now serving lUnCh Mon-sat at 11:30am • sunday Bottomless Champagne BRUnCh at 9am • happy hour 3-6pm daily & 9pm-midnight thu-sat • dinnER every day starting at 4pm • livE MUsiC at 6:30pm (7/11) California Evening trio (7/12) paisani

3 3 1 2 E s p l a n ad E • C h iCo 5 3 0 . 8 0 9 . 1 1 0 8 | opE n 7 days R E s E Rvat i o ns aC C E pt Ed

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave. North off of Hwy 32 and East Ave, (530) 321-5607.

AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

CHAPMAN FARMERS MARKET: A year-round

Certified Farmers Market. F, 2-5:30pm. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave., (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

CHICO POLICE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD: Monthly meeting hosted by the Chico Police Chief to discuss community issues. W, 5:307pm. Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1877 Hooker Oak Ave., (530) 342-7777.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle,

James B. Wood, M.D. Board Certified Pediatrician Traditional Medicine Personalized Care in an office-based practice

THINK

drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. F, 6-8pm; $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

END HOMELESSNESS IN BUTTE COUNTY: The first

572 Rio Lindo Ave, Ste. 203 Chico, CA 95926 Phone: (530) 342–4860 Fax: (530) 342–4844

FREE.

Accepting new patients on a limited basis

of three community wide forums to establish a 10-year strategy to End Homelessness in Butte County. Th, 7/11, 4-6pm. Email jcoles@housingtools.com for details.

ENERGY TOOLS WORKSHOP WITH GAYLE KIMBALL: A Kinesiology workshop to balance the body and mind using visualizations, acupressure tapping and healing tools. Sa, 7/13, 10am-4pm. $75. Chico Peace and Justice Center, 526 Broadway, (530) 893-9078, www.chicopeace.org.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced

FRIDAY 7/12 – MONDAY 7/15 DESPICABLE ME 2 (3D) (PG) 11:20AM 1:50PM 2:40PM 4:20PM 6:50PM 7:40PM 9:20PM DESPICABLE ME 2 (Digital) (PG) 10:30AM 12:10PM 1:00PM 3:30PM 5:10PM 6:05PM 8:30PM 10:10PM GROWN UPS 2 (Digital) (PG-13) 10:30AM 11:40AM 1:00PM 2:10PM 3:30PM 4:40PM 6:10PM 7:10PM 8:40PM 9:40PM HEAT, THE (Digital) (R) 11:15AM 2:00PM 4:45PM 7:30PM 10:15PM LONE RANGER, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 10:40AM 12:20PM 2:00PM 3:40PM 5:20PM 7:00PM 8:40PM 10:20PM

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (Digital) (G) 11:20AM 1:55PM 4:30PM 7:05PM 9:40PM

SOFAS ON SALE

26 CN&R July 11, 2013

FARMERS MARKET: NORTH CHICO: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. W, 7:30am-noon through 11/22. North Valley Plaza, 801 East Ave.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First

Ave. Corner of Downing and E. 1st Ave, (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

HEALING LIGHT MEDITATION: A weekly meditation

THIS IS THE END (Digital) (R) 1:30PM 7:15PM

MAN OF STEEL (Digital) (PG-13) 10:20AM 4:05PM 9:50PM

honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers’ Market, parking lot at Second and Flume streets, (530) 893-3276.

duce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Tu, 7:30am-noon through 10/15. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7069.

PACIFIC RIM (Digital) (PG-13) 11:55AM 2:55PM 6:05PM 9:05PM

WORLD WAR Z (Digital) (PG-13) 11:25AM 2:10PM 4:55PM 7:40PM 10:25PM

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods,

FARMERS MARKET: PARADISE: Farm-fresh pro-

PACIFIC RIM (3D) (PG-13) 10:25AM 1:25PM 4:25PM 7:25PM 10:30PM

WHITE HOUSE DOWN (Digital) (PG-13) 10:20AM 1:20PM 4:20PM 7:20PM 10:25PM

dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:3010pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

session for centering, insight and awakening. M, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St., (530) 343-0704, www.100thmon keycafeandbooks.com.

• ALL HARDWOOD FRAMES • MANY STYLES & COLORS • QUALITY & STYLE

HUMBUG SUMMIT CHECK-LISTING: Explore your botanical interests with a survey hike in the mountains east of Jonesville. See website for more info. Sa, 7/13, 8:30am-5pm. Chico Park & Ride, Hwy 99 & E. Eighth St., www.mount lassen.cnps.org.

HUMBUG SUMMIT CHECK-LISTING Saturday, July 13 Chico Park and Ride SEE COMMUNITY

Justice Center, 526 Broadway, (530) 343-3152, www.chico-peace.org.

PROSTATE CANCER AND NATURAL MEDICINE LECTURE: Given by Harry Chrissakis, a holistic

therapist and lecturer for over 20 years. Th, 7/11, 6:30pm. Chico Public Library, Corner Of E. First & Sherman Avenues, (530) 891-2726.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-7085.

SECOND SATURDAYS YOUTH ART WORKSHOP: A monthly hands-on workshop series encouraging youth to engage in artistic expression. This session will highlight photography. Sa, 12:30-5pm. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

TRADITIONAL WEST AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, E. Third and Pine, (808) 757-0076.

For Kids CAMP CHICO CREEK: An environmental education camp for children ages 5 to 11 with a different theme each week. This week: Crazy Creek Week. Call for more info. M-F through 8/16. $85-$135. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

GATEWAY DISCOVERY CAMP: A weeklong summer

eco day-camp experience. 7/15-7/19, 9am3pm. $185 for Eco-Rangers, includes lunch and snacks. For kids entering 6th, 7th and 8th grades. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade, (530) 898-4121, www.gateway science.org.

SUMMER DAY CAMP FOR KIDS: A summer camp emphasizing outdoor activity helping youth develop social and decision-making skills. Call or go online for more info. Through 8/14, 6:30am-6pm. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St. in Oroville, (530) 533-9622, www.oroville ymca.org.

PARADISE FARMERS MARKET IN THE PARK: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Th, 5-8pm through 9/5. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-6291.

PEACE PANEL PROJECT: An panel discussion

THE ESPLANADE & 8TH AVE, CHICO

891-4221 • esplanade-furniture.com

regarding topics like abuse of power, domestic violence, foreign policy violence and access to reliable information. Second Th of every month, 3:30pm. Free. Chico Peace and

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


“Who was that masked man?” quoth the Raven.

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush, Jason Cassidy and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Clark Kent’s discovery of his alien heritage and superhuman powers to donning the familiar “S” crest to save Earth from other, less friendly Kryptonian refugees. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Opening this week

Monsters University

Grown Ups 2

Adam Sandler and his grown-up childhood friends— David Spade, Chris Rock, Kevin James—reunite once again, this time in their sleepy hometown where Sandler’s character has returned to raise his family only to find that the place is a constant source of wacky shenanigans. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Hi-yo, silly!

Pacific Rim

A fun, if disposable, update on the classic Western radio and TV series

TGore Verbinski’s helter-skelter mash-up of the Lone Ranger story. But, at the very here isn’t much to celebrate in

least, this wildly erratic production deserves a measure of credit for maintaining some kind of oddball by Juan-Carlos comic momentum over the Selznick long haul (2 hours, 29 minutes) of its mock-epic Western-movie action. The story of the Lone Ranger, that masked Western hero with an Indian sidekick named Tonto, gained wide The Lone popularity first as a radio Ranger drama in the 1930s, and then Starring Armie as a TV series in the 1950s. Hammer, Johnny The Verbinski rendition, not Depp, Helena exactly a remake and only Bonham Carter and William partly a revisionist update, is Fichtner. a galloping circus of parody, Directed by silly satire and outlandish Gore Verbinski. extravagances of roughCinemark 14, house comedy and movie Feather River action. Cinemas and Written by Justin Haythe, Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13. Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, the story is disposable and inconsequential. Most of the best stuff in the film is bizarre action, exuberant Poor grotesquerie, cartoonish sight-gags and stunts, FX action involving vintage trains, etc., etc. Fair Johnny Depp plays Tonto here, and he’s central to the film’s peculiar appeal even Good though not really as dominant a figure as the film’s publicity might lead you to Very Good expect. (Depp is the movie’s star, but his weirdly re-imagined Tonto is still a sidekick figure.) Excellent

3

1

2

3

4

5

With his dead-bird headgear and assorted mystical and mythical trappings, Depp’s Tonto can seem like a rather Hunter S. Thompsonized version of the character played by the Native American actor Jay Silverheels in the TV series. But in his most elaborate action scenes, he seems to be channeling the deadpan stunts and intrepid spirit of Buster Keaton. Revisionist farce shows a less pungent side with the film’s Lone Ranger (Armie Hammer), a neurotic and somewhat narcissistic do-gooder who is little more than a mock-heroic accessory for the action sequences. If there’s satiric intent here, it seems aimed more at the paper-thin characterizations of the least memorable of Bmovie western heroes than at anything in the various incarnations of the Lone Ranger. The fiendish Butch Cavendish (played with perverse relish by William Fichtner) is more fascinating and memorable than the Ranger; he emerges, perhaps, as the picture’s “secret” favorite, but the script does nothing to make any sense of the guy’s ferocious, all-purpose villainy. Helena Bonham Carter is terrific and underutilized as the one-legged matron of a dance hall for scarlet women. Barry Pepper is well-cast as a General Custer figure, but too little develops with him as well. It’s not nearly as bad as some reviewers have been saying, but if you’d prefer something a little better in a recent Western, I’d recommend the following: the Verbinski/Depp animated Western Rango; the indie Dead Man’s Burden (now on DVD); the July 1 episode of Longmire (with strong Native American actors and themes) on A&E. Or, in related older items, Jim Jarmusch’s anti-Western Dead Man (with Depp) or the Republic Studios cliffhanger serial version of The Lone Ranger shown in theaters in 1938. Ω

