Page 1

The

Franco files

EVIL BLED TAKING ROOT See REEL WORLD, page 26

See NEWSLINES, page 8

ROBOT IN

THE O.R. See HEALTHLINES, page 12

BAND OF HARMONY See MUSIC FEATURE, page 22

BY

Former CN&R staffer chronicles how living abroad changed her life in America Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 36, Issue 33

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Vol. 36, Issue 33 • April 11, 2013

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OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 From This Corner . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES The Pulse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

GREENWAYS EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . 16 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . 23 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 In The Mix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

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Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Robert Speer Managing Editor Melissa Daugherty Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Calendar/Special Projects Editor Howard Hardee News Editor Tom Gascoyne Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Jesse Mills, Mazi Noble, Jerry Olenyn, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Nicole Gerspacher, Stephanie Geske, Melanie MacTavish Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Design Manager Kate Murphy Design Melissa Arendt, Priscilla Garcia, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Osa Advertising Consultants Dave Berman, Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

A bungled resolution At its meeting last week, the Chico City Council bungled its

handling of a proposed resolution in support of the Second Amendment. Yes, council members voted unanimously to reaffirm their oaths to support the Constitution, including the Second Amendment, but that wasn’t what the resolution called for. Let’s take another look at it. Although it was commonly described as an affirmation of support for the Second Amendment, it didn’t actually say that. Rather, it called for the council to do three specific things: (1) to state that it could not “abide by any provision infringing upon the Second Amendment”; (2) to state that it agreed with Butte County Sheriff Jerry Smith “in supporting the rights of mentally stable, law-abiding citizens to possess firearms”; and (3) to affirm that, “given the comprehensive body of law that already exists in California, [it] does not believe additional regulation is warranted….” There was no good reason not to discuss and debate these matters. A group of citizens brought them forward for that purpose. The council has discussed resolutions brought forward by other groups, and even voted on them. So why not this one? There’s a simple answer to that: politics. The man behind the resolution was defeated conservative council candidate Toby Schindelbeck, and he clearly was trying to put the liberal members of the council on the spot. They responded by dodging, and the two conservative members, Sean Morgan and Mark Sorensen, went along with it. At one point Morgan made a motion, seconded by Sorensen, to approve the original resolution. But the council members voted instead to reaffirm their oaths. There was no discussion of the resolution’s content, no vote was taken on Morgan’s motion, and Mayor Mary Goloff let it disappear from view. If the council allows its meetings to become forums on important issues, something we support, it must be open to all perspectives. It can’t welcome discussion of a “corporate personhood” resolution, for example, and dodge a gun-rights resolution. To do so may be politically convenient, but it’s also hypocritical. Ω

A taste of hell T have no trouble imagining what it could be like. I’ve just lived through it, and for those who believe in hough I’m not sure I believe in hell, I

hell but need motivation to be good in order to avoid it, I’ll offer a taste of what a perfect hell might be. You are sick with the worst head cold/sinus infection ever known to any organism with a respiratory system. The wastebasket beside your bed is overflowing with ratty little balls of Kleenex. Your nose has developed a pulse, and your nostrils by resemble the irritated skin heretoJaime O’Neill fore known only by flagellants on a thousand-mile pilgrimage. The author, a retired In the next room, your wife is Butte College English doing the taxes, an annual slice of instructor, is a hell that overmasters her skills. frequent contributor Though she holds post-graduate to the CN&R. degrees and has worked as an analyst in both state and federal government, she is muttering as she reads instructions from the tax code aloud. She does this because she thinks that reading these arcane bits of language aloud will make 4 CN&R April 11, 2013

them more intelligible, but also because she wants you to feel her pain, and to punish you for being the sort of person for whom such a task is even more impossible than it is for her. And though your wife is ordinarily a pleasant, attractive and loving human being, doing the taxes transforms her, allowing you a dim understanding of how the medieval mind came up with gargoyles. Your best hope is that your wife will remain oblivious to your honking and hacking, piteously absorbed in the attempt to comply with the dictates of a fiendish government written in words that didn’t begin as any known language. Sometimes you drift off into antihistamine haze, a condition something like sleep, but alive with the highlight reel of every stupid, embarrassing or borderline-criminal thing you’ve done, busted by everyone from your mother to agents of the CIA. You return to consciousness hearing your wife speaking in that voice from the soundtrack of The Exorcist. The fact that you bought a new car in the previous year threw her into a twisted tributary of the tax code, and she is beating against the current, trying to get back to the main channel. Should the computer crash at this point and she be forced to start over, hell would exceed the fiendish imagination of any imaginable Satan. And, if that ain’t hell, all that’s lacking is eternity. Ω

A way to fund schools One of the central features of Gov. Jerry Brown’s school-funding

proposal is to give inner-city schools more money by taking it from suburban schools. His intention is good, but he wants to rob Peter to pay Paul, and that’s bound to foster resentment. There’s a better way: enabling school districts to raise their own tax revenues. That would require a change in the voter threshold for approval of parcel taxes. Currently they require two-thirds approval for passage, but there is movement in the Legislature to lower that requirement to 55 percent, the same threshold now in place for construction bonds. It’s not a perfect solution. Parcel taxes are intensely regressive. Every parcel is taxed the same, whether it houses a shopping mall or a rundown cottage. But parcel taxes are all that is available, and lowering the threshold would give school districts—all of which have lost librarians, counselors, art and music programs and more in recent years—a possible way to rebuild. Inner-city residents would benefit because so many of the parcels in their neighborhoods have absentee owners, and suburban residents would have an easier way to invest in their local schools. We’re not arguing that school districts raise taxes, although we note that California is ranked 49th among the states in per-pupil funding. What we’re suggesting is that communities be given the option to vote on parcel taxes in a way that enhances democracy while improving schools. Requiring two-thirds approval gives a small minority the power to thwart the wishes of a large majority. That’s why we support lowering the threshold to 55 percent. Ω


Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

FROM THIS CORNER by Robert Speer roberts@newsreview.com

Fish out of water Have you heard the saying, “Whoever discovered water, you can be sure it wasn’t a fish”? I thought of it when I was reading our cover story this week. In it, former CN&R Managing Editor Meredith Graham takes us with her as she begins life in France, where she and her husband are both fish out of water. But they’re resilient people, so they adapt—and in doing so gain a fresh perspective on America. I had a similar, if much briefer, experience last week. My wife, Denise, had rented a beach villa about 30 miles north of Zihuatanejo, on Mexico’s Costa Grande. We were to spend a week there with our three young-adult offspring, Evan, Sophie and Liam. It didn’t happen. It turned out Liam’s passport had expired, and he couldn’t board the plane in Sacramento. That was on Saturday. Denise returned to Chico with Liam, but she didn’t give up. First thing Monday morning she was in line at the federal building in San Francisco. By 3 p.m. Liam had a new passport. They flew out of San Jose the next morning and were in Zihua by 2 p.m. We had four full days of vacation left to enjoy together. My wife is an amazing woman. The villa, which is owned by a Seattle couple, was designed for spending all but sleep time outdoors, mostly under a huge palapa. Whether eating the delicious meals our housekeeper, Aurora, prepared, hanging out on the couch reading, or swimming in the blue-tiled pool, we could see and hear the ocean right outside our compound and watch pelicans diving into the water, fishing. Colorful tropical plants and coconut palms swayed in the breezes. Aurora and Bernardo, the gardener, were there most days. They were lovely people, very helpful and friendly, and their presence gave us a good opportunity to practice our Spanish. But we couldn’t help feeling like gringos ricos when we visited Buena Vista, their nearby village, with its dirt streets, tiny cement houses and utter lack of anything like a “good view.” The beach town of Playa Troncones, up the coast a couple of miles, offered similar contrasts. What was once a fishing village has become a tourist hot spot, with local folks looking on as wealthy Americans build resort lodges along their beach. If they resent it, they don’t show it. The tourist dollars are welcome, and enterprising entrepreneurs have set up shops and outdoor restaurants to attract them. Similarly, for Aurora and Bernardo working at the villa is a good deal. Their jobs are easy, the pay is steady, and you can’t beat the scenery. I also got the impression, talking with Aurora, that life in Buena Vista was good, too. The village looked impoverished to me, but to her it was home, a place where she knew and was loved by everyone and where people took care of each other. Americans like to think of the United States as the greatest country ever. But who’s judging? And how do you measure such things? That’s the perspective I brought home from Mexico.

Robert Speer is editor of the CN&R.

Big Ag vs. whistleblowers Re “What’s the beef?” (Newslines, by Alastair Bland, April 4): Assembly Bill 343 is obviously an attempt by agribusiness to tie the hands of animal welfarists. To claim it’s not is insulting. As stated in the article, in order to prosecute or apply pressure for change in animal treatment, there has to be a pattern of behavior established, not just an isolated incident. AB 343 is a thinly veiled attempt to prevent investigators from being able to establish a pattern. Supporters say those filming can keep investigating... riiiiight... because the abusing party isn’t going to fire the person who blew the whistle immediately. Sure, and I have some Rolex watches I can sell you for just $20. Animal lovers hate that more animals are tortured while the investigation is in progress over days or weeks, but they know that shutting the offending place down, or forcing them to change their methods, will stop the suffering of many, many more animals in the long run. TERESA WALSH Chico

Ag-industry supporters of California’s proposed ag-gag legislation, AB 343, claim that they just can’t seem to understand why someone who supposedly cares about animal welfare would sit on evidence of animal abuse. This thinly veiled incredulity betrays the insincerity of those in the ag industry who sponsored and support this regressive legislation. I’d have more respect for those who support the bill if they would just come clean and admit that AB 343 is just another demonstration of Big Ag’s unwillingness to allow for transparency by attempting to further silence whistleblowers. Fortunately for those on the side of what is good, right and moral, the tide of public opinion has turned against the brutal practices and routine animal abuse Big Ag perpetrates upon innocent, sentient beings. Instead of helping the industry by uncovering and making public heinous factory-farming practices, supporters of AB 343 continue to defend an industry that requires the cruel and inhumane treatment of animals. ROBERT C. JONES Chico

The author is an assistant professor in Chico State’s Department of Philosophy.

Day centers for all Re “The day center idea” (Editorial, April 4): It’s a sad and dangerous impetus when the desire to remove homeless people from public sight leads to a long-overdue discussion of a Chico day center. A lot of the people who frequent the 600 or so bars downtown do so because they have no better place to be. Can we build a day center for them as well? BILL MASH Chico

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Tickets $30.00 On sale now in the Gift Shop or online at www.SierraNevada.com Join the Big Room e-mail list by visiting www.sierranevada.com 1075 E. 20th StrEEt • ChiCo • 896-2198 All Ages Welcome At Each Show

LETTERS continued on page 6 April 11, 2013

CN&R 5


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A damaging statement Re “Monca finds a home” (From This Corner, by Robert Speer, March 28): I was extremely disheartened to read the following statement, “Chico has never had an art museum…” in the article. This is simply untrue. I am a huge supporter of the arts in Chico and as such have worked tirelessly for the last four years as a volunteer PR/marketing chairperson on The Turner Museum board. I am deeply saddened to know that with one small phrase so much damage has been done to the many, many hours of work I have given to raise awareness of this local treasure. DEANNA LARES Chico

Robert Speer responds: I was referring to the kind of all-purpose regional art museum that exhibits the full range of visual arts. The Turner is indeed a local treasure, but one that quite understandably focuses exclusively on prints. I apologize for not making that distinction clearer.

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since 1987

I attended the Chico City Council study session on March 26 regarding the Clean and Safe Chico program. The CEO/president of the Chamber of Commerce, Katie Simmons, told us not to give to panhandlers; it makes sense why we shouldn’t. But that’s something I do. If I have money to give and I see someone in need, I want to help them. I’ve been truly blessed with more than I could ask for, and to give a little of it to someone in need just feels right. But I am going to make it my goal to make food packages that I can pass out instead of just spare change. I know going the extra mile to make those packages will go a lot further. You might even make their day by showing them there are people who care. MATTHEW PATRICH Chico

Local tomatoes in April? Re “A new vintage” (Chow, by Henri Bourride, April 4): Restaurants who claim to use seasonal, local, organic, etc., ingredients on their menus, in my experience as a cook, often are pulling the wool over the public’s eyes. Just one example is your review of Tannins Wine Bar & Bistro. How can you tell your customers you are using farmers’ market tomatoes in April? This is the time of year for planting tomatoes,

not harvesting them and using them on your menu. Tannins’ website is advertising farmers’ market tomatoes, which in my opinion is a bold-faced lie. Where is the integrity of the chef, and does he or she expect the public to be so naive? DAVID BRACY Chico

Editor’s note: The following letter was posted online in response to Mr. Bracy’s posting. That’s an interesting perspective, David. It seems a bit nitpicky, though, as the article states that the owner said she uses local produce as often as possible—not exclusively—which you seem to have read. To be perfectly honest I had the same curiosity when I ate there; so I asked, and they were perfectly forthcoming, informing me that when in season they use farmers’ market tomatoes, but currently buy from S&S (the local distributor listed in the article). Seems fair enough to me, no? It sounds like you have some personal vendetta going on here. Try the place. My girlfriend and I loved it. Nice article, by the way. JACOB DUNCAN Chico

imaginary man in the sky. I’m glad Mr. Stellar has the stomach to attend these events and uncover how the fear, selfishness and irrational beliefs of others can determine how the rest of us are allowed to live our lives. KELI HENDRICKS Petaluma

Show me the bills Although I carefully read the newspapers and watch the morning and evening news on television, I simply cannot find the reports of the government’s efforts to confiscate all the privately owned guns in this country. Obviously that’s the case, as the majority of those writing to you against firearms regulations cite this as fact. They state they are fearful of being left helpless against the criminals amassing on their doorsteps each evening and, of course, the day their brothers, sisters, relatives and friends in the military will turn on them and put them in concentration camps. I would be fearful too; I just need to read the proposed legislation they have all obviously seen. Try as I will, all I can find is proposed legislation to ban semiautomatic military weapons; ban

“Although I carefully read the newspapers and watch the morning and evening news on television, I simply cannot find the reports of the government’s efforts to confiscate all the privately owned guns in this country.” —Dean Carrier

Tea Party hypocrisy Re “LaMalfa and Agenda 21” (Guest comment, by Allan Stellar, April 4): This is another great article by the same reporter who did an amazing job uncovering the senselessness of the Adin coyote hunt a couple of months ago [Feb. 28]. After reading Stellar’s account of the Chico Tea Party meeting, I am struck by how similar the participants of these two seemingly different events really are. Both the coyote hunters and the tea partiers complain about any governmental regulations put in place to protect our environment for future generations. They often cry that these protections are a direct assault on their God-given freedoms. Ironically, these same people defend the government’s right to decide who can legally marry, based on the moral guidelines of some

magazines with the capacity of firing large amounts of bullets so unloading would be unnecessary if you needed to kill a lot of people fast; ban the trafficking of guns (which would be a huge aid to the war on drugs); and requiring those who purchase guns to prove they are neither criminals nor desiring to become such ( I recently had to do just that to volunteer to teach nature studies to children in our public schools). Could the CN&R please provide me with references to the legislation to take all my guns? DEAN CARRIER Paradise

Editor’s response: Like Mr. Carrier, we know of no such proposed legislation. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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Costa Rica, because they don’t have a military, and my Chico friends have talked about how nice it is there. New Zealand, because I hear it’s really beautiful there.

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CN&R 7


HENNESSY OUT, NEW GUY IN

Chico’s finance director, Jennifer Hennessy, has taken a similar job in the Southern California city of Temecula. Friday, April 12, is her last day. During her eight years here Hennessy came under intense criticism from some council members and private citizens as the city struggled to balance its budget, but annual audits of her department’s work were always glowing. Hennessy said her job is to make recommendations and provide status reports. “We don’t make the decisions.” When asked if her decision to go was a desire to find a new job or get out of Chico, she replied, “I’d say it was probably both.” Her replacement, Chris Constantin, was hired out of San Diego, where he’s served as assistant city auditor. According to the Voice of San Diego news website, Constantin and city Auditor Eduardo Luna were under investigation over allegations that they “created a hostile work environment and retaliated against employees.” Chico City Manager Brian Nakamura told the Voice that he knew of the investigations but wasn’t surprised. Good auditors, Nakamura said, attract controversy, and that’s what he believed had happened with Constantin. Constantin will make $130,000 a year as finance director and then jump to $160,000 when he becomes administrative services director. Even if that falls through, his contract states, he’ll bump up to $160,000 beginning June 1.

MANAGERS MAKING MUCH MONEY

Speaking of salaries, according to the city of Chico’s updated website, newly hired Assistant City Manager Mark Orme’s salary is $185,000, which is the very top of the position’s salary range. City Manager Brian Nakamura recommended the salary range, and the City Council approved it just before it was announced that Orme was taking the job. Other city manager salaries listed are Fire Chief Jim Beery ($150,209), Police Chief Kirk Trostle ($147,000), City Attorney Lori Barker ($190,000), City Clerk Deborah Presson ($132,710) and Nakamura ($217,000).

PLOWING POLITICAL GROUND

More than a year before the primary election, Butte County farmer Ryan Schohr has announced his candidacy for Dan Logue’s 3rd Assembly District seat. Logue will be termed out of office at the end of 2014. In a press release Schohr (pictured) says his family has farmed locally for more than 150 years and that “Our communities need a representative who has as much experience on a tractor as in a meeting room. “There is too much government intrusion via environmental regulations,” he charges. “It’s unacceptable that government ‘green schemes’ continue to slam businesses and families with higher energy prices that push up costs for everything. I say enough!” Schohr has served as president of the Butte County Farm Bureau, which, not surprisingly, has already endorsed his fledgling campaign. 8 CN&R April 11, 2013

A worker from the M&T Ranch plows property in southwest Chico as part of the Jesus Center Community Farm project. The effort was launched by Jesus Center Director Bill Such (inset).

Homeless people putting down roots Jesus Center Community Farm aims to help local homeless gain work and training

A shape in Chico. On the surface that may not sound like news; there are a number of these nother community garden is taking

cooperative grows in the area. But the push and purpose behind this undertaking is news, particularly in light of story and photos by recent calls either to help the Tom Gascoyne local homeless or herd or them out of town. tomg@ newsreview.com Bill Such, executive director of the Jesus Center, is spearheading the effort to plant the garden in southwest Chico. His plan is that the plot will be tended to by those who use the center, which provides meals and other services to the local destitute. Such said the idea, besides growing fresh vegetables and flowers, is to provide work and work training for the down-and-out. “One of the big elements that goes with this downtown [homeless] problem in Chico is we’ve got people who just can’t find work,” Such said. “Whether they’ve been in prison or whether they’ve been struggling Helping with substance abuse, now they hand: are 40, 50 or 55 years old, and For more info about it’s tough.” the Jesus Center’s The garden will sit on services, visit www.jesus 2.2 acres in the Barber neighborcenter.org. hood, located in southwest Chico

next to the old Diamond Match factory. The property is owned by the Growdon family, who also own Northern Star Mills feed and garden supply on The Esplanade. The family has agreed to lease the land to the Jesus Center for $1 a year. The soil needs to be tested, because it sits next to where the Diamond Match Co. operated from 1906 to 1975. Such said the garden will serve as a “work-based training spot for the agricultural industry.” Les Heringer of M&T Ranch told Such those with at least six months’ experience working on the garden would be employable at local farms, including his. Such said the plans include selling the flowers from a flower cart, which will be purchased with a $4,000 donation from the local Soroptimists. “We decided to create a flower cart and have it downtown where they can sell the flowers,” Such said. “It will help them become productive by developing a work ethic. They can also get some of the profit. My director of services, Shelly Watson, had the connection with Soroptimists member Laurie Maloney, [former Chico Police Chief] Mike Maloney’s wife.” The profit from the flower sales will also go toward the Sabbath House, Chico’s shelter for women. “It houses up to 26 women,” Such

said of the facility. “And they stay with us for up to six months to get their lives together.” The vegetables from the garden

—tomatoes, orange, red and green bell peppers, onions and garlic—will be made into sauces, bottled and sold. “My kitchen manager, Andy Hawes, once owned a restaurant, and he wants to make barbecue and salsa sauce,” Such said. “We’ll make sauce at the Jesus Center, where we have a commercial kitchen. And we’ll train people in making the sauce in the kitchen, and hopefully make some money by selling it locally.” He said they are thinking of calling it “Street Sauce.” On Saturday, March 30, Heringer brought in a tractor to plow the land and get it ready for planting. Heringer was contacted by Brian Pierce, whom Such described as a businessman and former farmer. “Les tried but couldn’t do it because it was too rocky,” Such said. “So they brought in a [heavy duty] Caterpillar [tractor], which got the job done. Les was on that tractor until 3 o’clock.” A worker from M&T Ranch was back the following Saturday, plowing the field into a finer grade. Also involved in the project were members of Chico Rotary, students from


both Chico High and Chico State, as wells as 25 people from the Jesus Center, Such said. “A number of these people showed an interest in wanting to be part of this work-based training center, which is what we want,” Such said. “We did the cleanup and put on a barbecue at noon for about 120 people. And we invited the neighbors, because the word’s gone out, and their concern is, ‘Oh, is this going to be a homeless gathering place?’” Those who do work on the garden will have to meet a number of conditions that include passing a drug test, he said. There is an existing neighborhood garden on the property. A woman pulling weeds there last Saturday (April 6) said neither she nor any of the others who work that garden have a problem with the Jesus Center project. Paul Cummings uses the Jesus

Center’s services and was there to help on that first Saturday. A native of Northern Ireland, Cummings said he arrived here from Orange County three months ago. A series of deaths in his family over a very short time, combined with a surprise paternity suit, pushed him over the edge both emotionally and financially, he said. He is looking forward to putting his efforts into the community garden. “We need to get the community involved,” he said with just a trace of an Irish accent. “We need local gardening places and anybody who wants to step up. This will employ the homeless by getting our hands in the dirt. “It’s not about the garden, it’s about us,” he said. “We’ve lost families and homes. It’s time to make a new start. We’re going to ask people to come out and work in the garden. I don’t mind if they just come and cheerlead. Even if the impact on the general [homeless] population is minimal, at least we did something.” Chatting recently at the Jesus Center, Debra Overton, a resident of the Sabbath House, was enthusiastic about her part in the effort. “We’ll be growing and selling flowers for the Sabbath House,” she said. “It’s a work in progress, and we’ll sell them in front of the grocery stores. If the Boy Scouts can do it, why couldn’t we?” Steven Baxter, who also uses the Jesus Center’s services, has put time in at the garden. “I like the social aspects of being in the garden with other people and getting off the street,” he said. “I want to stand up for myself and be more confident in job interviews, and it’s going to help on my résumé. “I like the aspect that we are taking a piece of unused property left on its own, like some of us have been left on our own. This is good for the community. When harvest day comes we’ll have a big community gathering.” Ω

Outlaw art

Artist James Moody didn’t realize he was breaking the law by painting city-owned trash bins.

Local man faces fines and jail for painting project

PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

hen James Moody began hand-painting W business logos and colorful scenes on Main Street trash cans one year ago, his

intentions were far from felonious. But almost a year after being told to stop defacing city property by Chico police, he is stuck in a bizarre legal limbo, hit with a felony vandalism charge he’s not sure how to begin fighting. Moody, an itinerant artist, self-described spiritual adviser and former Bollywood film actor, said he thought he was beautifying the community by painting the bins. “Just look at that thing, it’s butt-ugly,” he said, pointing to a replacement receptacle on the southeast corner of Second and Main streets, the site of his first “crime.” Moody said he approached the corner restaurant, Pluto’s, and asked if the business would like its logo painted on the trash can. Not only did management like the idea, he said, but they also provided him with printed material in order to best match their corporate color scheme. “I had permission from the businesses, never charged anybody anything, and used my own equipment and supplies,” he said. “It was all done by hand with paint and brush, no spray paint.” Moody spent about 40 hours on the bin, surrounding the logo with a forest scene. During that time, he said he received only positive input from passersby, including several CPD officers. This led him to contact more businesses and do two more trash cans, near Urban Laundry and Cyclesport. On June 6, while working on the third installment, Moody said police arrived and told him to stop. The officers, he said, informed him he would be charged with vandalism and restitution fees, but did not give him a citation at the time.

