Page 1

75 YEARS &

STILL LICKING See CHOW, page 31

POT GRADES See NEWSLINES, page 8

MIGHTY

MONARCHS See GREENWAYS, page 15

t w e k a r t a c h M BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA PAGE

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

17

Volume 36, Issue 40

Thursday, May 30, 2013

FESTIVALS, YEAH! See MUSIC, page 26

IN WITH THE NEW

See SECOND & FLUME, page 5


2 CN&R May 30, 2013


CN&R

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Vol. 36, Issue 40 • May 30, 2013

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OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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General Manager Alec Binyon

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Associate Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Arts Editor Jason Cassidy News Editor Tom Gascoyne Calendar/Special Projects Editor Howard Hardee Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Jesse Mills, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Robert Speer, Evan Tuchinsky Intern Melanie MacTavish Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Design Melissa Arendt, Mary Key, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Sharon Conley, Shannon Davis, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Receptionist Kendra Gray Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to chicoletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (200 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

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CN&R 3


Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

A perfect storm Those who want to blame three current City Council members

Stop the water profiteers T

here is at present a pressing matter concerning

water-right allocations, surface-water sales, and local groundwater transfers. I quote from the AquAlliance website: “The Bureau of Reclamation’s Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the 2013 Water Transfer Program reveals plans to export 190,906 acre-feet of Central Valley Project and State Water Project river water to buyers south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. To replace the river water sold to desert agriculture operations on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley (with low-priority water rights), the plan by Jimi Gomez would permit Sacramento Valley surfacewater-right holders to substitute all of the river water with groundwater to continue The author states he agriculture production here.” is “a San FranciscoSacramento Valley surface-water-right born California native, artist and advocate holders represent a small percentage of for change through the population, and those water rights are awareness, with in place to accommodate their local agrigreat respect and cultural use. The very concept that they appreciation for manipulate those water rights to create a Mother Earth and all “water for sale” business for profit is our relations.” contrary to the well-being of the majority of the population and the environment. The concept that “farmers” south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta are planting crops that are reliant on water 4 CN&R May 30, 2013

imports tells me these are not farmers at all, but business speculators, as farmers would not plant orchards in a desert lacking sustainable water. The Sacramento-San Joaquin valleys were once abundant, rich farmlands, but business speculators saw “opportunity” and sacrificed much of those lush farmlands to urban sprawl. A new plan is shipping water south to a desert region to replace those lost farmlands. Short-sighted, unsustainable, quick-profit business ventures fail to see the long-term effects of their actions. Clean water is becoming less available because of the lack of sustainable-use consciousness. The clearcutting devastation of our forests creates loss of watersheds, and contamination, and voluminous usage of water in fracking and mining operations continues the unsustainable use of limited water resources. This Water Transfer Project will set a precedent for water-for-sale business ventures that will bring short-term profits with long-term consequences. It is time for us to adapt a more conscious long-range approach to the use of this limited resource. It is time to realize that for far too long we have prioritized business interests and job creation over the welfare and well-being of people and the environment. Ω

for the city’s budget deficits are ignoring reality: The problems have been developing for many years and have many causes, some of them far beyond the control of local officials. No individuals bear particular responsibility. If previous city councils, liberal and conservative alike, had not agreed to overly generous pay and benefits packages for city employees, the deficits and debts would be smaller. And if a mid-1990s City Council, dominated by conservatives, had not dramatically reduced development fees, the private development fund would be in much healthier condition than it is. Just as nobody could have foretold the Great Recession, and the subsequent loss of sales- and property-tax revenues, nobody knew the state was going to reclaim all of the city’s redevelopment and vehicle-license-fee funds. Nor did anyone know voters would fail to approve the cell-phone tax measure last November, causing the annual loss of nearly a million dollars in revenue. While all this was happening, of course, residents were insisting that no services be cut—especially fire and police. So city administrators, with the backing of the council, allowed most of the reductions to take place elsewhere—in the planning, housing and general-services departments, for example. Altogether, city staff has been trimmed by close to 20 percent. Blaming three council members for this mess is not only unfair, it’s also a distraction. The city spends most of its general-fund money on salaries and benefits, and the largest chunk of that—75 percent—goes to police and fire. How is the council going to fill a projected $4.8 million annual deficit without making significant cuts in public safety? That’s the question before us, not who’s responsible for creating the perfect storm that laid waste to city finances. Ω

An opportunity lost The City Council bungled things by not granting the Chico

Certified Farmers’ Market a longer lease for the city parking lot it uses at Second and Wall streets each Saturday. Typically on a year-to-year lease, market organizers had agreed to pay for an extension of power and sewer lines in return for a two-year lease. That would have been beneficial to Chico residents in several ways: First, it would have allowed the CCFM to provide better restroom facilities for its vendors and customers. And as a result, that would have alleviated concerns of downtown business owners who say market customers come into their shops only to use the restroom. But the council’s stalemate vote ended the opportunity to do so. The decision was a bad deal all around. Approving the extended lease would not have locked the city into an indefinite agreement with CCFM, and the upgrades would cost taxpayers nothing. The market’s offer wasn’t chump change. It would have cost the organization approximately $16,000. But that’s a lot cheaper than what it would cost down the road, following the completion of the downtown couplet project. So now nobody wins. The market likely will stay in its home of the last 20 years, but without upgrades it desperately needs. And business people and the CCFM are at odds more than ever. That won’t make it any easier to finally put an end to the debate about whether the market has a detrimental economic impact on nearby businesses or the possible solutions to parking or other problems. We’re not convinced that the market is harmful to downtown sales. In fact, a survey out of Chico State implies the opposite is true. But we’re also not convinced that the CCFM has fully vetted ways to compromise over this long-debated issue. We hope the stakeholders will continue discussions, now that the city has dropped the ball. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty melissad@newsreview.com

Ode to Bob Most readers probably know my predecessor as Robert Speer, but around the CN&R’s Second and Flume streets office, he’s Bob. My colleagues and I, along with many former staff members—some going back to the beginning of the newspaper’s history in the late ’70s—worked to send Bob off proper at a recent retirement party. It was nice to see the camaraderie among those former staffers. They seemed to pick up where they left off 15, 20, 30 years ago or more. And it was great to hear so many of them praise Bob for his indelible mark on the newspaper and his service to community journalism. But not everyone has been as appreciative of his work. A few people have taken some cheap shots since he announced his retirement. I know Bob, so I know he’s not sweating it. I guess you grow several extra layers of epidermis after being a newspaperman for close to 40 years. I’ve built up a couple of them myself. Now that I’m editor, I suppose my skin will only get thicker. But on the week I head into my new post, I want to set the record straight on Bob. I’ve been a reporter at every (legitimate) Chico newspaper over the past 12 years, and nowhere else have I encountered the level of hands-on, savvy editing employed by Robert Speer. He’s a pro, and there are many reporters and editors, myself included, whose skills have grown immeasurably under his day-today tutelage. Bob cleaned out the last of his things from his office in the middle of the day last Friday (May 24) and, very nonchalantly, said goodbye to his staff. After the buildup over the past couple of months, it was fairly anticlimactic. I guess I’d envisioned us all drinking a couple of beers at the end of the workday, as we do on occasion, and hearing some sage piece of advice that would stick with me. Instead, I went about my tasks, which included editing Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia’s excellent cover story about the controversy surrounding the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market. Speaking of LaPado-Breglia, as you’ll see on the Contents Page, she’s been promoted to associate editor. She’s attached to the environmental section, Greenways, so she’s still in charge of it. Among her many new duties is proofreading everything else in the paper. There are, of course, other changes happening around these parts. I’ll write about those changes as they go down. In the meantime, my hope is for a smooth transition. In the next few weeks, I’ll literally be heading into the chief’s seat, moving into the second-floor office in our building at the corner of Second and Flume streets. Hence the name of this column. This is my first-ever column in the CN&R. I wrote a single column back in college while I was a news reporter. I’ve always been more comfortable writing about other people, though, and don’t plan on baring my soul here. Don’t worry. But you are likely to get to know me better through this space. And it’s a two-way street. So, drop me a line.

A great loss Re “Changing of the guard” (Newslines, by Ken Smith, May 23): Robert Speer’s exit from the CN&R is truly journalism’s loss. I had the privilege of writing a few stories for Robert and the CN&R in 1986-87. The circumstances were quite telling. I had moved from Oroville to Chico to write for the Enterprise-Record, which laid me off three months later. I was among the recently hired employees who were casualties of a cost-cutting maneuver. The E-R and Donrey instead poured money into Off the Record, an attempt to siphon off business and readership from the CN&R. Off the Record was a free weekly that came and went, a feeble throwaway that could not compete with the CN&R. It did not have Robert Speer or his vision. I grew up in Chico—living there or nearby for all but a year between 1963 and 1987. I saw The Wildcat become the CN&R, which in short order became a must-read every Thursday. When I read the story of Robert’s leaving, my mind raced back to the stories I wrote for the CN&R about D.A.-in-waiting Mike Ramsey and the late journalist Tony Koester, and the one I regretfully did not write about Pete Mathiesen’s exit as Chico State’s basketball coach. I started to think of my Mount Rushmore of Chico journalism. Robert’s face would be there with the late W.H. “Old Hutch” Hutchinson. I’m still racking my brain for the other two. Good luck to you, Robert. And to the CN&R. RON FLATTER New York City, New York

Birds-eye view Re “The market ain’t broke” (Letters, by Mike Wiedeman, May 23): Two and a half years ago, I became a downtown business owner. My window looks out on the Saturday-morning market. I would hope that people would give me a listen and put themselves in my shoes. For me personally, it is not a problem with the market per se, but that the market has become so successful that the competition for parking spaces for our customers has pitted the market vendors and their customers against downtown businesses and their customers. The market has expanded its offerings beyond just fruits and veggies; they are now in direct competition with our businesses. The impact has gone from being a benefit to a detriment for a majority of downtown businesses. The recent disparaging letters to the editor do nothing to solve the problems. I’m wondering if the gentleman farmer from Capay is a vendor at the market. His recent letter did nothing but harm the negotiations. I would hate to think that the vendors and customers of the market really don’t give a hoot about downtown businesses. I would love to stay put and build my business, but if the City Council decides the needs and wants LETTERS continued on page 6

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I just wanted to comment on the discussion about moving either the day or location of the Saturday farmers’ market because of the perceived negative impact to the downtown area. I frequent the market every week. And every week my family and I choose someplace different to eat or go visit. We’ve made it a game almost since we started about 18 months ago. By now, we have definitely doubled and tripled visits to some places. My point is that the only reason we visit these downtown businesses on Saturdays is because we come into town for the market. If it wasn’t for the market, we wouldn’t make the trip all the way from Durham into town just to eat. The day and location to me are ideal, and I think that the City Council should just leave well enough alone. AMY VAN VORST Durham

Hear, hear! Re “Time to annex Southside (Editorial, May 23): Bravo! Well-written article. The topic of annexation has been an agenda item, surfacing during campaign election years and has helped to “vote” in a candidate. Unfortunately, this campaign promise has never been brought to fruition. The status-quo conditions of Southside Oroville without annexation are: No voting privileges in city issues and mayoral elections; no sidewalks for residents who are wheelchair-bound, or for mothers with strollers, and especially for students of all ages who walk to school; poor drainage in the rainy winter months make some streets a virtual wading pool and impassable; little or no county funding for low-income housing; and there is continued disparity for Southside Oroville residents. Thank God for officials, such as Supervisor Bill Connelly, who are willing to pump the brakes and say, “This far and no more.” JANET GOODSON Oroville

A chosen lifestyle Re “City’s cash crunch” (Newslines, by Robert Speer, May 23) I’m writing in regard to the “civil sidewalks” ordinance. I too

once lived a very nomadic lifestyle, traveling city to city across the country. I can still recall a little coffee shop in San Francisco that we vagabonds spent many hours sitting in front of, most of us with little to no money. That shop didn’t make it, which I feel somewhat responsible for. I was 18 and did not take such matters into consideration. As a downtown business owner now, I’ve had mixed emotions. I believe the majority of people sitting and lying on the sidewalks and in our doorways have chosen this lifestyle. They’ll move on eventually, and the ones who stay tend not to linger in such ways. This is a respect issue. I believe that if we simply talk to them and ask for their assistance, and explain our dependency on a thriving storefront, then many will respect that. Many, not all perhaps, and that’s when we need the city support. It’s true what Graham Hutton said about the bathrooms. Who would really feel comfortable sending their child or themselves through a crowd of people lounging around the door? And I wonder what Pastor Ted Sandberg considers the “core issues causing homelessness,” because most of the street dwellers I encounter downtown have chosen this path, or so it appears to me. CRYSTENA HEMINGWAY Chico

Mayor Goloff stated that council members struggled to get budgetary details they asked for, and faced additional uncontrollable circumstances. I agree the council did not cause the economic downturn. Over the last seven years, the liberal-majority council was told by both conservative council members and members of the public who spoke at City Council and Finance Committee meetings that the city was going in the wrong direction, just to be told they did not understand city finance. Council members should know how to read a financial statement and know they were being given bad advice. Once more I ask that [longtime liberal council members Goloff, Gruendl and Ann Schwab] do the morally right thing and resign from the City Council. Had the last seven years been a conservative majority City Council, I would be asking for them to resign. MICHAEL REILLEY Chico

Students need guidance Re “Where’s the innovation?” (Guest comment, by Mary Goloff, May 23): Mary Goloff, thank you so much for your guest comment. I especially appreciate this part: “If we want students to learn about activities our community has to offer, then let’s invite them into our community and immerse them in the myriad positive, healthful

“Who would really feel comfortable sending their child or themselves through a crowd of people lounging around the door?”

–Crystena Hemingway

Tender resignations How can council members Mary Goloff and Scott Gruendl publicly state they were not responsible for the city’s financial problems? In 2003, the City Council was taken over by a liberal majority and has controlled the council since. In 2006/2007, City Manager Greg Jones told the City Council that, without correction, the deficit and the imbalance could lead to the city becoming insolvent. From 20072012, Gruendl was the chair of the Finance Committee. Mary Goloff was also on the committee for this time, along with one conservative committee member.

activities we have to offer.” When I was a Chico State student a few decades ago, I did not feel especially welcomed by the larger community. Fortunately, I got an off-campus job that introduced me to some wonderful Chico “old timers.” Those people, thank goodness, welcomed me and helped me to discover at least some of what Chico has to offer beyond the campus community. ROBERT SCHARFF Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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No, I think it’s awesome. Everybody should have a chance to make a little something. People struggle here every day— why should the downtown businesses get more of a chance? The farmers’ market provides variety for people to explore. They’ve got vegetables and fruits, and I don’t think it’s bad.

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I don’t know if it’s bad for downtown business. I suppose it could detract during the time that it’s open, but I also know a lot of the downtown businesses just set up stalls during that time, then they end up making bank, at least at the Thursdaynight markets.

Karin Fisk chef

No, not at all. I love the farmers’ market. I’m a chef myself. I shop there every Saturday. It’s an institution, a Chico institution. It draws people who wouldn’t normally come to downtown. I don’t usually go to the Thursday Night Market—it’s kind of a different scene.

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BYE-BYE, BUSINESSES

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Two longtime Chico businesses—Clifford’s Jewelry and the Burger Hut on Nord Avenue— will soon shut their doors. Clifford’s Jewelry owner Michael Hicks announced his impending retirement and the store’s closure via press release last week. The jewelry store was founded in Chico in 1898 by Charles A. Clifford, and has continued as a family business ever since. The store has yet to announce a closing date, but it is holding a retirement sale in the meantime. Also closing is Chico’s original Burger Hut, which opened in 1978 and was purchased by current owner Jim Williams in 1983. Williams told KHSL-TV he is closing to spend more time with family, and because of the older store’s declining business and rising upkeep costs. Burger Hut’s two other Chico locations—on Cohasset Road and Forest Avenue—will remain open. The Nord location was purchased by neighboring Star Liquors, which plans to bulldoze the building to expand its store.

AFTERMATH OF MEASURE J

The failure last fall of the passage of Measure J, which would have allowed the city of Chico to continue collecting a cell-phone userutility tax, is costing the city about $70,000 a month in lost revenue and will amount to $840,000 after a year. That information was presented by city Accounting Manager Frank Fields at the May 28 Finance Committee meeting, during an update on the city’s dire financial state. On top of that, 183 cell-phone users have filed for tax refunds from the city amounting to $9,100, or about $151 each. Measure J was placed on the ballot to update the city’s decades-old ordinance to include cellular and certain Internet phones, not just land lines. The city had already been collecting the fee from cellular providers, but the measure would have codified the practice. Measure J actually would have reduced the overall user-utility tax from 5 percent to 4.5 percent. But it was defeated by 54 percent of the voters.

DEAN EXCHANGE

Chico State University has named a new dean of College of Humanities and Fine Arts. Robert Knight (pictured), currently serving as associate vice chancellor for undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin— Eau Claire, will replace Joel Zimbelman in the position on Aug. 1. “It is a wonderful opportunity, and it will be great to get to know the university and community,” Knight said in a Tuesday (May 28) Chico State press release. In related news, Michael Ward, dean of the College of Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Management (ECC), left that position at the end of the academic year last week. Ward, a 25-year employee of Chico State, will return to teach in his home department, mechanical engineering. 8 CN&R May 30, 2013

Pot grades State’s regional water board offers little help in controlling county’s large marijuana grows

A from the state in getting a handle on large marijuana gardens in the local foothills has been request by Butte County for help

rebuffed. On May 7, a letter signed by Supervisor Bill Connelly was sent to the Central Valley Regional Water by Quality Control Board expressTom Gascoyne ing concern about environmental tomg@ damage caused by big pot-grownewsreview.com ing operations. The letter asked that the state step in and help enforce the federal Clean Water Act. “Butte County has its share of large marijuana grow sites,” the letter reads. “The development of these sites ha[s], in many cases, disturbed over one acre of soil and include[s] buildings and other improvements that support these large marijuana-growing operations without proper local and state permits.” The letter points out that the state regulates mining, industrial and construction operations with strict guidelines, and that the same should be done for large marijuana gardens. But Ken Landau, the assistant executive officer for the RWQCB, said in a May 24 phone interview that the board will not get directly involved in policing pot farms. “Yes, there is a real issue with these marijuana operations,” he said. “However, our staff are not armed peace officers, and we cannot be sending them into places where their lives will be at risk. We will provide technical support on evalu-

ating things, but they simply can’t be out on the front lines going into these places.” The RWQCB’s response to the county’s request had not yet been sent, Landau said. When contacted, Tom Fossum, land-development manager for the county’s Department of Public Works, said that since he had not yet seen the response, he could not comment. On May 7, Fossum presented the

Butte County Board of Supervisors with a verbal report and slideshow on the matter. “This past spring, we’ve seen quite a bit of grading in the foothills, much of it without permits,” Fossum told the board. “We’ve been asking the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board for their support in enforcing some of the rules that we believe they are required to [enforce].” He said a lack of support from the state—because the RWQCB considers the grows to be agricultural operations—was an ongoing problem. “We believe these operations are just like any other business operation that is required to have a structure stormwater permit and, if need be, an industrial stormwater permit,” Fossum said.