Writer/director Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth) takes a turn at large-scale sci-fi action with a film about humanity battling for survival against giant monsters that have risen from the sea with huge human-controlled robot fighters. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Re-opening this week

5

Before Midnight

Celine (Julie Delpy) and Jesse (Ethan Hawke) first met in Before Sunrise (1995) during a stopover in Vienna. They planned to meet again soon, but that reunion didn’t happen until nine years later in Before Sunset (2004), during Jesse’s book-tour visit to Paris. Now, after another nine years, they are a couple with twin daughters, vacationing in Greece (in Before Midnight). In writer-director Richard Linklater’s latest installment, Jesse is now a somewhat successful novelist, living in Europe with Celine and their daughters, and Celine is a somewhat frustrated Paris-based environmental activist. In the course of the three European interludes recounted in these films, Celine and Jesse have moved from the chancy freedoms of youthful romance to the conflicted passions of a notquite-disillusioned adulthood. The latest has some sorrow in it, but that seems to make the comedy and the romance count for even more. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Now playing

3

Despicable Me 2

Super-villain Gru (Steve Carell) turned straight in the original Despicable Me, so what’s left for him to do in round two? Fall in love. He’s also trying to stop an evil-doer who has stolen a chemical that turns any living creature into a killing machine. But the romantic subplot, involving flirtations between Gru and his detective partner Lucy (Kristen Wiig), proves more entertaining than the mediocre storyline about the search for criminal suspect Eduardo (Benjamin Bratt, in exaggerated Latino-stereotype mode). Whatever magic is lost from the original film is recovered by Gru’s tiny minions: His helpers look like aliens but possess the charm of babbling babies—a weird combination that’s onscreen gold (as was proven by the booming laughs from every child in the theater). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG —R.B.

The Heat

An odd-couple buddy-cop comedy with Sandra Bullock as an uptight FBI agent forced to partner up with a rough-around-the-edges Boston detective (Melissa McCarthy) in order to bring down a Russian drug lord. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

3

The Lone Ranger

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 — J.C.S.

Man of Steel

Henry Cavill is the latest in a long line of actors to don the famous blue-and-red costume in this reboot of the Superman movie franchise. The film focuses on the origin of the eponymous character, from a young

A prequel to the Pixar animated feature Monsters, Inc., featuring Mike and Sulley (voiced by Billy Crystal and John Goodman) during their monster-training days at Monsters U., where they first met and weren’t exactly best friends. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated G.

5

Mud

With river rats young and old haunted by misadventures and illusory romance on the Arkansas side of the Mississippi River, the latest film from Jeff Nichols (Take Shelter) feels a little like a modern-day Huckleberry Finn. A kid named Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and his pal Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) go prowling for a boat wedged in the treetops of a wilderness island and cross paths there with a scraggly fugitive named Mud (Matthew McConaughey). Mud’s obsession with erratic dream-girl Juniper (Reese Witherspoon) brings tattered romance and other troubles into the action. Mud, a battle-scarred neighbor (Sam Shepard), and Ellis’ uncle (Michael Shannon) are all variously compromised alternatives to the kid’s parents who are in the process of breaking up. A vengeful patriarch (Joe Don Baker) from nearby eventually forces a climactic shoot-out, but the movie’s real interest resides in the oddly tender tragicomedy that emerges from the characters’ heedless low-rent dreaming. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

3

This is the End

A scruffy cast of Hollywood comedians—Seth Rogan, Jonah Hill, Danny McBride, Craig Robinson, Jay Baruchel—is holed up at James Franco’s house as the apocalypse devours the world outside. Everyone’s playing versions of their real-life selves, and while the sum of their parts doesn’t equal their best previous individual or collaborative efforts (Pineapple Express, Superbad, Knocked Up, The Office, Eastbound & Down), it’s fun just having all the likeable comedians in one place together. They are each naturally funny (especially McBride in full-on selfish-pig mode) and riff so well off one another that this twisted comedic version of bunker-horror provides plenty of ridiculousness to laugh at and plenty of gross-out shocks to keep things moving briskly all the way up to the heavenly climax. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.

4

White House Down

The very least you can say about director Roland Emmerich’s latest is that no matter how goofy it gets (and it gets pretty goofy), it’s still remarkably coherent. It’s also remarkably entertaining. Channing Tatum plays a D.C. cop who shows up at the White House for an interview with the Secret Service. A job protecting the POTUS (Jamie Foxx) ostensibly will redeem him in his disappointed daughter’s eyes, but the interview doesn’t go that well. Soon enough, peckerwood terrorists blow up the Capitol as a diversion to storm the White House and grab the president, and Tatum’s character is suddenly given a second interview … this time with the president himself. The script is clever and the banter is witty. Sure, it’s big, dumb fun—but it’s clever big, dumb fun. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

2

World War Z

World War Z is a barely capable thriller in zombie drag, with shaky-cam and muddy editing to keep you confused when the shit hits the fan. Brad Pitt plays a retired UN spook who reluctantly re-ups to do something about all the damned zombies. He does so in a handful of noisy set-pieces loosely linked together to serve as story, but those pieces are just variations of “Shit! Someone just made a noise and here come the zombies! Run!” And here the infected come a-runnin’, as director Marc Forster emphasizes the swarming aspect of insects or even the disease itself. It’s a neat approach, one that aims for adrenaline over dread. There’s not much in the way of suspense, because that would slow down the action. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

July 11, 2013

CN&R 27


28 CN&R July 11, 2013


A wall lined with produce greets thirsty bike riders coming to Hernandez Farm for fresh juices and smoothies. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH (INSET PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA)

Fresh-squeezed salvation Fruit juices and smoothies offer respite from a brutal summer day

Oopen on the Fourth of July, Hernandez Farm—the 2-month-old juice, sandwich and f the few eateries that were

produce shop on Eaton Road in north Chico—was one of them. My 12-year-old daughter Lydia and I rode our bicyby cles from south Chico to Christine G.K. LaPadoHernandez Farm—spurred Breglia on in part by the good recommendation we had gotchristinel@ newsreview.com ten from a friend of ours, and in part (an increasing part, as we rode along during the already-hot summer morning) to get something good to drink. Hernandez Farm specializes in fresh juices, and ★★★ non-dairy smoothies made with “no sugar, no ice,� as a sandwich-board sign in Hernandez Farm front of the venue advertis156 Eaton Rd., es. Juice choices range Ste. E. Go to from a simple one-fruit www.facebook.com juice, such as apple, /Hernandezfarm orange or carrot, to a mixChico to “like� ture of all three, called Hernandez Farm Sunset Juice, to the Ultra and to view Garden, which combines their menu. 809-2489 orange, carrot, apple, celOpen daily, ery, cucumber and spinach. 6:30 a.m.All juices run $2.75 for a 7:30 p.m. (until small (9 ounces), $3.50 for 4 p.m. on 16 ounces, and $4 for a holidays). 24-ounce cup. Cucumber, kale and/or ginger can be added to any juice for no ★★★★★ extra charge. I opted for a EPIC medium-sized Sunset ★★★★ Juice. AUTHORITATIVE Lydia, after tasting the ★★★ sample offered her of HerAPPEALING nandez Farm’s Tropical ★★ Mango smoothie (made HAS MOMENTS with pineapple, mango, ★ FLAWED peaches and apple juice—

kids’ size, $3; small, $4; medium, $4.75; large, $5.75), chose a small one. Other smoothie choices include Melon Mayhem (honeydew melon, cantaloupe, apple juice, orange juice); Berry Blue (bananas, peaches, strawberries, blueberries, apple juice); Bananas for Cherries (bananas, cherries and apple juice); and Festival Blend (papaya, pineapple, mango, strawberries, orange juice). For 65 cents, one can add protein powder as well. One of the special smoothies offered that day was The Hulk, made with apple juice, pineapple, mango, peaches, kale, ginger and spinach. We also chose to split a sandwich from Hernandez Farm’s small build-your-own sandwich menu—turkey and pepper-jack cheese on multigrain bread with mustard, mayo, lettuce, tomato and red onion (all sandwiches are $5). After perusing the venue’s shelves stocked with pesticide-free (though not certified-organic) fruits and vegetables grown at the Hernandez family’s farms in Tehama County and Fresno, we relaxed in the tiny two-table dining area while we waited for our food and drinks. The juice was, as expected, refreshing and delicious, although next time I will ask for no ice. Lydia’s smoothie was yummy, as she already knew it would be. Our sandwich had a rustic, homemade appearance, loaded with thick slabs of turkey and piled-high produce (the white turkey meat is cut from a processed turkey loaf, not from an actual turkey breast). It reminded me of something my mother would have packed in a school lunch for me. As we ate, we chatted with a man who had come in from the heat in search of a drink of water, which the kind man from Hernandez Farm gave him in addition to a Hulk smoothie, which the man gratefully drank. Before we left the cheery bright-greenwalled eatery, we helped ourselves to two ripe peaches and a chubby purple eggplant from the “freeâ€? table near the entrance to the dining area. All in all, a very pleasant experience. â„Ś

PARK PLAZA CHICO 680 MANGROVE AVE 530-893-0808

PHEASANT RUN PLAZA CHICO 2009 FOREST AVE 530-893-2727

M–F 9–8 | SAT 9–7 | SUN 10–5 Check out ChicoSupercuts on facebook to receive a $3 off coupon

                    !" #$%&'$( )*'+ "',- #  .!!/0111120/!