Moody complied and believed it had blown over until he received a phone call in February from CPD Sgt. Rob Merrifield, ordering him to pick up the ticket. He met Merrifield Feb. 7, expecting a misdemeanor citation, but was presented with a felony charge. Merrifield also gave him a bill for damages, which amounted to almost $2,100 (two new cans costing $887 each, plus the cost of cleaning the third bin). According to the California Penal Code, vandalism resulting in more than $400 worth of damage can be charged as a felony and is punishable by up to $10,000 in fines and one year in jail. Moody went to Butte County Superior Court on the date ordered on the citation— March 6—to find it was actually slated for March 5. Court personnel informed him that, despite the clerical error, he could be charged with “failure to appear” and have a warrant issued for his arrest. To date, a warrant has not been

issued, which, ironically, exacerbates Moody’s situation. He said he has contacted CPD and court officials, who referred him to the Butte County District Attorney’s Office, but the D.A. has neither returned his calls nor issued a warrant. The office also did not return calls from the CN&R as of press time. Merrifield and court operations supervisor

SIFT|ER Destination: America The United States may not be perfect, but it’s still the most popular destination in the world among potential migrants, according to a recent poll. Out of the roughly 630 million people (13 percent of the world’s adults) who would like to live elsewhere, 138 million point to America as their desired home. Here’s a look at the top seven destinations:

Source: Gallup.com

United States United Kingdom Canada France Saudi Arabia Germany Australia

138 million 42 million 37 million 31 million 29 million 28 million 26 million

Janet Wilson confirmed Moody is in limbo. As Wilson explained, if a warrant is issued he can turn himself in to get a new court date. “I’m losing sleep over this,” Moody said. “I’ve got a pending felony hanging over my head, and I don’t want it pending. I want it over with.” Moody has made Chico his home on and off since 1981, spending his time away traveling the world. From 2004 to 2011, he lived in India and happened into a career as a Bollywood actor. He has been in more than 250 Indian films, and has pictures of himself alongside Bollywood starlets and Punjabi pop stars to prove it. In most he is costumed; in some even as a police officer (“90 percent of my roles were negative; I’d either be a bad Englishman or a bad American,” he explained). During that extended stay, he met and married an Indian woman. In Chico, she works as a nurse’s assistant while the former film actor earns his keep collecting cans. They live in a residential motel and struggle to make ends meet, even without restitution and felony-level fines. Moody said he hopes the charge is downgraded not because he fears jail (“At least I can do art there,” he said), but because a felony would disallow him from returning to India, further complicating his and his wife’s lives. He said his only prior trouble with the law was a minor marijuana-related crime in the early 2000s. Moody has gotten some sympathy from those aware of his plight. Josh Mills, owner of The Bookstore, said he’s known Moody for decades and doesn’t believe the punishment fits the crime. “This isn’t a bad guy,” Mills said of Moody. “Sure, what he did was kind of dumb because it was city property, but bleeding the guy with fines he can’t afford to pay and charging him with a felony for making a mistake is ridiculous.” Mary Gardner, the city’s art projects coordinator, is also sympathetic: “I did speak to him, and I believe that in his heart he felt that he was adding beauty to our downtown,” she said by email, “but it is clearly against the law to alter or damage city property in any way. “Had he sought permission first, things may have turned out differently.” —KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 April 11, 2013

CN&R 9


continued from page 9

In the path of bulldozers Israeli peace activist stands up to demolition of Palestinian homes will not do the right thing, if left to “GJeffovernments themselves.” Halper didn’t waste any time getting to the

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point. His warm, avuncular tone and gentle demeanor seemed only to underscore the urgency of his message. “Unless you mobilize the people, and the people begin to put pressure on the politicians, unless it trickles up, you can’t influence policy.” Halper, an American-born author, anthropologist and Nobel Peace Prize-nominated co-founder and director of the Israeli Committee Against Home Demolition (ICAHD), was a week into his month-long speaking and fundraising tour when he passed through Chico on Tuesday (April 9). His presentation on the Butte College campus was titled, “An Israeli in Palestine: Resisting Occupation, Forging Peace, Fostering Human Rights.” ICAHD is an Israeli peace and human-rights organization dedicated to the peaceful resolution of Israel’s occupation of Palestine. The focus of its work is opposing the Israeli practice of home demolition, which has resulted in the loss of 28,000 Palestinian homes in the occupied territories of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip since 1967. An immigrant himself, Halper is perhaps better suited than most to address the issue of home, and the loss thereof. Born in Minnesota in 1946, he cut his teeth on the street tactics of the civil-rights and antiVietnam War movements of the 1960s. After attending rabbinical school, he immigrated to Israel in 1973. He co-founded ICAHD in 1997, and his work with that organization led to his 2006 nomination, along with Palestinian peace activist Ghassan Andoni, for the Nobel Peace Prize. Asked to identify a common thread between his early stateside activism and current ICAHD tactics, Halper offered simply, “It was the people who mobilized in the civil-rights movement, the anti-war movement, and now with this occupation, with governments that wouldn’t have moved otherwise. “Occupation can be a very abstract term,” he said. “Even for people in Tel Aviv it’s pretty abstract. Focusing on this dimension of the occupation, house demolitions, gives an opportunity to see the human cost

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Jeff Halper moved to Israel 40 years ago, after years of activism in the United States.

of occupation; that this isn’t some abstract political concept.” On June 10, 1967, Israeli military and police

forces converged on the Moroccan Quarter in the Old City within East Jerusalem with a fleet of bulldozers and proceeded to demolish 350 Palestinian homes, mosques and other sites to open a plaza to increase Israeli access to the Wailing Wall, a Jewish holy site. This, said Halper, was the opening salvo of a war of occupation that continues today. And this violence, he explained, loops directly back in the form of terrorist aggression toward Israel. According to research by one Gazan psychiatrist, 60 percent of young Palestinian suicide bombers have had their homes demolished. Among the many human casualties of the Israeli demolition program is Rachel Corrie, a 23-year-old college student from Olympia, Wash., who in Get involved: 2003 was fatally run over Donations for the cause by a bulldozer while may be made at defending a Palestinian http://icahdusa.org. home using nonviolent tacTo get involved locally email chicopalestine tics. Corrie was in the action@gmail.com. region as part of her senioryear assignment to connect with her hometown’s sister city, Rafah. ICAHD’s tactics are twofold, Halper said. “If we can get there in time, we resist the demolition of Palestinian homes,” he said. “We chain ourselves inside the homes. We get on the roof. We get in front of bulldozers.” If they can’t save a house, he said, they organize Israeli, Palestinian and international volunteers to rebuild. This calls for fundraising. “These are political acts of rebuilding, these aren’t humanitarian acts,” he explained, “So we’re not going to get funding from the Rockefeller Foundation, or from the U.S. government.” To date, they’ve rebuilt 186 homes. Fifteen of those have been demolished again (one of them six times). “In the struggle for human rights, in the struggle for social justice, governments are not our friends,” he concluded. “Governments will not resolve conflicts; governments manage conflicts…. Whether it has to do with Palestine, or Congo, or Haiti, or domestic issues, anything that we want to do that smacks of justice, we the people have to do it.” —JESSE MILLS


Protect Yourself!

Vanished from Oroville Chico man is still missing after two weeks

I

t’s been more than two weeks since 24-year-old Chicoan Neal King vanished from an Oroville neighborhood, and details about the circumstances of his disappearance are being guarded tightly by the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. “This case is like a puzzle, and we’re not sure if we have the right pieces,� said Undersheriff Kory Honea. “So until we’re sure, we have to be very careful about what we reveal.� However, new details revealed in a Tuesday (April 9) press release indicate that King was “meeting a person there for a business transaction involving marijuana.� The BCSO press release goes on to say, “Based on information gathered, it is believed that foul play is involved with Neal King’s disappearance.� Investigators believe he was last seen alive in the Berry Creek area. Loved ones last heard from him on March 26. According to the Chico Police Department media log, King phoned his live-in girlfriend that morning and told her that he was on his way to a “business meeting� at a friend’s house on the 4000 block of Hildale Avenue in Oroville. Honea would not disclose whose home it was, or who else may have been there. An April 1 article in the Chico EnterpriseRecord quoted King’s sister, Juliana King, of Texas, as saying, “it’s never happened that he’s not talked to his girlfriend every day, they live together... he’s never gone on vacation without her, or visited family without her. They do everything together,� King’s girlfriend did not hear from him for three days after he went to Oroville, according to the incident report. She said she tried calling him, but to no avail, and eventually drove to the Oroville friend’s rural home, where she saw King’s black 2002 Ford Explorer parked. However, the missing man’s friend reportedly told her that King had never arrived at the house. The girlfriend found that King had no activity on his cell phone or his credit cards during those three preceding days, and reported him missing to Chico police. His vehicle was still parked at the location when police arrived, and was eventually towed. Since King’s car was found in Oroville, the case was transferred to the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. “Our detectives have been working very hard since we got the missing-person report,� Honea said. “We’ve interviewed several people and served search warrants on a few different places.� He would not say who the subjects of the search warrants were or what investigators were looking for. As to why King’s girlfriend waited

three days to report him missing, Honea said

he would not question the length of time or her motives. He also said he is sympathetic to the public’s frustration about the lack of information about the investigation. “I understand the community’s need for details in such a sensitive case,� Honea said, “but we feel the best approach is to limit the information we disclose in order to best

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This photo of Neal King was posted on a Facebook page about his disappearance.

allow us to follow up on our leads.� King’s brother has created a Facebook page for him called “Missing: NEAL KING.� Dozens of people have posted prayers and good wishes, and an entry made on April 9 says that several volunteers would soon be posting fliers in the area. Honea said there are no suspects or persons of interest they can name at this point. “We do have a number of people we’ve interviewed who we hope will be able to shed light on what happened,� he said. A new media release may be issued in the next few days based on a number of leads they are following up on, Honea said. King is 5-foot-11 and weighs about 120 pounds. He has short, red hair and was last seen wearing a light-green, longsleeved T-shirt, jeans and hiking boots. A picture of him wearing these clothes is posted on the Facebook page. Information has also been posted at the nonprofit missingperson website Cort Jones Project at www.cortjones.org. “Obviously the fact that King didn’t return from his business trip causes a great deal of concern,� Honea said. —VIC CANTU April 11, 2013

CN&R 11


THE PULSE BREAST-DENSITY LAW OFFICIAL

A new state law went into effect on April 1 that requires physicians to notify women receiving mammograms if they identify dense breast tissue, which has been linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 1538 into law in September of last year, making California the fifth state in the nation to require breastdensity notifications, according to KQED. Federal law already requires health-care providers to report mammogram screening results to patients in writing; in California, those notes will now require an extra paragraph if dense breast tissue is identified. The law is intended to encourage women to discuss possible courses of action with their physician. Some claim the law will create unnecessary anxiety for women as they wait for their test results by mail.

HEALTHLINES

Robotic help The da Vinci SI Surgical System. Inset: Dr. Ravi Nagubandi PHOTOS COURTESY OF OROVILLE HOSPITAL

CALI NEEDS PRISON HEALTH DIVISION

A group of federally appointed consultants has released a report recommending California develop a specialized division for the state’s prison health-care system. The report recommended the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation create an Undersecretary of Health Care to oversee an inmate health-care division, according to the Los Angeles Times. The report also recommended that California maximize the amount of federal funding it will receive through the upcoming MediCal expansion and that state officials should prepare for shortages in prison mental-health workers as health coverage is extended to more residents under the Affordable Care Act. California’s prison health-care system has been under federal oversight since 2006, when it was determined that one state inmate died every week as a result of medical malpractice or neglect.

U.S. KIDS SICK FROM JAPAN FALLOUT?

Fallout from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster may have sickened American children on the West Coast, a study finds. The study, compiled by the Radiation and Public Health Project, found that radioactive isotopes released from the failed reactors—which melted down following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in March 2011—made children in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington born one to 16 weeks after the disaster 28 percent more likely to suffer from congenital hypothyroidism, according to Grist.org. The radioisotope iodine131 was released by the failing reactors, and fell over Hawaii and the West Coast in the form of rain and snow at levels hundreds of times greater than what is considered safe. The link between nuclear fallout and hypothyroidism—in which development of the body and brain is stunted—was first established after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com. 12 CN&R April 11, 2013

Oroville Hospital doctors employ high-tech surgical system by

Evan Tuchinsky

Tfellowship, Dr. Ravi Nagubandi got a glimpse of his future when he observed an

en years ago, during his surgical

early version of robot-assisted surgery. Now he regularly performs operations using Oroville Hospital’s da Vinci SI Surgical System. Two other physicians also use the multimillion-dollar equipment, which came to the medical center in January, and others are lining up to get trained in the sophisticated, minimally invasive means of surgery. Nagubandi has primarily used the da Vinci for gallbladder surgeries, but two weeks ago he branched out into colon surgery. Meanwhile, obstetrician/gynecologists Pamela Simons and Peter Bippart have used the da Vinci to perform hysterectomies. That’s just a sliver of the technology’s potential. Robert Wentz, CEO of Oroville Hospital, said a cardiothoracic surgeon from Stanford University has applied for heart-surgery privileges. Intuitive Surgical, the da Vinci’s manufacturer, says the surgical system also is used on the bladder, kidneys, lungs, abdomen, prostate, head and neck. “It’s a very versatile piece of equipment,” Wentz said, “and we will continue to expand its use as our physicians get more trained.” It consists of two consoles, where the surgeon (or surgeons, in a multi-doctor operation) can see the surgical site and

operate the surgical implements; a fourarm tower that moves the tools; and a large-screen viewing center for other members of the surgical team. The technology expands upon laparoscopy, a minimally invasive technique in which a small tube with a camera and/or tool gets inserted through an incision to check for abnormal growths or perform a procedure. Much like laparoscopic surgery, the surgeon makes a small incision through which he or she inserts the instruments. Unlike laparoscopic surgery, with the da Vinci, the surgeon views the operation three-dimensionally and has greater range of motion with the tools. “The incisions are small anyway,” Nagubandi said, comparing laparoscopy to robot-assisted surgery. “But the visualization [with the da Vinci] increased depth

perception, because the camera that is used has two heads on it, so the image synthesized for me is a three-dimensional image rather than the two-dimensional image in a traditional laparoscopic surgery, and you can zoom in very close. “When it comes to the instruments, the instruments in traditional laparoscopic surgery tend to have a jaw-like motion, whereas the robotic surgery instruments have a mini-wrist—not only does [the instrument] do the open/close technique, but it also moves like a human wrist with a greater degree of freedom, so it increases our dexterity quite a bit.” The software in the system also makes it easier to perform single-site surgery: placing multiple tools through one incision, rather than needing multiple incisions HEALTHLINES continued on page 14

APPOINTMENT PROTECT YOURSELF In reaction to the string of stabbings in Chico in recent months, Azad’s Martial Arts Family Center (313 Walnut St.) is hosting a self-defense workshop on Tuesday, April 16, at 6 p.m. that will prepare adults to defend themselves against an attacker who is armed with a knife. The workshop is $24.95; call 892-2923 to reserve a spot.


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CN&R 13


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to accommodate the multiple tools. The fewer and smaller the incisions, the less risk for infection and an easier (shorter and less painful) recovery period. Like Nagubandi, Wentz had

his eye on robot-assisted surgery for years. What he was waiting for, he said, was “a surgical champion—a surgeon who was very interested in doing it. We found that in Dr. Nagubandi.” Nagubandi became a true believer last year after attending a conference on minimally invasive surgery. He learned about the latest da Vinci system, and he pitched the idea of getting one. “I was impressed by the latest advancements,” Nagubandi explained. “The latest robot has four arms instead of three. Added to that, the software in the technology is upgraded from the previous versions. Now there is a simulator available, so the surgeons can practice on the simulator before the actual operation. “Plus this is the latest technology where further advancements can be downloaded onto the system and you can upgrade the system further. I liken it to getting a new app—if they come up with a new development in the software, you can simply download it, so this latest machine, we don’t have to throw it away in two or three or four years when new developments come.” Nagubandi estimates he underwent 30 hours of training specifically on the da Vinci, not including additional practice runs on the simulator. It’s a continuing process, one that others soon will commence. After the da Vinci arrived, Nagubandi and the surgical team

OH online:

Go to www.orovillehospital.com to learn more about Oroville Hospital.

determined how best to set up the equipment in one of Oroville Hospital’s five operating rooms. (When not in use, the da Vinci components can be moved off to the side to allow for a traditional surgical setup.) They conducted a dry run, then performed their first robot-assisted gallbladder surgery. The response from patients has been positive, both Wentz and Nagubandi said. “There is a universal enthusiasm about it,” said Nagubandi. “There are some people who know of somebody in their family or outside it who went to Sacramento to have this kind of surgery done, and they’re excited we have it here. “I spend a good amount of time for them to understand what the robot does, and I also say that it’s the surgeon who’s in control, not the robot.” That is a key distinction. As with laparoscopy, the da Vinci robot is a tool. Wentz said it has been used for more than 1 million operations, and Nagubandi sees it as a tried and true technology. “Some people may have apprehensions about the robot,” Nagubandi said, “but the robot has been there for more than 10 years and increased in its technical capabilities, and I think it’s stood the test of time. “Obviously it’s the surgeon who’s important. It doesn’t matter whether the robot is there or not— it’s the quality of surgeon that’s most important. Ultimately, for the surgeon, what’s important is, ‘What’s the right thing to do for the patient?’” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE To be sure, dial 9-1-1 Apparently certain posts have been appearing on social media advising people that by dialing 1-1-2 rather than 9-1-1 in certain emergencies, they’ll get a better response. The Chico Police Department wants you to know that this is bad advice. According to Butte County 9-1-1 Coordinator Cheri Rockwell, 1-1-2 is the European emergency number. It may work on certain devices and wireless networks, but the only way to be sure your call for emergency assistance gets through is to dial 9-1-1.


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Nani Teves, Butte Environmental Council’s water outreach coordinator.

RIVERS AND STREAMS SUFFERING

More than half the streams and rivers in the U.S. are in poor condition, a national survey of waterway health finds. Conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the survey analyzed water samples taken from more than 1,900 randomly selected sites in the summers of 2008 and 2009 and found that only about a fifth of the nation’s rivers and streams were in good ecological condition, according to the Los Angeles Times. Of the three regions (eastern highlands, plains and lowlands, and the West) covered in the report, the West was in the best shape— 42 percent of its river and stream length was in good condition, 27 percent was in fair condition and 30 percent in poor condition. Excessive nitrogen and phosphorous, sedimentation, and denuded riverbanks were leading problems, and 9 percent of rivers and streams had unsafe bacteria levels.

Water blues

SIERRA SNOW HALF OF NORMAL

Though surveyors recently found the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada to be only half of what is expected for late March, outlook for summer water allocation could be much worse. The first three months of 2013 have been the driest in California’s recorded history. But November and December of last year were unusually wet in the northern Sierra, and water storage in the state’s two largest reservoirs—Lake Oroville and Shasta Lake—remain at above-average levels, according to the Los Angeles Times. However, the state has reduced projected water deliveries to Southern California, and farmers on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley may get only a fifth of the federal irrigation they have contracted.

SEA LIONS IN DIRE STRAITS

Southern California sea lions are mysteriously turning up on shore sick and emaciated in record numbers. In Los Angeles County, 400 pups have been stranded since the beginning of last year, with hundreds more reported in San Diego, Orange and Santa Barbara counties, according to the Los Angeles Times. Wildlife shelters like the San Pedro Marine Mammal Center—which is currently treating about 170 sick sea lion pups—have been overwhelmed. Perhaps most bizarre, the stranded pups— most of which were born over the summer and are between 6 and 8 months old—would normally be with their mothers. Some experts have suggested the mothers have ventured farther out to sea than usual in search of food, leaving the pups to fend for themselves. “They’re just not capable at this age,” said Sharon Melin of the National Marine Fisheries Service. “They can’t dive deep; they’re not very efficient swimmers.”

Send your eco-related news tips to Howard Hardee at howardh@newsreview.com.

BEC’s 2013 Code Blue series addresses crucial water-use issues facing the North State story and photo by

Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

N to do something about Gov. Jerry Brown’s new plan to send North State

avi Teves says it’s not too late

water south, and she and other local water activists have a plan of their own to inform residents on what’s at stake. Teves, water outreach coordinator for Butte Environmental Council, was referring in a recent interview to BEC’s Code Blue 2013 water outreach campaign, which kicked off on Feb. 5 with a free forum at Chico State called “Ethical Issues and Water: An Interfaith Dialogue.” The Code Blue series of no-cost, water-centric educational events—held “so that people are aware of what’s happening regarding local water, and are given the tools to do something about it”—will run throughout the year. “We’re about a tenth of the way through,” said Teves of the series. Included on the Code Blue schedule of free events: a talk titled Science and Politics of North State Water (May 1); an educational field trip (June 8) to the Bay Delta, under which two multibillion-dollar, 40-footdiameter tunnels are planned to be built to send North State water south; and fall work-

shops on installing water-conserving graywater and rainwater-catchment systems. “Last week, we showed the film Last Call at the Oasis [at the Grange Hall] in Paradise,” Teves said. “It’s a good overview movie about water.” Last Call at the Oasis, for the unfamiliar, is about “the vital role water plays in our lives, exposing the defects in the current system and depicting communities already struggling with its ill effects,” as the film’s website describes it. Activists such as Erin Brockovich and Robert Glennon, author of Unquenchable: America’s Water Crisis and What to Do About It, appear in the film. Up next, on April 18, is Code Blue’s water-activist training workshop, which will feature several prominent local water activists, including Marty Dunlap of Citizens Water Watch and Grace Marvin of the Code Blue connection:

Go to www.becnet.org to learn more about Butte Environmental Council’s Code Blue 2013 water outreach campaign. The next Code Blue event—Water Activism Training—will take place on April 18, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., at the Chico Peace & Justice Center (526 Broadway). Free, with dinner included, but space is limited to 20 people and registration required: Email nanibay@hotmail.com or call 891-6424. Ask about the Code Blue “stamp card”: Attend 4 Code Blue events for eligibility to win a graywater or rainwater-catchment system, or a river-raft trip.

local Sierra Club (see column note). “I’m really excited about that one,” Teves said of the workshop. “It’s good because it shows people how to do something: Now that you know our [North State] groundwater is being exported [south], what do you do with that information? You can take that information and, rather than be depressed, do something about it.” One of the issues that will be addressed—perhaps seemingly small, but important—is how to get one’s point across at public meetings that observe a threeminute time limit for speakers. “There are a couple of big issues [regarding North State water use],” said Teves, referring to the general thrust of Code Blue’s coverage. “No. 1 is the twintunnels project … which will move the [current water] pumps up north [from where they are now located] and will route more water out of the Delta to the San Joaquin Valley.” Championed by Gov. Brown, the “ambitious” tunnels, as a recent U-T San Diego article described them, “would be tall enough to comfortably fit an adult giraffe, wide enough for three freeway lanes and have ample room to carry enough water to serve 35,000 homes on a typical day.” As the same article pointed out, “This is Brown’s second bid for a … north-to-south GREENWAYS continued on page 16 April 11, 2013

CN&R 15


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16 CN&R April 11, 2013

[water] conveyance. In 1982, during his first go-round as governor, voters overwhelmingly blocked [what was then termed] the Peripheral Canal. Much of the opposition was fueled by fears in the north that the canal would drain the delta to benefit Southern California.” This time, however, Brown’s proposed tunnel project does not need voter approval; a cost analysis is due on April 22 and its final design and environmental approval are several months down the road for an anticipated 2016 groundbreaking. Teves noted that the increased amount of water flowing through the two tunnels, versus the current single tunnel, will go “mostly for huge agribusiness in the San Joaquin Valley,” which currently suffers from dry and salinized soil. “I would rather see solar panels go [into those areas] if those farms aren’t good for growing any more,” she offered. Additionally, since areas south will be able to get only the North State’s “extra water,” pressure is put on North State farmers and irrigation districts “to sell surface-water rights—private transactions that occur one at a time,” Teves said. The twin tunnels offer a means by which North State surface water can be easily transferred south, aided “by the money from big agriculture. … “Then [North State] farmers will be using groundwater after selling their surface water [down south], and that will affect the water table [in this area]. “And that’s what we’re really worried about. It’s huge. And they call that ‘conjunctive use.’” Conjunctive use—banking surface water in a groundwater basin for use during dry years—is touted as “managing surface and ground-

ECO EVENT

ANTI-FRACKING FIESTA The Rising Against Fracking Tour— which targets communities throughout the largest shaleoil regions in California— swings through Chico on April 14. The local tour stop— held at the ARC Pavilion (2020 Park Ave.) from 2 to 6 p.m.— includes a showing of the documentary The Sky is Pink, regional and local speakers, and live music from Los Caballitos de la Canción. Go to www.bec net.org or call 891-6424 for more info.

water so it’s more readily available to the greatest number of people,” said Teves, “which sounds nice, but can end up looking like selling our surface water and replacing it with groundwater and depleting the water table.” California’s water issues can be “tricky and complex,” BEC Executive Director Robyn DiFalco was quoted as saying in a recent BEC press release. “But it’s never been more important for the public to have a solid understanding of what’s being proposed and the potential impacts on regional water. … “The long-term goals of the [Code Blue] project will be increased public participation in demanding sustainable water policies that protect the Northern Sacramento Valley and Delta water supplies for fish, wildlife and residents.” Ω

UNCOMMON SENSE Waste not, want not A 2012 study by the Natural Resources Defense Council discovered that Americans waste about 33 pounds of food per person per month. Canada’s Best Health Magazine recently offered some tips to lessen that waste: • Buy less: Buy one-third less food than you usually do, and only enough produce for the next few days. • Play with recipes: Recipes commonly call for small amounts of vegetables and herbs, but your meal will improve if you toss it all in (rather than refrigerate the remainder). • Pick some favorites: Have goto recipes that use the abundance of leftover bits you usually toss.


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FRACKING WITH CHEVRON The United States isn’t the only North American country in which hydraulic fracturing—fracking—for hard-to-access shale gas and oil is an increasingly controversial issue, not least because of the possibility of groundwater contamination from the hundreds of chemicals used in the process. Canada, too, is eyeball-deep in the fracking fracas, including First Nations peoples—native Canadians—who are faced with the construction of a pipeline “across unceded indigenous territory to carry fracked [liquefied natural] gas [LNG] to the coast” of western Canada (see www.facebook.com/events/137069669801177/) for easy export to Asian markets. The Pacific Trail Pipeline project “is a proposed [288-mile] pipeline that will carry natural gas from Summit Lake, [34 miles] north of Prince George [in British Columbia], to the proposed Kitimat LNG facility on B.C.’s north coast,” according to a press release from Apache Canada and Chevron Canada Limited, the partners involved in the project. A Global Day of Action against Chevron and the Pacific Trail Pipeline was held on March 30; here in Chico, a number of people protested at the local Chevron station on East Avenue in solidarity with members of the affected Unist’ot’en Clan of the Wet’suwet’en nation. “American oil giant Chevron wants to build a destructive pipeline across unceded indigenous territory to carry fracked gas to the coast, and export climate change to the world. We say NO,” said the Global Day of Action’s Facebook page. “We do not need fracked gas, we do not want another pipeline, and we will not stand by as colonial governments and greedy corporations push us over the climate catastrophe cliff edge. “Chevron is the new corporate face of the Pacific Trail Pipeline project, having recently become 50/50 partners with Apache to build a fracking gas pipeline across 500 kilometres of largely unceded Anti-fracking protesters (left to right) Pamm Larry, land, from Summit Lake to Terre Reynolds and Mary Brosnan observed a Global LNG plants planned for KitiDay of Action against Chevron and the Pacific Trail mat. On March 30th we will Pipeline on March 30 near the local Chevron gas greet them with resistance station on East Avenue. across B.C. and around the PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS NELSON world. As politicians put economic growth and industry interests ahead of carbon common sense and indigenous rights, it is up to us to take direct action to raise the cost of pushing ahead with the project, and raise the stakes in the PR battle. “Everywhere they operate, Chevron exploits land and people for money, often through the use of force, and without taking responsibility for the consequences. Battles against environmental racism and illegal oil wars, movements for indigenous sovereignty and migrant justice—we amplify our resistance by uniting our struggles, so we are calling for solidarity actions and events against Chevron across Canada and around the world. “The Pacific Trail pipeline can still be stopped. There is a huge groundswell of public opinion against B.C.’s carbon corridor, the Unis’tot’en are mounting a determined resistance against incursions onto their territory, and a space is being carved out where we can change the course of B.C.’s energy future.” As the Unist’ot’en Action Camp put it during its successful Indiegogo.com fundraiser: “The Unist’ot’en understand that clean rivers you can drink from, healthy forests full of berries, and habitat for moose, bears, and salmon are infinitely more valuable than any amount of financial gain. This has been their land since time immemorial. And yet government and industry are intent on creating a massive corridor of oil and gas pipelines in order to facilitate expansion of the tar-sands gigaproject and highly destructive fracking fields in northeastern B.C., what environmentalists are referring to as the Carbon Corridor and a global-warming time bomb.”