He showed aerial photos of graded acres—and, in some cases, greenhouses under construction—in the Paradise, Magalia and Concow areas, as well as land near Forbestown and Feather Falls. A site off Jordan Hill Road, east of Paradise and near the Feather River, was discovered in early April. Fossum said his department estimates more than about 2,150 cubic yards of soil have been moved, violating the county’s limit of displacing 1,000 cubic yards without a permit, as called for in the county’s grading ordinance that was adopted in 2009. Even so, a project that involves excavating more than 50 cubic yards requires the landowner to first apply for an exemption. A second site on the same piece of property includes a freshly plowed road and more than 1,000 cubic yards of excavated soil. To the south, off Crystal Ranch Road near Lake Oroville, is a site where a significant amount of erosion took place over the winter; eroded material from the site could make its way to the creeks that feed the lake, Fossum pointed out. None of the sites have residences on them, he said, but some do have motor homes, travel trailers and greenhouses, including one that measures 70 feet long


and 20 feet wide. At that site, off Lakeview Terrace near Feather Falls, 10,000 cubic yards of soil have been moved, burying tree trunks up to 15 feet deep. Supervisor Maureen Kirk said the RWQCB would not hesitate to go after a builder who had made such violations, and called the situation “incredible.” Supervisor Larry Wahl asked if the Department of Public Works had shut down any of the operations. Fossum said it was in the process of doing so, but could certainly use the state’s help. Mike Crump, the county’s director of public works, said the RWQCB has ignored the county’s requests for help. “We’ve worked with the local office [in Redding], and they sent it up the chain and we have not really heard any response,” he said. “They are kind of saying, ‘We think it’s ag and so they are exempt.’ We haven’t really received any reason. Hopefully with a letter they’ll take this seriously and start enforcing the rules that they are making everybody else comply with. If nothing else, maybe we’ll get a better reason of why they chose not to go after this.” Crump said his department is trying to control the gardens by enforcing the county’s soil-grading ordinance, and that the Butte County District Attorney’s Office is looking into possible environmental violations. “But we think the state should be a partner in this,” he said. Supervisor Connelly also expressed frustration. “I don’t understand why the state won’t step in like they would if it was a developer or a contractor or the county,” he said. “They’ve come after us for building a road. I just don’t understand why they are not helping.” Local environmental activist

Kelly Meagher, a strong supporter of the value of medicinal marijuana, finds himself in an ironic position with the matter. More than 20 years ago he chained himself to a gate in protest of grading near his home in Butte Creek Canyon. “A developer was so upset with the county he just thought he’d knock all these big trees down and make holes in the ground,” Meagher recalled. “I had to chain myself to a gate, and the county came up with a really wimpy grading ordinance for the foothills.” He said the local farmers objected to such an ordinance, which led to the ag exemption. “They’ve adopted a new one, but it’s obvious it doesn’t address these kinds of issues,” he said. Meagher’s seen the photos, and questions if the sites are all for pot gardens. “If it’s true, and they want to grow dope and damage the environment, then they are frickin’ idiots,” he said. “I am totally opposed to what they are doing.” Ω

Higher fees, please City looks at upping service costs he city of Chico Finance Committee Tsideration agreed Tuesday (May 28) to send a conto increase the city’s service fees

designed to act as a deterrent to parking violations within the to the full City Council in June. city. Chris Constantin, the city’s new adminisThe proposed parktrative-services director, reported that part of ing-fine increases City Accounting Manager Frank Fields (foreground) explains the city’s bleeding budget is due to the fact would boost a meter the service-fee proposal to Finance Committee members that fees collected do not cover the costs of violation from the cur(left to right) Randall Stone, Sean Morgan (filling in for absent providing services. Frank Fields, the city rent $29 to $32; parkMark Sorensen) and Scott Gruendl at a May 28 meeting. accounting manager, told the committee— ing by a fire hydrant PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE made up of City Council members Scott would jump from $137 Gruendl, Randall Stone and Sean Morgan to $162; and parking in siveness that surrounds the downtown park(sitting in for Mark Sorensen)—that although a red zone would cost a whopping $338, up ing issue and said it was time for city offimost of the fees have automatic inflators, a from the current fine of $42. cials to hold a serious discussion. General jump “outside the normal increase” is needed There are 40 possible ways to violate the Services Director Ruben Martinez said the at this time. city’s parking rules, including parking in a matter has been well-researched, noting his The city is facing a $4.8 million deficit bus zone (currently $309, would rise to office has a stack of studies on downtown and City Manager Brian Nakamura told the $338), parking in an alley ($24, to $26), and parking that is 10- to 12-inches high. committee he wants to make $7 million in parking in a bikeway ($125, to $148). Staycuts over the next fiscal year. ing in a two-hour space for more than two The discussion moved onto the other The list of fee increases under considerahours, even with the meter paid, would cost suggested fee increases that will be put before tion included special-events liability insur$26 instead of $24. the full council at its June budget meeting. ance, loan processing for the housing-mortThe only parking fine that would remain Gruendl pointed out that any city-fee gage subsidy program, parking-ticket fines, the same is parking in a handicapped spot increase has to be in compliance with Prop. administrative fines, animal-service fees and without a handicapped sticker ($338). 26, which requires the fees cover specific sewer fees. Chico resident and business owner Mike costs of providing service, rather than generate Fields told the committee that there’d Trolinder described the city’s parking revenue. been a request to remove the parking-ticket enforcement as “predatory.” The special-events liability insurance fee increase for separate consideration, which is “Something is broken here,” he said. “Are is what the city charges while acting as an not surprising in view of the ongoing contro- the tickets based on fairness?” insurance broker between those putting on an versy that surrounds downtown parking. He compared the city’s parking manageevent in a city street or park and an insurance “This is seen as a barrier to people comment to what he considers is its unnecessary company called HUB International. The ing to the downtown area,” Constantin said. focus on issues “like marijuana and plastic insurance covers liabilities introduced by The motive for the parking-fine increase, bags.” things like bounce houses and pony rides; as he said in a report included with the Finance City Manager Nakamura acknowledged it has annually over the past few years, the Committee agenda packet, is not to generate the controversy, but pointed out there was rate is again slated to go up 50 cents, to $33, money but to “deter offenders from continualso public pressure to enforce parking laws, to cover staff time. ing the behavior for which those penalties and asked rhetorically if the city’s approach Other fees that are marked for increase and fees are assessed. Increasing the penalwas “predatory or complaint-driven.” include those to reimburse the city for costs ties and fines encourages the compliance “Some want us to be proactive so we can associated with helping a resident who’s with city rules and regulations …” move cars around [to open up parking received a city mortgage-subsidy loan. The He said the fiscal impact is unknown spaces],” he said. only increase will be loan-payoff recording because, ideally, increased parking fines are Councilman Morgan also noted the divifees, which would go from $22 to $41. Administrative fine increases include those issued at parties deemed “disorderly events”—those will jump from $266 to $300 for a first offense, $532 to $600 for a second offense, and $1,064 to $1,200 for a third offense. The same rate increase is suggested Race relations for noise-ordinance violations. Of the 220,000 people living in Butte County, a Park violations—including dogs offvast majority—80.8 percent—are white. leash, feeding of wild animals, riding a bike There are 38,041,400 people living in Califoron a skateboard track, and loitering on a nia, 74 percent of whom are white. Nationbridge or spillway—would all go up from wide, 78.1 percent of the country’s 313,914,000 residents are white. Here is a further $37 to $75 for a first offense, $58 to $150 for look at the demograhics: a second offense, and $112 to $300 for a third offense. Butte County California United States On the other hand, animal-shelter fees are Native American 1.4 % 1.7 % 1.2 % a mixed bag. Adopting a dog would drop from Asian 4.2 % 13.6 % 5.0 % $39 to $35 and adopting a cat would go from Black 2.1 % 6.6 % 13.1 % $37.50 to $31.50. Micro-chipping, however, Hispanic* 15.4 % 38.1 % 16.7 % would jump from $19.50 to $24.50. All other Native Hawaiian 0.2 % 0 .5 % 0.2 % fees at the shelter would remain the same.

SIFT|ER

* Some respondents listed their race as both Hispanic and white.

Source: The Butte County Department of Behavioral Health and the U.S. Census Bureau.

—TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 May 30, 2013

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continued from page 9

Mini mart denied liquor license

Realignment results

C

Reports Reports say say prison prison plan plan is is working working

No beer, no business haranjiv Singh, the owner of the Mangrove Mini Mart at the corner of Fifth and Mangrove avenues, says he has been treated unfairly in his pursuit of an alcohol license. The Chico City Council’s recent 6-1 vote to deny his application for an off-sale beer and wine license is a decision that will bring him “extreme financial hardship” in the near future, Singh said during a recent interview. He estimates that the resulting loss of business will force him to close the convenience store in six months to a year and a half. “The purpose of the convenience store is to carry a little bit of everything,” he said, insisting that customers will bypass his store in favor of others up the road. The India-born, first-time business owner purchased the convenience store—which had been closed for roughly a year after decades of operation—back in January 2012. At the time, he was under the impression that he would have no problem obtaining a beer and wine license. He began the application process in January of this year, allowing for the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control’s required 30-day posting period, during which community members can protest the license.

Charanjiv Singh says his convenience store won’t last without being able to sell alcohol. PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE

The 30-day window passed without protest, but as the ABC approval process dragged on, Singh began to suspect his application would be denied. He pleaded his case to Mayor Mary Goloff and Chico Police Chief Kirk Trostle in an email on April 1, in which he wrote: “We have customers walking out when they notice we do not carry beer and they leave without buying any other merchandise. The competition is already very fierce and making survival very hard for a small business like us.” Singh also collected about 540 signatures from customers petitioning the city to approve his application. 10 CN&R May 30, 2013

Since the purchase, Singh has invested nearly $400,000 in the store, borrowing from friends and family and taking out a Small Business Administration loan (approved largely based on the location’s previous alcohol sales). “I’m very shocked,” said Singh, who opened the store last summer. “If I had known I would go through all of this, I never would have bought a business here in Chico.” Singh, according to Chico Police Sgt.

George Laver, was the first applicant for a liquor license since Trostle, as Laver put it, decided to “draw a line in the sand.” In reaction to the string of alcohol-related student deaths and Chico State’s Call for Community Action released in January, Trostle has stated publicly that the city should stop granting new alcohol licenses entirely. “[Singh] was the first one to come along after he made that decision,” Laver said. “Had they done this last fall, they probably would have been approved and selling alcohol by now. Their timing was poor and it had absolutely nothing to do with them. It was simply a matter of circumstance.” Sean Morgan, the only council member to vote in favor of approving Singh’s application, said denying him an alcohol license after approving one in March for BevMo!, a major alcohol retail store, was “hypocritical.” “This guy came along, having already invested in the business, thinking he would be able to get his beer and wine license the whole time,” Morgan said. “When you turn around and say, ‘You can’t have it because we’re doing a 180 on our policy,’ I don’t think that’s fair to the business owner.” During the last City Council meeting, Trostle requested the council develop a new policy for licensees, a task assigned to the Internal Affairs Committee. “Yes, let’s sit down and come up with a policy, but let’s not surprise this new business owner,” Morgan said, adding that he “agreed that we need to give serious consideration to any further alcohol licenses.” Meanwhile, Singh is considering filing an appeal, but conceded the cost of hiring an attorney may prove prohibitive. —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com

wo recently released reports indicate Tcontrary, that, despite some political claims to the the state’s prisoner-realignment

effort is working both locally and statewide. Based on Assembly Bill 109, and triggered by order of the U.S. Supreme Court, the realignment has reduced the number of inmates in the state’s 33 prisons by about 28,000 since October 2011 by sending low-level felons to county jails rather than into state custody. Still, there remains a misconception that realignment transfers felons from state to county incarceration or releases them early. According to a fact sheet from the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, under AB 109 “newly convicted lowlevel offenders without current or prior serious or violent offenses stay in county jail to serve their sentence; this has reduced the annual admissions (to state prison) to less than 35,000 a year. Prior to realignment, there were approximately 55,000 to 65,000 new admissions from county courts to state prison.” According to the state report, since AB 109 went into effect, no offenders have received an early release from state prison, and post-realignment recidivism has actually decreased. The new info counters the statements by such state representatives as Sen. Jim Nielsen (R-Gerber) and Assemblyman Dan Logue (R-Loma Rica), who have warned constituents that realignment is putting local communities at risk. Last October, Nielsen held a press conference at the State Capitol and said, “This legislation, unlike any other before, has unleashed an unprecedented crime wave across the state over the past year, and it started in the very first week. This crime wave is real; AB 109 is not working.” In March, Logue commented on Republican bills introduced to counter realignment: “The governor’s program has been a disaster. We have more hardcore criminals on the streets. We have to reduce this trend. The people of California don’t feel safe anymore.”

A May 20 press release introducing

an assessment of AB 109 made by an interdisciplinary Chico State faculty group, the Consortium for Public Safety Research, says local implementation of the plan has

Butte County Sheriff Jerry Smith in the Butte County Jail, where some felons now spend their incarcerations under AB 109. CN&R FILE PHOTO

resulted in “positive results in Butte County’s response to the shift of some felony offenders from state prisons to county jails.” The report made three main findings: • That felons in Butte County’s alternative-custody program, who served their sentences outside of jail by wearing an electronic-monitor ankle device, had a first-year recidivism rate of 14 percent, which is lower than comparison-group estimates. • Butte’s AB 109 offenders were more likely to report they needed rehabilitative and therapeutic services compared to those jailed for misdemeanors. • The risk of the program’s failure could be predicted by a number of social and criminal facts about the individuals as well as from the results of a survey of the offenders that rated their general attitudes. The report, titled “Considering the LifeCourse of Crime: Contextualizing California’s AB 109 Offender under Correctional Supervision,” was written up by political science professors Sally Anderson, Jon Caudill, Ryan Patten and Matthew Thomas. Caudill said the county’s response to AB 109 contributed to “a respectable and substantially reduced recidivism rate given the nature of these correctional clients.” The report, he said, “adds critically important information to the current debates surrounding criminal-justice realignment.” Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey, who’s criticized AB 109 in the past, said the new local report was welcome news. “Generally we agree with the report, and the District Attorney’s Office is very pleased that it shows that the process is working for AB 109 here,” he said. Butte County Sheriff Jerry Smith said he was also pleased with the report. “This report reaffirms that we are making headway in our ongoing effort to enhance public safety by reducing recidivism,” he said. “The research conducted by the Chico State researchers is invaluable, and enables us to deploy our limited resources in a manner likely to achieve the best outcomes.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com


Taking life back from hip and knee pain When the pain you are experiencing in your hips or knees severely restricts your ability to walk or perform simple activities, it may be time to talk to an orthopedic surgeon and consider a joint replacement procedure. Mobility is a vital part of life and Feather River Hospital’s award winning Joint Replacement Center of Excellence is seeing to it that patients get back to the life they know and love faster. This includes patients who would consider themselves too young for a replacement. Feather River Hospital surgeons use unique, advanced techniques that require smaller incisions and damage less muscle tissue. These techniques allow faster recovery and a shorter hospital stay. Because surgeons are part of a skilled care team that provides a consistently high level of treatment from pre-op through recovery, patients are able to be active again more quickly. The care team comprised of surgeons, nurses, therapists and even dieticians also focuses on the patient experience and the benefit of compassionate, patient-focused care in promoting healing. This approach has helped the program to reach a level of excellence recognized by awards such as a 5-Star Rating in Total Hip Replacements for 10 years in a row from Healthgrades. Feather River Hospital is also a Blue Distinction Center+ for Hip and Knee Replacements. “Blue Distinction Centers set themselves apart by adhering to best practices in patient safety and surgical care

and producing consistently strong outcomes with fewer complications,” says Marcus Thygeson, M.D., senior vice president and chief health officer at Blue Shield of California. The Joint Replacement Center of Excellence offers an innovative, proactive approach to care for total knee and total hip replacement patients utilizing pre-operative learning classes and group therapy. “The focus of this effort is to create a smooth, cohesive plan for the patient that helps them to be fully prepared for their procedure and gives them a clear plan for recovery and an excellent outcome,” says Gloria Santos, Vice President for Patient Care. When recovering in the hospital, patients recover as a group – exercising, enjoying various activities, and providing support and encouragement to each other. Total joint replacement patients average a hospital stay of only one to three days. Most patients are putting weight on their new joint later in the same day that they have their surgery. For patients who once suffered from joint pain, being able to hike, golf, play with their children or even ride a motorcycle again greatly improves their lives. Feather River Hospital’s joint replacement program is helping them to achieve these excellent outcomes as fast as possible. For more information about the Feather River Hospital Joint Replacement Center of Excellence call (530) 876-7243 or visit www.frhosp.org. To learn more about Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care®, please visit www.bcbs.com or contact your Local Plan.

5 9 7 4 P e n t z R o a d Pa R a d i s e , C a 9 5 9 6 9 / ( 5 3 0 ) 8 7 7 - 9 3 6 1 / w w w. f R h o s P. o R g

May 30, 2013

CN&R 11


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES Enloe Medical Center diabetes nurse-educator Dawn Bryan (left) provides a glucose test for a community member. Inset: Deanna Reed, Enloe’s community-outreach coordinator.

OF PROCEDURES AND GEOGRAPHY

The frequency of elective medical procedures varies dramatically based on geographical area, new research finds. The California HealthCare Foundation recently updated its interactive online tool titled “All Over the Map,” which maps the variation of treatments patients receive based on where they live, according to a CHCF press release. For instance, when compared to the state average, men in Tracy are 479 percent more likely to undergo internal radiation for prostate cancer; women in Healdsburg are 248 percent more likely to receive a lumpectomy without radiation for breast cancer; and women in Laguna Hills and San Clemente are 273 percent and 277 percent, respectively, more likely to undergo breast-reconstruction surgery following mastectomy. Go to www.chcf.org/publications/2013/05/ medical-variation-map to view the map.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER

The health of a community

SILVER STATE HOSPITAL PROBED

Los Angeles is pursuing a criminal investigation of the Las Vegas hospital that allegedly bused mental-health patients to California and other states. In April, a review of bus receipts kept by the Nevada Division of Mental Health and Development Services revealed that the Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital in Las Vegas, a facility for adults with serious mental illness, has sent more than 1,500 mentalhealth patients to other cities since July 2008, according to The Sacramento Bee. Two hundred of the patients arrived in Los Angeles County. Los Angeles has an ordinance specifically describing “patient dumping” and criminal penalties for such violations. The ordinance requires that patients cannot be sent anywhere other than their home without written consent. Since the revelation, Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval said state officials have implemented stricter discharge policies.

ONLINE TOOL FOR CAREGIVERS

Home Instead Senior Care has launched an online tool to help family caregivers determine whether they are at risk of adverse health effects associated with caring for a senior loved one. Nearly one-third of Butte County’s adults are family caregivers potentially at risk of heart disease, diabetes, depression and other physical and mental issues prompted by the pressure of caring for a loved one, according to a Home Instead Senior Care press release. Nathan Vail, owner of the local Home Instead offices, said many are unaware of the “potential risk of caregiver distress because they don’t see themselves as caregivers.” Home Instead operates in Chico, Oroville and Paradise and can be reached at 895-6100. Go to www.familycaregiverstressrelief.com to use the selfassessment tools—the Are You a Caregiver quiz and the Family Caregiver Distress Assessment.

Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R May 30, 2013

Community Health Needs Assessment wants input from Butte County residents by

Evan Tuchinsky

Whealth needs, and where should organizations put their best efforts to meet

hat are Butte County’s biggest

those needs? That is the compound—and complex—question the Butte County Public Health Department and three local hospitals are hoping to answer with their joint Community Health Needs Assessment. A big piece of the process is an online survey, which will be conducted through June 9. As of last Wednesday (May 22), 200 people had responded, adding their perspectives to the feedback that assessment organizers had already received from around a dozen community organizations at three focus-group meetings. Following a fourth meeting on June 23, hosted by Feather River Hospital, officials from each of the four survey sponsors will collate the collected information and create their own action plans, as is required of all nonprofit medical centers under the Affordable Care Act. “We can identify hundreds of needs, probably, through this process,” said Deanna Reed, Enloe Medical Center’s community-outreach coordinator. “You don’t necessarily have to address all of them—you have to look at where you can make an impact, either with the resources the hospital has or by partnering with other community resources.” Enloe is one of the three area hospitals involved in the joint Community Health Needs Assessment. Feather River and Biggs-Gridley Memorial Hospital are the other two. Previously, each hospital con-

ducted its own needs assessment, but the collaboration makes sense because their service areas sometimes overlap. “Each of the hospitals has services we offer that may be unique,” Reed explained. “We also have some that are the same, but we’re going to draw from different areas of the region, for sure.” (Reed said she reached out to Oroville Hospital as well, but Oroville already had begun its needs-assessment process, so it is operating separately.) Hospitals must conduct a needs assessment every three years. They then must create their action plans, and the results of their actions must be released annually in a Community Benefits Report. Since its 2010 needs assessment, Enloe has adopted a half-dozen measures (the hospital has been conducting communityneeds assessments for years, though the regulations have changed for them under the ACA). The measures include the Pillars for Prevention community-outreach sessions to promote healthful lifestyle choices; bolstering the hospitalist program for

in-patient specialist physicians; and collaborating with outside agencies for prescription-drug drop-offs, diabetes education and heart-health improvement. “I’m excited to see what the community sees as needs,” Reed said, “and to find ways to partner with others to address them. There’s only so much we as one organization can do. We have lofty goals, and we want to heal people and make them better, but there’s only so much we can do in a day’s work. “That’s why I’m excited with how we approached it this year, by reaching out and having one-on-one dialogues with people in the community who share that passion, and hopefully we’ll be able to form partnerships that will be lasting and impactful.” Reed is encouraged by the scope of the organizations represented in the focusgroup meetings. Attendees included public

APPOINTMENT INFANT EXTRAVAGANZA Enloe Medical Center is hosting a Baby Faire for parents on Saturday, June 1, from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Enloe Conference Center (1528 Esplanade). The free expo will include breakfast, keynote speaker Dr. Natalie Vogel, and educational exhibits and sessions on a variety of baby-related topics. Call (877) 365-6363 to register.

HEALTHLINES continued on page 14


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HEALTHLINES

continued from page 12

agencies such as Butte County Behavioral Health, the Butte County Office of Education, the city of Chico, and the Social Security Administration. They also included organizations such as the Torres Community Shelter, California Health Collaborative, Planned Parenthood, Passages, and the Community Action Agency of Butte County. “It was really good dialogue because of the diversity,” Reed said. “We were able to talk about seniors, we were able to talk about children, we were able to talk about the homeless, we were able to talk about drug and alcohol abuse. It really created a robust dialogue.” At the end of each session, facilitators asked the participants if they’d be willing to collaborate on an action plan. “Without exception,” Reed said, “the answer was ‘Absolutely yes.’ There’s a lot of potential, because if we work together, we can make so much more impact than if each of us works independently.” What they’ll work on still

remains to be seen. That’s where the online surveys will play such a major role. The hospitals and Public Health already have empirical data from CommunityHealthRank ings.org and HealthIndicators.gov; now they want specific perspectives. Two hundred surveys in, Reed has already noticed some trends. When it comes to the question about risky behaviors, three top answers are alcohol, drugs and

Take the survey:

The Community Health Needs Assessment online survey is available at www.enloe.org/survey through June 9.

child abuse. (Tobacco use is a fourth.) For health conditions of concern, answers include heart disease, obesity, cancer and respiratory conditions. Reed stresses that these are just preliminary findings. She encourages everyone to add their own answers by taking the survey, which can be completed in 10 to 15 minutes at www.enloe.org/ survey or through any of the other participants’ websites. Regardless of which portal one uses, the information—all anonymous—gets collected in a single database accessible by the hospitals and Public Health. The final focus group will be Feather River’s Dinner with the Doctor on June 23, featuring Butte County’s publichealth officer, Dr. Mark Lundberg. Reed is prepared for the mass of information that will be processed. It can seem “overwhelming sometimes,” she admitted, saying that when she sees how many needs and areas for improvement exist, “you want to fix them all, make them all better, and you can’t. But hopefully by going through this process, we can figure out where that need is the greatest and help as many people as we can realistically.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE DON’T GET BAKED With summer comes long hours in the sun barbecuing, swimming, hiking and gardening. Keep the following guidelines in mind to avoid sunburn: • Limit your family’s exposure when the sun is strongest (between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.). • Apply sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher 30 minutes before going outside; re-apply every two hours and after swimming, sweating or toweling off. • Keep babies 6 months old and younger out of the sun entirely. • Cover up with clothing and hats. • Wear sunglasses that block UVA and UVB rays.

Source: Butte County Public Health Department


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS

SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROLL

Chico residents were treated to the houseshaking rumblings of an earthquake that struck at 8:47 p.m last Thursday, May 23. Its epicenter was in the Greenville area of Northern California, near Quincy. Initially reported as having a magnitude of 5.9, the 5.7-magnitude temblor set off car and house alarms as far south as Sacramento, reported the Los Angeles Times, one of numerous media sources covering the event. “Within minutes of the quake, more than 7,000 people reported feeling it on the USGS website,” said the Times. One of the more than 50 aftershocks that followed the quake registered at 4.9 on the Richter scale, according to the U.S. Geological Survey site. Go to www.earthquake.usgs.gov/ earthquakes for information on this and other earthquakes worldwide.

HOUSE APPROVES TAR-SANDS BILL

On May 22, the GOP-led House of Representatives passed a bill to bypass the president in order to hasten approval of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. The bill was approved by a vote of 241 to 175, with Republicans insisting the bill is necessary to ensure that the pipeline, first proposed in 2008, is constructed, according to SFGate.com. The 1,700-mile, $7 billion TransCanada pipeline would carry tar-sands oil from western Canada to refineries on Texas’ Gulf Coast. The measure was described by Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.) as a “reckless attempt to avoid environmental review.” Though not likely to be taken up by the Democratic-controlled Senate, it would effectively grant approval to the pipeline project without presidential permit (as required by law) or further environmental review. “There may be a few of my colleagues who are tired of Keystone bills, but the American people are also tired—tired of $3.70 a gallon gasoline, tired of unemployment above 7 percent, and tired of four years of delays that continue to block this critical jobs and energy project,” said Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.).

GOODBYE, FROG AND TOAD

Amphibian numbers in the United States are plummeting, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study. Nevada’s yellow-legged frog and Colorado’s boreal toad (pictured) are among the seven species of amphibians facing a 50 percent drop in their numbers within the next seven years if the current trend continues, according to the study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Scientists believe that a number of factors are contributing to rapid amphibian decline, including pesticide use, climate change and disease. “We knew they were declining and we didn’t know how fast,” said Michael J. Adams, the study’s lead author. “It’s a PHOTO COURTESY OF USGS loss of biodiversity. You lose them and you can’t get them back.” Send your eco-related news tips to Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia at christinel@newsreview.com.

End of a reign? Scientists point to habitat loss as main reason for decline in monarch butterflies

Don Miller, who teaches biology at Chico State, monitoring the 2009 Butte County butterfly count. FILE PHOTO BY JASMINE ROUFCHALE

by

Meredith J. Graham

A we are, and as many discoveries as we make each year about other planets, genets technologically advanced as

ics and long-extinct species, there is at least one mystery humans have yet to solve— that of the monarch butterfly. How, for instance, does one butterfly return to the roosting place of its predecessors five generations past? The migration pattern has long stumped scientists. “The adults that come back to the overwintering sites are five generations removed. That’s one of the amazing things about monarchs—how do they know where to go?” said Sarina Jepsen, program director at the Oregon-based Xerces Society, which, among other things, monitors monarchs. “Nobody knows how they find the same trees, but they come back to the same sites every single year.” Beyond its baffling migrations, though, the monarch holds a place in many hearts for its sheer beauty. Nothing seems to signal spring quite like the first sighting of those bright orange and black wings. “The monarch is special. It is big and bright and connects with our sensibilities in a positive way,” offered Don Miller, an associate professor of biological sciences at Chico State. “It’s the butterfly that springs to people’s minds first when they imagine a butterfly—at least in North America.” Unfortunately, the population of monarchs has hit a historic low. National Geographic reported in March that scientists who monitor the insects as they “winter” in

Mexico had recorded an appreciably smaller group than in the past. This past winter they occupied an area 59 percent smaller than last year. In addition, Jepsen said the Xerces Society— named after the extinct Xerces blue butterfly, which called San Francisco home before its lush native habitat was destroyed—said results of an annual monarch count in California reveal a more than 80 percent decline since 1997. Much of this is due to two factors, scientists agree—habitat loss and climate change. “The numbers sound alarming, and they’re why we’re working on monarch conservation,” Jepsen said. “But I also have to urge caution. We’re confident the monarch is declining, but we aren’t ready to say they’re in danger of extinction.” The monarch’s eastern territory

lies mostly to the east of the Rocky Mountains, where they can be seen in huge numbers flying from their wintering grounds in Mexico all the way up to Canada. In California, the migration is a bit

Join the count:

Log onto www.tinyurl.com/butterflycount to participate in the sixth annual Butte County butterfly count, scheduled for Tuesday (June 4) at the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve. Cost: $5.

different—instead of flying north, the monarchs roost on the coast during the winter and make their way east. At the end of the year’s multigenerational cycle, they head back to the ocean. “Monarchs really do stand out because of their powerful migration,” said Miller, a butterfly enthusiast who leads an annual local count of the insects for the North American Butterfly Association. While he does catch a glimpse of a monarch now and again, he said, “I’ve never seen them in appreciable numbers around Chico.” The migration may be awe-inspiring, but the life cycle of the monarch is no less magical. A tiny egg laid on a milkweed plant hatches into a caterpillar, or larva. The caterpillar feeds on the milkweed leaves until it’s nice and plump, and then, sensing that it’s time for a makeover, spins a silky cocoon in which it “sleeps” for about 10 days. When it emerges, it’s not a caterpillar that appears, but a vibrantly colored butterfly. That butterfly then flies north—or, in California’s case, east—to find a milkweed plant on which to lay its eggs. So, what happens when milkweed plants are hard to find? What happens when trees formerly used as roosts during the winter have been replaced by apartment complexes? “In the West, development is a huge issue,” Jepsen said. She pointed to 27 sites GREENWAYS continued on page 16 May 30, 2013

CN&R 15


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in California that, according to the Xerces Society, were former We alWays offer monarch hotspots taken over by Insurance Specialists • Commercial Accounts development, and at least 30 Oven-Baked Finishes • Written Guarantees more that are threatened by it. An Free Written Estimates • Fast, Efficient Service even bigger cause of habitat loss Factory Color Matching • Low Prices across the country, however, is the increased use of genetically modified organisms. “As monarchs are flying throughout the U.S., it’s important Serving Butte County for 33 yearS that they be able to find milk2304 Park ave, Chico weed,” she said. “Historically, a 891-8677 www.miracleautochico.com lot of milkweed would crop up in corn and soy fields, and on crop edges. But now that growers have these new GMO crops that are ‘Roundup-ready,’ they’re able to spray their whole crop and quite easily wipe out anything that is not their crop. It’s led to a lot less milkweed across the landscape.” Individuals across the country IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE have taken it upon themselves to plant milkweed—it’s available at Floral Native Nursery in Chico, Miller said—to offer monarchs a place to reproduce. That’s one way Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties ordinary citizens can help out. Climate change affects the 24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) monarch in California by way of www.rapecrisis.org drought. The drier the year, Jepsen said, the fewer monarchs her REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. & group PREV. has counted in its annual Thanksgiving monarch census in the Golden State. In addition, she said, “The predicted changes in climate expected to happen in the next few decades likely will create a climate that is not suitable for the type of tree where monarchs roost in Mexico.”

This showcase for the running and hiking trails of Upper Bidwell Park, on Saturday, June 1, from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., includes a 10K trail run, a sunrise party with breakfast and music, moderate and easy hiking options, educational activities for kids, and more. The event kicks off at the Five-Mile Recreation Area off Centennial Way; admission is $15 to $25 (free under age 5). Call 894-7738 or go to www.landconserva tion.org for more info.

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The monarch is not currently

on any endangered species list. In

fact, Jepsen said they probably exist in the millions, mostly on the East Coast. And, by both Jepsen’s and Miller’s accounts, the monarch occupies no great link on our ecological food chain. (In fact, they are poisonous to most predators—something they owe to the milkweed plant they eat as a caterpillar—and are extremely bitter-tasting.) But most people would agree that the monarch, with all its beauty and mystery, is special. “Butterflies are by far and away the most charismatic, the most appealing of invertebrates,” Miller said. “They make us appreciate the natural world, and they make us want to take steps toward trying to preserve it.” Ω

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16 CN&R May 30, 2013

More than 800 rattlesnake bites are reported annually nationwide, most of them when warm weather makes the serpents more active and drives humans outdoors. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife offers the following tips to avoid getting bitten: Identification: California’s six rattlesnake species are heavybodied, blunt-tailed and have triangular heads. Not all have rattles—they may be lost or undeveloped. Do: Wear hiking boots and loose-fitting pants, avoid tall grass and underbrush, and step on (not over) rocks and logs. Do not: Disturb snakes, go barefoot or wear sandals in the wild, or reach into hidden spaces.

G

THE

reen HOUSE

by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

BUYING NEW WINDOWS Local sustainable architect Hyland Fisher, whose handy tips on air-sealing one’s house against the cold and selecting green products for the home appeared in the Jan. 17 and Feb. 21 installments, respectively, of The GreenHouse, recently sent me a piece on choosing windows for a home. Fisher’s sage advice will run in two parts. Part 1: “There are a number of considerations when selecting windows for your new home or replacements for your existing home,” he says. “Windows are a long-term investment and a critical part of your house’s performance, quality and style. When purchasing windows, it is important not only to take cost into consideration, but also energy performance, potential toxicity, operation, and maintenance. “Window frames come in four material types: vinyl, composite, wood, and metal: • Vinyl windows are the popular choice for residential windows because of their low cost. They typically have good energy performance; however, vinyl manufacturing is toxic, and vinyl windows may off-gas chemicals in your home. The movie Blue Vinyl (2002) covers toxicity related to vinyl manufacturing, and is worth watching. • Composite windows include fiberglass with other materials (such as wood fiber and plasLocal sustainable architect tic). These are also chemically manufactured, Hyland Fisher recommends but are generally less toxic than vinyl, require the 2002 documentary film less maintenance, and have very high energy Blue Vinyl. performance. • Wood windows are beautiful and have good energy performance. In general, they require more maintenance than other types of windows; however, they can be purchased with metal-clad exteriors which offer durability and require less maintenance. You can also select locally harvested wood (e.g., Sierra Pacific Windows) and FSC [Forest Stewardship Council]-certified sustainable wood (e.g., Loewen). • Metal windows are often selected for their modern or commercial style. They have poor energy performance, unless they are manufactured with a thermal break [thermal barrier] (though thermally broken metal windows are hard to find and expensive). Metal windows last a long time and are low maintenance. “When considering energy performance, keep in mind that hinged-operation windows (e.g., casement, awning) offer a better seal, and allow less air infiltration, than gliding-operation windows (e.g., sliding, single-hung).” Look for Part 2 of Fisher’s window-purchasing advice next week, which will cover window-glass options. YET MORE FUN SUMMER-CAMP OPTIONS! The Gateway Science Museum recently announced details about its June and July Gateway Discovery Camp sessions. The Eco-Kids camp, for children going into the fourth and fifth grades, runs June 24 to 29, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. “Exercise environmental stewardship while exploring awesome hands-on activities such as solar cookers, renewable energy sources, composting, and making art with robots!” says the museum’s website about this camp session. Lunches and snacks will be provided. Cost is $175 per student. Eco-Rangers camp, for kids entering sixth, seventh and eighth grades, takes place July 15 through 19, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and costs $185. The museum’s website describes it this way: “Investigate principles of environmental stewardship by delving deeper into science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), while learning natural-resource management, building wind turbines, robotics programming and much more!” Lunches and snacks provided. Camp registration is currently open; go to www.tinyurl.com/blt4pra to download registration form. Call 898-4119 for more info. EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM


r k a e t M

PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

INSTABILIT Y

Popular Saturday farmers’ market has no permanent home

Vendors from Orland’s Burylson Enterprises offer fresh cherries for sale.

by

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

“T

his is my religion!” said a beaming Diane Prince on a recent Saturday morning at the downtown Chico Certified Farmers’ Market, waving her hands in a gesture that attempted to take in the entire busy market area. Like thousands of other locals, Prince attends the Saturday-morning market regularly to buy such things as fresh produce and flowers, get a bite to eat, and socialize with friends. “I go throughout the year, no matter what the weather is,” said Prince, a longtime Chico resident originally from New York City. “It has such a great spirit of community. If I have out-of-town friends visiting, I always hope it is over a Saturday so I can give them a glimpse of how cool Chico is.”

While others may not speak of the market in such worshipful terms, it should be clear to anyone spending even a short period of time at this definitively Chico-esque event—located in the city parking lot at East Second and Wall streets— that many locals love the market. But the future of the weekly event, in its current location for the past 20 years, is uncertain. On May 7, after discussing the city of Chico Finance Committee’s recommendation to approve a twoyear lease for the market in its current location— instead of its usual year-to-year lease—in exchange for the CCFM’s offer to pay $16,000 for power and sewer lines to be extended to the market’s lot, the City Council deadlocked in a 3-3 vote (one council member with a nearby business

abstained), effectively stopping forward movement of the project. As recently retired CN&R Editor Robert Speer wrote in a recent story (see “Exercise in futility,” Newslines, May 9), “It was a one-time opportunity that would take advantage of the downtown couplet project to bring in lines at a reduced cost and replace the sometimes-gross current portable toilets with temporary bathrooms connected to the sewer lines.” Certain council members were apparently swayed by the resurfaced concerns of some downtown business owners who believe the market negatively affects their sales on Saturday. The “MARKET” continued on page 18 May 30, 2013

CN&R 17


“MARKET” continued from page 17

idea of moving the location to the Chico Municipal Center parking lot and/or the day of the market, to Sunday, was brought up. Nancy Lindahl, owner of downtown specialty homegoods store Zucchini & Vine and card shop Magna Carta, was quoted in Speer’s article as telling the council that evening, “Businesses are closing downtown. This is more of an emergency than you realize.”

downtown business. I think downtown and the farmers’ market are one. I think that’s why we’re so successful, why we got the national recognition.” The Chico Certified Farmers’ Market was, in fact, mentioned in an April 1, 2006, Sunset magazine article titled “Chico spring break” as one of the highlights of any trip to Chico. More recently, vendor Dave Miller, whose Miller’s Bake House booth graces the west end of the market every Saturday, was featured in Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, the latest book by famous good-food guru Michael Pollan. The Saturday market provides an “economic-multiplier effect for this region,” said Brock, a former high-school history and economics teacher. “I think this is one of the most powerful economic engines in the community and it can get even better. … We all need to work together, not emphasize differences, and I think it’ll change positively for everyone.” But, he acknowledged, “Farmers and merchants have been going at it since the Middle Ages, so …”

IT’S 7 A.M. ON A RECENT SATURDAY,

half an hour before the Saturday market is due to open for business. Farmers are hustling in the still-cool morning air to get their booths set up. By about 7:15, early-bird customers are cruising the aisles, planning their first-pick strategy as vendors artfully arrange baskets of freshly Clockwise from above: picked raspberries and straw- Longtime Chico farmer Bruce Balgooyen arranges heads of lettuce shortly before the market’s 7:30 a.m. berries, and mounds of start time. squash, beets, lettuce and potatoes. Master baker Dave Miller mans the Miller’s Bake “It’s great! The farmers’ House stall. market has really grown in the Kate and Adam Rich and their children munch on last few years,” offered Joanie farmers’-market food at the rear of their van on a Bosque, employee at Califorrecent Saturday morning. nia Organic Flowers, as she PHOTOS BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA placed bouquets of sunflowers in containers of water, stepping back every so often to eye her work. many] interests [involved] is Bosque commented on the important. farmers’-market situation briefly as But, in fact, a survey on the she moved quickly to get set up: market has already been done. “My personal opinion is to grow on Bruce Balgooyen, a longtime what’s already working. I think local farmer and market vendor doing a public survey would be with a nearby stall, cited statistics really helpful. Balancing [the from a 2009 study done by Chico