July 11, 2013

CN&R 29


SCENE

HigHest Quality Paint Jobs Most Affordable Prices

We alWays offer

Insurance Specialists Oven-Baked Finishes Free Written Estimates Factory Color Matching

• • • •

Commercial Accounts Written Guarantees Fast, Efficient Service Low Prices

We Want to Help! Chico Cash Exchange

• Collateral Loans / Pawns • Cash for Gold • Check Cashing • Payday Advance Serving Butte County for 33 yearS 2304 Park ave, Chico 891-8677 www.miracleautochico.com

20th & Park • 892–2222 CA Lic # 04020994 / Permit # 11233001 Licensed by Dept. of Corps under the CA Deferred Deposit Transaction Law

Art is the reward

From left: Katharine Sherman’s “Full Water” and “Peacock Cow,” Sophie Rodgers-Davidson’s “Four Slats of Peter,” and “Between” by Nel Adams. TOP TWO PHOTOS BY JASON CASSIDY BOTTOM TWO IMAGES COURTESY OF 1078 GALLERY

1078 hits jackpot with randomly curated group show

R artists. The willingness to try something new— and potentially fail miserably in the process—is a trait isk taking is something we expect from

that, when combined with talent, can lead to something new and wonderful being brought into the world. by For the current group show at the Jason 1078 Gallery—2(D) for the Entire Cassidy Gallery Show—it isn’t just some of jasonc@ newsreview.com the artists who have taken chances; the exhibit itself is the result of the gallery taking one big chance. The eight featured artists were randomly chosen from a pool of 60 whose age and experience ranged from amateurs Now showing: who had never shown their work to 2(D) for the experienced professionals with Entire Gallery Show on display résumés full of previous exhibitions. Last August, for the 1078’s 2(D) through July 27. Reception: for the Show 2(2012) for 2(Dollars), Friday, July 12, anyone who ponied up two dollars 5:30-7:30 p.m. and produced a piece of art on the 1078 Gallery blank face of the show’s announce820 Broadway ment card would be a part of that 343-1973 exhibit and be placed in a drawing www.1078 for a chance to be one of the featured gallery.org artists in this year’s group show. Ten were selected, eight made it to the exhibit. And given the range of backgrounds and styles, the exhibition is surprisingly cohesive and engaging. At first viewing, one would be hard-pressed to imagine that it wasn’t actually a curated show. Other than an overall refreshing variety of approaches, there isn’t really a theme at work. But all of it is ready for showing. Of the eight artists, four have direct connections to the gallery (Exhibitions Co-Chair Maia Illa, volunteer Sophie Rogers-Davidson, Vice President Maria Navarro, and Navarro’s daughter, Natasha Easton) and two are high-school students (Rogers-Davidson and Katharine Sherman). The last three are all working artists: Chikoko fashion collective member Nel Adams; spiritual counselor/healing-artist Sheryl Karas; and former Chicoan (and current Brooklynite) Brad Thiele. Thiele’s typically fun pieces are the most immedi-

30 CN&R July 11, 2013

ately engaging, each a little game or puzzle demanding close attention. “Black Belt” appears as its title suggests when the tiny graphite line on white paper is looked at from a distance, but upon walking closer the simple message “i must warn you – i know karaoke” comes into focus. By virtue of its size and its placement on the back wall in line with the front door, Adams’ As Above, Below is the de facto focal point of the exhibit. The mixed-media assemblage features four sculptures mounted on squares of linoleum. Drawing on her textiles experience, the fashion designer formed three just-blooming flower sculptures out of padded-bra cups—one black, one red, one pink (titled “Shadows,” “Between” and “Illumination,” respectively)—with the final piece (“Divine”) being a mounted set of cloth horns with a lacy horseshoe draped over the top. There are two oval picture frames mounted like eyes in the center of it all, and with the horns sticking out of the top and the red flower blooming at the bottom like a mouth, the whole collection resembles a big Mr. Potato Head face on the white wall. The show has been arranged with the artists mixed together around the gallery, and there are a lot of fun surprises to be found as you circle the space. Navarro’s abstract watercolors are fresh and wonderful, with each grouping offering a different play on forms and a nice palette of bright colors. Some of my favorites, though, were a few of the pieces by the teenagers. Rogers-Davidson’s “Four Slats of Peter” is an homage to her brother, with sections of his mug drawn and painted in four different ways on four different slats and stacked into one very striking face. I was very impressed with a few of the varied pieces by Sherman. Her painted ceramic “Peacock Cow” (it’s a cow and a peacock!) is just gorgeous. And the arrangement of similarly gray/purplehued paintings that included an acrylic portrait of a mysterious-looking young black woman (“Beneatha”), and two small watercolors—one simple yet unmistakable portrait of local painter Sal Casa (“Sal”) and my favorite piece in the show, the expressive image of a pregnant woman in a belly-hugging dress (“Full Water”)—is outstanding. It might have been a risk, but the show definitely Ω paid off.


Peter Carlson PublicAffairs I learned the word “picaresque” a long time ago, but have had very few occasions to use it. Peter Carlson’s Civil War odyssey is a picaresque tale, the story of two reporters who got themselves captured by confederates in Vicksburg, Miss., in May 1863, a misfortune that set them on the journey (and the adventure) chronicled in this detailed and gripping story. The fact that this isn’t a novel, and that Carlson has gathered the details of the two men’s travail from mostly neglected sources, allows Civil War buffs a whole new perspective on that seminal event in American history. For those of us who have worked in journalism, the insight into how reporters worked a century and a half ago only adds to the interest generated by the episodic events that take place as Junius Browne and Albert Richardson make their way from Mississippi across the south, ending up in the infamous Libby Prison before later making an escape to the union lines. Carlson, a respected journalist himself, resurrects these two 19th-century journalists, bringing them back to life vividly. And, if you don’t know the word picaresque, this is the perfect time to add it to your word hoard.

BOOK

—Jaime O’Neill

Volume 3 She & Him Merge Records

MUSIC

—Matthew Craggs

My Dog: The Paradox Matthew Inman Andrews McMeel Publishing Matthew Inman’s illustrated retelling and clever description of the process of “The OneMan Human Centipede”—wherein his cute dog, Rambo, eats his own poop, pukes up the poop, eats the puke, re-poops it all on the floor, and tries to eat it again (while Inman rushes around his house trying, in vain, to stop him every step of the way)—is not as disgusting as it might sound. In fact, in Inman’s comic hands, it’s extremely funny, as is the rest of this book chronicling the random, baffling, lovable traits of this one man’s best friend. Inman is the guy behind the hilarious online comic site The Oatmeal, which features his quirky, sometimes (refreshingly) shocking, always side-splitting comics, such as “What it’s Like to Own an Apple Product” and “How to Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You”, and My Dog: The Paradox initially appeared there. He immortalizes Rambo here in all his contradictory glory: The little guy will bark at bears or moose and has no fear of the garbage truck, but he can’t even make eye contact with the cat and runs away from hair dryers. It’s a short, fun romp in the dog park that not only points out the many ways our dogs are paradoxes, but also how the owners who invest themselves in these sometimes frustrating, short-lived furry friends are as well.

BOOK

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

Call it the curse of a trilogy or blame it on lead singer Zooey Deschanel’s busy schedule on New Girl—one of the best sitcoms currently running—but She & Him’s Volume 3 feels half-hearted and disjointed. On many tracks, such as “Turn to White,” “Somebody Sweet to Talk To” and “Snow Queen,” Deschanel’s vocals and M. Ward’s music seem unaware of each other. There’s no conversation between his simple melodies and her raw-but-beautiful voice. It’s as if Deschanel is singing someone else’s songs with perfect understanding of the music and little insight into the emotions behind the notes. Of the 14 tracks—three of which are covers—there are noteworthy exceptions. “London” gives Deschanel permission to writhe in the melancholy she seems to want to bring to nearly every song. It’s haunting and beautiful in its sincere sorrow. “Something’s Haunting You” could fit in a dark and twisted 1920s Disney cartoon; the vibraphone is a fun, slightly spooky addition that turns personal demons into living ghouls. While Volume 3 doesn’t live up to the duo’s previous work, there’s enough here to keep fans interested in a Volume 4.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

Junius and Albert’s Adventures in the Confederacy

La Dolce Piazza 3217 Cohasset #120 Cor ner of Cohasset & Lassen 891-3582 fur niturechico.com Monday - Saturday 10 - 6

Save the Date! The Ampla Health Chico Medical & Pediatrics Center Grand Opening! Thursday, August 15, 2013

CHICO MEDICAL & PEDIATRICS 680 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95926

MEDICAL: (530) 342-4395 | Mon - Sat 8:00am - 5:00pm PEDIATRICS: (530) 342-6150 | Mon - Fri 8:00am - 5:00pm Sat 8:00am - Noon

—Connie Cassidy July 11, 2013

CN&R 31


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 7/11—WEDNESDAY 7|17 THE RAILFLOWERS CD RELEASE: Th, 7/11, 8pm. $10. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway,

CARAVANSERAI

(530) 343-1973; www.1078gallery.org.

Saturday, July 13 Feather Falls Casino

THURSDAY NIGHT CONCERTS IN THE PARK: Oroville’s weekly concert series continues with The James Slack Band. Th, 7/11, 6:30-8pm. Free. Riverbend Park, 1 Salmon Run Rd. in Oroville, (530) 5332011.

SEE SATURDAY

12FRIDAY

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

FUNKANAUTS AT LASALLES: Psychedelic

music from planet funk. Th, 7/11, 69pm. Free. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. (530) 893-1891.

BASSMINT: A weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4, (530) 895-3888.