Approximately, 310,014 Residents live in the Tri-County Area. If 50K Residents participated @ $0.03 a day x 30 days =a total of $0.90 for the month of April. That $0.90 x 50K Residents would=$45k

EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

April 11, 2013

CN&R 17


HOW LIVING ABROAD TAUGHT ME ABOUT MYSELF AND LIFE IN AMERICA by

Meredith J. Graham

La vie en France About the author:

Freelance writer Meredith J. Graham is a former managing editor of the CN&R. She lives in Colorado with her husband, Josh, and four dogs.

Meredith and Josh Graham below La Chapelle SaintMichel d’Aiguilhe in the town of Le-Puy-en-Velay, in Auvergne, France.

W

hen my husband, Josh, and I decided to take the rather large leap from our comfortable lives in Chico to a small town in south-central France, we predicted we’d come back with a greater understanding of the French language and culture. But there were many experiences we did not foresee that would shape the way we see the world. Perhaps one of the most obvious differences between small-town USA and smalltown France can be seen on street corners, in centuries-old market squares and along cobblestone alleys. Mom and Pop still run France’s consumer culture. The idea of Costco made our French friends shake their heads and laugh. We moved to France so Josh could attend pastry school, and what better place to do so than the land of the croissant and éclair? The French value expertise in a way that many Americans seem to have forgotten. In France, it’s not uncommon to meet a pastry chef who had perfected the art of tempering chocolate by age 15. The same goes for so many other trades. Walking along the time-worn streets of small-town France, we gained a new-found appreciation for homemade, for handcrafted, for true quality that Americans have taken for granted almost to the point of forcing it all to extinction. We often shopped at the farmers’ market in Yssingeaux, a town of 8,000 whose entire downtown—every road and alley of it—is filled with fresh produce, cheese, meat, fish, spices and knicknacks every Thursday morning. We navigated our new surroundings with a mixture of curiosity, difficulty and, many times, surprise at what we’d learned. We struggled with the language, relished the flavors, marveled at the history and fumed at the bureaucracy. 18 CN&R April 11, 2013

Some of the experiences during our time abroad were positive; others, not so much. Yet each one forced us to reassess the value we place on convenience and how we choose to spend our money and time. We landed in France last April, and returned in December with new insight into ourselves and how we want to live life in the States. GETTING US TO FRANCE TAUGHT me that I’m more determined and patient than I ever realized. Josh had started looking for pastry schools a few years ago and, being so close to the Bay Area, he first set his sights on San Francisco. Pretty quickly, though, his search took him to Chicago, then New York. By the time we imagined a cross-country move—and to an expensive city like the Big Apple—we thought to ourselves, “We might as well move to France!” So he changed his search parameters altogether, found a small but

Clockwise from top: A street scene in Allegrè, a charming village in the Haute-Loire department near Yssingeaux; the author and her husband (right) and roommate at a sidewalk café; a fruit tart created by Josh Graham at ENSP, a pastry school; produce from the weekly farmers’ market in Yssingeaux. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MEREDITH J. GRAHAM

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEREDITH J. GRAHAM

much paperwork. (Actually, all four of us might not have made the overseas flight had Dr. Wrinkle at Valley Oak Veterinary Center not been kind enough to rush to the clinic on her day off to type up a letter stating the pups could fly in 45 degree weather and fax it to American Airlines. She deserves a special thanks for that.) reputable school that offered classes in English, applied, and was accepted. Voilà, right? Well, not exactly. Turns out the application process was considerably easier than that of actually getting us the roughly 6,000 miles from Chico to the small town of Yssingeaux (pronounced ee-san-joe). This is where it came down to hard work and patience. You know the caricature of the Frenchman drowning in bureaucratic paperwork? It’s only a slight exaggeration. Just to get our visas that would enable us to stay in the country for longer than three months (the amount of time a normal tourist can stay), we needed no less than: our passports, Josh’s acceptance letter and an official document explaining he’d be living at the school, our marriage certificate, bank statements showing sufficient funds to last us the duration of our stay, plane tickets to prove our date of arrival in France, documentation to show our current residence to ensure we were at the correct consular location (in our case, San Francisco), and a notarized letter stating I would not seek employment while in France. Oh, and each document had to be presented in person, in triplicate. Consider that we took two dogs with us and that they required almost as

WE CHOSE FRANCE, AND THE COMMUNITY OF Yssingeaux in particular, because of its pastry school. Josh had been baking bread for nearly a decade, first at Tin Roof Bakery and more recently at the Upper Crust, and had decided to expand his skill set. What better place to do that than a French pastry school … in France? We’d done plenty of research and found what appeared to be the perfect place for him, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Pâtisserie (ENSP for short). Josh was one of seven international students—and the only American—in the intensive, five-month French Pastry Arts program. Classes were taught in English, but between French classes, recipes delivered in both languages, and French friends in town and at the school, Josh came away learning more French than he had expected. (Just the other day he admitted to having, when it comes to pastry, a hard time pronouncing the word “fruit” the American way instead of the alternative fwee.) He spent four days a week in the lab, learning and perfecting everything from chocolates and candies to mousses and ice creams to entremets (beautifully designed mousse cakes) and tarts. He made croissants, baguettes, eclairs, wedding cakes, you name it. And because it was a “pastry arts” course, the emphasis was not only on taste, but also presentation, something very important to the French. Josh brought a particularly American male perspective to the class of mostly women. During the lesson on wedding cakes, he opted to use blue frosting rather than the “FRANCE” continued on page 20 April 11, 2013

CN&R 19


HOW LIVING ABROAD TAUGHT ME ABOUT MYSELF AND LIFE IN AMERICA by

Meredith J. Graham

La vie en France About the author:

Freelance writer Meredith J. Graham is a former managing editor of the CN&R. She lives in Colorado with her husband, Josh, and four dogs.

Meredith and Josh Graham below La Chapelle SaintMichel d’Aiguilhe in the town of Le-Puy-en-Velay, in Auvergne, France.

W

hen my husband, Josh, and I decided to take the rather large leap from our comfortable lives in Chico to a small town in south-central France, we predicted we’d come back with a greater understanding of the French language and culture. But there were many experiences we did not foresee that would shape the way we see the world. Perhaps one of the most obvious differences between small-town USA and smalltown France can be seen on street corners, in centuries-old market squares and along cobblestone alleys. Mom and Pop still run France’s consumer culture. The idea of Costco made our French friends shake their heads and laugh. We moved to France so Josh could attend pastry school, and what better place to do so than the land of the croissant and éclair? The French value expertise in a way that many Americans seem to have forgotten. In France, it’s not uncommon to meet a pastry chef who had perfected the art of tempering chocolate by age 15. The same goes for so many other trades. Walking along the time-worn streets of small-town France, we gained a new-found appreciation for homemade, for handcrafted, for true quality that Americans have taken for granted almost to the point of forcing it all to extinction. We often shopped at the farmers’ market in Yssingeaux, a town of 8,000 whose entire downtown—every road and alley of it—is filled with fresh produce, cheese, meat, fish, spices and knicknacks every Thursday morning. We navigated our new surroundings with a mixture of curiosity, difficulty and, many times, surprise at what we’d learned. We struggled with the language, relished the flavors, marveled at the history and fumed at the bureaucracy. 18 CN&R April 11, 2013

Some of the experiences during our time abroad were positive; others, not so much. Yet each one forced us to reassess the value we place on convenience and how we choose to spend our money and time. We landed in France last April, and returned in December with new insight into ourselves and how we want to live life in the States. GETTING US TO FRANCE TAUGHT me that I’m more determined and patient than I ever realized. Josh had started looking for pastry schools a few years ago and, being so close to the Bay Area, he first set his sights on San Francisco. Pretty quickly, though, his search took him to Chicago, then New York. By the time we imagined a cross-country move—and to an expensive city like the Big Apple—we thought to ourselves, “We might as well move to France!” So he changed his search parameters altogether, found a small but

Clockwise from top: A street scene in Allegrè, a charming village in the Haute-Loire department near Yssingeaux; the author and her husband (right) and roommate at a sidewalk café; a fruit tart created by Josh Graham at ENSP, a pastry school; produce from the weekly farmers’ market in Yssingeaux. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MEREDITH J. GRAHAM

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEREDITH J. GRAHAM

much paperwork. (Actually, all four of us might not have made the overseas flight had Dr. Wrinkle at Valley Oak Veterinary Center not been kind enough to rush to the clinic on her day off to type up a letter stating the pups could fly in 45 degree weather and fax it to American Airlines. She deserves a special thanks for that.) reputable school that offered classes in English, applied, and was accepted. Voilà, right? Well, not exactly. Turns out the application process was considerably easier than that of actually getting us the roughly 6,000 miles from Chico to the small town of Yssingeaux (pronounced ee-san-joe). This is where it came down to hard work and patience. You know the caricature of the Frenchman drowning in bureaucratic paperwork? It’s only a slight exaggeration. Just to get our visas that would enable us to stay in the country for longer than three months (the amount of time a normal tourist can stay), we needed no less than: our passports, Josh’s acceptance letter and an official document explaining he’d be living at the school, our marriage certificate, bank statements showing sufficient funds to last us the duration of our stay, plane tickets to prove our date of arrival in France, documentation to show our current residence to ensure we were at the correct consular location (in our case, San Francisco), and a notarized letter stating I would not seek employment while in France. Oh, and each document had to be presented in person, in triplicate. Consider that we took two dogs with us and that they required almost as

WE CHOSE FRANCE, AND THE COMMUNITY OF Yssingeaux in particular, because of its pastry school. Josh had been baking bread for nearly a decade, first at Tin Roof Bakery and more recently at the Upper Crust, and had decided to expand his skill set. What better place to do that than a French pastry school … in France? We’d done plenty of research and found what appeared to be the perfect place for him, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Pâtisserie (ENSP for short). Josh was one of seven international students—and the only American—in the intensive, five-month French Pastry Arts program. Classes were taught in English, but between French classes, recipes delivered in both languages, and French friends in town and at the school, Josh came away learning more French than he had expected. (Just the other day he admitted to having, when it comes to pastry, a hard time pronouncing the word “fruit” the American way instead of the alternative fwee.) He spent four days a week in the lab, learning and perfecting everything from chocolates and candies to mousses and ice creams to entremets (beautifully designed mousse cakes) and tarts. He made croissants, baguettes, eclairs, wedding cakes, you name it. And because it was a “pastry arts” course, the emphasis was not only on taste, but also presentation, something very important to the French. Josh brought a particularly American male perspective to the class of mostly women. During the lesson on wedding cakes, he opted to use blue frosting rather than the “FRANCE” continued on page 20 April 11, 2013

CN&R 19


SUNDAY, APRIL 28TH

Rattlesnakes are abundant in our area. We have treated snakebites on as many as 7 different dogs in one day. To teach your dog to stay away from the curious sounds and smell of rattlesnakes, we will be hosting a one on one specialized Rattlesnake Aversion Training for your dog(s). Recommended for dogs 6 months and older. The registration fee for the training will be $80 with a portion going to the Butte County Humane Society. Go to www.valleyoakveterinarycenter.com/promotions for more information or call (530)342-7387 and ask for Lori Schaefer.

VALLEY OAK VETERINARY CENTER 2480 Dr. MLK Jr. Pkwy, Chico, CA 95928 (530)342-7387 20 CN&R April 11, 2013

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

RATTLESNAKE AVERSION TRAINING

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

“FRANCE” continued from page 19

more common pink or purple. His instructor and chef, Kyung-Ran Baccon, was at first averse to this color palette, but Josh surprised her by creating flawless flowers by hand (she commented that she hadn’t thought it possible that such a big man could create such delicate flowers), and afterward she admitted that he’d managed to make her like blue. LIVING AS AN AMERICAN IN FRANCE gave me a new perspective on life for all the foreigners who have made the United States their home. I no longer take for granted the fact that I can ask a bus driver which stop I need, explain the kind of haircut I want, understand a menu or offer someone directions. While abroad, every time I opened my mouth to speak to a French person, I had to first think about what I was going to say. I’d taken French through high school, and had brushed up using Rosetta Stone, but I was far from fluent, and every conversation was hard work. Once we settled into our apartment with our Brazilian roommate, Clovis, my main goal was to “live in France” while Josh went to school. I went to the farmers’ market every week (amazing!), I quickly found the best butcher in town, the best grocery store, the best cheese monger. I could buy things. I could even do it politely. But when it came to asking questions, mine were very, very basic. My go-to was, “Q’est-ce que c’est?” which simply means, “What is this?” One morning, when I was to meet Josh’s French teacher, I challenged him to introduce me to her. In French. He mustered up the courage and said, “C’est une femme. Elle s’appelle Meredith.” I got a pretty good laugh out of it, because what he’d meant to say was, “This is my wife. Her name is

Yssingeaux...was first settled around the year 1000. Montélimar, the “Nougat Capital of the World,” is a medieval city. We lived in a studio in the old part of the city. The roads were narrow (one was just wider than my arm span)...most of them cobblestone.

Meredith.” But what he actually said was, “This is a woman. Her name is Meredith.” Obviously, it could have been worse; it just so happens that the word femme means both “woman” and “wife” (let’s not get into that one!). I was proud of him for trying, though. Half the battle with learning any new language is getting up that courage to blurt out the words. And hey, he got it mostly right. SMALL-TOWN FRANCE IS STEEPED IN history. Yssingeaux, where we lived for the five months Josh attended ENSP, is about an hour by car southwest of Lyon in what’s known as the Haute-Loire department (the equivalent of a county). It was first settled around the year 1000. That fact alone is almost unfathomable

Josh Graham at ENSP with a week’s worth of sweets made by his class. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. GRAHAM


to an American whose “historic” monuments go all the way back to the 1700s. ENSP is housed in a castle. It’s been renovated, of course, so the interior is completely new. But he got to go to school in a castle. How many people can say that? After Josh finished school, he had to complete an internship in a French pastry shop. His choice was not far from Yssingeaux, to the south, at the entryway to Provence. Montélimar, the “Nougat Capital of the World,” is a medieval city whose downtown used to be walled. We lived in a studio in the old part of the city. Our landlady said the building was built around 1800, and our big, old keys backed up her story. The roads were narrow (one was just wider than my arm span), most of them cobblestone, and they wove an intricate web through town. Every day, as I walked through town, I reminded myself that I would probably never again live amid such beautiful history. The castle in Montélimar (every city has one) was built in the 1100s and sits perched above the old city. There’s a church in the middle of town that was first referenced around 1050, meaning it might be much older. It burned down and was rebuilt in the 1600s. Before the United States was a country. There’s some perspective for ya. FOR MANY AMERICANS, ONE OF THE MOST STRIKing differences of French life is the slower pace of everything, including work. Perhaps it’s a byproduct of the no-rush mentality (or maybe it’s the cause—who knows?), but the French seem to take a much more balanced approach to work and life than we Americans. Lunches last at least an hour, and the work week is 35 hours instead of 40. While Josh was at his internship in Montelimar, his lunch break was 2 1/2 hours long. No joke. He was able to come home for lunch, sometimes go on long walks with me and the dogs around town, and more than once sit down for a very French, very long coffee at an outdoor café. This is probably why fast-food restaurants and even to-go ordering is hard to find in France. Adjusting to this way of living took some time and patience. When I arrived at the electric company office—a mile walk from our apartment—only to find a sign on the door that said they were on vacation and to come back the following week, well, I was more than a little annoyed. Don’t expect to get anything done during August in France— even government offices shut down so everyone can go to the beach. To the French, Americans work too hard

and take too little vacation. Having lived like the French for a little while, I can understand why they would think that. We live to work in such a way that many of us don’t take the time to enjoy what we have—our families, our friends, our homes, even our food. One of the more important lessons I’ve taken away from my experience in France is that, while work is clearly an important part of life, it is not in control—I am. JUST AS A FOREIGNER VISITING THE UNITED States would quickly be able to point out all the fast-food restaurants, strip malls and SUVs that America is known for, it is not hard to find examples of everything you’ve heard about France while there. Some of the clichés are admittedly more true than others. In France, in my experience, you will absolutely see at least three people walking around town carrying a baguette and/or croissant every morning. There is at least one sidewalk café in every town, along with a very old church and a castle or the remnants thereof. The wine, cheese and chocolate really are amazing (and amazingly affordable). Perhaps it’s their willingness to take time to eat rather than grabbing McDonald’s on the way home, or their penchant for walking, but the French certainly live up to the stereotype of being thin. There’s no obesity epidemic there, despite their intense love of good, rich food and drink. One myth I will dispel is the one of the beret. The only person I saw wearing one was a policeman in Paris. Seeing as it was part of his uniform, it doesn’t really count. Of course, the American stereotype of the French is that they are snooty. Well, that might be true of Parisians, who generally think they’re better than everyone, even their countrymen. But I found that, even in Paris, as long as I made an effort to speak French, the people were quite friendly. I truly believe that it’s the arrogant Americans who walk into Paris restaurants demanding things in English who give us—and the French—a bad name. One thing that was easy to get used to was France’s love of dogs. The French basically consider it a right to bring their canine companions everywhere

Our experiences with culture shock and interactions with not only the locals but also people from all over left me with one major impression: The world is humongous, so much bigger than my Chico bubble, than Butte County or California or even the entire United States.

The French seem to take a much more balanced approach to work and life than we Americans. Lunches last at least an hour, and the work week is 35 hours instead of 40. with them, including cafés and restaurants. We adapted easily, often taking our dogs with us when we sat for cappuccinos or went shopping. In fact, I think the only places that were consistently off limits to the pups were grocery stores. (Now, if they would adopt the American attitude about picking up after their pooches, France might just be perfect.) Most of the dogs we encountered while in France were small, like ours. Think Shih Tzus, Pomeranians, Bichon Frisés ... But not a lot of chihuahuas. So, our chihuahua-Jack Russells got quite a bit of attention. Twice I had strangers come up to me while I was walking them and exclaim, “Ils sont magnifiques!” meaning, quite rightly, that “They are magnificent!” A LOT OF CULTURE SHOCK LIES IN WHAT IS CONsidered normal in one place but not another. In America, it’s normal to drive everywhere, and when we go shopping we not only expect store employees to bag our groceries, but also to provide the bags and trek our carts back to the corrals for us. In France, something as simple as grocery shopping is such a different experience. Everyone brings their own bags—if you don’t, you buy one, and it’s reusable. You bag your own groceries. And you put a euro coin into a slot in your shopping cart to release it from the corral—if you want it back, you put your cart back. Our experiences with culture shock and interactions with not only the locals but also people from all over left me with one major impression: The world is humongous, so much bigger than my Chico bubble, than Butte County or California or even the entire United States. It really hit me one evening when we were having dinner with Josh’s classmates. We heard stories about growing up in the USSR; about post-apartheid South Africa; about contracting dengue fever in Brazil— twice; about life as a Bollywood actress; and

about going to school in Indonesia during the SARS outbreak. Sure, I’d read about apartheid and seen news coverage of SARS, but nothing quite brings those things home like experiencing it yourself or through someone you know. This was probably an even bigger revelation for Josh, who had never been outside the United States until we landed in Paris. Among other culture shocks, he had a hard time understanding that phrases like “‘Sup?” and “How’s it goin’?” are uniquely American and don’t quite translate. (He loves using “word” as an affirmative answer so much that he started saying it in French, finally settling on “mot, chien”—literally “word, dog.”) ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, IT’S GOOD TO BE HOME. Living in France was a true adventure. But it was not easy. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t breathe a sigh of relief when I stepped off the plane onto American soil. There was a big mixture of emotions—sadness that our adventure was over, but relief that the nightmare of traveling with all our luggage and two dogs via train, car and plane was behind us; already nostalgic for friends we’d made as well as my favorite wines and cheeses, but excited for what new discoveries the future might hold. One discovery is how living abroad has given us a new perspective on life in the States. So far, that life is in Colorado, where Josh is working as a pastry chef in a European bakery in Boulder. He’ll soon be adding his own dessert—an entremet he learned to make at ENSP—to the menu. I’m a freelance journalist, writing from home, exploring our new environs and taking life one day at a time, something I learned from the French. Living in France gave us a new appreciation for quality, both of ingredients and the expertise it takes to turn them into something worth waiting in line for, and paying more for. There’s nothing quite like spending eight months without conveniences to make you question your values. One thing that immediately went out the door upon returning to the States was our reliance on fast food and drive-through coffee shops. We now cook most of our meals, as we did in France. We’re also less inclined to jump in the car to travel a few blocks. We’re now sharing a car, which, quite frankly, despite the fact that we both lived within walking distance of work in Chico, would not have seemed possible for us then. Now it works, even if it is less convenient. America is a wonderful country, but that doesn’t mean we’ve gotten everything right. It can be hard to get perspective on your life—and your way of life—while you’re living it, which is what makes traveling and experiencing other cultures so valuable. In the end, living abroad truly gave us a new appreciation for the world as a whole as well as for the country we call home. When we feel we need a reality check, or just a nice, long vacation, you’ll likely find us in France. Or in some other country—who knows? Ω April 11, 2013

CN&R 21


Arts & Culture Horse people: (from left) Tyler Ramsey, Bill Reynolds, Ben Bridwell, Creighton Barrett and Ryan Monroe.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER WILSON

THIS WEEK 11

THURS

Songs come first

Special Events CARD CLASSIC MOVIE SERIES: The classic movie

series kicks of with Singin’ in the Rain. Second Th of every month, 1pm through 8/8. Opens 4/11. Free. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California

Park Dr. off Bruce Rd.; (530) 895-4015.

Band of Horses bassist talks songwriting, harmonizing, and joining the band at just the right time

“A favorite thing is playing behind a great singer,” said Bill Reynolds of Band of Horses during s an artist, as a bass player, my

a recent phone interview. “Nobody wants to hear you wank off on the bass.” Reynolds assumed bass duties following the release of the band’s second album, 2007’s Cease to Begin, and immeby diately embraced his supportive Howard role. Indeed, lead singer Ben BridHardee well’s distinct, reverb-soaked howardh@ vocals are the centerpiece of the newsreview.com folk-tinged sound that has made the indie-rock band an internationally successful touring act. And as PREVIEW: someone who has a deep appreciaBand of Horses tion for the work of Roy Orbison performs Tuesday, and Tom Petty, Reynolds feels April 16, at 8 p.m., strongly about playing to bring at the Senator Theatre. The Olms Bridwell’s voice and the band’s opens. close vocal harmonies to the foreTickets: $27.50, ground. www.ticketweb.com “When I’m playing bass, I’m not thinking, ‘How cool is my bass Senator Theatre 517 Main St. part?’” he said. “I’m thinking, www.jmax ‘How can I make this guy sing betproductions.net ter?’ My job as a bass player is to make sure Ben feels supported and feels like he has something to lean into.” The Blue Rags, Reynolds’ former band, was signed to Sub Pop Records when the Seattle-born (but now Charleston, S.C.-based) Band of Horses (of the same label at the time) released their breakthrough hit, “The Funeral.” He described being a big fan of the group prior to meeting them in the studio and learning they were in need of a new bassist. Reynolds said he knew right away that he “was the right man for the job.” Of joining the group just as they were beginning to experience significant success, Reynolds said, “At 22 CN&R April 11, 2013

that point, they were still touring around in a van and everyone was blown away that [the band] had taken off so well, so I got to be a part of the early realization that it was working. It was fun to watch.” Many of Band of Horses’ standout songs are heartfelt slower songs, a good handful of which— “The Funeral,” “Is There a Ghost,” and the more uptempo “Laredo”—have become indie-rock classics. When asked if he ever takes a step back to appreciate how their work has struck an emotional chord with such a wide audience, Reynolds said the connection listeners have made to the music is fully apparent. “I don’t have to take a step back,” he said earnestly. “We’re working at a high level and I don’t ever take it for granted. That’s the highest compliment you can have as an artist, to touch people like that.” Since he became a full-time member and the band’s lineup was set after Cease to Begin, Reynolds said the quintet’s songwriting process has become much more of a collaboration. “We all bring songs to the table,” he said. “For Mirage Rock [2012], I wrote a lot of songs. I’ll write the music and Ben will put lyrics on it, then we’ll take it in and the band will realize it through their eyes, whether that means a different drum part or putting it in a different key.” Though there are plenty of the band’s signature atmospheric rock tunes on the new album, much of Mirage Rock has ’70s acoustic-rock feel, in the vein of The Eagles. Reynolds said that during the band’s recent tour of Australia, the new songs receiving the best crowd reactions were lead single “Knock, Knock,” and “Everything’s Gonna Be Undone,” which features the tight vocal harmonies Reynolds considers Band of Horses’ trademark. “That’s something we have that will always be ours,” he said. “That’s a strength; to have three people who can really sing together.” Ω

KNOW IT ALL: THE BOOK ABOUT YOU: A presentation and book signing with local author Carol Williamson. Th, 4/11, 7pm. Free. Lyon Books, 121 W. Fifth St., (530) 891-3338, www.lyon books.com.

MAD ABOUT MUSIC: The Chico Guild’s annual fundraiser features a gourmet dinner, live jazz and performances from Chico State’s spring musical, The Music Man, along with a silent auction. Th, 4/11, 6-10pm. $75. Butte Creek Country Club, 175 Estates Dr.; (530) 8985984; www.northstatesymphony.org.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. This week: Southern and classic rock with Rewind, smooth jazz with Chuck’s Place and street magic with Wayne Houchin. Th, 6-9pm. Prices vary. Downtown Chico; www.downtown chico.net.

Art Receptions DAVID BACA RECEPTION: A reception for the exhibition of abstractions by New Mexico artist David Baca. Th, 4/11, 5-8pm. Free. James Snidle Fine Arts & Appraisals, 254 E. Fourth St.; (530) 343-2930; www.jamessnidlefinearts.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY RECEPTION: Featured artists Sten Hoiland and Raymond Eastman will be on-hand at this reception with live music and refreshments. Th, 4/11, 4:30-6pm. Free. Enloe Cancer Center, 265 Cohasset Rd.; (530) 332-3856.

Music UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN: A funny, virtuosic, twangy and foot-stomping homage to rock ‘n’ roll featuring eight ukulele players and bit of guitar thrown in for good measure. Th, 4/11, 7:30pm. $18-$32. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chico performances.com.