“WE FELT LIKE WE WERE BEING VERY

State geography and planning professor LaDona Knigge and recreation, hospitality and parks-management professor Richard Gitleson, which found that for twothirds of those surveyed, going to the farmers’ market was their main reason for coming downtown on a

Saturday. Two-thirds of the respondents said they planned to shop, eat or drink downtown either before or after they attended the market. Balgooyen talked while carefully positioning huge, leafy organic lettuces in big plastic display tubs. “The farmers’-market membership, by a wide margin, is in favor of staying on Saturday, not moving to Sunday,” he said. “And they’re also strongly in favor of staying where we are. If you check around the country, the most successful farmers’ markets are mostly on Saturdays and mostly in prime downtown locations. The first thing any business needs is customers, and we bring the customers into the downtown area.” James Brock, Balgooyen’s business partner for the past eight years, chimed in. “There’s an umbilical cord between the market and the epicenter of downtown,” Brock said. “So customers come back and forth. If we cut the umbilical cord by moving to the City Hall lot, it potentially could impact the market negatively, as well as Sharon Casey, owner of Towani Organic Farm in Bangor, wants the farmers’ market to remain on Saturday. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

18 CN&R May 30, 2013

generous by offering to pay for the [hookup for new, semi-permanent] bathrooms,” said Lance Alldrin, a CCFM board member. Alldrin, along with his three sons, operates the Alldrin & Sons Alaska Salmon booth at the Saturday market. “We basically said … we’re willing to pay for and bring in portable bathrooms on Saturday mornings and haul them away on Saturday afternoons. … [Second Street] will be torn up through June—if we opted to do it a year from now, it’s going to cost a heck of a lot more than $16,000!” As CCFM board member and advertising director Reid Seibold pointed out, “Legally, we have to have a bathroom within 50 feet of the market. We want better facilities … and we don’t want to send people to downtown businesses [to use the restroom].” Alldrin said that he does not want the market to be held on Sunday as he and his sons attend church then, and he “would have to hire someone outside of the family to work the market.” (A number of the Chico market’s vendors also work at Sacramento’s farmers’ market on Sunday.) As for a venue change, “Saturday at the municipal lot—that would be my second choice. But that lot has just as many issues— we still don’t have bathrooms … and it actually has less room for “MARKET” continued on page 22


PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM

11th Annual Old Fashioned

COUNTRY FAIRE and Threshing Bee

June 8th & 9th 2013 9AM - 4PM Located on the Midway- Between Chico and Durham • Chico Dancers performing • Children’s Activities • & Tram RidesCountry • Artisan Faire Faire • Artisan Fine ArtDiamond Exhibit and Sale & teaching square • Grand Farmhouse Tours • Tractor and Draft Horse ParadeHorse Parade • Tractor and Draft • Children’s Activities & dancing Tram Rides • Food Court and Live Music • Old Fashioned Wheat Harvest • Old Fashioned Wheat Harvest • Grand Farmhouse Not toTours be missed! • Vintage Stanley Steamer Car on display • Bee & Stock Dog Demonstrations • Bee & Stock Dog Demonstrations • Food Court and Live Music • Fine Country Art Exhibit and Sale

• Barnyard animals

Join us!

Tickets: $8 Per Adult, $5 For Ages 6-12 Children 5 & Under FREE, when accompanied by adult!

For more information, call 342-4359 or 892-1525 or visit PatrickRanchMuseum.org Presented in conjunction with Vintage Iron Early Day Gas Engine and Tractor Association and the Golden State Draft Horse and Mule Club. A Far West Heritage Association Event May 30, 2013

CN&R 19


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bicycle What is your favorite thing about your bike(s)? It gets me where I need to go in a very pleasant way, and at a sane pace. What one thing would you most like car drivers to know/do/change? Please watch for bicycles going by whenever you are coming out of driveways and alleys. Also, be courteous of bike riders that are in those skinny little bike lanes squeezed between the right-turn lane and the next one over--don’t cut us off, please! (A little aside to everyone: Please don’t throw broken glass into the road where bikes travel. It’s hell on tires!) How does bicycling reflect your philosophy about life? Why DO you ride? I ride because it is good exercise, economical, environmentally friendly and thoroughly enjoyable. I love riding in all seasons as it makes me feel like I am part of my environment, adaptable to the changing weather. – Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia, Local Musician & Associate Editor, Chico News & Review

“Caring for your pets is our family tradition.”

20 CN&R May 30, 2013

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CN&R 21


our yHOMETOWN NURSERY

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Citrus • Bare Root Trees • Veggies • Roses Garden Art • Custom Containers Unique Gifts • Perennials • Annuals + more

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➤ Ar tisan and Vendor Faire ➤ Live Music

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➤ Exhibit and Sale ➤ Bee & stock dog Exhibit . ➤ Pioneer Craf ts Interactive Exhibits ➤ Children’s Activities ➤ Narrated Tram Rides

JOiN US fOR a claSS!

➤ Wheat Threshing, Making Flour & Biscuit and Bread Making

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➤ Barnyard animals T f ORg E dON’T N Ual N OU R a RE E E R SOi SUMM

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➤ Vintage Stanley Steamer Car on display

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CN&R 21


“MARKET” continued from page 18

vendor booths.” That lot, in front of the Chico Municipal Center, two blocks to the south of its current location, is where Lindahl, owner of Zucchini & Vine, would like to see the market relocated. The municipal-center lot “is so much prettier,” she said. “There could be tables for people to sit and eat at. There are grassy areas to sit and eat a peach or chat with friends. There is a PA system and electricity, so you could do cooking demonstrations and music. “Overall, the area is much calmer and more inviting,” said Lindahl. “I also think it would be beneficial to draw people deeper into downtown. The businesses in the block of Main Street by the Senator [Theatre] would benefit, the [City] Plaza might see more use than just the homeless, and it could revitalize the ‘lost’ block of Main between Third and Fourth streets by making it more interesting to retail tenants.” Lindahl referenced an informal email questionnaire she sent out to 26 unnamed downtown retail-business owners on the afternoon of May 7, before her appearance at the City Council meeting that evening. The questionnaire consisted of three questions: 1) “Is the farmers’ market impacting your Saturday business as it gets bigger and more successful?”; 2) “Would you support having the market on Sunday at [its current location] without a sewer hookup or electrical utilities, but with the market expanding to all four rows in the parking lot?”; and 3) “Would you say that you do not support renewing the market franchise for two years at [its current location] for a Saturday market with sewer hookup and electrical utilities?” “Of the 26 inquiries, there were 21 responses,” she said. “Twentyone said the market did impact their Saturday business in a negative way because it tied up parking. The four businesses that said they felt no impact were on Broadway within a block of the parking structure.” “I wish nothing but excellence for the market,” Lindahl said. “Our Market online:

Go to www.chicofarmersmarket.com to learn more about the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market.

Make your voice heard:

Mayor Mary Goloff wants feedback concerning the Saturday farmers’ market. Go to www.chico.ca.us/ city_council/home_page.asp for her email address, as well as the addresses of the other City Council members. 22 CN&R May 30, 2013

Clockwise from far left: Adams Olive Ranch vendor Bob Adams is adamantly against changing the location or day of the market. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

Anne Ennis, owner of Brambley Cottage, in the Garden Walk Mall, believes the Saturday market is bad for her business. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

Brad Perry’s handmade pottery. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

fight is only with people who want to keep everything the way it is. I can assure you, the market is in good shape and is very much a destination. Market customers will follow it a block and a half without question.” AT THE SATURDAY MARKET, ADAMS OLIVE

Ranch vendor Bob Adams was animated: “There’s a hundred downtown business people right here—why doesn’t our vote count? We need to stay here! What right does anybody have to move [the market]?” Adams is also against changing the date of the market to Sundays. “The customers don’t want the date to change,” offered Ana Naveira, who runs the Leonardo’s Spanish-food booth, along with her husband, Luis Saenz, next door to Adams’ stall. As for Sunday, “Why? What is the reason for having it moved to Sunday?” she asked. “The [downtown] stores aren’t open [on Saturday] until 10 or 11, anyway. … “I’d like to see the farmers’ market like it is in Europe, in Spain and France—a [year-round] roofed structure with legs.” Master baker Miller, at his Miller’s Bake House stall, offered a more conciliatory tone. “It has to work for everybody. If we really are affecting downtown businesses in a negative way, then we have to come up with a different solution,” Miller said. “But any changes will affect 80 different [farmers’ market] businesses—200, if you’re counting all the businesses that sell here [year-round]. So we really have to know that it’s a net negative for downtown. I’m not convinced of that yet.” LINDAHL’S CONCERN OVER THE RECENT

closing of several downtown businesses is well-founded. However, the vacancy rate of downtown busi-

nesses is actually lower than the city-wide rate—5 percent, as of late last year, compared to 7 percent, respectively, according to senior city planner Shawn Tillman (see “Closing time,” CN&R, May 2, 2013). That positive news aside, some downtown business owners remain convinced that the Saturday market is detrimental to their business. “The farmers’ market has a negative effect because of the parking,” said Cecilia Richardson, owner of the African Connection, an Afro-centric specialty shop inside the Garden Walk Mall. Richardson explained that “customers want you to order something for them, but they say they won’t come in on Saturday to pick it up because you have to go round and round and round [looking] for parking.” She would like to see the Saturday market either move to the municipal-center lot or change its day of operation to Sunday. “Sometimes people misunderstand us in the Garden Walk,” Richardson said. “Customers of the farmers’ market will come in and start fights, saying that we want to close down the farmers’ market. That’s not what the idea is. Just move, so our customers can get parking.” Richardson said that her business is “very, very slow on Saturday mornings, between the time we open at 10 until after 2:30. Sometimes we’re just giving keys to the toilet to farmers’-market customers.” Anne Ennis, owner of British specialty shop Brambley Cottage, down the hall from African Connection, cited the recent Mother’s Day holiday as proof of what she perceives as the market’s general deleterious effect on her business. “The Thursday and Friday [before Mother’s Day] were great days for business,” Ennis said. “But

any one specific downtown business does not benefit on that market occasion, the fact is that it reconfirms the downtown as a community center. It plants in people’s heads that [shopping downtown] is part of their pattern, as a core function of their lives. [The market] brings people into this geography, and that spills out [to the downtown area].” The Upper Crust “very much benefits” from the Saturday market, she said. ADAM AND KATE RICH ARE SEATED ON

we did about 50 percent on Saturday [the day before Mother’s Day] of [the business] we did on Friday. … “The farmers’ market tells us that it brings business to downtown Chico. It does—but to the farmers’ market,” she said. “What they seem to forget is people don’t go to a farmers’ market and buy produce and flowers and baked goods—perishables—and put them in their car and then go shopping. It doesn’t take a space scientist to figure that out.” A block away from the Garden Walk Mall on Main Street, Lori Powers—co-owner, along with Becky Shadd, of the popular Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery—gave a different summation of the market’s impact. “I find it hard to believe that there would be any downtown businessperson that would not see the market as a driving force for participation in the downtown environment,” said Powers. “Even if

folding chairs near the back of their van, which is parked on Third Street next to the buzzing Saturday market; their two children, ages 2 and 4, are seated at the rear of the open vehicle, munching on burritos and tamales. The Rich family moved to Chico from Davis two years ago; Adam is assistant principal at Paradise High School. “They have a designated covered space in Davis for their farmers’ market,” which is located in a park setting—the city’s Central Park, Adam Rich pointed out. “What that made us do was hang out there—and for many hours—to meet people, stay for lunch, listen to live music.” The couple would like to see the market moved to downtown’s City Plaza “or some place that’s more like a park space,” he said. “But having it in a parking lot kind of takes away parking for downtown businesses. We come downtown, and we eat and get our groceries [at the market] and go home. We rarely spend more than 45 minutes.” Not far away from the Riches’ car, Richard Coon, chairman of the CCFM board of directors, is sitting at the market-manager’s table, giving out wooden market tokens to EBT customers. Coon—co-owner along with his wife, Christine Hantelman, of Wookey Ranch, which sells grassfed lamb and pastured poultry at the market—was filling in for market Manager Amber Suppus, who was out of town.


“The whole issue is we need more room and we need more bathrooms,” Coon said. “What we really want is a better customer experience, and to do that, we need more space. We want to bring in more interesting local foods. We have a huge waiting list [of potential vendors].” He said the CCFM’s proposal to the Finance Committee outlined the market’s three major topics of concern: temporarily expanding the market into the northerly “third aisle” of the parking lot while the Second Street couplet project is underway; upgrading the lot with a portable bathroom structure and possibly an office; and using the farmers’ market as a means to promote Chico as a place to live and as a tourist destination. “The Finance Committee was unanimous in supporting [our proposal],” he said. “Then, for whatever reason, by the time it got to the City Council, there was a 3-to-3 split. It seems amazing to me that the City Council wouldn’t listen to the Finance Committee.” ON MAY 15, A LITTLE MORE THAN A WEEK AFTER THE

City Council’s stalemate vote, the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market board held its monthly meeting at the Chico Grange Hall. Attended by about 20 vendor-members, as well as CCFM “citizen adviser” and former City Councilman Tom Nickell, the meeting’s main focus was a “continuing update and discussion of CCFM negotiations with the city of Chico with emphasis on strategies to move forward

Goloff voted with Councilmen Mark Sorensen and Sean Morgan to deny the approval of the proposed two-year lease. One vendor expressed concern that the city might be planning to revisit the idea of turning the lot into a parking structure, a proposal that was shelved back in 2006 after more than 6,000 voters signed a referendum opposing fees to fund it. The city has no such plans: “No, there are no plans for development of the parking lot (City Parking Lot No. 1) pending at this time,” replied Mark Wolfe, director of the city of Chico’s Planning Services Department, when asked via email if the city had any plans to develop the lot, for parking or otherwise. THE CITY COUNCIL’S FAILURE TO MOVE FORWARD ON

Richard Coon, CCFM chairman of the board. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

with the DCBA and downtown merchants,” as the agenda outline put it. “The City Council, in a surprise move, did not go along with the Finance Committee’s recommendation,” began Coon, adding that he believes the market’s franchise agreement will be renewed by the city, “but at the status quo”—a year-to-year lease. “We don’t really know what the council wants,” he said, adding that he was “surprised at [Mayor] Mary Goloff’s response,” referring to the fact that

the Finance Committee’s recommendations took a number of locals by surprise, including businesswoman Cheryl King, of JM King & Associates, who is also a representative of the group Friends of the Farmers’ Market. “There are over 100 businesses downtown. All I have is anecdotal evidence from a handful of businesses [the 21 respondents to Lindahl’s email questionnaire] that it [the market] hurts business,” she said. “We had a study done [by Knigge and Gitleson] that proves statistically that there’s a multiplier effect from the money spent at the farmers’ market. “I say that if you have 3,000 or more people coming downtown and you can’t fig-

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ure out how to get them in your business, you have a business problem, not a parking problem.” Councilman Sorensen, however, believes that the market does cause a parking problem. “I hope that the farmers’ market will look at some options for improving the parking situation in that quadrant,” he said recently by phone. “And that may include alternate locations or alternate days.” Mayor Mary Goloff, when asked for her thoughts, said, via email, “I am always open to feedback from members of the community. Staff will be working with the CCFM board on viable options given the council deadlock on Tuesday night. “As I stated at the meeting, I believe we have a real opportunity to come together and find a solution that works for the entire community. This is going to take a willingness on the part of everyone involved to be openminded, flexible and focused on what’s best for Chico.” As for Knigge, the Chico State professor involved in the market survey, she isn’t surprised to see the issue being discussed yet again. “I think that decisions about the future of the farmers’ market must emerge from all the interested parties or stakeholders: the farmers of the CCFM, the downtown merchants, the city of Chico and, perhaps most important, the public, who seem to have a limited role in this discussion currently.” Ω

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CN&R 23


Arts & Culture Fabrication station

Sean Mitchell sits with fellow co-founder Erin Banwell’s paper-and-LED geodesic spheroid. Below: Artist Dave Seied’s 3-D print, “Tear Drop Fractal”. PHOTOS BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

High-tech “maker space” opens its doors for budding designers

THIS WEEK

IPinterest, scanning through the DIY-project and craft boards, dreaming of the day you will have your know how much time you spend on

own workshop. You’ll need a laser cutter to create unique wooden business cards and by leather pendant jewelry; a router to MaryRose fashion that amazing coffee table Lovgren and those vintage-style kids toys; and, of course, a 3-D printer to create your own plastic swizzle sticks. Too bad you can’t just divert a IDEA few thousand dollars from your FABRICATION 401(k) for some of these toys. LABS Thankfully, you don’t have to, 603 Orange Street because as of May 4, Chico has its 592-0609 own membership-based collaboraVisit the the tive open-source workshop offering website at access to tools like these. Idea Fabwww.idea fablabs.com rication Labs is a “digital-fabricafor info on tion facility” located just a few classes and blocks from downtown and Chico memberships. State. On a recent balmy Friday evening, my

10-year-old son and I met with two of the founding members of this fab lab, web developers Jordan Layman and Sean Mitchell, in the recently renovated 7,000-square-foot workspace. My son asked the question that was burning in my own mind: How did you get the idea to do this? “We’re nerds,” they replied. It started a year and a half ago at the Naked Lounge coffeehouse, a downtown gathering space for artists, writers and tech lovers. Layman admired the shirt worn by another patron and asked him where he’d gotten it. The “guy in the shirt” was Erin Banwell, a sculptor and artist who, along with his wife, Kristina, designs and creates products using a laser cutter. “We got to talking and just hit it off,” explained Layman. From similar interests in art and technology came the idea to create a “maker space” where technology could be used to help facilitate people’s ideas. The five friends, including fellow “maker” Billy Hopkins, brainstormed ways to make it happen. “We spent a lot of nights just totally geeking out,” said Mitchell. “A lot of people at computers, a lot of discussion, whiteboards ... a lot of whiteboards.” Together, they transformed a warehouse that had previously housed a reptile farm into a big, inviting space with white walls and wooden floors. The three core areas of the facility reflect the 24 CN&R May 30, 2013

three main missions of the lab: an art gallery showcasing technologically created art; a maker space with computers and tables for collaboration; and, of course, the tool-work rooms. In the gallery were elaborate geometrical figures laser-cut from wood, as well as interlinked metal and sandstone figures that had been fashioned entirely by using a 3-D printer. They were the work of Dave Seied, an artist and sculptor out of Colorado who is the Fab Lab’s first artist-in-residence. “Our plan is to have these regular exhibitions of different artists from all over the world come work for two weeks and then have the gallery showcase,” said Layman. (Although, since their 3-D printer isn’t scheduled to arrive for another couple of months, Seied did create his 3-D objects for the show elsewhere.) At one point in our tour Mitchell said the magic words: “Do you want to come check out the laser?” The laser cutter looks like an oversized copier with a glass top. Mitchell used the computer next to it to design a simple hexagon shape, while Layman lifted the glass top and put a flat piece of wood into the machine. The laser is reflected onto a mirror that moves around the wood on two axes, emitting a sound not unlike a pet-store tag cutter. A small flame flickered where the laser cut through the wood and a sweet, campfire-like smell rose from the machine. When the cutting was done, Sean lifted the lid and presented the hexagon to my son, who turned it over in his hand. “Oh!” he exclaimed. “That’s neat!” There are hourly, weekly and monthly memberships for varying hours of reserved time in the workshop space. In addition to the high-tech equipment, members will have access to all of the woodworking tools, including a chop saw, drills and a grinder. Safety classes are offered (and required) before using many of the tools. “A lot of what’s happened here has been very ad hoc, very organic, and we’re sort of following the open-source methodology, which is a software concept but can be applied to any system,” explained Layman. It’s hoped that the members of the lab will work in the spirit of this kind of sharing. “It’s really about collaboration.” Ω

30

THURS

Special Events THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. This week: alternative rock from Live to Rise, smooth jazz from Chuck’s Place and blues, jazz and swing from Rube and Alan Rigg. Th, 6-9pm. Prices vary. Downtown Chico; www.down townchico.net.