THE HARMED BROTHERS: The Eugene,

FLO SESSIONS: Flo’s weekly local music

showcase continues. F, 8pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental local troupe BOGG. F, 11am. Free. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with a performance from Dylan’s Dharma. F, 7-8:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 345-6500, www.down townchico.net.

HAPPY JAZZ: Jazz with Shigemi Minetaka on keyboard and Christine LaPadoBreglia on upright bass. F, 7/12,

Ore., indie-grass crew is joined by Chico/Santa Cruz folksters Sons of Jefferson and Heather Michelle. Th, 7/11, 7pm. $5. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

11THURSDAY ARMED FOR APOCALYPSE CD RELEASE: Local metal band Armed For Apocalypse release their new full length album The Road Will End. Death Valley High, Horseneck and Sorin open. Th, 7/11, 8pm. $8. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

13SATURDAY

6:30-8:30pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St., (530) 891-9044.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: Country music in the lounge. F, 7/12, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.gold countrycasino.com.

REUNION: ’70s tribute band, covering hits by Elton John, Rolling Stones, etc. F, 7/12, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino

Brewing Company, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com/brewing-co.

CARAVANSERAI: Santana tribute band in

the brewery. Sa, 7/13, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Company, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com/ brewing-co.

CONVERGENCE CD-RELEASE: 18 musicians,

12 songs, and one weekend of collaboration. The Electric Canyon Convergence compilation will be performed in its entirety with local musicians from Alli Battaglia & the Musical Brewing Co., Soul Butter, The Resonators, Not Dead Yet, Gravybrain, Mandalyn May, Deedee Vest, The Party, One-Up and more. Sa, 7/13, 8pm. $8. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomthe atre.com.

PLAYS WELL WITH OTHERS

Playing music with other musicians is an extremely gratifying experience and the best way to pick up new songs, techniques and tricks. It can also be intimidating at first, and some more seasoned musicians can be snobbish and critical. But not the folks at Jim Meyers’ monthly Old-Time Slow Jam, next occurring Wednesday, July 17, at Sid Lewis’ Acoustic College. In this context, “slow jams” have nothing to do with R. Kelly, but rather offer an opportunity for musicians of all skill levels to play together, sans the performance anxiety.

JOHN SEID DUO: John Seid and Larry Peterson play and eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 7/11, 6-9pm; Th, 7/18, 6-9pm. Grana, 198 E. Second St., (530) 809-2304.

PARADISE PARTY IN THE PARK: Paradise’s weekly marketplace and concert series continues with music from Paisani & Post-Apologetik. Th, 7/11, 5:30pm. Free. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise; (530) 872-6291, www.paradisechamber.com.

Natural Wellness

DEX RECORDS 167 EAST 3RD STREET

07.11.2013

7PM // ALL AGES // $15 ADV // $18 @ DOOR

A SKYLIT DRIVE

Summer Vacation

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS: A HOLY GHOST REVIVAL ENGRAVED IN ARMOR INCREDIBLE ME

DEX RECORDS 167 EAST 3RD STREET

07.17.2013

8PM // ALL AGES // $8 @ DOOR

MOBILE DEATHCAMP

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS: BLACK TIE HERO HOLLYWOOD JESUS DR LUNA AOD

$50 off new patients

50OFF

$

With this ad. Not good with other offers

any doctor

Chico Only Not Valid With Other Offer Exp 07/18/13

SIX FEET UNDER LORDS OF PERDITION GOD-VAN DAMME ASTRONAUT FALLON EMBRYONIC DEVOURMENT ADVANCE TICKETS AT BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM & BLAZE N J’S

NINKASIBREWING.COM 32 CN&R July 11, 2013

BREWED IN EUGENE, OR

319 MAIN CHICO 530.892.2445

www.newsreview.com

07.18.2013

8PM - 1AM // 21+ // $15 @ DOOR


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24

17WEDNESDAY

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ Friday, July 12 Cafe Coda

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. W, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

SEE FRIDAY

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues,

15MONDAY JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

16TUESDAY AARON JAQUA: An open singer-songDUCHESS WILDER BAND: Groove-driven,

blues-based rock in the lounge. Sa, 7/13, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

LOCAL BAND NIGHT: Singer/songwriter

Heather Michelle joins a couple of new local crews the Vesuvians (featuring members of The Shankers and The Yule Logs) and the Persian Skirts (with Bob Howard, Ska-T and Steve Bragg). Sa, 7/13, 9pm. $3. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted by local country musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa, 5-9pm. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 7102020.

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: Country music in

because it's too hot for walking

Liberty Cab

898-1776 $150 to the Sacramento Airport!

the lounge. Sa, 7/13, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.goldcountrycasino.com.

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and stand-up bassist Christine LaPadoBreglia. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, (530) 343-2056, www.farmstarpizza.com.

THE WAYWARDS: The Seattle punks join

local crews Icko Sick, Fight Music and Banned from Earth. Tu, 7/16, 8pm. Dex, 167 E. Third St., next to the Crazy Horse Saloon, (530) 327-8706.

country, tin pan alley, jazz and more. W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St. Upstairs from The Beach.

OLD-TIME SLOW JAM: Bring your bluegrass instruments and song suggestions for this jam hosted by Jim Meyers. Third W of every month, 7-9pm. Free. Sid Lewis’ Acoustic College, 932 W. Eighth Ave., (530) 876-8629.

STRING BAND SHOWDOWN

Sisters Hannah, Beth and Ellen Knight and their friend Emma Blankenship have been wowing crowds with their sweet folk and stone-solid harmonies since forming The Railflowers in 2009, scoring a 2010 CAMMIE award for Best Female Vocalists straight out of the gate. After a few years of winning the hearts and minds of many of Chico’s Americana fans, they’re now entering their next phase with a tour kick-off/release party for their latest album, Heirloom, on Thursday, July 11, at 1078 Gallery. Opening the show are Auburn’s Hannah Kile and local tribal/trashheap drum crew Wolf Thump.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country music

showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 79:30pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

NTS POST EVE Y ONLINE B AT G IN R E T IS REG hico

newsreview.c

NEW LOCATION

om/c

Voted Chico’s Best Bar

11 times.

s a m e g r e at s e r v i c e

master cut + color new clients welcome looking for additional stylists Experience + Booth Rental | Call for more info

Sookies h a i r

- Award Winning Bloody Mary’s - Best Juke Box - Best Conversations

s a l o n

1194 e lassen, ste 110 | 530.893.8851

Open daily · 337 Main St · 343-7718

July 11, 2013

CN&R 33


ARTS DEVO

$10 off

Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

your next

THINK

FULL SERVICE GROOM

FREE.

Highest Yelp Ratings Cleanest shop in town Sr. & Veteran discounts available *Limit one coupon per household

Coature Pet Spa

1411 Mangrove, Chico 530-899-8433

PERFORM YOUR BEST Specializing in Sports Massage & Deep Tissue

TECHNIQUES TO HELP... maximize gains, prevent injury, remove toxins, increase range of motion, relieve pain, sleep better & encourage faster recovery

BUILT FOR BODYWORK CALL & SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY! 530.924.0298 1166 Esplanade #2 chicobodyw chicobodywork.com

CHICO NEW HOURS!

2157 PILLSBURY RD. CHICO

M–F 7AM–10PM SAT 8AM–10PM SUN 8AM–9PM

NEXT TO KMART

345-2666

BUTTE CREEK PALE ALE OR PILSNER 6 PACKS

$

4.99 CHICO STORE ONLY

ARTS DEVO’S BIG FOUR In this column, I love talking about local arts (and about myself), but more often than not, what I’m actually thinking about is one of four things: basketball, new music, David Lynch and my dog. And, as faithful readers already know, sometimes those subjects push their way into this space. This is one of those times. BASKETBALL Since 1985, when the team moved to Nor Cal from Kansas City, Mo., the Sacramento Kings have been the closest Chico would ever get to having its own major pro-sports team. And so, it comes as a great relief that the team for which I root is staying in Sacramento. There are new owners, and a new coach—and a new downtown arena is in the works as well. And, by some miracle the pure-shooting, über-atheletic Ben McLemore fell into the team’s lap as the No. 7 pick of the recent NBA draft! With a shooting stroke that’s been compared to Ray Allen’s (McLemore’s scoring efficiency during one year at Kansas rivaled even current Golden State Warriors superstar Steph Curry’s freshman year at Davidson) and the skills and athletic ability to be an elite NBA defender, McLemore has the potential to become not only the best player from this year’s draft Greivis! class, but also a perennial all-star PHOTO BY KEITH ALLISON and cornerstone of the team. It looks like the new Kings owners think so as well, since they made room for McLemore by sending their current starting shooting guard (and former Rookie of Year) Tyreke Evans to the New Orleans Pelicans for point guard Greivis Vásquez. I love Evans, but I have no problem trading out one talented scorer for another younger one and getting a pass-first point guard (whose first name is Greivis!) as well. These are special times, my friends. It’s good to be a Kings fan. NEW MUSIC Thank you (thank you, thank you!) to local mustachioed keyboardist and appreciator of righteous dance-beats Kirt Lind for his pro summer-jam tip: “Is This How You Feel?” by New Zealand’s The Preatures. Slide over to the stereo and turn up this sneaky groove and watch the party start to move. DAVID LYNCH The Big Dream, my favorite film-

maker’s second solo album, is not so sneaky. But it does have its own kind of grooviness— swampy, dark, scary, repetitive grooviness. With Lynch singing/speaking surreal disembodied blues (and playing some guitar) over the top, the overall effect is a fairly uncomfortable and somewhat grating moodiness David Lynch! that is, of course, awesome. The album comes out July 16, and is streaming for free online at Pitchfork.