WAYNE HOUCHIN

Friday & Saturday, April 12 & 13 Chico Theater Company SEE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Theater THE BEVERELY HILLBILLIES: A stage adaptation of the ’60s TV show following simple country folk who move to Beverly Hills. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 4/21. $7-$15. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

JANE EYRE: The classic tale of a young woman’s transition into adulthood and her love for the proud, moody master of Thornfield Manor. ThSa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 4/21. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

12

FRI

Special Events BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL: The world’s best films on mountain adventure and culture and the environment selected from hundreds of entries submitted from around the world. Go online for more info. F, 4/12, 6:30pm. $6-$8. Bell Memorial Union Building, Chico State; (530) 898-4011; www.aschico.com/advo/aobanffmountain filmfestival.

RAY KURZWEIL PRESENTATION: Scientist, inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil will discuss his research on “singularity,” the merger of humans and intelligent machines, in this multimedia presentation. F, 4/12, 7:30pm. $18-$32. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperformances.com.

WAYNE HOUCHIN: The local magician, who has performed in more than 30 countries, presents his newest show, Insanity. F, Sa, 7:30pm through 4/13. $10-$15. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

WHERE THE MAGIC HAPPENS: An evening of art and fashion wherein a story will be told fusing the talents of Marie Fuentes of Couture Hair by Marie, and Marc Johnson of Able Abe Studios. F, 4/12, 8:30pm. $8. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway; (530) 343-1973; www.1078 gallery.org.


FINE ARTS from Los Caballitos de la Cancion. Su, 4/14, 26pm. Free. Arc Pavilion, 2040 Park Ave.; (530) 891-6424.

Music THE EXPENDABLES: Often compared to Sublime, the laid-back ska, funk and surf rock band best understood by the stony love ballad, “Bowl for Two.” Pacific Dub and The Pyrx Band open. Su, 4/14, 7:30pm. $15. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmax productions.net.

UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN Thursday, April 11 Laxson Auditorium

SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC

Theater THE BEVERELY HILLBILLIES: See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

JANE EYRE: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8775760, www.totr.org.

Poetry/Literature LOCAL POETRY READING: Local poets share their work at this reading hosted by Bob Garner. Refreshments served. F, 4/12, 6:30pm. Free. The Bookstore, 118 Main St.

13

SAT

Special Events BUTTE HUMANE SOCIETY GALA: Butte Humane Society hosts this ‘40s-themed dinner with live and silent auctions, wine and presentations. Sa, 4/13, 5:30pm. $115. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

KING OF THE CAGE: A totally brutal battle royale featuring a mixture of several different martial arts and headliners Tank Abbott vs. Warpath. Sa, 4/13, 5:30pm. $40-$100. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.goldcountrycasino.com.

PARADISE GEM & JEWELRY SHOW: Two days of educational activities for kids, mineral exhibits, lapidary demonstrations, fossils, crystals, beads, finished jewelry and more. Sa, 4/13, 9am-5pm; Su, 4/14, 9am-4pm. $2 admission. Paradise Elks Lodge, 6309 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7324.

United Methodist Church, 6722 Clark Rd. in Paradise; (530) 877-8155.

WAYNE HOUCHIN: See Friday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

Art Receptions CONTEMPORARY WOMAN RECEPTION: A reception—with a juror talk and awards presentation—for the juried exhibition featuring dozens of two- and three-dimensional artworks. Sa, 4/13, 7-9pm. Free. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 6; (530) 895-8726; www.chicoartcenter.com.

Music CATFISH ROW: A concert version Gershwin’s

Porgy and Bess. The band also performs Egmont by Bert Appermont and the Fenland Suite with Professor Emeritus David Rothe playing the Centennial Pipe Organ. Sa, 4/13, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Harlen Adams Theatre, W. First St. CSU, Chico campus; (530) 898-5739.

Theater THE BEVERELY HILLBILLIES: See Thursday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

JANE EYRE: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8775760, www.totr.org.

14

SUN

Special Events PARADISE GEM & JEWELRY SHOW: See Saturday. Paradise Elks Lodge, 6309 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7324.

RISING AGAINST FRACKING: The Rising Against

run through Lower Bidwell Park to benefit the Peg Taylor Center. Contact for more info. Sa, 4/13, 7:30am. $25-$35. One Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park; (530) 342-2345.

SILENT AUCTION & CARNIVAL FOR KIDS: The annual event will include free activities for kids, a bake sale, a raffle and a silent auction to benefit the church’s preschool program. Sa, 4/13, 11am-2pm. Free admission. Paradise

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL Friday, April 12 BMU Auditorium

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

1078 GALLERY: Into This Vastness I Steal Away, a Chico State MFA culminating exhibition featuring work from Mariam Pakbaz. Through 4/13. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

2ND FLOOR PUBLIC SPACE GALLERY: Quiet

Artist, Talkative Artworks, a display of work by Hiroshi Yakabi, a talented artist with autism, as part of Chico State’s annual Far East Fusion. Through 5/8. Bell Memorial Union Building at Chico State.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: From the Trenches, an

Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

exhibition of work from Chico State students relating their daily slog through technical and creative obstacles. Through 4/13. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

JANE EYRE: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge

CHICO ART CENTER: Contemporary Woman Art

Theater THE BEVERELY HILLBILLIES: See Thursday.

Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8775760, www.totr.org.

15

MON

Music 2 CHAINZ: All the dirty southern rapper wants for his birthday is a big-booty hoe, according to his outrageous “Birthday Song.” Cap 1 opens. M, 4/15, 8pm. $30. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmax productions.net.

BLAME SALLY: Blame Sally is an all-female folk quartet mad up of talented multi-instrumentalists and vocalists. M, 4/15, 7:30pm. $17. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierranevada.com/ bigroom.

16

TUES

Music BAND OF HORSES: The twangy indie-rockers have established a niche with their folktinged, atmospheric pop tunes. The Olms open. Tu, 4/16, 8pm. $27.50. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproductions.net.

PRIMA TRIO: A classical trio of internationally acclaimed soloists perform works ranging from chamber music standards to more exotic selections. Tu, 4/16, 7:30pm. $25. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St. in Oroville; (530) 589-2667.

Fracking Tour swings through Chico with a showing of the documentary The Sky is Pink, national and local speakers and live music

POPPY WALK & 5K RUN: A one-mile walk or 5K

Art

Show, a juried exhibition featuring dozens of two- and three-dimensional artworks. 4/13-5/10. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUNICIPAL BUILDING: Camera Club

Exhibit, works by the Chico Camera Club on display. Through 7/12. 411 Main St., (530) 8967214.

CHICO PAPER CO.: California Mountain Series, Jake Early’s mountain serigraphs—now including the recently completed “Tamalpais”—on display. Through 4/20. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopaper company.com.

ELLIS ART & ENGINEERING SUPPLIES: Window

Gallery, Cynthia Sexton’s shoe series, from boots to ballet, on display. Through 4/30. 122 Broadway St., (530) 891-0335, www.ellis hasit.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Wire sculptures by Northern California artist Sten Hoiland and oil paintings by Raymond Eastman. Through 7/18. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS & APPRAISALS:

Dacid Baca Exhibition, abstract paintings with architectural references, muted colors and spatial compositions. Through 4/30. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.jamessnidlefinearts.com.

exhibition emphasizing outdoor scenes. Ongoing. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 345-3063.

UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: A Fickle Menagerie, an exhibition of drawings depicting an unsettling vision of the future from Chico State MFA candidate Ruby Rudnick. Through 4/12. Trinity Hall At Chico State, (530) 8985864.

Call for Artists CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION EXHIBITION: All media accepted for the show to commemorate Child Abuse Prevention Month. Contact for more info. Through 4/26. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 864-0070, www.chicoartcenter.com.

THE LP COOKIE CAMP MYSTERY MIXER: Artists are asked to create using an LP and a fortune cookie. Look up MANAS on Facebook for complete info. Through 5/11. Manas Art Space & Gallery, 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 5885183.

Museums BUTTE COUNTY PIONEER MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Antique Firearms Display, an exhibition of firearms designed and manufactured before the beginning of the 20th century. Ongoing. 2332 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497.

CHICO MUSEUM: I Heart Chico, paintings, poetry, kid’s art, photography, textiles, videos and interactive collaborative exhibits inspired by Chico. Through 6/2.This is Our Home, Here We Remain, a Mechoopda Indian exhibit on display. Through 5/31. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Spring Exhibits, The exhibit “Sportsology” explores the science behind sports, while “Brain Teasers 2” offers a new collection of confounding puzzles. Through 5/5. $3-$6. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

LOTT HOME IN SANK PARK: Woodcarver’s

Exhibit, work from the Oroville Woodcarver’s Club on display. Ongoing. 1067 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Infinity & Beyond, an exhibit tracing early human celestial observation to modern space endeavors with a Russian Sokol Space suit, a moon rock and brand-new footage of deep space on display. Ongoing. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

MANAS ART SPACE & GALLERY: American

Heritage, an exhibition of works in all mediums using the historical journal “American Heritage” as inspiration. Through 5/3. 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Earth & Water, an

BULLETIN BOARD on page 24 for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 28

Art in bloom Sure, it’s probably going to be mostly sunny for the next few months, but it is spring, and when the clouds inevitably open up wouldn’t it be nice to have somewhere to duck into and ride out Mariam Pakbaz at 1078 Gallery the storm—somewhere like an art gallery that just put new art on the walls to keep your days sunny? There are at least four fresh exhibits kicking off the month: James Snidle Fine Arts (abstract works by New Mexico painter David Baca) and the Healing Art Gallery at Enloe Cancer Center EDITOR’S PICK (featured artists Sten Hoiland and Raymond Eastman) both have openings tonight, April 11; 1078 Gallery’s short run of Chico State student Mariam Pakbaz’s MFA exhibit, Into this Vastness I Steal Away, finishes up this weekend; and the Chico Art Center kicks off its annual Contemporary Women group show with a reception on Saturday, April 13.

—JASON CASSIDY April 11, 2013

CN&R 23


BULLETIN BOARD HOURS 8AM - 9PM EVERYDAY

2157 PILLSBURY RD. CHICO

345-2666

NEXT TO KMART ON COHASSET RD.

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WINE TASTING APRIL 25TH TO BENEFIT ARC. CRYSTAL ROOM NEXT TO QUACKERS. 5P-7P. $5

ARTIST TALK WITH ALLISON HYDE: Currently a featured artist at the Janet Turner Print Museum, Hyde will speak on her exploration of personal identity, memory and personal histories. Th, 4/11, 5:30pm. Free. RowlandTaylor Recital Hall, Chico State.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.butte county.net.

in the park serving as a neighborhood collaborative forum focusing on healthy lifestyle promotion, education and access. F, 2-5:30pm through 12/31. Free. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 592-0889, www.cchaos.org.

CHICO CONTRA DANCE: Traditional contra dance

with music by the Pub Scouts. Second Sa of every month, 6:30-10pm. $4-$8. Chico Grange, 2775 Nord Ave., (530) 877-2930.

CHICO POLICE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD: Monthly meeting hosted by the Chico Police Chief to discuss community issues. Third W of every month, 5:30-7pm. Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1877 Hooker Oak Ave., (530) 342-7777.

sale and baked goods to benefit the Children’s Choir of Chico. Su, 4/14, 9am-5pm. Prices vary. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978.

COLOMBIA: LAND OF BIRDS: A photographic tour of Colombia and its wide range of bird species with geographic and cultural information mixed in. M, 4/15, 6:30pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

HEALTH & BEAUTY PRODUCTS

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

DEER CREEK HIKE: A 5 to 6 mile round-trip hike. Bring lunch, water and appropriate clothing. Rain cancels. Sa, 4/13, 9am. Chico Park & Ride, Hwy 99 & E. Eighth St., (530) 893-1994.

FACTS: LIFE IN OCCUPIED PALESTINE: Butte College instructor Jeff Crawford presents a vivid account of Palestinian life in the West Bank and Israel under occupation. Tu, 4/16, 7:30-9pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St., (530) 228-1344.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods, honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more.

Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday

Farmers’ Market, Parking Lot, (530) 893-3276.

FORECLOSURE ALTERNAIVE CLINIC: A workshop covering alternatives to foreclosure and prevention measures. Call to register. F, 4/12, 10am. Free. Legal Services of Northern California, 541 Normal Ave., (530) 345-9491.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor

Vendors for the League of Women Voters’ annuaL Wine tasting:

$40 - Advance $45 - Door

Anselmo Vineyards Bertagna Son-Kissed Vineyard Burnsini Vineyards and Winery Classic Wines of California Doe Mill Vineyard Emerald C Vineyards Epic Wines Grant Eddie Winery Green & Red Vineyard Grocery Outlet PB Hein Vineyards Henry Wine Group Hickman Family Vineyards

HoneyRun Winery LaRocca Vineyards Matson Vineyards Moniz Family Wines Nevada City Winery New Clairvaux Vineyard Nichelini Familly Winery Quilici Vineyards A. Rafanelli Winery Renaissance Vineyard and Winery Shannon Ridge Winery Van Ruiten Family Winery

medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 14pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First

Ave. Corner of Downing and E. 1st Ave, (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

FROM THE TRENCHES TALK: A talk with advanced Chico State painting and drawing students highlighted in Avenue 9’s “From the Trenches” exhibit. F, 4/12, 6pm. Free. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

THE GREAT DEBATE: A day-long public forum in which hundreds of students and community members will address the theme “Agriculture and Water Issues.” F, 4/12, 9am-7pm. Free. Chico City Council Building, 421 Main St., (530) 898-5883.

IN THE NAME OF REVOLUTION: A talk focusing on revolutionary authority with Dr. Dan Edelstein as part of the Humanity Center’s “Revolution” series. Th, 4/11, 7:30pm. Free. Chico State Humanities Center (Trinity Hall), Chico State, (530) 898-6341, www.csu chico.edu/hfa/hc.

Sponsored by

24 CN&R April 11, 2013

Wednesday, April 17 SEE COMMUNITY

CHAPMAN FARMERS MARKET: A farmers’ market

CHILDRENS CHOIR RUMMAGE SALE: A rummage

HUGE SAVINGS ON ORGANICS &

NO BULLYING MEETING

LAS SENORAS ANNUAL YARD SALE: A yard sale with books, kitchen utensils, craft supplies,

jewelery, children’s clothing, toys and more to benefit local charities. 4/12-4/13, 8am-2pm. Las Senoras, 2748 E. Lassen, (530) 354-3276.

MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS LECTURE SERIES: Gateway’s annual spring lecture series continues with “Sports-Induced Central Nervous System Injury” with Penelope Kuhn of Chico State’s Psychology Department. W, 7:30pm through 4/24. Opens 4/10. $3. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/ gateway.

NO BULLYING COLLABORATIVE MEETING: A community meeting to address bullying in schools with a panel of teens sharing their perspectives and experiences. W, 4/17, 5:30-7pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 343-6265, www.butte county.net/bclibrary.

PEACE VALLEY IN SUTTER BUTTES STATE PARK: Two hiking options—a mild wildflower search and a more strenuous route over surrounding ridges. Bring lunch, water and appropriate clothing. Sa, 4/13, 8:30am. $2. Chico Park & Ride, Hwy 99 & E. Eighth St.

PROM PROJECT: Designed to allow teens from financially constrained families, the Prom Project provides free prom attire and educational booths. Sa, 4/13, 10am-3pm. Free. 6th St. Center for Youth, 130 West Sixth St. Behind Jacks Restaurant and Post Office, (530) 8948008.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. Next to Long’s Drugstore in Paradise, 872-7085.

SECOND SATURDAYS YOUTH ART WORKSHOP: A monthly hands-on workshop series encouraging the community’s youth to engage in artistic expression. Each session will highlight a different medium. Second Sa of every month, 12:30-5pm. Opens 4/13. Free. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

SELF-DEFENSE FOR ADULTS WORKSHOP: A workshop to address how to defend yourself or a loved one against an attacker with or without a knife. Tu, 4/16, 6pm. $24.95. Azad’s Martial Arts Family Center, 313 Walnut St. 150 Corner of Walnut and 4th St., (530) 892-2923, www.azadsmartialarts.com.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524.

TABLE MOUNTAIN WILDFLOWER TOURS: Go online

to register. Sa, 10am & 1pm through 5/4. Free. Contact for info, (916) 358-2869, www.dfg.ca.gov/lands/er/region2/northtable. html.

UPPER BIDWELL PARK BIRD WALK: A birding hike around Horseshoe Lake and up Yahi Trail in Upper Bidwell Park. Bring binoculars, snacks, water and appropriate clothing. Sa, 4/13. Horseshoe Lake, Upper Bidwell Park, (530) 872-8837.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


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French guitarist plays his fingernails off for tiny crowd invites You to Join Us in the Big room

Ogoing on in our fair city that it can be daunting. A cursory glance at the CN&R’s cal-

Eilen Jewell with Melody Walker

n any given night, there is so much

endar section offers so many options in the town’s coffee shops, bars, galby leries and other venues that Ken Smith it’s sometimes hard to pick a place to start. Sometimes, it’s nice to kens@ newsreview.com just give something random a shot. I did exactly this last Friday (April 5), opting to check out visiting guitarist Claude Bourbon at 1078 Gallery based solely on a short REVIEW: description of his music as “Spanish Claude Bourbon, and Medieval blues.” Friday nights Friday, April 5, at 1078 Gallery. are a valuable commodity, and gambling with them in such a manner 1078 Gallery can sometimes backfire; but with 820 Broadway Bourbon, I hit the jackpot. www.1078 Bourbon is a French-born guigallery.org tarist classically trained in Switzerland and whose influences reach far beyond. Within moments of him picking up his guitar it was apparent that I and the few others who took the same gamble—an audience of 14 in total, including me and gallery staff—were in for a treat. It was initially hard to tell where one song ended and another began, with Bourbon utilizing a variety of techniques and styles to take the small crowd on a musical journey through some fantastic places. In the first 10 minutes alone, flamenco, gypsy-jazz and Indian influences were evident, as was a touch of good old Southern blues and Americana. It’s also quite apparent Bourbon is a Jimmy Page devotee, with some of his songs possessing a similar feel to Page’s spotlight numbers (think “White Summer”/“Black Mountain Side”). While weaving disparate styles can be disastrous and not at all interesting in less competent hands, Bourbon pulled it off seamlessly. In fact, deciding which hand to watch was part of the fun of the performance; Bourbon’s left hand slid up and down the fretboard while all five fingers of his right flowed like rippling water as he fingerpicked with amazing speed. Early in the set he also added in some slide, and he

Wednesday, May 15, 2013 The art of fingerstyle guitar at 1078 Gallery with Claude Bourbon. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

managed to pack in more tricks and incredibly varied techniques into every single song. One of the most interesting aspects of the show was the way Bourbon played his travel-worn Gibson. He didn’t play the guitar like a normal performer, but rather played parts of it that wouldn’t even occur to most players. For example, at several points he would actually press hard on the soundboard or crank hard on the top of the neck to create bends accomplished only by the best bluesmen. Though most of the performance was instrumental, Bourbon can also sing, his voice something like latterday Dylan with a French accent, smooth with just a tinge of soulful raspiness. In Bourbon’s hands, even standards sound not-so-standard—his 10-minute-plus version of Gershwin’s “Summertime” was epic, even though the lyrics were the only recognizable part (“Summertime and the livin’ is easy …”). One particular standout original was the desperate-sounding and creepy bluesy number “I Need Shelter.” Though I like and respect great guitar playing, I’m not usually a fan of the super technical; too often, great technical skill can lead to scale-monsterism and self-indulgent wankery, resulting in music that’s flat and lacks passion. But not so with Bourbon; the man has soul. He’s also not afraid to get a little sloppy and gritty, basking in his guitar’s natural distortion, plucking the bass strings harder than most and all around letting himself have a good time. This was Bourbon’s third local visit. It’s a shame more people weren’t there to appreciate it. It didn’t seem to matter to him as he played with such gusto he had to cut the show short when he broke a fingernail, an essential accessory to a fingerstyle player who doesn’t use picks. There are at least 14 people, I’m fairly certain, eagerly awaiting his next visit. Ω

E

ilen Jewell blends Americana, country, folk, and other styles acquired while traveling the U.S. Since her 2006 debut album, “Boundary County,” Jewell’s subsequent recordings have given fans variety, including a homage to Loretta Lynn as well as 2009’s “Sea of Tears,” which bristled with the electricity of 60s UK garage rock and Chicago blues. Her latest, “Queen of the Minor Key,” draws on everything from classic country to early R&B. Melody Walker, quickly becoming a Chico favorite, will open the show. Picker extraordinaire Jacob Groopman complements Walker and they’ve melded their influences into a style they like to call “Americali”—Americana with a California twist. Drawing from bluegrass, rock, jazz, classical, Afrobeat and more, the duo create literate music that honors tradition yet sounds completely of the moment. Join us for an extraordinary evening of exceptional talent that’s climbing the sonic ranks.

Tickets $20.00 On sale Saturday, 04/13 in the Gift Shop or online at www.SierraNevada.com Doors open at 6pm • Music starts at 7:30pm

Special concert Dinner available - $12.50

Join the Big Room e-mail list by visiting www.sierranevada.com 1075 E. 20th StrEEt • ChiCo • 896-2198 all ages Welcome at each Show April 11, 2013

CN&R 25


Pruning in the rain? That’s how people get hurt.

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

3

Opening this week

G.I. Joe: Retaliation

42

Biopic about Jackie Robinson, who broke Major League Baseball’s color barrier in 1947 and went on to become one of the best players in history while helping to further the cause of the civil-rights movement along the way. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

On the Road

If you want blood … Evil Dead remake/sequel is really gross but not so scary

“Tsubgenre that followed the rudimentary structure of porn, but with a different currency orture porn” was a recent horror

of money shots. It sounded more disturbing than most of the films really by were. A lot of the notoriety was Craig Blamer carried by the term. But this Evil Dead remake might be the one that really defines the genre … just 10 years later. I’m guessing that this is satire. It’s hard to tell someEvil Dead times, especially when it’s Starring Jane irony-free. If nothing else, here Levy, Shiloh we have the first true majorFernandez and studio splatter film. Jessica Lucas. Admirably enough it’s a Directed by remake of a cult classic that Fede Alvarez. Cinemark 14, aggressively demands comparFeather River ison with the source material. Cinemas and Not that the 1981 original is a Paradise Cinema great movie. It’s a sporadically 7. Rated R. awful movie held together with bursts of terror and genius— and blood, claymation and even more blood. It has its Poor charms, it has its followers, and I still think it’s the best of the Evil Dead movies with its Fair perfect balance of giddiness and horror. The remake plays the pitchblack camp straight. It also Good tips its hand early with a small in-joke that implies this is actually Evil Dead 4. It’s pretty Very Good much the same cast of characters, with different names and all polished up. Original director Sam “I’m back!” Raimi is Excellent

3

1

2

3

4

5

26 CN&R April 11, 2013

on hand as producer to OK the coloring outside the lines. The story: Four idiotic but attractive kids arrive at a spooky cabin in the woods to stage an intervention. The intervention is irrelevant. They find a bunch of slaughtered cats strung from the ceiling of the basement and … well, that’s kind of irrelevant, too. They hang around. The brainy one reads an incantation from an ominous book. Spooky noises. Then the junkie goes out into the woods and gets raped by a tree and … yeah, there’s an uncomfortable misogyny at work here. As it parallels and tops the original version, the two dudes still get off light in the punishment, and now the three ladies are former prom queens. Two of the young women are given a couple of lines so they won’t be mistaken for props. The other one is given a subplot that becomes irrelevant the moment the blood hits the fan—although that might be part of the satire. If that’s what it is. Otherwise it’s lazy character development that doesn’t offer anything but the bare minimum to set these props to slaughter. There’s also no internal logic, and a narrative hiccup late in the game renders character points moot. The film does look good, though. It manages to evoke the pus-’n’-blood palette of recent French and Spanish horror and douse it with the cartoon excess of ’90s Japanese gorgasms. And if it’s CGI blood, it’s bloody good work. The main problem is that it’s not particularly scary, nor suspenseful, since none of the characters are anywhere near likeable. They’re pretty, so there’s that. Then all hell breaks loose and all that pretty goes to hell. In several baskets. Ω

Jack Kerouac’s road novel for the Beat Generation gets a cinematic treatment by director Walter Salles (The Motorcycle Diaries). Starring Sam Riley as Sal Paradise (the Kerouac character) and Garrett Hedlund as Dean Moriarty (the Neal Cassady character), plus Kristen Stewart and Kirsten Dunst. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Scary Movie 5

The fifth installment in the spoof-horror franchise, this one featuring the talents of no less than Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan and Mike Tyson. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Admission

A romcom about the hijinks (and romance?) that ensue when the worlds of three people collide: a college admissions officer (Tina Fey), the principal (Paul Rudd) at an alternative high school, and a high school kid (Nat Wolff) who might be the son the admissions officer gave up for adoption. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Call

A young woman (Abigail Breslin) calls a 911 dispatcher (Halle Barry) from the trunk of her abductor, which draws the operator into a dangerous game that finds her back in the sights of a killer (Michael Eklund) from her past. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Croods

Nicolas Cage, Ryan Reynolds, Emma Stone and Catherine Keener provide voices for this computeranimated feature about a prehistoric family on an adventure through uncharted territory. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

3

Emperor

Tommy Lee Jones has the standout role in this doggedly earnest docudrama, but a less imposing character played by Matthew Fox is at the center of most of the action. After the surrender of Japan in World War II, General Douglas MacArthur (Jones) must decide whether the Emperor Hirohito should be included among those charged with war crimes. He orders Gen. Bonner Fellers (Fox), an “expert” on the Japanese, to conduct the investigation. The script (by David Klass and Vera Blasi) is a blandly earnest history lesson with a half-hearted romantic subplot upping the ante a little on matters of cultural differences. Jones gives the thing some charming swagger at the start and finish, while Fox plugs away in a role that is both catalytic and marginal. Pageant Theatre and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Evil Dead

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —C.B.

In this second installment in the film series based on the famous toy, the original Joe (Bruce Willis) joins the G.I. Joe squad, led by Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, to help them bring down the Cobras as they try and take over the world. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

2

The Host

Sometime in the vague future alien “souls” have infiltrated nearly every human body in the world. While trying to avoid a similar fate, a human named Melanie (Saoirse Ronan) gets caught, and her body is infused with the soul of an alien called Wanderer. Usually, the human spirit dies, but a resistant Melanie lives on in the subconscious of the alien who soon empathizes with the entrapped human, leading to some unintentionally funny schizophrenia as they talk to each other within the same body. Of course they each have eyes for different human hunks, and so we get a very weird version of a love triangle. Bottom line: It’s another pretty but contrived Hollywood formula piece, with the added distraction of being a convoluted and silly love story. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —R.B.

