Page 1

SIGNS

OF THE TIME See NEWSLINES, page 8

TODAY’S CATCH See CHOW, page 27

LOST ART

FOUND See SCENE, page 32

ALTERED

STATE See HEALTHLINES, page 16

PAGE

20 Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

WRITE TIME

See FICTION 59 entry rules, page 26

Volume 36, Issue 23

Thursday, January 31, 2013


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OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 From This Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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26

COVER STORY

20

Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Scene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 In The Mix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

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BACKSTOP From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 ON THE COVER: PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Robert Speer Managing Editor Melissa Daugherty Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Calendar/Special Projects Editor Howard Hardee News Editor Tom Gascoyne Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Mazi Noble, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Evan Tuchinsky Intern Melanie MacTavish Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Design Manager Kate Murphy Design Melissa Arendt, Priscilla Garcia, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith

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Everyone’s cats Chico has a cat problem. As in most cities, thousands of

felines—strays and ferals—live in our neighborhoods, eating the food we put out for our own pets and out of our backyard scrap piles, killing rodents and, yes, birds too. Without a doubt, these estimated 14,600 “community cats” do create a nuisance. Aside from killing avian life, they carry fleas and breed rapidly, which comes with territorial behaviors of fighting and spraying. But curbing the population through euthanasia, as has been tried for decades, is not the solution. It has not worked. More cats simply move in to take their places. That’s why, this week, beginning on Feb. 1, the Chico Animal Shelter will no longer accept healthy stray, feral and surrendered pet cats. Officials at the shelter knew not everyone would be on board with their new policy, but we believe they are making the right call. So, now what? Well, it’s up to all of us to deal with the issue, by banding together with our neighbors and having these cats spayed and neutered. There are several local nonprofit organizations willing to help those who don’t have a lot of extra money, including Paws of Chico, and the low-cost spay and neutering clinics of Oroville-based PAWS of Butte County and the Butte Humane Society. The cats can then live out the rest of their days in the neighborhoods they know as home, doing so without contributing to the overpopulation problem. The shelter’s new policy will save it money, and our hope is that, eventually, some of that money will be used by the city to establish its own program to help folks spay and neuter community cats or to help fund existing programs. The more options in this effort, the better. Ω

A rare act of courage O fireman rescuing a family from a burning house or a policeman facing down a cranked-up meth-head or the doctor ne of the bravest acts I ever witnessed wasn’t a

who gave CPR to a heart-attack victim at a soccer game. The bravest deed I’ve ever seen was on a soccer field, but the hero was a 16-year-old girl. Just a week earlier she had come into my classroom, a shy smile on her handsome face. Tall, athletic, at the height of youth, as they say. She had missed a few practices lately, missed a game, unusual, but it was the flu season and she was a dedicated by player. She sat in the chair Tim Milhorn next to my desk. “I’m probably going to The author teaches miss some practices the English and drama next few weeks.” The shy and coaches soccer smile reappeared. at Orland High “OK,” I replied, mild School. curiosity stirring around in my head. “I know you’ve been sick; it’s all right.” “Well, it’s a little more than that.” The smile again, this time a bit of chagrin curling the corners. Oh, great, I thought to myself: pregnant! I’d thought she’d finally dumped her pain-in-the-ass boyfriend. I looked at her, an expression of curious encouragement.

She looked me in the eye, no hesitation, not a blink. “I had a biopsy last week. I got the test back this morning. That’s why I’m late to class and have been missing practice. The test was positive. I have breast cancer.” I write. A lot. But I’m as much at a loss for words now as I type on this keyboard as I was at that moment: stunned, shocked, surprised, flabbergasted, confused. The feelings simply cannot be described. You know? She saw the look on my face. “It’s OK, Milhorn. I’ll be fine. I’m coming out of this 100 percent.” She smiled, touched my arm, the kid with cancer reassuring the adult. I forced back tears. “Yes,” I said. “I think you will. I know you will.” A week later, as two of her teammates held their arms around her out on the soccer field, the winter sun shining down, she told the team she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. I fought back tears. I didn’t succeed. While less than 1 percent of teens get breast cancer, girls should never ignore a lump in their breast or under their armpit. Please tell your daughters to regularly selfexamine and not ignore any signs. Ω

She told the team she had been diagnosed with breast cancer.

4 CN&R January 31, 2013

Welcome to the Harbowl Super Bowl XLVII is already a historic match-up, and the coin

hasn’t even been tossed yet. That’s because, as every football fan in the world knows, John and Jim Harbaugh are the first sibling head coaches to meet in the Super Bowl. It’s an accomplishment that’s unlikely to reoccur anytime soon unless they themselves do it again sometime in the future. And to think that when they were kids they shared a bedroom. Who could have known? Of course, football is in their blood. Their father, Jack Harbaugh, was an assistant under the University of Michigan’s legendary coach Bo Schembechler, whose great rival for most of the 1970s was the equally legendary Woody Hayes, head coach at Ohio State. These were great oldschool coaches, and to this day the Harbaugh brothers credit them with providing the foundation of their very similar coaching styles. Both men come into the game with outstanding records. Since becoming the Baltimore Ravens’ coach in 2008, John Harbaugh has taken the team to the playoffs every year, twice getting to the AFC championship game but losing both times. And in the two years since Jim Harbaugh took over a struggling San Francisco 49ers team, he has led it to the playoffs twice. In the 2011 NFC championship game, the Niners narrowly lost in overtime to the New York Giants, 20-17. The Associated Press named Harbaugh the NFL coach of the year. Sunday’s game is not just about winning the biggest single athletic contest in the country. Yeah, that’s important, but you’ve got to figure the real fight here is over bragging rights at future Harbaugh family Thanksgiving dinners. Which reminds us: These two teams and coaches have met before, in a Thanksgiving Classic game in 2011 that Baltimore won, 16-6. Revenge will be sweet. Ω


FROM THIS CORNER by Robert Speer roberts@newsreview.com

Shake-up at City Hall It’s been a little over three weeks since John Rucker boxed up his personal items and walked out of City Hall. One day he was the assistant city manager, the next day he was “retired.” It’s not supposed to happen like that. Most valued, long-term employees who retire are honored with a special presentation before a City Council meeting. The mayor praises their service and reads a proclamation and everybody stands up and claps. That didn’t occur with Rucker. Exactly why he quit remains a mystery to all but a few people, and they’re not talking. Not on the record, anyway. I’ve heard from a number of city employees lately, some via anonymous emails and letters. They’re not happy with the way things are going since Brian Nakamura became city manager last fall. Rucker’s sudden and unexplained departure was the key event, but it was symptomatic of deeper problems, they say—poor communication, for one, and a lack of respect on Nakamura’s part for the painful process city employees have gone through as they’ve adjusted to hard times. As one high-level employee put it to me, “There’s a different vibe here. You can just feel it in the air.” Morale, she said, is in the tank. At-will employees—those managers not protected by a union—fear they’ll lose their jobs, and their worry may be well-founded. At the City Council meeting Tuesday (Jan. 29), Nakamura proposed a dramatic reorganization of the city’s staffing structure, and he seems to have the council’s support on it. (See my report on page 11.) Nakamura came in with a handicap: He was the first outsider ever to take on the city manager job. The Rucker matter occurred before he’d had time to build up trust with city staff, to whom Rucker was like family. Those who know what actually happened—City Council members, in particular—say Rucker’s leaving was a necessary parting of the ways. A couple of them were sufficiently specific to convince me they were right. In an interview, Nakamura said he and Rucker agreed that Rucker would make the “retirement” announcement to city staff, which he did by email. Nakamura didn’t think it was his place to add to Rucker’s explanation, which was so vague as to be a non-explanation. I think that was a mistake. Mysteries produce misunderstanding. Nakamura should have gathered together his staff and told them, in so many words, “Hey, there were irreconcilable differences. John and I agreed it wasn’t working. No blame, no shame.” People need reassurance. At this point, Nakamura says, he’s hopeful that staff will rally ’round when they see that he’s clarifying the city’s direction going forward. As one senior employee told me, “The train isn’t off the tracks. If it weren’t for what happened with John Rucker, we wouldn’t even be having this conversation.” That was before he knew about Nakamura’s reorganization plan, however. The train may still be on the tracks, but some people may be thrown off the train.

Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

Homelessness seen anew Re “Homeless in Paradise” (Cover story, by Amanda Allagree, Jan. 24): I seldom read anything in the paper that touches both my heart and mind, but Amanda Allagree’s perceptive article on the homeless population in Butte County did both. Allagree’s writing shows a maturity beyond her age, and I admire her courage in tackling such a charged topic. After reading her story, I will have a different reaction when I encounter homeless people on our streets. There is no simple one-size-fits-all reason why some people end up without a place to call home. Where once I would have avoided eye contact, I will now remind myself that people without homes are not so different from me. LETHA ALBRIGHT Chico

Because Amanda Allagree is only 16, I assume she was enrolled in Steve Metzger’s class because she’s in the College Connection program that gives the brighter and better-motivated young people of Butte County a chance to take college-level classes before they graduate from high school. Good on Mr. Metzger for spotting the obvious talents Amanda has, and good on Amanda for using those talents to bring to light such an often overlooked subject. In my years of teaching at Butte College, I dealt with more than a few budding young talents like Amanda, many of them in the very well-run College Connection program. Finding and nourishing their enthusiasm and their gifts was one of the compensatory joys of teaching, and so I knew what Steve Metzger had experienced when he had the opportunity to work with Amanda and help usher her work into print. He did a service to her, and she, in turn, did a service to her community in writing such a vivid and compassionate piece. And the CN&R also did a service to the community by running it.

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I connected with the difficulty of being homeless and the time and energy expended on surviving. It’s exhausting, and often humiliating. I went into a downtown business early this morning to check on some gloves I lost. The door was open, and I carefully went in, saying over and over again, “Hello?” Halfway through the establishment a flabbergasted man said, “Just get out of here,” and shooed at me with his hands as if I was an animal. I paused at the front door to calmly confront him. “Listen, I’m a human being,” I said. “I don’t care. Get out!” he snipped, his hand moving in a sweeping movement signifying my insignificance. LETTERS continued on page 6

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Later that morning I spent time with Guitar Clem and his dog Mud. A pleasant young gentleman with face iron laughingly shared, “A lady came by, petted Mud, and carried on how cute he was. Several times I said, ‘Hello, good morning.’ She totally ignored me!” On a good day we’re treated as well as dogs. Not today.

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Re “The felines among us” (Newslines, by Melissa Daugherty, Jan. 17): We recently had to deal with a feral cat in our north Chico location. First let me say that the people at the shelters who deal with excess animals do a great job. However, when a feral cat is entering your house in the middle of the night through your cat’s door, you have a problem. Disease, fleas, ticks, etc. can be a problem. I was able to live trap the cat, but when I took it to the shelter, the folks wanted to have the cat neutered and released in our yard. Sorry! Cats kill, according to the American Bird Conversancy, 500 million birds a year in the United States. The shelter says there are almost 15,000 cats in Chico. I much prefer to see birds in my yard rather than cats spraying around the house. Releasing these dangerous cats is not the correct answer to this huge problem. Let’s be realistic and find a better way to deal with the cat issue. MARC DEVEREAUX Chico

before uttering a sound. What say ye? Have we taken the path less traveled? REY MARTINEZ Chico

Partied to death We all know the recent effort to acknowledge and tackle the alcohol and drug problem among college students in our community was long overdue. But now that there does seem to be a sincere desire to reach out to the community for ideas, I would like to propose a project that I put forth 10 years ago, shortly after student Adrian Heideman’s death. I suggested that we obtain permission from the parents of students who literally partied themselves to death to frame their portraits and create a memorial exhibit. A paragraph stating their age, hometown, and aspirations would be under each one, followed by the date of their death. The permanent home for the exhibit would be the BMU, but it could “travel” throughout the campus and community to any number of student-related events (dare I say bars?) as a sobering reminder that we do have this problem and are taking it seriously. In the event

ning the one-time use of plastic bags. Their paid appearance on a Republican political mailer that endorsed both Mitt Romney and Elizabeth Emkin would lead the ill-informed to believe they held the same valued principals of personal responsibility and limited government that are core to the Republican Party. But that’s not why I write today. I wish to correct the misstatement that I am an employee of Supervisor Wahl. I am not. I am a part-time, at will, non-union employee of Butte County. Supervisor Wahl did ask me to apply for the position in his office. But I, as any other supervisor’s assistant, had to fill out an application and have it reviewed and verified by both the director of Human Relations and the CAO of Butte County, who made it abundantly clear I was an “at-will” employee. I had 13 years of mid-management municipal experience at a well-managed Midwestern town and excellent recommendations from many previous employers. I was thrilled to be asked and am proud to serve the residents of Butte County. STEPHANIE L. TABER Chico