PUPPY DOGS There she is, probably anxiousORGANIC KETTLE POTATO CHIPS 5OZ

$

1.99

CHICO STORE ONLY

OCEAN SNACK ROASTED SEAWEED 3 PACK

$

.99

CHICO STORE ONLY

TOM’S OF MAINE TOOTH PASTE 4.7OZ-5.50Z

EO ESSENTIALS SHAMPOO OR CONDITIONER 32 OZ.

CHICO STORE ONLY

CHICO STORE ONLY

$

3.79

$

7.99

Come out and support our veterans ON SAT. 13TH FROM 11AM-2PM. HOT DOGS AND SODA $1.00. ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE VETERANS.

34 CN&R July 11, 2013

ly anticipating my arrival as I write this. I better go. “I’m a-comin’, Honey!”

DEVOtions

Old hats, new bands: Two new local crews featuring familiar faces spanning the history of Chico’s music scene will be hitting the stage together this Saturday, July 13, at the DownLo. First, former Asskickers dudes (and members of dozens of other bands before and after) Bob Howard, Scott Pressman and Honey dog! Steve Bragg join up with bassist Alex Kokkinakis (Disorderly Events) in The Vesuvians (which Howard described as “a mix of rock and indie, with elements of Americana”), followed by Kerra Jessen and Johnny Meehan (aka Kerra and Johnny Shanker) and drummer Jake Sprecher (The Yule Logs) showing off their new trio, The Persian Skirts. Heather Michelle opens.


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

Sponsored by the City of Chico

HUD-appr awarded oved certification at the en d of classis

5291 XENO PLACE • PARADISE

Homebuyer Readiness Workshop Location:

Community Housing Improvement Program, Inc (CHIP) 1001 Willow St. • Chico Enter training room off parking area Presented by:

Community Housing Improvement Program

Saturday, July 20 th, 2013 9am-12pm: Learn how to work with realtors, lenders, title & escrow officers, & home inspectors 12:30-3:30pm: Budgeting & financial management

Amazing one owner custom built home in one of Paradise’s nicest neighborhoods. 2124sq. ft, 3 Bedrooms 2 baths, move-in ready custom home features an awesome kitchen with stainless steel refrig, dishwasher, Viking gas stove and tons of cabinets with pull-outs. Other wonderful features this home has to offer are: built-in book shelving, gas starting pass through fireplace, formal dining room, skylights, indoor laundry and wood plantation shutters. Master suite offers a huge walk-in closet, dual sinks, soaking jetted tub, and separate shower. Downstairs you’ll find a great bonus room which can be used as an office or wine cellar. Located on at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac and is ready to GO!

$289,000 Scott Mercer | REMAX of Paradise | 530-520-6778 | dre#01317971

Call 891-6931 or 1-888-912-4663 to reserve a seat or more information HUD approved Housing Counseling Agency. A division of Community Housing Improvement Program, Inc.

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com CHECK THESE NEW LISTINGS! 2637 Ceanothus. 3 bd 2 ba,e1407 d sq ft $235,000 reduc 10 Allie Ct. Park location. 3 bd 2 ba, d 1507ssqoftl$289,950 WaTCH for NEW LISTINGS!

Steve Kasprzyk (Kas-per-zik) (530) 899–5932

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$695,000 $585,000 $585,000 $585,000 $540,000 $500,000 $480,000 $420,000 $397,500 $374,500 $363,000 $350,000 $348,000 $310,000

Call for a free evaluation of your home. Your home may be worth more than you think!

Frankie Dean

Realtor/E-Pro

Paul Champlin (530) 828-2902

BR/BA

3/ 2.5 8/ 4 2/ 1 3/ 3 4/ 2 4/ 3.5 4/ 3.5 3/ 3.5 4/ 3 3/ 2 4/ 1.5 3/ 1.5 4/ 3 3/ 2

SQ. FT. 2510 3328 3328 1669 2366 2355 2799 3089 2301 1904 2191 1678 2101 1846

#01767902

530-717-3884

Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Homes Sold Last Week 952 Vallombrosa Ave 723 Rancheria Dr 739 Rancheria Dr 604 Brookwood Way 2309 North Ave 62 Chicory Rd 33 Sparrow Hawk Ln 4596 Hicks Ln 6 Spinnaker Way 205 Crater Lake Dr 2 Verde Ct 300 W 6th Ave 596 Desiree Ln 16 Shari Ln

Looking for sellers!!!

550 W. Lassen Ave 4 bd 3 ba plus office on over an acre. Covered RV Pkg with complete hook ups and 650 sq. ft shop.

Call or TEXT for more info.

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

2732 Silver Oak Dr 10 Allie Ct 5 Nevadillo Ct 2141 Ramsey Way 963 Hazel St 2409 Mariposa Ave 415 Mission Santa Fe Cir 159 Remington Dr 3265 Rockin M Dr 2334 Tiffany Way 70 Herlax Cir 2524 Pillsbury Rd 16 Jean Ln 1381 Lucy Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$297,000 $295,000 $289,000 $271,500 $260,000 $260,000 $255,000 $255,000 $247,500 $229,000 $225,000 $220,000 $215,000 $215,000

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

4/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 1 6/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 3 3/ 2 3/ 2

1668 1507 1826 1726 1358 2209 1479 1391 2972 1482 1357 2268 1827 1126

July 11, 2013

CN&R 35


open

house Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

3Bd / 3 Ba, 3934 sq. ft. $395,000 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837 Kathy Kelly 570-7403

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 2-4

2270 N. Lindo Ave ( X St. Hwy 32) 5 Bd / 3 Ba, 3221 sq. ft. $699,000 Frankie Dean 717-3884

Sun 2-4 3908 Barbados Ct (X St: Spyglass) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2507 sq. ft. $529,000 Becky Williams 636-0936

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1762 Brinson (X St: Lott Road) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2685 sq. ft. $499,000 Brandon Siewert 828-4597 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1256 Orchard Ln (X St: Floral Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1992 sq. ft. $308,000 Anita Miller 321-1174 Russ Hammer 566-3540 Lindsey Ginno 570-5261

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1

438 Black Oak Dr (X St: W. Lindo) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1846 sq. ft. $349,000 Carolyn Fejes 966-4457 Frank Speedy Condon 864-7726 Mark Reaman 228-2229

1788 Heron Ln (X St: Skylark) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1472 sq. ft. $275,000 John Wallace 514-2405

9 Olympus Ln ( X St: Eaton Rd) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1248 sq. ft. $219,000 Nate Smith 321-1558

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sun. 11-1

624 W. 6th Ave (X St: Warner) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1874 sq. ft. $260,000 Chris Martinez 680-4404 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

1573 1st St ( X St. Fig Ln), Corning 2 Bd / 1 Ba, 1300 sq. ft. $130,000 Becky William 636-0936

356 St. Augustine (X St. Potter Rd) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1781 sq. ft. $328,500 Jerry Bode 518-8466 Chris Martinez 680-4404

2570 Durham Dayton (X St: Teal) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2473 sq. ft. $499,000 Mark Reaman 228-2229

9 River Wood Loop (X St: Glenwood) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1915 sq. ft. $314,000 Ed Galvez 990-2054

1 Pistachio Dr (X St: Entler) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 2635 sq. ft. $499,777 Heather DeLuca 228-1480

720 Grand Teton Way ( X St. Godman Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1652 sq. ft. $319,000 Sandy Stoner 514-5555 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

91 Eagle Nest Drive (X St: Skyway) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 3024 sq. ft. $469,000 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1991 Potter Rd (X St: 20th St) 3 Bd, 2.5 Ba, 2260 sq. ft. $409,900 Nick Zeissler 520-6968 Justin Jewett 518-4089

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

4858 Colter Wy 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1776 sq.ft. $119,900

Sat. 9-12

6178 Ponderosa 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1524 sq. ft. $189,500 6186 Firethorn Cr 2 Bd / 3 Ba, 1926 sq.ft. $239,000

1962 Belgium (X St: 20th St.) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1406 sq. ft. $249,000 Saeed Khan 916-705-6977

13 Luciano Ct (X St: Peninsula Dr) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1570 sq. ft. $309,500 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508 Frank Speedy Condon 864-7726

14639 Bridgeport Cr 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1404 sq. ft. $153,000

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1

15300 Tan Oak Dr ( X St: Coutolenc), Magalia

All Magalia OPEN HOUSE TOUR

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Remax of Paradise

1086 E. 5th Ave ( X St: Neal Dow Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1841 sq. ft. $249,900 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 2247 Floral Ave (X St. Calla Ln) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1340 sq. ft. $249,800 Laura Ortland 321-1567

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

Sun. 11-1

2793 Ceres Ave (X St. Diablo Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1170 sq. ft. $229,000 Kristen Wilson Ford 519-7600 Anita Miller 321-1174

Sun. 11-1

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

2640 Guynn Avenue (X St: Henshaw Ave) 3 Bd, 2 Ba, 2021 sq. ft. $365,000 Brandi Laffins 321-9562

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 2-4

3 Bd / 2.25 Ba, 1419 sq. ft. $235,000 Sat. 2-4, Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Vikki Reimer 520-4802

401 Henshaw Ave (X St: Esplanade) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1482 sq. ft. $309,000

2840 Burnap Ave (X St: Lassen Ave) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1302 sq. ft. $245,000 Paul Champlin 828-2902

14635 Bridegport Cr 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1718 sq. ft. $160,000

Sat. 2-4

14452 Essex Ct 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1080 sq. ft. $75,000

2637 Ceanothus Avenue (X St: Viceroy)

www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Ask the Professionals at Century 21 — 345-6618 Wondering what your home is worth today?