Theater THE BLACK BIRD SINGS: The classic detective

noir The Maltese Falcon is retold in this musical adaptation. Th-Sa, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

TIME LORD: Two youngsters travel through time, encounter historical figures and bring prehistorical creatures to the present in this Young Co. production. Th-Sa, 7pm & Sa-Su, 2pm. $8 $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

preserving nature. Live music provided by the Swingtown Trio. F, 5/31, 5-8pm. Free. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave.; (530) 879-1821; www.avenue9gallery.com.

Music FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with the fiery traditional Mexican music group Los Caballitos de la Cancion. F, 7-8:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St.; (530) 896-7200; www.downtownchico.net.

LAMB OF GOD: A real heavyweight on the national metal scene, Lamb of God has toured with the likes of Slayer and Metallica and dabbles in speed, thrash and groove metal. Decapitated and Anciients open. F, 5/31, 7:45pm. $29. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproductions.net.

Theater THE BLACK BIRD SINGS: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

TIME LORD: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blue roomtheatre.com.

Poetry/Literature THE ACCIDENTAL SNAKE THIEF BOOK SIGNING:

Author Matheau Desilva discusses The Accidental Snake Thief, the first novel in his three-book Maninkari Trilogy. Th, 5/30, 6:30pm. Free. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

CHICO STORY SLAM: Names go in a hat and 10 “tellers” share their unscripted stories, with applause determining the winner. This month’s theme: “detours.” Last Th of every month, 7pm. Opens 5/30. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

31

FRI

Special Events STEVE’S SAX & IMPROV JAM: The debut of Chico’s newest improvisational comedy troupe, Steve’s Sax, is followed by an improv jam where audience members are encouraged to play. F, 5/31, 7:30pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway; (530) 343-1973; www.1078 gallery.org.

Art Receptions ACUMEN: An opening reception for the exhibition of photography by Karma Ganzler and sculpture by Doug Rathbun on a theme of

HOOKED ON FISHING Saturday, June 1 Horseshoe Lake, Bidwell Park

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS COVERED BRIDGE PANCAKE BREAKFAST: The 48th annual pancake breakfast, which includes live Celtic music from the Pub Scouts, drawings and prizes is a benefit for the Honey Run Covered Bridge Association. Su, 6/2, 7-11am. $5-$7.50. Honey Run Covered Bridge, Honey Run Rd. At Centerville Rd. 4.5 miles from Skyway; (530) 895-0911; www.honeyrun coveredbridge.com.

SIERRA ORO FARM TRAIL WINERY & FARM TOUR: A

1

SAT

Special Events

chartered van tour of Gale Vineyards, Bertagna Son Kissed Vineyards, Dog Creek Cellars, Maisie Jane’s and La Rocca Vineyards. Call to RSVP. Su, 6/2, 10:30am. $50-$80. Contact for info, see listing; (530) 520-4303.

ACUMEN RECEPTION Friday, May 31 Avenue 9 Gallery

SEE FRIDAY, ART RECEPTIONS

BARK FOR LIFE: A walk for dogs and their owners to raise funds for the American Caner Society. Festivities include demos, contests and games for humans and canines alike. Go online to register or for more info. Sa, 6/1, 10am-2pm. $20-$25. One Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park; http://tinyurl.com/nfhwuet.

WISH: Ballet, hip-hop and contemporary dance styles merge in this performance by Dance Evolution Studio. Sa, 6/1, 2 & 7pm. $10-$12. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise; (530) 876-9798; www.danceevolutionstudio.com.

CHICO BODYBUILDING, FIGURE & BIKINI CONTEST: Male & female contestants pose to music as judges determine winners in bodybuilding, physique, figure and bikini. Go online for more info. Sa, 6/1, 6pm. $8-$21. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicobodybuilding.com.

FOOD TRUCK FEST: Food trucks join forces to benefit the Boys and Girls Clubs of the North Valley’s Teen Center food program. Festivities include live music by the Feather River Gypsies, a raffle and door prizes. Call for ticket info. Sa, 6/1, 11:30am-2:30pm. $15. Southside Community Center, 2959 Lower Wyandotte Rd. in Oroville; (530) 899-0335.

FRATERNAL ORDER OF EAGLES FUNDRAISER: Wine tasting accompanied by food courses, live music, drawings, and a door prize as a fundraiser for the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Call to RSVP. Sa, 6/1, 3pm. $25. Eagles Hall, Mullberry & 20th Streets; (530) 990-2564.

HOOKED ON FISHING, NOT ON DRUGS: The annual event for kids ages 14 and younger promotes fishing as a pastime. Limit one fish per child; call for more info. Sa, 6/1, 7am-1pm. Free. Horseshoe Lake, Upper Bidwell Park; (530) 8914757.

IN THE LAVENDER FIELDS: The annual antique fair and art show includes a salad luncheon, drawings and a silent auction to benefit FOCUS Hands Helping Children. Call or go online for ticket info. Sa, 6/1, 9am-3pm. $25. Bayliss Ranch, Highway 99 E & Rio Bonito Rd. in Biggs; (800) 838-3006; www.brown papertickets.com/event/231130.

TAKE A HIKE!: This showcase for the running and hiking trails of Upper Bidwell Park includes a 10K trail run, a sunrise party with breakfast and music, moderate and easy hiking options, educational activities for kids and more. Proceeds benefit the Northern California Regional Land Trust. Sa, 6/1, 7:30am-1pm. $15$25. Five Mile Picnic Area, Centennial Way; (530) 894-7738; www.landconservation.org.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Music CHICO COMMUNITY BAND SPRING CONCERT: The 50-member Chico Community Band presents well-known music from some of America’s favorite films. Su, 6/2, 2-3pm. Free. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Dr. off Bruce Rd.; (530) 342-8673.

Theater TIME LORD: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blue roomtheatre.com.

Music CHICO BICYCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL: The annual bikepowered music festival will start in Camelia Way Park, go mobile as a bike parade through Bidwell Park and conclude at the GRUB Cooperative. The lineup includes Kyle Williams, Evin Wolverton, Pat Hull, Mandalyn May, Thomas Fogg, MaMuse, Wolf Thump and more. Sa, 6/1, noon. Free. Call or visit website for details, locations vary; http://tinyurl.com/ o997jyr.

Theater THE BLACK BIRD SINGS: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

TIME LORD: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blue roomtheatre.com.

2

SUN

Special Events CENTERVILLE 49ER FAIRE: Fine arts and crafts, live music, a BBQ, gold panning, cemetery tours, plant sales, weaving demos, a silent auction and more to benefit the Centerville Schoolhouse and Colman Museum. Su, 6/2, 9am-4pm. Prices vary. Colman Museum, 13548 Centerville Rd.; (530) 893-9667; www.colman museum.com.

3

MON

Special Events CAR & BIKE CRUISE NIGHT: Cars, motorcycles, a

drawing and more outside the brewery. M, 6/3, 5pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.feather fallscasino.com.

Poetry/Literature WORD PLAY: A freestyle poetry reading open mic ending in a two-round slam. M, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

5

WED

Music CELEBRATION OF THE SONG SHOWCASE: KZFR Community Radio’s annual singer-songwriter contest culminates in this evening hosted by musician Joe Craven. The top three finalists will perform at Grass Valley’s California Worldfest this summer. W, 6/5, 7:30pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierranevada.com.

Art 1078 GALLERY: Apocalypse, a glass and light installation serving as Chico State art student Crystal Keesey’s MFA culminating exhibition. Through 6/1. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

ANGELO’S CUCINA TRINACRIA: Go Fish: Koi

Games, paintings by Dolores Mitchell of Avenue 9 Gallery. Through 6/30. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Acumen, photography by Karma Ganzler and sculpture by Doug Rathbun on a theme of preserving nature. 5/31-6/29. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: Betty Benson

Retrospective Exhibition, a retrospective exhibition of works from the local artist Betty Benson. Ongoing. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO MUNICIPAL BUILDING: Camera Club

Exhibit, works by the Chico Camera Club on display. Through 7/12. 411 Main St., (530) 8967214.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Northern California Gold, Jake Early’s new six-piece serigraph collection depicting familiar local scenes. Springtime on Table Mountain, a collection of works in oil on canvas by Ellen Heise. Woven Memories, a new series with a painter’s approach to tapestry motifs by Marilyn Jennings. 345 Broadway, (530) 8910900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

ELLIS ART & ENGINEERING SUPPLIES: Student

Works in Watercolor, a display of pieces by students of Ellis Art’s watercolor workshops. Through 5/31. 122 Broadway St., (530) 891-0335, www.ellishasit.com.

GRACE BRETHREN CHURCH: Michael Halldorson Exhibition, about 20 intaglio etchings and collagraphs on display. Through 5/31. 355 Panama Ave.

HAS BEANS INTERNET CAFE & GALLERIA: Judy Macomber Exhibition, nine colorful paintings on display. Through 5/31. 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Raymond Eastman, oil paintings by Raymond Eastman on display. Through 7/18. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

IDEA FABRICATION LABS: 3D Exploration

Exhibition, three-dimensional works created by Colorado sculptor David Seied during a two-week residency at Idea Fab. Through 6/1. 603 Orange St., (530) 592-0609.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS: Tony Natsoulas &

Jeff Nebeker Exhibition, works in clay varying from figurative sculptures to alluring pastries and desserts in wonderful colors. Through 6/29. 254 E Fourth St. corner 4th st. & Wall, (530) 343-2930.

MANAS ART SPACE & GALLERY: LP Cookie

Camp Mystery Mixer, for this group show artists chose a used LP, picked up a fortune cookie and got inspired. Through 6/28. 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Art & Soul, a new

exhibition on display. Through 6/6. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 345-3063.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: Spring Fling, abstract and realistic works from Avenue 9 painters and photographers. Through 6/2. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

Call for Artists CHICO ICONS: NEIGHBORHOOD: Works in various mediums (using the theme “neighborhood” as a creative springboard) accepted. Go online for complete requirements and submission info. Through 6/29. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.ave nue9gallery.com/call-for-artists.

ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS ART CHALLENGE: Accepting pieces in any medium that must reference rock, paper, and scissors. Call for more info. Through 6/8. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

Museums BUTTE COUNTY PIONEER MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Antique Firearms Display, an exhibition of firearms designed and manufactured before the beginning of the 20th century. Ongoing. 2332 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: I Heart Chico, paintings, poetry, kid’s art, photography, textiles, videos and interactive collaborative exhibits inspired by Chico. Through 6/2.This is Our Home, Here We Remain, a Mechoopda Indian exhibit on display. Through 5/31. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Secrets of

Circles, an exhibition exploring the properties of a simple shape with powerful applications. Through 9/1. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Infinity & Beyond, an exhibit tracing early human celestial observation to modern space endeavors with a Russian Sokol Space suit, a moon rock and brand-new footage of deep space on display. Ongoing. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 32

Sam the dick sings

STEVE’S SAX IMPROV Friday, May 31 1078 Gallery

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Theatre on the Ridge is bringing back a local classic this weekend: The Black Bird Sings is an original musical penned by local theater stud Jerry Miller and previously performed in the Chico City Plaza during 2007’s Shakespeare in the Plaza summer-rep program. Miller is also on hand to direct his pop-music retelling of Dashiell Hammett’s famed EDITOR’S PICK The Maltese Falcon, about the hard-boiled private dick Sam Spade. Opens tonight, May 30, and continues with performances Thursday-Saturday nights through June 22 (with Sunday matinees the final three weekends).

May 30, 2013

CN&R 25


MUSIC BULLETIN BOARD Community ACHIEVEMENT IN THE ARTS AWARDS CEREMONY: Mayor Mary Goloff will present awards to exceptional CUSD artists in grades 7 through 12. Call for more info. Tu, 6/4, 6:30pm. Free. Chico City Council Building, 421 Main St., (530) 896-7214.

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info. M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave. North off of Hwy 32 and East Ave, (530) 3215607.

BottleRockers: (from left) Bad Religion fan; Alabama Shakes’ Brittany Howard; Jackson Browne; a hooper ready to twirl. More BottleRock photos online.

AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti, Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

Festive days ahead

BABY FAIRE: A parenting expo featuring

The new BottleRock Fest kicked off Nor Cal’s season of summer music fests

T and they will come” rang true earlier this month (May 9-12) as the inaugural, five-day he mantra of “build a festival

BottleRock Napa Valley music festival ignited the North State’s festival seastory and son by drawing up to 35,000 photos by spectators a day to the Napa Alan Valley Expo Fairgrounds. Sheckter Anchored by a monster 70foot-high main stage, the fest’s promoters held nothing back, offering a full-tilt extravaganza of music, food, wine, comedy and beer. Music was at the top of most people’s agendas, and the roster was eclectic and rich with bands young and old: The Black Keys, The Avett Brothers, The Flaming Lips, Charlie Musselwhite, and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, to name a few. And with so many major artists from multiple genres, strolling the grounds was a surreal experience at times as acts like Jackson Browne and Jane’s Addiction would be playing at the same time on different stages. At one point, Richard Thompson, a 45-year member of Britishrock royalty, spoke eloquently in the media tent about his days with Fairport Convention but paused as, several yards away, Joan Jett took the stage and amplified one of her old hits, belting out “I don’t give a damn ’bout my bad reputation!” The vibe was kind of an upscale tailgate party, with party dudes harmoniously sharing festival territory with trendy hipsters and chic fashionistas. The two major stages projected crystal-clear, über-powerful audio, augmented by big-screen video. But what made this fest decidedly Napa were the gourmet-food offerings from top local purveyors, and a staggering 42 wineries on hand. A sectioned-off food market included everything from wood-fired pizza and halibut ceviche, to pork-belly tacos and barbecued oysters. First-year wrinkles? There were a few minor logistical glitches. But that aside, the North State’s answer to Coachella kicked off the summer’s festival season in grand fashion. And here’s what’s up next.

26 CN&R May 30, 2013

Reggae in the Hills June 7-9, Calaveras County Fairgrounds, Angels Camp Featuring: Steel Pulse, Capleton, Inner Circle, Anuhea, Mystic Roots, more. Tickets: $45-$120 (one-three days), $150 (three days with camping). Info: www.reggae inthehills.com Huichica Music Festival June 14-15, Gundlach Bundschu Winery, Sonoma Featuring: Blitzen Trapper, Fruit Bats, Jonathan Wilson, Damien Jurado, more. Tickets $18 (Friday), $40 (Saturday), $50 (two-day). Info: www.huichicamusicfestival.com The Bounce Festival June 20-24, Highway 70, Twain Featuring: Beats Antique, Griz, Boombox, Justin Martin, more. Tickets: $160 (three days with camping), $50 (to add fourth day). Info: www.the bouncefestival.com Sierra Nevada World Music Festival June 21-23, Mendocino County Fair, Boonville Featuring Damian and Stephen Marley, Soja, Alpha Blondy, Marcia Griffiths, Groundation, more. Tickets: $60-$75 (one day), $170 (3 days). Info: www.snwmf.com Wild Mountain Faire June 28-30, 12967 Concow Road, Concow Featuring: Jellybread, SambaDá, Watertruck, Delhi 2

Dublin, Dylan’s Dharma, Alli Battaglia and the Musical Brewing Company. Tickets: $30 (one day) to $65 (three days with camping). Info: www.wildmountainfaire.com

Kate Wolf Music Festival June 28-30, Black Oak Ranch, Laytonville Featuring: John Prine, Angelique Kidjo, Dave Alvin, Iris DeMent, Elephant Revival, more. Tickets: $190 (three days). Info: www.katewolf musicfestival.com High Sierra Music Festival July 4-7, Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds, Quincy Featuring: Robert Plant and The Sensational Space Shifters, Primus, Thievery Corporation, moe., more. Tickets: $75-$85 (one day) to $205 (four days with camping). Info: www.highsierramusic.com California WorldFest July 12-15, Nevada County Fairgrounds, Grass Valley Featuring: Pink Martini, Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers, Bruce Cockburn, Delhi 2 Dublin, Vieux Farka Toure, more. Tickets: $55 (one day) to $170 (four days with camping). Info: www.worldfest.net Guitarfish Music Festival July 26-28, Cisco Grove Campground, Cisco Grove Featuring: Lyrics Born, Orgône, Jazz Mafia, SambaDá, New Monsoon, more. Tickets: $75 (one day) to $155 (three days with camping). Info:

breakfast, keynote speaker Natalie Vogel, MD, exhibits and educational sessions on a variety of baby-related topics. Call to register. Sa, 6/1, 9amnoon. Free. Enloe Conference Center, 1528 Esplanade, (877) 365-6363.

BCCER BUTTERFLY SURVEY: A survey to collect butterfly population trend data led by entomologist Don Miller. Call for more info. Tu, 6/4, 9am. Free. Chico Park & Ride, Hwy 99 & E. Eighth St., (530) 898-5010.

COOKING WITH BEER DEMO & LUNCHEON: Head chef Michael Iles demonstrates special beer-infused cooking techniques during this afternoon luncheon. Sa, 6/1, 1pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 345-2739, www.sierranevada.com.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

FANCY FEET DANCE: Beginning to experienced dancers welcome to work on the foxtrot, waltz, swing and more to a live band. Tu, 7:30-10pm. $5-$7. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4015, www.chicorec.com.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods, honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm.

www.guitarfishfestival.com

Reggae on the River Aug. 1-4, French’s Camp, Piercy Featuring: Julian Marley and the Uprising Band, Morgan Heritage, Tarrus Riley, Anthony B, more. Tickets: $190 (3 days with camping) to $250 (four days with camping). Info: www.reggaeontheriver.com Outside Lands Aug. 9-11, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco Featuring: Paul McCartney, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nine Inch Nails, Phoenix, Vampire Weekend, more. Tickets: $249.50 (three days). Info: www.sfoutsidelands.com

Chico Certified Saturday Farmers’ Market, parking lot at Second and Wall streets, (530) 893-3276.

FARMERS MARKET: NORTH CHICO: Farmfresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. W, 7:30am-noon through 11/22. Prices vary. North Valley Plaza, 801 East Ave.

FARMERS MARKET: OROVILLE: Farmfresh produce, hand-crafted wares and entertainment. First Sa of every

month, 7:30am-noon through 10/26.

Prices vary. Oroville Municipal Auditorium, 1200 Myers St. in Oroville, (530) 589-0735.

FARMERS MARKET: PARADISE: Farmfresh produce, hand-crafted wares

and entertainment. Tu, 7:30am-noon through 10/15. Prices vary. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7069.

PARADISE GARDEN TOUR: A tour of six beautiful gardens in Paradise. Proceeds benefit the Paradise Garden Club. Sa, 6/1, 10am-4pm; Su, 6/2, 12-4pm. $15. Contact for info, (530) 877-4242, www.paradisegarden club.org.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524, www.chicorec.com.

TRADITIONAL WEST AFRICAN DANCE: All levels of drummers and dancers welcome. W, 5:30-7pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, E. Third And Pine, (808) 757-0076.