“In the event of a student death, a prayer ceremony could take place on campus, as yet another portrait of a young, bright, promising student is added to the memorial.” —Lynne Bussey

Those who were silenced Re “Roe v. Wade at 40” (Editorial, Jan 17): Let us celebrate 40 years of progress since Wade v. Roe. Sadly, millions are not with us to rejoice in this monumental advancement in our culture. How far have we come? Some hold trees as a national treasure, so much so that we call them tree huggers, yet there are too many who will never feel a loving hug. Some hold high our need to reduce our carbon footprint, yet there are too many who will never leave a small footprint in the sand. Some hold woodstove emissions as harmful to breathing, yet there are too many who will never take their first breath of air. Some hold loudly that it is a woman’s news & review business choice, yet there have already ss too many who 03.03.11 designerbeen issUe dATesilenced were

FiLe nAMe lawofficesofbh030311r2

of a student death, a prayer ceremony could take place on campus, as yet another portrait of a young, bright, promising student is added to the memorial. This is only one idea, of many, that need implementation. I for one am on board. LYNNE BUSSEY Chico

Taber corrects the record Re “Bags o’ trouble” (Newslines, by Tom Gascoyne, Jan. 10): First I want to thank the editors of the CN&R for correctly quoting me when I addressed [Councilmembers] Schwab, Stone and Ritter at [the Jan. 2] council meetu s e o n ly ing during the discussion regardamb ACCT eXeC ing developing an ordinance banreV dATe

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E-bikes for seniors Re “Carving out a niche” (Greenways, by Claire Hutkins Seda, Jan. 17): My husband and I have had e-bikes for several years. We are seniors, and we are the niche ebikes really help. We don’t hesitate anymore about taking a long bike ride because if we get really worn out, we can use it in electric mode to bike home! It’s also great for hills. LAURA HUTKINS Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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METH BUST IN OROVILLE

An Oroville man was arrested on Sunday (Jan. 27) and charged with transportation and possession for sale of methamphetamine after he was found in possession of 3.5 grams of meth, narcotic pills and $1,600. Jeremy Lee William Appleyard, 37, was confronted by police involved in a meth-sales investigation in downtown Oroville in the parking lot of a Montgomery Street motel. As Appleyard is currently on parole for vehicle theft, officers conducted a search and allegedly discovered the contraband at around 1 p.m. Detectives from the Butte Interagency Narcotics Task Force responded to the scene and to Appleyard’s residence, where more drugs were found.

Signs of the times

WILD RIDE AND RUN

In what sounds like an episode from The Dukes of Hazzard, on Jan. 24 the driver of a pickup truck, in a high-speed chase with a Butte County sheriff’s deputy, crashed the vehicle into a power poll at Foothill Boulevard and Oroville Quincy Highway, sheared it off and ripped down the lines, which landed in a vacant residence starting a fire. The truck then hit another vehicle and a fire hydrant before coming to rest against a large boulder. The driver, 24-year-old Christopher South, was being chased as a suspect in a home invasion in Forbestown in which the resident said two men forced their way into his home, pepper sprayed him, and stole his truck and items from his home, according to the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. Deputy Grant Landis spotted the truck and gave chase. Following the crash, the driver ran between two houses and up a hill toward Canyon Highlands Drive, where he was captured by Landis while trying to enter a house. South was on parole for burglary and arrested on charges of possession of stolen property, vehicle theft, and home invasion. The other suspect has not been located.

DIALING FOR DOLLARS

Chico residents now seeking to apply for a “phone tax” refund—guaranteed by the defeat of Measure J on last November’s ballot—can now find an application to do so on the city of Chico’s website. Individuals must complete the application and show documentation that they were charged and paid the 5 percent utilityusers tax for cell phone or Voice over Internet Protocol (VOIP) services in the last 12 months. Refunds will be paid beginning Feb. 21, and those not collected within the next year will be placed in the city’s general fund. Measure J was defeated by 54 percent of Chico voters. Prior to that, the city was collecting about $900,000 annually from cell-phone taxes. The City Council is still trying to figure out how to replace the loss to the city’s general fund. 8 CN&R January 31, 2013

Sign artist Charles Withuhn (center) is working with Signs and Graphic Design’s new owners, Richard Collins and Christine Bieberly, to ensure a smooth transition.

Chico sign maker’s work provides a window into local business history

O on the Sierras on the eve of Pioneer Week, Charles Withuhn followed three beer trucks into

ne fateful day in 1972, as the sun set

Chico and decided he’d found home. Withuhn, then in his 20s, said he’d spent a few years traveling story and and doing odd jobs since graduphoto by ating from UC Berkeley and Ken Smith was looking to plant some roots: kens@ “I was having a great time but newsreview.com felt like I wasn’t part of anything that was going anywhere.” With the long-term goal of settling in Chico, he set out on the short-term goal of finding employment. After a miserable day of going door-to door unsuccessfully seeking any available work, he sat exhausted on a bench. “Then I looked up, and I saw a sign,” Withuhn said, speaking literally rather than metaphoriMore info: cally. “It was a beat-up, dirty, old sign, just completely shot. Go to www.signsand So I ran in and told the guy I’d graphic.com to repaint it and make it good as learn more about new for $50, and he agreed.” the business Seeing further opportunity, started by Withuhn applied for a business Charles Withuhn.

license and, with a bicycle and a few quarts of paint, founded Signs and Graphic Design, which for more than 40 years has provided some of Chico’s most iconic imagery and outfitted businesses large and small. Withuhn recently sold the business to longtime Chico residents and entrepreneurs Christine Bieberly and Richard Collins, but he remains on staff. “I love making signs, but it can be demanding for one person to get enough work to keep a whole crew busy,” Withuhn explained in the office portion of the business’ shop, with the new owners also present. “So I advertised that I wanted to do it this way, to sell the business but keep on working to ensure a smooth transition, and they answered. My goal is to stay on and at least work a few hours a week as long as they’ll have me.” Bieberly and Collins interjected in unison, “We’ll keep him!” Bieberly came to Chico 12 years

ago as a refugee from “large corporate America” and has spent part of her time here consulting local businesses. Collins formerly ran a company that helped

small businesses do retirement planning. Bieberly is particularly enthralled with the mechanics of the sign business, she said: “Of course the image tells the story, but there’s a lot that goes on behind the image, with measurements, where it’s going and what needs to be done to hold it in place. How all the little pieces and parts fit together into a big puzzle is fascinating to me. “Then, it’s really rewarding to drive down the street and say, ‘We made that sign.’” “What really appealed to me is that signs are a visual display of the community,” Collins said. “They tell stories about the people who want the signs and the people who build them. There’s great history in that, and signs can really display character. When you have great artists like Charles doing these signs, it adds a great deal of value to the community.” Signs and Graphic Design’s Commercial Avenue shop is part modern production facility and part museum, with signs of all sizes, shapes, colors and material makeup decorating the walls. Hanging elsewhere and everywhere are framed photos and collages of familiar


images Withuhn and his colleagues have created and installed, from favorite local restaurants to large constructions proclaiming Corning as the “City of Olives” to passersby on Interstate 5. Some of the more exotic pieces include a mechanized, hand-painted sign from a city of Chico safety campaign featuring caricatures of city officials as the cast of Gilligan’s Island, and a large neon sign that, Withuhn proudly pointed out, blinks to read “Delight In Signs.” There are also plenty of signs

from before 1972, as the company’s history goes much deeper. In 1985, Withuhn partnered with Wilson Wellsfry, and Sign and Graphic Design absorbed Wellsfry Sign Co. Wellsfry had been making signs since 1945, and the company was founded decades earlier by his father, Walter, a sign maker since 1918.

When you have great artists like Charles doing these signs, it adds a great deal of value to the community. —Richard Collins Collins said the collection of signs gives glimpses not only into Chico’s past, but also into the history of sign making itself. “You can see the progression in technology over the years, from hand-painting to using a projector to using graphic prints.” Withuhn is quick to share the stories behind the signs, as well as his adventures in sign making, as he gives the tour. One of his favorite stories, though he no longer has the sign, dates back to 1980: “I got a call from this guy who said he’d like a sign painted but didn’t have much money,” Withuhn said before adding with a laugh, “which is a pretty typical line we hear.” “So I pedaled my bike over to this steel building in the middle of nowhere, it’s mid-summer and really hot, and this guy pops out of a 10-foot-diameter milk vat holding a Black and Decker drill in one hand and a rotary wire brush in another.” The man showed him a logo, and that night Withuhn hand-painted and airbrushed a 6-by-2-foot sign cut from halfinch plywood. The man turned out to be Ken Grossman, and the sign was the first to publicly proclaim the existence of the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., Withuhn said. Signs and Graphic Design continues to do much of the brewery’s sign work today. Ω

Majority rules

Assistant City Clerk Dani Brinkley (left) and City Clerk Deborah Presson count ballots of the applicants for city boards and commissions. PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

Few minorities among applicants for commission seats

relationships over the past four or five years. I wanted specifically to make sure they were aware of the recruitment and possibilities.”

is a photo on the city of Chico webTonhere site recruiting applicants to fill open seats the four city commissions and one board.

The photo depicts 10 smiling adults, four men and six women of varying ethnic backgrounds. In fact, the photo does not represent the current makeup of the city government or its citizen commissions. The city’s website call for applicants reads: “The City of Chico supports diversity. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.” But of the 60 who applied for the 18 open seats, only five come from what could be called a non-white heritage, with one African-American, one Hmong, one Middle Easterner and two Hispanics. And none of them made the cut when the City Council members voted at the Jan. 24 council meeting. Forty of the applicants were men, and of the 18 appointees, 10 were men and eight were women. Two years ago the City Council deadlocked on appointing someone to take the vacant seat of Larry Wahl, who’d been elected to the Butte County Board of Supervisors. The politically divided council split, 3-3, over appointing Bob Evans, who’d finished just out of the running in the November 2010 council election. They also deadlocked on Sor Lo, a member of the Hmong community who’d been urged to throw his hat into the ring. At a couple of meetings in which the matter was discussed, many members of the Hmong community were in attendance to show their support for Lo. In the end, recognizing a stalemate, Councilman Andy Holcombe changed his vote to support Evans.

Schwab noted that applicants did

A dozen years ago a man named Dan Nguyen-Tan, born in Saigon in 1974, was elected as the only ethnic minority ever to serve on the City Council. And the number of women who have served on the council and as mayor has steadily increased over the last 20 years. One of those women, current Councilmember and former Mayor Ann Schwab, has been a major force in trying to get the city to recognize minority communities in Chico and encourage their involvement in local government. As mayor she helped launch the Diversity Action Plan, whose mission includes reaching out to minorities and inviting them into the fold. The plan is still being implemented. “It takes a lot of trust and relationship building, I believe, with groups that don’t see themselves at the table,” she said in the wake of the recent board appointments. “I personally contacted the president of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and asked her to make announcements to her constituents. I also made some contacts with the Butte County Hmong Association. I’ve been building those

SIFT|ER The costs of living The costs of energy and food are the greatest hits to American pocketbooks, according to recent Gallup polls. Seventy-nine percent of those surveyed on the financial impact of nine various economic issues ranked the cost of energy—including gasoline—as very hurtful to their finances; the price of food was cited by 76 percent of the respondents. Other highranking issues included taxes (69 percent) and health-care costs (68 percent). Related polls revealed the lowest income brackets (under $24,000) are more affected by the cost of food than the highest ($90,000 and above), with 81 percent of the poorest ranking food costs as damaging compared to 65 percent of the most wealthy.