Great home close to campus. 4/2 over 2,200 sq.ft Charming home on a large lot.

1 acre, garage, lg . shop, ready Gfor a PENDIN home! Chico $174,500

You might be surprised. Call me to find out.

3/1 on a large lot in Chico $185,000 Cabins in Jonesville! Call for more info.

SMILES ALWAYS Joyce Turner

Russ Hammer 530.894.4503

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

HammerSellS@Sbcglobal.net

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of June 24, 2013 — June 28, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 1004 Regency Dr 709 Pomona Ave 385 E 6th St 93 Arroyo Way 1983 Lionsgate Way 568 El Reno Dr 49 Sycamore Valley Rd 837 Glenn St 285 Lassen Ave 2497 Nakia Ct 120 Pierpont Dr 2854 Foothill Blvd 321 Palermo Dr 22 Louise Ln

36 CN&R July 11, 2013

TOWN

PRICE

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Durham Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$215,000 $199,000 $180,000 $155,000 $154,000 $149,000 $146,000 $135,000 $132,000 $476,000 $273,500 $197,000 $190,000 $189,000

BR/BA

3/ 2 2/ 1 2/ 1 3/ 1 2/ 2 3/ 1.5 2/ 2 3/ 1.5 4/ 1.5 3/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 2/ 2 3/ 2

SQ. FT. 1126 932 712 1019 1714 1032 1936 1140 1241 2284 1873 1729 2084 1560

ADDRESS 1700 12th St 269 Canyon Highlands Dr 75 Gaylor Ave 33 Southview Dr 16 Slope Oaks Ct 5406 Hickory Way 6244 Forest Ln 832 Natures Way 973 Waggoner Rd 1863 Conifer Dr 6545 Rocky Ln 6117 Greenwood Dr

TOWN

PRICE

Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$172,500 $160,000 $130,000 $115,000 $750,000 $414,500 $282,000 $280,000 $273,000 $270,500 $189,000 $139,000

BR/BA

3/ 2.5 3/ 1 2/ 1.5 3/ 1.5 3/ 3.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 2/ 2 3/ 3 2/ 1

SQ. FT. 1811 1336 1472 1152 3985 1949 1542 1877 1480 2146 1908 1249


Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

METAPHYSICAL

Online ads are

STILL

Emily Watts, God-Gifted Love Psychologist Reunites Lovers. Stops Unwanted Divorce. Helps all problems. 2 Free Questions by Phone. 1-630-835-7256 (AAN CAN)

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

GENERAL Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN)

BULLETIN BOARD

SCHOOLS AND TRAINING WINE EDUCATION / SOMMELIER TRAINING FOR INDIVIDUALS OR BUSINESSES Increase your professional value or feed your passion. Our next Level - 1 Sommelier Class is Aug 3 & 4 in Reno. On-site staff training also available on request. Call 775-544-3435 or visit Schoolofwine.net.

GENERAL $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-great-­ pay.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing & Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) Independent Sales Consultant Mountain Valley Living Magazine needs an Independent Sales Consultant for the Chico Area. Join our team and be a part of the Fastest Growing Magazine in Northern California. Sales Experience Needed. Email your resume to mvlsuzanne@yahoo.com Paid In Advance! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station.com (AAN CAN)

MUSICIAN SERVICES Record your own album on CD at a quality home studio. Call Steve 530-824-8540

APARTMENT RENTALS ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

If you were unable to attend my

TENNIS THEORY WORKSHOP

Don’t worry you still have an opportunity to get my TENNIS BOARD GAME at the promotional price. Visit www.joseluistennistutor.com. You can also buy it at eBay by typing “Educational Tennis board Game.” While you are online also visit my new website at www.joseluistennisteacher. com

WANTED TO BUY WILL BUY JANET TURNER prints and originals. Call Jim at (530)343-2930 or 415)850-7898.

Custom Studio Apt in Cohasset private, beautiful view, large deck, wash/dry, shared garage, storage. $700/ mo avail 8/1 530-343-2003

AUTOS

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE A Beautiful Massage

in a warm tranquil studio. w/ Shower, $35 deal. Appts. 10am-7pm

530-893-0263

Therapeutic Massage Luxurious far infrared heat & purifying ionic therapy gives you complete satisfaction with every treatment! First treatment $25/hour, normal fees $50. 530-343-5102 Bill Gochenour MindBody Connection

Massage By John

$25 special. Full-body Massage for Men. In-Calls. Located in Orland. By Appointment. CMT, 530-680-1032

1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer.All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. $6000 530-895-8171

CLASSICS 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FUNNY FACES at 6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. JENNIFER BORGMAN

this Legal Notice continues

6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER BORGMAN Dated: June 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000802 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO PARTY BOUNCERS at 6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. JENI BORGMAN 6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER BORGMAN Dated: June 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000801 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name CHICO PARTY BOUNCERS at 2018 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928. KRISTI R SMITH 2018 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTI R SMITH Dated: June 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2010-0001557 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11,2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as INSPIRE ME CREATIONS at 561 E. Lindo Ave Suite 1 Chico, CA 95926. KYMBERLY COCO 561 E. Lindo Ave #7 Chico, CA 95926. TAMARA PATTERSON 8564 Silver Bridge RD Palo Cedro, CA 96073. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KYMBERLY COCO Dated: May 30, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000762 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SHARPS LOCKSMITHING AND GARAGE DOORS INCORPORATED at 2200 Myers Street Oroville, CA 95966. SHARPS LOCKSMITHING AND GARAGE DOORS INCORPORATED 2200 Myers Street Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: Robert L. Sharp Dated: June 4, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000783 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FOOD FROM THE HEART OF CHICO at 880 East Avenue Chico, CA 95926. OUR THING INC 279 Brookvine Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RONALD W. LANDINI Dated: June 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000814 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AT YOUR SERVICE at 1230 Bonnie Lane Oroville,

this Legal Notice continues

CA 95965. KENDELL OGEL 1230 Bonnie Lane Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KENDELL OGEL Dated: June 14, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000820 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BURNING OAKS ENTERPRISES at 4960 Starflower Lane Chico, CA 95973. DEBRA S NUZZO 4960 Starflower Lane Chico, CA 95973. JAMES L NUZZO 4960 Starflower Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DEBRA S NUZZO Dated: June 14, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000819 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROOM FOR BEAUTY at 170 E. 2nd Ave Suite #2 Chico, CA 95926. DORHANDA MARIE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. WOODROW WAYNE SOULLIERE 2505 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DORHNADA SOULLIERE Dated: June 18, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000838 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NEIGHBORHOOD CAT ADVOCATES, PAWPRINTS QUALITY THRIFT BOUTIQUE at 1346 Longfellow Chico, CA 95926. COMPANION ANIMAL WELFARE ALLIANCE 1346 Longfellow Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: Ingrid Cordes Board Treasurer Dated: June 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000808 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEST ASIAN MASSAGE at 2991 Esplanade Suite 150 Chico, CA 95973 CHONGKUN GUAN 116 Shasta St Apt 4 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHONGKUN GUAN Dated: June 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000839 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RANCHO VISTA APARTMENTS at 85 Rancho Vista Drive Chico, CA 95967. KATHLEEN L NICOL 20 Upper Lake Ct Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL J WARREN 20 Upper Lake Ct Chico, CA 95928. PAMELA A WARREN 20 Upper Lake Chico, CA 95928. PENNY L WARREN

20 Upper Lake Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: MICHAEL J. WARREN Dated: May 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000750 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BODHI SANCTUARY HEALING CENTER at 1390 East 9th ST #150 Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTINE CARROLL 1345 West Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95926. KRISTIANA LOPEZ 846 Coit Tower Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CHRISTINE CARROLL Dated: June 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000793 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as L.E.A.F. CONSTRUCTION at 857 Colusa HWy Gridley, CA 95948. ELIZABETH SANTILLAN 857 Colusa HWY Gridley, CA 95948. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ELIZABETH SANTILLAN Dated: May 24, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000740 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ALL AMERICAN REAL ESTATE at 1600 A Feather River BLVD Oroville, CA 95965. PATRICIA BOGGS 133 Grand Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PATRICIA BOGGS Dated: June 20, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000849 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DIRT DUDE at 2252 Cindy CT Oroville, CA 95966. TRAVIS BYRAM 2252 Cindy CT Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TRAVIS BYRAM Dated: June 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000843 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ISADORA’S FOLLY at 3 Casita Terrace Chico, CA 95926. ROSELLE DIANE PETERS 3 Casita Terrace Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: R. DIANE PETERS Dated: May 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000753 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing buinsess as THE ARGUS at 212 W. 2nd St Chico, CA 95928. GAUTAM AND SCOTT, INC. 687 E. 8th St Chico, CA 95928.

this Legal Notice continues

This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SCOTT BALDWIN, PRESIDENT Dated: June 27, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000880 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as POWELL’S SWEET SHOPPE-CHICO at 121 W. 3rd Street Chico, CA 95928. HAROLD CARLSON 120 Copperfield Dr. Chico, CA 95928. NANCY M CARLSON 120 Copperfield Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: NANCY CARLSON Dated: June 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000842 Published; July 3,11,18,25, 20131 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DANCING DAISIES BOTANICALS at 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. MARIROSE DUNBAR 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. GEORGE FREDSON 1297 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MARIROSE DUNBAR Dated: June 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000798 Published: July 11,18,25, Au-­ gust 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JUST JUMP IT, INC at 4345 Hedstrom Lane Chico, CA 95973. JUST JUMP IT, INC 4345 Hedstrom Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: MICHELLE KALBERER, CO - OWNER Dated: June 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000830 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO HOUSE CALLS at 2220 St. George Lane #3 Chico, CA 95926. VICTORIA LEE OTA 312 Orient St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VICTORIA OTA Dated: June 3, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000773 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO CHUCKWAGON at 1564 Citrus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL JANOSZ 1564 Citrus Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Indivudal. Signed: MICHAEL JANOSX Dated: June 25, 2013 FBN: Number: 2013-0000866 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KATHRYN DANIELS at 49 Kemre RD Forbestown, CA 95941.

