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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

Stabilizing the market It was amazing to see the Chico City Council come to a unani-

mous decision in supporting the extension of the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market’s franchise agreement for the next 18 months at the CCFM’s current home at Second and Wall streets. Had the council deadlocked yet again on the issue—as is did when considering a two-year extension last month—the market’s agreement would simply have been renewed without any further discussion on the issue. Until next year, that is. We’re certain grumblings of downtown merchants would have resurfaced yet again, and the problems between them and the market, real or perceived, would never come to any sort of resolution. As it stands, the council’s decision forces supporters and opponents to find solutions within a specific timeline. Whether that means finding a new downtown location for the market or making some simple concessions at the current site, at least the stakeholders will be working together. That’s what really needs to happen to give the market the permanence it deserves as such a vital and valuable resource. What the market did not deserve was a rush job to find a new location. But that’s exactly what would have happened had the council terminated the franchise. Mayor Mary Goloff and City Manager Brian Nakamura should have known that it would be nearly impossible to engage in meaningful dialogue and come to a solution in a single meeting. The issue is simply too complex. We hope that the process has opened Nakamura’s eyes to the kind of community Chico is and how civic engagement works here. The city manager said he had to endure a litany of criticisms regarding the issue. “It took me 90 minutes to get down one aisle [at the market] this past Saturday,” he said. He shouldn’t take such criticisms personally. People are passionate about the market. That’s a good thing. Ω

Counterpoint on GMOs Ipoints shared by Dylan Burge in the June 6 edition of the CN&R (see “Stop demonizing GMOs,” in Letters, June 6).

’d like clarify a few of the GMO-industry talking

GMOs (genetically modified organisms) have not been proven safe for humans, animals, the environment or our economy. In fact, there is an extensive and growing body of “unbought” science that says quite the opposite. GMOs are not the product of the same breeding methods of the past. An ocean pout (eel-like creature) does not cross with a salmon. Yet unlabeled GMO salmon containing pout genes will be on by our tables soon—unless we stop it. An Pamm Larry Arctic Ocean fish does not normally cross with yeast to give Dreyer’s Ice Pamm Larry is a Cream its “creaminess.” Corn does not 35-year resident of naturally produce its own pesticide. Chico, a grandmother GMOs are not the way we will feed and former farmer, the world. Agribusiness is killing the soil, the Northern polluting water, increasing greenhouse California director for gases, and harming farmers in the long Labelgmos.org and the initial instigator of run. Google the IAASTD Report; GMO the 2012 Proposition Myths and Truths; the Rodale Institute’s 37 campaign to label 30-year study; A Harvest of Heat; and genetically engineered more reports countering this biotech pubfoods in California. lic-relations “misrepresentation.” GMOs have not been proven safe for long-term human consumption. A study has shown increased tumors in rats fed

4 CN&R June 20, 2013

GMO corn. Another very recent study found pigs fed GMOs suffered from a higher rate of stomach inflammation and enlarged uteri. Yet another peer-reviewed study found that the main ingredient in Roundup, which is sprayed on GMOs, city streets, golf courses and playgrounds, could be linked to Parkinson’s disease, infertility and cancer, among other health problems. GMOs harm our farmers’ export security. GMO wheat was recently found in Oregon, so Japan and South Korea stopped importing shipments. If found elsewhere, the other 62 countries that label or ban GMOs could also refuse our hard-working farmers’ crops. Our North State rice farmers went through the same thing a few years ago because of GMO rice contamination, which resulted in bans on our rice exports. Seed varieties are dwindling—chemical companies are patenting heirloom varieties, and then taking them off the market. Chard and table beets are becoming contaminated by sugar beets. Canola (a brassica) is contaminating our broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbages and others in its family. Our food system is being taken over by a few corporations. We, the people, are waking up to these deceiving PR campaigns, but we need to do so more quickly and in larger numbers. Together, we can take back our food supply. Ω

A plea for help As the City Council struggled with adopting a budget that calls

for employee layoffs that will impact a number of city services, Administrative Services Director Chris Constantin mentioned that the annual average pay for police officers is $97,000 plus benefits and $117,000 plus benefits for firefighters, while the median income in Chico is just $36,000. That’s per household, which could mean a husband, wife and a couple of kids. That is also some serious disparity. The numbers are too hard to ignore in these days of spending cuts and losses of city services. Yes, we need police and fire protection; those services are already too lean for a city the size of Chico. And we need to be able to offer incentives to attract competent candidates for the jobs. And, indeed, fighting crime and fighting fires are dangerous jobs. But we also think the salaries are way out of whack for the local economy, thus presenting a great opportunity to reduce city spending. Police officers, firefighters and their families are part of the community and must recognize that they, too, will be affected by cuts in city services. The Chico Police Officers Association (CPOA) did come forward earlier this month with an offer to the city to temporarily pay for some benefits, but it was an offer that Councilman Sean Morgan said would cost the city more in the long run. Morgan noted that the CPOA is the only city-employee group to come forward with any offer of help at this point. Perhaps now that the City Council has instructed city staff to look into ways to finance hiring six more officers, CPOA will act in kind with an offer of pay and benefit reductions to help the city through these troubled times, and the firefighters will follow suit. Ω


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Meeting Madis Monday morning, just before I left for the office, came a knock on my front door. I answered and met Madis, a college student from Estonia who’s spending the summer in Chico. Dressed neatly in a light-pink shirt, shorts and a ball cap, Madis was articulate and polite while explaining where he is from and why he has an accent. But I was in a rush to get out the door with my husband and 20-monthold son, so after a minute or two into his wind-up to a pitch, I asked him, “What can I do for you?” That’s when Madis told me what he was selling: children’s books. He knew I had a child, so I know one of my neighbors sold me out. We get a lot of door-to-door salespeople in my neighborhood for some reason, probably because my street is on a fairly busy part of the bike path. I’m a tough sell, though. I’ve only ever bought Girl Scout cookies. Then I met Madis. I told him I was far too busy to sit down and look at the books at the moment, but that I would be free early in the evening. As I finished getting ready for work, I couldn’t help feeling a bit worried about Madis, who is just a week into his summer stay in a strange city 5,300 miles from home. On our way into work, my husband and I drove around the neighborhood to track him down. We found him one street over, looking at a clipboard. We pulled over and asked him if he was OK, and I gave him my business card and said to call if he had trouble navigating the area. He very nicely told me I sounded like his mother. That’s when I realized I sounded just like my mother. While I was growing up, my mom would help makes ends meet by renting a room to college students who were interning at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in my hometown of Livermore. Money was tight when my parents split up, but my mom was determined to keep us in our home. She, my brother and I lived in a big five-bedroom house with a lot of space to spare, so it was easy renting a room or two every summer to help us get by. Most of the interns were physicists, working on master’s degrees, sometimes a doctorate. A few were from other countries—Simon from Israel and Pascal from Belgium, for example. My mom always ended up being a mother figure to our guests, worrying about them at times. Almost every one of them became like family for the few months we shared a roof. Madis did come back Monday evening. I’m a reporter, so I pried into his stay. Madis said he was enjoying Chico and meeting a lot of nice people. He’s here with two other Estonian college students, who are saving money for school. I restrained myself from offering him food, but I did buy my kid a set of books. If Madis comes knocking on your door, be nice, would you?

Re “Canning way of life” (Cover story, by Marilyn Fry, June 13): Brava to the utterly charming Marilyn Fry for her beautifully written tutorial on recycling and, therefore, another poignant portrait of poverty. Ms. Fry teaches us about the remarkably hard work, and the disdain of a few and the kindness of many, involved in collecting aluminum and plastic discards. In so doing, although not homeless herself, she describes what many of us endure as bums. As Tom Gascoyne points out in a sidebar, what Ms. Fry does to supplement her Social Security is a crime. That is exactly the intent of many of the founders of Clean and Safe Chico—or as I think of them: the Haters—to criminalize poverty, to run the poor out of Chico, and to harass and humiliate the already marginalized. The Haters seek to blame those of us who are easy targets standing (or rather sitting and lying) in their way of a fantasy world of preternaturally white teeth and cute outfits, where everyone carries a platinum Amex card. It’s pathetic. Ms. Fry, however, lives her life with dignity and grace, demonstrating through her words that the majority of Chico citizens are compassionate, generous and well aware that they could be her.

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For about a year now I have been putting all my CRV recyclables in an old plastic flower-pot about five feet back from my recycle barrel, so the gal who collects on my block does not have to dig through my recycle barrel. She gave me a Christmas card. Recently I got a job working at a group of apartments that are rented by mostly students. I am astounded by the large number of people who make a living from the housingrelated needs of students. This includes a large number of canners who glean the CRV recyclables from the Dumpsters (very few of our students seem to bother separating their recyclables from their trash). This is just one more way the university and its students contribute to our local economy. ROD GRAY Chico

Never forget Dorothy Re: “Farewell, Dorothy” (Newslines, by Ken Smith, June 13): I have lived in Chico since 1980. Early on, I learned that new community volunteers were pressured to take sides. Pure altruism in community service was hard to find. Two members of this community will always remain dear to my heart because of LETTERS continued on page 6

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their ability to put the greater good ahead of any personal ambitions they might have. One was the late Ted Hubert. Ted spoke his mind and spoke it truthfully. I was very much on the opposite side of the ideological fence from Ted, yet we were always able to respectfully discuss many issues without rancor. Another was the late Dorothy Parker. Dorothy was my counselor while I was dealing with depression in my mid-50s. It was then that I learned about her no-compromise compassion for others in need. Dorothy did what had to be done, from her perspective. These two people, ideologically different but both truly believing in the greater good, deserve not to be forgotten. RON ANGLE Chico

Use common decency Re “Baby-food fight” (Newslines, by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia, June 13): As a mother of two, I have breastfed both and have done it out in public. I feel like it is my duty to cover myself with a receiving blanket. I do this because I want to be able to give my children what is best for them, and also have enough class and common decency to cover myself. Also, I don’t want a child or gentleman staring at me. This is the direction this discussion should be going, and the focus should be on a woman covering her breast, which will be stared and looked at unless we simply cover it. JENNIFER HOYT Chico

Special doesn’t pay bills Re “Govern our city ‘the Chico way’” (Guest comment, by Paul Friedlander, June 13): Paul Friedlander wrote: “Chico is a special place. Our town offers so much: high-quality, healthful food for the table; extraordinary nourishment for the mind and soul; a breathtaking environment; a place to thrive as an individual, raise a family and live in the golden years. This exceptional hometown has been carefully managed by balancing the needs of our citizens, local businesses and the environment.” Paul, healthful food doesn’t pay the bills. A breathtaking environment doesn’t pay the bills. The liberal council for the last eight years did not “balance” anything. Police are in extremely short supply. The facts are that the liberal council OK’d and awarded extremely high pensions and

salary increases that are the direct cause of the city’s financial collapse. It’s happening all over the country and our state. The unions used the Democrats and promised them votes in return. In the ’70s, we called wealthy people capitalist pigs. Paul, your unions are very rich. Our town is very poor. You conveniently left out these facts. We’re tired of the political con-jobs, all spoken under the guise of “we love our Chico.” RICK CLEMENTS Paradise

Views on moving the market Re: “Market to move?” (Downstroke, June 13): I am adamantly opposed to some of the members of the City Council tinkering with the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market on Saturdays. If anything needs to be changed about the market, the change should come by mutual agreement among the people who shop there, the farmers, and the City Council, not simply seven citizens on the council acting alone. In addition, it is inappropriate to simply refuse to renew the lease for the market without another plan in place. I would think that the city is interested in fresh and healthful food for the citizens. In this day and age of massproduced contaminated foods and resulting disease, the farmers’ market is a gold mine of health for our community. To put profit over health is a common theme in this country. We do not need more of the same in Chico. Chico is better than that. JOE LOOMIS Chico

So, where does Mayor Mary Goloff suggest the market go? The Saturday downtown farmers’ market should be improved where it is. It’s a long-standing Chico tradition! It brings foot traffic to downtown businesses, too. Parking downtown is always a problem just as it is for every downtown in every city—it’s to be expected for the merchants and shoppers alike. Perhaps raise the fees to cover portable restrooms. Perhaps shoppers could pay an entrance fee of no more than $1 just to walk through the market to help defray the cost of the porta-potties. Other suggested sites have been the Chico Municipal Center parking lot or the parking structure downtown, but the same problems would still exist. There must be a solution that would serve most of

the people—there will never be a solution that would please all of the people. BARBARA LINDSAY Chico

I don’t quite understand why there is a problem with the farmers’ market moving. The reasons the market has cited in the past is that it would be less visible, but as I see it, the 3,000 people coming down will still be coming down to the market wherever it may be. We should give the local business owners the benefit of the doubt and believe them when they say that the market hurts their business. Why would they lie? The market keeps expanding and the owners keep complaining. Answer: Move to a larger location. Seems to be a no-brainer. STEVE PETERSON Chico

It’s an August Saturday and the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market is buzzing. The aisles are wider; strollers and wheelchairs move without congestion. Shade provided by so many trees helps fend off the heat. I get bread, vegetables, and fruit, seeing friends and checking out the new vendors. The patio area has dancers and Girl Scouts are selling their cookies near the hands. I get a coffee and a roll and now feel the call of nature. Inside the City Hall, I use a well-tended restroom. Parking is a challenge but people are parking south of the market and the city lot is now open. A banner pointed me to the new location. Bluegrass music is coming from the City Plaza. Kids play in the fountains, and I decide to make a day of it. Seems like the merchants are doing business, the expanded farmers’ market is a huge success, the City Plaza is alive, and downtown Chico has become the place to be on a Saturday. STEVE CATTERALL Olde Gold Estate Jewelry

Correction In last week’s Greenways feature, “Pollinator paradise,” by Claire Hutkins Seda, Jennifer Jewell was quoted as saying there are 16,000 bee species and 160 beetle species in California. What Jewell meant to say was that there are 1,600 bee and 10,000 beetle species. The error has been corrected online.—ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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A house in San Francisco. It would have a big front yard and picket fence, like everybody wants. It would have five bedrooms, four bathrooms and a huge back yard.

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Something that has a yard, a porch, and that isn’t too close to the neighbors. Doesn’t really matter how big it is. I like the old Victorian style. … It would be in Chico. The houses on Jac-O-Lyn Way, off of Keefer Road, are probably the best houses in Chico.

Jill Anchordoguy social worker

Off the top of my head, probably Sleeping Beauty’s castle at Disneyland. Just [because of] the beauty of it, the fantasy that’s connected to Disneyland, and, you know, it’s just a little girl’s dream. … Actually, any kind of castle would be cool.

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June 20, 2013

CN&R 7


EMPIRICAL CALLS IT QUITS

A little more than a year after hitting the magazine racks of bookstores across the United States and eight other countries, Empirical magazine is going out of business. Olav Bryant Smith, who with his wife, Tara Grover Smith, founded the local literary-andcurrent-affairs magazine, made the announcement in a recent letter addressed to the publication’s readers and contributors, which included political economist Gar Alperovitz and local Buddhist Lin Jensen. “Tara and I personally poured everything we have (emotionally, physically and financially) into this start-up, from scratch, here in the small Northern California city of Chico,” said the letter. “After more than a year and a half working nearly all day every day toward the success of the magazine, we must turn most of our energies over to regaining control over our personal lives, and our personal financial survival.”

Market supporters make some noise in response to Mayor Mary Goloff’s statement that the city of Chico owns the parking lot on which the event is located. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

BURNED BODIES STILL A MYSTERY

Investigators have yet to determine the identities of three bodies found in a burned vehicle last week on the Skyway. Butte County Sheriff’s deputies and CalFire firefighters responded to a report of a vehicle fire on the outskirts of Magalia shortly after midnight on Thursday, June 13, finding a 2000 Acura TL engulfed in flames, according to a Butte County Sheriff’s Office press release. Responders found the bodies—two in the trunk and one in the back seat—upon extinguishing the fire. No cause of death had been announced as of press time. Though details are scarce as the investigation continues, BCSO confirmed that the Acura was stolen from a woman in Sacramento just days before the fire.