Source: www.gallup.com.

include a range of ages, from a teenage girl to senior citizens. “I think the assumption is that, if people can see themselves in those roles, they are more apt to make those applications. It’s a process that needs to be continually worked on,” she said. City Clerk Deborah Presson told the council at its Jan. 24 meeting that there were only five applicants by the time the first deadline came up in early December. The deadline was extended by two weeks, resulting in “a couple more” applicants, and then extended again for a second time, Presson said, “and we were inundated with a total of 60.” The Airport Commission, which meets four times a year, had four open seats and 15 applicants. One incumbent, Bob Koch, had moved out of the city, and Commissioner Robert Michels passed away while in office. The terms had expired for Commissioners Kurt Nathan and Charles Mueller. Nathan reapplied and was appointed, along with former Chico Mayor Karl Ory, BT Chapman and Gregory Sanger. Six people applied for four open seats on the Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board. In this case, three incumbents, Marci Goulart, Thomas Thomson and Dale Bennett, were joined by newcomer Clancy Callahan. The board meets monthly. The Arts Commission, which also meets once a month, had 14 applicants vying for four open seats, including incumbents Geraldine Mahood and Ginny Crawford, neither of whom was re-appointed. The new arts commissioners are Angela Cook, Todd Hall, Kandis Horton and John Reed. The Bidwell Park and Playground Commission, which also meets monthly, had 20 applicants for three positions. Incumbent Mary Brentwood was joined by Janine Rood and Andrew Traulsen. Not making the cut here was former Vice Mayor Tom Nickell and Andrew Coolidge, who came in fourth in last year’s City Council race for three seats. Coolidge also applied for a seat on the Planning Commission, but didn’t make it there either. Those three open seats went to former Chico Mayor Mardi Worley, Toni Scott and Eleanor Anderson. Coolidge didn’t deny his disappointment with the outcome. “I’m a little surprised with the partisan nature of the vote,” he said. “I was really hoping for something else.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 January 31, 2013

CN&R 9


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continued from page 9

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hico police believe a man offiCresponsible cers arrested on Jan. 26 is for committing two

south-campus sexual assaults that took place last fall. Both involved the kidnapping of a woman who was injected with an unknown tranquilizer. The suspect, Lonnie Scott Keith, 40, is also being investigated for possible involvement in a series of 11 attempted or actual rapes, kidnappings and assaults of college-age women that took place in the same area over the past 18 months. At a Tuesday (Jan. 29) press conference, Chico Police Lt. Mike O’Brien explained how detectives Stan Duitsman, Scott Franssen and patrol officer Mark Hoffman were on a stakeout in the early-morning hours of Jan. 26 and had stopped Keith for a minor traffic violation. The detectives noticed the rear windows were partly covered with bedding and blankets, similar to the vehicles described in the September and October assaults. Keith consented to a search of his vehicle, where detectives found what may be incriminating evidence: a combination stun gun/flashlight in a cup holder near the driver’s seat, two syringes filled with an unknown liquid, latex gloves, several nylon stockings, and strips of adhesive tape. The suspect in at least one of the fall incidents wore latex gloves

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Chico Police Lt. Mike O’Brien stands in front of a photo of Lonnie Scott Keith, who is alleged to have committed at least two kidnapping and sexual assaults, but is suspected in a series of other cases as well. PHOTO BY VIC CANTU

and a nylon-stocking-like face covering, and both victims had their eyes shut with strips of tape. Keith voluntarily accompanied the detectives to the police station, where he was subsequently arrested. Police obtained a search warrant for the car and found looped zip ties hidden in the trunk. They also discovered a secret compartment hidden under the driver’s seat containing more latex gloves, several syringes, metal handcuffs, metal leg restraints, more plastic zip ties and several vials of sedative prescription drugs. O’Brien explained that in the fall attacks the victims’ hands and feet were bound with plastic zip ties and some of the vials in the secret compartment contained the same substance used in the October assault. He also said that in December Keith sold two vehicles similar to those described in the September and October assaults: a dark SUV and a dark sedan. Police were able to locate and confiscate both for evidence testing. DNA evidence has been collected in several of the incidents with no timetable set for results, he said. Keith, who is married and

has four children, has no arrest record. He works as a physician’s assistant at both Enloe Occupational Health and at Oroville Medical Center.

During questioning following the press conference, O’Brien said that Keith, in his profession in the medical industry, was authorized to inject patients and prescribe them medication. He also said Keith had done medical testing for the Chico Police Department as part of his duties at Enloe. Keith is being investigated further for possible theft of the medications found in his possession. He was arraigned the same day of the press conference on a count of rape, two counts of kidnapping and one count of assault with the intent to commit rape. His bail was set at $3.2 million. If convicted on all charges he could face 32 years to life in prison, according to a CPD press release. O’Brien pointed out that although several of the assaults involved a second suspect, none has yet been found. The Butte County Sheriff’s Office is investigating a similar assault that occurred a few blocks from the area of the other incidents, said O’Brien. “This arrest is especially important for the victims and any potential victims,� said O’Brien. “Almost all of these incidents have happened to a single victim walking alone,� O’Brien warned. “You should walk with at least one other person or a group of people.� —VIC CANTU


Valentine’s Day Sale

Remaking city government Nakamura unveils dramatic restructuring of city staffing hose who attended the first of the Chico Tsessions City Council’s two so-called goal-setting last Thursday (Jan. 24) but not the

second one on Tuesday (Jan. 29) missed the dramatic conclusion of this two-act play. “Goal-setting sessions” doesn’t really describe what happened here. The meetings were actually two acts of a mostly one-man show in which new City Manager Brian Nakamura proffered his analysis of city government and his solution for its problems. Over the course of several hours Nakamura outlined, using PowerPoint slides, the financial problems facing the city, including a $3.24 million structural deficit, before finally, at the end of Tuesday’s meeting, unveiling his dramatic cost-saving solution: a wholesale reorganization of the city’s staffing structure. If the council approves his plan—and it appeared likely to do so, perhaps with minor changes—the number of city departments will go from 12 to five: Police, Fire, Public Works/Airport, Community Development and Administrative Services. Several current departments—Finance, Housing and Neighborhood Services, Capital Projects and Planning, among others—would be subsumed under one or another of these five, meaning their directors’ jobs likely would be either eliminated or substantially revised. Leading up to the unveiling of the reorganization plan, Nakamura warned council members that solving the city’s financial problems would be like taking off a bandage: You can do it fast or slow, and fast is better. Yes, it will hurt, one of his slides read, “but the city needs to immediately get on the road to recovery.” It’s important to “separate people from the problem,” he said, and “focus on interests, not positions,” hinting that in the process of returning the city to full financial health some people and positions would be sacrificed. Heretofore the city has responded to the loss of revenue caused by the recession and state take-backs of redevelopment and vehicle-license funds by reducing staffing through attrition, cutting salaries and benefits, deferring maintenance and upgrades,

borrowing internally from specialized funds, and dipping into its emergency reserves. This has allowed the city to get by without reorganizing, but it’s also created a permanent structural deficit, depleted reserves to dangerous levels, and made it difficult to finance important technological upgrades, including much-needed new radio and computer systems in the public-safety dispatch office at a cost of $1.7 million. For a long time it wasn’t clear what all this financial bad news was leading to. At one point Mayor Mary Goloff asked Nakamura, “What’s the goal of these sessions? Where are we going?” However, he wasn’t ready to reveal his reorganization plan, so he gave her a roundabout non-answer and went back to his PowerPoint presentation. After a discussion of the importance of “right sizing” the organization and “right funding” individual departments, Nakamura finally unveiled his reorganization chart, saying it would reduce expenses and foster greater efficiency. Council members stared at it intently as it dawned on them just what he had in mind. Councilman Sean Morgan was immediately supportive. Warning the plan’s implementation “would have pitfalls,” Morgan said that nevertheless the status quo was no longer feasible. “This is fantastic!” he exclaimed. But his enthusiasm was nothing compared to Councilman Scott Gruendl’s. “I think tonight we’re turning a huge corner,” he said, addressing Nakamura. “It’s why we brought you in as city manager.” He said he was “really proud because this represents a significant shift in this organization.” And he began choking up when he added, “If this community fails, it’s not the staff who will be blamed, it will be us.” Nakamura’s proposal came without numbers, however, and some council members wanted to know how much money it would save. Nakamura promised to come back with that information at next week’s council meeting, on Feb. 5.

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Krispy Kreme enthusiasts bundled themselves in big jackets and blankets outside of the chain doughnut producer’s original Chico location on Business Lane at 5 a.m. Tuesday, a half hour before the shop opened its doors to the public. The opening-day line spiraled around the building, as did a line of cars waiting for the drive-through. The earliest of the devotees arrived Monday, camping out to win prizes of free doughnuts (the first person receiving doughnuts each week for a year) and T-shirts. PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

January 31, 2013

CN&R 11


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Passage of the California Homemade Food Act, Assembly Bill 1616, allows people to make certain foods at home, like these cupcakes, and sell them in markets.

SENATE PUSHING FOR KEYSTONE XL

Just days after promising tough action on climate change at his inauguration, President Obama is facing pressure from the U.S. Senate to move forward with the controversial Keystone XL Pipeline. More than half the Senate is urging quick approval of the $7 billion project, which would carry tar-sands oil from Alberta, Canada, to the Texas Gulf Coast, according to SFGate.com. A letter signed by 53 senators—44 Republicans and nine Democrats—said the proposal has “gone through the most exhaustive environmental scrutiny of any pipeline” in U.S. history and “there is no reason to deny or further delay this long-studied project.” The Obama administration has twice blocked development of the pipeline—once in 2011 to address concerns regarding the proposed route through environmentally sensitive areas of Nebraska and again in January 2012, as Obama said the concerns had not been properly addressed.

SEA-LEVEL-RISE ACTION NEEDED?

Though California has done more than most coastal states to prepare for rising sea levels, experts warn efforts need to be redoubled. Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed an executive order in 2008 mandating that the California Resources Agency and other entities study the possible effects of sea-level rise. The order also required state agencies to take sea-level projections into account when planning future projects, according to SFGate.com. But the executive order does nothing to address existing communities and shorelines at risk, and no single state agency is currently in place to oversee future management efforts like new levees, raised seawalls, expanded wetlands and improved drainage systems. Projections have indicated hundreds of square miles of the Bay Area are in danger of flooding by 2050.

ACTIVIST TURNS EPA BIGWIG

Environmental activist Matthew Tejada of Houston, Texas, has been named the Environmental Protection Agency’s new director for the Office of Environmental Justice. Tejada (pictured), who begins his new job in March, faced some of the nation’s most serious pollution problems for the last five years along the Gulf Coast as the executive director for Air Alliance Houston, according to Environmental Health News. Tejada said “environmental racism” will be at the forefront of issues he faces during his tenure, referring to the widespread health risks posed by the proximity of oil refineries, power plants and chemical factories to neighborhoods of low-income communities of color. Tejada said his candidacy was successful because “they feel like I can be a very reasonable but effective advocate for environmental justice issues throughout the EPA and, hopefully, throughout the federal government.”

Send your eco-related news tips to Howard Hardee at HowardH@newsreview.com.

12 CN&R January 31, 2013

Below: Chaffin Family Orchards’ Chris Kerston (left) and Butte County Public Health Environmental Health Director Brad Banner, shown here at the Chaffin farm, are pleased with the new bill. PHOTO BY CLAIRE HUTKINS SEDA

Exactly like homemade New law allows certain cottage-food operations to make products in a home kitchen by

Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

Tmental-health director for the Butte County Public Health Department, tells it, it he way Brad Banner, environ-

is thanks to “a popular guy in L.A. who made gourmet bread in his home” for sale at a farmers’ market being “shut down by the health department” that Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles) was spurred into writing Assembly Bill 1616. Banner, for his part, helped with the passage of AB 1616, also known as the California Homemade Food Act, which took effect on Jan. 1. “I worked for it,” said Banner. “I’m excited because it’s part of the local food movement and I think that’s a really good thing.” In a nutshell, the California Homemade Food Act allows “an enterprise at a private home”—termed a cottage-food operation, or CFO—to prepare for packaged sale to consumers “specific low-risk food products that do not require refrigeration,” as the Environmental Health Division of the Butte County Public Health Department puts it in the Frequently Asked Questions section of its website (see column note for Web address). Thirty-two other states in the United States, including Oregon, Washington and Colorado, have passed similar laws

allowing home-kitchenbased businesses to produce goods for sale to the public. Included on California’s list of approved CFO products are baked goods without cream, custard or meat fillings, like bread, biscuits, churros, cookies and tortillas; chocolate-covered nonperishable foods such as nuts and dried fruits; dried pasta; fruit pies, empanadas and tamales; granola and trail mix; honey; nut butters; popcorn; mustard; and roasted coffee and dried tea. CFOs are divided into two categories according to the Homemade Food Act— Class A CFOs may engage only in “direct sale” (such as at farmers’ markets and community events, or via mobile units) of cottage foods, while Class B CFOs are allowed to engage in both direct and indirect sale (such as through a retailer). Class A CFOs require no initial inspection; rather, they are required to “simply California Homemade Food Act:

Go to www.tinyurl.com/awec2do to read the entire text of AB 1616; visit www.tinyurl.com/cottagefaq to read the answers to frequently asked questions about the California Homemade Food Act.

register with the health department and sign a self-certification document that they’ll follow the rules,” Banner said. A couple of those rules, according to the statutory requirements for cottage-food operations as laid out in the California Health and Safety Code, are: “No cottage food preparation, packaging or handling may occur in the home kitchen concurrent with any other domestic activities, such as family meal preparation, dishwashing, clothes washing or ironing, kitchen cleaning, or guest entertainment,” and “All food preparation and food and equipment storage areas shall be maintained free of rodents and insects.”