this Legal Notice continues

KATHERINE WHITBY 49 Kemre RD Forbestown, CA 95941. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHERINE WHITBY Dated: June 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000828 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRO NAILS AND SPA at 1950 East 20th Street Suitei 907 Chico, CA 95928. BIHN T TRAN 1290 Notre Dame BLVD APT# 69 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: B TRAN Dated: July 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000897 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name: PRO NAILS AND SPA at 1950 E 20th Street STE I 907 Chico, Ca 95928. HNERY VAN TRUONG 1450 Springfield Drive #27 Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: HENRY VAN TRUONG Dated: July 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0000770 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California business code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contains clothes, furniture, boxes, ect. The unit numbers and names are: 451: April Reeves 332: April Reeves The contents will be sold to the highest bidder on: July 20, 2013 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Ln, Chico, CA 95926. Published: July 11,18, 2013 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (Secs 6101-6107 U.C.C.) 1.Notice is hereby given to creditors of the within named seller(s) that a bulk sale is about to be made of the assets described below: 2.The name(s) and business address of the seller(s) are: Chai Saechao 2588 Olive Highway, Suite C Oroville, CA 95966. 3.The location in California of the chief executive office of the seller is: 2588 Olive Highway, Suite C Oroville, CA 95966. 4.The name(s) and business address of the buyer(s) are: Sia Vue 2620 A Street Oroville, CA 95966. 5.The business name used by the seller(s) at said location is: Donut Tree, 2588 Olive Highway, suite C, Oroville, CA 95966. ESCROW HOLDER: Bidwell Title & Escrow Co. 500 Wall St. Chico CA 95928. P.O.Box 5173, Chico, CA 95927 ESCROW OFFICER: Jolleen Whitsett Order No. 00247084-002

classifieds

CONTINUED ON 38

July 11, 2013

CN&R 37


DATE OF ANTICIPATED SALE: August 1, 2013 LAST DAY TO FILE CLAIMS: July 31, 2013 Notice is hereby given that Transferor intends to make a BULK SALE of the assets of the above described Business to Transferee including all stock in trade, furniture and equipment used in the said Business, to be consummated at the office of Escrow Holder at the time of consummation or thereafter. Creditors of the Transferor may file claims with the Escrow Holder on or before the last day to file claims stated above. This sale is subject to Sec. 61066107 of the California Commercial Code. Transferor has used the following business names and addresses within last three years so far as known to Transferee: None Dated: June 18, 2013 Signed: Sia Vue Published: July 11 , 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANASTACIA PUENTE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CONSUELO CROMWELLVILLEGAS Proposed name: CONSUELO OJEDA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 26, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean

this Legal Notice continues

38 CN&R July 11, 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CYNTHIA L. CALDERON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CYNTHIA L. CALDERON Proposed name: CYNTHIA L. WOLF THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 30, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 25, 2013 Case Number: 159850 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MATTHEW JORDAN WOMER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MATTHEW JORDAN WOMER Proposed name: MATTHEW JORDAN MAYFIELD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 8, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 27, 2013 Case Number: 159905 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SHERI ADELL DOCKENDORF BROWN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SHERI ADELL DOCKENDORF BROWN Proposed name: SHERI ADELL SOUZA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

this Legal Notice continues

Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 24, 2013 Case Number: 159696 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINE ALICIA STOLP NAKAO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTINE ALICIA STOLP NAKAO NAKYLA KUMA STOLP NAKAO Proposed name: ALICIA NARYCE NAKYLA STOLP NAKYLA KUMA NAKAO STOLP THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 29, 2013 Case Number: 159522 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MOHAMMED ALTALIB, EMAN ALSHIHAB filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RENAD MOHAMMED ALTALIB Proposed name: RANA MOHAMMED ALTALIB THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 9, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 20, 2013

this Legal Notice continues

Case Number: 159797 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DANYAIL M KIENZLE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Joseph L Selby Chico, CA 95926 Dated: October 19, 2012 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158087 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013

(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alfred W Driscoll III Attorney At Law 1339 The Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 157597 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: STEVE DUTTER AKA STEVE P DUTTER YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY DBA ACCOUNT RESOLUTION ASSOCIATES NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the

this Legal Notice continues SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RUBEN J DELAGARZA CHARLENE R DELAGARZA YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center

this Legal Notice continues

adult ENTERTAINMENT MARQUISE GIRLS

17 yrs Of Top Quality Hottest Girls Guaranteed Bachelor/B-day/Any Last Minute Strip Parties! Double Trouble Shows XXX Intro Chico Suave MALE DANCERS We are Hiring We Bring the Show to You!

899-7173

New Website: www.marquisegirls.com

courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alaine Patti - Jelsvik 194748 9301 Winnetka Avenue Ste. B, Chatsworth, CA 91311. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 155122 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: YVONNE MARIE HOAG AKA YVONNE MARIE HICKEY AKA MARIE HOAG YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your

this Legal Notice continues

response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Joseph L Selby Law Offices of Leverenz, Ferris & Selby 515 Wall Street Chico, Ca 95928. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158082 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-­ ney referral service. If you can-­ not afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: James E. Reed P.O. Box 857 Fall River Mills, CA 96028. Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158601 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2013

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: CRYSTAL WILLIAMS-ARCILLA AND THE TESTATE AND IN-­ TESTATE SUCCESSORS TO ROBERT LEE WILLIANS, DE-­ CEASED ABD ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH OR UNDER SUCH DECENDENT AND DOES 1-20 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BILLY DURBIN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask

this Legal Notice continues

www.newsreview.com

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LUCINDA VALDOVINOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ROBERT MELENDREZ II Proposed name: ROBERT ANTHONY STILES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-­ tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 16, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 10, 2013 Case Number: 159660 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013

Dated: May 30, 2013 Case Number: 159646 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2013

To place an adult ad, call (530)894-2300 ext.5 SUNNY’S!

The North State’s Largest Selection of HOT, Sexy Ladies! More ROOMS! More Privacy! More Fun! Discrete, Private, Convenient Location! Shower Shows, Sensual Massage, Private Shows, Lap Dances, Double Trouble, and MUCH More! (Chico) See Our Awesome Website www.sunnysgirls.com

343-3594

ESCORTS Your Candy Girl Voluptuous vixen. Your pleasure is my poison. Absolute

satisfaction. Get what you want. Katt 530-513-2390

SENSUAL TOUCH AFTERNOON DELIGHTS

Cold air conditioning & hot massage. **SUMMER TIME SPECIAL!** 11am-7pm. Daily 588-4474

PHONE ENTERTAINMENT Feel the Vibe! Hot Black Chat Urban women and men ready to MAKE THE CONNECTION Call singles in your area! Try FREE! Call 1-800-305-9164 (AAN CAN)

CALL SEXY SINGLES ON QUEST! Live Local Chat Try us FREE! 18+ 916-282-2300 530-760-1010 www.questchat.com Where Local Girls Go Wild! Hot, Live, Real, Discreet! Uncensored live 1-on-1 HOT phone Chat. Calls in YOUR city! Try FREE! Call 1-800-261-4097 (AAN CAN) ¨Hablas Español? HOT Latino Chat Call Fonochat now & in seconds you can be speaking to HOT Hispanic singles in your area. Try FREE! 1-800-416-3809 (AAN CAN)


ARIES (March 21-April 19): The

Space Needle is a tourist attraction in Seattle. It’s taller than the Washington Monument but shorter than the Eiffel Tower. Near the top of the structure is a circular restaurant that rotates slowly, making one complete turn every 47 minutes. The motor that moves this 125-ton mass is small: only 1.5 horsepower. In the coming days, Aries, I foresee you having a metaphorically similar ability. You will be able to wield a great deal of force with a seemingly small and compact “engine.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “How many years can some people exist / Before they’re allowed to be free?” asked Bob Dylan in one of his most famous songs, written in 1962. “The answer is blowin’ in the wind,” he concluded. Many people hailed the tune as a civil-rights anthem. Thirteen years later, a hippie cowboy named Jerry Jeff Walker released “Pissin’ in the Wind,” a rowdy song that included the line, “The answer my friend is pissin’ in the wind.” It was decidedly less serious than the tune it paid homage to, with Walker suggesting that certain events in his life resembled the act described in the title. “Makin’ the same mistakes, we swore we’d never make again,” he crooned. All of this is my way of letting you know, Taurus, that you’re at a fork. In one direction is a profound, even noble, “blowin’ in the wind” experience. In the other, it would be like “pissin’ in the wind.” Which do you prefer? It’s up to you.

redemption. In what area of your life would you like to experience it?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to

my reading of the astrological omens, the next 12 months will be a time when you will have more power than usual to turn your dreams into realities. You’ll have extra skill at translating your ideals into practical action. To help make sure you capitalize on this potential, I suggest you adopt this Latin phrase as your motto: a posse ad esse. It means “from being possible to being actual.” So, why not simply make your motto “from being possible to being actual”’? Why bother with the Latin version? Because I think your motto should be exotic and mysterious—a kind of magical incantation.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 2010, two economics professors from Harvard University wrote a paper that became a crucial piece of evidence for the global austerity movement. Politicians used it to justify their assertion that the best way to cure our long-running financial ills is for governments to spend less money. Oddly, no one actually studied the paper to see if it was based on accurate data until April 2013. Then, Thomas Herndon, a 28-year-old Ph.D. student at the University of Massachusetts, dived in and discovered fundamental mistakes that largely discredited the professors’ conclusions. I believe you have a similar mojo going for you, Scorpio. Through clear thinking and honest inquiry, you have the power to get at truths everyone else has missed. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

artist Duccio di Buoninsegna painted his Madonna and Child sometime around the year 1300. It’s a compact piece of art¡ªjust 11 inches high and 8 inches wide. Nevertheless, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art paid $45 million for the pleasure of owning it. I propose that we choose this diminutive treasure as your lucky symbol for the next eight to 10 months, Gemini. May it inspire you as you work hard to create a small thing of great value.