LAMALFA BUSTED FOR TAKING SUBSIDIES

The House of Representative’s version of the federal farm bill cuts $20 billion from the food-stamp program over the next 10 years, eliminating 2 million recipients, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Freshman Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-Richvale, pictured), speaking at a House Agriculture Committee meeting last month, said the private sector should help poor people because “it comes from the heart, not from a badge or from a mandate.” The farm bill would also eliminate $5 billion in direct payment of crop subsidies to farmers. As Los Angeles Times business columnist Michael Hiltzik reported on Friday, June 14, and the CN&R has reported previously, LaMalfa’s family rice farms have received such subsidies since 1995, totaling $5.1 million. According to the Times, instead of direct payments, the proposed bill offers government-subsidized crop insurance that assures certain farmers get 90 percent of their average annual revenues. The government pays “roughly two-thirds of the premiums of crop insurance,” reported the Times. LaMalfa supports this as well. 8 CN&R June 20, 2013

Finding a middle ground The City Council’s vote allows the farmers’ market to stay put as stakeholders determine the event’s future

Tis guaranteed another 18 months in its current location at the city parking lot at Second and

he Chico Certified Farmers’ Market

Wall streets, but its long-term home will be up for debate over that course of time by by a committee comprising a Melissa cross-section of the community. Daugherty That year-and-a-half timemelissad@ line, along with the formation of newsreview.com an ad-hoc group, was approved by unanimous vote of the Chico City Council Tuesday evening (June 18) toward the end of the panel’s all-day budget session, an exhaustive 15-hour-long meeting that included more than three hours’ worth of discussion on the market alone. At the beginning of that discussion, City Manager Brian Nakamura explained how the intention of severing the city’s franchise agreement with the CCFM was to finally put an end to the longstanding contention between farmers and the nearby businesses who say the use of the city parking lot on Saturdays hurts their sales. Terminating the agreement would have forced the CCFM to forge a new agreement with the city at another location by the end of this year. But doing so under those conditions did not sit well with market vendors and representatives, as well as the dozens of customers who showed up at the meeting to weigh in on the merits of the weekly downtown event. (The city put the item on the agenda because it was the last opportunity to give the CCFM the required notice of 180 days prior to the end of its franchise agreement should any changes to the franchise be enacted.) “It scared everybody. We were being evicted,” said Laurie Noble of Noble Orchards, a 92-

year-old Paradise-based apple-growing operation and regular CCFM vendor. Noble was among the 60 people who signed up to speak on the issue during the public-comment portion of the discussion, though several people, having waited for many hours, didn’t make it through the marathon meeting. All told, about 40 spoke to the issue, two of whom were in favor of terminating the franchise agreement. Much of the debate centered on

the perception of a lack of parking in the downtown region on Saturdays, due primarily to the market. But a couple of downtown business owners countered that assertion as well as charges that the market is detrimental to sales. Jeff King, owner of Grana, located at the northwest corner of West Second and Wall streets, told the council that his restaurant’s best day for lunch sales is Saturday. King noted how patrons regularly walk into his establishment carrying goods from other downtown businesses. They also don’t appear to have difficulty with parking, he said. “Not once has a guest ever complained to me about a parking problem, and I’m right across the street, probably 100 feet [from the market],” King said. A local criminal-defense attorney with downtown offices and the owner of a popular used-books store later echoed King. Emotions ran high at several points during the meeting. Market supporters

appeared extremely frustrated with Mayor Mary Goloff, who had asked for the issue to be agendized. Goloff explained that she felt the city has no greater issue than economic development, and that she brought the market discussion forward to find a solution that works for both the market and nearby merchants. “I think there’s a missed opportunity if we don’t allow ourselves to have this discussion,” she said. One point that didn’t go over very well with the gathering was when Goloff stated that “the parking lot belongs to the city of Chico.” Almost immediately, a majority of those seated in the gallery arose, shouting at the dais such things as, “We are the city of Chico!” The CCFM had rallied an impressive level of support for keeping the market at its current location. In the week leading up to the meeting, organizers had gathered 1,628 signatures on a petition asking the panel to renew the market’s franchise agreement. Meanwhile, another 687 signatures were gathered online. At several points during the

meeting, supporters referenced a survey conducted four years ago by the classes of Chico State professors Richard Gitleson and LaDona Knigge that found the market actually aided the downtown economy by attracting around 3,000 people to the region. Back in August 2009, the CCFM and


the Internal Affairs Committee were looking at making changes at the Second Street location. But that discussion evolved into talk on whether the market should move to the Chico Municipal Center lot. Amid the rancor during that meeting, Knigge volunteered her geography class to conduct the survey as a service-learning project. Gitleson ended up joining the effort, along with his recreation class. The results were presented to the IAC in December 2009. Tuesday evening, Gitleson reiterated the results of the survey, which took more than 90 hours to complete. The data, he said, found that two-thirds of market-goers either had shopped or were planning to shop elsewhere downtown. Two-thirds of the respondents indicated the market was their main reason for coming downtown. Parking analysis found that 88 percent of respondents did not have a difficult time locating a space. Knigge also spoke before the panel, recalling that she and Gitleson had previously recommended the market and city look at long-term solutions, including finding the event a permanent home. That never happened. “We’re kind of stuck and we need to move forward,” she said. Councilman Sean Morgan, who was not on the council back in 2009, discounted the relevance of the survey, pointing out how it did not include options for other locations. But as former City Councilman Tom Nickell pointed out, city staff had mapped out other locations, especially the City Municipal Center lot. What was discovered is that the concrete islands in the lot would actually give the CCFM fewer spaces for vendors. “Every single time [when looking at alternative sites], it did not work,” said Nickell, who was on the council and the IAC four years ago. Councilman Mark Sorensen didn’t buy the assertion that parking isn’t an issue. “When folks say we don’t have a parking problem, I reject that right off the bat,” he said. Sorensen went on to list several ways the market in its current location is detrimental to downtown businesses, including the co-opting of parking, and competing interests between the CCFM vendors and their brick-and-mortar neighbors. In the end, around 11:30 p.m., the council voted 6-0 (Councilwoman Ann Schwab recused herself because she owns a downtown business) to extend the franchise agreement until Dec. 31, 2014, and to form a committee of stakeholders—CCFM board members, vendors, downtown business owners, parking-plan advocates, local business organizations—charged with collaborating on a market plan that’s best for everyone. Ω

Delta blues AquAlliance joins other groups in lawsuit challenging Delta Plan adopted last month to manage the beleaguered SacramentoAtheplan San Joaquin River Delta could have cataclysmic consequences on local environment, according to local water-watchdog group

AquAlliance, which last week joined a legal effort to halt the plan. AquAlliance—formed to “challenge threats to the hydrologic health of the northern Sacramento River watershed,” according to its website, www.aqualliance.net—joined a handful of other groups to demand the Delta Plan be “vacated” in a lawsuit filed Friday (June 14) in San Francisco Superior Court. The Delta Plan was created by the Delta Stewardship Council—a state agency formed by the Delta Reform Act of 2009—and adopted May 16. Its stated goals are to provide reliable water supplies for California agriculture and drinking water, as well as protecting, restoring and strengthening the Delta’s ecosystem, by means of such things as habitat restoration. More than 25 million residents and 3 million acres of farmland are dependent upon water sent south from the Delta. AquAlliance and its co-plaintiffs contend the plan fails to meet California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) regulations, that preliminary environmental-impact reports were inadequate, and that the plan allows for too much water to be diverted from the Delta. “The Delta Stewardship Council has refused to honor its own mandate, [which is] the adoption of an effective strategy for distribution of water, and preservation of the Delta,” said Carolee Krieger, executive director of the statewide California Water Impact Network (C-WIN), in a Monday (June 17) telephone press-conference with the plaintiffs. In addition to C-WIN and AquAlliance, the plaintiffs include the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance, Restore the Delta, Friends of the River, and the Center for Biological Diversity. “The Delta Reform Act of 2009 provided the council with the historic opportunity to remedy the water-policy failures of the past 40 years,” Krieger said. “Instead of seizing this golden moment and acting with dispatch and integrity, they decided to follow the lamentable precedent of caving to powerful corporate interests.” Criticisms of the plan, as well as legal challenges, haven’t been heard from only environmentalists and water warriors. The case filed by AquAlliance and cohorts is one of seven filed as of Tuesday (June 18), several of which come from water contractors who claim—contrary to the environmentally minded complainants—that it doesn’t allow for enough water to be transferred. “The only people this plan serves at all are those who have an interest in maintaining the status quo,” said Barbara Vlamis, executive

AquAlliance Executive Director Barbara Vlamis speaks with a local TV news reporter on the banks of the Feather River in this CN&R file photo. PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

director of AquAlliance, in a follow-up interview to the press conference. “The real problem with that is the status quo is already unsustainable; the amount of water already being transferred is too much.” Vlamis said the California Department of Water Resources has “failed terribly” to protect its groundwater resources; the agency has publicly acknowledged at least 11 basins across the state have been over-drafted since the early 1980s. A good deal of the controversy around the Delta concerns

the proposed construction of two enormous tunnels—each 40 feet in diameter and 35 miles long—planted 150 feet beneath the Delta to replace the current pumping system and enable more water to be funneled south. Though being developed separately, the $14 billion tunnel project will be folded into the Delta Plan once it is approved and permitted. “The real problem child in this situation is the western San Joaquin Valley,” Vlamis explained. “It’s a desert that they made the poor business and environmental decision to turn into farmland at one point, and they continue to make bad decisions to try to keep it going.” Turning dry land into farms in one place can lead to throwing another off balance, Vlamis explained, as she warned of the effects the twin tunnels could have locally. “If they build them,” she said, “we might as well start adjusting to life in the desert, because that’s what it will become here.” Vlamis said too few people—including local legislators—understand the impact that taking water from one place can have on another. “When you consider water in the Delta, you also have to consider the source,” she said, noting water in Butte and surrounding Glenn and Tehama counties comes from the Tuscan Aquifer, an underground reservoir. She said serious threats come from what she calls “double-dipping.” Once surface water is diverted to Time heals Dubya’s image other uses, she explained, more groundwater is For the first time since 2005, more Americans have a positive opinion of former Presiextracted to compensate for the loss. dent George W. Bush than a negative opinion, according to a recent Gallup poll that Vlamis said she believes the Delta Stewardfound 49 percent of Americans view Bush favorably, while 46 percent have a negative ship Council didn’t take into account prevailing view of him. When Bush left office in January 2009, 40 percent of Americans had a science and simple math that proves the plan is positive opinion of him, while 59 percent viewed him negatively. The results follow a unsustainable, and said the proper information general trend of Americans viewing former presidents positively—Ronald Reagan, was always at the panel’s disposal. For one, she Jimmy Carter, George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton all exceeded 60 percent approval ratings said the Environmental Water Caucus, a coaliwhen last measured. Here’s a look at George W. Bush’s popularity going back to 2005: tion of more than two-dozen environmental groups (including AquAlliance), fishing organi% Unfavorable % Favorable zations, environmental-justice groups and Native American tribes, presented the council 66 63 59 61 53 53 49 with several reports that could have contributed to a better plan. 59 46 44

SIFT|ER

39

2005

38

2006

2007

Source: www.gallup.com.

32

2008

35

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

—KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 June 20, 2013

CN&R 9


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Tightening the belt City Council adopts thriftier budget he Chico City Council adopted TTuesday the 2013-14 fiscal-year budget (June 18) after more than

10 hours of reports from department heads, discussions among council members and input from a 246 West 3rd St. • Downtown Chico couple of dozen citizens. 530-891-0880 • KirksJewelry.com The new budget calls for LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1975 LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1967 across-the-board cuts to help plug a $4.8 million general-fund deficit and rein in spending. A report from Administrative Services Director Chris Constantin released a few weeks back says that over the past five years the city “deficit-spent or reduced their cash basis by $20.5 million.” City Manager Brian Nakamura, in his opening statements to the IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE council, said it was important to “separate people from the probFamily Law | Criminal | Juvenile lems” and not lay personal blame for current financial conditions. He said the city consists of “givers, Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties matchers and takers. Unfortunately, there are a lot of takers.” The new budget, based on the 24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) consolidation of 11 city departwww.rapecrisis.org ments into five, calls for the elimination of more than 50 city jobs, DESIGNER REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE JEN_PU JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. &many PREV. of which are currently Last Thursday of the Month vacant. But a number of city employees have received “bumping notices” that say they may have the chance to switch to another job or may be laid off. Some of those job losses come from public-safety sectors. The proposed budget called for the elimination of five currently vacant fire-department positions and 13 unfilled positions within the police department. But the police would also lose two positions due to retirement, two communityservice officers, one crime analyst Thursday, June 27 | 5–7pm and one animal-control officer. The city-employee payroll The Crystal Room accounts for 87 percent of the 968 East Ave (next to Quackers) budget, making job elimination a Tickets $5 natural target for cutting spending. Altogether, the city spends Wine supplied by Grocery Outlet – Chico $36 million on salaries and bene2011 Rosemount Chardonnay, South Eastern Australia fits. The Chico Police Department 2009 Three Rivers Sauvignon Blanc, Columbia Valley WA. accounts for 46 percent of the 2011 Lake and Vine Sauvignon Blanc, Lake County CA. city’s general-fund spending, the 2010 Lake and Vine Red Wine, Lake County CA. fire department accounts for 27 2010 Rosemount Shiraz-Cabernet, South Eastern Australia percent, and general government operations get 11 percent. 2011 Ritzy Moscato, CA Constantin told the council that A fundraiser for: city efforts to get a line of credit

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Peter Durfee, head of the Chico Police Officers Association, addresses the Chico City Council as it considers a proposed budget. PHOTO BY KAREN LASLO

10 CN&R June 20, 2013

from Bank of America, which holds the city’s accounts, were rejected because the of the city’s dire financial situation. Still, he said sales-tax revenue is expected to increase by 5.4 percent over last year and property tax could increase by 10 percent, based on estimates by an outside consultant. The possible compromise of public safety was the concern most voiced by the council members and the public. Police Chief Kirk Trostle said the department had 133 employees 10 years ago. In 2007 it had 157. Today it has 125. A national standard says a city the size of Chico should have 141 total police employees. Trostle said he would like to see 82 sworn police officers on board; the city currently has 61. Fire Chief Jim Beery said the department will probably have to close down a station, most likely Station 3, which serves the Chico Municipal Airport. But that in turn could lead to the Federal Aviation Agency halting commercial flights into the airport. The Public Works Department, which oversees the parks and the urban forest, is also facing employee layoffs. The tree services will lose four full-time employees, which eliminates the tree crew. Tree work will now be contracted out to private companies. Much of the public input concerned the potential erosion of public safety. Tom Nickell, a former council member and highway patrolman, suggested a quartercent sales-tax increase dedicated to hiring more police. Peter Durfee, head of the

Chico Police Officers Association, told the council that crime is up 7.4 percent while the police officer staffing is at a 20-year low. “The Chico Police Department is running on fumes,” he said. “And we understand we are largest piece of the [budget] pie.”

“City efforts to get a line of credit from Bank of America, which holds the city’s accounts, were rejected because the of the city’s dire financial situation.” Others protested cuts to the arts, parks and the fire department. When it came back to the council and staff, Constantin pointed out that the annual average pay for police officers is $97,000 plus benefits, while firefighters get $117,000 plus benefits. The median income for a Chico household is $36,000. Perhaps, Constantin seemed to be saying, the police and fire employees could offer the city some help at the union bargaining table. In the end, the council voted 5-2 to adopt the new budget with the caveat that Constantin and Nakamura also bring a plan to finance the hiring of six police officers to the July 2 meeting. Councilmembers Ann Schwab and Sean Morgan cast the dissenting votes. —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com


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A SERIES IS ONE TICKET TO SIX DIFFERENT PERFORMANCES

Eco-conscious subscription services catching on

AUGUST



Chico Community Ballet

Tower of Power Funk & Soul Icons

JANUARY

SEPTEMBER

Golden Dragon Acrobats Fabulous Chinese Acrobats

Peter Rowan

Pink Martini

Big Twang Theory

â&#x20AC;&#x153;N

obody gets mail anymore. There is little interaction with the doorstep,â&#x20AC;? said Jesse Richardson, co-founder of Conscious Box, a company that supplies vegan and vegetarian boxes via subscription through the mail. Jameson Morris, a partner, vets the products. The cost is $19.95 per month and can include goods from soap to fair-trade chocolate, to household supplies and snacks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want people to discover the best products,â&#x20AC;? Richardson said. The first vegetarian box launched in October 2011, and the vegan one followed about eight months later. Conscious Box provides products in line with principles fostering organic, non-GMO food, fair trade and cruelty-free treatment of animals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a demographic culture change happening in the U.S with more people wanting to live a sustainable life,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a growing culture of green.â&#x20AC;? Goodebox is another eco-conscious, shipto-your-door subscription business. Before founder Aysia Wright sends out a Goodebox full of beauty, personal-care and wellness items to new subscribers, she collects details on their hair and skin type, and what colors they prefer in a lipstick. About 10 percent to 15 percent of subscribers opt for a vegan box. Wright says it is â&#x20AC;&#x153;tough to source highperforming vegan beauty products. Many have beeswax and toxic chemicalsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy those products.â&#x20AC;? Wright uses the cosmetics database from the Environmental Working Group to aid her search for toxin-free products and considers other factors such as a companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sustainability and animal-welfare practices. Guest experts like celebrity makeup artist Kristen Arnett and TV host and chef Renee Loux choose each monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s products, some of which can be found at other outlets like Sephora and Whole Foods. Competition is fierce in what Wright calls the â&#x20AC;&#x153;subscription commerce field.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are many start-ups and the field is exploding, resulting in a race to carve out your own space,â&#x20AC;? she said. Indeed, Eco-Emi has carved out its econiche. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mission of Eco-Emi is to help our subscribers live a green, eco-friendly life,â&#x20AC;? said owner Christine Bowman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want them to learn about toxic chemicals, which companies are producing which products and which ones are preserving wildlife.â&#x20AC;? The Eco-Emi box includes home and personal-care products, and while it is not

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Jake Shimabukuro 100 percent vegan, since it sometimes includes honey, Bowman does not accept honey from vendors that stun bees. The boxes cost $15 per month and are packaged by disabled people. Bowman says she tries out â&#x20AC;&#x153;each and every productâ&#x20AC;? while contacting vendors for samples and turning down companies that fail to provide adequate information about manufacturing and sustainability practices. There are five to 10 sample-sized and one full-sized product in every box. Bowman works with nonprofits such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and Save the Manatee Club, and includes organization information in the boxes.

Stunt Dog Experience

Beauty and the Beast JR.

Tommy Emmanuel

OCTOBER

Crazy Doggy Antics

with special guest Martin Taylor

FEBRUARY BĂŠla Fleck & Brooklyn Rider

Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell

Banjo Quintet

Country Legends

TAO: Phoenix Rising

Eve Ensler

Japanese Taiko Drumming

Author, Playwright, TED Speaker

Lonestar

Bonnie Raitt

Country Rock

Ten-Time Grammy Award Winner

True Blues History of the Blues

SFJAZZ Collective

Corey Harris, Guy Davis & Alvin Youngblood Hart

Jazz Masters

STOMP

The Graduate

Theatrical Percussion!

Live Radio Theatre

Ari Shapiro

With a name touting its good inten-

Carlos NuĂąez

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tions, The Honest Company launched in January 2012 with actress Jessica Alba as a cofounder. Alba is a hands-on team leader when available, according to co-founder Christopher Gavigan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our company is built as a solution for modern families to gain access to better, safer products,â&#x20AC;? he said. The Honest Company sells eco-friendly diapers, bath and body items and cleaning products that are delivered to homes each month. The diapers are made with wheat and corn, and contain no petrochemicals. They are also free of chlorine, perfume, phthalates, lotions and PVCs. The diaper bundle costs $79.95 per month. Cleaning materials from The Honest Company do not contain ingredients found in traditional cleaning products such as chlorine bleach, ammonia, dyes, phosphates and formaldehyde. Instead, they are made with plant-based and coconut-based cleansers that do not emit toxic vapors, Gavigan said. The cleaning bundle is $35.95. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People, especially parents, are time-poor and need moments in their day to gets things done,â&#x20AC;? Gavigan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our products are nontoxic and we want to help parents get these products in an efficient manner. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guiltfree shopping.â&#x20AC;?

Power Packed Celtic Music

Momix: Botanica

The Manhattan Transfer

Multimedia Dance, Puppets & Fantasy

Alton Brown

The Edible Inevitable Tour

Van Cliburn Gold Medal Winner Classical Piano

NOVEMBER Jack Hanna

Into the Wild Live

Jazz/Pop Superstars

MARCH  

Keeping Dance Alive! Eclectic Dance Concert

Chamber Orchestra Kremlin Dynamic String Orchestra

Wynton Marsalis

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra

Whose Live Anyway?

Elvin Bishop, James Cotton, & Paul Thorn

Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt

Diavolo

Comedy Improv

An Acoustic Evening

Andrew Bird

Multi-Instrumentalist & Musical Innovator

Ballet Folklorico Quetzalli de Veracruz The Music & Dance of Mexico

DECEMBER The Onion Live! The Second City

An Irish Christmas

Rock, Blues & Barroom Boogie Thrilling Gymnastics & Dance

APRIL San Francisco Scottish Fiddlers

High Energy Fiddle Ensemble

Arlo Guthrie Folk Music Icon

MAY Aladdin JR.

Playhouse Youth Theatre

Celebrate the Holidays!