Jurassic Park: 3D

In celebration of its 20th anniversary, Spielberg’s 1993 dino theme park flick gets the 3-D treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Olympus Has Fallen

Things explode all over Washington, D.C., as it is attacked by terrorists who kidnap the president (Aaron Eckhart). His only hope is a disgraced former security agent (Gerard Butler) trapped in the White House and helping authorities who have no choice but to rely on his inside knowledge of the situation. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

2

Oz the Great and Powerful

It’s been 74 years since the release of The Wizard of Oz, and director Sam Raimi (Spiderman) and company are exploring its title character, preDorothy and gang. Struggling magician/conartist/womanizer Oscar “Oz” Diggs (James Franco) isn’t living up to his “great” potential, working the circus scene in Podunk, Kansas. So when a tornado sweeps him away to the land of Oz, where the inhabitants believe that he’s their awaited wizard, he goes with it. With the help of Glinda The Good Witch (a sappy Michelle Williams), this amateur hero attempts to save the citizens of Emerald City from the wicked sister witches (Rachel Weisz and Mila Kunis). There’s plenty of visual oohing and ahhing to be had, but the fun stops there. The dialogue falls flat and the mediocre acting does little to save it. Keep traveling down that yellow brick road. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —R.B.

On the Road


CHOW

6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

IN

ends sunday tommy lee jones is gen mac arthur in

S HOWTIMES G OOD F RI 4/12 - T HUR 4/18

42

 1:00 3:55 6:45 *9:30PM

[PG-13]

EMPEROR

 1:30 4:15 7:15 *9:35PM

[PG-13]

SCARY MOVIE 5

 1:25 3:25 5:25 7:30 *9:45PM

EVIL DEAD

[R]

 1:00 3:05 5:15 7:25 *9:35PM

JURASSIC PARK 3D [PG-13]

 IN : 1:15 4:00 6:50 *9:30PM

[PG-13]

G.I. JOE: RETALIATION

More than port

[PG-13]

THE CROODS [PG]

*L AT E S H O W S

ON

IN : 1:00 5:20 7:30 *9:40PM IN 2D: 3:10PM F R I & S AT O N LY

A L L S H O W S B E F O R E 6PM A R E B A R G A I N M A T I N E E S  INDICATES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

Americans are finally tasting all the wines of Portugal

399

$

+ tax

Mon.-Fri.

ALL DAY!!! 1/4 lb. Jr Grad Burger & fries or salad

I people because they consume so much red wine, then the Portuguese can’t be far behind. There, the

f the French truly live longer than other

average man and woman drinks 60 bottles of wine per year. Only France, Italy and by Luxembourg exceed this per capiAlastair Bland ta rate. The country is one-fifth the size of California, yet grows about the same acreage of grapevines. Hundreds of indigenous varieties occur there—and winemaking itself began in Portugal more than a millennium before the French or Italians ever purpled their hands, feet or carpets. In spite of its vinicultural street cred, Portugal has remained a quiet player through the modern global wine craze, and its wines are only beginning to trickle into Chico. At Creekside Cellars, the wine shop’s owner, Dennis McLaughlin, says Portuguese wines simply don’t sell fast enough to merit keeping a ready supply. Monks Wine Lounge & Bistro, which carries nearly 200 wines, does not currently carry even one Portuguese table wine. At Trader Joe’s, Portuguese wines have only a slightly surer foothold. The local branch currently carries two Vinho Verdes, a light, spritzy, and summery white-wine style from northern Portugal. Each bottle, at $3.99, makes a fine entryway for newbies into Portugal’s wine world. Deeper into this wine-dark land, one will encounter region names like Dão, Bairrada, Alentejo, Ribatejo and Estremadura—the last two of which changed names in 2010, to Tejo and Lisboa, respectively (however, bottle labels of earlier vintages will naturally feature the old names). The most reputable region may be Douro, origin of port dessert wines. Locally, those who embark on determined Portuguese wine-hunting outings may watch for Winery Esporão’s mighty red Reserva blend, a ripe, rich, and toasty Alentejo wine made of the relatively unknown arinto grapes, antão vaz and roupeiro. Another Alentejo red, a four-grape blend called Mariana, from Herdade do Rocim, is earthy and robust, but with an acidic, tingling spark that speaks to elegant terroir and sophisticated winemaking. Vinho Verde is the summery, drinkable star of the north. Here, grapevines are often trained up fences, trees and telephone poles in a rustic, guerilla-style approach to wine-growing that likely will not appear in California—though the wines are here. Shannon

: 1:25 7:05 *9:45PM IN 2D: 4:00PM IN

IT’S

BASEBALL SEASON! Join us for great specials all season long.

Quick & Cheap Lunch or Dinner!

the emperor thurs-sat 6:30pm; sunday 2pm starts Friday amy adams Kirsten dunst in the jacK Kerouac classic

on the road Fri/sat 8:30pm; sunday 4:15pm mon-thurs 6:30pm (4/15-18)

www.PageantChico.com

1099

$

+ tax

Thurs & Sat

Slow Cooked Pork Ribs

smothered in Chico’s Best BBQ Sauce served with Fries, Salad & Garlic Bread

YUM!

In Portugal, high-climbing Vinho Verdes grapes are harvested. PHOTOS BY FELICIANO GUIMARÃES

McGahan, manager and wine buyer at Monks, says she does at times carry Vinho Verdes—and, better yet, McGahan believes that soon she will rotate into her inventory some red Portuguese blends. Portuguese grapes themselves are now taking root increasingly around California as winemakers take greater interest in exploring new varieties. Hottest among these is a burly red-wine grape by the name of touriga nacional. Traditionally reserved for port-style sweet wines, touriga nacional can be fermented to dryness and may be shaping up to become the redwine superstar of Portugal, with shoulders broad enough to bump a Napa Valley cab off the table and with enough presence to draw the spotlight from Spain’s tempranillo. In the Sierra foothills, Bumgarner Winery, Obscurity Cellars, Oakstone Winery, and Jeff Runquist Wines have each made a touriga nacional. Statewide, a miniscule 200 acres of the variety are grown (the state’s cabernet sauvignon acreage tops 70,000), though just a decade ago that figure was closer to zero. In El Dorado Hills, at Shaker Ridge Vineyards, Andy Standeven grows just a single acre of touriga nacional, which he sells to several wineries. Standeven notes that marketing a new variety at the retail level is not always easy in established wine markets. “It’s very hard to break a new varietal into the people’s vocabulary,” said Standeven. “Someone has to experiment with these new grapes.” Winemaker Stuart Spencer is doing just this at St. Amant Winery in Lodi. Spencer’s family vineyard, best known for zinfandel, includes 25 acres of touriga nacional and other Portuguese grapes, such as souza, verdelho, tinta francisca, bastardo, and tinta cão. “These wines can be great, but they’re still a hard sell,” Spencer acknowledged. “You need to have people taste them if they’re going to buy them. They won’t just jump up and move off the shelf.” Ω

“Families Always Welcome” 344 W. Eighth Street • 343.2790 • Open Daily @ 11am

FRIDAY 4/12 – THURSDAY 4/18

4/11 Ukulele Orchestra

4/12 Ray Kurzweil

5/9 Paul Taylor Dance Co.

5/15 The Little Mermaid Jr.

All shows at Laxson Auditorium California State University, Chico

42 (Digital) (PG-13) 1:30PM 4:25PM 7:20PM 10:15PM ADMISSION (Digital) (PG-13) 11:40AM 2:15PM 4:50PM 7:25PM 10:00PM CALL, THE (Digital) (R) 12:40PM 3:00PM 5:20PM 7:40PM 10:10PM CROODS, THE (3D) (PG) 11:30AM 2:00PM 4:30PM 7:00PM CROODS, THE (Digital) (PG) 12:40PM 3:15PM 5:45PM 8:15PM EVIL DEAD (Digital) (R ) 12:45PM 3:10PM 5:30PM 8:00PM 10:25PM GI JOE: RETALIATION (3D) (PG-13) 11:45AM 2:25PM 5:05PM 7:45PM 10:25PM GI JOE: RETALIATION (Digital) (PG-13) 1:05PM 3:45PM 6:25PM 9:05PM

HOST, THE (2013) (Digital) (PG-13) 1:35PM 4:25PM 7:15PM 10:10PM JURASSIC PARK (2013) (3D) (PG-13) 4:30PM 7:30PM 10:30PM JURASSIC PARK (2013) (Digital) (PG-13) 1:30PM OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (Digital) (R) 11:20AM 2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:20PM OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL (3D) (PG) 1:00PM 4:05PM 7:05PM 10:05PM OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL (Digital) (PG) 11:35AM 2:35PM 5:35PM 8:35PM SCARY MOVIE 5 (Digital) (PG-13) 1:25PM 3:35PM 5:45PM 7:55PM 10:15PM

TICKETS - (530) 898-6333 or CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM April 11, 2013

CN&R 27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 4|11—WEDNESDAY 4|17 OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians

CAMMIES MUSIC FEST

Thursday, April 11-Saturday, April 13 Multiple venues SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY & SPECIAL CAMMIES INSERT

4/11, 5:30pm. Free. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891; www.news review.com/cammies.

CAMMIES INDIE/EXPERIMENTAL SHOWCASE: This year’s Indie/Experimental nominees for the Chico Area Music Awards are all over the map. Th, 4/11, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.newsreview.com/ cammies.

11THURSDAY

CAMMIES WORLD/CELTIC/REGGAE SHOWCASE: If you couldn’t tell by its long title, the World/Celtic/Reggae genre showcase is the most eclectic of the Chico Area Music Awards. Th, 4/11, 9pm. $5. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853; www.newsreview.com/ cammies.

BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

midnight. Lynn’s Optimo, 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

BLUES UNPLUGGED: An acoustic blues showcase with host Steven Truskol and guests Jive Coulis. Th, 4/11, 7-10pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

CAMMIES AMERICANA/COUNTRY SHOWCASE: The patio is hopping during

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473.

JOHN SEID & LARRY PETERSON: The local duo plays an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Th, 5:308:30pm through 4/25. Free. Grana, 198 E. Second St.; 809-2304.

UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN: A funny, virtuosic, twangy and footstomping homage to rock ‘n’ roll featuring eight ukulele players and bit of guitar thrown in for good measure. Th, 4/11, 7:30pm. $18-$32. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperfor mances.com.

12FRIDAY THE BLUE MERLES: Bakersfield-style honky-tonk dance music in the lounge.

F, 4/12, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

CAMMIES ELECTRONIC SHOWCASE: CAMMIES teams up with BassMint to produce this year’s Chico Area Music Awards Electronic Showcase. F, 4/12, 9:30pm. $2 before 10pm; $3 after. Peeking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 4; (530) 895-3888; www.newsreview.com/chico.

CAMMIES FUNK/JAM SHOWCASE: Share your sweat with your neighbors as the groove-makers of the CAMMIES Funk/Jam genre pack every danceable surface in the DownLo. F, 4/12, 8pm. $5 (one price for both Funk & Rock shows). The DownLo, 319 Main St.; (530)

892-2473; www.newsreview.com/ cammies.

CAMMIES JAZZ SHOWCASE: This year’s Chico Area Music Awards Jazz Showcase is our most eclectic ever. F, 4/12, 7pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.news review.com/cammies.

CAMMIES RAP SHOWCASE: Four of the six rap nominees will own the stage for first half of the night. F, 4/12, 8pm. $5. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.; (530) 8911853; www.newsreview.com/cammies.

CAMMIES ROCK SHOWCASE: It’s a happyhour rock fest as the brave Furlough Fridays and The Hambones represent the CAMMIES Rock genre. F, 4/12, 6pm. $5 (one price for both Funk & Rock shows). The DownLo, 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473; www.newsreview.com/ cammies.

COUNTRY NIGHT: Live country music with

the ’70s to today. F, 4/12, 9pm. Free. Towne Lounge, 327 Main St.; (530) 8960235.

RAVE SCENE: A full-on rave featuring a mega-trippy light show, glowsticks and DJs FreakBeatz, Emvee, 3W and Ian Monks. F, 4/12, 8:30pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

honky-tonk dance music in the lounge.

Sa, 4/13, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls

about real life issues like social media, bioethics and making a difference. F,

4/12, 7pm. $20-$25. Bidwell

Presbyterian Church, 208 W. First St.; (530) 343-1484; www.bidwellpres.org.

Sunday, April 14 Senator Theatre

covering four decades of hits in the brewery. Sa, 4/13, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.feather fallscasino.com.

THE BLUE MERLES: Bakersfield-style

SARA GROVES: The songwriter sings

THE EXPENDABLES

AEROROCKS: An Aerosmith tribute band

Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

CAMMIES ACOUSTIC/FOLK SHOWCASE: Eight of the 11 CAMMIES Folk/Acoustic nominees will take over the taproom for an afternoon acoustic fest. Sa, 4/13, 3pm. Free. Maltese Bar & Taproom, 1600 Park Ave.; (530) 3434915; www.newsreview.com/cammies.

SEE SUNDAY

Rancho Mars. F, 5-8pm. Free. Towne Lounge, 327 Main St.; (530) 896-0235.

DAMAGE INC.: An explosive early Metallica tribute band in the brewery.

F, 4/12, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls

Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.; (530) 343-7718.

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13SATURDAY

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NIGHTLIFE 2 CHAINZ

Dang! JMax Productions is the center of the rap universe this spring, with no less than Odd Future founder Tyler, The Creator coming to the Senator Theatre on May 15, and newly signed Def Jam rapper 2 Chainz hittin’ the stage on Monday, April 15. The Georgia-born MC’s 2012 album, Based on T.R.U. Story, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard charts, sold more than 500,000 copies and was even nominated for a 2013 Grammy for Best Rap Album.

CAMMIES BLUES SHOWCASE: It’s the CAMMIES dancers favorite CAMMIES night: the Blues Showcase. Sa, 4/13, 9pm. $5. The DownLo, 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473; www.news review.com/cammies.

CAMMIES HARD ROCK/METAL SHOWCASE: Four local HEAVYweights take over the cafe. Sa, 4/13, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.newsreview.com/cammies.

CAMMIES PUNK SHOWCASE: The Pyrate Punx have a marathon of nearly every punk band in town, playing one after the other to a mosh pit of appreciation. Sa, 4/13, 6:30pm. $5 donation. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 345-7672; www.newsreview.com/cammies.

SINGER-SONGWRITER SHOWCASE: A showcase with three singer-songwriters— Mandalyn May, Bryan Anthony Phoenix and Sanra Dolores. Sa, 4/13, 7-10pm.

don’t forget to file your taxis

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22 $2-$5. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

14SUNDAY THE EXPENDABLES: Often compared to Sublime, the laid-back ska, funk and surf rock band best understood by the stony love ballad, “Bowl for Two.” Pacific Dub and The Pyrx Band open. Su, 4/14, 7:30pm. $15. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproductions.net.

JAZZ: Weekly jazz. Su, 4-6pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

JOHN SEID & LARRY PETERSON: The local duo plays an eclectic mix of The Beatles, blues and standards. Su, 4/14, 6-9pm. Free. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.; (530) 891-6328; www.5thstreetsteakhouse.com.

15MONDAY 2 CHAINZ: M, 4/15, 8pm. $30. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproductions.net.

BLAME SALLY: Blame Sally is an all-female folk quartet mad up of talented multi-

instrumentalists and vocalists. M, 4/15, 7:30pm. $17. Sierra Nevada Big

Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 3452739; www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

16TUESDAY BAND OF HORSES: The twangy indierockers have established a niche with their folk-tinged, atmospheric pop tunes. The Olms open. Tu, 4/16, 8pm. $27.50. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproduc tions.net.

SHIGEMI & FRIENDS: Weekly live jazz with keyboardist Shigemi Minetaka and rotating accompaniment. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade; (530) 343-2056; www.farmstar pizza.com.

17WEDNESDAY

OLD-TIME SLOW JAM: Bring your bluegrass instruments and song suggestions for this jam hosted by Jim Meyers. Third W of every month, 7-9pm. Opens 4/17. Free. Sid Lewis’ Acoustic College, 932 W. Eighth Ave.; (530) 8768629.

OPEN MIC: All ages welcome. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

VINEGAR & OIL: The concert band (vinegar) and Jazz II (oil) play a wide array of concert pieces—including the music of Bach, Reed and Barnes—and big band music. W, 4/17, 7:30pm. Free. Harlen Adams Theatre, W. First St. CSU, Chico campus; (530) 898-5739.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country music

showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 79:30pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

TWIZTID: The “horror-core” hip-hop duo out of Michigan is comparable to the Insane Clown Posse. Potluck, (hed)PE and Glasses Malone open. W, 4/17, 7:30pm. $20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproduc tions.net.

BLAME SALLY

Monday, April 15 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE MONDAY

BOB KIRKLAND TRIO: Mandolin jazz and

standards. W, 4/17, 7-9pm. Free. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Dr.; (530) 8999250; www.winetimechico.com.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, tin pan alley, jazz and more.

W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St. Upstairs from The Beach.

MOVIEOKE: Participants will re-enact their favorite movie scenes in 3 to 5 minute skits. Proceeds benefit The Lost Cabaret’s upcoming Rock ‘n’ Roll High School performance. W, 4/17, 7:30pm. $10. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

K N I H T .

E E R F

$150 to the Sacramento Airport!

April 11, 2013

CN&R 29


DESIGNER

JEN_PU

ARTS DEVO Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

The Magic of 2 Tommy Flanagan & Jaki Byard Resonance Records

NO.

IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE

SPRING-SONGY Kind of buried in the excitement over Band of Horses

coming to town this Tuesday, April 16, is the mysterious opening band that will take the Senator stage before them, The Olms. Turns out it’s the new project of singer/songwriter Pete Yorn, who some of you might remember for his acclaimed 2001 debut Musicforthemorningafter, or Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties maybe for his recent stuff, including a duet 24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) album with Scarlett www.rapecrisis.org Johansson and his 2010 self-titled solo disc proREP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE duced by The Pixies’ Frank JLD 10.23.08 RAPE CRISIS INTERV. & PREV. Black. The new band, which also features L.A. The Olms California Communities country-rock singer/songwriter J.D. King, has an album on the way this June, and the lead single, “Wanna Feel It” (available for download on iTunes and Amazon), is a wonderful, breezy, super-catchy bit of hand-clapping pop that is destined to spend its summer at the beach. If you’re going to the show, don’t get lost at the bar and miss the opener.

342-RAPE

fr e e e v e nt

Rising AgAinst FRAcking touR Coming to chico

Sunday, April 14 2pm–6pm at The ARC Pavillon 2020 Park Ave • Guest Speakers • “The Sky is Pink” Movie • Los Caballitos de Cancion - Live Music

stAnd AgAinst FRAcking 30 CN&R April 11, 2013

ANOTHER SUMMER JAM PREDICTION The only bummer with Band of

Horses making it to Chico is that they are playing the same night that my current favorite band, Vampire Weekend, is going to be playing in Davis. The New York City quartet and Arcade Fire are probably the only bands these days for which I look forward to every release with the same energy as when I was in my early 20s, back Vampire Weekend when looking forward to new releases was mostly all I worried about in the world. VW’s third album is scheduled to come out May 14, and at www.vampireweekend.com there are already a couple of teaser tracks up, one of which, “Diane Young,” is a hyper and herky-jerky piece of kick-ass pop that is already melting faces off at your Memorial Weekend BBQ. Jam of the summer No. 1 is in the books a couple of months early. Nice.

POWERED BY MUSIC I gotta say that I’m a little bit overwhelmed by all

this music goodness, especially as it comes right in the middle of that local-music season which needs no introduction. Tonight the CN&R officially kicks off the CAMMIES with a free, Americana/country happyhour party on the outdoor patio at LaSalles. I’ll be there, soaking up the breeze and sunshine as The Blue Merles kick up some of that Bakersfield dust, then I’ll be moving onto the next 11 shows over the weekend [see this week’s special CAMMIES insert for the full schedule], trying to hold the whole production together while not missing out on too much of the party. Like everyone else, I have my preferred styles of music, and not every genre moves me. But what is consistent from showcase to showcase, and from band to band in Chico, is how much I enjoy the people making music of every style. I’ve always said that musicians are my favorite kind of people, and it’s in Chico where that notion was born and has been nurtured. Over the years I’ve made no secret of my opinion that the nominating/voting gimmick we use to drum up interest isn’t my favorite aspect of the CAMMIES. I think that the power and greatest value in this event is that, once a year, it brings us all together in the same room to hear a lot of music and create a memory. That’s the stuff I remember anyway, and I look forward to slapping a few backs and getting some hugs from some of my musical friends whom I haven’t seen in like … a year. Hello, Jack Dammit!

The 11 tunes here come from a 1982 gig by pianists Tommy Flanagan and Jaki Byard (in both duo and solo performances) at San Francisco’s Keystone Korner, the North Beach jazz club run by Todd Barkan from 1972-83. Barkan, who moved to the Big Apple some years ago and has just begun managing a Keystone Korner jazz series at Manhattan’s Iridium, co-produced this disc and is heard introducing the pianists before they launch into their first tune, a rousing version of Charlie Parker’s “Scrapple from the Apple.” Besides providing a ton of info (plus photos) on the musicians and club, the accompanying 24-page booklet also details the order of solos on the duo’s tunes, which is a major help. The elegant Flanagan’s forays into Ellingtonia include three Billy Strayhorn compositions—among them a luxurious version of “Chelsea Bridge”—while the earthier Byard’s three solo efforts include a remarkable rendition of Stevie Wonder’s “Send One Your Love,” on which he offers up tastes of Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” and goes back in history with some stride piano à la James P. Johnson. The disc closes with their version of Miles Davis’ “The Theme,” the tune Davis used to close his sets. This is a magnificent effort that demands—and will reward—one’s close attention.

MUSIC

—Miles Jordan

A Wicked War Amy S. Greenberg Knopf The invasion of Iraq was not the first U.S. war to be launched with a lie. That distinction probably goes to the 1846 Mexican-American War, though there’s usually a big serving of political prevarication whenever a nation starts building toward conflict. “In war, truth is the first casualty.” So said a wise Greek a few thousand years ago. President James K. Polk wasn’t doing anything new when he lied us into a war with Mexico by concocting a tale of aggression that hadn’t happened. Polk was intent on expanding American territory, and he wanted to provide new ground in which slavery could take root, so he sold a war based on jingoism, and off we went to Mexico to rape and pillage until the whole sorry business concluded with a reshaping of the map. In the interim, lots of people died, of course, including American troops picked off by Mexican guerrillas during the extended occupation of that country. Much of what is found in Amy Greenberg’s engrossing account of a little-remembered war seems eerily similar to what we’ve recently lived through in Iraq. Arrogance plus ignorance equals lots of dead people. Or to quote yet another sage, “It’s déjà vu all over again.”

BOOK

—Jaime O’Neill

God of War: Ascension Santa Monica Studio PlayStation 3 The latest entry in the God of War franchise attracted buyers, myself included, because of the addition of multiplayer levels. Unfortunately, there’s just not enough here to make the game worth playing for more than an hour. Ascension centers around the Spartan character Kratos, who is once again fighting his way toward an opponent who has wronged him in some way. This game is pretty short—I beat it in a few days—though the missions are a little tougher than previous entries. One of my main complaints is that a couple of the primary weapons from previous games—for example, the sword—have been replaced with “temporary” ones, which are virtually useless. I’ve never been a fan of the chains, a staple of God of War weaponry, so being stuck with only a temporary arsenal and the chains was a big letdown. The multiplayer mode feels like it was added on in an attempt to reach out to the Call of Duty audience, but it ends up being just a big jumble of people swinging axes around. Despite the fact that this is supposed to be a prequel to the series, it’s basically a stale repackaging of previous games.

GAME

—Plexifoil


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Coming Soon!

2 bed/2 bath, 1974 manufactured home on 1/4 acre in Chico. Possible owner carry. $118,500.

1 acre North Chico horse set-up, beautiful home and pool. Call for more info.

Dana W. Miller

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

KATHY KELLY 530-570-7403

DRE# 01860319

KathyKellyC21@gmail.com

• Bungalow 2 bed/1 bth, 818 sq ft, garden beds + more $159,900 • Condo, upstairs, upgraded 3 bd/2 ba, 1,025 sq ft. $149,000 • Horse Property, 9.90 Ac, 3 bed/2bth, 1,669 sq ft. $399,999 • Quality custom 3 bd/4 ba, 1.66a acs, pool + more $668,000 • Senior Manufactured ING! 2bd/1ba, 643 sq ft $15,000 PEND Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

USDA 100% FINANCING AVAILABLE on this new construction! Two plans to choose from & 8 different lots at this price, 3 bed & 2 bath models with a den & 3 car garage. 90-120 day build out, call me for materials list & subdivision information. $280,000

MARK REAMAN 530-228-2229 Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

Jeffries Lydon

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of March 25, 2013 — March 29, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS 196 Vista Del Rio St 14764 Woodbow Ct 13950 Jarvis Cir 144 Acacia Ave 635 Riverview Ct 2210 Oro Bangor Hwy 108 Acacia Ave 210 Shirley Ln 88 Lariat Loop 206 Windward Way 4520 Lower Wyandotte Rd 2782 Fay Way 72 Skyline Blvd 6667 Shay Ln 32 CN&R April 11, 2013

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Gridley Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise

$116,000 $213,000 $120,000 $259,000 $228,000 $198,000 $185,000 $140,000 $139,000 $132,000 $130,000 $119,000 $113,000 $265,000

3/ 2 3/ 1.5 2/ 1.5 4/ 3 2/ 2 1/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 1 3/ 1 3/ 1.5 2/ 2.5

SQ. FT. 1496 2454 1584 2595 1375 1200 2288 1456 1155 1144 980 1454 1190 1973

ADDRESS 2004 Hillpark Ln 281 Keffer Ln 183 Valley Ridge Dr 6567 Montna Dr 486 Green Oaks Dr 1773 Drendel Cir 890 Central Park Dr 6372 Harvey Rd 5880 Fickett Ln 6902 Farber Ln 5799 Ingalls Rd 1549 Kay Ct

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$260,000 $200,000 $190,000 $185,000 $162,500 $154,500 $146,000 $125,000 $115,500 $110,000 $109,000 $108,000

2/ 2.5 2/ 1 2/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1 2/ 1 2/ 1 2/ 1 2/ 2 2/ 1 3/ 1.5

SQ. FT. 2260 672 1802 1647 1540 993 1680 947 1002 1344 926 1088


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*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Drug & Alcohol Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480-577-1172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable Self-Pay / Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN)

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE A Beautiful Massage

in a warm tranquil studio. w/ Shower, $35 deal. Appts. 10am-7pm

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ROOMS FOR RENT JOHNSON HOUSE OF SOBRIETY

Men, women & women w/ children, a sober living environment, rooms for rent. includes utilities. $425/mo 530-520-5248

METAPHYSICAL FREE SPIRITUAL READINGS By Cittorah Will answer all you questions. Specializing in love, business, marriage, health & family. Chakra balancing, psychic readings & tarot card readings. 323-630-3424

SHARE LARGE HOME 1 block from Esplanade. Enjoy large bdrm, large pvt bath (tub & shower) living room, storage, seperate entrance. Share util w/ prof owner @ other end of house. Large fenced yard. Pet OK. $300/mo 2nd bdrm $100/ mo. Ideal for single parent and child. 530-566-1010

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CAT SITTER

Experienced & prefer near West East Ave.