Breakthrough will probably not arrive wrapped in sweetness and a warm glow, nor is it likely to be catalyzed by a handsome prince or pretty princess. No, Sagittarius. When the breakthrough barges into your life, it may be a bit dingy and dank, and it may be triggered by questionable decisions or weird karma. So, in other words, the breakthrough may have resemblances to a breakdown, at least in the beginning. This would actually be a good omen¡ªa sign that your deliverance is nothing like you imagined it would be, and probably much more interesting.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When the

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In a

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Italian

comic-book hero Superman first appeared on the scene in 1938, he had the power to jump over tall buildings, but he couldn’t fly. By 1941, he was hovering in midair, sometimes moving around while floating. Eventually, he attained the ability to soar long distances, even between stars. Your own destiny may have parallels to Superman’s in the coming months, Cancerian. It’s possible you will graduate, metaphorically speaking, from taking big leaps to hovering in midair. And if you work your butt off to increase your skill, you might progress to the next level¡ªthe equivalent of full-out flight¡ªby March 2014.

wheat field, a rose is a weed¡ªeven if that rose is voluptuous and vibrant. I want you to promise me that you will work hard to avoid a fate like that in the coming months, Capricorn. Everything depends on you being in the right place at the right time. It’s your sacred duty to identify the contexts in which you can thrive and then put yourself in those contexts. Please note: The ambience that’s most likely to bring out the best in you is not necessarily located in a high-status situation where everyone’s ambition is amped to the max.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “It is never too late

to be what you might have been,” said novelist George Eliot. I’d like you to keep that thought in mind throughout the rest of 2013 and beyond, Leo. I trust you will allow its sly encouragement to work its way down into your darkest depths, where it will revive your discouraged hopes and wake up your sleeping powers. Here are the potential facts as I see them: In the next 10 months, you will be in prime time to reclaim the momentum you lost once upon a time ... to dive back into a beloved project you gave up on¡ªand maybe even resuscitate a dream that made your eyes shine when you were younger and more innocent.

soul feeling parched? In your inner world, are you experiencing the equivalent of a drought? If so, maybe you will consider performing a magic ritual that could help get you on track for a cure. Try this: Go outside when it’s raining or misting. If your area is going through a dry spell, find a waterfall or high-spouting fountain, and put yourself in close proximity. Then stand with your legs apart and spread your arms upwards in a gesture of welcome. Turn your face toward the heavens, open up your mouth and drink in the wetness for as long as it takes for your soul to be hydrated again. (In an emergency, frolicking under a sprinkler might also work.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When I first

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Igor

arrived in Santa Cruz some years ago, I helped start a new-wave-punk band called Mystery Spot. Our first drummer was a guy named Lucky Lehrer. After a few months, our manager decided Lucky wasn’t good enough and kicked him out of the band. Lucky took it hard, but didn’t give up. He joined the seminal punk band the Circle Jerks, and went on to have a long and successful career. Flipside magazine even named him the best punk drummer of all time. I suspect, Virgo, that in the next 10 to 12 months, you will have a chance to achieve the beginning of some Lucky Lehrer-type

Running with the club

by Rob Brezsny

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Is your

Stravinsky was a 20th-century composer who experimented with many styles of music, including the avant-garde work “The Rite of Spring.” “My music is best understood by children and animals,” he said. In my vision of your ideal life, Pisces, that will also be true about you in the coming week: You will be best understood by children and animals. Why? Because I think you will achieve your highest potential if you’re as wild and free as you dare. You will be fueled by spontaneity and innocence, and care little about what people think of you. Play a lot, Pisces! Be amazingly, blazingly uninhibited.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

story and photo by

Katherine Green Barbara Carlson has been an avid runner for 12 years. Since moving to Chico from Southern California about a year ago, she and her husband have been members of the Chico Running Club, and have been loving it. The Chico Running Club has been organizing races and informal runs/walks for 38 years, and the CN&R talked to Carlson the morning of the recent Independence Day 5K in Bidwell Park. The club’s next official race is the H.O.T. Half—the Hooker Oak Trail halfmarathon/quarter-marathon, on Oct. 6. Visit www.chicorunningclub.com for more info on races and how to join.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of July 11, 2013

raderie. When you don’t think you can take another step, there they are to help you.

Do you notice the club having an impact on the community?

When we moved here, there was an article in the [newspaper] about the running club, and my sister-in-law saved it for me because she knew I ran. So she gave it to me, and we joined.

Yes, a very good one. Bringing people together, the runs that they sponsor, and all the things that they do. They give a lot of support, financially and otherwise, to the two local highschools’ track-and-field programs. They’re always the last on the list to get any money from the school, at least down south where my grandson ran track.

How long have you been running?

What do you get out of running?

I’ve only been running about 12 years. Before that, I walked, did aerobics, everything else. But just running—it’s been 12 years. My husband made me start running. When I first started running, I was running with [him], and we did a lot of 5ks, 10ks, and ran short distances.

Oh, it’s a huge stress relief. It is my No. 1 stress release; I put on my shoes, and I take off, and solve the world’s problems. My favorite thing about running would be the endorphins. [I] have to probably run four or five miles before I get it, at least. And then the longer you run, the more of the high you get.

Why did you join the club?

What’s the longest distance you’ve run?

Oh, the support! The support is fantastic. I love it. We have a lot of friends in the club. It’s not just about running—we have other things in common. It’s all about the support and cama-

The farthest distance I’ve run would be a marathon, 26.2 miles. I would say 10 miles is my favorite distance; that’s nice. I like to run in the park here, in Bidwell; it’s very nice.

How did you hear about the Chico Running Club?

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Empty Sometimes I forget Janice died. I sleep in our bed, and I see the same pictures on the walls and the same miscellaneous stuff in the driveway, and I forget that she’s not here; I’m getting so used to what is. She’s never here; that’s the default. And then something reminds me that she used to be right here with me, and it can take my breath away. When I was about 11, Louis and Neal and I were walking down State Street going home for lunch, and Louis began twirling around while he walked with his arms stretched out—a goddamn helicopter. As he got near me, he made a fist and hit me in my solar plexus or thereabouts, doubling me over and emptying my lungs. I’d been chestized. For a few seconds I felt clearly that I might have breathed my last, which wasn’t so bad except that I didn’t get a chance to get ready for it, to get set with my feet planted and my attention focused. Not, “The next one will be your last breath, so make the most of it.” More like, “Oh, that last breath was your last one. I hope you weren’t multitasking.” That’s how I feel:

empty for good. I know she’s dead; I watched her go. I’m still waiting for the other shoe to drop, though, or looking for the end of the sentence. It feels like a song that’s cut off just as it gets to a good part. Here’s another example. You know how when you stop a car there’s a point when motion ceases and the car and everything in it rebounds slightly in the opposite direction? Sudden stops cause the most extreme reactions. Once as a teenager I was driving and Big Bob was riding shotgun, although we didn’t call it that then. On a whim, as I came up to a light that was turning red, I slowed down as gradually and smoothly as I could, such that we drifted to a stop so gently that there was no detectable point when our motion ended. We felt the same as a few seconds before when we were moving, and we were stock still. Big Bob went nuts. He could hardly speak and he didn’t have to, because I knew what he was on about since I was nuts myself. I released the brake so the car moved a couple of feet, and then I jammed on the brake for that satisfying jerk to confirm that we had stopped. I want that jerk. July 11, 2013

CN&R 39


go

Green at

corning ford

YoUr LoCaL EV CErTiFiEd HYBrid, ELECTriC and PLUg-in ELECTriC dEaLEr

298

$

a month

700

$

customer cash down

2013 Ford C-Max EnErgi

108 city / 92 hwy / 100 combined MPge EPA estimated rating. EPA estimated total range 620 miles 44 city / 41 hwy / 43 combined

2013 FUSion EnErgi

2013 FoCUS ELECTriC

The first five-passenger all-electric vehicle to achieve 110 MPge city.

108 city / 92 hwy / 100 combined MPge EPA estimated rating 44 city / 41 hwy / 43 combined MPG

Based on estimated EPA ZEV Certification testing.

2013 Ford Focus $298 per month plus tax Stock # 44730 Vin# DL364432 36 month lease, 12,000 mile allowance per year. Security deposit waived. $11,750 Ford Red Carpet Lease Rebate + $1,000 Bonus Customer Cash for total rebate amount of $12,750 plus $700 cash due from customer for a total of $13,450 total due at signing. MSRP $39,745 Total payments for lease $11,539.08 Actual net cap cost $28,595.84 Not all lessees will qualify for the lowest Red Carpet Lease payments. See dealer for details.

2013 Ford C-Max HYBrid

108 city / 92 hwy / 100 combined MPge Based on EPA estimated rating

2013 FUSion HYBrid

47 city / 47 hwy / 47 combined MPg Based on EPA estimated rating

TAKE THE MONEY SAVING SHORT DRIVE 2280 Short Drive, Corning, CA 96021 | 530.824.5434 | www.corningford.com

C 2013 07 11  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you