ECO EVENTS A Class A CFO may, however, be inspected if “on the basis of a consumer complaint, [there is] reason to suspect that adulterated or otherwise unsafe food has been produced” by the CFO, according to the text of AB 1616. Class B CFOs, on the other hand, require “an initial inspection … and no more than one inspection per year,” Banner said. “This is new to our department—we’ve never gone into people’s homes to inspect their kitchen. It’s a whole new thing for staff.” So far, said Banner, four people in Butte County have taken advantage of AB 1616—three CFOs have registered as Class A and one was permitted as Class B. “The primary thing that

AB 1616 offers us is … being able to do things with dried fruit, you know, like chocolate-dipped, for gift packs and things of that nature,” said Chris Kerston, managing partner at Oroville’s Chaffin Family Orchards (go to www.chaffinfamilyorchards.com to learn more), in a recent telephone interview. Chicoans are familiar with Chaffin Family Orchards’ permaculture-raised fresh fruits and vegetables (and, of course, its dried fruit), grass-fed meats and awardwinning olive oils, often via its booth at the Saturday farmers’ market in downtown Chico. “Until AB 1616, we were allowed to sun-dry

OF WATER & NATURE Tuesday, Feb. 5, is a mighty green day. First, Chico State’s year-long Book in Common theme of water conservation continues with a free discussion of spiritual and stewardship issues regarding water. The discussion takes place in Colusa Hall Room 100B, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Call 891-6424 or go to www.becnet.org for more info. Then, at 7 p.m. that night, the Chico Creek Nature Center (1968 E. Eighth St.) begins its weekly “Nature Education” talks as community members share short tales of the outdoor world to inspire, inform and engage. The series will continue every Tuesday in February; call 891-4671 or go to www.bidwellpark.org to register.

the fruit, but you weren’t allowed to ‘value-add’ it in any way,” said Kerston. “We would have had to rent a commercial kitchen,” which can be pricey, he noted. Ditto for making jam, which Chaffin Family Orchards produced before the passage of the California Homemade Food Act. “We’ve always had to rent a commercial kitchen for jam,” Kerston said. “If you go to a commercial kitchen, you’re renting for a particular date, once a month. You can’t save the culled fruit [for this purpose]—you have to take first-run fruit. If you’re making small batches of jam in a [home] kitchen, you can use culled fruit as the ‘waste’ fruit presents itself.” Kerston brought up the example of peaches: “Say you have a peach that is 90 percent good, or has a bug bite, or a bird strike. You can’t

UNCOMMON SENSE Ditchin’ the commercial shampoo Have you, out of concern for both the environment and the health of your hair, wondered if there might be a more healthful alternative to commercial shampoos and conditioners? Well, Elisabeth Kwak-Hefferan, Grist.org’s “Greenie Pig” columnist swears by a regimen so simple—and so successful—that you’ll wonder why you wasted all that money over the years on commercial hair products. Ready? Baking soda and applecider vinegar. That’s it. Kwak-Hefferan’s “desire to avoid the chemicals packed into everyday toiletries, reduce plastic-bottle purchases and old-fashioned thriftiness” led her to the discovery that washing her hair with a paste made from baking soda and water and conditioning it with apple-cider vinegar diluted with a little water left her hair looking and feeling considerably healthier and easier to style than all the shampoos and conditioners she’d ever tried. Her mom, her boyfriend and her friend, Tinaz, tried it and loved it, too. Go to www.tinyurl.com/glamlocks to read Greenie Pig’s entire article.

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sell that at the farmers’ market as whole fruit as customers are generally turned off. Now, we have a ‘home’ for our ‘seconds,’” which before AB 1616 “often would end up as livestock feed” simply because of the appearance. “Now, we can do a small batch of jam every weekend after the farmers’ market, rather than a oncea-month date,” Kerston said. “We’re looking forward to taking advantage of this in summer.” But even more important than the fact that the California Homemade Food Act allows small businesses to use home kitchens for food preparation, notes Kerston, is the fact that the new law increases access to healthful food. As Kerston explained it, “The [food] movement right now is trying to go back to this old-fashioned, heirloom way of life, but the reality is, in our modern society, everyone’s really busy. Sixty years ago, every home had one person in the household whose sole job was to feed and clothe the family—and we don’t have that anymore. And that’s OK. “But for this food movement to grow, and for people to have access to fresh, healthy food, we have to be able to offer them ready-to-eat foods. The more we can remove the barriers [to accessing fresh, healthful, ready-to-eat foods], the more people will have access to healthy foods. “This is designed to be an incubator program,” Kerston added, of AB 1616. “It allows small businesses to see what works before renting a full-blown commercial kitchen and getting a staff and all those next steps of growth. It provides an opportunity to get some experience, some customer feedback before taking those next steps on growing your business.” Ω more GREENWAYS continued on page 15

Find Out More and Register Online: www.buttehabitat.org or In-Person at Fleet Feet Sports 241 Main St., Downtown Chico January 31, 2013

CN&R 13


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14 CN&R January 31, 2013


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INCREASING FOOD SECURITY Sue Hilderbrand, program coordinator for

Cultivating Community Advocates (CCA)—the new organization within foodaccess education group Cultivating Community NV—sent me a press release about CCA’s 2013 Food Security Competitive Grant Program. The program offers mini-grants to chosen applicants as part of a larger Specialty Crop Block Grant from the California Department of Food & Agriculture. “The CCA Food Security Competitive Grant Program will offer three rounds for funding, totaling $120,000 over a period of 2.5 years,” says the press release. “The Spring 2013 funding cycle will award up to $40,000, with a maximum single award of $10,000 and a minimum award of $3,000.” The purpose of the grant program is “to encourage food localization and to support food security within the Butte County farming area, and specifically within communities with historic barriers to access,” such as those with language, income or documentation barriers. Community members “who face systemic difficulty accessing the resources, information and skills needed to … grow, sell, buy, prepare [or] preserve” healthful food are encouraged to apply for the mini-grants. A free and open-to-all-potential-applicants grant-proposal workshop will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the Independent Living Services Center (1161 East Ave.). The deadline for submitting an application is March 1 at 5 p.m. Go to www.cultivatingcommunitynv.org for a full description of the grant program, application requirements and rating criteria.

THE ETHICS OF WATER USE A recent press release from Butte Environmental

Council advocacy consultant Nani Teves announced the upcoming free forum, “Ethical Issues and Water: An Interfaith Dialogue,” which will take place on Feb. 5, from 4:30 to 6 p.m., in Chico State’s Colusa Hall, room 100B. “CSU, Chico’s Book in Common Group and Butte Environmental Council invite the public to a forum … focus[ing] on the spiritual and stewardship issues that surround water, including water as an element essential to all life, as a human right and as a contentious public-policy issue in California and beyond,” the press release says. Chico State religious-studies professor Bruce Grelle, attorney and water-issue mediator Marty Dunlap and Buddhist writer Lin Jensen are among the speakers at this event.

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CN&R 15


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES Renew Float Spa owner Rick Blair stands with his partner, beautician and massage therapist Elizabeth Anastasi, near the entrance to the spa’s flotation chamber.

OUTPATIENT ABORTIONS SAFE

First-trimester abortions performed by trained midwives, nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants are as safe as those performed by physicians, a new study finds. A six-year study led by researchers at UC San Francisco also found that abortions performed at outpatient clinics are safe procedures whether they are performed by a physician, nurse practitioner, midwife or physician’s assistant, according to a UCSF press release. In California, 13 percent of women on state Medicaid insurance who have abortions performed do so in the second trimester, when complications are more likely and cost of care is higher. Also, black, uninsured and low-income women continue to have less access to abortion care. “Increasing the types of health-care professionals who can provide early aspiration abortion care is one way to reduce this health-care disparity,” said lead study author Tracy Weitz.

ADHD RATES ON RISE

California’s children are increasingly diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a report finds. The report, compiled by researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Medical Group, found that the rate of children in California diagnosed with ADHD has increased by 24 percent since 2001, according to USA Today. Researchers noted that on average, children were diagnosed between the ages of 8 1/2 and 9 1/2 years old; white children were more likely to be diagnosed than black, Hispanic or Asian children; and boys were three times more likely to be diagnosed than girls. Lead author Darios Getahun said the results suggest a growing awareness of ADHD among physicians and parents.

UNPREPARED FOR PRISON OVERSIGHT

Following a tour of two-thirds of California’s prisons, a federal official has deemed the state unprepared to reassume oversight of its prison health-care system. In a report filed with the U.S. District Court, Special Master Matthew Lopes said Gov. Jerry Brown’s recent request for the federal government to drop its mandate requiring California to reduce prison populations and allow the state to regain oversight is “not only premature, but a needless distraction from the important work that is being done in the [state’s] quality-improvement project,” according to The New York Times. Lopes said federal oversight is necessary for several reasons—at least 32 inmates committed suicide in 2012; prisons had various lapses in care; and in several instances, inmates with mental illnesses were put in isolation for long periods of time rather than given treatment. He also found that all 11 outpatient healthcare facilities in the prison system conduct inmate counseling sessions in public rather than confidential settings.

Send your health-related news tips to Howard Hardee at HowardH@newsreview.com.

16 CN&R January 31, 2013

PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

An hour in limbo A trial float at Renew, Chico’s only spa with a flotation chamber

by

Howard Hardee howardh@ newsreview.com

A warm, salty water of the flotation chamber at Renew Float Spa, I thought of s I lowered myself into the

what owner Rick Bair told me directly before I entered the room: In the complete darkness and silence of the chamber, nearly all first-time floaters are uncomfortable for a five- to 10-minute period as they adjust to the feeling of “being out in the middle of the universe.” When my hour was through, he told me, he would knock distinctly on the wall six times. I was to knock three times in response so he knew I wasn’t asleep. After immersing myself in the foot-high water, which is heated to 95 degrees and infused with a thousand pounds of Epsom salt, I couldn’t help thinking that an hour in the chamber would feel like an eternity. Indeed, I was tense during what I presumed to be the first five minutes of my float (I lost accurate perception of time almost immediately). Making matters worse, I had taken Bair’s advice to heart and put myself through a spin class at In Motion Fitness the night before my appointment to make sure I was as sore as possible. The discomfort in my lower back was considerable.

As I lay there with the water nearly up to my eyes (the Epsom salt keeps the body afloat), I put myself through some basic breathing exercises—sharp intake, a pause, and slow release. Soon, I was past the adjustment period Bair spoke of. With my anxiety eased, I was able to focus on the experience itself. The lack of sensation

was remarkable; I couldn’t think of another time in my life so completely devoid of sights and sounds. Only my occasional bumping into the sides of the tank reminded me I wasn’t actually suspended in limbo. Just as the mind tends to wander at night just before falling asleep, my

APPOINTMENT VIVA! Enloe Medical Center’s Cancer Connections program will host a free Viva! cancer-support event for kids and teens who are dealing with cancer in their families, from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Fountain Medical Conference Room (251 Cohasset Road, across from Chico Sports Club). The event will offer resources and networking opportunities as well as pizza and age-appropriate activities. Call 332-3856 to register or for more info.


Say yes to Fancy a float?

thoughts turned to matters of apparent importance—immediate obligations that week, personal relationships, long-term goals, whether or not the float was going to make my skin all pruney. But unlike the vague thoughts that make one toss and turn at night, I was considering the issues at hand with a kind of singular focus that I’ve only rarely been granted. About midway through my hour in the chamber, I discovered that my back no longer ached whatsoever. As far as I could tell, it wasn’t a gradual easing of discomfort; I was aware of the pain one moment and it was gone the next. At that point, able to completely relax, I worked through another quick series of breathing exercises and attempted to turn my mind off. It must have worked, because Bair’s six knocks were a jarring dose of reality. I gave him three knocks in response and opened the chamber, feeling as if I had been inside for less than half an hour. “My partner gave me a float

for my birthday about three years ago,” Bair said during an interview immediately following my hour in the chamber. Bair is a soft-spoken retiree who worked for Budweiser as Chico’s operations manager for about 20 years before getting into the spa business. “I sure liked it—I came out of there and, like you, I was surprised when they told me my hour was up. That euphoric feeling stayed with me all day.” Indeed, I felt like a million bucks after getting out of the chamber, and my high mood stayed with me until I fell asleep (quite easily, I might add) that night. Not only were my spirits running high, but I also felt like I could have easily done another spin class. Bair’s initial impression of floating—which came at a “hippie commune” in Grass Valley—led him to seek the experience in other locations. As he spoke with the managers of various spas, he began to envision opening his own in Chico with his partner, Elizabeth Anastasi, a beautician and massage therapist. But unlike other spas in Chico, they would have a float tank. Since opening Renew inside the In Motion Fitness facility last October, Bair has seen people use the tank for a wide range of issues—chronic pain, stress relief, insomnia, depression, anger management, rheumatism and even hangovers. “There is a natural release of

Make an appointment at Renew by calling 588-7378 or dropping by the spa at 1030 Village Lane (In Motion Fitness), Ste. 190. Cost for an hour-long flotation session is $50. Go to www.renewfloatspa.com for more info.