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;HARRIET WEINSTEIN

A longer version of this story appeared in the March/April 2013 issue of E/The Environmental Magazine.

Ukulele Wizard Chico World Music Festival Blue Room Young Company

 

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CN&R 11


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS The women behind the Chico Seed Lending Library (left to right): Sherri Scott, Stephanie Ladwig-Cooper, Joan Bosque and Sarah Vantrease. Inset: Painted Mountain is an heirloom corn variety Sherri Scott has been growing and saving for years.

GLOBAL ENERGY DEMAND SLOWS?

Energy giant BP’s annual review of the global energy market found that demand for coal, gas, oil and nuclear power grew at a reduced pace last year. According to the report, energy consumption slowed to 1.8 percent in 2012 compared to 2.4 percent in 2011, due to such factors as the recession, weak economic growth and increased energy efficiency. Energy demand from developed countries fell 1.2 percent overall, which includes a 2.8 percent drop in the United States, reported The Associated Press. Energy demand continued to rise in India and China which, combined, accounted for nearly 90 percent of the global increase.

SKI RESORTS FOR CLIMATE ACTION

Ski areas across the nation are calling on Congress to take a bold stance on climate change. A total of 115 ski areas in 24 states signed the Climate Declaration, which was also signed by 40 other American businesses and a coalition of large investors and public-interest groups that maintain addressing climate change is “one of America’s greatest economic opportunities of the 21st century,” according to Environment News Service. The ski areas charge that tackling climate change is in the best interest of their industry, which produces roughly $12.2 billion in annual revenue and generates about 160,000 jobs. “It is obvious that the success of ski business operations depends greatly on climate, which is why we are so invested in programs that keep our slopes sustainable,” said Brent Giles, chief sustainability officer for Utah-based POWDR Corp. “But our actions alone won’t be enough without strong policies.”

WILD ANIMALS: NOT CIRCUS ACTS

Colombian legislators passed a bill on June 12 that eventually will ban the use of wild animals in both traveling and non-traveling circuses. Bill 244, 2012, was passed six years after Animal Defenders International launched a public campaign aimed at exposing the widespread suffering of animals used as circus acts in Colombia, according to an ADI press release. The organization’s undercover investigators spent two years in South America documenting the circuses’ poor animal environments, small cages, and violent handling and training methods. Since the campaign—which included scientific reviews, awareness-raising days and public debates—was launched in 2007, similar bans have been enacted in Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay and Peru. Though the ban sought to stop the use of all animals in Colombian circuses, domestic species were excluded in the Senate. Circuses will have two years to comply with the law. Send your eco-related news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R June 20, 2013

Seed security Chico Seed Lending Library brings the revived practice of seed-saving to the fore story and photos by

Jesse Mills

I from your garden and “grown it out” into a plant the following spring, you know

f you’ve ever saved a tomato seed

the feeling. Even if you’ve just made room for a few volunteer plants that came up in the compost pile, you get it: the feeling of unlocking an arcane mystery, participating in an ancient tradition. Becoming a seed saver is a bit like joining a secret society, one that respects the uniqueness—and potential—of each seed. And four Chico women have begun to organize a way for Chicoans to reconnect to that largely lost tradition. In February, the Chico Seed Lending Library (CSLL) quietly announced its fledgling presence on Facebook. The brainchild of Sherri Scott (GRUB Education Program), Stephanie Ladwig-Cooper and Joan Bosque (both of Chico Permaculture Guild), the objective of CSLL—still in the formative stage—is to promote the saving and sharing of open-pollinated vegetable seeds, and to bring this once-common practice back out of the shadows. Not so long ago, saving seeds was anything but secret. Neighbors shared seeds over the garden fence, often unique varieties that had been in the family for generations, each one a link in a chain of growers, some extending back thousands of years. Each season, by selecting seeds from the largest and healthiest specimens, the plants adapted a little more to the climate

and conditions of the region, weaving in a sort of genetic signature of the communities in which they grew. The result was a diverse, resilient and highly localized food supply. Following the exodus of rural populations into cities, many of these traditional skills were forgotten and thousands of heirloom seed varieties became extinct. Since that first dispatch in Febru-

ary, the work on building CSLL has been ongoing, and the growth has been of the invisible kind so familiar to the home gardener: the crucial yet unspectacular development of roots. Communicating, forging connections, developing policy, soliciting donations. Scott and Ladwig-Cooper went on the road seeking inspiration from other seed libraries in the Bay Area, and came back loaded with notes, brochures, new ideas and new alliances. When it came to finding a home for the seed collection, the Chico branch of the Butte County Library seemed an obvious choice. The three women approached branch librarian Sarah Vantrease about a partnership, and she was immediately on board. “It’s really meaningful to have community seeds in a community library,” Vantrease said at a recent project-strategy meeting. “The public library is a really neutral place in town where people from

Seed-saver connection:

Go to www.facebook.com/pages/Chico-SeedLending-Library/357498104365101?fref=ts to hook up with the Chico Seed Lending Library.

all walks come in, and all are welcome.” Interested gardeners with a Butte County Library card will be able to browse the seed library’s collection, choose what they’d like to plant, check out the seeds and grow them. At the end of the growing season, they will collect seeds from their healthiest plants and return them to the library where they are sorted and catalogued for the following season. Seeds are alive, and can avoid extinction only by being regularly grown out by informed gardeners. But it’s not always a simple process. Some seeds require intricate cultivation strategies in order to “breed true” to the parent plant. Squash flowers, for example, require insects for pollination. When a bee enters your squash flower carrying pollen from another variety in a neighbor’s yard, the plant will still produce the desired butternut or pumpkin, but seed saved from that fruit will grow a strange-looking and often unpalatable hybrid. To ensure varietal purity, hand pollination and bagging or taping flowers shut is required. But there’s good news for legume lovers: “Peas and beans are the easiest,” said Ladwig-Cooper. “They actually selfpollinate, and they pollinate before the flower opens all the way,” making crosspollination unlikely. To help gardeners orient themselves, seeds will be rated on a challenge scale: super-easy, easy, and difficult. CSLL will also regularly host instructional workshops

GREENWAYS continued on page 14


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CN&R 13


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BATS VS. MYTHS This educational walk in Lower Bidwell Park—titled Beneficial Bats—on Saturday, June 22, will serve to dispel some longstanding bat myths. Participants will learn about how bats communicate and navigate, and their eating habits. Meet at the Chico Creek Nature Center (1968 E. Eighth St.) at 7:30 p.m. There is a suggested donation of $10; call 891-4671 or go to www.bid wellpark.org for more info.

expand that collection with books donated from supporters. Donated materials and the donated time of volunteers will be the life blood of the project. So far there are more than 30 volunteers on the signup sheet, and more are welcome as the word gets out. Donations of seeds, stamps, envelopes and money are also appreciated. Monetary donations earmarked for CSLL can be made through the county library. There will be a produce exchange at the library at the end of July to raise awareness for the project, and CSLL’s kickoff event will be held there sometime in October. Until then, keep your backs strong and your spades poised, and get ready for a new way to “go local.” Ω

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14 CN&R June 20, 2013

and skill-shares. There will be educational materials on hand, which they’d like to make available in Spanish and Hmong. “We’re really hoping to engage other community organizations” in CSLL’s educational efforts, Ladwig-Cooper said, mentioning the Chico Grange, the Butte County Master Gardeners Program, and 4-H, among others. “That way it becomes an outreach hub for other organizations to get involved with both the seed library and the library, and then outreach to the community about what they’re [working on].” There are some folks in Chico who have already been working quietly in their gardens to keep the tradition alive. Scott said she’s met a few of them at the Seed Swap, the annual free seed exchange she and Ladwig-Cooper organized at the GRUB Cooperative. “There are a number of people who are secret backyard breeders who didn’t have anyone to share with except for maybe a couple neighbors,” Scott said. “They were so excited to come out” and share the regionally adapted varieties they’d been developing. She hopes to elicit their participation in the CSLL. the middle of the library, along with chairs, educational materials and the Chico branch’s entire collection of gardening books, which Vantrease said are in high demand. “Of the gardening books we have, which is in the hundreds, half are checked out on any given day,” she said. She’d like to

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TO PULL OR NOT TO PULL? A CN&R reader wrote me a letter (an actual letter, which I truly appreciate) recently, saying how much he enjoyed Claire Hutkins Seda’s May 23 Greenways feature, “Before you pull it,” on useful weeds. He went on to list a number of other wild, weedy plants for consideration as useful plants, including chicory, acorns and purslane. One plant on his list—pokeweed—took me by surprise, as I have considered it invasive and poisonous, and have sought to eradicate it from my yard year after year as soon as the prolific plant starts to pop up. “When young and green, it’s delicious,” said this reader. “When color appears, its usefulness wanes, although the stillgreen tops are good until berries start to form.” According to EattheWeeds.com, pokeweed is edible and has been eaten for quite some time, particularly in the Southern United States, where cans of Allen’s Poke Salet Greens were sold until the spring of 2000 (apparently, there were not enough people interested in picking pokeweed for Allen’s, says the website of the demise of massproduced, canned pokeweed). But, “if prepared incorrectly or carelessly it can make you quite ill, or worse, put a ‘k’ in front of ill as in kill you,” says the EattheWeeds site. “But when picked and prepared properly, as millions have done over the centuries, it is perhaps the most delicious pot herb of all, one that makes you look forward to next season.” (A “pot herb,” I learned from TheFreeDictionary.com, is “A plant whose leaves, stems, or flowers are cooked and eaten or used as seasoning.”) EattheWeeds.com goes on to say that one should “never eat the seeds or the root [of the pokeweed plant]. Accidental poisonings have happened by people getting a little root with the shoot. And never eat a mature pokeweed. What’s mature? For safety, I would consider any pokeweed over 7 inches mature and off-limits. And/or any pokeweed with deep red stems, no matter how short it is.” I asked Dan Efseaff, the city of Chico’s parks and natural resources manager (and an opponent of invasive plants) to weigh in: “We have a very active progam against common pokeweed (Phytolacca americana),” wrote Efseaff in an email. “It is a shade-tolerant perennial … and thrives in deep, moist soils (and can dominate areas along creeks and rivers in California). Pokeweed is native to the eastern U.S. “All parts of pokeweed are considered fatal to mammals (!),” he continued, “but not birds (who do most of the spreading of the seed). It supposedly has medicinal values and can be used for food, but I always see the warning ‘must be specially prepared’ when authors mention those values (which makes me nervous about what you might need to do to make it right). Phytolacca americana “I have not looked at the toxicity in depth, but it makes me nervous about noting the edible aspects of it without the cautions and the potential for poisoning (i.e., ‘Sure, it’s a cheap substitute for asparagus, but it also can kill you’ … or ‘It can clear up itching, but the convulsions and potential for death also take your mind off the itching, too.’” (Efseaff including a smileyface icon at this point.) For more info on pokeweed, go to www.tinyurl.com/pokesaletweed and read the invasive-plant profile of American pokeweed in the fall 2012 issue of the city Park Division’s quarterly newsletter. Go to EattheWeeds.com and search “pokeweed” to read (a lot) more about the “prime potherb.” EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

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CN&R 15


THE PULSE AUTISM THERAPY ‘ESSENTIAL BENEFIT’

Golden State autism-care advocates received some good news on the heels of their disappointment after the state budget agreed upon by Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislative Budget Conference Committee eliminated a $50 million general-fund provision to fund autism services. Senate Bill 126, authored by Sen. Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), “would require California insurers to include applied behavior analysis— known as ABA therapy—as an essential benefit under the Affordable Care Act,” according to California Healthline. The proposed law, unanimously approved by the Assembly Committee on Health, would affect approximately 12,700 people with private insurance who are diagnosed with autism. “This bill is a huge step in the right direction in giving families a ray of hope that brings light at the end of the tunnel,” Steinberg said.

CHILDREN’S HOSPITALS GET NOD

Pediatric orthopedics programs at two North State children’s hospitals were jointly ranked among the top in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. The magazine’s top 50 children’s orthopedics programs in the nation for 2013-14 included a conjunctive effort from Northern California’s Shriners Hospitals for Children and the UC Davis Children’s Hospital, according to a Shriners press release. Both of the hospitals are located minutes from downtown Sacramento. “We have worked hard, and successfully, with UC Davis to form relationships that strengthen all our programs and, most important, enhance the quality of care available to children and families in our region,” said Margaret Bryan, administrator and CEO of Shriners Hospitals for Children—Northern California.

PROZAC BAD FOR FISH

Fish exposed to antidepressant drugs become anxious, antisocial and homicidal, new research finds. Rebecca Klaper, a professor of freshwater sciences who presented her findings at a Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry conference last fall, found that exposure to three common antidepressants made male fathead minnows ignore females, take more time capturing prey, take longer routes and make more directional changes when evading predators, and even kill females in some cases, according to Environmental Health News. The minnows were introduced to water tainted with the antidepressants Prozac and Effexor, and Tegretol, an anti-convulsant and mood-stabilizing drug, at levels found in wastewater discharged into streams. Antidepressants are the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States—with about 250 million prescriptions filled every year—and are also the highest-documented drug found contaminating waterways. Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R June 20, 2013

HEALTHLINES “There are a lot of hidden costs in health care that people don’t realize,” says Kevin Erich, CEO of Paradise’s Feather River Hospital.

Why so high?

PHOTO COURTESY OF FEATHER RIVER HOSPITAL

A look at the hidden costs behind what local hospitals charge health-care consumers by

Evan Tuchinsky

Mtal for care experience the same side-effect: sticker shock. “Twenty-five

any people who go to a hospi-

dollars for one aspirin? How can that be?” Some of the high prices correlate to the delicate dance between hospitals and insurance companies, in order to reach a “discounted” total that both can live with. But hospitals also incur a lot of expenses to keep running 24/7—some expenses that are obvious, but many that are inconspicuous. “There are a lot of hidden costs in health care that people don’t realize,” said Kevin Erich, CEO of Feather River Hospital in Paradise. “They look at the aspirin and say, ‘Why does the aspirin cost so much?’ It’s not that the aspirin costs so much; you’re also paying for the support system around that aspirin in case you need more services than just that aspirin.” The CN&R asked three local hospitals’ CEOs—Erich, Oroville Hospital’s Robert Wentz and Enloe Medical Center’s Mike Wiltermood—about these hidden costs. (They listed so many that we couldn’t fit them into a single story, so this is the first of a two-part series.) “I think that the public is probably not as tuned in as we’d like them to be about the so-called hidden costs,” Wiltermood said. “Clearly, when we provide community benefits, that’s a decision we make to help enhance our service to the community, even if it’s not compensated for. Some of the more insidious costs have to do with rules and regulations. There’s almost too many of these things to count.” Hospitals need to pay staff, naturally,

but unlike most businesses, hospitals never close. Their emergency rooms and inpatient wards continuously operate. Hospitals need doctors on call—either physically in the facility or at home nearby, available by phone—as well as nurses. Those physicians are, in essence, independent contractors. As Wentz explained, “California is one of the few states that doesn’t allow for doctors to be employed by hospitals, so that means hospitals have to go through costly organizations or contracts in order bring a doctor in and make sure they’re adequately compensated when they work in our community.” Hospitals can employ nurses directly, but state regulations determine the staffing levels. The more intensive the care, the more nurses on duty to meet the nurse-topatient ratio. Wentz and Wiltermood explained that these ratios are determined by the ward a patient is in, rather than the condition of the patient. So, when rooms in “stepdown” wards (for those patients requiring less care) are unavailable, patients who

may no longer require intensive care remain in intensive-care, with the corresponding amount of nurses. Stays in intensive-care are more expensive, but insurance plans don’t always pay a variable rate based on the patient’s ward, but rather on his or her procedure. “There are a lot of positives about mandatory nurse-patient staffing ratios,” Wiltermood said, “but sometimes, because it’s a black-and-white rule, it does create some additional cost to hospitals that I think could be avoided, and it does limit your creativity in terms of your staffing. We’ve gotten used to it in California, but it does fix our cost at higher rates per patients than states that don’t have those rules.” State regulations also impact

equipment. On top of the price for sophisticated technology comes the approval process, which Wiltermood said can take up to a year. A hospital can’t just replace HEALTHLINES continued on page 18

APPOINTMENT A FAIR DAY FOR HEALTH A display of the da Vinci SI Surgical System robot, along with free health screenings like cholesterol checks and blood pressure monitoring, make Oroville Hospital’s Community Health Fair on Saturday, June 22, worth checking out. The fair (which includes a Next Top Surgeon contest for kids) will be held at Oroville Sports Club (2600 Oro Dam Blvd.) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 538-0123 or go to www.orovillehospital.com for more info.