UNDERSTANDING DEMENTIA: ENHANCING CARE: The Alzheimer’s Association

annual education conference. Th, 5/30, 8am-12:30pm. $15-$45. Chico Masonic Life Family Center, 1110 East Ave. Between Guynn Ave. & Nord Ave., (530) 895-9661, www.alz.org/norcal.

USING THE SUN TO COOK YOUR FOOD: Learn how to build your own solar oven and bake “solar cookies.” Call for more info. Sa, 6/1, 9am. $35. Chico Park & Ride, Hwy 99 & E. Eighth St., (530) 898-5010.

Strawberry Music Festival Aug. 29-Sept. 2, Camp Mather, Groveland (just outside Yosemite National Park) Featuring: The Del McCoury Band, Peter Rowan and the Big Twang Theory, The California Honeydrops, more. Tickets: $65 (one day) to $200 (four days with camping). Info: www.strawberrymusic.com Chico World Music Festival Sept. 13-14: Chico State, Chico Featuring: Jake Shimabukuro on Friday performance (prices TBA), plus a full day of free performances on Saturday (performers TBA). Info: www.chicoperformances.com


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CN&R 27


The Purge

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush, Jason Cassidy and JuanCarlos Selznick.

Opening this week After Earth

Writer/director M. Night Shyamalan (Signs, The Sixth Sense) returns with a story set in a future where humans have fled Earth to live on another planet. When a space general and his son (Will Smith and his real-life son, Jaden) crash-land on the abandoned planet, they have to run for their lives from the species that have evolved in absence of humanity. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now You See Me

A month of mayhem The summer-blockbuster season kicks off with a big, noisy June

A is to quit making movies for less than $100 million. So, this summer promises some serious smack-

pparently the new Hollywood paradigm

downs between studios as they put all their money on one contender. The downside of all this is, of course, that stories takes a backby Craig seat to spectacle. And the five weekBlamer ends this June start off the season with very little in the way of actors talking on screen. But whatever—bring on your big, dumb fun, Hollywood. But please don’t forget the fun.

This first weekend of June sees Hollywood

giving M. Night Shyamalan yet another chance, this time with his post-post-apocalyptic After Earth. Will Smith and son Jaden get to work out some father-son issues after their spacecraft crashes on Earth a thousand years after humanity sailed off into space to despoil other planets. And apparently there are lots of giant mutant creatures waiting to make their odyssey spectacular. The Smiths are up against Jesse Eisenberg and Woody Harrelson trying to atone for the awfulness of Zombieland with Now You See Me, playing two-quarters of a quartet of Vegas magicians that uses its stage act to pull Robin Hood-style heists while Mark Ruffalo and Morgan Freeman try to take them down. It’s directed by the dude who brought us Clash of the Titans and written by the team behind Super Mario Bros., so there might be some stoopid, flashy fun to be found. The following week sees The Purge (with Ethan Hawke) taking the home-invasion theme of 2008’s The Strangers and bumping the mayhem quotient up to apocalyptic levels by presenting us with an allegorical version of ’Murica, where in order to maintain utopia we get one night a year of dystopia when everyone cuts loose with their simmering sociopathy and kills each other with no consequences. Produced by Michael Bay. ’Nuff said. The same weekend, we also get Vince Vaughan and Owen Wilson as a couple of oldsters competing against tech-savvy millennials at Google in the The Internship, plus an update of Much Ado About Nothing by Joss Whedon. I suppose if there’s one dude 28 CN&R May 30, 2013

floating around who can sell Shakespeare to a mass audience, it’s Whedon, the whiz behind a little film from last summer called The Avengers and a string of cult-fanatical TV shows—Buffy, Firefly, et al. In the middle of June, civilization as we know it gets a last call with This is the End. Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg get all their Hollywood friends together and make a disaster movie that promises us that they’ll kill off the Judd Apatow posse (playing themselves) in horrible ways. While the idea of watching Rogan, Michael Cera, James Franco and Jonah Hill die horribly has tremendous potential, I’m more excited about August’s The World’s End from the Shaun of the Dead/Hot Fuzz team. I’m guessing, though, that it won’t stand a chance against the yetanother reboot of the Man of Steel. I’ve enjoyed most of Zack Snyder’s work, and I’m hoping he can take the goody-goody ethos of Superman and darken it down all gritty-like. Later in the month, we’re invited to Monsters University, Pixar’s sequel to Monsters, Inc., which will probably obliterate its competition for the week: World War Z. The in-name-only adaptation of Max Brooks’ popular zombie allegory (starring Brad Pitt) is Hollywood’s first blockbuster attempt at cashing in on the zombie craze. If approached as having absolutely nothing to do with the novel, it might stand as its own entity. The end of June sees table scraps tossed into the multiplex with Roland Emmerich’s take on the Oval Office under fire with White House Down. On the heels of the similarly bent Olympus Has Fallen, released just three months ago, it doesn’t look promising. But it’s not as despairing as the Sandra Bullock/ Melissa McCarthy vehicle, The Heat. I’m not gonna think on this one any further, since I’ve heard the feds have replaced waterboarding in favor of using the trailer for this thing during Gitmo interrogations. Of course, there are more mega-budgets rumbling throughout the rest of the season (e.g. The Lone Ranger and Wolverine in July), but aside from the aforementioned The World’s End (August 23) and Guillermo del Toro’s robots vs. giant monsters smashing up the Pacific Rim (July 12), there appears to be very little noise worth sitting through. Ω

A Robin Hood-style heist film with four magicians (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) using their powers of illusion to steal from the rich and give to the audiences at their performances. Also starring Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo and Michael Caine. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Epic

A computer-animated feature about a teen girl who is magically transported to a fantastical secret world deep in the forest. There, she teams up with a rag-tag group of the strange residents to save their world (and the “real” world as well) from evil forces. Featuring the voices of Amanda Seyfried, Colin Farrell and Beyonce. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Fast & Furious 6

Car go fast. Explosion! Pretty girl dies young? Ker-plow! Froggy Vin Diesel “needs to know for sure.” Hey, she has amnesia! Oh shoot, some bad guys have fast cars, too. One … more … job. Bang! Bang! Bang! Is your shirt tight enough to drive with The Rock? Watch out, you almost got hit by that fast car that jumped over that semi that shot out of that tank as it flew off that bridge! Number 7: coming summer of 2014. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

3

The Great Gatsby

Some of what I like about Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby extravaganza is just the simple fact of a visualization of the characters, the settings, and the celebrated events of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel. More substantially, Luhrmann deserves some special credit for staying true to an aspect of the novel that often gets neglected: Gatsby is the title character and the story’s “star,” but the narrator of the novel—young Nick Carraway—is more truly the central character here. His account of Gatsby’s fleeting “greatness” is a catalytic phase in the story of his own rise and fall. The cast is a good one— Leonardo DiCaprio as Gatsby, Tobey Maguire as Carraway, Carey Mulligan as Gatsby’s dream girl, Daisy Buchanan, etc., but Luhrmann’s razzle-dazzle direction is so relentlessly attentive to flashy surfaces that none of the performances have much depth. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

2

The Hangover Part III

I wish they’d just used the same gimmick as the first two, the one where the mismatched goofs who form the Wolfpack (Ed Helms, Bradley Cooper and Zach Galifianakis) are scrambling around trying to undo all the damage from a wild night that they can’t remember thanks to being dosed by mind-erasing drugs. Instead we get a weak premise set up ridiculously by a cranky crime boss played by John Goodman. There are a few funny bits (mostly provided by Ken Jeong as the criminally

insane Leslie Chow) scattered along the path of destruction they cut from Tijuana to Las Vegas. But the funniest moment by far comes once the credits have already started rolling, and it’s of course in the aftermath of another forgotten night, one that would’ve been a more promising starting point for round three. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.

5

Mud

With river rats young and old haunted by misadventures and illusory romance on the Arkansas side of the Mississippi River, the latest film from Jeff Nichols (Take Shelter) feels a little like a modern-day Huckleberry Finn. A kid named Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and his pal Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) go prowling for a boat wedged in the treetops of a wilderness island and cross paths there with a scraggly fugitive named Mud (Matthew McConaughey). Mud’s obsession with erratic dream-girl Juniper (Reese Witherspoon) brings tattered romance and other troubles into the action. Mud, a battle-scarred neighbor (Sam Shepard), and Ellis’ uncle (Michael Shannon) are all variously compromised alternatives to the kid’s parents who are in the process of breaking up. A vengeful patriarch (Joe Don Baker) from nearby eventually forces a climactic shoot-out, but the movie’s real interest resides in the oddly tender tragicomedy that emerges from the characters’ heedless low-rent dreaming. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

4

Renoir

More idyllic period piece than artworld biopic, this leisurely episode from the last years of the great impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir offers up an enchanting mixture of art history; the summer of 1915; the lush countryside of the South of France; sensuality of a particularly French sort; and a glimpse or two of incipient film history. Middle Renoir son and future filmmaker Jean, home from duty in World War I while his wounds heal, gets besmitten with the brash charms of fledgling actress Andrée Heuschling, a new addition to the small host of models, maids, and female aides that populate his widowed father’s bucolic estate. The richly colored atmosphere created by director Gilles Bourdos and cinematographer Mark Ping Bing Lee takes precedence over the big dramas occurring just off screen and leaves us quite content to hang out with the Renoirs in a Renoir movie that seems inspired by the elder Renoir’s paintings. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

3

Star Trek Into Darkness

In J.J. Abrams’ follow-up to his 2009 reboot of the franchise, Chris Pine is back as a young Captain Kirk, and this mission into space has Kirk taking the Starship Enterprise crew to Kronos, the dangerous planet of the Klingons, on a mission of vengeance. There is some good chemistry—especially in the lighter moments— between Captain Kirk and first officer Spock (Zachary Quinto), but when the interactions get overly dramatic (a few over-the-top close-up shots beg for a Saturday Night Live spoof) things come to a halt. To be fair, the film must be caught up in its own spectacle, because everything is expected to be such a scene in a space epic. This works impressively well most of the time for the action-adventure scenes, but no so much for the interpersonal ones. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —R.B.

Still here

3

Iron Man 3

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.


6701 CLARK ROAD

Modern Vampires of the City

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

Vampire Weekend

IN

S HOWTIMES G OOD F RI 5/31 - T HUR 6/6

FRIDAY 5/31 – weDnesDAY 6/5

XL Recordings New York four-piece Vampire Weekend has, thankfully, always ignored the fussy traditionalists and simply listened to and used whatever sounds they damn well please—Afro-pop, classical, reggae, ska, synth pop, electronic, indie rock—when making their refreshing brand of pop rock. And they’ve once again proven on this, their third album, to be one of the few contemporary bands able to make something completely new with the sounds they borrow. Overall, the hooks are maybe slightly less unique than on their previous two albums (time will tell), but the band’s focus is sharper and its delivery stronger than ever. It took exactly one listen to frenetic lead-single “Diane Young” to be completely won over by the hyperactive track that threatened to send me into a full sprint with the urgency suggested by the title’s double meaning (say it fast). Every song has something uniquely rich to offer. The baroque, spooky chamber-popness of “Step”; the Afro-bouncy rhythm and weirdly effective crying background vocals on “Ya Hey”; and the handful of subtly layered slowburning numbers: “Don’t Lie,” “Hannah Hunt,” and the gorgeous, sobering opener, “Obvious Bicycle” (“Oh, you oughta spare your face the razor/ Because no one’s gonna spare the time for you”). As fun as VW has been to follow, it’s exciting to think that the best might be yet to come.

MUSIC

—Jason Cassidy

AFTER EARTH (Digital) (PG-13) (10:45AM*) 12:00PM 1:15PM 2:30PM 3:45PM 5:00PM 6:15PM 7:30PM 8:45PM 10:05PM

HANGOVER PART III, THE (Digital) (R) 11:00AM 12:15PM 1:30PM 2:45PM 4:05PM 5:15PM 6:30PM 7:45PM 9:00PM 10:15PM

EPIC (3D) (PG) (10:20AM*) 12:50PM 3:20PM 5:50PM♠ 8:20PM♠

INTERNSHIP, THE (Digital Sneak) (PG13) 8:00PM♣

EPIC (Digital) (PG) 11:35AM 2:05PM 4:35PM 7:05PM 9:35PM FAST & FURIOUS 6 (Digital) (PG-13) (10:00AM*) 11:00AM 12:00PM 1:00PM 2:00PM 3:00PM 4:00PM 5:00PM 6:05PM 7:00PM 8:00PM 9:05PM 10:00PM GREAT GATSBY, THE (2013) (Digital) (PG-13) 12:50PM 4:00PM 7:10PM 10:20PM

Poker Night 2 Telltale Games PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 Though the online-poker craze has died down, there is a new reason to go all-in. This sequel to Poker Night at the Inventory features a new cast of card sharks—crossing over from other games, movies and TV shows—who will mercilessly mock you and call your bluff. Sam and Max are back from the previous game, but this time it’s Sam’s turn at the table. Ash Williams (Army of Darkness), Claptrap (Borderlands 2), and Brock Samson (The Venture Bros.) join the doggy detective and you around the table while GLaDOS (Portal) acts as the dealer. The game offers Texas Hold ’em and Omaha tournaments, and themed chip, card and table sets, but the real appeal is the banter between your tablemates. You couldn’t ask for a better lineup, and each gambler brings a distinct comedic style to the table. Telltale Games does a great job of making the various styles work together, and the hilarious dialogue will win over non-poker fans. Eventually, you’ll hear the same jokes and, while annoying at times, a few cameos and the ability to win in-game gear for Team Fortress 2 and Borderlands 2 keep things interesting. Considering that the most money you’ll ever lose is the $5 you spend on the game, Poker Night 2 is the safest bet in town.

IRON MAN 3 (3D) (PG-13) (10:40AM*) 4:30PM 10:25PM

 12:35 2:55 5:10 7:25 9:40PM

AFTER EARTH

[PG-13]

NOW YOU SEE ME [PG-13]

 1:30 4:15 7:10 9:40PM : 12:30 5:10 7:30PM  IN 2D: 2:50 9:50PM



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THE HANGOVER PART III [R] STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

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IRON MAN 3

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IN

 12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30 9:45PM

IN

IN IN

IN : 1:00 6:45PM 2D: 3:50 9:35PM

: 1:00 6:50PM 2D: 4:00 9:35PM

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IRON MAN 3 (Digital) (PG-13) 1:35PM 7:25PM NOw YOU SEE ME (Digital) (PG-13) 11:15AM 2:05PM 4:55PM 7:40PM 10:30PM STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (3D) (PG-13) 11:25AM 2:35PM 5:45PM 8:55PM STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (Digital) (PG-13) 1:00PM 4:10PM 7:20PM 10:30PM

Showtimes listed w/(*) shown Sat. & Sun. only Showtimes listed w/ ♠ NOT shown Sat. or Mon. Showtimes listed w/ ♣ shown Sat. & Mon. only

GAME

—Matthew Craggs

Somewhere Keith Jarrett Trio ECM Records Ezra Pound once said that the duty of a poet was to take experience and “make it new.” By that definition, Keith Jarrett is, without doubt, a poet of the piano. Like few others, he can take old tunes and make them new, embroidering unexpected riffs on old cloth, transforming tired melodies into flights of imagination. When he plays, you can hear him exclaiming or moaning in the background—the sound of creativity as it happens. I’d have to go way back in time to come up with a jazz-piano-trio album as good as this one. Jarrett is, of course, a giant of his instrument, and of the genre, but his virtuosity doesn’t automatically ensure a home run every time he comes to the plate. Here, however, he hits it out of the park, with reinvention of songs I might have assumed were beyond reinvention. How, for instance, did Jarrett find new life in a standard as thoroughly probed and prodded as “Stars Fell on Alabama”? And his extended improvisation on “Somewhere,” the old Bernstein/Sondheim number from West Side Story proves to be fertile ground for Jarrett’s inventions. If you think jazz has grown boring, check out this album before you give up on this rich American music.

MUSIC

—Jaime O’Neill May 30, 2013

CN&R 29


ARTS DEVO Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

TRUE STORY It’s finally quiet enough around Chico for me to tell you the pioneer-day story that I’ve been dying to share. No, this isn’t going to be a tale of couch fires in the street or downtown parades. This is a story about the true pioneer day. Things are about to get real. The youngest of Arts DEVO’s three sisters lives in Shingletown, a very-rural foothill community in the eastern part of Shasta County. Over beers recently, my sister told us the story (with typical colorful and unedited flair) about the “pioneer day” field trip she chaperoned with eight kids, including two of her own, from the local elementary school. The idea was that the kids would go out into the woods and get a hands-on education in the kinds of survival skills utilized by our pioneering forefathers. Out in the field, there were different stations set up, and the kids rotated from one to the next. Station one: sawing. Kids love playing with sharp things, especially the jagged teeth of a crosscut saw. With a kid on each handle, they pushed and pulled their way through a modest log under the watchful eye of a sawyer and a serious-looking old man in suspenders. Station two: nails! “Here, little girl. Take this handful of nails and this hammer and go hammer your name (in nails!) into a hunk of wood, you adorable little pioneer.” Station three: hell. (Before you read on, I just want to remind you that this all really happened and that I’ve labeled this station “hell.” You’ve been forewarned.) During the middle of the field trip, one of the modern-day pioneers, having arrived late, backed his pickup into his station and began to hastily set up his demo. He pulled the tarp off his truck bed to reveal one fullgrown deer corpse. Having the children’s full attention, like a true showman he first chopped the head clean off the fuzzy forest creature. He then proceeded to take all of those in attendance back to a simpler and much darker olden time, when adults apparently peeled the faces of severed deer-heads in front of young children. Next, he pulled out his knife and yanked Bambi’s coat off and stretched it out over a makeshift frame. Bambi is sleeping, kids. Now, all you city slickers who take your pansy kids on boring tours of Bidwell Mansion might not know it, but the best way to tan a deer hide is to rub some sort of oil across its surface. And there’s no better oil than the emulsified goodness running through deer brains, and lucky for the kids there was a skull full of such treasure lying at their feet. So Ranger Hannibal Lecter then invited the youngsters to dip their hands right in and …

Classic Car and Street Rod Show: 7am - 3pm ˜CjYf%)$WUfg +)5kUfXg5jU]`UV`Y ˜HfU]`YfYX GhcW_ UbXAcX]ÑYX ˜%$$cZdfcWYYXghcVYbYÑhh\Y >Ygig7YbhYfUbX9gd`UbUXY<cigY cZ7\]Wc ˜:cfXYhU]`gWU``>UW_9XacbXgcb Uh)'$!,*)!($() Rib Cookoff: 11am - 6pm H]W_Yhg%)!5``dfcWYYXg VYbYÑhh\Y<UbX]!F]XYfg W W W. R O L L I N G H I L L S C A S I N O . C O M

THAT’S ENOUGH, ARTS DEVO! This is Calendar Editor Howard Hardee and I’ve taken AD’s keyboard away to tell you a much-less disgusting story, one about my Memorial Day weekend at the Sasquatch! Festival at the Gorge Amphitheatre in southeastern Washington. Though the festival ran for four days, the grueling 12-hour drive limited my buddy and me to two days and nights of camping on the edge of the jaw-droppingly beautiful Colombia River Gorge. Being a music festival in the Pacific Northwest, Sasquatch!’s lineup was indie-heavy, with acts like Vampire Weekend, Sigur Rós, Arctic Monkeys, The Postal Service, The xx, Mumford and Sons, etc. The xx, with their brooding, dramatic stage aesthetic, was a particularly good fit for the main stage, providing an awe-inspiring soundtrack to a spectacular canyon sunset. But the main attraction for me was Tame Impala, a wicked-awesome rock band out of Australia that played the more modest Yeti Stage on Saturday night. Their sound— drawing heavily from ’60s psychedelic rock—is simply immense. The most surreal act, however, was the invisible cyclone that ripped through our city of tents on Sunday afternoon as most festival-goers were idly lounging in the sun. The camping area was sent into chaos as several tents in our immediate proximity were violently ripped from their stakes and launched several hundred feet in the air. There were shrieks of terror and exhilaration as the cyclone made its way through the campsite, picking up tarps, garbage and a particularly eye-catching multi-colored wig as it passed. Thanks to the goodness of humanity, strangers helped strangers track down wayward tents and return belongings. And thanks to the goodness of Sasquatch!, it was a kick-ass weekend. Twelve hours to Sasquatch!