530-345-2312

ITEMS FOR SALE For Sale 4-16 inch (5 lugnut) Eagle tires off of a Toyota Celeca - very little use on the tread $400. Sue 343-0614 or Michael 228-3823

WELLNESS SUPPLIES

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BULLETIN BOARD

House for Rent 4 Bed 2 Bath Fresh paint & new carpet north Chico 2 car garage $1400 rent/deposit please call 530-570-9479

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AUTOS 1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer. All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. $6000 530-895-8171

CLASSICS 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE at 2687 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. ALVRO RAY HUBBARD 2687 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. BEVERLY JUNE HUBBARD 2687 Grape Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: ALVRO R. HUBBARD Dated: February 27, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000281 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LTK REAL ESTATE REFERRALS at 9648 Jones Avenue Durham, CA 95938. LEE T KOEPPING 9648 Jones Avenue Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LEE T. KOEPPING Dated: March 12, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000358 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO VIRTUAL TOURS, NETGUAVA, SHARP VIRTUAL TOURS at 3209 Esplanade Suite 150 Chico, CA 95973. NETGUAVA INC 3209 Esplanade Suite 150 Chico, CA 95973 This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: STEPHEN CONNELL Dated: March 1, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000294 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEATHER’S NOVALTIES at 930 Columbus Avenue #2 Chico, Ca 95926 HEATHER GOMES 930 Columbus Avenue #2 Chico, CA 95926 This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HEATHER GOMES Dated: March 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000365 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL The following person has withdrawn as a partner from the partnership operating under THREE GIRLS AND A KITCHEN at 3183 Sespe Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. KIMBERLY LUCE 882 Glenn Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DAVID CHEN Dated: February 12, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000044 Published: March 21,21, April 4,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JADE RAVEN PHOTOGRAPHY at 1160 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. JADE ASHLEIGH MILES 1160 Lupin Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JADE MILES Dated: March 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000349 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS at 2197 North Ave Chico, CA 95926. PERRYMAN & ASSOCIATES, INC. 2197 North Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VICKI PERRYMAN, PRESIDENT Dated: March 14, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000385 Published: March 21,28, April 4,11, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BROWN AND GAMBOL ENTERPRISES, CHICO TAR HEELS BASKETBALL FAMILY RONALD BROWN 1617 E Lassen Ave Chico, CA 95973. MARLON GAMBOL 1617 E Lassen Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RON BROWN Dated: March 18, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000398 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FARMSTRONGBRAND, STOP AND STARE MEDIA GROUP at 568 Grand Smokey Ct Chico, CA 95973. CHRIS MOODY 568 Grand Smokey Ct Chico, CA 95973. MATT MOODY 568 Grand Smokey Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MATTHEW MOODY Dated: March 26, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000450 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as INCREDIWEAR EMPIRE at 260 Cohasset RD, Suite 150 Chico, CA 95926. PATRICK HALEY 3122 Calistoga Dr Chico, CA 95973. ED RODGERS 168 Donald Dr Chico, CA 95973. MIKE SWAIN 759 North 5th St San Jose, CA 95112. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PAT HALEY Dated: March 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000406 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DREAM HOME INVESTMENTS at 205 Hagenridge RD Chico, CA 95973. ALEX HOAG 205 Hagenridge RD Chico, CA 95973. DEBRA HOAG 205 Hagenridge RD Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: DEBRA HOAG Dated: February 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000234 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as VALUEPLAN at 1055 The Esplanade Suite 1 Chico, CA 95926. BUSINESS VALUE GROUP LLC 1055 The Esplande Suite 1 Chico, CA 95926 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: HANS P. SHROEDER Dated: March 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000394 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAMA SATTVA at 173. E. Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95926. CYNTHIA M GAGE

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173 E. Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CYNTHIA GAGE Dated: March 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000378 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BOBKAT PROPERTY SERVICES, BPS, BPS PROPERTIES at 3120 Cohasset Road Suite 10 Chico, CA 95973. BOBKAT BUILDERS, INC 3120 Cohasset Road Suite 10 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BROOKE SHELTON V.P. Dated: March 13, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000367 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WESTERN TERMITE SOLUTIONS at 43 Deer Run Lane Berry Creek, CA 95916. JAMES M HITESHEW 43 Deer Run Lane Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JIM HITESHEW Dated: February 26, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000273 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REAL DEAL TRAINING PROPS at 140 Estates Dr Chico, CA 95928. DOUG K MARTIN 140 Estates Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DOUG K MARTIN Dated: March 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000413 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OLOFAT ONE-BITE BARBECUE (BBQ) at 1040 Windsor Way Chico, CA 95926. SIGRAH BILLYOS 1040 Windsor Way Chico, CA 95926. MD OBET 1050 Columbus Ave Apt 19 Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT SUZUKI 180 E. 8TH Avenue #203 Chico, CA 95926 This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SCOTT SUZUKI Dated: March 22, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000432 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AKE BREAKERS at 702 Mangrove Ave # 143 Chico, CA 95926. DAVID LOUIS WALDRON 1764 Elm St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID WALDRON Dated: February 25, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000265 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PURE THRIFT at 1306 Palm Ave Chico, CA

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95926. JEANNE M SCHADEMAN 1306 Palm Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEANNE M SCHADEMAN Dated: March 12, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000361 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business names: STOP AND STARE MEDIA GROUP, FARMSTRONGBRAND at 568 Grand Smokey CT Chico, CA 95973. CHRIS MOODY 568 Grand Smokey CT Chico, CA 95973. MATT MOODY 568 Grand Smokey Ct Chico, CA 95973. PAUL AITKEN 568 Grand Smokey CT CHico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CHRIS MOODY Dated: March 26, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000408 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NURTISHOP CHICO at 1141 Forest Avenue STE 20 Chico, CA 95928. BURTON, MCVANNEL AND RIX LLC 1208 Bidwell Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DARCI BURTON MEMBER/ MANAGER Dated: March 27, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000458 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL AGENCY, HPA at 2555 Zanella Way Suite F Chico, CA 95928 HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL AGENCY 2555 Zanella Way Suite F Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KYLE NELSON Dated: March 11, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000354 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TUXEDO DEN at 6234 Greenback Lane Citrus Heights, CA 95621. MR FORMAL INC 1205 SE Grand Ave Portland, OR 97214. State: OR This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MATT ROSENBERGER, CONTROLLER Dated: march 19, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000405 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TWELVE SEASONS at 296 E 8TH Avenue Chico, CA 95926. ZI QUAN KUANG 820 W 4TH Avenue # 244

CLASSIFIEDS

CONTINUED ON 34

April 11, 2013

CN&R 33


Chico, CA 95926 KIRILL ALEKSANDROVICH OBRAZSTOV 296 E 8TH Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ZI KUANG Dated: March 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000471 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIFTH AND ORIENT at 1692 Mangrove Ave #142 Chico, CA 95926 PHUONG K LY 533 Orient Street Chico, CA 95928. LEAH E MORRIS 117 W 18TH Street B Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: PHUONG LY Dated: March 6, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000319 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVE YOUR LEAP LIST at 3112 Ceanothus Ave Chico, CA 95973. DANELLE LEES 3112 Ceanothus Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANELLE LEES Dated: March 29, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000473 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE KITCHEN TABLE at 1250 East Ave Suite #30 Chico, CA 95926. NATHAN DANIEL JOHNSON 1833 Roth Street #B Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NATHAN JOHNSON Dated: April 2, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000479 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTHERN SERVICES at 71 Felicidad Lane Chico, CA 95973. Lyle Foster 71 Felicidad Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LYLE FOSTER Dated: April 2, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000481 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PURE SKIN at 136 W. 3rd Street Chico, CA 95928. YVONNE MARIE GAILEY 7 Sunland Drive Chico, CA 95926. LORRAINE NELSON 14 Walnut Park Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: YVONNE GAILEY Dated: March 21, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000429 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL The following person has withdrawn as partner from the partnership operating under: PURE SKIN at 334 Broadway Chic, CA 95928. JANNAFER REED 347 Legion Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by General Partnership. Signed: YVONNE GAILEY Dated: March 14, 2013 FBN Number: 2008-0001752 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: THE IZEN ARTWORK at 14421 Carnegie RD Magalia, CA 95954. DIANA FAY EISENBEISS 14421 Carnegie RD Magalia, CA 95954. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: DIANA EISENBEISS Dated: April 3, 2013 FBN Number: 2011-0000334 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROKN 4M BBQ at 221 Windward Way Oroville, CA 95965. DIANA MCDOWELL 221 Windward Way oroville, Ca 95965. MORGAN MCDOWELL 221 Windward Way Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: MORGAN MCDOWELL Dated: March 28, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000464 Published: April 11,18,25, May 2, 2013

NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE EUGENE L. GIBESON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: EUGENE L GIBESON AKA EUGENE LEROY GIBESON. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BRIAN GIBESON. in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: BRIAN GIBESON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: May 2, 2013

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34 CN&R April 11, 2013

Time: 1:30pm Dept:TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1)four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representativ, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40580 Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973. Published: April 11,18,25, 2013 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California selfstorage facility act (B&P code 21770 et.sec.) the undersigned will sell the contents of: Candace Carby Unit 219: clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. Shelly Byrd Unit 078: clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. Amanda Wood Unit 245: clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. To the highest bidder on: April 27, 2013 Beginning at 12:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Ln, Chico, CA 95926. Published: April 11, 18, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHRISTY ANNA WENZEL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHRISTY ANNA WENZEL Proposed name: CONNOR ALWYN WENZEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 3, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: March 15, 2013 Case Number: 159118 Published: March 28 April 4,11,18, 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MUHAMMED ALTALIB filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RENAD ALTALIB Proposed name: DANAH ALTALIB THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 17, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: March 20, 2013 Case Number: 159205 Published: March 28 April 4,11,18, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EMARELD ANNA-ERICKA BEHRENS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EMARELD ANNA-ERICKA BEHRENS Proposed name: EMERALD ANNA-ERICKA BEHRENS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 17, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: March 20, 2013 Case Number: 159120 Published: March 28 April 4,11,18, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SEAN THOMAS OVERTON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SEAN THOMAS OVERTON Proposed name: SEAN CONSTANTINE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objec-

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tion that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 10, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: March 22, 2013 Case Number: 158833 Published: April 4,11,18,25, 2013

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: STEVEN R MCCORMICK AKA STEVE R MC CORMICK, an

this Legal Notice continues

individual, and Does 1-100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC, A Limited liability company, dba, ACCOUNT RESOLUTION ASSOCIATES. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp),

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your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association.

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NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alaine Patti-Jelsvik PERSOLVE, LLC dba Account Resolution Associates 9301 Winnetka Ave. Suite B Chatsworth, CA 91311 (818)534-3100 Dated: August 13, 2013 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 157524 Published: March 28, April 4,11,18, 2013

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ARIES (March 21-April 19):

German theologian Martin Luther (1483-1546) was a central figure in the rebellion against the Catholic Church that led to the Protestant Reformation. You’ll never guess where he was when he was struck by the epiphany that became the core axiom of his new religion. I’ll tell you: He was sitting on the toilet in the Wittenberg Monastery. The Holy Spirit gave him the crucial knowledge then and there, or so he testified. In this spirit, Aries, keep a very open mind about where you will be and what you will be doing when your illuminations arrive this week.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your task is to uncover the semihappy ending that was hidden back in the story’s beginning. Once you do that, you may be able to create a graceful and honorable climax. In fact, I don’t think you will be able to bring about the semihappy ending any other way. It’s crucial that you return to the original flash of inspiration—the time when all the plot lines that eventually developed were first germinating. You need to remember fate’s primal promise. You’ve got to read the signs you missed in the early going. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you play

poker, the odds are one in 649,740 that you will get a royal flush. That’s an ace, king, queen, jack and 10 of one suit. As for drawing a straight flush—any five consecutive cards of one suit—the odds are one in 72,192. Judging from the current astrological omens, Gemini, I’d say your chance of getting one of those hands is far better than usual—maybe one in 88,000 for the royal flush and one in 8,888 for the straight flush. But those still aren’t great odds. On the other hand, getting a flush—all five cards of the same suit—is normally one in 509, but these days, it’s pretty likely for you. The moral of the story, not just for when you’re playing cards, but in whatever you do: Expect really good luck, but not miraculous, out-of-this-world luck.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Wherever

you stand, be the soul of that place,” wrote the poet Rumi. This is excellent advice for you right now, Cancerian. You are nearing the peak of your power to express yourself with beautiful accuracy. You have more skill than usual at understanding and conveying the interesting truth. As a result, you’re in a position to wield extra influence. People are receptive to being moved by your heartfelt intelligence. So, please do more than simply push for greater efficiency, order and discipline. Those things are good, but I hope you will also be a radiant role model who exemplifies what it means to be soulful.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Golden Rock is a

Buddhist holy site in Myanmar. It’s a small pagoda built on top of a giant boulder that in turn seems to be precariously balanced at the edge of a down-sloping bed of rock. How does the boulder remain stationary? Why doesn’t it roll off the edge? It appears to defy gravity. Legend says that it’s held in place by a single strand of hair from the Buddha’s head. I suspect that many of you Leos will soon have access to a tricky asset with resemblances to that magic strand. True, it might be merely metaphorical. But if used correctly, it could become a key element in a future foundation.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s soul-

searching season: a good time to go in search of your soul. To aid your quest, I’ll offer a few lines from “A Few Words on the Soul,” a poem by Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska: “We have a soul at times. / No one’s got it non-stop, / for keeps. / Day after day, / year after year / may pass without it. … For every thousand conversations, / it participates in one, / if even that, / since it prefers silence. … It’s picky: it doesn’t like seeing us in crowds, / our hustling for a dubious advantage / and creaky machinations make it sick. / Joy and sorrow / aren’t two different feelings for it. / It attends us / only when the two are joined. / We can count on it / when we’re sure of nothing / and curious about

Holistic healer

by Rob Brezsny everything. / … It won’t say where it comes from / or when it’s taking off again, / though it’s clearly expecting such questions. / We need it / but apparently / it needs us / for some reason too.” (Translation by Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh. Read the whole poem at http://tinyurl.com/searchsoul.)

by

Shannon Rooney

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I’ve never

believed in God,” said Mexican painter Diego Rivera, “but I believe in Picasso.” My poetmusician friend Tanya has a similar philosophy. “I don’t believe in God, or even Goddess, for that matter,” she says. “But I do believe in Patti Smith.” Do you have a God substitute, Libra? Or, if you do have faith in a Cosmic Wow, is there also a more approachable, second-tier source of divinity you love? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you would really benefit from feeling an intimate kind of reverence right now—a tender devotion for something higher and brighter that awakens the sleeping part of your lust for life.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This would be an excellent time to stage staring contests with yourself in the mirror. There’s a high likelihood that you will win every time. I think you’ll also have great success whenever you try to read your own mind. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ve got an uncanny knack for plucking buried secrets and self-deceptions out of their hiding places. One more thing, Scorpio: Have you ever considered how fun it might be to wash your own brain and kick your own butt? Now would be an excellent time to experiment with those radical acts of healing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “It’s so hard to forget pain, but it’s even harder to remember sweetness,” writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. “We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.” Your assignment in the coming days, Sagittarius, is to prove Palahniuk wrong. As the surges of sweetness flow through you, as your secret joy ripens into bright blooming bliss, imprint the sensations on your memory. Vow to remember them for the rest of your life. Make these breakthrough moments into talismans that will serve as magical spells whenever you need rejuvenation in the future. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein had his priorities straight. This is what he said about his profession: “In philosophy the race is won by the one who can run slowest—the one who crosses the finish line last.” It’s my belief, Capricorn, that a similar rule should apply to you in the coming days—no matter what project you’re working on or goal you’re trying to accomplish. Proceed slowly enough to be absolutely thorough, meticulous and conscientious. As you make your way to the finish line, be as deep as you dare.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of April 11, 2013

Eve Crowe was in her mid-20s when she first explored holistic medicine to help her with health issues. She was well within two weeks, which inspired her to want to help others. “I went from being a travel agent to assisting others with their health and well-being,” she said. Crowe, who has more than 20 years’ experience as a shamanic healer, moved from the Bay Area to Chico in February. “I put the intention into my meditation: Where can I live that has both a country and a city feeling? Everyone I met started talking about Chico, and that got my curiosity going,” she said. “That’s what happens when you have an intention and meditate on something and put it out there to the universe that you want to make a change. Things start happening to move you in that direction.” Crowe can be reached at evacrowe@yahoo.com or www.eevebcrowe.com.

esteem, or life issues, such as money or relationship issues.

And you also teach workshops and coach? I teach reiki and shamanism and do life coaching. My clients are all over the world—I do phone sessions, and I have an office in Chico where I can meet with clients.

What do you do as a holistic practitioner?

How did your first workshop in Chico go?

I have three basic healings that I do: shamanism, clearing core beliefs and patterns, and aligning the subconscious mind with the conscious mind. Within six months, most people see their lives change. I can read people really well—I can tell just by seeing someone what their core issues are. With every person it’s different as to which techniques I use. I love animals and do the same healings on animals that I do on people.

I had a class on shamanism and power animals the weekend before last, and 22 people showed up. That let me know people here are open to and thirsty for shamanism.

What is shamanism? Shamanism is an ancient form of healing where you’re healing the soul from past traumas that can create pain in the body, low self-

What’s a success story? There was a man who was working at a bank, and his dream was to own his own investment company, but he grew up hearing “there’s not enough money.” We worked on removing limiting beliefs and aligned him to believing he could have his own company in six months and could make a million dollars his first year, and that’s what happened. My best client is someone who wants to make a change in life.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter anthonypeytonporter@comcast.net

Regarding the P.O.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In

Samuel Beckett’s novel Molloy, the main character talks about a long overland journey he took on foot and by bicycle. Before the trip, he had read somewhere that when people are lost in a forest, they often imagine they’re moving in a straight line when in fact they’re going in a circle. That’s why, during his own travels, he intentionally walked in a circle, hoping thereby to go straight. Although this might sound like a loopy strategy, Aquarius, I think it will make sense for you to adopt in the coming week. Your apparent path may be very different, maybe even opposite, to your actual path.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you in

competition with someone who is doing mediocre work? Do you find it incomprehensible that anyone would pay attention to that weak expression instead of flocking to your beautiful vibe? If so, here’s my advice. Withdraw your attention from your inferior opponent. Don’t waste a minute feeling jealous or resentful or incredulous. Instead, concentrate your energy on making your production so strong and smart and irresistible that you simply overshadow and overwhelm your rival’s.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Editor’s note: Anthony is taking a break this week, so we’re re-running this column from February 2012. I love the post office. The post office is a useful government service and worth paying for, like Amtrak, Social Security, and universal single-payer health care. We shouldn’t expect it to make a profit or even break even—we should just pay for it. One of my uncles worked for the post office for 42 years. He had a good job and was one of my mother’s heroes. I worked for the post office for a couple of years in the sixties and, while working there now is bound to differ from my experience, the post office is still doing the same thing it was doing when I had the best part-time job in town. Management was a bit dim—as management tends to be—and it didn’t matter because everybody knew that the goal was delivering stuff. We never had strategy meetings or new thoughts about what to do. We delivered stuff. Because we all knew why we were there management had limited influence. I don’t know what this month’s first-class postage is. I don’t care. It’s worth it. I can give the post office a letter and somebody will put it in the designated

slot anywhere I say in the continental United States for less than 50 cents. What’s cheaper than that? Nothing. Businesses that depend on cheap junk mail can die and go away. Whenever I piece together postage with several stamps I put extra stamps on as a tip. Since the post office people should expect to do the necessary work for every stamp sold, when I buy stamps and don’t ask anything in return, I feel like I’m giving them a little respite, a slackening in their steady pace, a minuscule, anonymous break. The Internet has caused the post office to lose a lot of business. That’s traumatic for the people who make their livings that way, and I hope the government will do right by them as they try to find another way to make a living. I hope they can be as useful as they are now. I give a little extra to the city of Chico, too. I used to keep nickels, dimes and quarters for parking meters, and now I use quarters only, even if I’m only gonna be five minutes. You’re welcome, Chico. If you handed me a No. 10 envelope and told me where to put it in Chicago or Key West for 50 cents, I might tell you where to put it. If the post office charged a dollar instead of the current rate, I wouldn’t squawk. Deliver your own mail and see how you like it. April 11, 2013

CN&R 35


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2013 CAMMIES Music Festival

Showcase schedules for April 11-13, 2013

I

t’s that time of year again, when the Chico News & Review rocks, moshes, shakes, twirls and bangs its head to the beat of our vibrant and eclectic music scene. It’s CAMMIES season! That extra-sunny couple of weeks during the spring when the Chico Area Music Awards takes over the town, first with the three-day CAMMIES Music Festival, featuring 12 genres of local music being showcased during 12 separate live shows, at seven local venues, over three nights, ThursdaySaturday, April 11-13. We’ve tried to stretch out the music over a longer period of time each day of the fest, and to avoid as many genre conflicts as possible in order to give rabid local-music fans a chance to catch the maximum amount of bands. And next week, it’s the FREE CAMMIES Finale/Awards Show, where People’s Choice winners (as well as Critics’ Choice Awards) will be announced at the Chico Women’s Club (592 E. Third St.), on Saturday, April 20, 2-7 p.m. But before then, make sure to log on at www.newsreview.com/cammies to vote for your faves. Polls close at midnight, April 14. Ready? Here we go!

THURSDAY, APRIL 11

FRIDAY, APRIL 12

Americana/Country Showcase, 5:30 p.m., no cover, 21-over

Rock Showcase, 6 p.m., $5, all Folk/Acoustic Showcase, ages (one price for Rock 3:30 p.m., no cover, 21-over Maltese Taproom, 1600 Park Ave. & Funk/Jam)

LaSalles, 229 Broadway (on the patio) 5:45 - Broken Rodeo 6:20 - Gordy Ohliger 6:55 - The Blue Merles 7:40 - Three Fingers Whiskey 8:25 - Low Flying Birds

DownLo, 319 Main St. (downstairs) 6:30 - The Hambones 7:20 - Furlough Fridays

Indie/Experimental Showcase, 8 p.m., $5, all ages

Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave. 7:10 - Eric Peter 7:55 - First Monday Jazz Series 8:40 - Christine LaPado-Breglia Trio 9:25 - Chico Jazz Collective 10:10 - Bogg

Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave. 8:15 - Clouds on Strings 9:05 - Pageant Dads 9:55 - French Reform 10:45 - West by Swan

World/Celtic/Reggae Showcase, 9 p.m., $5, 21-over Lost on Main, 319 Main St. 9:15 - Los Caballitos de La Canción 10:00 - Ha’Penny Bridge 10:50 - Dylan’s Dharma 11:40 - Soul Union

Jazz Showcase, 7 p.m., $5, all ages

Funk/Jam Showcase, 8 p.m., $5 (one price for Rock & Funk/Jam) DownLo, 319 Main St. (downstairs) 8:15 - Black Fong 9:00 - Alli Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co. 9:45 - Gravybrain 10:30 - Jeff Pershing Band 11:15 - Swamp Zen

Rap Showcase, 8 p.m., $5, 21-over Lost on Main, 319 Main St. 8:20 - Lynguistix 9:00 - Big Slim 9:40 - Resonators 10:20 - TyBox

Electronic Showcase, 9:30 p.m., $2 (before 10); $3 (after 10), 21-over Peeking Restaurant, 243 W. Second St. 9:30 - Factor 8 10:10 - ALO 10:50 - Billy the Robot 11:30 - DJ Becca 12:10 - Simple Science 12:50 - Eyere Eyes 2013 CAMMIES ARTWORK BY RICK BARNETT

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 3:45 - Envelope Peasant & the Scientific Orchestra 4:20 - John Paul Gutierrez 4:55 - Fera 5:30 - Pat Hull 6:05 - Bunnymilk 6:40 - Kyle Williams 7:15 - Aubrey Debauchery

Punk Showcase, 6:30 p.m., $5 donation, all ages Monstros, 628 W. Sacramento Ave. 6:30 - Brass Hysteria! 6:45 - Nothing Left 7:00 - Born Into This 7:15 - Big Tree Fall Down 7:30 - Ryan Davidson 7:45 - Michelin Embers 8:00 - Badger 8:15 - Impulse 8:30 - Icko Sicko 8:45 - Master Lady 9:00 - Fight Music 9:15 - The Oisters 9:30 - Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise 9:45 - Zabaleen 10:00 - Severance Package 10:15 - Mom & Dad 10:30 - Season of the Witch

Hard Rock/Metal Showcase, 8 p.m., $5, all ages Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave. 8:15 - Teeph 9:15 - Into the Open Earth 10:15 - Cold Blue Mountain

Blues Showcase, 9 p.m., $5, 21-over

New ! Venue

DownLo, 319 Main St. (downstairs) 9:00 - Laurie Dana & Eric Weber 9:30 - Big Mo & The Full Moon Band

Go to www.newsreview.com/cammies to vote! Polls close at midnight, April 14. April 11, 2013

OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES 3


2013 CAMMIES

BALLOT T

Rockin’ 101 Years in Business! Congratulations to all of the nominated

bands! Visit our booth at the CAMMIES Finale & Awards Show for some delicious, musical munchies!

he nominees in 11 of the 12 genre categories below were chosen by the Chico News & Review’s CAMMIES selection committee. (The one exception being the Punk genre, which— in the spirit of the all-inclusive Pyrate Punx who host the Punk Showcase at Monstros every year—features every punk band in the area as a nominee.) The selection committee is made up of local musicians, promoters, DJs, soundpeople, journalists, music-store employees and music fans, and the members’ sifted through the hundreds of eligible local artists to pick their favorites from the past year. Now it’s your turn. Go check out the bands at the showcases (April 11-13), and between now and April 14, log on at www.newsreview.com/cammies and cast your votes for your faves. The winners of the People’s Choice awards will be announced, along with the Critics’ Choice awards, at the 2013 CAMMIES Finale/Awards Show on Saturday, April 20, 2-7 p.m., at Chico Women’s Club.