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an outdated CT scanner, for instance; state regulators must approve an application to do so. The process costs the hospital in terms of time and energy—work for which the hospital must pay. Next come what Wiltermood calls “market forces”—how manufacturers set themselves up to compete with others. “We have so many vendors who market directly to physicians and patients,” he explained, “and they create markets that are very expensive … and the difference [between their products] is negligible.” As an example, Wiltermood cited the various implants available for knee-replacement surgery. Not only does the hospital need to buy the implant, but also a “tool kit” specifically for that implant that won’t work on a competitor’s implant. “We’re highly vendor-driven,” he noted. “Everybody is trying to get an edge or do something a little bit better, a little bit faster. Any vendor who can promise that usually has the ear of the clinicians, and it does at times make it very difficult for us to standardize processes, which is really where the savings is.” A major technology expense stems from the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The PPACA requires hospitals to adopt electronic health records— computer-based data storage—as opposed to paper charts. The federal government offered financial incentives to help defray the cost

Next week in Healthlines: The second in a two-part series on hidden costs of operating a hospital.

of buying new hardware and software, but hidden costs include maintenance, training and additional time required to input information into the system. “Health-care information systems are way behind regular industry—they’re very costly and very time-consuming, difficult to operate,” Wiltermood said. “That to me is a huge cost we’ve seen escalate in health care over the past five years or so. Ironically, the more we use computers, the more [work] hours we have to pay for to make sure our patients get the bedside care they’re supposed to get.” As with other equipment, there is no single system of electronic records. It’s another vendor-driven industry, albeit one where the federal government requires a degree of interconnectivity. Hospitals have little choice but to pay these—and many other— hidden costs. Ask a CEO what percentage of the operating budget goes to behind-the-curtain infrastructure, and you may not be able to get an accurate answer. “You can analyze it, but I think there’d be a large degree of error,” Wentz said. “One of the problems is it becomes integrated into the fabric of our organization and it is just part of the cost.” Ω

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CN&R 19


Clockwise from left: The entryway to the Reynolds residence on Estates Way. PHOTO BY DAVE KELLEY

E.T. Reynolds, Butte County supervisor, circa 1889. Sherman A. Reynolds at Butte Meadows, circa 1900. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MERIAM LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

Backyard views of the Reynolds residence. PHOTOS BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Life as a house

a

I

n early 1959, Edward Reynolds strode through a 7-acre almond orchard, mentally noting the size and species of the nut trees, automatically calculating the yield in pounds—the whole time keeping an eye out for a suitable location for his new house. Reynolds was the plant manager at Tri-Co Almonds, Inc., the largest independent almond handler and processing company in California. Tri-Co stood on the southwest corner of Whitman and East 20th streets, where Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s hops field is now located. Reynolds was beloved by his workers and friends alike. He was a quiet man, which obscured the fact that he was a scion of a well-to-do Chico family, one that had exerted influence locally in both business and politics since the 1870s. The house he was soon to build was markedly different from the large

20 CN&R June 20, 2013

and often ostentatious mansions—like the Goodman House and the Stansbury House— that Chico’s wealthy families historically had favored in the late 1890s. Reflecting the changes that had come along by the mid-20th century, Reynolds opted for the prevailing nationwide style of the times—a ranch house. The style is loosely based on early Spanish Colonial forms seen in the American Southwest, modified by influences borrowed from the Prairie style, and to a lesser extent the Craftsman style. Asymmetrical exterior facades, long roof overhangs and massive, centrally located chimneys are Prairie style, whereas natural materials and muted earth-tone colors come from the Craftsman period. The Reynolds residence is an uncomplicated, single-story, wood-framed building—clad with vertical clear-heart redwood-board siding,

A mid-century residence tells a tale of Chico history, agriculture and architecture topped off with a low-slope roof with deep overhangs—closely embracing the site. It differs from ornate mansions by its lack of decoration. The residence is not a cookie-cutter home like many other period houses in the Park Estates subdivision, which is bordered on the north and east by Bidwell Park and to the south by Parkview Elementary School Reflecting his family’s own desires, as well as the spirit of the times, Reynolds’ house values privacy over showiness, mod-

esty over grandiosity, while at the same time subtly creating a sophisticated space where prominence is projected inward. The house speaks volumes about how Chico has changed over the years, changes that were reflected by the Reynolds family’s own history. Reynolds’ grandfather, E.T. Reynolds,

arrived in San Francisco in 1869 at the age of 22. The Gilded Age culture didn’t fit his

Midwest upbringing, which exposed him to both agriculture and small business. BY Reputedly, in DAVE 1870, E.T. Reynolds KELLEY walked north from San Francisco, arriving in Chico with nothing but a bedroll. From this humble beginning he went to work for Charles Sherman, hauling supplies up to the mining camps and lumber mills around Butte Meadows, coming back down the mountain carrying a full load of lumber. His hard work proved fortuitous, and he became a business partner with Sherman. During the off-season, they both hired themselves out to plow fields. In 1876, they leased a large tract of land in Colusa County and

began growing wheat and barley. After five years of making good money, they bought 1,600 acres of the Reavis Ranch along River Road, which today is home to Chico’s Water Pollution Control Plant. E.T. Reynolds entered politics in 1884, when he was elected to the Butte County Board of Supervisors from the 2nd District, where he served for 17 years. Edward Reynolds’ father, Sherman A. Reynolds, inherited his father’s political ambitions and was elected in 1915 as a city trustee (a City Council member, in today’s parlance) from the Third Ward, then one of Chico’s electoral districts. He chaired the fire, light and water commission and was instrumental in equipping the Fire Department with motor power on the steamer

“The house he was soon to build was markedly different from the large and often ostentatious mansions—like the Goodman House and the Stansbury House—that Chico’s wealthy families historically had favored in the late 1890s.”

“HOUSE” continued on page 22 June 20, 2013

CN&R 21


Clockwise from left: The entryway to the Reynolds residence on Estates Way. PHOTO BY DAVE KELLEY

E.T. Reynolds, Butte County supervisor, circa 1889. Sherman A. Reynolds at Butte Meadows, circa 1900. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MERIAM LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

Backyard views of the Reynolds residence. PHOTOS BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Life as a house

a

I

n early 1959, Edward Reynolds strode through a 7-acre almond orchard, mentally noting the size and species of the nut trees, automatically calculating the yield in pounds—the whole time keeping an eye out for a suitable location for his new house. Reynolds was the plant manager at Tri-Co Almonds, Inc., the largest independent almond handler and processing company in California. Tri-Co stood on the southwest corner of Whitman and East 20th streets, where Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s hops field is now located. Reynolds was beloved by his workers and friends alike. He was a quiet man, which obscured the fact that he was a scion of a well-to-do Chico family, one that had exerted influence locally in both business and politics since the 1870s. The house he was soon to build was markedly different from the large

20 CN&R June 20, 2013

and often ostentatious mansions—like the Goodman House and the Stansbury House— that Chico’s wealthy families historically had favored in the late 1890s. Reflecting the changes that had come along by the mid-20th century, Reynolds opted for the prevailing nationwide style of the times—a ranch house. The style is loosely based on early Spanish Colonial forms seen in the American Southwest, modified by influences borrowed from the Prairie style, and to a lesser extent the Craftsman style. Asymmetrical exterior facades, long roof overhangs and massive, centrally located chimneys are Prairie style, whereas natural materials and muted earth-tone colors come from the Craftsman period. The Reynolds residence is an uncomplicated, single-story, wood-framed building���clad with vertical clear-heart redwood-board siding,

A mid-century residence tells a tale of Chico history, agriculture and architecture topped off with a low-slope roof with deep overhangs—closely embracing the site. It differs from ornate mansions by its lack of decoration. The residence is not a cookie-cutter home like many other period houses in the Park Estates subdivision, which is bordered on the north and east by Bidwell Park and to the south by Parkview Elementary School Reflecting his family’s own desires, as well as the spirit of the times, Reynolds’ house values privacy over showiness, mod-

esty over grandiosity, while at the same time subtly creating a sophisticated space where prominence is projected inward. The house speaks volumes about how Chico has changed over the years, changes that were reflected by the Reynolds family’s own history. Reynolds’ grandfather, E.T. Reynolds,

arrived in San Francisco in 1869 at the age of 22. The Gilded Age culture didn’t fit his

Midwest upbringing, which exposed him to both agriculture and small business. BY Reputedly, in DAVE 1870, E.T. Reynolds KELLEY walked north from San Francisco, arriving in Chico with nothing but a bedroll. From this humble beginning he went to work for Charles Sherman, hauling supplies up to the mining camps and lumber mills around Butte Meadows, coming back down the mountain carrying a full load of lumber. His hard work proved fortuitous, and he became a business partner with Sherman. During the off-season, they both hired themselves out to plow fields. In 1876, they leased a large tract of land in Colusa County and

began growing wheat and barley. After five years of making good money, they bought 1,600 acres of the Reavis Ranch along River Road, which today is home to Chico’s Water Pollution Control Plant. E.T. Reynolds entered politics in 1884, when he was elected to the Butte County Board of Supervisors from the 2nd District, where he served for 17 years. Edward Reynolds’ father, Sherman A. Reynolds, inherited his father’s political ambitions and was elected in 1915 as a city trustee (a City Council member, in today’s parlance) from the Third Ward, then one of Chico’s electoral districts. He chaired the fire, light and water commission and was instrumental in equipping the Fire Department with motor power on the steamer

“The house he was soon to build was markedly different from the large and often ostentatious mansions—like the Goodman House and the Stansbury House—that Chico’s wealthy families historically had favored in the late 1890s.”

“HOUSE” continued on page 22 June 20, 2013

CN&R 21


“HOUSE” continued from page 21

wagon and fire truck. Sherman A. Reynolds attended Chico Normal School for a few years but quit early to enter the fruit business with his father. In 1898, they established the E. T. Reynolds and Son Co., specializing in fruit drying, packing and shipping. By 1902, business had boomed, and they expanded to occupy two warehouses on the northwest corner of West First and Cherry streets. Eventually, E.T. Reynolds and Son merged with another local nut processor, later becoming Tri-Co. Almonds, Inc., where Edward Reynolds managed the plant operations. The warehouse buildings and land owned by E. T. Reynolds and Son were donated to Chico State in 1971. One hundred-plus years of industrial-agricultural history was torn down about seven years ago to make way for construction of Chico State’s Wildcat Recreation Center, which opened its doors in 2009. The only remaining link to that past is the lumber—milled from original rough-sawn roof timbers, sanded smooth and covered with a glossy finish—now adorning the reception counters in the gymnasium’s lobby. These remaining timbers are a true facade, masking the Reynolds’ robust industrial past. The 1960s were transitional in Chico, whose well-off residents were moving away from the pronounced display of social status between the 1920s and the mid-1950s. People joined groups and social clubs such as the Comanche Riders, the Cosmos and the No Host Dance Club. Many would gather in the late afternoon at the Hotel Oaks, and then retire to someone’s house in the evening to dance and enjoy catered parties. The transition away from this conspicuous display of wealth began in 1941, during World War II, when the Chico Municipal Airport became the home of the Army Air Corps base. At the height of the war-effort activity, the air base employed more than 4,000 personnel. This boom brought a lot of money to town and many wannabe young pilots (aka flyboys). A local old-timer and former Tri-Co Almonds employee said that “the flyboys fell in love with local girls, came back after the war, and established many new businesses. “The newcomers melded harmoniously with the local agriculture crowd.” 22 CN&R June 20, 2013

Reynolds made his move in

1960 and purchased the 7-acre orchard tract, carving out one lot for his family and selling the remainder off to the Park Estates residential developer. At that time, social circles were as influential in the soft governance of Chico as the Bidwells were in their day. During the 1960s, local movers and shakers outsourced their medical care and residential designs to the Bay Area. Reynolds acted locally and hired architect Lawrence G. Thomson, who was born and raised in Chester. Thomson began his practice in San Francisco and was influenced by acclaimed architect Bernard Maybeck, who had developed an eclectic vocabulary of designs, borrowing heavily from

“The home is designed such that every move and turn keeps day-to-day life fresh and invigorating.”

regional indigenous elements. Maybeck’s most recognized work is the Palace of Fine Arts, located in the Marina District of San Francisco, next to the Presidio. Maybeck mentored Thomson and architect Julia Morgan, famous for her work on the Hearst Castle in San Simeon. Locally, she designed Chico State’s Albert E. Warrens Reception Center, the former Presi-

Clockwise from top left: Recent photo of a 1902 home in Berkeley designed by famed architect Bernard Maybeck. PHOTO COURTESY OF BERKELEYSIDE

Maybeck at Mission Carmel, circa 1919. PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTEREY COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES

Architect Lawrence G. Thomson in his office in May 1980. PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK AMBROSIA

dent’s Mansion, at 341 Mansion Ave. Thomson spent countless hours studying Maybeck’s turn-of-thecentury houses in Sausalito and Tiburon, and in the Berkeley Hills. In fact, Maybeck’s family occasionally babysat Thomson’s son. Notable parallels between Maybeck’s and Thomson’s work include experimentation with innovative building materials; extensive use of native woods; large, full-height windows that blur the line between indoors and outdoors; broad eaves to shade interior views; handcrafted details; spatial integration with the landscaping; and environmentally responsive building orientations. These features are evident in the well-known local buildings designed by Thomson, such as the Chico City Council chambers and the Chico branch of the Butte County Library. Thomson’s goal in designing Reynolds’ house was to maximize personal privacy and indoor/outdoor social spaces simultaneously,

without losing scale and intimacy, which can easily occur with larger residences. Basic interior elements in

the 2,400-square-foot house include a living room/entry foyer, a dining/family room, a kitchen/ breakfast nook, two bedrooms, a den, three bathrooms, and a laundry room that connects the house to the carport. Exterior elements consist of two outdoor patios, one covered by the deep roof overhang, and an oval-shaped swimming pool with sitting benches around the wide concrete pool deck—all surrounded by a beautiful, tranquil backdrop of Japanese maples, dogwood trees and flowering rhododendrons. Thomson’s formidable design challenge was to organize and link these interior and exterior elements together, arranging the spaces to accommodate their inherent functional needs—providing smooth spatial transitions that imbue the experience with richness, beauty and fun. He mastered the design challenge, in part, through the careful

and subtle use of underlying axial orientation, which simply directs the eyes toward a specific view, or in a certain direction, or to a particular object. Among other methods, he accomplished this by ending hallways with windows instead of solid walls and contrasting floor textures/materials at key intersections. The home is designed such that every move and turn keeps day-today life fresh and invigorating. But Thomson’s design starts long before the front door is opened; the location of the residence is a key element. Approached from the street, the front entry appears distant, framed by a set of clay-brick piers demarcating the street-side driveway opening. With no formal sidewalk in sight, a long, narrow, curved driveway beckons arrival at the front door. Once there, the architecture feels a bit underwhelming. But the mood lifts immediately once inside the entry foyer. Looking at the far end of the living room, the darkbrown posts separating the floor-to-


About the author:

Dave Kelley is an associate architect at Nichols Melburg & Rossetto Architects in Chico, a former Chico planning commissioner and an occasional contributor to Chico News & Review. He was a candidate for City Council in 2012.

A view of the Reynolds home from the breakfast nook. The Horgan family (also pictured on the cover) has the perfect spot to sit and enjoy backyard views. Erin and James Horgan bought the home in 2010. PHOTOS BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

ceiling windows frame the backyard landscaping, glowing greenish-yellow from the sun’s illumination and drawing one’s eyes outdoors. The living room divides passive and active functions, with the sleeping quarters to the left and the dining and kitchen areas to the right. A hallway that crosses in front of the entry alcove connects the two opposing functions. The right side of the living room is anchored by a large free-standing

brick fireplace, squat and wide, prohibiting an easy view around its sides. Moving forward, two unexpected passageways are revealed, one on each end of the fireplace, that lead to the active portion of the house. This massive, centrally located fireplace is another space divider, far more exciting than a simple sheetrocked stud wall. The best outside view is along the glass walls that stretch from the living room to the breakfast nook. The real grand vista is courtesy of

Bidwell Park, where oldgrowth sycamores loom tall on the skyline, again focusing the eyes. This time of year, smaller deciduous trees with full canopies shorten the vista, providing enclosure and perceived privacy. In the winter, barren tree branches create a feeling of expansion, allowing the eyes to roam freely into the horizon, reducing indoor isolation. Kevin Quinn, the home’s

owner from 1998 through 2010, firmly believes Thomson achieved his initial design goals by taming “the wild chunk of space” with his design skills. Quinn credits Thomson for framing views “in his head, before those rooms or windows existed,” and said that Thomson “uses scale but he doesn’t compete with it. “Thomson intended everything about this house to be particular to this lot and this site,” Quinn said. Erin and James Horgan bought

Roof timbers from the old Reynolds Warehouse were planed and reused for counters at Chico State’s Wildcat Recreation Center. PHOTO BY DAVE KELLEY

the house from Quinn in 2010. James is a second-generation Chicoan, who runs his own accounting firm for professional service companies; he specializes in accounting services for doctors, dentists and lawyers. Erin came to Chico to go to the university, and ended up falling in love with James and the city. The couple lived in Tucson, Ariz., for a time and then moved back to Chico. One day when bicycling through Bidwell Park with their two young children, they spotted a for-sale sign tacked to the backside of a wooden fence. Erin arranged to see the house and said the living room is what sold her on the residence. “I fell in love with the view out to the back yard,” she said. “I would have bought the house for the livingroom view itself.” She also loves being in the back yard, and said she especially appre-

ciates the changing seasons “where winter colors are beige, brown and blues coming from the sky” and “the summers are green and filled with blooming colors from the maples and dogwoods.” The couple also enjoy the immediate access to the park and the seclusion to raise their children. Great architecture is hard to pin down, but you know it when you see it, feel it, sense it—and when it satisfies. Mediocre architecture, on the other hand, provides ample opportunities for criticism; imperfections are easily recognized. Reynolds and Thomson created a wonderful residence—a space with a continuous sense of presence and balance. This house tells a fabulous story, linking the history of an early Chico family to the region’s early agricultural industry and also to Thomson’s exemplary architecture— a past worthy of recognition. Ω June 20, 2013

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture THIS WEEK

Twang for your buck

20

THURS

Special Events THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. This week: acoustic music with Bob McDaniel, folk, rock and blues with Kate Tansey and the Chico School of Rock KidFest. Th, 6-9pm. Prices vary. Downtown Chico, www.downtownchico.net.

Wayne ‘The Train’ Hancock makes a raucous stop in Chico

T proved to be a fine venue for music on June 11, as retro country-swing master he Blue Room Theatre

Wayne “The Train” Hancock returned to Chico and turned the room into a swingin’ hillstory and photo by billy honky-tonk roadAlan house. For 2 1/2 hours, Sheckter Hancock led his three sidemen through a couple of dozen twangy tales of heartache, drinking REVIEW: and life of the road. Wayne Hancock The intimate theater’s and Michelin Embers, June 11, tiered seating, and black Blue Room Theatre. walls, ceiling and floors, added to the roadhouse vibe. And stylishly dressed swing dancers—men in jeans and women in summer dresses—added to the feeling of a happy hootenanny, and brought smiles to Hancock’s sweat-beaded face. Hancock’s world is one of grease and grit, and he plays and sings from the heart. Dressed in a blue long-sleeve work shirt and thickly cuffed denim jeans, and sporting neatly slicked-back hair, the 48-yearold Hancock was all business on stage. Admittedly suffering from a nasty cold (“I got a flu shot when I left Texas, and it worked: I got the flu,” he said at the outset), Hancock chugged from song to song, many of which had a fundamental trainlike rhythm, reminiscent of Johnny Cash. 24 CN&R June 20, 2013

Music CHICO SCHOOL OF ROCK KIDFEST: The Chico School of Rock student

Hancock’s past bouts with alcohol, including a 2011 stint in rehab are no secret, but he was on top of his game on this night. Tossing in many songs from his own catalog as well as a number of old-timey covers, Hancock was in town in support of his latest project, Ride, the first of his nine albums ever to make the charts. Acting as bandleader, front man, rhythm guitarist and lead vocalist, Hancock appeared with twin twangy lead-guitarists Zach Sweeney and Bob “Texaco” Stafford (the latter also played trombone), as well as Jim Karrow on stand-up bass. Hancock-penned tunes, many of which lasted only three or four minutes, included tales of the road—such as “Thunderstorms and Neon Lights,” with the lyric, “This here motel livin’ is the only life for me”— and love, such as “Little Lisa”: “Oh little Lisa, you done stole my heart/ I miss your kisses, when we’re apart.” Other songs, such as “Johnson City,” touched on both love and the road: “All I need with me’s my honey and a thousand miles of open desert road.” The long set also included such covers as Bob Wills’ “Take Me Back to Tulsa” and George Gershwin’s “Summertime.” Hancock is a pretty fair guitar player and his Hank Williams-like voice is pleasing enough, but it’s his songs, and his delivery of them, as well as a charismatic, old-time-country persona, that combine for an irresistible package. With a sound

Wayne ‘The Train’ Hancock brought his gritty brand of hillbilly honky-tonk to the Blue Room Theatre June 11. PHOTO BY ALAN SHECKTER

concert during the Thursday Night Market also features a “musical petting zoo” in which a wide variety of instruments are available to pick up and play. Th, 6/20, 6-9pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 894-2526.