endorphins,” he noted. Floating also replenishes “magnesium, which is taken out of the body by stress and exercise. So, it’s really good for athletes in training.” Endurance athletes in particular are able to recover from their workouts much faster after floating, Bair said. He has recently begun scheduling regular floating sessions for runners and cyclists, and experimenting with results both pre- and post-competition. And while most floaters have related positive experiences, Bair has had three people exit the chamber before their hour was up. Two reported getting “seasick,” while the third was overcome with

F o r Yo u : F o r L i f e : F o r E n e r g y

anxiety. He said many more worry they might feel claustrophobic, but argues that the concern is unwarranted because the chamber is tall enough to stand up in. A handful of people (including Bair) have also reported closed-eye visualizations while in the darkened chamber. “It’s not a common experience,” he said. “It happens to people who go into a deeper, restful place. It can be anything from faces—and I’d say those people have actually gone into a sleep—to just little DESIGNER ‘continents’ with a highlighted edge JEN_PU around them. I always get the visuals while still conscious.” More than anything, Bair has been impressed by the range of responses from people coming out of the tank. “It’s helping people who are in pain, it’s helping people with stress, it’s helping people solve problems,” he said. “It’s a broad spectrum, and I think I’ve just hit the tip of the iceberg of what it can do.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Avoiding the flu, naturally Your neighbors on both sides of your house are sick with the flu, as are the folks across the street. Ditto for a handful of your workmates. It may feel as though the latest round of influenza is closing in on you. But even under such daunting circumstances (some people are even going so far as to call this latest nationwide flu attack a “pandemic”), one can follow measures that have a reasonable chance of helping you avoid the flu bug by boosting your immune system. NaturalNews.com offers these helpful tips: • Eat lots of fruits and veggies: Make sure that you eat a wide variety of vitamin- and mineralpacked fruits and vegetables. During flu season, increase your intake of vitamin C—such as naturally occurs in citrus fruits—for extra virus-fighting benefits. • Eat garlic daily: Besides having a reputation as being good for warding off vampires, garlic is praised for its antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. Eating two cloves of garlic per day is the recommended fluseason dose. • Eat ’shrooms: Mushrooms (we’re not talking the psychedelic kind) are great for increasing the activity and production of white blood cells, which fight infection. Maitake and shiitake mushrooms are said to be the best for immune-system boosting. • Exercise: Thirty to 60 minutes of daily exercise can give your immune system extra oomph. For instance, people who walked regularly for 12 weeks reported half the number of colds and sore throats as lessactive folks, according to an Appalachian State University study. Go to www.tinyurl.com/noflubug for more tips.

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CN&R 17


18 CN&R January 31, 2013


January 31, 2013

CN&R 19


FRESH

Los Caballitos de la Canción: (from left) Gordy Ohliger, Michael Cannon, Amalie Sorensen, Joel Quivey, Jo Chavez, Jim Williford, David Cowan, Christine LaPado-Breglia and Jerry Morano. PHOTO BY ELIZABETH QUIVEY

A

EL SUPER GROUP Los Caballitos de la Canción Los Caballitos de la Canción—a new Chico ensemble that delivers a sophisticated mélange of Spanish and Latin American sounds—is a super group of local music-scene giants. Led by vocalist/keyboardist Jo Chavez, the ninepiece features Gordy “The Banjo-ologist” Ohliger (on rhythm guitar here), the Pub Scout’s timeless leader Michael Cannon on another guitar, and North State Symphony’s Amalie Sorensen and Joel Quivey on violins. There’s also Jerry Morano, formerly of Spark ’n’ Cinder (and presently of Black Fong), on tasty bongos, congas, and the box drum, Beltain’s David Cowan on accordion, renowned local guitarist Jim Williford (formerly of Big Mo’s band, among others), and busy local jazz player (and CN&R staffer) Christine LaPado-Breglia on stand-up bass. “Everyone in the band is top notch—and extremely, maddeningly and lovingly quirky,” said Chavez, the band’s guiding force who also led the Ruby Hollow Band, which is on extended break. “Egos are at bay, and we are very focused.” The material itself, in addition to a few Chavezpenned tunes, includes many traditional works, ranging from the classic Mexican love song “La Malagueña” to the accordion-rich “El Canoero,” which Los Lobos recorded in 2000, and the romantic “Siente Mi Amor,” which Salma Hayek sang in the movie Once Upon a Time in Mexico. Chavez, a New Mexico native who went back home to study mariachi music a few years ago, said she posted a Los Lonely Boys video to Facebook upon returning to Chico, with a query: “Hey, anyone

interested in doing anything like this?” Cannon responded first, she said, “and it was like a cascade from there on out.” Los Caballitos’ sophisticated and polished fusion of Spanish flamenco and Mexican conjunto provides a delicious alternative to the local sound. Though the group’s players’ have their own diverse and accomplished backgrounds, Los Caballitos nicely gels as one. “Each member is solid,” Ohliger wrote in an email, “each nailing their part. It reminds me of when I played tympani in an orchestra. Everyone is focused exactly on their part, and when combined, it’s a magical power.” When asked, “Why this band? Why now?” Morano said, “Two words: ‘Jo Chavez.’ She brings the passion to the music and inspires me to play my best.” Added Williford: “The players are exceptional, and creating music with them is a gift. The music tugs at my Texas heart. Proud to be a Caballito amigo.” The band recently recorded a six-song EP, appropriately titled Seis Canciones, at local engineer Dale Price’s Electric Canyon Studios and is in the process of booking summer festivals and events at which they are bound to appeal to those who already love Spanish-tinged cabaret music, as well as those who will be discovering it for the first time. www.reverbnation.com/loscaballitosdelacancion —ALAN SHECKTER

t the beginning of each year, we here at the Chico News & Review survey the library of bands that make up the Chico music scene and try and choose a handful of the newer musical acts that promise to bring something special to local stages in the upcoming year. For 2013, we’ve zeroed in on seven: everything from a super group of some of the best musicians in town providing a fresh take on Latin music (Los Caballitos de la Canción), to a quartet of experimental merrymakers that break up their mathy freakouts with an ongoing series of skits chronicling the lives of four fathers of beauty-pageant contestants (Pageant Dads). And, this year, we’ve even included a couple of our own in the mix. The CN&R has several musicians on staff, and even though we often shy away from recognizing the work we do outside of the office in order avoid any appearance of conflict of interest, this year we couldn’t ignore the fact that two of our editorial cohorts are involved in bands that are legitimately among the most noteworthy young acts in town: Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine LaPado-Breglia, stand-up bassist for Los Caballitos de la Canción, and busy ukulele player and staff writer Ken Smith in the Michelin Embers. There’s a really fun collection of new sounds out there this year. Get out to a show and hear for yourself!

French Reform: (from left) Aric Jeffries, Phil Anker, Elias Nipert, Kirt Lind and Nik Burman. PHOTO BY JOEY MOSHIRI

20 CN&R January 31, 2013

Seven Chico bands that you must add to your local play list

AVANT-GARDE BRUNCH AND A NIGHT OF THEATER Bogg and the Pageant Dads

JAMS GET SHARP French Reform Following French Reform’s appearance at the Origami Recording Lounge as part of the End of the World Transcendence Ball on Dec. 21, owner Scott Barwick shared, unprompted, that the group is “kind of the cool new thing” in town. The band has performed live only three times since forming in March of last year, but the indie-pop outfit seems on its way to generating a buzz locally. During a recent interview with lead singer and guitarist Aric Jeffries and keyboardist and back-up vocalist Kirt Lind, Jeffries said the band’s sound “comes out poppy, energetic, and it rocks at times.” He also conceded all five members—including guitarist, keyboardist and back-up vocalist Phil Anker, bassist Elias Nipert and drummer Nik Burman—share an affinity for ’80s New Wave. Their mutual interest is apparent in the band’s first single, “Stay Sharp,” a short and sweet synth-heavy arrangement with reverb-soaked guitars and vocals The Cure’s Robert Smith would almost certainly approve of. As for how French Reform’s sound fits into Chico’s music scene, Lind believes they’re “definitely filling a niche. I haven’t seen a band in town like us for a while.” The band formed after responding to each other’s posts on Craigslist. Although Lind—who has played in many local bands, from Squirrel Vs. Bear to The Yule Logs—knew of Anker and Burman through past musical projects (Anker from Pan Pan and Shabby Car, and Burman from metal bands like Into the Open Earth), none of the members had collaborated before meeting for the first time. “There was never any period of awkwardness,” Jeffries said. “It clicked immediately because we have very similar influences, so we had stuff to talk about right off the bat. It also helps we have Nik in the band—he wants to get the ball rolling all the time.” Indeed, both Jeffries and Lind agree their drummer is key to French Reform’s creative process. During practice (which they hold in a converted chicken coup at Anker’s property in Red Bluff), Burman will diagram the shifting dynamics of each song on a dry-erase board. “[Burman] doesn’t write the parts, but he’s very much the person who works on assembling them,” Jeffries said. “He has very specific ideas for how he thinks things should go.” “It’s a cool dynamic, because there are three guys in the group who have made solo albums [Jeffries, Anker and Lind],” Lind said. “But it still feels like Nik writes the songs.” As for the band’s immediate future, they hope to begin recording an album early this summer. But more writing needs to be done, Lind said. “We only have nine songs, if you count that one we hate.” French Reform performs Feb. 13 at The Maltese. www.frenchreform.bandcamp.com —HOWARD HARDEE

Though the two bands don’t sound a whole lot alike, there are at least three reasons to combine avant-garde jazz trio Bogg and theatrical experimental prog-rockers the Pageant Dads in one profile. First, the guys in both bands are all friends, frequent collaborators and neighbors (they all live on the same block in the Avenues). Second, the bands share two members: Michael Bone (of Clouds on Strings) plays guitar and sings in the Pageant Dads and plays drums in Bogg, and Gavin Fitzgerald plays bass in both bands. Last, and most important, both are seemingly driven by the same desire to constantly try something new—and making each other laugh while they do so. “[We share] a big bed like in Willie Wonka,” said Pageant Dads’ lanky drummer, Alex Coffin, during a recent interview in Bone’s living room. The assembled members of both bands responded by laughing and rattling off a string of clever quips of their own. Both bands have been together less than one year, but they have already put in a ton of work toward their new projects. Bogg is an offshoot of sorts from prolific prog tricksters Clouds on Strings, with COS’s Bone and keyboardist Josh Hegg collaborating with their friend Fitzgerald. “We wanted to play more jazz,” Bone explained, and they have played a ton of it. Shortly after forming they booked the weekly Friday morning Brunch Music Series at Café Coda, for which they built sets around themes (Star Wars, Elton John), playing nearly every week there since September, as well as at 100th Monkey Books for a string of similar weekly gigs. “It’s like every single day we did Bogg stuff,” said Hegg. They also made time to record three EPs (go to www.bogg.bandcamp.com to download), and they provided the live soundtrack for a local Chikoko fashion show as well as a production of The Raven in San Francisco. Right now they are putting the finishing touches on a very ambitious and impressivesounding EP of originals called So Happy, It Hurts, featuring a huge cast of guest players, including a horn section, guitarist Loki Miller, and vocalist Samantha Francis of Decades, among others. Pageant Dads is something completely different, not just in comparison to Bogg, but compared to anything in Chico. “We’re all four dads. We met at our daughters’ pageants over the years,” said Bone, explaining the fake-dad concept. The four “pageant dads” are Tom Chaz

(Bone), Hawk Mahalo (Coffin), Craig D’Anthony (Fitzgerald), and Ruth Wardwell (played by fourth member, guitarist Danny Wardwell). The soap opera of these four friends’ lives plays out in little skits and gags that are interspersed among the band’s Zappa-esque sonic explorations. Ruth is jobless and sleeping on Craig’s couch. Tom is dating Hawk’s ex-wife and is kind of a douche for milking his friend’s child support.