FOLK /ACOUSTIC

Aubrey Debauchery Bunnymilk Envelope Peasant & the Scientific Orchestra Evin Wolverton Fera John Paul Gutierrez Kyle Williams Lish Bills MaMuse Pat Hull The Railflowers

JAZZ

Big Slim The Hooliganz Lynguistix Resonators Twisted Strategies TyBox

BLUES

09

10

Oroville 533–1488 Chico 898–1388 4 OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES April 11, 2013

WORLD /CELTIC / REGGAE

AMERICANA / COUNTRY

Bogg Chico Jazz Collective Christine LaPado-Breglia Trio Eric Peter First Monday Jazz Series

Best Asian Cuisine | Best Take-Out | Best Restaurant in Oroville

Alli Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co. Black Fong Gravybrain Jeff Pershing Band Swamp Zen

Boss 501 Dylan’s Dharma Ha’Penny Bridge Los Caballitos de La Canción Soul Union Wolf Thump

The Blue Merles Broken Rodeo Gordy Ohliger Low Flying Birds Michelin Embers Three Fingers Whiskey

Wishing you health & happiness!

JAM /FUNK

Big Mo & The Full Moon Band Ira Walker Sapphire Soul Second Hand Smoke Swamp Daddy

ROCK

Furlough Fridays Gentlemen’s Coup The Hambones Perpetual Drifters Surrogate

RAP

HARD ROCK / METAL

Amarok Armed For Apocalypse Cold Blue Mountain A Holy Ghost Revival Into the Open Earth Teeph

PUNK

Animal Cruelty Badger Baghdad Batteries Big Tree Fall Down Born Into This Brass Hysteria! Cody K & The Thundertrain Express Disorderly Event

Fight Music Filthy Luke Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise Icko Sicko In Reach Jay Decay Jorge Jonze Kasm Mom & Dad Nothing Left The Oisters Pintlifter The Pushers Ryan Davidson Season of the Witch Severance Package The Suspects Zabaleen

INDIE / EXPERIMENTAL

Clouds on Strings French Reform Pageant Dads The Shimmies West by Swan

ELECTRONIC (PRODUCER & DJ)

Electronic producer ALO Billy the Robot Kezwik Electronic DJ DJ Becca Eyere Eyes Simple Science

Log on and vote at www.newsreview.com/cammies


Apri l 11, 2013

Official guide to CAMMIES music showcases 5


2013 CAMMIE Nominees OK, we admit it. We have a problem. We just can’t stop at five bands per genre. It doesn’t seem right to exclude an act that is one vote shy of being our selection committee’s fifth choice. So that’s why some genres have more nominees than others for the 2013 Chico Area Music Awards. And with this year’s Acoustic/Folk category, the voting was especially tight, so we let in 11 nominees! Of course, the Punk genre, as always, is a come one, come all egalitarian free-for-all of communal goodness, making the eighth edition of the CAMMIES our most band-packed celebration of Butte County’s energetic and eclectic music scene ever. Read through our little snapshots and get out to the showcases this weekend, and go to www.newsreview.com/cammies and do your part by voting for your faves.

Americana/ Country

The Blue Merles: This country quartet embraces the Bakersfield sound made famous by Buck Owens and Merle Haggard, which is to say the best kind of country music. Of course, they crank it up a bit. But if you close your eyes, you’ll be magically whisked away to the Crystal Palace. Broken Rodeo: This two-piece country outfit keeps things sparse— guitar, mandolin, suitcase percussion—which leaves more room for their yarns of love lost and life on the road. It’s enough to put a tear in your beer—which calls for more beer. Gordy Ohliger: This self-proclaimed “musical Mark Twain” is about the only person on the planet who can get away with calling himself a “banjo-ologist.” He performs all over—both solo and with other players—and partakes in speaking engagements at various museums. Ohliger also has also been called a Local Bad-Ass … not self-proclaimed. Low Flying Birds: Made up of longtime local Americana and jam-band musicians, Low Flying Birds call themselves “An Original Acoustic California Outlaw Grass Dance Band.” Fair enough. Whenever these picker-grinners are involved there’s going to be lots of dancing on grass. Three Fingers Whiskey: The elder Michelin Embers

Three Fingers Whiskey

Gordy Ohliger

statesmen (and woman) of local country, Three Fingers Whiskey continue to play originals inspired by the Highway Men and good ol’-fashioned rock ’n’ roll. And whiskey. And fingers. What else really needs to be said here? Michelin Embers: Post-atomic porch music for the people living in the woodwork. These twangers have played punk clubs as well as atop flatbed trucks in more off-the-beaten-path podunks. It’s all about hardlivin’ and broken hearts.

Indie/ Experimental

vana) continue to write songs that are lean and mean, and immediately catchy. Live, they take on even more gravitas. Offstage, the members are cuddly, furry little men that just want a hug. West By Swan: These dinosaurs will definitely make the Earth shake. You might not find a louder, more ferocious band with such Zen-like members. West By Swan’s music is thick and heavy, much like their beards and their beers.

World/Celtic/ Reggae

Clouds on Strings: Math is never fun. Math rock can be tolerable. But these lads out of the Chico State music program know how to make a three-over-four hemiola a real kick in the pants. This adds to the probability that there is a god. Not to mention they like King Crimson and Steely Dan, both pluses. French Reform: These oldies but newbies are sort of a United Nations of local indie rock, featuring members of The Yule Logs, Shabby Car and a former member of Into the Open Earth. As French Reform, they divvy up pop that’s precious and precocious, with lots of synthy doodles that draw a line running from MTV-new wave to Franz Ferdinand. Pageant Dads: A band with a concept … now there’s a concept! Pageant Dads play along to a fictitious backstory of four fathers who met at their daughters’ pageants. Quirk and drama ensues. And the storyline keeps growing. The band even wrote a Valentine’s Day musical comedy. Musically, they recall Zappa playing through the stock speakers of a 2009 Sebring. The Shimmies: Still shimmying their way through Chico’s laid-back music scene, the brothers Galloway (reared on Simon & Garfunkel and Nir-

Boss 501: Ska and reggae have been effectively shunned by hipsters over the past decade in order to make way for chill wave, or whatever flavor tastes good that month. This eightpiece bucks the trends, keeping blueeyed ska on the radar, at least in Chico, which makes them more punk rock than most punk rockers. Dylan’s Dharma: Dylan Seid has been making his way to Zion for years now in various incarnations of Dylan’s Dharma. As Chico’s hippie culture continues to twirl, Dylan’s Pageant Dads

Dharma adds reggae flavor and poprock sensibility to the lost art of slow-groove breakdowns, keeping local dance floors alive in 2013. Ha’Penny Bridge: Mark McKinnon mixes the Old World with new age with his Celtic ensemble, Ha’Penny Bridge. Fastidiously recalling Irish history and lore, McKinnon spins it into yarns that keep it real here in Chico, unlike those green-beer specials of yore. Los Caballitos de la Canción: This nine-piece made up of some of the finest local musicians—including bandleader Jo Chavez—are bringing a little Latin culture to white-bread Chico. The music is acoustic and really quite lovely. Their six-song EP is a good place to start, but live is where it’s at. It’s like having our very own Buena Vista Social Club, but, you know, more white. Soul Union: The name says it all. Or maybe not? We do know the vocal delivery of Johnny Dutro is frantic as he spits inspirational lyrics. And it’s a funky bunch of percussion-heavy world styles guaranteed to get people to kick off their shoes and incite massive drum circles. We do know that. Wolf Thump: OG MoHips drummer and The Loyd Family Players percussionist Mike Wofchuck brings us another samba troupe, a rag-tag collection of lively drummers called Wolf Thump.

All the bands Chico can handle Rock

Dylan’s Dharma

Boss 501

Furlough Fridays: What do you get when you cross NOFX, Smashing Pumpkins and Alice in Chains? It’s Furlough Fridays, which are all about big, fat riffs, all gussied up by vocalist Minnie Mental. Gentlemen’s Coup: Scott Barwick continues to harness a good acid trip through Gentlemen’s Coup, a band that pays especially close attention to out-there, withinthe-lines pop of the Plastic Ono Band. It’s heavy on Mellotron and piano, with enough spacey voyages to ensure a far-out trip. Perpetual Drifters: Fronted by songwriter Garrett Gray, the Perpetual Drifters lie on that intersection between early Byrds and the later twangy, hazy influence of Gram Parsons. There are hooks aplenty that will get lodged

Los Caballitos de la Canción

The Hambones

Soul Union

Gentlemen’s Coup

Clouds on Strings

West By Swan

Ha’Penny Bridge

intro (and Punk) by

Jason Cassidy

hip-hop, and even Star Wars influences in there. And their out-there sounds are welcome in a musical style steeped in tradition. Chico Jazz Collective: Featuring some of Chico’s best-known names: D’Augelli, Winslow, Delgardo, Chico Jazz Collective is brimming with so much talent, it’s as if Zeus put together his own house band. Kraken beware! Bogg: Featuring members of local Christine LaPado-Breglia Trio: prog-rock band Clouds on Strings, CN&R Greenways/Healthlines editor Bogg takes an avant-garde approach and stand-up bassist Christine LaPato jazz. You’ll hear a little Zappa, do-Breglia fronts her own jazz trio, which takes a quirky approach to jazz standards, melding bluegrass Christine LaPado-Breglia Trio and jazz together with Chris Wenger’s fun vocals. Eric Peter: This impeccable guitar player has been performing in and around Chico for more than three decades. Peter knows jazz and the blues like the back of his calloused hand. When the mood strikes he can also be spotted playing some mean slide guitar on his sevenstring with a Budweiser bottle and/or a beer pitcher. First Monday Jazz Series: With so much local talent, it’s insane that jazz has been relegated to a background lilt for dinner crowds. CAMMIE Award-winning bassist Jonathan Stoyanoff brings together a rotating crew of local players for the weekly First Monday Jazz Chico Jazz Collective concert series at Café Coda as a way to move the emphasis away from people’s plates and back onto the music. yet. These cats are somewhat enigmatic though—you won’t see them play out very often, but if you put the record on during your next party, even your hippest guests will be impressed.

Jazz

Bogg

NOMINEES continued on page 8

Surrogate Perpetual Drifters

The Shimmies

6 OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES April 11, 2013

Eric Peter

Furlough Fridays

Low Flying Birds

Broken Rodeo

in your ears, and clever lyrics to give your gray matter a good kneading. The Hambones: Garage rock never gets old, and The Hambones, with their collective love of old R&B and rock ’n’ roll, seem poised to spike the punch bowl at the sock hop with their timeless, fun and catchy sound. Surrogate: Chris Keene has been fronting his band Surrogate for five years, quietly putting out tremendous pop records. The band’s latest, Post Heroic, is their most energetic

bios by

Mark Lore

French Reform

First Monday Jazz Series Wolf Thump April 11, 2013

OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES 7


2013 CAMMIE Nominees OK, we admit it. We have a problem. We just can’t stop at five bands per genre. It doesn’t seem right to exclude an act that is one vote shy of being our selection committee’s fifth choice. So that’s why some genres have more nominees than others for the 2013 Chico Area Music Awards. And with this year’s Acoustic/Folk category, the voting was especially tight, so we let in 11 nominees! Of course, the Punk genre, as always, is a come one, come all egalitarian free-for-all of communal goodness, making the eighth edition of the CAMMIES our most band-packed celebration of Butte County’s energetic and eclectic music scene ever. Read through our little snapshots and get out to the showcases this weekend, and go to www.newsreview.com/cammies and do your part by voting for your faves.

Americana/ Country

The Blue Merles: This country quartet embraces the Bakersfield sound made famous by Buck Owens and Merle Haggard, which is to say the best kind of country music. Of course, they crank it up a bit. But if you close your eyes, you’ll be magically whisked away to the Crystal Palace. Broken Rodeo: This two-piece country outfit keeps things sparse— guitar, mandolin, suitcase percussion—which leaves more room for their yarns of love lost and life on the road. It’s enough to put a tear in your beer—which calls for more beer. Gordy Ohliger: This self-proclaimed “musical Mark Twain” is about the only person on the planet who can get away with calling himself a “banjo-ologist.” He performs all over—both solo and with other players—and partakes in speaking engagements at various museums. Ohliger also has also been called a Local Bad-Ass … not self-proclaimed. Low Flying Birds: Made up of longtime local Americana and jam-band musicians, Low Flying Birds call themselves “An Original Acoustic California Outlaw Grass Dance Band.” Fair enough. Whenever these picker-grinners are involved there’s going to be lots of dancing on grass. Three Fingers Whiskey: The elder Michelin Embers

Three Fingers Whiskey

Gordy Ohliger

statesmen (and woman) of local country, Three Fingers Whiskey continue to play originals inspired by the Highway Men and good ol’-fashioned rock ’n’ roll. And whiskey. And fingers. What else really needs to be said here? Michelin Embers: Post-atomic porch music for the people living in the woodwork. These twangers have played punk clubs as well as atop flatbed trucks in more off-the-beaten-path podunks. It’s all about hardlivin’ and broken hearts.

Indie/ Experimental

vana) continue to write songs that are lean and mean, and immediately catchy. Live, they take on even more gravitas. Offstage, the members are cuddly, furry little men that just want a hug. West By Swan: These dinosaurs will definitely make the Earth shake. You might not find a louder, more ferocious band with such Zen-like members. West By Swan’s music is thick and heavy, much like their beards and their beers.

World/Celtic/ Reggae

Clouds on Strings: Math is never fun. Math rock can be tolerable. But these lads out of the Chico State music program know how to make a three-over-four hemiola a real kick in the pants. This adds to the probability that there is a god. Not to mention they like King Crimson and Steely Dan, both pluses. French Reform: These oldies but newbies are sort of a United Nations of local indie rock, featuring members of The Yule Logs, Shabby Car and a former member of Into the Open Earth. As French Reform, they divvy up pop that’s precious and precocious, with lots of synthy doodles that draw a line running from MTV-new wave to Franz Ferdinand. Pageant Dads: A band with a concept … now there’s a concept! Pageant Dads play along to a fictitious backstory of four fathers who met at their daughters’ pageants. Quirk and drama ensues. And the storyline keeps growing. The band even wrote a Valentine’s Day musical comedy. Musically, they recall Zappa playing through the stock speakers of a 2009 Sebring. The Shimmies: Still shimmying their way through Chico’s laid-back music scene, the brothers Galloway (reared on Simon & Garfunkel and Nir-

Boss 501: Ska and reggae have been effectively shunned by hipsters over the past decade in order to make way for chill wave, or whatever flavor tastes good that month. This eightpiece bucks the trends, keeping blueeyed ska on the radar, at least in Chico, which makes them more punk rock than most punk rockers. Dylan’s Dharma: Dylan Seid has been making his way to Zion for years now in various incarnations of Dylan’s Dharma. As Chico’s hippie culture continues to twirl, Dylan’s Pageant Dads

Dharma adds reggae flavor and poprock sensibility to the lost art of slow-groove breakdowns, keeping local dance floors alive in 2013. Ha’Penny Bridge: Mark McKinnon mixes the Old World with new age with his Celtic ensemble, Ha’Penny Bridge. Fastidiously recalling Irish history and lore, McKinnon spins it into yarns that keep it real here in Chico, unlike those green-beer specials of yore. Los Caballitos de la Canción: This nine-piece made up of some of the finest local musicians—including bandleader Jo Chavez—are bringing a little Latin culture to white-bread Chico. The music is acoustic and really quite lovely. Their six-song EP is a good place to start, but live is where it’s at. It’s like having our very own Buena Vista Social Club, but, you know, more white. Soul Union: The name says it all. Or maybe not? We do know the vocal delivery of Johnny Dutro is frantic as he spits inspirational lyrics. And it’s a funky bunch of percussion-heavy world styles guaranteed to get people to kick off their shoes and incite massive drum circles. We do know that. Wolf Thump: OG MoHips drummer and The Loyd Family Players percussionist Mike Wofchuck brings us another samba troupe, a rag-tag collection of lively drummers called Wolf Thump.

All the bands Chico can handle Rock

Dylan’s Dharma

Boss 501

Furlough Fridays: What do you get when you cross NOFX, Smashing Pumpkins and Alice in Chains? It’s Furlough Fridays, which are all about big, fat riffs, all gussied up by vocalist Minnie Mental. Gentlemen’s Coup: Scott Barwick continues to harness a good acid trip through Gentlemen’s Coup, a band that pays especially close attention to out-there, withinthe-lines pop of the Plastic Ono Band. It’s heavy on Mellotron and piano, with enough spacey voyages to ensure a far-out trip. Perpetual Drifters: Fronted by songwriter Garrett Gray, the Perpetual Drifters lie on that intersection between early Byrds and the later twangy, hazy influence of Gram Parsons. There are hooks aplenty that will get lodged

Los Caballitos de la Canción

The Hambones

Soul Union

Gentlemen’s Coup

Clouds on Strings

West By Swan

Ha’Penny Bridge

intro (and Punk) by

Jason Cassidy

hip-hop, and even Star Wars influences in there. And their out-there sounds are welcome in a musical style steeped in tradition. Chico Jazz Collective: Featuring some of Chico’s best-known names: D’Augelli, Winslow, Delgardo, Chico Jazz Collective is brimming with so much talent, it’s as if Zeus put together his own house band. Kraken beware! Bogg: Featuring members of local Christine LaPado-Breglia Trio: prog-rock band Clouds on Strings, CN&R Greenways/Healthlines editor Bogg takes an avant-garde approach and stand-up bassist Christine LaPato jazz. You’ll hear a little Zappa, do-Breglia fronts her own jazz trio, which takes a quirky approach to jazz standards, melding bluegrass Christine LaPado-Breglia Trio and jazz together with Chris Wenger’s fun vocals. Eric Peter: This impeccable guitar player has been performing in and around Chico for more than three decades. Peter knows jazz and the blues like the back of his calloused hand. When the mood strikes he can also be spotted playing some mean slide guitar on his sevenstring with a Budweiser bottle and/or a beer pitcher. First Monday Jazz Series: With so much local talent, it’s insane that jazz has been relegated to a background lilt for dinner crowds. CAMMIE Award-winning bassist Jonathan Stoyanoff brings together a rotating crew of local players for the weekly First Monday Jazz Chico Jazz Collective concert series at Café Coda as a way to move the emphasis away from people’s plates and back onto the music. yet. These cats are somewhat enigmatic though—you won’t see them play out very often, but if you put the record on during your next party, even your hippest guests will be impressed.

Jazz

Bogg

NOMINEES continued on page 8

Surrogate Perpetual Drifters

The Shimmies

6 OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES April 11, 2013

Eric Peter

Furlough Fridays

Low Flying Birds

Broken Rodeo

in your ears, and clever lyrics to give your gray matter a good kneading. The Hambones: Garage rock never gets old, and The Hambones, with their collective love of old R&B and rock ’n’ roll, seem poised to spike the punch bowl at the sock hop with their timeless, fun and catchy sound. Surrogate: Chris Keene has been fronting his band Surrogate for five years, quietly putting out tremendous pop records. The band’s latest, Post Heroic, is their most energetic

bios by

Mark Lore

French Reform

First Monday Jazz Series Wolf Thump April 11, 2013

OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES 7


NOMINEES continued from page 7

Funk/Jam

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Alli Battaglia & the Musical Brewing Co.: Alli Battaglia leads her 2012 CAMMIE award-winning Musical Brewing Co. through originals that bring to mind the easygoing early ’70s, and the dusty vinyl records that period has left in thrift stores across the country. No shirt, no shoes, no problem! Black Fong: From the dirty mind and immaculate bowels of oldschool funkmeister Jack Dammit comes the dirty funk of Black Fong. No matter what the funk you think of them, Black Fong is here to funk, and funk all night long. So go funk yourself. GravyBrain: The words “gravy” and “brain” together conjure up all kinds of tasty images. But “funk and fusion” is how GravyBrain envisions what they’ve cooked up. This four-piece is more than funky; they could pass as the Burning Man house band. GravyBrain has a song called “Kung Fu Grip” that clocks in at almost nine minutes for the recorded version—live, it’s probably still playing. The Jeff Pershing Band: Guitarist Jeff Pershing has spent as much time studying and teaching music as he has playing it, giving him the distinction of being the Zen Buddha Jedi of Caribbean funk. The tunes will whisk you away to the deck of a tropical pleasure cruise, where only The Jeff Pershing Band and a piña colada will keep you cool. Black Fong

Swamp Zen

Twisted Strategies

Big Slim Lynguistix

The Resonators

Swamp Zen: The Ramones had leather jackets and ripped jeans. KISS, cod-pieces and platform boots. Swamp Zen keep it light and airy with flip-flops and tie-dyed shirts. Ringleader Doug Stein has been at it in Chico for more than 20 years.

TyBox

Rap

Big Slim: Last year Chico MC Big Slim (aka Sleezy Sleez) wrote 101 songs in as many weeks. That’s a lot of tunes. It’s all documented at www.new-music-monday.com, his New Music Monday website. Of course, in that time he’s also made a name for himself in Chico’s hip-hop scene. The Hooliganz: It’s a House Party 3 marathon when these cats are around the milk bowl. “Way That I Be” is the official soundtrack to every backyard party from here to North Cherry Street. The Hooliganz can play your party, too … if you don’t mind dancing, scantily clad women, a spilled Corona or two, or penguin costumes.

The Hooliganz

Lynguistix: Ryan Walton settled in Chico after years of moving around the Los Angeles area. “Mathematix” is a prime cut, and the video showcases the rapper’s smooth delivery and his even smoother threads. The Resonators: Since Himp C joined The Resonators in 2008, the group has upped their game while holding down their corner of Chico’s hip-hop scene. One of the true old-school rap groups in town, The Resonators have kept things alive, conscious and thumping in this little burg. NOMINEES continued on page 10

GravyBrain The Jeff Pershing Band

Alli Battaglia & the Musical Brewing Co. 8 OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES April 11, 2013


where local music lives!

90.1 fm proud sponsors of the 2013 cammies

www.KZfr.org Apri l 11, 2013

Official guide to CAMMIES music showcases 9


NOMINEES continued from page 8

Twisted Strategies: The self-proclaimed “best live hip-hop band” in Chico embodies the Beastie Boys’ early frat hijinx and the reggaepunk of Sublime. We know Chico likes to party … well, here’s the city’s house band. TyBox: Beatboxer extraordinaire TyBox is the alter ego of rapper Tyson Harris. This year has seen a steady flow of songs and demos— both solo and collaborations. His cut “Green Thumb” is a sticky little number about the green stuff everyone loves. Money? Beans? Frogs? I give up.

Electronic (DJ)

DJ Becca: She’s been deejaying house parties for more than a decade, and in the process DJ Becca’s love for electronic music has grown into a regular presence playing house, techno, nu disco and indie-dance music at underground

DJ Becca

warehouse parties, outdoor fullmoon parties and occasionally local clubs. Eyere Eyes: Atmospheric and strange, bass is only part of the equation. The rest is a swirl of robotic sounds with occasional string samples thrown in the mix. It sounds like a Philip K. Dick novel come to life. Simple Science: Beneath the cold, metallic beats beats a heart of rock ’n’ roll. Billy Hopkins—aka Simple Science—creates a sound he’s dubbed “rocktronic.” I suspect if this kid can bring rock music and drum and bass together, he could bring peace to the Middle East.

Billy the Robot: The artist formerly known as MANIC ONE has been manning the ones and twos for nearly two decades, which means he probably has an incredible vinyl collection. BtR is known for his mashups, often combining hip-hop with dance music from the ’80s and ’90s. Fun facts: He is neither a robot, nor named Billy. Kezwik: This 17-year-old prodigy specializes in dubstep; but first and foremost Kezwik is all about keeping the party lively. (Although the dancing must not include grinding, and hands must remain on waist and shoulders at all times, and we’re keeping a close eye on the punch bowl.)

Electronic (producer)

Fera

ALO: This punk-rock-metalheadturned-producer has been curating the Friday-night BassMint electronic performances along with fellow CAMMIE nominee Eyere Eyes at Peeking Restaurant for some time now. It’s given electronic music of all sorts a proper home.

Folk/Acoustic

Aubrey Debauchery: Aubs Debauch hasn’t released a proper album in a while, but she’s kept busy writing and playing her tell-all folk-punk songs about heartbreak, hangovers and small-town drama. And now, with five years of seasoning under her belt she’s heading into the studio to record 25 new songs with fellow CAMMIE nominees Bogg. Bunnymilk: This banjo-and-guitar duo describe themselves as “two drunken songbird angels.” Sounds accurate. Their song “Dire Stand” is a sad and stunning number that will do a number on you. Which is to say these women know what they’re doing. Envelope Peasant & the Scientific Orchestra: Sean Harrasser is about as good a songwriter as you’ll find in Chico. The former Harvester front man couldn’t resist adding a band to his longtime solo acoustic-pop project. Leave it to the effusive wordsmith to add a Scientific Orchestra when we’re still trying to figure out what an Envelope Peasant is.

MaMuse

Evin Wolverton: In just under two years, Evin Wolverton has emerged as a true talent in the local folk scene. His songs are of the spiritual country variety, and they take off on the back of his soaring, wideranging vocals. Fera: Fera is an artist. With an ear for detail, he’s given his bedroom folk songs a big, dramatic sound. His 2012 release, Sobriquets, is a moody collection of extended folk experiments that push the envelope of the genre. John Paul Gutierrez: The former Goldmind guitarist has struck it rich on his own, winning the KZFR songwriting contest a few years back. As of late, he’s added a trio of backup players to augment his funky folk. Kyle Williams: This big teddy bear of a man with a tangle of dreadlocks and sweet voice will melt your heart. His latest release, She Is, brings to mind the easygoing, surf-inspired pop of Jack Johnson. The soundtrack to your hot Chico summer. Lish Bills: The alter ego of metal wunderkind Kirk Williams, who lends his shred skills in CAMMIE

Kyle Williams Evin Wolverton

Aubrey Debauchery

Simple Science

Eyere Eyes

Lish Bills

John Paul Gutierrez

ALO

Envelope Peasant & the Scientific Orchestra

Kezwik Bunnymilk

Pat Hull

Billy the Robot

The Railflowers 10 OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES April 11, 2013


nominees Armed For Apocalypse. His solo boozy country is perfectly captured in the song “The Booze”: “Let’s start making some mistakes / We’re living the dream and drinking our lives away.” MaMuse: The voices of Sarah Nutting and Karisha Longaker are something special—otherworldly even. They are the queens of the houseshow circuit, but expect bigger things in 2013. Mansions?! Pat Hull: No one sounds like Pat Hull, and his otherworldly voice is in fine form on his latest LP, Shed Skin. It’s folk with a good bit of California pop in the vein of Fleetwood Mac. Minus the coke. The Railflowers: The sisters Knight were raised on Emmylou Harris and Joni Mitchell, which explains The Railflowers’ nod to early country and folk. But what explains those angelic, harmonizing voices? We don’t have that kind of time.

combine European black metal with NWOBHM and all of its American descendants. And they speak fluent Tolkenese. It’s melodic and wellproduced, and the piano and synths get these guys extra points in the epic column. Into the Open Earth: Into the Open Earth sounds angry. And their Doomfruit EP might scare the pants right off you. Imagine an alien invasion and a zombie apocalypse happening at the same time. Enjoy! Teeph: Teeph are semiretired, semiserious and they come at you with the force of a semi. It’s like Porky’smeets-Friday the 13th, with sordid tales of murdering hipsters and soliciting sex at deer pens, all set to the soundtrack of Saw III.