30 CN&R May 30, 2013


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“T“I know for a fact that they stay open until 10 o’clock. Every night.”

hey were not closed.” Colette scowled.

I looked at my watch: 7:15. She smiled suddenly. “You got lost, didn’t you, little brother? You couldn’t even find Shubert’s. I knew by Henri I shouldn’t have let you drive.” Bourride “Sorry,” I said. “That’s OK. Let’s walk down.” I thought I was going to get out Shubert’s of it. Ice Cream It was a balmy, late-spring and Candy evening, perfect for a stroll, so we 178 E. Seventh St. leashed up Miss Marilyn and Mr. 342-7163 Theo and set out. When we got to www.shuberts.com Shubert’s, the sidewalk was full of Hours: families and students munching on Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; cones and spooning ice cream out of Saturday-Sunday, cups—on the benches out front, at the 11 a.m.-10 p.m. two tables, and standing in circles chatting. “Go ahead,” I said. “I’ll wait out here.” “Good idea.” She handed me Mr. Theo’s leash. “A pint of Mt. Shasta and a pint of peach?” I nodded, then tried to lose myself in the crowd. She came back out a few minutes later, holding the bag of ice cream, and looked at me, clearly suspicious. “So,” she said, “when the clerk was counting my change, she said, ‘Are you with the gentleman in the funny hat?’ ‘Yes,’ I said, ‘Why?’ ‘Oh, he’s one of our favorite customers. In here almost every day. But hardly ever twice in the same evening.’” Merde! “You didn’t get lost at all, did you?” I shook my head. “And you’ve already had a bit of ice cream this evening?” I nodded. “Uh-huh.” “How much?” I reached for the bag, pulled out the two pints. “You ate the two pints you were supposed to bring back to the house?” “I was just going to taste them. I couldn’t stop.” She shook her head. “What am I going to do with you?” I handed her Mr. Theo’s leash. “Eat some ice cream with me? Let’s sit down.” “No way,” she said. “We’re saving these. Let’s get

going before it starts to melt.” Henri is a huge fan of Shubert’s Ice Cream and Candy (obviously), though the clerk might have been exaggerating a bit. I love their homemade ice cream and have tried most flavors. My favorites, all delicious on waffle cones: chocolate chip, toasted almond, Chico mint (milk chocolate with pieces of Shubert’s green homemade mints), and amaretto, although on occasion the yummy bittersweet chocolate or Mt. Shasta (chocolate ice cream with coconut) call my name. I also love the feel of the place, like I’ve stepped back in time. The walls are covered with framed screen prints of old-Chico events, including from past Kite Days, Robin Hood Days and Christmas Previews, and an old-timey milkshake maker whirs behind the counter. And the aroma—so sweet the air feels thick. This year marks Shubert’s 75th anniversary (which it will celebrate by offering 5-cent cones on June 8), founder Leonard Shubert having come to California from Montana in 1938 looking for a spot to open an ice cream parlor. So impressed with the special place that Chico was, he opened the shop on Seventh Street, and then in 1941 hired his nephew, Charles Pulliam Sr., to help out. Pulliam took over the business 10 years later. Fourth-generation Pulliams work at Shubert’s today. The epitome of a local business, Shubert’s not only makes all its ice cream and most of its candies on the premises, but also uses as many local ingredients as possible—butters, creams, honeys and nuts coming from local farms year round, fruits and berries seasonally. Shubert’s ice cream cones are $2.45, $3.70 and $4.95 for single, double and triple scoops (add 50 cents for a waffle cone). Handpacked ice cream is $4.50 a pint. Sundaes are $3.50-$5.50. The venue’s candies include Shubert’s signature mints, plus truffles (not made on site), turtles, fudge and toffee, tantalizingly displayed behind the glass counter and available individually or by the box (a one-pound assorted box is $16.95). When we got back to the house that night, Colette put the bag in the freezer. “I should probably put a padlock on this door,” she said, shutting it. “I think I have one in a drawer somewhere.” “Oh, don’t be silly,” I said. “I’m fine,” although my hands were trembling. Later that night, Henri was having trouble sleeping. Thankfully, no padlock. Ω

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CN&R 31


NIGHTLIFE LAMB OF GOD Friday, May 31 Senator Theatre SEE FRIDAY

(from Sacramento) and new outfit Cities (featuring members of Goat and Teeph) open. Th, 5/30, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafe coda.com.

THE MUSIMIANS: Live music on

the back patio. Th, 5/30, 6-9pm. Free. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

31FRIDAY BASSMINT: A weekly electronic dance party with a rotating cast of local and regional DJs. F, 9:30pm. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4; (530) 895-3888.

BRIAN CLINE BAND: Pop, modern

30THURSDAY BOX KNIFE BETTY: A newly formed local garage-rock band. Fallin’ to Rise and Abstract Abyss (from Yuba City) share the bill. Th, 5/30, 7:30pm. $5. Dex, 167 E. Third St. Next to the Crazy Horse Saloon; (530) 327-8706.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473.

CLOUDS ON STRINGS: Chico’s favorite prog-rockers say farewell to longtime bassist Randall Jangula. Isaac Bear

and classic rock, funk, R&B and more in the lounge. F, 5/31, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville; (530) 5349892; www.goldcountrycasino.com.

BRYAN MCALLISTER & DAVID COLON: Jazz on guitar and piano. F, 5/31, 8pm. $5$10. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway; (530) 343-1973; www.1078gallery.org.

THE CALIFORNIA BEACH BOYS: Rich Amaral’s Beach Boys tribute band in the brewery. F, 5/31, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.feather fallscasino.com.

THURSDAY 5/30—WEDNESDAY 6|5 FLO SESSIONS: Flo’s weekly music showcase continues. F, 8pm. $5. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

TWERKAPALOOZA: Performances from hip-hop acts WillDy Diamond, Lynguistix, Young DoeJah, Belvy Jones and DJs Darkness and Swang. F, 5/31, 8pm. $6. Dex, 167 E. Third St. Next to the Crazy Horse Saloon; (530) 327-8706.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES: The summer’s weekly concert series continues with the fiery traditional Mexican music group Los Caballitos de la Cancion. F, 7-8:30pm. Free. Downtown Chico Plaza, 400 Broadway St.; (530) 896-7200; www.down townchico.net.

1SATURDAY

tion: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.; (530) 343-7718.

ACOUSTIC MUSIC JAM: A jam hosted by Butte Folk Music Society and led by local musician Steve Johnson. First Sa of every month, 2-5pm. Free. Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery, 130 Main St.; (530) 345-4128.

CHICO BICYCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL: The

ABERRANCE: Groovin’ thrash metal out of

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradi-

Third St. Next to the Crazy Horse Saloon; (530) 327-8706.

Paradise. Blood Cabana, Brutal Acclivity and Leige offer additional heaviness. Sa, 6/1, 8pm. $5. Dex, 167 E.

annual bike-powered music festival will start in Camelia Way Park, go mobile as a bike parade through Bidwell Park and conclude at the GRUB Cooperative. Sa, 6/1, noon. Free. Call or visit website for details, locations

vary; http://tinyurl.com/o997jyr.

MUSIC SHOWCASE: An open mic hosted

by local musicians Rich and Kendall. Sa. Free. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Rd. Turn right onto River Road at the western end of W. Sacramento Road; (530) 710-2020.

NORTHERN HEAT: Classic rock and coun-

try in the nightclub. Sa, 6/1, 9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning; (530) 528-3500; www.rollinghillscasino.com.

SINGER-SONGWRITER NIGHT: Local tunesmiths Bran Crown, Aubrey

JOHN SEID TRIO: John Seid, Steve Cook and Larry Peterson play an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. F, 5/31, 6-9pm. Free. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St.; (530) 8919044.

CHICO BICYCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL

This is how Chico does it: An all-bike, all-music, all-sustainability-focused community event to send us skipping into another Chico summer. Saturday, June 1, live music amplified by pedal-powered generators happens at the start (Camellia Way Park), at the end (GRUB Cooperative), and en route while looping through Bidwell Park. This year’s lineup includes MaMuse, The Loyd Family Players, Wolf Thump, Mandalyn May, Kyle Williams, Evin Wolverton, Pat Hull, Thomas Fogg, Chikoko fashion collective and Origin belly dancers.

LAMB OF GOD: A real heavyweight on the national metal scene, Lamb of God had toured with the likes of Slayer and Metallica and dabbles in speed, thrash and groove metal. Decapitated and Anciients open. F, 5/31, 7:45pm. $29. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproductions.net.

LAST STAND: A stand-up comedy

open-mic with a show to follow. F, 5/31, 7-10pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

THE TRASHIES

The Trashies ride their scum-wave down from Seattle to thrash about Café Coda with a duo of Chico power trios: garage-rockers Severance Package and old-school riffrockers The Hambones. Get to the café early Sunday, June 2, and have dinner—maybe a little antipasto and some flatbread pizza. Finish with a pot of tea, and then flip your table over and cut loose across the handsomely carpeted dance floor: “One, two, three, four!”

Debauchery, Fera, Lish Bills and Bunnymilk perform. Sa, 6/1, 9pm. $2. Maltese Bar & Taproom, 1600 Park Ave.; (530) 343-4915.

THE SPAZMATICS: An energetic,

music from some of America’s favorite films. Su, 6/2, 2-3pm. Free. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Park Dr. off Bruce Rd.; (530) 342-8673.

accompaniment playing “Electric

Django.” First M of every month, 7-8:30pm. Opens 6/3. $10. Café Coda,

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

4TUESDAY AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

BELLY DANCE CLASS: Weekly belly dance with BellySutra. Tu, 6-7pm. $8. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and stand-up bassist Christine LapadoBreglia. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade; (530) 343-2056; www.farmstarpizza.com.

265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

5WEDNESDAY

THE TRASHIES: Locals The Hambones and

unabashedly dorky cover band in the brewery. Sa, 6/1, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfalls casino.com.

2SUNDAY CHICO COMMUNITY BAND SPRING CONCERT: The 50-member Chico Community Band presents well-known

Severance Package perform with The Trashies out of Seattle. Su, 6/2, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

3MONDAY 1ST MONDAY JAZZ SERIES: The jazz series highlighting the contributions of a different jazz innovator each month continues with Jimmy Grant and violin

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DINNER WITH THE DEAN-O-HOLICS: Dinner accompanied by covers of songs by Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Frank Sinatra and other cool crooners in the brewery. W, 6/5, 6-8pm. $10-$35. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885 ext. 510; www.featherfallscasino.com.

OPEN MIC: An all-ages open mic for musicians, poets, comedians, storytellers and dancers. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country music

showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 79:30pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

LION I AM: A post-hardcore outfit with emo undertones. Under Cities and the Jet Stole Home open. W, 6/5, 8pm. $8. Dex, 167 E. Third St. Next to the Crazy Horse Saloon; (530) 3278706.

MIDNIGHT BLUES SOCIETY: An open blues jam—bring your own axe. First W of every month, 7pm. Free. Nash’s Restaurant, 1717 Esplanade; (530) 896-1147; www.nash srestaurantchico.com.

THE 51 CARDS: Energetic, happy-golucky rock with dashes of ska, punk and late ’60s influences. The Cause opens. W, 6/5, 9pm. $3. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

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CELEBRATION OF THE SONG SHOWCASE: KZFR Community Radio’s annual singer-songwriter contest culminates in this evening hosted by musician Joe

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CN&R 33


34 CN&R May 30, 2013


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Frankie Dean

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Paul Champlin (530) 828-2902

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

3515 Keefer Rd 3455 Brook Valley 1763 Hooker Oak Ave 909 Coit Tower Way 456 Juniper St 1700 Lawler St 495 Windham Way 372 Gardenside Ct 788 Downing Ave 134 W Tonea Way 234 Legacy Ln 563 Morgan Dr 1893 E 8th St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$743,500 $444,000 $371,000 $354,000 $350,000 $342,000 $340,000 $340,000 $329,000 $310,000 $295,000 $290,000 $286,000

5/ 4.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 3 3/ 3 3/ 2 3/ 2.5 3/ 3 3/ 3 3/ 2 3/ 2 5/ 2.5

SQ. FT. 4467 2285 2293 2288 2399 1743 2064 2779 1916 2478 1581 2538 1755

#01767902

530-717-3884

Making Your Dream Home a Reality

Call or TEXT for more info.

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1739 Oriole Ct 3074 Coronado Rd 240 Estates Dr 3 1275 Calla Ln 13308 Oak Ranch Ln 1378 Wanderer Ln 1533 Manchester Rd 27 Skywalker Ct 10 Christopher Alan Ln 19 Coleman Ct 1603 Chico River Rd 16 Benton Ave 10 Venetian Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$282,000 $258,000 $255,000 $252,500 $245,000 $245,000 $245,000 $242,000 $238,000 $233,000 $225,000 $225,000 $220,000

3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 6/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 2

SQ. FT. 1806 1352 1540 1200 1749 1471 1475 1607 1323 1404 2306 1374 1366

May 30, 2013

CN&R 35


YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

OPEN

hOuSE

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 2-4

Sat. 2-4 & Sun. 11-1

550 W. Lassen (X St: Cussick) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3109 Sq. Ft $599,950 Paul Champlin 828-2902 Shane Collins 518-1413

10 Allie Court (X St: Manzanita) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1507 sq. ft $289,950 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

728 W. 12th Avenue (X St: Holly) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1328 Sq. Ft $234,500 Brandi Laffins 321-9562

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

Sat. 2-4

3913 Aruba Court (X St: Carribean) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2,830 sq. ft $589,000 Heather DeLuca 228-1480 Laura Ortland 321-1567

2 Knotts Glen (X St: Cussick) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1494 sq. ft $276,000 Paul Champlin 828-2902 John Wallace 514-2405 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

1516 E. Lassen Avenue (X St: Eaton) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1248 Sq. Ft $207,500 Sandy Stoner 514-5555

Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 2-4

3908 Barbados (X St: Spyglass) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2507 sq. ft $540,000 Becky Williams 636-0936

2637 Ceanothus Avenue (X St: Viceroy) 3 Bd / 2.25 Ba, 1419 sq. ft $258,500 Dustin Wenner 624-9125 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 5 River Wood Loop (X St: Glennwood) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1915 Sq. Ft $344,000 Ed Galvez 990-2054

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 115 Mandalay Court (X St: Esplanade) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1860 sq. ft $304,500 Lindsey Ginno 570-5261 Paul Champlin 828-2902

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 9278 Stanford Lane (Durham Dayton Hwy, Durham) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1306 sq. ft $197,500 Saeed Khan 916-705-6977

Sun. 11-1 2050 Springfield #319 (X St: Forest) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1528 Sq. Ft $115,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sun. 2-4 16 Hemming Lane (X St: Ceres) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, 1286 Sq. Ft $239,000 Kristin Wilson Ford 519-7600

Sat. 2-4 2854 Lovell Avenue (X St: Ceres Ave.) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1306 sq. ft $235,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Ask the Professionals at Century 21 — 345-6618 VERY CUTE!

NEED A WAREHOUSE & OFFICE SPACE?

1 acre, garage, lg . shop, ready for a home! Chico $174,500

3 bed 2 bath with a darlingDkitchen ING

3/2, 1,785 sq . ft . ½ acre plus , like new! Paradise Reduced! $229,900

PEN

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2/2, 1,680 sq . ft .

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 13, 2013 — May 17, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 43 Skywalker Ct 2309 North Ave 1162 Lawton Dr 320 W 11th Ave 1628 E Lassen Ave 341 W Lincoln Ave 9960 Cohasset Rd 13678 Endicot Cir 14093 Drexel Dr 6408 Corning Ct 219 Schlaf Dr 115 Weger Dr 9 Nikki Ct 36 CN&R May 30, 2013

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Cohasset Magalia Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville

$214,500 $201,000 $185,000 $177,500 $174,000 $153,000 $139,000 $235,000 $130,000 $125,000 $500,000 $258,000 $232,000

3/ 2 4/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1 3/ 1.5 3/ 2 1/ 1 3/ 2.5 2/ 2 3/ 1.5 11/ 8 3/ 2 4/ 2

SQ. FT. 1181 2366 1152 1136 1231 2046 736 1873 1363 1056 7733 1292 1902

ADDRESS 18 Almquist Dr 169 Canyon Highlands Dr 3057 Clemo Ave 265 Fortune Way 1996 20th St 966 Plumas Ave 5000 Malibu Dr 1231 Nunneley Rd 429 Nottingham Dr 5820 Yorkshire Dr 1257 Elliott Rd 1450 Nunneley Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$230,000 $185,000 $149,500 $120,000 $120,000 $115,500 $299,000 $288,000 $227,000 $191,500 $165,000 $120,000

3/ 2 3/ 2.5 3/ 2 2/ 1 3/ 1.5 2/ 1 3/ 4 3/ 3.5 2/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 1

SQ. FT. 1712 2001 1600 960 1152 1234 2872 2365 1530 2036 1328 1012


Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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GeNeRal $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900 Record your own album on CD at a quality home studio. Call Steve 530-824-8540

Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) Next Door Pharmacy in Chico, CA seeks a Pharmacy Manager to oversee and direct pharmacy operations, fill prescriptions, compound and dispense medication, provide clinical services, and counsel patients. Must have Bachelors in Pharm and 5 years of progressive experience* *+ active pharmacy license in California. Must be immunization certified. Send Cover letter and Resume to: Saudjr@gmail.com No calls/EOE Paid In Advance! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station.com (AAN CAN) SUMMER WORK $14.25 base/appt. Customer Sales/service Flexible Schedules Scholarship Oppty. No Experience required All ages $17+ conditions apply 530-722-6000 collegeincome.com

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WellNess sUPPlies NEED VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Call Power Pill. 1-800-374-2619 (AAN CAN)

Got Junk? Dump runs, hauling, clean-ups. We load. Neil Bennett 530-354-1511 Butte County & Chico.