Theater THE BLACK BIRD SINGS: The classic detective noir The Maltese

Falcon is retold in this musical adaptation. Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

that brings to mind folks like Williams and Jimmie Rodgers, Hancock excels in a world of country music far removed from the glitz and glamour of today’s big-name country-pop stars, such as Taylor Swift. Notably, in a recent review with the Herald & Review of Decatur, Ill., Hancock said he didn’t even know who Swift was, adding, “I don’t know the singers people are talking about, and that’s not a swipe against them. I don’t listen to it because I can’t relate to it. … That part of the industry is a dam that only allows what it wants to pass through.” The show, one of several music offerings at the Blue Room this year as the venerable playhouse refocuses (Chad Lewis has replaced Fred Stuart as artistic director) was produced by KZFR-FM community radio as a partial benefit for the station. Chico’s own Michelin Embers, now featuring Scott “Ska T” Pressman (joining fellow local old-timer Steve Bragg, plus front man Johnny Meehan and CN&R writer Ken Smith on ukulele) on lap-steel guitar, provided a wonderfully appropriate opening act, offering a neat set of what they call “Western skiffle.” Ω

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES: An upbeat musical comedy following the Wonderettes to high school prom in 1958, set to classic ’50s hits. Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su, 2pm. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

BUTTE COUNTY OLIVE FESTIVAL Saturday, June 22 Ehmann Home, oroville

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS Art 1078 GALLERY: Mythos, a new series of oil

BBQ COOK-OFF Saturday, June 22 Feather Falls Casino SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

paintings from Daniel Papke. Through 6/29. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

ANGELO’S CUCINA TRINACRIA: Go Fish: Koi

Games, paintings by Dolores Mitchell of Avenue 9 Gallery. Through 6/30. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Acumen, photography by Karma Ganzler and sculpture by Doug Rathbun following a theme of preserving nature. Through 6/29. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: Community Challenge Art Exhibition, the center’s first-ever Community Challenge Show in which all pieces reference rock-paper-scissors. Through 7/5. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 8958726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO MUNICIPAL BUILDING: Camera Club

21

FRI

Music EBONY & IVORY MUSIC SERIES: The monthly music series to benefit the restoration of the club’s Steinway concert grand piano continues with Rube and the Rhythm Rockers, a five-piece blues band playing an eclectic mix of styles. Festivities include wine, hors d’oeuvres and dancing. F, 6/21, 6-8pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978, www.chicowomensclub.org.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with blues and soul from The Amy Celeste Band. F, 78:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 896-7200, www.down townchico.net.

Theater THE BLACK BIRD SINGS: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheater company.com.

22

SAT

Special Events BBQ COOK-OFF: Professional North State “pit masters” compete in a three-meat cook-off set to live music. Sa, 6/22, 1:30pm. $10. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 559-5274, www.featherfallscasino.com.

BUTTE COUNTY OLIVE FESTIVAL: Olive and olive oil tastings, live music, drawings, beer tasting

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

and tours of the Ehmann Home. Call for more info. Sa, 6/22, 11am-4pm. Free admission. Ehmann Home, 1480 Lincoln St. in Oroville, (530) 877-7436.

PERCEPTION PREMIERE: The premier of a locally shot, 26-minute romantic drama. Two other local short films, Fray and Fly, will open. Sa, 6/22, 3pm, Su, 6/23, 6pm. $5. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St.

Music ELVIN BISHOP: The blues and rock ’n’ roll guitarist and songwriter, best known for penning the 1976 hit “Fooled Around and Fell in Love,” plays the brewery. Sa, 6/22, 9pm. $20-$30. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885 ext. 510, www.featherfalls casino.com.

Theater THE BLACK BIRD SINGS: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheater company.com.

23

SUN

pong and more to benefit KZFR Community Radio. Go online for a team entry form. Su, 6/23, 10am. $5. Chico Racquet Club & Resort, 1629 Manzanita Ave., (530) 895-0706, www.kzfr.org.

PERCEPTION PREMIERE: See Saturday. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St.

Theater THE BLACK BIRD SINGS: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheater company.com.

24

MON

Poetry/Literature WRITERS OF THE FUTURE BOOK SIGNING: A book signing with North State authors Tina Gower and Stephen Sottong, both of whom were featured in L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future, Volume 29. M, 6/24, 7-8pm. Free. Lyon Books, 135 Main St., (530) 891-3338, www.lyonbooks.com.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 32

Special Events KZFR BOCCE BALL TOURNAMENT: A 16-team bocce

Exhibit, works by the Chico Camera Club on display. Through 7/12. 411 Main St., (530) 8967214.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Woven Memories, a new series with a painter’s approach to tapestry mofits by Marilyn Jennings. Through 6/30. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

ELLIS ART & ENGINEERING SUPPLIES: Window

Gallery: Acrylic Paintings, Giraffes, hummingbirds, big pink trees and more rendered in bright colors by Paul Hood and Sheryl Karas. Through 6/30. 122 Broadway St., (530) 891-0335, www.ellishasit.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Raymond Eastman, oil paintings by Raymond Eastman on display.

Through 7/18. 265 Cohasset Rd., inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS & APPRAISALS: Tony Natsoulas & Jeff Nebeker Exhibition, works in clay varying from figurative sculptures to alluring pastries and desserts in wonderful colors. Through 6/29. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.james snidlefinearts.com.

MANAS ART SPACE & GALLERY: LP Cookie

Camp Mystery Mixer. For this group show artists chose a used LP, picked up a fortune cookie and got inspired. Through 6/28. 1441-C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Figure Drawing

Group Show, featuring work from the Sally Dimas figure drawing group. Through 7/27. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 345-3063.

line drawings from John McMackin on display. Through 6/30. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

Call for Artists ALL MEDIA SHOW: Works in all media accepted for this national juried exhibition intended to showcase diversity. Through 7/5. $25 for two works. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.ChicoArtCenter.com.

ARSENIC & OLD LACE AUDITIONS: A casting call for eleven men (ages 25 to 80) and one young woman (ages 25 to 35). Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script, but come prepared with a recitation. Sa, 6/22, 1pm. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

BIRDS OF A FEATHER EXHIBITION: An openentry exhibit inviting artists to explore human nature in any medium. Submit work from July 10 to 13. Call or go online for more info. Through 7/13. $5-$10. Manas Art Space & Gallery, 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183, www.manasartspace.com.

CHICO ICONS: NEIGHBORHOOD: Works in various mediums (using the theme “neighborhood” as a creative springboard) accepted. Go online for complete requirements and submission info. Through 6/29. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com/call-for-artists.

Museums BUTTE COUNTY PIONEER MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Antique Firearms Display, an exhibition of firearms designed and manufactured before the beginning of the 20th century. Ongoing. 2332 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Secrets of

Circles, an exhibition exploring the properties of a simple shape with powerful applications. Through 9/1. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Infinity & Beyond, an exhibit tracing early human celestial observation to modern space endeavors with a Russian Sokol Space suit, a moon rock and brand-new footage of deep space on display. Ongoing. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY:

Prints & Contour Line Art, intaglio etchings and collagraphs from Michael Halldorson and continual

ball tournament along with live music, food, adult refreshment, swimming, volleyball, ping-

KZFR BOCCE BALL TOURNAMENT Sunday, June 23 Chico Racquet Club & Resort SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Eyes wide open Perception, a homegrown 26-minute romantic drama, and the latest from local auteur Shawn Dyer, premieres this weekend at the Pageant Theatre with showings on Saturday, June 22, at 3 p.m. and Sunday, June 23, at 6 p.m. The non-linear film follows a man, Robert, who wrestles with perceptions of the world and EDITOR’S PICK of his romantic relationship after suffering a terrible accident. Two other local films, Fray and Fly, will also be shown. Dyer co-founded the now-defunct Not Quite Hollywood production company and currently runs his own company, Ulexite Films.

June 20, 2013

CN&R 25


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DISCOVER

BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave. North off of Hwy 32 and East Ave, (530) 321-5607.

AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

BENEFICIAL BATS: An educational walk in Lower Bidwell Park covering bat communication, navigation, eating habits and more. Call to register. Sa, 6/22, 7:30-9pm. $10 suggested donation. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwell park.org.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.butte county.net.

CHAPMAN FARMERS MARKET: A year-round Certified Farmers Market serving as a community forum for healthy lifestyle promotion and education. F, 2-5:30pm through 7/25. Chapman Mulberry Community Center, 1010 Cleveland Ave. (530) 624-8844, www.cchaos.org.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DANCING FREEDOM: A weekly open dance with

the elements. First and Second F of every month, 6-8pm; Third F of every month. $6-$12 sliding scale. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 532-1989.

EAT RIGHT WHEN MONEY IS TIGHT: A monthly class to help low-income families establish health eating habits. Third Th of every month, 6-7pm through 6/21. Free. OPT for Healthy Living, 1311 Mangrove Ave., (530) 345-0678, www.optfitforkids.org.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:30pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods, honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers’ Market, parking lot at Second and Flume streets, (530) 893-3276.

FARMERS MARKET: NORTH CHICO: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. W, 7:30am-noon through 11/22. North Valley Plaza, 801 East Ave.

FARMERS MARKET: PARADISE: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Tu, 7:30am-noon through 10/15. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7069.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor

medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave. Corner of Downing and E. 1st Ave, (530) 5188300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

FUEL: An inspirational documentary about moving away from fossil fuels, followed by a discussion. Su, 6/23, 6-9pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/ bclibrary.

26 CN&R June 20, 2013

CIRCUSRENO.COM

Saturday, June 22 Chico Creek Nature Center SEE COMMUNITY

PARADISE FARMERS MARKET IN THE PARK: Farm-fresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. Th, 5-8pm through 9/5. Opens 6/20. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-6291.

PAWS & PAGES: A Butte Humane Society mobile adoption event along with info on programs, services and upcoming events. Sa, 6/22, 9amnoon. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 343-7917, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST HIKE: An easy twomile hike through a picturesque ravine in the Plumas National Forest. Bring lunch, water, hiking gear and money for ride-sharing. Su, 6/23, 8:30am. Free. Chico Park & Ride, Hwy 99 & E. Eighth St., (530) 343-2397.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. in Paradise, 872-7085.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

TRADITIONAL WEST AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:307pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, E. Third And Pine, (808) 757-0076.

For Kids CAMP CHICO CREEK: An environmental education camp for children ages 5 to 11 with a different theme each week. This week: Marvelous Mammals. Call for more info. M-F through 8/16. $85-$135. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

KIDS & CREEKS MAIDU SUMMER DAY CAMP: A camp for kids to learn about Maidu history and culture and ecology of the Chico area. M,

6/24, 8am-2pm. $140. 5 Mile Picnic Area,

Upper Bidwell Park, (530) 895-1749, www.kids andcreeks.org.

SUMMER DAY CAMP FOR KIDS: A summer camp emphasizing outdoor activity helping youth develop social and decision-making skills. Call or go online for more info. Through 8/14, 6:30am-6pm. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St. in Oroville, (553) 533-9622, www.oroville ymca.org.

HOMEOPATHY MOVIE NIGHT: A showing of the documentary “Homeopathy Around the World,” which chronicles homeopathic projects overseas. M, 6/24, 6pm. Free. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St., (530) 924-4883.

INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: An open dance

800.648.5010

BENEFICIAL BATS WALK

with no partners required. F, 8pm through 6/28. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


NEED ATTENTION?

Artisan take-out Chico Natural Foods’ take-out food matches that of a classy sit-down eatery

I hungry after a busy morning at work that compelled me to wolf down bite after t wasn’t just the fact that I was

bite of the freshly made chicken-topped Caesar salad I had just picked up from the Chico Natural Foods Cooperative for lunch. In fact, the salad—made with organic romaine lettuce, parmesan cheese from Rumiano Cheese Co. in nearby Willows, insanely tender chunks of Applegate Farms chicken breast (no nitrates, no antibiotics and cruelty-free production), and sprouted-wheat croutons from Tin Roof Bakery & Café—was so mouthwateringly delicious that I didn’t want to stop eating it, even after it was gone. by Thus, I licked my finger after wipChristine G.K. ing clean the plastic to-go container LaPadoBreglia of the tangy salad dressing—made with lemon juice, olive oil, roasted christinel@ garlic, sea salt, black pepper and newsreview.com Dijon mustard. At $4.99, the co-op’s chicken Caesar is a steal. Removed from its take-out box and arranged on a fancy plate, the salad could easily fetch $10 or more if served at a dine-in restaurant. The 8-ounce cup ★★★★ 1⁄2 of Roasted Tomato Florentine soup, made with roasted local heirloom Chico tomatoes, that accompanied my Natural Foods salad was equally impressive (all Cooperative soups of the day run $3.29 for 818 Main St. 8 ounces; $4.89 for 16 ounces; and 891-1713 $7.99 for a 32-ounce container). www.chico The Sunshine potato salad natural.com ($5.99 per pound) that I ate the folHours: lowing day was a delightful mixDaily, ture of organic Yukon Gold and 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. purple potatoes from local Heartseed Community Farm, seared organic yellow squash from Comanche Creek Farms, and a lemon-herb vinaigrette that popped pleasingly with the taste of marjoram. The pineapple-laced tropical rice pudding (made with sushi rice, coconut milk and toasted coconut—$3.79) that I gobbled down next was wonderful. It will be one year at the end of ★★★★★ June since Bethany Hunter took EPIC over as manager of the Chico Nat★★★★ ural Foods kitchen, which turns out AUTHORITATIVE the wide array of lunch items—sal★★★ ads, sandwiches and more—that APPEALING populate the store’s refrigerated ★★ sections, as well as an always-invitHAS MOMENTS ing daily soup offering (such as ★ FLAWED spicy coconut-curry, and creamy

LET’S NOT GO TO EXTREMES. Former executive chef Bethany Hunter manages the kitchen at the Chico Natural Foods Cooperative. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

Inset: The co-op’s Waldorf salad with local blueberries and green-apple vinaigrette. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CHICO NATURAL FOODS COOPERATIVE

broccoli-and-cashew). Fresh hot oatmeal, with an assortment of toppings, and baked goods are available at breakfast time. The fingerprint of Hunter’s impressive food-world résumé is evident on every item coming out of the coop’s kitchen. Trained at Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Scottsdale, Ariz. (formerly the Scottsdale Culinary Institute), she spent years as an executive chef in her former hometown of Tucson and as carry-out manager for local-food-focused Bacio Catering & Carry Out in Chico “Really, my huge focus is to work with local farmers and artisans,” Hunter said recently. Along those lines, each day she and her kitchen staff of eight create an assortment of lip-smacking dishes that conform to eclectic, health-promoting dietary guidelines, including vegan, paleo, gluten-free and lactose-intolerant. “All of the grains we use are organic; all of the dairy we use is certified organic, with the exception of some locally crafted cheeses,” she said. “All produce is either certified-organic, or local and sustainable.” As part of the research necessary to finish writing this review (oh, poor me!), I trotted back to Chico Natty and bought a yummy basil egg-salad sandwich (organic eggs, fresh basil, red onion, carrot, garlic, sea salt, black pepper, Vegenaise, mustard and lettuce on toasted whole-wheat bread—$5.99) and a little tub of basil spinach-pesto (gluten-free) pasta salad with almonds, feta cheese, olives and sun-dried tomatoes ($6.99 per pound). I am finishing up the divine pasta as I write. “What is so amazing to me is that I have creative freedom, so that when a farmer walks in the back door with a box of beautiful heirloom tomatoes that he picked that morning, I dice them, throw in some lemon cucumber and purple basil and a squeeze of lemon, put it on the shelf, and it’s gone within a couple of hours. “People just want that fresh, local food.” Amen to that. Ω

ADVERTISE WITH (530) 894-2300

from a loCal farmer’S field

to your table. ChiCo Saturday 2nd & Wall Streets year round, rain or shine Sat 7:30am – 1pm

ChiCo North Valley Plaza Pillsbury road oPeN – Nov 22 Wed 7:30am – 12pm

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Chicofarmersmarket.com | (530) 893–farm

always fun & family friendly June 20, 2013

CN&R 27


6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

FINAL WEEK

MUD

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY 

NIGHTLY 7:45PM EXCEPT SUNDAY AND TUESDAY SUNDAY MATINEE 3:30PM STARTS FRIDAY NOAH BAUBACH’S

FRANCES HA NIGHTLY 5:45PM (EXCEPT SUNDAY) SUNDAY MATINEE 1:30PM (ENDS TONIGHT 6/20)

THE SAPPHIRES (5:45PM)

Call 343-0663 or visit www.PageantChico.com

RECYCLE

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IN

S HOWTIMES G OOD F RI 6/21 - W ED 6/26 IN



IN

[G]

: 12:30 5:20 7:45PM 2D: 2:55 9:50PM

WORLD WAR Z

[PG-13]

 IN : 1:15 4:15 7:15 9:45PM  IN 2D: 12:45 3:45 6:45 9:30PM

MAN 

IN



IN

OF

STEEL

[PG-13]

: 12:30 3:30 6:30 9:30PM 2D: 1:30 4:30 7:30 9:25PM

THIS IS THE END [R] NOW YOU SEE ME [PG-13]

 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:30 10:10PM 1:30 4:15 6:45 10:30PM

FREE FAMILY MATINEE TUESDAY 6/25 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT [PG] TUE: 10:00AM STARTS THURSDAY JUNE 27

WHITE HOUSE DOWN THE HEAT [R]

[PG-13]

 TH: 7:00PM

Life after sunset Romance is on the clock in third film of Richard Linklater’s Before series

 TH: 10:00PM

A L L S H O W S B E F O R E 6PM A R E B A R G A I N M A T I N E E S  INDICATES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

CHawke) first met in Before Sunrise (1995) during a stopover in Vienna. They planned to meet again eline (Julie Delpy) and Jesse (Ethan

soon, but that reunion didn’t happen until nine years later in Before Sunset (2004) during Jesse’s book-tour visit to Paris. Now, by Juan-Carlos after another nine years, they are a Selznick couple with twin daughters, vacation-

ment and inquiry, are lively forms of action in the movie-magic conjured up by Linklater and his star collaborators. Linklater’s directorial approach—long takes and unhurried pacing—has much to do with the impression that Before Midnight and its predecessors are laid-back romantic comedies made extraordinary by their tone of gentle, honest realism.

Same time next decade?