Blues

Punk

Are there really 26 punk bands in town? Yes! In a nod to the community-minded spirit of the Pyrate Punx who host the marathon CAMMIES Punk showcase every year at Monstros Pizza, we’ve once again included every single punk band we could think of on the list of nominees: Animal Cruelty, Badger, Baghdad Batteries, Big Tree Fall Down, Born Into This, Brass Hysteria!, Cody K & The Thundertrain Express, Disorderly Event, Fight Music, Filthy Luke, Frankie

Armed For Apocalypse

Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise, Icko Sicko, In Reach, Jay Decay, Jorge Jonze, Kasm, Mom & Dad, Nothing Left, The Oisters, Pintlifter, The Pushers, Ryan Davidson, Season of the Witch, Severance Package, The Suspects, Zabaleen.

Hard Rock/Metal

Amarok: Slow and low, that is the tempo. Amarok’s latest release is a 20-minute song called “Survival.” And if you make it

Teeph

through it alive, you win free heart palpitations and the Earth will stop rotating. Armed For Apocalypse: A4A are a lean and mean metal machine. Armed with loads of Herculean riffs and an even more Herculean drummer, A4A is inspired by ’90s metal heavyweights like Crowbar and Pantera, but with a few of their own tricks up their tattoo sleeves. Cold Blue Mountain: From the land of sky-blue waters comes the powerful, sludgy, epic and soaring supergroup of sorts that is so goddamn heavy, they could actually qualify as a super-duper group. Their music will definitely parch your ears. A Holy Ghost Revival: These dragon-slaying metalheads from Oroville

Ira Walker: Ira Walker could probably fit into several of the CAMMIES genre categories. The singer/songwriter is as much a folk, country and rock musician as he is a purveyor of smooth blues. With influences from Jimmy Reed to Buddy Guy, Walker’s brand of blues is probably better described as Southern soul. Big Mo and the Full Moon Band: Since moving to Northern California from Germany in 1989, Maurice “Big Mo” Huffman and his band have pretty much ruled the roost

here in California and beyond, blending blues with southern rock and soul. This guy should be mayor of Paradise. He’s definitely the king of blues in Chico. Sapphire Soul: Front man and multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Arthur’s beard is the first thing you’ll notice. Then you’ll hear the boogie-woogie blues that’ll make you wanna boogie oogie oogie on the dance floor. Then you’ll marvel at the beard again. Rinse. Repeat. Second Hand Smoke: Blues at its roots, Second Hand Smoke also digs into everything that came after. Their stockpile of covers include “Blue Suede Shoes” to “Strange Brew” and even “Margaritaville.” Swamp Daddy: These Daddy-O’s go for the heart of New Orleans (N’awlins, if you’re nasty). It’s a steaming cauldron of musical gumbo with a little of this and a little of that, but not so spicy that it will frighten off the wallflowers.

Sapphire Soul

Second Hand Smoke

Ira Walker

Into the Open Earth

Swamp Daddy

Big Mo and the Full Moon Band Amarok

A Holy Ghost Revival

Cold Blue Mountain April 11, 2013

OFFICIAL GUIDE TO CAMMIES MUSIC SHOWCASES 11


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Welcome to the 2013 California Nut Festival!

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oin us for a day filled with experiences as a special guest and celebrity emcee for to delight all your senses! At the festithe cooking demonstrations. val this year, you’ll undoubtedly enjoy Make a day of it and ride the Chico sampling nut-inspired dishes by local Trolley to the festival. Tour guides will be restaurants, caterers and chefs. Plus, you on board, sharing their knowledge of local can sip wine, brews, agriculture as you coffee and teas proenjoy the scenic ride. duced right here in the The trolley leaves from North State while listhe downtown Chico tening to talented and Transit Center on the entertaining local hour and returns from musicians on two outthe Patrick Ranch on door stages. As you the half hour. We also stroll through the encourage you to take amazing grounds of advantage of the bike the historic Patrick path that runs along Ranch, you can also the Midway. Take the feast your eyes on ride knowing that your agrarian-inspired art, bike will be secure at chat with local farmthe Nut Fest bike ers, shop for local check. Parking is limproducts, learn about ited so we encourage the equipment used in you to carpool. nut farming, tour the Patrick Ranch restored Glenwood Museum charges $3 home, find out what’s per carload. buzzing with bees and GET YOUR he mission of the important role the California agriculture plays in Nut Festival is to the North State. We connect consumers welcome you in joinNOW! and farmers, and to ing us as we salute cultivate an underour local agriculture, Your admission includes: standing of nut prohistory, farmers and • Commemorative glass duction in California the food we are proud • 6 food sampling tickets and how California to harvest. nuts fit into a healthy You also won’t want • 6 drink sampling tickets lifestyle. Proceeds are to miss the celebrity• Festival Guide dedicated to the chef demos at noon • Reusable California Nut development of the and 2 p.m. This year Festival Bag Patrick Ranch we are proud to host • Live entertainment, cooking Museum to preserve Sacramento’s talented demonstrations, art show and interpret the agri“farm-to-fork” chef and more! cultural history of the Kurt Spataro. A farmSacramento Valley. ers’ market enthusiast, Cost: We invite you to “go Spataro will delight the $25 online and at area nuts” with us April 20 audience with demonTri Counties Bank locations and enjoy a beautiful strations of tasty nutday at the Patrick inspired recipes while $30 day of the event Ranch Museum—close his wife and popular to town yet you’ll feel radio personality Kitty www.CaliforniaNutFestival.com miles away! O’Neal will participate

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iverwest is a first-class processing destination for growers and a complete supply solution for customers seeking high-quality, natural California-grown almonds. We make grower service and appreciation a priority and ensure that our growers receive the most superior almond processing, marketing, and payment services possible. We provide our customers, domestic and abroad, with excellent service and high quality almonds, making the Riverwest name respected as a quality product worldwide. 3190 Hwy 45 Glenn, CA 95943 (530) 891–5858

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2013 California Nut Festival

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chico - 342.6421 1368 Longfellow Ave oroville - 533.3424 2080 Myers 2013 California Nut Festival

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SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 11AM–4PM, SAT. APRIL 20

Thank You to our 2013 Sponsors

PHOTO BY PAULA BEEHNER

Chef Kurt Spataro

BEVERAGE TASTING

SHOP LOCAL

Drink tasting tickets good at any of these stations.

Visit these vendors to purchase products that are locally grown or made.

21st Amendment Brewery Bertagna Son Kissed Vineyards Chico Chai Crispin Cider Doe Mill Vineyards Emerald C Vineyards Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. Feather River Brewing Co. Grey Fox Vineyards Hickman Family Vineyards Honey Run Winery Karl Strauss Brewing Company LaRocca Vineyards Lost Coast Brewery Mendocino Brewing Company Mount Tehama Winery New Clairvaux Vineyard Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Tahoe Pure Water Tejava Tea Western Pacific Brewing Co.

2 English Ladies Ammin Nut Co. Baja Mariner Quality Foods Bianchi Orchards Bordin-Huitt Ranch Brannen Gourmet Cowboy BBQ Lodestar Farms Lucero Olive Oil Maisie Jane’s California Sunshine Products Mary’s Gone Crackers Noble Orchards Orland Farmstead Creamery Prestigio Foods Sauce Partners LLC Skylake Ranch SWIZZMIX Terri Sue’s Toffee

FOOD TASTING Food tasting tickets good at any of these stations. Bacio Catering & Carry Out Garibaldi’s Catering Italian Cottage Italian Guy Catering Madison Bear Garden Mayhem Gourmet Grilled Cheese Mim’s Bakery Mom’s Shuberts Ice Cream Sicilian Café Three Girls and a Kitchen Tin Roof Bakery

TJ Farms

LEARN MORE Visit these booths to learn more about the nuts from production to health benefits. California Women for Agriculture The North Valley CWA educates and promotes local agriculture products and commodities. Far West Heritage Society Stewards of the Patrick Ranch Museum and the Chico Museum

Ord Bend Farms Learn about pistachio production, varieties and nutritional information. Taste samples. Shamrock Farms Learn about the important role bees and beekeepers play in nut production. View the observation hive and sample delicious honey butter. UCCE Master Gardeners We’re here to answer your gardening questions. University of California Cooperative Extension Ask the experts about area agriculture, bees and nutrition.

RIDE THE CHICO TROLLEY FREE!

Or, ride your bike along the Midway bike path and park in our secure bike valet! Carpool! Parking is $3 per car. 2013 CALIFORNIA NUT FESTIVAL

Kitty O’Neal

Celebrity Chef Kurt Spataro Paragary Restaurant Group Executive Chef Kurt Spataro is the celebrity chef for the 2013 California Nut Festival. A self-taught chef who is always in search of new sources of food and fresh inspiration, Spataro is a leader of Sacramento’s “farm-to-fork” movement and is a dedicated farmers’ market enthusiast. Spataro’s approach to both classic and modern cooking has been influenced by the classic cooking shows of Julia Child (The French Chef) and Graham Kerr The 2013 California Nut Festival is proud to offer two nut-inspired cooking demos presented by (The Galloping Gourmet). An avid traveler, Spataro’s Sacramento’s talented and widely admired experience with the food and cultures of countries “Farm-To-Fork” Chef Kurt Spataro! Chef Spataro such as Italy, France, Mexico, Japan, Hong Kong, will tempt your taste buds with these amazingly creative menu items: Indonesia and Thailand is invaluable to the concepts of diversity and regional focus at the Noon Paragary Restaurant Group. Wild Salmon with Almond & Spataro is a member of culinary advisoGreen Garlic Sauce ry boards for American River College and 2 p.m. the Elk Grove School District. In addition, he Strawberries with Yogurt Panna Cotta & is a member of the American River College faculty Crushed Pistachio Brittle and remains actively involved in several philanthropAs an added treat popular Sacramento radio ic foundations. Spataro was born and raised in personality Kitty O’Neal will emcee the Celebrity Sacramento and is a graduate of California State Chef Demonstrations! University, Sacramento. Married to KFBK radio personality Kitty O’Neal, Spataro is also an accomplished lifelong musician who has played piano and guitar in numerous area bands. In his spare time, he also enjoys snow skiing and surfing along the Northern California coast.

Delicious Demonstrations

Northern California Regional Land Trust Learn about the Buy Fresh Buy Local campaign.

Travel to the Festival with young farmers as your tour guides. Board at the Transit Center, W. 2nd St. at Salem St. on the hour starting at 11am, return on the half hour. Last trolley leaves the Patrick Ranch at 4:30pm.

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More info about the Fine Arts display in Pat’s Barn on page 11

HELPFUL TIPS for a great experience at the Festival!

• Tickets are required for everyone attending the event (including any children and non-drinkers/samplers) • If you plan to purchase extra food and drink tickets (cost is three for $5) or buy locally-made goods from vendors, cash is preferred as some do not take credit cards and there is not an ATM on-site • Parking is limited and costs $3 per carload • Avoid the parking fee by riding the trolley FREE, complete with young farmers as your guides • Bike riding is encouraged on the beautiful bike path that runs right by the Patrick Ranch Museum (bike valet available for secure parking) • No outside food or beverages, except water • Seating is available but you may want to bring a chair or blanket to relax and enjoy the music

Live Musical Entertainment The Butte Folk Music Society presents continuous performances on two outdoor stages!

See page 11 for complete schedule.

SPECIAL PULL-OUT ADVERTISING SECTION

• The event is primarily outdoors so hats and sunscreen are encouraged • Children and strollers are allowed at the event but please be advised, there are no activities designed for children • No pets are allowed at the festival

2013 CALIFORNIA NUT FESTIVAL

7


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 11AM–4PM, SAT. APRIL 20

Thank You to our 2013 Sponsors

PHOTO BY PAULA BEEHNER

Chef Kurt Spataro

BEVERAGE TASTING

SHOP LOCAL

Drink tasting tickets good at any of these stations.

Visit these vendors to purchase products that are locally grown or made.

21st Amendment Brewery Bertagna Son Kissed Vineyards Chico Chai Crispin Cider Doe Mill Vineyards Emerald C Vineyards Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. Feather River Brewing Co. Grey Fox Vineyards Hickman Family Vineyards Honey Run Winery Karl Strauss Brewing Company LaRocca Vineyards Lost Coast Brewery Mendocino Brewing Company Mount Tehama Winery New Clairvaux Vineyard Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Tahoe Pure Water Tejava Tea Western Pacific Brewing Co.

2 English Ladies Ammin Nut Co. Baja Mariner Quality Foods Bianchi Orchards Bordin-Huitt Ranch Brannen Gourmet Cowboy BBQ Lodestar Farms Lucero Olive Oil Maisie Jane’s California Sunshine Products Mary’s Gone Crackers Noble Orchards Orland Farmstead Creamery Prestigio Foods Sauce Partners LLC Skylake Ranch SWIZZMIX Terri Sue’s Toffee

FOOD TASTING Food tasting tickets good at any of these stations. Bacio Catering & Carry Out Garibaldi’s Catering Italian Cottage Italian Guy Catering Madison Bear Garden Mayhem Gourmet Grilled Cheese Mim’s Bakery Mom’s Shuberts Ice Cream Sicilian Café Three Girls and a Kitchen Tin Roof Bakery

TJ Farms

LEARN MORE Visit these booths to learn more about the nuts from production to health benefits. California Women for Agriculture The North Valley CWA educates and promotes local agriculture products and commodities. Far West Heritage Society Stewards of the Patrick Ranch Museum and the Chico Museum

Ord Bend Farms Learn about pistachio production, varieties and nutritional information. Taste samples. Shamrock Farms Learn about the important role bees and beekeepers play in nut production. View the observation hive and sample delicious honey butter. UCCE Master Gardeners We’re here to answer your gardening questions. University of California Cooperative Extension Ask the experts about area agriculture, bees and nutrition.

RIDE THE CHICO TROLLEY FREE!

Or, ride your bike along the Midway bike path and park in our secure bike valet! Carpool! Parking is $3 per car. 2013 CALIFORNIA NUT FESTIVAL

Kitty O’Neal

Celebrity Chef Kurt Spataro Paragary Restaurant Group Executive Chef Kurt Spataro is the celebrity chef for the 2013 California Nut Festival. A self-taught chef who is always in search of new sources of food and fresh inspiration, Spataro is a leader of Sacramento’s “farm-to-fork” movement and is a dedicated farmers’ market enthusiast. Spataro’s approach to both classic and modern cooking has been influenced by the classic cooking shows of Julia Child (The French Chef) and Graham Kerr The 2013 California Nut Festival is proud to offer two nut-inspired cooking demos presented by (The Galloping Gourmet). An avid traveler, Spataro’s Sacramento’s talented and widely admired experience with the food and cultures of countries “Farm-To-Fork” Chef Kurt Spataro! Chef Spataro such as Italy, France, Mexico, Japan, Hong Kong, will tempt your taste buds with these amazingly creative menu items: Indonesia and Thailand is invaluable to the concepts of diversity and regional focus at the Noon Paragary Restaurant Group. Wild Salmon with Almond & Spataro is a member of culinary advisoGreen Garlic Sauce ry boards for American River College and 2 p.m. the Elk Grove School District. In addition, he Strawberries with Yogurt Panna Cotta & is a member of the American River College faculty Crushed Pistachio Brittle and remains actively involved in several philanthropAs an added treat popular Sacramento radio ic foundations. Spataro was born and raised in personality Kitty O’Neal will emcee the Celebrity Sacramento and is a graduate of California State Chef Demonstrations! University, Sacramento. Married to KFBK radio personality Kitty O’Neal, Spataro is also an accomplished lifelong musician who has played piano and guitar in numerous area bands. In his spare time, he also enjoys snow skiing and surfing along the Northern California coast.

Delicious Demonstrations

Northern California Regional Land Trust Learn about the Buy Fresh Buy Local campaign.

Travel to the Festival with young farmers as your tour guides. Board at the Transit Center, W. 2nd St. at Salem St. on the hour starting at 11am, return on the half hour. Last trolley leaves the Patrick Ranch at 4:30pm.

6

More info about the Fine Arts display in Pat’s Barn on page 11

HELPFUL TIPS for a great experience at the Festival!

• Tickets are required for everyone attending the event (including any children and non-drinkers/samplers) • If you plan to purchase extra food and drink tickets (cost is three for $5) or buy locally-made goods from vendors, cash is preferred as some do not take credit cards and there is not an ATM on-site • Parking is limited and costs $3 per carload • Avoid the parking fee by riding the trolley FREE, complete with young farmers as your guides • Bike riding is encouraged on the beautiful bike path that runs right by the Patrick Ranch Museum (bike valet available for secure parking) • No outside food or beverages, except water • Seating is available but you may want to bring a chair or blanket to relax and enjoy the music

Live Musical Entertainment The Butte Folk Music Society presents continuous performances on two outdoor stages!

See page 11 for complete schedule.

SPECIAL PULL-OUT ADVERTISING SECTION

• The event is primarily outdoors so hats and sunscreen are encouraged • Children and strollers are allowed at the event but please be advised, there are no activities designed for children • No pets are allowed at the festival

2013 CALIFORNIA NUT FESTIVAL

7


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2013 California Nut Festival

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A FREE Guide for Visitors and Locals, too. THE NEWEST EDITION IS AVAILABLE NOW! Pick it up the at hotels, restaurants and select locations around town. SPECIAL REQUESTS: If you’re hosting an event or large group of guests visiting the area, ask us to reserve a supply of Guides for you. Call 530-894-2300 x2222

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2013 California Nut Festival

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PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM A Must-See Destination

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he Patrick Ranch Museum is proud to be hosting the 2013 California Nut Festival! Each year, the 28-acre property donated by Hester Patrick really comes alive during this exciting event. The interior and exterior restoration of Glenwood house is complete and visitors are welcome to tour the elegant home. Guests will be awed by grand mirrors, magnificent bookcases, desks and headboards and intrigued by unique chairs, lamps and decorative pieces. The exterior of the Visitor Center, framed last year by the Chico State Construction Management Class, is now complete. Fundraising efforts are underway to finish the interior which will provide designated space for museum displays, an office, an educational DVD viewing theater, bathrooms and a quality museum store at a cost of $72,000. If you would like to host a fundraising event, make a donation or help with this project, please contact John Chambers at manager@patrickranchmuseum.org The extraordinary planned growth of our interactive agriculture museum continues with the ongoing development of the University of California Master Gardener Demonstration Garden; the historic demonstration almond orchard; and the Blacksmith Shop/North State Blacksmithing Learning Center (which will be completed in 2014 and is being paid for by a group of dedicated blacksmiths from Chico and beyond). Additional

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Take a tour of the Glenwood home and you’ll witness the ongoing restoration.

interactive learning opportunities include agriculture-science classrooms for students in Butte and surrounding counties; our 11th Annual Country Faire and Threshing Bee and Fine Arts Show (June 8-9); participation in Sierra Oro Trails tours; a month-long October AutumnFest featuring Cinderella Pumpkins, house tours, hay rides and more; and Christmas at Glenwood, which will include home tours and an extraordinary fine-art show and sale. Volunteers are the lifeblood of the Patrick Ranch Museum and are at the heart of any successful museum. If you are interested in sharing a skill, an avocation, a vocation or just really enjoy people and would like to volunteer, please contact Carol Oxsen at carol_oxsen@msn.com

Meet the Farmer’s Circle

C h iC o is r a d. faCt. “ChiCo is my happy plaCe” T-shirts & Stickers Exclusively at Home Ec

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2013 CALIFORNIA NUT FESTIVAL

The California Nut Festival would like to thank our Farmer's Circle members, a dedicated group of farmers and agricultural-related businesses who have committed time, money and resources to the event. We appreciate your continued support and belief in the mission of promoting the bounty that is grown and produced here in the North state.

A & J Family Farms Andersen & Sons Shelling BidCal.com Bill & Kathy Chance C.F. Koehnen and Sons Chico Electric Cox Orchards Durham Pump, Inc. Emmett Skinner Farmers International, Inc. Frederick S. Montgomery Gorrill Ranch Helena Chemical Co. Kimmelshue Orchards M&T Chico Ranch Matson & Isom Northgate Petroleum

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Nicolaus Nut Company North State Electric & Pump North Valley Ag Services Northern Ca. Farm Credit Ord Bend Farms, Inc Omega Walnuts PBM Supply & Mfg, Inc Paiva Farm Management Pam & Larry Wear RC Meline Orchards, Inc. Richard McGowan Farming Riverwest Processing Stacy J. Gore Farming T.M. Duche Nut Co Thomas Manufacturing, LLC Vanella Farms Willadsen Orchards, Inc


Enjoy Live Music provided by the Butte Folk Music Society The Butte Folk Music Society is excited to provide entertainment and delight guests with a variety of talented local bands performing on two outdoor stages. Culturally-diverse music will be highlighted this year; from Gypsy Jazz to Celtic to Latino, with an emphasis on Americana. The Butte Folk Music Society is dedicated to encouraging, supporting and sharing traditional and folk music in the Northern Sacramento Valley through concert venues and other music-related activities. Joe Craven sic Our Mu Emcee

Mossy Creek

Phil Johnson & Ryan Miller

PORCH STAGE 11:00 - 11:45 . . . . . Jimmy Grant Quartet

Superb quartet delivers top notch instrumentals in “hot” jazz style. www.jimmygrant.net

12:00 - 12:45 . . . . . Mossy Creek

Joe Craven Trio

Voted Chico’s Best Local Act annually for the third time, this high powered 7 piece Bluegrass/Americana band features some of the best pickers in the area, with tight three to five part harmonies and standout harmonica legend Bob Littell. www.mossycreekband.com

1:00 - 2:00. . . . . . . . Joe Craven Trio

Ha’Penny Bridge

Nationally known, long standing “power trio” of keyboards, key bass, drums, fiddle, mandolin and vocals, lead by awardwinning musician, educator and performer, Joe Craven. www.joecraven.com

2:15- 3:00 . . . . . . . . Ha’Penny Bridge

Popular Northern California Celtic band whose vocaldriven,"California Celtic" repertoire combines lively original songs and stirring adaptations of traditional and contemporary Celtic-style ballads and tunes. www.hapennybridgeband.com

3:15 - 4:00. . . . . . . . Los Caballitos de la Cancion

Nine member acoustic ensemble promotes savory and potent musical expressions of Latino culture, with fiery richness and passion. www.loscaballitosdelacancion.com The Railflowers

Hannah Kile

TRUCK STAGE 11:30 - 12:00 . . . . . Garrett Gray

As winner of the Critics’ Choice award for Best Songwriter in last year’s CAMMIES, Perpetual Drifters’ frontman is dubbed the reigning poet laureate of the local music scene by CN&R. www.perpetualdrifters.com

12:15 - 1:00. . . . . . . The Railflowers

Captivating trio of sisters blending soothing harmonies with guitar, banjo, and mandolin in contemporary folk and pop songs of inspirational memories and life’s experiences. www.therailflowers.com

Los Caballitos de la Cancion

1:15 - 1:45. . . . . . . . Molly Paul

With influences from 1920’s and 1930’s jazz to indie folk heroes Nathan Moore and Gillian Welch, Molly Paul’s lilting voice and ukulele have a spirit all their own. Find Molly Paul on Facebook.

2:00 - 2:30. . . . . . . . Phil Johnson & Ryan Miller Modern-day troubadours play skillful guitar and pure harmonies in folk tradition.

2:45 - 3:15. . . . . . . . Hannah Kile

A sweet, soulful songwriter, Hannah provides poetic messages blending original and traditional folk, with individual voice and instrument. Find Hannah Kile on Facebook. Molly Paul

Jimmy Grant Quartet

Garrett Gray

Fine Art and Agriculture: A Natural Union

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his year’s theme of “a simpler life of harvest, bounty, changes in season, the elements and agriculture” will be showcased in beautiful works of art on special display in Pat’s Barn. Eighteen local artists have worked all year to create pieces for this fine arts exhibit. Among these talented artists are painters, sculptors, photographers, potters, jewelers, and glass blowers. All work is exceptional and interprets the vision of marrying art and agriculture through imagery or natural elements. These local artists are honored and excited to present their work at the annual California Nut Festival, which has been the driving force in making a connection between agriculture and fine art in our community. Please be sure to visit the Barn and enjoy this unique collection of natural beauty. For more information, contact Amber Palmer, Fine Arts Coordinator at amberpmft@sbcglobal.net or (530) 570-7343.

Amber Palmer, Fine Arts Coordinator, Watercolors and Photography Carol Preble Miles, PRM Gallery Curator, Watercolor Paintings Augie Velasquez, Stone Sculpture Benjamin Hills, Photography Beth Bjorklund, Acrylic Painting and Prints Camille de Ganon, Photography Dave Dragoman, Turned Wood Dolores Mitchell, Watercolor and Oil Paintings Gail Shultz, Watercolor Paintings James Fuhring, Pottery Janet Lombardi Blixt, Pastel Paintings Lauren Mesa, Acrylics and Mosaic Marianne Werner, Photography Melinda Vasquez, Jewelry Patti Lunn, Jewelry Retta Wilmarth, Pottery and Plant Sculptures Sally Dimas, Watercolors and Pastels Vicki Lea Eggen, Photographic Art

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2013 CALIFORNIA NUT FESTIVAL

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Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 10 10 11:30am07 – 2:30pm 08

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Join us for Happy Hour Mon–Fri 4:30–6pm 10

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