Bogg and The Pageant Dads: (from left) Alex Coffin, Michael Bone, Gavin Fitzgerald, Josh Hegg and Danny Wardwell. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

And there are stories and dramas that unfold for each of them from gig to gig as the band writes new chapters to their stories for every show. “I want[ed] a full show with a wider spectrum of entertainment,” said Wardwell, talking about how the band’s early jam sessions evolved to striving to create a more entertaining live experience for Chico. And the Pageant Dads story is being expanded further in a Valentine’s Day musical comedy that’s being written by the group and produced by Hegg at the 1078 Gallery on Feb. 16. “This is a story for lovers and for people who don’t know the first thing about love,” said Coffin in a press release for the show, which promises to blur the lines between the band, the actors, and even the audience. “It’s hilarious to us,” said Fitzgerald, to which Hegg responded, “It’ll make you fall in love regardless.” In addition to playing tonight, Jan. 31, 8 p.m., at Café Coda, the Pageant Dads will also star in The Love Seat Diaries, a musical comedy Feb. 16, 7 p.m., at 1078 Gallery. Bogg performs Fridays, 11:30 a.m. at Café Coda and will host an EP-release party March 14, 8 p.m., also at Café Coda. www.tinyurl.com/pageantdads and www.facebook.com/boggjazz —JASON CASSIDY

“LOCAL MUSIC” continued on page 22 January 31, 2013

CN&R 21


FRESH

Los Caballitos de la Canción: (from left) Gordy Ohliger, Michael Cannon, Amalie Sorensen, Joel Quivey, Jo Chavez, Jim Williford, David Cowan, Christine LaPado-Breglia and Jerry Morano. PHOTO BY ELIZABETH QUIVEY

A

EL SUPER GROUP Los Caballitos de la Canción Los Caballitos de la Canción—a new Chico ensemble that delivers a sophisticated mélange of Spanish and Latin American sounds—is a super group of local music-scene giants. Led by vocalist/keyboardist Jo Chavez, the ninepiece features Gordy “The Banjo-ologist” Ohliger (on rhythm guitar here), the Pub Scout’s timeless leader Michael Cannon on another guitar, and North State Symphony’s Amalie Sorensen and Joel Quivey on violins. There’s also Jerry Morano, formerly of Spark ’n’ Cinder (and presently of Black Fong), on tasty bongos, congas, and the box drum, Beltain’s David Cowan on accordion, renowned local guitarist Jim Williford (formerly of Big Mo’s band, among others), and busy local jazz player (and CN&R staffer) Christine LaPado-Breglia on stand-up bass. “Everyone in the band is top notch—and extremely, maddeningly and lovingly quirky,” said Chavez, the band’s guiding force who also led the Ruby Hollow Band, which is on extended break. “Egos are at bay, and we are very focused.” The material itself, in addition to a few Chavezpenned tunes, includes many traditional works, ranging from the classic Mexican love song “La Malagueña” to the accordion-rich “El Canoero,” which Los Lobos recorded in 2000, and the romantic “Siente Mi Amor,” which Salma Hayek sang in the movie Once Upon a Time in Mexico. Chavez, a New Mexico native who went back home to study mariachi music a few years ago, said she posted a Los Lonely Boys video to Facebook upon returning to Chico, with a query: “Hey, anyone

interested in doing anything like this?” Cannon responded first, she said, “and it was like a cascade from there on out.” Los Caballitos’ sophisticated and polished fusion of Spanish flamenco and Mexican conjunto provides a delicious alternative to the local sound. Though the group’s players’ have their own diverse and accomplished backgrounds, Los Caballitos nicely gels as one. “Each member is solid,” Ohliger wrote in an email, “each nailing their part. It reminds me of when I played tympani in an orchestra. Everyone is focused exactly on their part, and when combined, it’s a magical power.” When asked, “Why this band? Why now?” Morano said, “Two words: ‘Jo Chavez.’ She brings the passion to the music and inspires me to play my best.” Added Williford: “The players are exceptional, and creating music with them is a gift. The music tugs at my Texas heart. Proud to be a Caballito amigo.” The band recently recorded a six-song EP, appropriately titled Seis Canciones, at local engineer Dale Price’s Electric Canyon Studios and is in the process of booking summer festivals and events at which they are bound to appeal to those who already love Spanish-tinged cabaret music, as well as those who will be discovering it for the first time. www.reverbnation.com/loscaballitosdelacancion —ALAN SHECKTER

t the beginning of each year, we here at the Chico News & Review survey the library of bands that make up the Chico music scene and try and choose a handful of the newer musical acts that promise to bring something special to local stages in the upcoming year. For 2013, we’ve zeroed in on seven: everything from a super group of some of the best musicians in town providing a fresh take on Latin music (Los Caballitos de la Canción), to a quartet of experimental merrymakers that break up their mathy freakouts with an ongoing series of skits chronicling the lives of four fathers of beauty-pageant contestants (Pageant Dads). And, this year, we’ve even included a couple of our own in the mix. The CN&R has several musicians on staff, and even though we often shy away from recognizing the work we do outside of the office in order avoid any appearance of conflict of interest, this year we couldn’t ignore the fact that two of our editorial cohorts are involved in bands that are legitimately among the most noteworthy young acts in town: Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine LaPado-Breglia, stand-up bassist for Los Caballitos de la Canción, and busy ukulele player and staff writer Ken Smith in the Michelin Embers. There’s a really fun collection of new sounds out there this year. Get out to a show and hear for yourself!

French Reform: (from left) Aric Jeffries, Phil Anker, Elias Nipert, Kirt Lind and Nik Burman. PHOTO BY JOEY MOSHIRI

20 CN&R January 31, 2013

Seven Chico bands that you must add to your local play list

AVANT-GARDE BRUNCH AND A NIGHT OF THEATER Bogg and the Pageant Dads

JAMS GET SHARP French Reform Following French Reform’s appearance at the Origami Recording Lounge as part of the End of the World Transcendence Ball on Dec. 21, owner Scott Barwick shared, unprompted, that the group is “kind of the cool new thing” in town. The band has performed live only three times since forming in March of last year, but the indie-pop outfit seems on its way to generating a buzz locally. During a recent interview with lead singer and guitarist Aric Jeffries and keyboardist and back-up vocalist Kirt Lind, Jeffries said the band’s sound “comes out poppy, energetic, and it rocks at times.” He also conceded all five members—including guitarist, keyboardist and back-up vocalist Phil Anker, bassist Elias Nipert and drummer Nik Burman—share an affinity for ’80s New Wave. Their mutual interest is apparent in the band’s first single, “Stay Sharp,” a short and sweet synth-heavy arrangement with reverb-soaked guitars and vocals The Cure’s Robert Smith would almost certainly approve of. As for how French Reform’s sound fits into Chico’s music scene, Lind believes they’re “definitely filling a niche. I haven’t seen a band in town like us for a while.” The band formed after responding to each other’s posts on Craigslist. Although Lind—who has played in many local bands, from Squirrel Vs. Bear to The Yule Logs—knew of Anker and Burman through past musical projects (Anker from Pan Pan and Shabby Car, and Burman from metal bands like Into the Open Earth), none of the members had collaborated before meeting for the first time. “There was never any period of awkwardness,” Jeffries said. “It clicked immediately because we have very similar influences, so we had stuff to talk about right off the bat. It also helps we have Nik in the band—he wants to get the ball rolling all the time.” Indeed, both Jeffries and Lind agree their drummer is key to French Reform’s creative process. During practice (which they hold in a converted chicken coup at Anker’s property in Red Bluff), Burman will diagram the shifting dynamics of each song on a dry-erase board. “[Burman] doesn’t write the parts, but he’s very much the person who works on assembling them,” Jeffries said. “He has very specific ideas for how he thinks things should go.” “It’s a cool dynamic, because there are three guys in the group who have made solo albums [Jeffries, Anker and Lind],” Lind said. “But it still feels like Nik writes the songs.” As for the band’s immediate future, they hope to begin recording an album early this summer. But more writing needs to be done, Lind said. “We only have nine songs, if you count that one we hate.” French Reform performs Feb. 13 at The Maltese. www.frenchreform.bandcamp.com —HOWARD HARDEE

Though the two bands don’t sound a whole lot alike, there are at least three reasons to combine avant-garde jazz trio Bogg and theatrical experimental prog-rockers the Pageant Dads in one profile. First, the guys in both bands are all friends, frequent collaborators and neighbors (they all live on the same block in the Avenues). Second, the bands share two members: Michael Bone (of Clouds on Strings) plays guitar and sings in the Pageant Dads and plays drums in Bogg, and Gavin Fitzgerald plays bass in both bands. Last, and most important, both are seemingly driven by the same desire to constantly try something new—and making each other laugh while they do so. “[We share] a big bed like in Willie Wonka,” said Pageant Dads’ lanky drummer, Alex Coffin, during a recent interview in Bone’s living room. The assembled members of both bands responded by laughing and rattling off a string of clever quips of their own. Both bands have been together less than one year, but they have already put in a ton of work toward their new projects. Bogg is an offshoot of sorts from prolific prog tricksters Clouds on Strings, with COS’s Bone and keyboardist Josh Hegg collaborating with their friend Fitzgerald. “We wanted to play more jazz,” Bone explained, and they have played a ton of it. Shortly after forming they booked the weekly Friday morning Brunch Music Series at Café Coda, for which they built sets around themes (Star Wars, Elton John), playing nearly every week there since September, as well as at 100th Monkey Books for a string of similar weekly gigs. “It’s like every single day we did Bogg stuff,” said Hegg. They also made time to record three EPs (go to www.bogg.bandcamp.com to download), and they provided the live soundtrack for a local Chikoko fashion show as well as a production of The Raven in San Francisco. Right now they are putting the finishing touches on a very ambitious and impressivesounding EP of originals called So Happy, It Hurts, featuring a huge cast of guest players, including a horn section, guitarist Loki Miller, and vocalist Samantha Francis of Decades, among others. Pageant Dads is something completely different, not just in comparison to Bogg, but compared to anything in Chico. “We’re all four dads. We met at our daughters’ pageants over the years,” said Bone, explaining the fake-dad concept. The four “pageant dads” are Tom Chaz

(Bone), Hawk Mahalo (Coffin), Craig D’Anthony (Fitzgerald), and Ruth Wardwell (played by fourth member, guitarist Danny Wardwell). The soap opera of these four friends’ lives plays out in little skits and gags that are interspersed among the band’s Zappa-esque sonic explorations. Ruth is jobless and sleeping on Craig’s couch. Tom is dating Hawk’s ex-wife and is kind of a douche for milking his friend’s child support.

Bogg and The Pageant Dads: (from left) Alex Coffin, Michael Bone, Gavin Fitzgerald, Josh Hegg and Danny Wardwell. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

And there are stories and dramas that unfold for each of them from gig to gig as the band writes new chapters to their stories for every show. “I want[ed] a full show with a wider spectrum of entertainment,” said Wardwell, talking about how the band’s early jam sessions evolved to striving to create a more entertaining live experience for Chico. And the Pageant Dads story is being expanded further in a Valentine’s Day musical comedy that’s being written by the group and produced by Hegg at the 1078 Gallery on Feb. 16. “This is a story for lovers and for people who don’t know the first thing about love,” said Coffin in a press release for the show, which promises to blur the lines between the band, the actors, and even the audience. “It’s hilarious to us,” said Fitzgerald, to which Hegg responded, “It’ll make you fall in love regardless.” In addition to playing tonight, Jan. 31, 8 p.m., at Café Coda, the Pageant Dads will also star in The Love Seat Diaries, a musical comedy Feb. 16, 7 p.m., at 1078 Gallery. Bogg performs Fridays, 11:30 a.m. at Café Coda and will host an EP-release party March 14, 8 p.m., also at Café Coda. www.tinyurl.com/pageantdads and www.facebook.com/boggjazz —JASON CASSIDY

“LOCAL MUSIC” continued on page 22 January 31, 2013

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“LOCAL MUSIC” continued from page 21

Evin Wolverton PHOTO BY LINDSAY MARIE

POST-ATOMIC PORCH MUSIC Michelin Embers It’s difficult pinpointing exactly what Michelin Embers is all about. Even the members aren’t exactly sure. Internally they refer to themselves as a Western band, country-blues-punk, post-atomic skiffle punk—all of which are accurate. Vocalist-guitarist Johnny Meehan— affectionately known as Johnny Shanker around these parts—says the music is important, but that the real impetus for Michelin Embers was getting together with likeminded individuals. Makes sense, since it all started with Meehan and uke player (and CN&R staff writer) Ken Smith playing tunes on a porch. Soon venerable gutbucketeer Steve Bragg entered the fray, and they recently recruited slide guitarist Hobilly MF to fill out the sound. “We sorta half-assed it for a year,” says Meehan, explaining the band’s casual approach. “It’s not like if I get a stubbed toe I’m gonna call off practice. There’s a certain level of dedication.” With Meehan’s band The Shankers on hiatus, Michelin Embers are playing more than porches these days. And they’ve even done a bit of recording as well, albeit of more loosey-goosey practice sessions. The band plans to record seven or eight songs—mostly originals—with Dale Price at Electric Canyon Studios at the beginning of February. Michelin Embers is, in essence, a

Michelin Embers: (from left) Steve Bragg, Ken Smith, Hobilly MF and Johnny Meehan. PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHELIN EMBERS

bluegrass band—the first song Meehan and Smith played together was Roger Miller’s “The Moon Is High.” But the pedigrees of the members point directly to underground and punk rock. The band’s versatility is summed up best in a pair of early gigs where the Embers played a day show on top of a flatbed trailer at the Tehama County Museum Jubilee and later that night crawled into the dark confines of Monstros Pizza for an evening show with the punks. Meehan, who pens most of the lyrics, knows what he likes in a song. “I was in a junk store in Los Molinos and I was looking through this book, I think it was an old Charlie Brown book. And there was this line: ‘Happiness is a sad song.’ I like sad songs.” And Meehan’s tales of desperation make good company with the band’s minor chords and syrupy slide guitar. Michelin Embers is darker and weirder than most bluegrass or country groups. One listen to songs like “Batteries” and “Moonlite Motel,” and it’s clear that post-atomic skiffle punk can be made only by these four dudes. “It’s more about playing with awesome people, not musicians,” Meehan says. “Our thing is to have fun while we’re practicing. But these songs mean a lot to me.” www.tinyurl.com/michelinembers —MARK LORE