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1-888-242-3214 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN)

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laNd 20 ACRES FREE BUY 40 - GET 60 ACRES. $0 DOWN, $168/MONTH. MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN)

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aUTOs 1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer.All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. $6000 530-895-8171

classics 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

ficTiTiOUs BUsiNess FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MK DESIGNS, MK MEDICAL INTERIORS at 1165 Dog Leg Drive Chico, CA 95928. MELINDA KENNEMER 1165 Dog Leg Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual.

this legal Notice continues

Signed: MELINDA M KENNEMER Dated: April 30, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000621 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH STATE LEVELING at 9242 Holland Ave Durham, CA 95938. KMT INDUSTRIES LLC 9242 Holland Ave Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: KENNETH TOZIER, CEO Dated: April 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000569 Published: May 9,16,23,30 , 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO HOMES at 2571 California Park Drive, Suite 200 Chico, CA 95928. CHICO HOMES REAL ESTATE SALES, INC 2571 California Park Drive, Suite 200 Chico, CA 95928 This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SANDI BAUMAN, CEO/PRESIDENT Dated: April 17, 2013. FBN Number: 2013-0000558 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: CHICO HOMES at 2571 California Park Drive Suite 200 Chico, CA 95928. SANDI BAUMAN 288 Idyllwild Circle Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: SANDI BAUMAN Dated: April 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2011-0000741 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A TASTE OF MAIDU at 52 Orchardcrest Drive Oroville, CA 95965. CIARRA BURLEY 52 Orchardcrest Drive Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CIARRA M BURLEY Dated: April 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000538 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOCKSMITH CHICO at 12 Marydith Ln Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL D MEYER 12 Marydith Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL D. MEYER Dated: May 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000652 Published: May 16,23,230, June 6, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TOP TIER CAKE DESIGN at 2500 Floral Ave #10 Chico, CA 95926.

this legal Notice continues

EMILY L BROWNFIELD 5 Morga Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY BROWNFIELD Dated: April 4, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000499 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SJS CARPET CLEANING at 312 Otterson Drive, STE O Chico, CA 95928 SELECT JANITORIAL, INC 312 Otterson Drive, STE O Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LEAH WILLS Dated: April 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000613 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDYMAN IN PARADISE at 1221 Wagstaff Rd Paradise, CA 95969. CHRISTINE MCCALLY 1221 Wagstaff RD Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINE MCCALLY Dated: April 24, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000586 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JOHNNY’S TEXAS STYLE BBQ at 551 Shasta Ave Oroville, Ca 95965. JOHN T WILLIS 551 Shasta Ave Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN WILLIS Dated: May 8, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000663 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CALI LOVE CLOTHING at 666 E. 20TH Street Chico, CA 95928. TONI FISHER 666 E 20TH Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TONI FISHER Dated: April 25, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000595 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIRSTPOINT SYSTEMS at 2259 Santa Clara Ave Chico, CA 95928. JOSHUA ERIC CARLSON 1593 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. PAUL JOSEPH WRIGHT 2259 Santa Clara Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PAUL WRIGHT Dated: May 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000627 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the Fictitious Business Name:

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COACH WORKS at 2844 Northgate Drive Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT E ORPUT 11 Glenbrook Court Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT E. ORPUT Dated: May 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2007-0001588 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013

95926. BENJAMIN ANTHONY BECKMAN 1524 La Linda Lin Chico, Ca 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BENJAMIN A. BECKMAN Dated: May 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000667 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SAL FARMS, SUPER AWESOME LUCKY FARMS at 1521 Golden Birch PL Chico, CA 95928. NOEL ANDREWS 1521 Golden Birch PL Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NOEL ANDREWS Dated: April 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000543 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COST U LESS PAINTING at 2321 Honey Run RD SPC #39 Chico, CA 95928. NICHOLAS SALERNO III 2321 Honey Run RD SPC #39 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NICK SALERNO III Dated: May 14, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000702 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LEYDEN ENGINEERING at 2961 HWY 32 STE 17 Chico, CA 95973. MANUEL LEYDEN 4 El Cortez Cir Chico, CA 95926. SAMUEL LEYDEN 371 Java Morro Bay, CA 93442. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MANUEL LEYDEN Dated: May 7, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000654 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROADIES at 3346 Konning Ave Chico, CA 95928. TIMOTHY ROBERT WALKER 3346 Konning Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIM WALKER Dated: April 24, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000588 Published: May 23,30 June 6,13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as INSURANCE CONNECTION at 2057 Mitchell Ave Oroville, Ca 95966. MARK H TRUMM 303 Mira Loma Dr Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK H. TRUMM Dated: May 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000688 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HOT RED APPLE COM at 1622 Bidwell Avenue Chico, CA 95926. GARY LEE QUIRING 1622 Bidwell Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GARY QUIRING Dated: March 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000353 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUILT FOR BODYWORK at 3769 Rio Lindo Ave Chico, CA

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ELITE TRUCK PERFORMANCE AND WINDOW TINT at 2866 Esplande Chico, CA 95973. JAMES BARNESON 3021 Sandi Drive Chico, CA 95973. MARCUS BEYROUTI 710 Billie Road Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARCUS BEYROUTI Dated: May 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000707 Published: May 23,30 June 6,13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as URBAN WAX CA at 1380 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. D AND D MANAGEMENT GROUP LLC 3154 Olympic Way Auburn, CA 95603. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DEAN HEGARTY Dated: April 26, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000592 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LASER RENEW ZIT at 113 West 8th Ave Suite C Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT DEAN STOREY 10 Maddie Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT DEAN STOREY Dated: May 21, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000719 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BACIO CATERING COMPANY at 1903 Park Avenue CHico, CA 95928. BACIO INC 1903 Park Avenue Chico, Ca 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: AMANDA LEVERONI Dated: May 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000651 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DECADES at 1168 Patricia Drive Chico, CA 95926. TOBIAS SEAN BROOKS 2220 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95927. WILLIAM JOSEPH DIBONO 2220 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95927. SAMANTHA LOUISE FRANCIS 1116 Orchard Way Chico, Ca 95928. BENJAMIN OGDEN RUTTENBURG 6 Moraga Drive Chico, CA 95926. WILLIAM THOMAS HENRY WATJE 2220 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: William Joseph Dibono Dated: May 21, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000721 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ADRENALINE X, CROSS FIT CHICO at 345 Huss Drive Chico, CA 95928. WHITNEY WOLFF 1394 Wanderer Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: WHITNEY WOLFF Dated: April 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000607 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REVILAKS HER RATERS, REVS HERS at 2659 Williams Rd Butte Valley, CA 95965. JOHN S REVILAK 2659 Williams Rd Butte Valley, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Individual. Signed: JOHN REVILAK Dated: May 22, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000724 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PEACEFUL PINES MOBILHOME PARK at DALE MANSFIELD TRUSTEE 5528 Forbestown Road Forbestown, CA 95941. BETTY PETERS TRUSTEE 5528 Forbestown Road, Forbestown, CA 95941. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: BETTY PETERS Dated: May 23, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000730 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GRANDMA JO’S ORIGINAL SAUCE at 999 Jonell Lane Chico, CA 95926. SAUCE PARTNERS LLC 999 Jonell Lane Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DONNA M. OLSON Dated: April 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000611 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2013

classifieds

CONTINUED ON # 38

May 30, 2013

CN&R 37


NOTICES CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 To ( names of persons to be notified, if known, including names on birth certificate): MOLLEY A. INSHCO and anyone claiming to be a parent of (child’s name): KI born on (date): December 23, 2010 at (name of hospital or other place of birth and city and state): KAISER HOSPITAL SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA A hearing will be held on Date: July 11, 2013 Time: 8:30 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA Located at: Superior Court Of California County of Butte 1 Court Street Oroville, CA 95965 At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The Social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminated your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Signed: SHARON THOMPSON Dated: May 7, 2013 Case Number: J-36105 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California business code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contains clothes, furniture, boxes, ect. The unit numbers and names are: 116: LUCINDA ANDERSON 146: CASSANDRA WEST 241: AMANDA WOOD 359: ROY RAMIREZ The contents will be sold to the highest bidder on: June 1, 2013 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Ln, Chico, CA 95926. Published: May 23,30, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HAZEL FERN LENTZ To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HAZEL FERN LENTZ A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JEANETTE M. NIELSEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: JEANETTE M. NIELSEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very

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38 CN&R May 30, 2013

important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 27, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept:TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40655 Petitioner: JEANETTE M. NIELSEN 6 Tommy’s Place Oroville, CA 95966. Published: May 23,30 June 6, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ZELA IRENE CROCKER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ZELA IRENE CROCKER A petition for probate has been filed by: DAVID GENE CHILDS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The petition for probate requests that: DAVID GENE CHILDS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative yo take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows

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good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: August 8, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept: TBA Address of the court: 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing, Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the person representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1)four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect you rights as a creditor. You man want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of the estate assets or any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40658 Petitioner: David Gene Childs 1458 N. Topanga Cyn. Blvd #14 Topanga, Ca 90290. Published: May 30, June 6,13, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHERI LYNN ROCKWELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BRYSON ALLEN TIEDEMANN Proposed name: BRYSON ALLEN ROCKWELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 28, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 30, 2013 Case Number: 159426 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTINA ALINA SIERRA filed a petition with this court for

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a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTINA ALINA SIERRA Proposed name: CHRISTINA SIERRA GEBHART THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 07, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 12, 2013 Case Number: 159349 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SAMANTHA JOSEPHINE KALSO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CRISTIANO ABERNATHY Proposed name: CRISTIANO KALSO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 14, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 1, 2013 Case Number: 159443 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MELISSA STEVENS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MELISSA DARLENE STEVENS, RANDALL DEWAYNE PERKINS ALAVAZO Proposed name: MELISSA DARLENE PERKINS, RANDALL DEWAYNE PERKINS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to

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show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 21, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 30, 2013 Case Number: 159442 Published: May 9,16,23,30, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JULIE DE LAIR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NOLAN REED BELOATE Proposed name: NOLAN REED DE LAIR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 14, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 18, 2013 Case Number: 159381 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner STACY MORAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name as follows: Present name: HEATHER ROSE MORAN Proposed name: SHAWN LOVANCE MORAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition should not be granted NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 14, 2013 Time: 9:00 A.M. Dept.: TBA The address of the court is: 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: April 22, 2013 Case Number: 159404 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner REBECCA TOBIAS, LORENZO TOBIAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LARISSA LANAY MOORE Proposed name: LARISSA LANAY TOBIAS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

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NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 28, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: May 8, 2013 Case Number: 159478 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2013

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT DELORES MILLER You are being sued. Petitioner’s name is: JONATHON MILLER You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court One Court St. Oroville, CA 95965 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: JONATHAN M. MILLER

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6593 Rosewood Dr. Magalia, CA 95954 Signed: Kimberly Flener, B NICHOLS Dated: February 19, 2013 Case Number: FL043230 Published: May 16,23,30, June 6, 2013 SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT MELVIN J. BORBA You are being sued. Petitioner’s name is: MICHELLE P. BORBA You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court One Court St. Oroville, CA 95965 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: MICHELLE P. BORBA PO BOX 803 PALERMO, CA 95968 Signed: Kimberly Flener, R GARCIA Dated: April 3, 2013 Case Number: FL043491 Published: May 2,16,23,30, 2013

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ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Back in the 1920s, the governor of Texas was determined to forbid the teaching of foreign languages in public schools. To bolster her case, she called on the Bible. “If English was good enough for Jesus Christ,” she said, “it’s good enough for us.” She was dead serious. I suspect you may soon have to deal with that kind of garbled thinking, Aries. And it may be impossible to simply ignore it, since the people wielding it may have some influence on your life. So what’s the best way to deal with it? Here’s what I advise: Be amused. Quell your rage. Stay calm. And methodically gather the cool, clear evidence about what is really true.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A few weeks ago, the principal at a school in Bellingham, Washington, announced that classes would be canceled the next day. What was his rationale? A big storm, a bomb threat or an outbreak of sickness? None of the above. He decided to give students and teachers the day off so they could enjoy the beautiful weather that had arrived. I encourage you to make a similar move in the coming days, Taurus. Take an extended joy break¡ªmaybe several of them. Grant yourself permission to sneak away and indulge in spontaneous celebrations. Be creative as you capitalize profoundly on the gifts that life is offering you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Japan it’s not rude to slurp while you eat your ramen noodles out of a bowl. That’s what the Lonely Planet travel guide told me. In fact, some Japanese hosts expect you to make sounds with your mouth: They take it as a sign that you’re enjoying your meal. In that spirit, Gemini, and in accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to be as [[[[un?]]]]inhibited as you dare this week¡ªnot just when you’re slurping your noodles, but in every situation where you’ve got to express yourself uninhibitedly in order to experience the full potential of the pleasurable opportunities. As one noodle slurper testified: “How can you possibly get the full flavor if you don’t slurp?”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Reverence is

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When explorer Ernest Shackleton was planning his expedition to Antarctica in 1914, he placed this ad in London newspapers: “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, return doubtful, honor and recognition in case of success.” Would you respond to a come-on like that if you saw it today? I hope not. It’s true that your sense of adventure is ratcheting up. And I suspect you’re itching for intense engagement with the good kind of darkness that in the past has inspired so much smoldering wisdom. But I believe you can satisfy those yearnings without putting yourself at risk or suffering severe deprivation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’d rather not sing than sing quiet,” said the vivacious chanteuse Janis Joplin. Her attitude reminds me a little of Salvador Dalí’s. He said, “Painting’s never difficult. It’s either easy or impossible.” I suspect you Sagittarians may soon be in either-or states like those. You will want to give everything you’ve got, or else nothing at all. You will either be in the zone, flowing along in a smooth and natural groove, or else totally stuck. Luckily, I suspect that giving it all and being in the zone will predominate. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In

thought from philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein: “A person will be imprisoned in a room with a door that’s unlocked and opens inwards; as long as it does not occur to him to pull rather than push.” I’d like to suggest that his description fits you right now, Cancerian. What are you going to do about it? Tell me I’m wrong? Reflexively agree with me? I’ve got a better idea. Without either accepting or rejecting my proposal, simply adopt a neutral, openminded attitude and experiment with the possibility. See what happens if you try to pull the door open.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you have been

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As a

waiting for the right moment to perfect your party skills, I suspect this might be it. Is there anything you can do to lower your inhibitions? Would you at least temporarily consider slipping into a chronic state of fun? Are you prepared to commit yourself to extra amounts of exuberant dancing, ebullient storytelling and unpredictable playtime? According to my reading of the astrological omens, the cosmos is nudging you in the direction of rabble-rousing revelry.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Where exactly are your power spots, Virgo? Your bed, perhaps, where you rejuvenate and reinvent yourself every night? A place in nature where you feel at peace and at home in the world? A certain building where you consistently make good decisions and initiate effective action? Wherever your power spots are, I advise you to give them extra focus. They are on the verge of serving you even better than they usually do, and you should take steps to ensure that happens. I also advise you to be on the lookout for a new power spot. It’s available.

story and photo by Vic Cantu

one of the most useful emotions. When you respectfully acknowledge the sublime beauty of something greater than yourself, you do yourself a big favor. You generate authentic humility and sincere gratitude, which are healthy for your body as well as your soul. Please note that reverence is not solely the province of religious people. A biologist may venerate the scientific method. An atheist might experience a devout sense of awe toward geniuses who have bequeathed to us their brilliant ideas. What about you, Libra? What excites your reverence? Now is an excellent time to explore the deeper mysteries of this altered state of consciousness.

1948, Nelson Mandela began his fight to end the system of apartheid in his native South Africa. Eventually, he was arrested for dissident activities and sentenced to life imprisonment. He remained in jail until 1990, when his government bowed to international pressure and freed him. By 1994, apartheid collapsed. Mandela was elected president of his country and won the Nobel Peace Prize. Fast-forward to 2008. Mandela was still considered a terrorist by the United States and had to get special permission to enter the country. Yikes! You probably don’t have an antiquated rule or obsolescent habit that’s as horrendous as that, Capricorn. But it’s past time for you to dissolve your attachment to any outdated attachments, even if they’re only mildly repressive and harmful.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s a

Carry that weight

by Rob Brezsny

renowned artist, photographer and fashion designer, Karl Lagerfeld has overflowed with creative expression for 50 years. His imagination is weird and fantastic, yet highly practical. He has produced a profusion of flamboyant stuff. “I’m very down to earth,” he has said, “I’m just not from this earth.” Let’s make that your mantra for the coming weeks, Aquarius: You, too, will be very down to earth in your own unique way. You’ll follow your quirky intuition, but always with the intent of channeling it constructively.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the fol-

lowing passage, French novelist Georges Perec invites us to renew the way we look upon things that are familiar to us. “What we need to question,” he says, “is bricks, concrete, glass, our table manners, our utensils, our tools, the way we spend our time, our rhythms. To question that which seems to have ceased forever to astonish us.” A meditation like this could nourish and even thrill you, Pisces. I suggest you boost your ability to be sincerely amazed by the small wonders and obvious marvels that you sometimes take for granted.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Though he won’t admit it, Chicoan Will Bono is a life saver to many. Six years ago Bono, president of local environmental-consulting company Hanover Environmental Services, Inc., began yearly trips to the Kilolo District of Tanzania in East Africa as part of the Kilolo Star Well Drillers project, which was spearheaded by Chico attorney Ron Reed. Wanting to help the locals make a living for themselves, they taught them to use the equipment to drill wells—more than 130 so far—for surrounding villages. Now Bono’s spearheading another nonprofit project to teach villagers near Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro how to build bike trailers in order to transport goods to market. Bono doesn’t accept donations, but if you have ideas for projects email him at wbono@hanoverinc.com.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of May 30, 2013

How will the bike trailers be utilized? The poor villagers near Moshi, Tanzania, make a little money selling their meager crops or livestock in the town, which is 10 or more miles of very hard roads away. They don’t have cars and can’t afford the bus, so they carry their goods by hand or balance them on their bike seats while they push them along. I used Chico’s pedicab idea with my friends Ron Reed and Dr. Bruce Gallaway to build a variant called the “Chico Pup” that will carry up to 1,000 pounds of weight.

What are the villagers’ living conditions? They’re not starving, but are undernourished and live on $1.25 a day. They live in mud huts with no electricity and are subject to disease. They have only one doctor for every 17,000 people. If you are born with clubfoot, which is

routinely cured in this country, you will have it for life. I’ve seen people with a misshapen cleft lip who are too ashamed to ever leave their homes.

How did you settle on the trailers as the best option? We wanted to find a product that was viable for them to manufacture with local materials to improve their lives. We also wanted to give them a business plan to execute so they can have their own careers building and selling them to those in need. We saw so many villagers struggling to bring their crops and livestock to the city markets, so we hit on the bike-powered-cart idea.

When will you deliver the trailers? On June 20, four of us will travel [to Tanzania] with two prototypes. One is a utility trailer and the other carries two to three people. We will test them there to see if they are robust enough for their unpaved, ungraded roads. We will then modify them there as needed, and judge the manufacturing costs and their market viability. While there, we will also drill at least one well for the locals.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Parting I recently met a couple of other widowers, one of six years and the other a month. They’d read some of these essays, contacted me, and I met one for a cup at 100th Monkey Books & Café, where I know they don’t mind weeping. I was glad for the chance to talk to a man about all this, and I was comforted to learn that that constricting welling-up in my chest and throat wasn’t mine alone, which isn’t charitable, I know, but there it is. The initial sensation feels a little like the prelude to a sneeze, only in my solar plexus. I know what’s coming and I resist it anyway. It hurts. I can get choked up anywhere, anytime. In my car, in a store, in the park, in the garden, and especially at the co-op and at home. The first few months I did all right when I was with people, most of whom were enough of a distraction for me to remain dry-eyed and composed. Lately, not so much. I can ride the brink of sobbing long enough to get through the checkout and maybe to my car. That’s as far as I get usually, because my car was Janice’s car until last September, and it will always remind me of

her, so then I weep because she’s not driving her car instead of me. That’s not to say that if she were there she’d be driving, because I doubt it. There were times when I rode as Janice’s passenger, usually when I was dead tired or she was gonna drop me off somewhere. As Janice’s passenger, I tried hard to be a disinterested observer, and I never failed to arrive sweaty and bug-eyed. I found over many years and after many trials and trips that I could best relax for several minutes as Janice’s passenger if I kept my eyes closed, which even I thought rude. So nearly always if Janice and I were going somewhere in the same car, I drove. To the co-op or to Seattle, I drove; her car or mine, I drove. I guess I miss her being there in the passenger seat, by my side. Very corny. And this other guy and I talked about how “till death do us part” was just a phrase when we got married. I thought, “forever,” but it’s not. It’s until somebody dies, and there’s a pretty good chance it’ll be your best friend. There was no way to prepare emotionally anyway. We’re clueless because there are no clues. Phooey. May 30, 2013

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WORLD’S MOST REFRESHING CAN JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER.

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