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

5 FRIDAY 6/21 – WEDNESDAY 6/26 AFTER EARTH

4:45PM 7:30PM 10:15PM

EPIC (Digital)

(R ) 9:30PM♦

(Digital) (PG-13) 10:40AM

(PG)11:40AM 2:10PM 4:40PM 7:10PM

PURGE, THE (Digital) STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (Digital)

FAST & FURIOUS

(PG-13) 1:20PM 7:20PM

INTERNSHIP, THE MAN OF STEEL (3D)

(Digital) (R ) 11:50AM 1:10PM 2:30PM 3:50PM 5:10PM 6:30PM♦ 7:50PM 10:25PM

MAN OF STEEL

WORLD WAR Z (3D) (PG-13) 10:30AM 12:25PM 1:20PM 4:05PM 5:55PM 6:50PM 9:35PM

6 (Digital) (PG-13) 4:20PM 10:20PM (Digital) (PG-13) 9:40PM

(PG-13) 11:10AM 12:25PM 2:35PM 5:50PM 6:55PM 9:05PM

(Digital) (PG-13) 10:15AM 1:30PM 3:40PM 4:45PM 8:00PM 10:10PM

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (3D)

(G) 11:30AM 2:25PM 3:20PM 5:10PM 7:55PM 8:50PM

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (Digital) (G)10:45AM 12:35PM 1:30PM 4:15PM 6:05PM 7:00PM 9:45PM

NOW YOU SEE ME (Digital) (PG-13)

11:15AM 2:00PM

Before Midnight

Ends tonight, June 20. Starring Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke. Directed by Richard Linklater. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

THIS IS THE END

WORLD WAR Z

(Digital) (PG-13) 11:25AM 2:15PM 3:10PM 5:00PM 7:45PM 8:55PM 10:30PM

(SUMMER MOVIE CLUBHOUSE) - THE SMURFS (2013) (Digital) (PG) Wed. & Thur. ONLY 10:00AM

(SPECIAL SHOWING) - MET OPERA: II Trovatore Met Summer Encore 2013 (Digital) (NR) Wed. 6/26 ONLY 7:00PM

Show times listed w/ ♦ not shown Wed. 6/26

28 CN&R June 20, 2013

1

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ing in Greece (in Before Midnight). All three films are the work of writer-director Richard Linklater (Dazed and Confused, School of Rock, Bernie), but they are also, quite crucially, collaborations with Hawke and Delpy. Hawke, who is also a published novelist, and Delpy, who has also established herself as an accomplished writer-director (2 Days in New York, The Countess, 2 Days in Paris), share screenwriting credit with Linklater on the second and third entries in this series. Part of the pleasure and enchantment of all three pictures comes via their air of off-handed spontaneity in scenes of smart, carefully scripted talk. These are primarily conversational movies, but they are never merely talky, let alone dull. Conversation, and argu-

Time is of the essence in all three, with leisurely summer relationships feeling the sting of imminent departures, changing seasons, changing times, and—in Before Midnight—the first hints of middle age. All three are, in effect, engagingly ironic reflections on the bloom of romance, its inevitable fading and its possible renewals. For the record, Jesse is now a somewhat successful novelist, living in Europe with Celine and their twin daughters, but worrying about his early-teen American son who spends his summers in Europe but lives the rest of the year with his mother, Jesse’s ex-wife, in Chicago. Celine is a somewhat frustrated Paris-based environmental activist who is, if anything, even more free-spirited and feisty now than she was in the 1990s. In the course of the three European interludes recounted in these films, Celine and Jesse have moved from the chancy freedoms of youthful romance to the conflicted passions of a not-quite-disillusioned adulthood. The latest installment has some sorrow in it, but that seems to make the comedy and the romance count for even more. Ω


Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush, Jason Cassidy and JuanCarlos Selznick.

Opening this week Frances Ha

Writer/director Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale) filmed this story about freespirited Frances (Greta Gerwig) in black and white, following the eternally optimistic 27year-old as she tries to stay true herself in the face of the realities of making it in New York City. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

and superhuman powers to donning the familiar “S” crest to save Earth from other, less friendly Kryptonian refugees. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

5

Mud

With river rats young and old haunted by misadventures and illusory romance on the Arkansas side of the Mississippi River, the latest film from Jeff Nichols (Take Shelter) feels a little like a modern-day Huckleberry Finn. A kid named Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and his pal Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) go prowling for a boat wedged in the treetops of a wilderness island and cross paths there

cessfully eliminated the crime rate by encouraging the Purge, a 12-hour window that opens one day out of the year for the “haves” to go out and slaughter the havenots with impunity. (Politicians, of course, are off-limits.) Apparently, the system is working out: The unemployment rate is down to 1 percent, and crime is virtually non-existent. So here we end up with a masked posse of bored rich kids terrorizing a bunkered estate in a gated community during the Purge. The movie exists only to let the intruders crash the gates so people can go about plodding through dark hallways, stalking and killing other people until the end credits. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —C.B.

Monsters University

A prequel to the Pixar animated feature Monsters, Inc., featuring Mike and Sulley (voiced by Billy Crystal and John Goodman) during their monster-training days at Monsters U., where they first met and weren’t exactly best friends. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated G.

World War Z

World War Z

Brad Pitt stars in this film adaptation of the zombies/human-war novel by Max Brooks (who also penned The Zombie Survival Guide), playing a UN employee who travels across the globe looking for a cure for the worldwide zombie pandemic. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing

5

Before Midnight

See review this issue. Ends tonight, June 20. Cinemark 14. Rated R. —J.C.S.

Epic

A computer-animated feature about a teen girl who is magically transported to a fantastical secret world deep in the forest. There, she teams up with a rag-tag group of the strange residents to save their world (and the “real” world as well) from evil forces. Featuring the voices of Amanda Seyfried, Colin Farrell and Beyonce. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Fast & Furious 6

Car go fast. Explosion! Pretty girl dies young? Ker-plow! Froggy Vin Diesel “needs to know for sure.” Hey, she has amnesia! Oh shoot, some bad guys have fast cars, too. One … more … job. Bang! Bang! Bang! Is your shirt tight enough to drive with The Rock? Watch out, you almost got hit by that fast car that jumped over that semi that shot out of that tank as it flew off that bridge! Number 7: coming summer of 2014. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

3

The Internship

Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson, reprising versions of their Wedding Crashers’ personae, are out-of-work sales reps who talk themselves into an internship program at Google’s Mountain View campus. What ensues is a mildly diverting buddy-buddy comedy folded into what at times looks rather like an infomercial for Google recruitment. Vaughn, who co-wrote the script with Jared Stern, is particularly sharp with his familiar knucklehead/conman/savant shtick, and Wilson has that charmingly goofy glow even though he looks vaguely distracted at times. Aasif Mandvi is agreeably snotty as the interns’ supervisor. Rose Byrne (the Wilson character’s “love interest”) and Max Minghella (an obnoxious rival intern) play it a little too straight in a supporting cast otherwise loaded with fresh-faced caricatures of youthful, rambunctious caricatures. Formulaic, but not lacking in amusement and whimsy. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Man of Steel

Henry Cavill is the latest in a long line of actors to don the famous blue-and-red costume in this reboot of the Superman movie franchise. The film focuses on the origin of the eponymous character, from a young Clark Kent’s discovery of his alien heritage

with a scraggly fugitive named Mud (Matthew McConaughey). Mud’s obsession with erratic dream-girl Juniper (Reese Witherspoon) brings tattered romance and other troubles into the action. Mud, a battle-scarred neighbor (Sam Shepard), and Ellis’ uncle (Michael Shannon) are all variously compromised alternatives to the kid’s parents who are in the process of breaking up. A vengeful patriarch (Joe Don Baker) from nearby eventually forces a climactic shoot-out, but the movie’s real interest resides in the oddly tender tragicomedy that emerges from the characters’ heedless low-rent dreaming. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

2

Now You See Me

The title is a tease, and a not very clever one at that. It seems apt enough at first, what with a story involving magicians, high-stakes sleight-of-hand, bank robbery as Vegas-style entertainment, and assorted now-you-see-it, now-you-don’t shenanigans. Publicity for Now You See Me makes much of the bank-robbing-magicians angle, but that’s really only the most conspicuous hook in a gratuitously convoluted (and ultimately fatuous) plot. The story does have a quartet of mostly young magicians pulling off a series of spectacular escapades, and those tricks and capers provide the occasion for some big but not particularly impressive scenes. But much of the rest of the film is a rather whimsical war of attrition among increasingly absurd plot points involving a half-dozen other characters. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

2

The Purge

We’re asked to accept that, nine years in the future, America is taken over by a gratuitous theocratic system that has suc-

3

Star Trek Into Darkness

In J.J. Abrams’ follow-up to his 2009 reboot of the franchise, Chris Pine is back as a young Captain Kirk, and this mission into space has Kirk taking the Starship Enterprise crew to Kronos, the dangerous planet of the Klingons, on a mission of vengeance. There is some good chemistry—especially in the lighter moments—between Captain Kirk and first officer Spock (Zachary Quinto), but when the interactions get overly dramatic (a few over-the-top close-up shots beg for a Saturday Night Live spoof) things come to a halt. To be fair, the film must be caught up in its own spectacle, because everything is expected to be such a scene in a space epic. This works impressively well most of the time for the action-adventure scenes, but no so much for the interpersonal ones. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —R.B.

3

This is the End

A scruffy cast of Hollywood comedians—Seth Rogan, Jonah Hill, Danny McBride, Craig Robinson, Jay Baruchel—is holed up at James Franco’s house as the apocalypse devours the world outside. Everyone’s playing versions of their real-life selves, and while the sum of their parts doesn’t equal their best previous individual or collaborative efforts (Pineapple Express, Superbad, Knocked Up, The Office, Eastbound & Down), it’s fun just having all the likeable comedians in one place together. They are each naturally funny (especially McBride in full-on selfish-pig mode) and riff so well off one another that this twisted comedic version of bunker-horror provides plenty of ridiculousness to laugh at and plenty of gross-out shocks to keep things moving briskly all the way up to the heavenly climax. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.

June 20, 2013

CN&R 29


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At the hop

We Want to Help! Chico Cash Exchange

• Collateral Loans / Pawns • Cash for Gold • Check Cashing • Payday Advance

20th & Park • 892–2222 CA Lic # 04020994 / Permit # 11233001 Licensed by Dept. of Corps under the CA Deferred Deposit Transaction Law

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

Dance and sing into summer with Chico Theater Company’s pop-song musical

Usongs o the 1950s and ’60s as a vehicle, Chico Theater Company’s latest musical sing some of the best popular f

provides a very satisfying evening of innocent summer fun. Each of the solo and ensemble by numbers during the openAlan ing-night (June 7) performSheckter ance of the colorful and affable The Marvelous REVIEW: Wonderettes was performed The Marvelous with an appropriate measure of overWonderettes the-top squeaky-cleanness and shows Thursday- accompanied by its own well-suited Saturday, 7:30 p.m., and choreography. Act 1 is set at a 1958 high-school Sunday, 2 p.m., through June 30, prom, where the four women of The at Chico Theater Marvelous Wonderettes—each in a Company. radiantly colored dress—revive Tickets: $12-$20 juke-box staples of the era (“LolChico Theater lipop,” “Mr. Sandman,” etc.) as a Company last-minute replacement act for the 166 Eaton Road evening (due to the fact, we are told, 894-3CTC that one of the Crooning Crabwww.chicotheater cakes—the boys’ glee club that was company.net supposed to perform that night—was suspended from school). And, adding to the drama, all four bandmates are soon selected as prom-queen nominees. As the slightly nerdy and unlucky-in-love Betty Jean, Max Zachai was quite dynamic, combining a powerful singing voice and plenty of comic relief, most of which was directed at rival and high-school hottie Cindy Lou, aptly played by Meghan Murphy. Murphy seized her role as a naughty beauty with a penchant to kiss and tell. Nicole Rayner was suitably innocent as the giggling Suzy, whose squealing exuberance, ever-present bubble gum, and allegiance to Richie, the prom’s spotlight operator, helped build her character. Finally, Stacy Sudicky was awesome as Missy, the shy, bespectacled Wonderette who exhibits a lack of self-confidence and has a big-time crush on one of her teachers. Each performer was quite believable in her role, and was showcased in her own character-fitting numbers. As the rightfully suspicious Betty Jean, Zachai offered the Connie Francis hit, “Lipstick on Your Collar,” while Rayner also performed a number made famous by Francis, “Stupid Cupid,” in which she asks Cupid to set her free because “I can’t do my homework and I can’t think straight.” Sudicky poured out her heart in Doris Day’s “Secret Love,” a song that alludes to her teacher 30 CN&R June 20, 2013

Starring as The Marvelous Wonderettes: (clockwise from left) Meghan Murphy, Max Zachai, Stacy Sudicky and Nicole Rayner. PHOTO BY JODI RIVES MEIER

crush; and Murphy killed it on Ruth Brown’s song of self-assurance, “Lucky Lips.” The four prom-queen candidates brought some necessary depth to the production by offering distinct, unique personalities, each with her own idiosyncrasies and quirks. In addition to bopping along with the bouncy songs, we were also inclined to cheer along, and in turn sympathize, with each of the young women. The audience was nicely immersed in Springfield High’s school spirit (“Go, Chipmunks!”) and following the prom-queen candidates’ appeals to win us over, we each cast an official, and hilariously written, “Queen of Your Dreams” ballot for the evening’s performance. In Act 2, we join the foursome at their 10-year reunion, in the same high-school gym—only the punch bowl has been replaced with bottles of wine. With their characters nicely established, the women are revisited, now with late-’60s hairdos, dresses (with furry hems and cuffs), go-go boots and love lives. Our heroines catch up with each other about life’s new challenges and delightfully sing and dance to a bunch of ’60s songs. Standout tunes include Martha and the Vandellas’ “(Love is Like a) Heat Wave” and Dusty Springfield’s “Son of a Preacher Man.” Things are naturally less fluffy a decade after the events of Act 1 as we witness the grown-up women becoming more self-realized and self-assertive. Perfectly chosen songs—such as “Respect,” made famous by Aretha Franklin—help the women in expressing their newly found independence. Director/choreographer Judi Souza did a great job of bringing together a lively, energetic production. But in the end, it was her work with the talented quartet and their sprightly performance of the two dozen or so memorable hits of the ’50s and ’60s that made the show, and provided a marvelous way to kick off the Ω summer.


Cinema, Circus & Spaghetti Sexmob The Royal Potato Family This NYC quartet—led by Steven Bernstein, (slide trumpet, alto horn) with Briggan Krauss (alto and baritone sax), Tony Scherr (bass) and Kenny Wollesen (drums, gongs, vibes)—whose name appears to be trading on the flash-mob craze, has actually been around for 17 years. Bernstein defines the group’s ethos thusly: “Jazz used to be popular music. People would go out to clubs, listen to the music, go home, and get laid. Simple as that. We’re bringing that spirit back.” There’s a tremendous amount of spirit here, but I can’t imagine their interpretations of Fellini’s surrealistic films’ striking scores (composed by Nino Rota) will result in much horizontal action. Rota’s dreamily haunting accompaniment to Amarcord is, fittingly, the first track, and there are echoes of it in some of the other 11 tunes. Then things start to get a little weird as they interpret “Juliet of the Spirits” and “La Strada,” before revisiting Amarcord on “Volpina,” which gets a joyously percussive street-band treatment that abruptly segues into the frenetic free-jazz Paparazzo segment of “La Dolce Vita.” The wheezy horns also get their freak on in other Dolce and Amarcord passages, while “Zamparo” is mostly bass and drums, as is the quietly reflective “Gelsomina” (also from La Strada). This charmingly chaotic CD is not for the faint of heart. —Miles Jordan

MUSIC

Mel Brooks: Make a Noise PBS American Masters, Shout! Factory In this latest installment of PBS’ American Masters series (currently streaming at www.pbs.org for free), Mel Brooks tells a story of his time as a soldier in World War II when he grabbed a megaphone and sang to the German soldiers across enemy lines. From across the battlefield, he could hear his enemy’s applause. It’s the applause that makes this a Mel Brooks story. Through film, photos, and archived and new interviews with Brooks and his friends, such as Carl Reiner, Nathan Lane and Cloris Leachman, this documentary traces the artist’s career spanning more than six decades. From The Show of Shows and Get Smart to The Producers and the film’s Broadway production, Brooks deserves his status as one of only 14 EGOT— Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony—winners. The segment on Brooksfilms (The Fly and The Elephant Man) will be of interest to fans who know Brooks for his genre spoofs such as Young Frankenstein and Blazing Saddles, while the behind-the-scenes stories on his well-known comedies are as hilarious as the films themselves. A notoriously private man, we see only glimpses of Brooks’ personal life, but when he opens up about struggling as an artist and his 41-year marriage to Anne Bancroft, it is clear this is a man who’s passionate about life and not simply comedy. —Matthew Craggs

DVD

A Rise in the Road Yellowjackets Mack Avenue Records

“The CN&R is the

cornerstone of our maRkeTiNg.”

In Motion Fitness has been advertising with the Chico News & Review since we opened in 1992. Every week the CN&R provides a professional and impressive product that delivers our message with clarity and style. The full color ads really showcase the pools and water features, the palm trees and gardens, the Mediterranean architecture and the bodies In Motion. From kids’ activities to senior programs, the CN&R effectively targets and reaches all demographics. It seems like everybody in Chico views the CN&R. We would highly recommend the CN&R to any business in Chico.” -CARL SOMMER OWNER OF IN MOTION FITNESS

An unimaginably long time ago, I spent a Sunday morning in Sausalito, drinking Ramos fizzes with a best friend while we listened to jazz played by a quartet whose name is lost to my memory. It was glorious. The sun was out, the bay was glistening, sailboats were bobbing in time to the bass lines, and San Francisco shimmered in the distance. That morning came to mind as I listened to the crisp ensemble playing on the 22nd album released by the Yellowjackets, a band I’ve neglected far too often. I won’t be making that mistake in the future. This album hits the sweet spot that jazz can hit for me, creating a mood both reflective and celebratory. Russell Ferrante’s piano evokes a range of emotion through this 10-song set, but it all feels good— to the ear and to the soul. Ferrante wrote most of the pieces here, and Bob Mintzer, whose sax playing is perfectly in synch with Ferrante’s piano, contributed four compositions, including “I Knew His Father,” a song about Jaco Pastorius, the father of Felix Pastorius, the band’s new bass player who replaces longtime Yellowjackets bassist Jimmy Haslip. Pastorious hooks up nicely with drummer William Kennedy. The result: It’s sunny in Sausalito, and the band plays on. —Jaime O’Neill

MUSIC

June 20, 2013

CN&R 31


THURSDAY 6/20—WEDNESDAY 6|26 BASSMINT: A weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4, (530) 895-3888.

CHILI SAUCE: Classic and contemporary

R&B, pop and rock in the nightclub. F, 6/21, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort,

3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844, www.colusacasino.com.

DECADES: A cover band playing hits from

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

Friday, June 21 Duffy’s Tavern SEE FRIDAY

CHICO SCHOOL OF ROCK KIDFEST: Th, 6/20, 6-9pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 894-2526.

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Steve Cook and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 5:30-8:30pm through 6/27. Free. Grana, 198 E. Second St., 8092304.

THE MONDEGREENS: Three singer-song-

your music, poetry, comedy, or other talents in a 10-minute slot. First and Third Th of every month, 7pm. $1. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise, (530) 873-1370.

PARADISE PARTY IN THE PARK: Paradise’s weekly marketplace and concert series kicks off with rock ’n’ roll covers from Spy Picnic. Th, 6/20, 5:30pm. Free. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise, (530) 872-6291, www.paradisechamber.com.

Oroville’s weekly concert series continues with blues and soul from The Amy Celeste Band. Th, 6/20, 6:30-8pm. Free. Riverbend Park, 1 Salmon Run Rd. in Oroville, (530) 533-2011.

EBONY & IVORY MUSIC SERIES: The monthly music series to benefit the restoration of the club’s Steinway concert grand piano continues with Rube and the Rhythm Rockers, a five-

21FRIDAY

FACING EXTINCTION: Balls-to-the-wall gloom metal and grindcore in all its crusty glory. Into The Open Earth, The Sky Above and the Earth Below open. F, 6/21, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave., (530) 3457672.

FLO SESSIONS: Flo’s weekly music showcase continues. F, 8pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

JORDHUGA REUNION SHOW: F, 6/21, 9pm.

FRIDAY MORNING JAZZ: A weekly morning jazz appointment with experimental local troupe Bogg. F, 11am. Free. Café

summer’s weekly concert series continues with blues and soul from GravyBrain. F, 7-8:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St., (530) 896-7200, www.down townchico.net.

Lost On Main, 319 Main St., (530) 8911853.

RURAL CONCERT SERIES: Feather River Recreation and Park District’s summer Rural Concert Series kicks off

CHICO SCHOOL OF ROCK KIDFEST

Now in its fourth year, the annual KidFest gives Chico School of Rock students the opportunity to showcase their developing chops at the downtown City Plaza during the Thursday Night Market. The school partners with the Butte Folk Music Society, which will feature a “musical petting zoo” full of instruments everyone is invited to pick up and play. Tonight, June 20.

ARTHUR LEE LAND: An electro-Americana singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and innovative loop artist. F, 6/21, 8pm. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

AUDIOBOXX: Rock, metal and pop music in the lounge. F, 6/21, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.gold countrycasino.com.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

writers join forces to play folk-rock music with tight vocal harmonies. Ramona Skye and Birdy Fiedler open. Th, 6/20, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to share

THURSDAY NIGHT CONCERTS IN THE PARK:

Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

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20THURSDAY

SURROGATE & SHIMMIES

cover band on the back patio. Th, 6/20, 6-9pm. Free. LaSalles, 229 Broadway, (530) 893-1891.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The

it

STILL NOT DEAD YET: A Grateful Dead

the ’40s to today in the brewery. F, 6/21, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3

Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 5669476, www.cafecoda.com.

piece blues band playing an eclectic mix of styles. Festivities include wine, hors d’oeuvres and dancing. F, 6/21, 68pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978, www.chicowomensclub.org.

Leg

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Highland Springs Wellness center Immediate Appointments Available

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32 CN&R June 20, 2013


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

ELVIN BISHOP Saturday, June 22 Feather Falls Casino

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

BELLY DANCE CLASS: Weekly belly dance with BellySutra. Tu, 6-7pm. $8. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

SEE SATURDAY

26WEDNESDAY JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. W, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musiMUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted

by local musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd., (530) 710-2020.

OLD-TIME FIDDLER JAM: An open jam with Jim Halsey and Jeff Simi. F, 6/21, 6:30-8pm. Free. Feather Falls Grange, 9 Lumpkin Rd. in Feather Falls; (530) 5332011.

SURROGATE & THE SHIMMIES: Chico’s most beloved indie rock bands share the Duffy’s stage. F, 6/21, 9:30pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 3437718.

22SATURDAY AUDIOBOXX: Rock, metal and pop music in the lounge. Sat, 6/22, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville, (530) 534-9892, www.gold countrycasino.com.

CALIFORNIA BLEEDING: Experimental noise-rock out of San Diego infused with punk rock energy. Rodent Lord and Amigo the Devil open. Sa, 6/22,

8pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

CHILI SAUCE: Classic and contemporary

R&B, pop and rock in the nightclub. Sa, 6/22, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort, 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa, (530) 458-8844, www.colusacasino.com.

ELVIN BISHOP: The blues and rock ’n’ roll guitarist and songwriter, best known for penning the 1976 hit “Fooled Around and Fell in Love,” plays the brewery. Sa, 6/22, 9pm. $20-$30. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885 ext. 510, www.featherfallscasino.com.

THE MONTANES: Contemporary dance tunes, country rock and alternative country in the lounge. Sa, 6/22, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

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hosted by the California Old-Time Fiddler’s Association. Fourth Sa of every month, 1-5pm. Free. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Myers St. in Oroville, (530) 533-8370.

PAGEANT DADS: Performances by experimental local indie-rockers Pageant Dads and Cities sandwich sets by two traveling acts, Yaktooth and Baby Girl. Sa, 6/22, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave., (530) 566-9476, www.cafecoda.com.

URBAN LEGEND: A variety of rock, ’80s hits, pop, oldies and more. Sa, 6/22, 9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning, (530) 5283500, www.rollinghillscasino.com.

24MONDAY THE EXTRA CRISPIES: Folk music made crispy. Touring Maui singer-songwriters Elaine Ryan and Sebrina Barron open. M, 6/24, 7-10pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E.

NTS POST EVE Y E IN ONL B AT ING REGISTER

25TUESDAY

newsreview.c

AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

om/chico

cians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country music

showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 79:30pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St., (530) 514-8888, www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

JAMMERS REUNITE!

One-time Chico jam-band heavyweights Jordhuga are getting the old crew back together for one huge party on the first day of summer, Friday, June 21, at Lost on Main. Featuring a couple of current Chico musicians—Scott Barwick (Candy Apple front man, owner of Origami Lounge) and Swamp Zen percussionist Steve Hoffman—and a host of original members who are flying in just for the show, the dance-friendly funksters will keep the downtown bar hot until closing.

We’ll Take You There Liberty Cab

898-1776

$150 to the Sacramento Airport!

2:15 is the new 4:20 for

BEER! 337 MAIN ST

(corner of 4th St. & Main)

June 20, 2013

CN&R 33


ARTS DEVO

CHICO’S DOWNTOWN DIRECTORY Your Guide to All Things Downtown

Filled with complete listings for shopping, dining, and specialty services, this easy-to-carry compact guide helps you navigate the cultural and business hub of Chico. LOOK FOR THE NEWEST EDITION THIS JULY. Downtown Advertisers: Contact your CN&R representative today to be included in the Directory: 530-894-2300

Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

PLAYING GAMES Maybe, like Arts DEVO, you’ve been noticing the promo online about rapper Game (formerly “The Game”) coming to the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds on June 26. The only problem with that promising scenario is that no one told the folks at Silver Dollar Fairgrounds about it. At press time, the Facebook event page for the show featured several comments from the fairgrounds that read: “This concert will not be at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds. Someone must have made an error.” The error appears to have been made by Colin Sweeney, the same promoter who advertised a show Game over. by rapper Coolio at Lost on Main on May 8 that was canceled at the last minute. When contacted by phone about the phantom Game concert, Sweeney’s initial “official comment” was: “Screw Chico!” He went on to insist that he had scheduled the show at the fairgrounds. He also bemoaned Chico’s lack of an audience for bigprofile acts and said that the Coolio show was canceled due to low presales. Silver Dollar Fair Manager Scott Stoller said that, while he had communicated with Sweeney in the past about other potential shows, no contracts were ever entered into and no dates were ever confirmed. In fact, Stoller said that a previous show being promoted by Sweeney was publicized as happening at the fairgrounds despite not having been confirmed with his office, which led to Stoller deciding to not work with Sweeney on any shows, ever. “[It’s] absolutely ridiculous [for him] to think that there’d be anything different,” Stoller said in reference to the possibility of the Game show happening at the fairgrounds. A quick check of the live calendars at Game’s artist, record-label, management and Facebook sites had no shows for Chico listed. By press time, Game’s management had not returned phone calls seeking comment. If you bought one of the $30 tickets for the show, it would appear you are owed a refund (and possibly a clear explanation). For his part, Sweeney says that he will give the “$190” worth of ticket sales back to the opening act (local rapper Lynguistix) from whom people purchased tickets. ON HOLIDAY WITH DEVO I am going to take a measure of pity on my readers and not rub everyone’s face in the details of the glorious time Mr. and Mrs. DEVO spent vacationing in Monterey County last week. Instead of showing slides of my pale legs skipping across the sand, I will take the opportunity to simply recommend a few destinations for those who might be considering a coastal getaway this summer: • Phil’s Fish Market, Moss Landing: The BBC recently called the ocean-side market and eatery one of the five best beach restaurants in the world. I don’t know about that, but sitting in the shadow of the Moss Landing Power Plant’s giant smoke stacks and enjoying the trough-sized bowl of cioppino made with fresh clams, mussels, whitefish, calamari, Dungeness crab, prawns and scallops was about the best seafood experience I’ve ever had. • Pfeiffer Beach, Big Sur: A steep turn off Highway 1, down a two-milelong one-lane road, opens up to a secluded white-sand paradise. (Runner-up beach, the picturesque Carmel Beach.)

353 E. Second Street, Chico www.newsreview.com

34 CN&R June 20, 2013

• Gravity Garden, Carmel: To prove that the stacked-rock sculptures that cover his property on the outskirts of Carmel weren’t set in place with the aid of any adhesive, sculptor Jim Needham casually reached out and pulled the top rock off one stack and then effortlessly, while still talking to us, balanced it right back in place. Awesome. www.rock stacker.com • Restaurant 1833, Monterey: World-class meat-fest: Beef bone-marrow appetizer, pan-roasted duck for him and baconwrapped pork loin for her. Best meal of our lives, hands down. www.restaurant1833.com

Rock-stacker, Jim Needham.


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

6 ROBERTO COURT • CHICO COOL POOL. Beautifully remodeled home on the South side. Close to shopping and schools. Home features new kitchen cabinets, granite counters, crown moldings through out the family room and living room. The office has a wet bar and has been used as a man cave and has it’s own entry with a Dutch door. Remodeled baths with a walk in tile shower in the master. Laminate flooring through out the house. 4o year roof. In ground gunite pool with beautifully landscaped back yard and garden area.

K N I H T E.

FRE

LIsTEd aT: $272,500 Steve Kasprzyk (Kas-per-zik) | Realtor Associate Century 21 Jeffries Lydon | (530) 899-5932

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Opportunity knocked. Then it rang the doorbell. It left you an email. Now it’s at your door again. What are you waiting for???

Brandon Siewert Realtor

brandonsiewert.com • 828-4597

Great home close to campus. 4/2 over 2,200 sq.ft Charming home on a large lot.

GREAT LOCATION!

NEW LISTING!

3/1 on a large lot in Chico $185,000

$305,000 GARRETT FRENCH

3131 Willow Bend Dr 4/3 3,700+ sq ft, 4 car garage on 1.16 acres.

On cul-de-sac, 4 bd, 2ba home in Eaton Village. 1,741 sq. ft. Reduced!

530-228-1305

Cabins in Jonesville! Call for more info. www.AtoZchico.com

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

GarrettFrenchHomes.com Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in Chico, Orland, Willows.

Homes Sold Last Week

$630,000 EMMETT JACOBI

Cell 530.519.6333 • emmettjacobi.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

176 Donald Dr 12065 Merlin Ln 4189 Spyglass Rd 205 Mill Creek Dr 1018 Autumnwood Ct 4328 Keefer Rd 3258 Caspar Ct 350 Picholine Way 3540 Grape Way 358 Picholine Way 315 W Lincoln Ave 1666 Park Vista Dr

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$681,500 $570,000 $485,000 $417,000 $412,500 $385,000 $369,500 $357,000 $340,000 $339,000 $325,000 $310,000

5/ 4 4/ 3.5 3/ 3 4/ 2 5/ 4 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 1 3/ 1.5

4158 3420 2421 2202 2854 1999 1893 1680 2143 1763 1662 1760

1822 Bedford Dr 326 Chestnut Rose Ln 1021 Southampton Dr 4 Discovery Way 921 Madrone Ave 1353 Oleander Ave 1345 Oleander Ave 477 E 18th St 1057 Verde Dr 1066 Humboldt Ave 2639 San Jose St 1746 Broadway St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$270,000 $250,000 $245,000 $237,000 $233,000 $230,000 $230,000 $215,000 $200,000 $190,000 $187,000 $157,000

3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 2 2/ 1 1/ 1 4/ 3.5 3/ 1.5 3/ 1 4/ 2.5 3/ 1

1842 1482 1357 1236 1686 1396 560 1914 1152 1000 1745 964

June 20, 2013

CN&R 35


OPEN

Bringing You To

PARADISE 1,200 Sq. Ft $6,500 Ad #457

2BR/2BA Price Reduced

1,440 Sq. Ft. $110,000 Ad # 505

3BR/2BA 2207 on an acre Price Reduced! Commercial property

$149,000 Ad #462

View Lot 3 + Acres Developed For You

$149,500 Ad #479

hOuSE

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

Sat. 11-1 91 Eagle Nest Drive (X St: Skyway) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 3024 sq. ft. $469,000 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

Sat. 11-1 550 W. Lassen (X St: Cussick) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3109 sq. ft. $599,000 Matt Kleimann 521-8064

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 615 Windham Way (X St: Rogue River Mine) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3166 sq. ft. $429,000 Frankie Dean 717-3884 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 3908 Barbados (X St: Spyglass) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2507 sq. ft. $540,000 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1 Pistachio Dr (X St: Entler) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 2635 sq. ft. $499,777 Heather DeLuca 228-1480

1991 Potter Rd (X St: 20th St) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 2260 sq.ft. $429,000 John Wallace 514-2405 Frankie Dean 717-3884 Justin Jewett 518-4089

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 1762 Brinson (X St: Lott Road) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2685 sq. ft. $499,000 Patty Davis Rough 864-4329

5350 Skyway, Paradise

(530) 872-7653

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1186 Filbert Ave (X St: Riviera Ct) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2422 sq.ft. $425,000 Michael Prezioso 514-1638

Sun. 2-4 2570 Durham Dayton (X St: Teal) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2473 sq. ft. $499,000 Mark Reaman 228-2229

Paradise@C21SelectGroup.com www.C21Skyway.com 1-800-785-7654

5 Wooded Acres

Horse property in Butte Valley. Beautiful 4 bed/3 bath 2313 sq ft home on approx 3 acres with year round creek running through it.

Above Forest Ranch. 3bd/2ba, art studio & 5 acres! $235,000

$425,000.

Dana W. Miller

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

KATHY KELLY 530-570-7403

DRE# 01860319

KathyKellyC21@gmail.com

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 125 Emerald Lake Ct (X St: Amber Grove/ Esplanade) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2172 sq. ft. $414,999 Heather DeLuca 228-1480 Justin Jewett 518-4089 Lindsey Ginno 570-5261 Sherrie O’Hearn 518-5904

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 3095 Chico River Rd (X St: Crouch) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1744 sq.ft. .$365,000 Johnny Klinger 864-3398

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 712 Linden St (X St: Woodland) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1775 sq. ft.. $325,000 Brandi Laffins 321-9562 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 Lindsey Ginno 570-5261

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 115 Mandalay Court (X St: Esplanade) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1860 sq. ft. $294,500 Paul Champlin 828-2902 Mark Reaman 228-2229

Sun. 11-1 6 Roberto Court (X St: Webster) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1640 sq. ft. $272,500 Kristin Wilson Ford 519-7600

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1962 Belgium (X St: 20th St.) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1406 sq. ft. $255,000 Saeed Khan 916-705-6977

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

5 River Wood Loop (X St: Glenwood) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1915 sq. ft. $319,000 Ed Galvez 990-2054

• Stunning, Quality 3 bed/2 ba, 1,909 sq ft. $359,900 • Durham, 3 bed/2.5 ba, 2,685 1.13 acs, $499,000 • Quality custom 3 bd/4 ba, 1.66a acs, pool $668,000 • Bungalow 2 bd/1 ba, 818 sq ft, garden beds $159,900 • Short sale, 4 bd/3 ba, 2,110 sq ft, huge yard, pool $409,000 • Pool, 1/2 acre, 3 bd/3 ba, west side, 2,177 sq ft $330,000 • 2 homes 1 lot, 1.1 acrs, Nord $325,000

1509 Ridgebrook Way (X St: Auburn Oak) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 1994 sq.ft. $305,000 Paul Champlin 828-2902

2637 Ceanothus Avenue (X St: Viceroy) 3 Bd / 2.25 Ba, 1419 sq. ft. $249,950 Dustin Wenner 624-9125

USDA 100% FINANCING AVAILABLE on this new construction! Two plans to choose from & 8 different lots at this price, 3 bed & 2 bath models with a den & 3 car garage. 90-120 day build out, call me for materials list & subdivision information. $280,000

MARK REAMAN Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

530-228-2229

www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

Jeffries Lydon

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of June 3, 2013 — June 7, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

1125 Sheridan Ave 61 2112 Laurel St 5073 Bagshot Rd 1765 White Mallard Ct 1428 Bowwood St 14693 Carnegie Rd 6604 Woodward Dr 14741 Carnegie Rd 15254 Skyway 75 Bobcat Saddle 201 Valley View Dr 5035 Pioneer Trl 36 CN&R June 20, 2013

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

Chico Chico Forest Ranch Gridley Gridley Magalia Magalia Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville

$142,500 $137,000 $150,000 $230,000 $129,500 $185,000 $156,000 $150,000 $139,500 $345,000 $329,000 $208,000

2/ 1.5 2/ 1 2/ 2 4/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 2 2/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 3 2/ 2

1008 974 1626 2538 1184 1795 1546 1742 1648 2130 2467 1416

5967 Golden Feather Dr 44 Crane Ave 220 Fairhill Dr 132 Canyon Highlands Dr 5034 Larkin Rd 2 Trail Ct 5405 Breezewood Dr 1445 Pine Creek Way 1880 Stearns Rd 1526 Forest Cir 6373 Oliver Rd

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1/ 1 4/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 1 2/ 1.5 4/ 4 3/ 2 2/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 2

1620 1715 2213 1300 1039 1440 2598 2255 1865 1759 1427


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as URBAN WAX CA at 1380 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926.

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D AND D MANAGEMENT GROUP LLC 3154 Olympic Way Auburn, CA 95603. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DEAN HEGARTY Dated: April 26, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000592 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LASER RENEW ZIT at 113 West 8th Ave Suite C Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT DEAN STOREY 10 Maddie Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT DEAN STOREY Dated: May 21, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000719 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BACIO CATERING COMPANY at 1903 Park Avenue CHico, CA 95928. BACIO INC 1903 Park Avenue Chico, Ca 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: AMANDA LEVERONI Dated: May 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000651 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DECADES at 1168 Patricia Drive Chico, CA 95926. TOBIAS SEAN BROOKS 2220 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95927. WILLIAM JOSEPH DIBONO 2220 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95927. SAMANTHA LOUISE FRANCIS 1116 Orchard Way Chico, Ca 95928. BENJAMIN OGDEN RUTTENBURG 6 Moraga Drive Chico, CA 95926. WILLIAM THOMAS HENRY WATJE 2220 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: William Joseph Dibono Dated: May 21, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000721 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADRENALINE X, CROSS FIT CHICO at 345 Huss Drive Chico, CA 95928. WHITNEY WOLFF 1394 Wanderer Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WHITNEY WOLFF Dated: April 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000607 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REVILAKS HER RATERS, REVS HERS at 2659 Williams Rd Butte Valley, CA 95965. JOHN S REVILAK 2659 Williams Rd Butte Valley, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Individual. Signed: JOHN REVILAK Dated: May 22, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000724 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PEACEFUL PINES MOBILHOME PARK at DALE MANSFIELD TRUSTEE 5528 Forbestown Road Forbestown, CA 95941. BETTY PETERS TRUSTEE 5528 Forbestown Road, Forbestown, CA 95941. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: BETTY PETERS Dated: May 23, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000730 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GRANDMA JO’S ORIGINAL SAUCE at 999 Jonell Lane Chico, CA 95926. SAUCE PARTNERS, LLC 999 Jonell Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DONNA M. OLSON Dated: April 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000611 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ECO IN CHICO at 1803 Mangrove Ave. Suite D Chico, CA 95926. DARCI RENEA CROSSIN 1405 Palm Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DARCI CROSSIN Dated: May 23, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000734 Published: jUNE 6,13,20,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name(s): ECO IN CHICO, BABY’S BOUTIQUE, ECO IN CHICO BABYS BOUTIQUE at 1803 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. AMANDA SAVANGSY 46 Artesia Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA SAVANGSY Dated: May 23, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0001005 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GREAT AMERICAN REALITY at 2 Peacock Lane Chico, CA 95926. CHARLES L MCKIM 2 Peacock Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHARLES L MCKIM Dated: May 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000757 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE COACH WORKS at 2844 A Northgate Dr Chico, CA 95973. SALVADOR VILLEGAS 13043 Orchard Blossom Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SALVADOR VILLEGAS Dated: May 2, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000634 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PORT OF SUBS 178 at 2036 Forest Ave Chico, CA 95928. HARMINDER K BHOGAL 1788 Roth Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HARMINDER BHOGAL Dated: May 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000678 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COURTYARD APARTMENTS, THE COURTYARD APARTMENTS at 2720 Oro Dam Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. KIRK BENGSTON 1037 Village Ln Chico, CA 95926. STEVE DEPA 1037 Village Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: KIRK BENGSTON Dated: June 4, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000779 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLEANERS EXTRAORDINAIRE at 6 Sandra Circle Chico, CA 95926. JOAN MALUMPHY 6 Sandra Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOAN T. MALUMPHY Dated: May 28, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000745 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as VICTORY PRECISION at 360 Southbury Lane Chico, CA 95973. BRYAN RIDGLEY 360 Southbury Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRYAN RIDGELY Dated: May 24, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000739 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GREEN ENERGY CONSTRUCTION at 2954 HWY 32 Suite 1300 Chico, CA 95973 MICHAEL T GROSBERG 3168 Aloha Lane Chico, CA 95973. STEPHEN M MCNULTY 3075 Coronado Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MIKE BROSBERG Dated: May 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000478 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RAPID FUEL NUTRITION st 1030 E. 20TH Street Chico, CA 95928. PATRICK LAVERTY 1119 Stewart Ave Apt 30 Chico, CA 95926. BRIAN PARKER 1119 Stewart Ave Apt 30 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PATRICK LAVERTY

this Legal Notice continues

Dated: June 4, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000781 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTHSTATE AUTO MACHINE at 1814 Park Ave Chico, CA 95926. SHAREEF ABOUZEID 4665 Munjar RD Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAREEF ABOUZEID Dated: May 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000747 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE ANTLER WORKS at 1710 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. DANA KRUEGER 1710 Magnolia Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANA KRUEGER Dated: May 30, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000765 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MIGHTY POOLS at 3320 Pathway CT Corning, CA 96021. RICHARD SANCHEZ 3320 Pathway Ct Corning, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD SANCHEZ Dated: June 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000786 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BURGER KING #2699 at 7300 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. BUTTE FOODS, INC. 2565 Zanella Way STE C Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BRYON CROSSEN PRESIDENT Dated: May 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000677 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TRINITY ALPS LANDSCAPING at 2021 Tehama Ave Oroville, CA 95965. CALEB JAMES LONG 2021 Tehama Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CALEB LONG Dated: April 30, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000624 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FUNNY FACES at 6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. JENNIFER BORGMAN 6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER BORGMAN Dated: June 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000802 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO PARTY BOUNCERS at 6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. JENI BORGMAN 6 Sterling Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER BORGMAN Dated: June 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000801 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name CHICO PARTY BOUNCERS at 2018 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928. KRISTI R SMITH 2018 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTI R SMITH Dated: June 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2010-0001557 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11,2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as INSPIRE ME CREATIONS at 561 E. Lindo Ave Suite 1 Chico, CA 95926. KYMBERLY COCO 561 E. Lindo Ave #7 Chico, CA 95926. TAMARA PATTERSON 8564 Silver Bridge RD Palo Cedro, CA 96073. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KYMBERLY COCO Dated: May 30, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000762 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SHARPS LOCKSMITHING AND GARAGE DOORS INCORPORATED at 2200 Myers Street Oroville, CA 95966. SHARPS LOCKSMITHING AND GARAGE DOORS INCORPORATED 2200 Myers Street Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: Robert L. Sharp Dated: June 4, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000783 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ISADORA’S FOLLY at 3 Casita Terrace Chico, CA 95926. ROSELLE DIANE PETERS 3 Casita Terrace Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: R. DIANA PETERS Dated: May 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000753 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FOOD FROM THE HEART OF CHICO at 880 East Avenue Chico, CA 95926. OUR THING INC 279 Brookvine Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RONALD W. LANDINI

CLASSIFIEDS

CONTINUED ON 38

June 20, 2013

CN&R 37


Dated: June 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000814 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AT YOUR SERVICE at 1230 Bonnie Lane Oroville, CA 95965. KENDELL OGEL 1230 Bonnie Lane Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KENDELL OGEL Dated: June 14, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000820 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BURNING OAKS ENTERPRISES at 4960 Starflower Lane Chico, CA 95973. DEBRA S NUZZO 4960 Starflower Lane Chico, CA 95973. JAMES L NUZZO 4960 Starflower Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DEBRA S NUZZO Dated: June 14, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-000819 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ZELA IRENE CROCKER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ZELA IRENE CROCKER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DAVID GENE CHILDS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: DAVID GENE CHILDS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: August 8, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept:TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days

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38 CN&R June 20, 2013

from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40658 Petitioner: David Gene Childs 1458 N. Topanga Cyn. Blvd #14 Topanga, CA 90290 Published: June 6,13,20, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINE ALICIA STOLP NAKAO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTINE ALICIA STOLP NAKAO NAKYLA KUMA STOLP NAKAO Proposed name: ALICIA NARYCE NAKYLA STOLP NAKYLA KUMA NAKAO STOLP THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 8, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 29, 2013 Case Number: 159522 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JULIE MICHELE SCHNEIDER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JULIE MICHELE SCHNEIDER Proposed name: JULIE MICHELE HOLLAND THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is:

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Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: June 7, 2013 Case Number: 159672 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DWAYNE WILLIAM NICHOLS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DWAYNE WILLIAM NICHOLS Proposed name: WILLIAM DWAYNE SMYTHE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 26, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: June 7, 2013 Case Number: 158989 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LUCINDA VALDOVINOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ROBERT MELENDREZ II Proposed name: ROBERT ANTHONY STILES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 16, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. McLean Dated: June 10, 2013 Case Number: 159660 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ROBERT B MELLO, SHERRI L MELLO AKA SHERRI L MILLER YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP

this Legal Notice continues

NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: ALFRED W DRISCOL III Attorney at Law 1339 The Esplanade Chico, CA 95926 Dated: July 17, 2012 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 157382 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: DANYAIL M KIENZLE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to

this Legal Notice continues

call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at

this Legal Notice continues

the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory

this Legal Notice continues

lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue,

this Legal Notice continues

Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Joseph L Selby Chico, CA 95926 Dated: October 19, 2012 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 158087 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2013

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Maybe you’ve seen that meme circulating on the Internet: “My desire to be well-informed is at odds with my desire to remain sane.” If you feel that way now— and I suspect you might soon if you don’t already—you have cosmic permission, at least for a while, to emphasize sanity over being wellinformed. Lose track of what Kim Jong-un and Kim Kardashian are up to, ignore the statements of every jerk on the planet, and maybe even go AWOL from the flood of data that relentlessly pours toward you. Instead, pay attention to every little thing your body has to tell you. Remember and marvel at your nightly dreams. Go slow. Lay low. Be soft. Have fun with unspectacular influences that make you feel at home in the world. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I expect you will be called on to move fluidly between opposing camps or competing interests or different realities. Maybe you’ll volunteer to serve as an arbiter between the crabby good guys and the righteous bad guys. Perhaps you’ll try to decode one friend’s quirky behavior so that another friend can understand it. You might have to interpret my horoscopes for people who think astrology is bunk. You may even have to be a mediator between your own heart and head, or explain the motivations of your past self to your future self. You can’t be perfect, of course. There will be details lost in translation. But if you’re as patient as a saint and as tricky as a crow, you’ll succeed.

flood of enduring slack. The cosmic omens suggest that such an achievement is quite possible. Appleseed was a 19th-century folk hero renowned for planting apple trees in vast areas of rural America. During the 70 years this famous Libra was alive, he never got married. He believed that if he remained unwed during his time on Earth, he would be blessed with two spirit wives in the afterlife. Have you ever done something like that yourself, Libra? Is there an adventure you’ve denied yourself in the here and now because you think that’s the only way you can get some bigger, better adventure at a later date? If so, now would be an excellent time to adjust your attitude.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “It is kind of fun to do the impossible,” said Walt Disney, a pioneer animator whose cartoon innovations were remarkable. Judging from your current astrological omens, I think you Scorpios have every right to adopt his battle cry as your mantra. You’ve got an appointment with the frontier. You’re primed to perform experiments at the edge of your understanding. Great mysteries will be tempting you to come closer, and lost secrets will be teasing you with juicy clues. As you explore and tinker with the unknown, you might also want to meditate on the graffiti I saw scrawled on a mirror in a public restroom: “Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Casals was one of the greatest cello players who ever lived. Among his early inspirations was the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Casals discovered Bach’s six cello suites when he was 13 years old, and played them every day for the next 13 years. Have you ever done something similar, Gemini? Devoted yourself to a pleasurable discipline on a regular basis for a long time? I invite you to try it. The coming months will be an excellent time to seek mastery through a diligent attention to the details.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I know

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

that I am not a category,” said philosopher Buckminster Fuller. “I am not a thing¡ªa noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process.” Philosopher Norman O. Brown had a similar experience. “The human body is not a thing or substance, but a continuous creation,” he mused. “It is an energy system which is never a complete structure; never static; is in perpetual inner self-construction and self-destruction.” Now is an excellent time to imagine yourself in these terms, Cancerian. You’re not a finished product and never will be! Celebrate your fluidity, your changeableness, your instinctual urge to reinvent yourself.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Renowned 20th-

century theologian Karl Barth worked on his book Church Dogmatics for 36 years. It was more than 9,000 pages long and contained more than 6 million words. And yet it was incomplete. He had more to say and wanted to keep going. What’s your biggest undone project, Leo? The coming months will be a good time to concentrate on bringing it to a climax. Ideally, you will do so with a flourish, embracing the challenge of creating an artful ending with the same liveliness you had at the beginning of the process. But even if you have to culminate your work in a plodding, prosaic way, do it! Your next big project will be revealed within weeks after you’ve tied up the last loose end.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Susannah Cibber was a popular 18th-century English contralto whose singing was expressive and moving. On one occasion, she performed Handel’s Messiah with such verve that an influential priest responded by making an extravagant guarantee. He told her that as a result of her glorious singing, any sins she had committed or would commit were forever forgiven. I’d like to see you perpetrate an equivalent amazement, Virgo: a good or beautiful or soulful deed that wins you a

by

Vic Cantu

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Johnny

Astronauts on lunar expeditions have orbited the moon and seen its entire surface. But the rest of us have never seen more than 59 percent of it. As the moon revolves around the Earth, it always keeps one side turned away from our view. Isn’t that amazing and eerie? The second most important heavenly body, which is such a constant and intimate factor in our lives, is half-hidden. I’d like to propose that there is an analogous phenomenon in your inner world, Sagittarius: a part of you that forever conceals some of its true nature. But I’m pretty sure you will soon be offered an unprecedented chance to explore that mysterious realm.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Pablo

Sweet rider

by Rob Brezsny

Anglo-Irish novelist Laurence Sterne married his wife Elizabeth in 1741. Twenty-five years later, he fell in love with another woman, Eliza. In composing love letters to his new infatuation, he lifted some of the same romantic passages he had originally written to Elizabeth when he was courting her. Try hard not to do anything remotely resembling that, Capricorn. Give your intimate allies your freshest stuff. Treat them as the unique creatures they are. Resist the temptation to use shticks that worked to create closeness in the past.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s important that you not punish yourself or allow yourself to be punished for the sins that other people have committed. It’s also crucial that you not think nasty thoughts about yourself or put yourself in the presence of anyone who’s prone to thinking nasty thoughts about you. Self-doubt and self-criticism may be healthy for you to entertain about 10 days from now, and at that time, you will probably benefit from receiving compassionate critique from others, too. But for the moment, please put the emphasis on self-protection and self-nurturing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For more

than three decades, a man in Assam, India, has worked to build a forest. When Jadav “Molai” Payeng started planting and tending seeds at the age of 16, the sandbars bordering the Brahmaputra River were barren. Today, almost entirely thanks to him, they’re covered with a 1,360-acre forest that harbors deer, birds, tigers, rhinos and elephants. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you could launch a comparable project in the next 12 months, Pisces¡—a labor of love that will require your persistent creativity and provide you with sanctuary for a long time.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of June 20, 2013

If you’ve driven down East 20th Street past the Chico Mall on a Saturday night, chances are you’ve seen some souped-up Camaros from the 1970s, tricked-out ’20s Fords, and even some sexy Corvettes. Those and other kinds of cool, customized cars can be found near the sidewalk in the Toys ‘R’ Us parking lot, from 6 to 9 p.m., along with their owners sitting or standing nearby, during the weekly Stroll and Shine gathering. Afterward, these car aficionados drive to Big Al’s Drive In on The Esplanade and chat it up from 9 to 10:30 p.m. One of them is retired Chicoan and Air Force veteran Don Pustejovsky, 67, who organizes the informal car gathering. Pustejovsky is owner of an immaculate, 1929 Model A Ford Coupe. For more info about the gathering, contact Pustejovsky at 228-8432.

Why did you start the gatherings?

just rode with others until then. I’ve always loved anything with a gas motor. As a kid I used to watch mechanics tear down engines, so I started taking apart lawnmower engines but couldn’t put them back together!

My wife, Donnie Davis, and I have loved cars since we were teenagers, so we wanted a place to hang out with other car lovers to talk about our rides, and life in general. We started four years ago at the In-N-Out burger parking lot, then moved to the Toys ‘R’ Us lot when Krispy Kreme Doughnuts reopened there at the beginning of the year. This lot has great exposure. We end the night with a loop through town and sit outside Big Al’s, just like we did in high school. It helps bring in customers.

What type of people and cars show up?

What got you into cars?

No, I also have a ’53 Buick Special two-door, a ’51 Chevy Deluxe four-door, and a 1929 Ford Model A pickup.

I’ve loved cars since my teenage years, but couldn’t afford one until after high school, so I

We get young and old, with no limits on car makes or models. Members of local car clubs like The Strollers also show up. In good weather we have 20 to 30 cars show up. We bring chairs, and the tall trees give lots of shade. We talk about upcoming car shows, fixing our cars, and even help each other rebuild them. A few years ago, I spent a year helping a friend rebuild his 1930 Model A and five months helping another friend rebuild his ’54 Chevy.

Is this 1929 Ford Coupe your only car?

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Two people Some years ago in a history of Western civilization, I found a reference to a princess of the West Roman Empire—daughter, sister, and mother of emperors—Galla Placidia. In 410, the Goths, led by Alaric, sacked Rome, captured 20-ish Placidia, paraded her in chains through the streets, and took her with them when they left. Placidia a few pages later turned up as the wife of a Gothic king. Her husband was killed and she was ransomed by her brother, the emperor, from her captors and returned to the palace apparently hale and hearty. I suspect she had had an incestuous relationship with her brother when they were young. Eventually she became the de facto ruler of the West Roman Empire when her 6-year-old son was named emperor, and she died in 450. I was intrigued by this woman for whom “resilient” is a mild word. I spent many hours at the Minneapolis Pubic Library downtown looking for books, reading the ones I couldn’t borrow, and now and then copying microfiche. I thought at first of writing a screenplay about her but that would take another life, although I did write just enough to show me how much I don’t know.

I still have a folder full of photocopies and a halfdozen books I found at used bookstores. Lately I’ve been editing a memoir by a former student at Piney Woods Country School, in Rankin County, Miss. Piney Woods was founded in 1909 and run for many years by Laurence C. Jones, a black man who refused lucrative offers in music and business in order to struggle for the poor colored students at Piney Woods. He seems to have been altruistic, selfless and steadfast, and an event in his life that stands out happened during World War I. One Sunday in 1918, some young white men heard Jones talking to a group of negroes in a church about the necessity of putting on armor and fighting to survive. A rumor was alive in that part of Mississippi that the Germans had been inciting the local colored people to rebellion. The words “armor” and “fight” so close together meant danger to these young men, and their fear of Jones and ignorance of metaphor caused them to put a rope around him, drag him a mile, and stand him up on a pile of faggots with a rope around his neck. They were gonna burn Jones and hang him at the same time. First, though, they gave him a chance to speak, and when he finished they let him go and gave him money for his cause. June 20, 2013

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