PAYIN’ RENT IN THE TOWER OF SONG Evin Wolverton In the short time that he’s lived in Chico, singer-songwriter Evin Wolverton has shared the stage regularly with the likes of such local favorite musical acts as MaMuse, The Railflowers and the Perpetual Drifters. No surprise, since Wolverton—who moved to Chico from Berkeley in July 2011—possesses the sort of musical talent that easily propels him into the ranks of our community’s most-loved performers. A listen to Wolverton’s “Only God” or his sensitive take on Barbadian pop queen Rihanna’s “What’s My Name?” (visit www.youtube.com/user/evinwolverton to watch and listen)—reveals his passionate vocals and adept guitar playing. Both songs appear on his recently recorded Woodland Sessions EP (available at www.evinwolverton.com as a free download), with the latter featuring his frequent vocal harmonizer, Clio Wilde. “I grew up listening to a lot of country and bluegrass music,” said the warm, articulate 28-year-old in a recent interview at a sunny outdoor table in front of the Naked Lounge. Wolverton—who holds a bachelor’s degree in English, with a creative-writing emphasis, from CSU, Northridge—began playing the guitar at age 16. “I was also raised in a very peculiar religious environment,” he added, not wishing to reveal much more, other than to say that his early spiritual education plays a big role in the content of his first full-length CD, which he is currently at work on. In fact, the self-professed “perfectionist” has put performing on hold for a bit while he works, at Scott Barwick’s Origami Recording Lounge, on Knuckle County Thunder, the working title of the upcoming album. Wolverton aims to release the CD—which will feature local drummer Mike Wofchuck, MaMuse’s Karisha Longaker and Sarah Nutting, former Grateful Dead pedal-steel player Peter Grant, and possibly other local performers yet to be selected—in the spring. “I’m not playing [out] so much right now,” said Wolverton. “I find it splits the focus between refining existing material and finishing new material. Right now, I’m just looking at finishing the record, and I’ll plan some shows in the spring, including a release show.” Wolverton was keen to express his appreciation for the power of community support in the production of his new album; he raised the funds for its production via fundraising website Kickstarter.com. “I went in hopeful,” he said of his Kickstarter experience, “but it was crazy how well people responded. Beyond just getting the money right, it was an incredible way to interact with a local community and galvanize a following.” www.evinwolverton.com —CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

22 CN&R January 31, 2013


BONUS BANDS

RIFF-ROCK REVIVALISTS The Hambones The brief history of The Hambones is part love story, part music history lesson, and all rock ’n’ roll. “I’d known Christina [Von Ulch] from her being in The Shankers and ran into her one night at a Shannon and the Clams show and asked if she wanted to get together and jam,” explained Trent Burnham, front man for the three-piece retro-rock outfit. With a chuckle and a wry smile he added, “That’s how I got her to come over.” Two unexpected things happened when they started meeting to play music about a year ago. Von Ulch ditched her drum and picked up a bass for the first time and, compelled by shared loves of garage rock, R&B, soul and Atomic-age kitsch culture, they started—and continue— to have more than a musical relationship. Burnham found himself writing a lot of love songs based around oldstyle rock riffs, and soon a set was formed, with The Hambones debuting as a duo at a friend’s art show. Drummer Wes Jensen joined the fold soon after. “I liked what they are doing. The songs are great, and it’s right up my alley,” said Jensen, a veteran of Chico favorites Candy Apple. “I also liked the idea it was a three-piece … It’s a lot easier to be in a band with three people than it is with six.” Conversation with The Hambones—this one held in the living room of the house Barnham and Von Ulch now share, a mix of Fats Domino and old Motown providing a soundtrack—is peppered with the odd tidbit of music trivia. “I read something recently that Chubby Checker’s name was a play on Fats Domino,” Von Ulch said. “Then some other guy took it a step further and called himself something really ridiculous.” She couldn’t recall the name but guessed “Obese Chess Piece.” Then there’s how the band was named. Von Ulch explained the “hambone” beat is an earlier name for the distinctive syncopated rhythm more commonly known as the Bo Diddley beat. “Also, Link Wray learned to play guitar from an old carnie named Hambone,” she added. The Hambones’ sound doesn’t stray far from the music they admire, and they’re comfortable with that: “I don’t use any effects on my guitar, and we like that The Hambones: it’s so straightforward.” Burnham said. “Old-school (from top) roots rock ’n’ roll has such a strong foundation in its Trent Hambone, simplicity. It’s timeless.” Christina www.facebook.com/thehambones Hambone and Wes Hambone.

PHOTO BY CHRISTINA HAMBONE

—KEN SMITH

Six more local music-makers to listen for by Jason Cassidy

Star Thistle Wall

Redding dude Thomas Fogg comes south to lead a band of funky friends and fellow Chico State recording-arts students with a grooving brand of indie rock that is equally comfortable on the stages of LaSalles and Café Coda. A debut CD and live DVD are in the works. www.facebook.com/starthistlewall

Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise

When high-schoolers figure out how to start a band, they have more fun than the rest. And the colorful goofballs in Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise appear to be having a blast with their hyper mix of ska, punk and funky rock. Change out of your cranky pants and give in to the fun. www.facebook.com/frankiedopplers nuclearsunrise

Bran Crown

Low Flying Birds

Some old names from some old bands— Doug Stein and Noel Carvalho of Swamp Zen; Sid Lewis and Johnny Lombardo of Crazygrass—come together for a new take on bluegrass music. You could call it jamgrass, but the band’s description of “California boogie grass” gives a better image of the happy group’s fasttempoed good-time sound. www.facebook.com/lowflyingbirds

Kezwik

Despite being the youngest musician in the local electronicdance-music scene, 17-year-old Michael Jones is making bigger waves in the greater EDM world than anyone in Chico. The dubstep producer/DJ has been all over the charts in 2012 at beat port.com, including snagging No. 1 for the collaborative remix (with Protohype) of Static Revenger’s “Turn the World On (feat Dev).” www.facebook.com/kezwikofficial

If you’re looking for sweet, angelic melodies and pretty guitars, just take your glass of chardonnay and keep walkin’, because in here we have a flask of Wild Turkey tucked in our coat and we’re gonna drown these demons in Don Parrish’s freak-folk flames and warm our broken hearts at the fire. www.brancrown.bandcamp.com

The LoLos

The LoLos do that thing that Chico loves so much— strike a delicate balance between breezy and groovy. The new fourpiece rock crew just released their debut EP and are working on a full-length to be called XOXO—go to youtube.com/user/thelolosmusic and hear the first single, “Nightbird.” It’s, you know, breezy and groovy. Search “Lolos” on Facebook. January 31, 2013

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture El otro lado

THIS WEEK Punk for the people. PHOTO COURTESY OF LA PLEBE

San Francisco’s La Plebe straddles the border with its brand of mariachi punk

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Special Events

THE SOUND OF MUSIC: The classic Rodgers and Hammerstein musical performed by the talented children and adults of the Chico Theater Company. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 2/10. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

THE EELITERATE FREINDS OF THE BOOKSTORE:

N District just beyond the garages of Thee Oh Sees and The Fresh & Onlys is five-piece punk band estled in San Francisco’s Mission

La Plebe. You could call them ska—a genre that has been effectively shunned over the past decade—but “mariachi punk” by would be more accurate. The beauMark Lore ty of this gritty ensemble is that they continue to operate outside of any bubbles. The band’s name— translation: “The People” (as in “the masses”)—sort of says it all. The members of La Plebe have been at it for 12 years, playing PREVIEW: La Plebe peforms clubs all over the Bay Area, cities Friday, Feb. 1, and pueblos in Mexico, and even a 8 p.m., at fair share of shows in the Balkans. Monstros. They roll out their dusty punk Severance Package, tunes—sung in both Spanish and The Pushers English—to give voice to the disand Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear enfranchised; and I get the impresSunrise open. sion it’s the type of band that needs Cost: $5 to be experienced live in order to be truly appreciated. Monstros Pizza “It’s nerve-wracking trying to 628 W. Sacramento Ave. capture what we do,” says trumwww.facebook.com/ peter Alberto Cuéllar of La Plebe’s monstrospizza recordings. “We write music by all actively participating. It’s more involved. Sometimes we pull it off, sometimes we don’t.” La Plebe records most of its material live— including the horns (the trombone player is Cuéllar’s older brother, Antonio). Since forming in 2001, La Plebe has released a pair of (now out-of-print) EPs and three full-lengths. The group’s latest Brazo en Brazo is its most fully realized record, one that saw the band working again with Faith No More founding member and bassist Billy Gould, who produced 2007’s ¡Hasta la Muerte! and 2005’s Entre Cerveza, Ritmo y Emoción. La Plebe mixes punk-rock pub anthems like “Been Drinkin’” with more to-the24 CN&R January 31, 2013

point political songs like “Guerra Sucia” (“Dirty War”) and “Campesino.” But even when songs get serious, they’re still fun. Cuéllar says La Plebe’s outspokenness on the social realties of Latinos and even larger global issues has occasionally put the band in an odd political limbo. “I think if you have an opinion and put it out there, you’re expected to participate in everything. We’ve been in situations where we were expected to punch a cop in the face,” he explains. “And if you’re too political, people distance themselves. You can’t please everyone.” Cuéllar was raised in Santa Cruz, born just two months after his parents came to the United States from Mexico in 1975. He grew up listening to traditional mariachi and ranchera music, until fourth grade when he discovered—of all things—four guys who wore makeup and sang about partying (“There was this guy in our neighborhood in a lowrider, who listened to all this traditional music. But he loved KISS.”). Cuéllar began playing the trumpet that same year, and started to explore jazz and rocksteady. Once he entered junior high, Cuéllar put down the trumpet and wouldn’t pick it up again for another decade until he joined La Plebe, the band that has essentially helped shape him the past 12 years. La Plebe spends a good amount of time on the road, playing up and down the West Coast (the band cites Chico as one of its favorite stops), as well as tours of Europe. Still, the majority of La Plebe’s shows are south of the border, a country that embraces the group as much as the members embrace Mexico. For such a worldly crew, the members still call San Francisco home. Cuéllar continues to live in the Mission, and his comrades all live nearby. The neighborhood has become as much a part of La Plebe’s identity as Cuéllar’s and his brother’s Mexican roots. “It’s changing, but it’s still retained its charms,” says Cuéllar. “I couldn’t imagine living anywhere else.” Ω

Local actors and musicians host an evening of original one-act plays, skits, monologues, live music, dance and a silent auction to benefit The Bookstore in downtown Chico. Th, 1/31, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St.; (530) 895-3749; www.blueroomtheatre.com.

Art Receptions ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM RECEPTION: A reception and curator’s talk for the exhibition

exploring abstract expressionism. Th, 1/31, 5:30pm. Free. The Turner Print Museum at CSU, 400 W. First St. Meriam Library breezeway, CSU, Chico; (530) 898-4476; www.the turner.org.

ART & ART HISTORY FACULTY RECEPTION: Opening night for the display of works from Chico State art and art history professors. Th, 1/31, 5-7pm. Free. University Art Gallery, 400 W First St. Trinity Hall; (530) 898-5864.

Theater THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES: A humorous stage adaption for the classic Sherlock Holmes thriller with three actors playing 16 roles. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 2/16. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Poetry/Literature CHICO STORY SLAM: Names go in a hat and 10 “tellers” share their unscripted stories, with applause determining the winner. This week’s theme: “Carpe Diem! One of My Most Vital Moments.” Last Th of every month, 7pm. Opens 1/31. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

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Special Events THE PAWNS OF COMEDY: The Bay Area stand-up comedy team (including DNA, Butch Escobar, Jesse Hett and Brendan Lynch) brings its adult-oriented 90-minute alternative comedy

ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM RECEPTION Tonight, Jan. 31 Janet Turner Print Museum

SEE THURSDAY, ART RECEPTIONS


FINE ARTS Art

TOMMY EMMANUEL

1078 GALLERY: Winter Shadow Cast by Light,

Friday, Feb. 1 Laxson Auditorium

work from various Pacific Northwest artists on display. Through 2/2. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078 gallery.org.

SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC

ANGELOS CUCINA TRINACRIA: Maria Phillips

Exhibition, large, other-worldly watermedia paintings on display. Ongoing. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

routine to Chico. 2/1-2/2, 8 & 10pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.theblueroomtheatre.com.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Snowgoose Festival

STAND-UP COMEDY NIGHT: Stand-up comedy

Exhibit, a display of art depicting wildlife. Through 2/2. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

with Tommy Savitt and Bengt Washburn on the Rolling Hills Comedy Stage. F, 2/1, 8:30pm. $10. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning; (530) 528-3500; www.ticketforce.com.

BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT:

Drawings and Collages, works by Richard J. Robinson on display. Through 2/28. 1387 E. Eighth St., (530) 894-2800.

Art Receptions STILL WE RISE RECEPTION: Opening reception for

BOHO: Urban Oculars Photography Show, an

Still We Rise: Making Heritage Visible, a group show featuring photographs presented by the South Oroville African-American Historical Society. F, 2/1, 6-7:30pm. Butte College Art Gallery, 3536 Butte Campus Dr., (530) 895-2208.

examination of underground culture through various photography styles and acrylic and spray paint canvas works. Through 2/24. 225 Main St. D, (530) 895-3282.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Still We Rise: Making Heritage Visible, a group show featuring photographs presented by the South Oroville African-American Historical Society. Through 2/15. 3536 Butte Campus Dr., (530) 895-2208.

Music FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS CONCERT: Performances by Alli Battaglia and the Musical Brewing Company, The Jeff Pershing Band and Ha’Penny Bridge under dozens of Christmas, strobe and L.E.D. lights to benefit KZFR Radio. F, 2/1, 8pm. $10. Chico Womens Club, 592 E. Third St.; (530) 894-1978; www.kzfr.org.

CHICO ART CENTER: Chico Art Center

Members Show, showcasing more than 100 pieces of visual works from local artists. Through 2/8. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 8958726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

TOMMY EMMANUEL: A Chico favorite, the renowned fingerstyle guitar virtuoso will showcase his album Little By Little, as well as play favorites from his vast repertoire. F, 2/1, 7:30pm. $24-$36. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperformances.com.

Theater THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE SOUND OF MUSIC: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

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SAT

Special Events AQUAJETS CRAB & TRI-TIP FEED: Dinner, a raffle, silent and live auctions (with the high schoolage swimmers volunteering to do an array of household chores) and DJ dancing to benefit the Chico AquaJets swim team. Sa, 2/2, 6pm. $45. Chico Masonic Life Family Center, 1110 East Ave. Between Guynn Ave. & Nord Ave.; (530) 518-7946; www.518-7946.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUNICIPAL BUILDING: Camera Club music and food; call for more info. Sa, 2/2, 11am-4pm. Donations. Bedrock Park, Safford & Feather River Blvd. in Oroville; (530) 533-2011.

Music HATEBREED: A blend of thrash metal and hardcore punk, Hatebreed has shared bills with the likes of Slayer, Avenged Sevenfold and Disturbed. Shadows Fall, Dying Fetus, The

Contortionist and Chico’s own Armed For Apocalypse open. Sa, 2/2, 7pm. $19. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproductions.net.

Theater THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

THE SOUND OF MUSIC: See Thursday. Chico

FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS CONCERT Friday, Feb. 1 Chico Women’s Club SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC

Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

THIS WEEK continued on page 26

Exhibit, works by the Chico Camera Club on display. Through 7/12. 411 Main St., (530) 8967214.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS AND APPRAISALS:

Estates Show, a continually changing exhibition of artwork. Through 1/31. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.james snidlefinearts.com.

MANAS ART SPACE & GALLERY: BTW Have You Seen My Keys?, work from local artists in various media incorporating spare keychains. Through 3/7. 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

THE TURNER PRINT MUSEUM AT CSU: American International: Abstract Expressionism, exploring historic and modern abstraction, from the post-World War II birth of abstract expressionism to the present. Through 2/24. 400 W. First St. Meriam Library breezeway, CSU, Chico, (530) 8984476, www.theturner.org.

UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Art & Art History

Faculty Exhibition, works from Chico State art and art history professors on display. 1/31-2/27. 400 W First St. Trinity Hall, (530) 898-5864.

THE VAGABOND ROSE GALLERY & FRAMING:

Watermedia Exhibit, a display of works from 15 artists and longtime students of Sal Casa. Through 2/13. 236 Main St., (530) 3431110.

Call for Artists 2013 ART FIESTA BOOTHS: Artist booths are still available for next spring’s event. Call or email for more info. Through 4/1. Matador Motel, 1934 Esplanade, (530) 487-4553.

CONTEMPORARY WOMAN ART SHOW: Works in all media except film, video and installation accepted from female artists 18 or older. Go online for more info. Through 2/23. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET PERFORMERS: Applications accepted for performance slots. Through 3/21. Contact for info, (530) 345-6500.

CHICO MUSEUM: I Heart Chico, paintings, poetry, kid’s art, photography, textiles, videos and interactive collaborative exhibits inspired by Chico. Through 1/31. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Lewis Jones, over 20 original scratch boards from the renowned local artist. Through 3/31.Mountain Series, the California Mountain Series—now including the recently completed “Tamalpais”—on display. Through 3/31. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Sten Hoiland, wire sculptures by Northern California artist Sten Hoiland. Through 4/11. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

Museums GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Spring Exhibits, The exhibit “Sportsology” explores the science behind sports, while “Brain Teasers 2” offers a new collection of confounding puzzles. Through 5/5. $3-$6. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Infinity & Beyond, an exhibit tracing early human celestial observation to modern space endeavors with a Russian Sokol Space suit, a moon rock and brand-new footage of deep space on display. Ongoing. Opens 1/30. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

THE PAWNS OF COMEDY: See Friday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.theblueroomtheatre.com.

POLAR BEAR DIP: Brave near-freezing water at this benefit for the Las Plumas High School Safe Grad Night. The afternoon will include

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Funny in his genes Chico ex-pat DNA can’t get enough of his old town. The former local concert promoter, actor, comedian and City Council candidate is returning with his traveling stand-up crew, The Pawns of Comedy, for four worth of comedy over two nights, Friday & SaturEDITOR’S PICK shows’ day, Feb. 1-2. Joining DNA on the Blue Room Theatre stage will be a trio of stand-up veterans from the Bay Area, including Brendan Lynch and a pair of San Jose comedians, Jesse Hett and Butch Escobar. It probably goes without saying, but the Pawns make jokes for mature audiences only. January 31, 2013

CN&R 25


RECYCLE

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THIS WEEK continued from page 25

3

SUN

Theater THE SOUND OF MUSIC: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chico theatercompany.com.

5

TUES YOU’RE WELCOME, EARTH.

Special Events UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES: The Chico State Humanities Center’s film series continues with From the Quarters to Lincoln Heights. Tu, 7:30pm through 5/2. Opens 1/29. $3 donation. Ayres 106, Chico State Campus; (530) 898-6341.

Music NEW MONSOON: A boot-stomping dance band taking cues from The Allman Brothers, The Grateful Dead and Southern rock. Tu, 2/5, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierra nevada.com/bigroom.

CAN YOU TELL A STORY IN 59 WORDS? Well, we wanna read them! The annual Fiction 59 contest is back. Submit your stories to the Chico News & Review today for the chance to have your work published in the CN&R’s annual Fiction 59 issue on March 7. Winners will also be invited to read their works (and receive prizes!) at a reading at Lyon Books. ONLINE AND EMAIL ENTRIES PREFERRED. Visit www.newsreview.com/fiction59 to submit, or email stories to fiction@newsreview.com. Please specify age and division: adult; high school (grades 9-12); junior-high (grades 6-8); kids (5th grade and under). Under-18 entries, please specify age. You can also drop off or mail your entries to the Chico News & Review office at 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA, 95928. Deadline for submission is Tuesday, Feb. 19, at 5 p.m. THE RULES: Stories can be on any topic, but must be exactly 59 words. Count carefully. Every year we disqualify at least one amazing entry that has come in over or under as little as one word. Only three entries per person. Hyphenated words are not considered one word; i.e., “one-stop shop” NEED ADVICE AND would count as three words. INSPIRATION FOR YOUR ENTRY? Exceptions are words that Chico State English professor Rob don’t become free standing Davidson will conduct a workshop when the hyphen is removed, for writers preparing stories for as in “re-examine.” Fiction 59 titled The Dynamics of Contractions count as one Flash Fiction. Saturday, Feb. 9, word. The story title will not 10 a.m.-noon, at the be included in the word count. 1078 Gallery.

6

WED

Special Events CIRQUE MECHANICS BIRDHOUSE FACTORY: Trapeze artists, acrobats and contortionists—incluidng former members of Cirque du Soleil and the Moscow Circus—tell the comedic story of workers in a birdhouse factory. W, 2/6, 7:30pm. $19-$33. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 8986333; www.chicoperformances.com.

FREE SCI-FI FILM SERIES: A sci-fi film series to coincide with the exhibit Infinity and Beyond kicks off with the 1936’s Flash Gordon. W, 12-1pm through 3/13. Opens 2/6. Free. Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology, CSUC Meriam Library Complex; (530) 898-5397.

BULLETIN BOARD Community THE ADVENTURE OF ADVENTURE LECTURE: Laird Easton, an author and chair of the Chico State History Department will present on the concept of adventure in Western culture from the Middle Ages to the present. W, 2/6, 7:30pm. Free. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, 400 W First St. CSU, Chico, (530) 898-4284.

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS: A workout set to the sounds and rhythms of West Africa. Call for info.

M, 6pm. $10. Chico Grange Hall, 2775 Old Nord Ave. North off of Hwy 32 and East Ave, (530) 321-5607.

AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Womens Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

ART FOR KIDS: Art instruction from Chico State Art Education faculty. Open to students in first through 12th grades. Email to register. Tu, 3:305pm through 2/19. Opens 2/5. Free. The Turner Print Museum at CSU, 400 W. First St. Meriam Library breezeway, CSU, Chico, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.buttecounty.net.

BUSINESS SUMMIT 2013: A “state of the city” address and update on the Economic Development Action Plan presented by City Manager Brian Nakamura. Call to RSVP. Th, 1/31, 2-5pm. Free. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 891-5556, www.chicorec.com.

CHAPMAN FARMERS MARKET: A farmers’ market in the park serving as a neighborhood collaborative forum focusing on healthy lifestyle promotion, education and access. F, 2-5:30pm through 12/31. Free. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 592-0889, www.cchaos.org.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico

Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:1511:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.butte county.net/bclibrary.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, find your feet and free your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, (530) 891-6524.

E-WASTE DROP OFF: Responsibly dispose of your electronic waste at this drop-off organized by the Durham Elementary fifth graders. Call for more info. Sa, 2/2, 9am-1pm. Free. Chico Enterprise Record, 400 East Park Ave. Corner of Skyway and Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, (530) 566-2203.

ETHICAL ISSUES & WATER FORUM: A discussion on spiritual stewardship issues surrounding water as part of Chico State’s year-long Book in Common theme. In room 100B. Tu, 2/5, 4:30-6pm. Free. Colusa Hall, 400 West First St. Chico State, (530) 891-6424, www.becnet.org.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods, honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers Market, Parking Lot, (530) 893-3276.

FINDING TRUE NORTH: A weekly hour of mediation, inspiration and self-discovery with Rev. Jill Lacefield. W, 5-6pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

FOLK DANCING: Traditional folk dancing, no partners necessary. Call for more info. F, 8pm through 3/1. Opens 2/1. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor med-

CIRQUE MECHANICS Wednesday, Feb. 6 Laxson Auditorium

SEE WEDNESDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

ical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 1-4pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave. Corner of Downing and E. 1st Ave, (530) 518-8300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

HAPPY HEALING HOUR: Psychic and self-awareness

readings, energy balancing and more. F, 5-6pm. Donations. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

Deadline for submission is Tues., Feb. 19, at 5 p.m.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE page 30

26 CN&R January 31, 2013

Check off after proofing:

NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY GENERAL MEETING: Greg Suba, conservation director for the for the California Native Plant Society, will discuss the

THE ADVENTURE OF ADVENTURE

Wednesday, Feb. 6 Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State SEE COMMUNITY

importance of renewable energy as part of the effort to preserve plant habitat. W, 2/6, 7:30pm. Free. Chico Public Library, Corner Of E. First & Sherman Avenues, (891) 891-2726, www.mount lassen.cnps.org.

[Fic

NED TALKS: Weekly “Nature Education” talks in which community members share short tales of the outdoor world to inspire, inform and engage. Call to register. Tu, 7pm through 2/26. Opens 2/5. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

Fic

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. Next to Long’s Drugstore in Paradise, 8727085.

Ca We SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and freeRev you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience Wi necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524.

On Vis

SURVIVING & THRIVING: A weekly workshop with discussions and presentations designed for men and women seeking to enhance their outlook on life. Interaction encouraged but not required. Tu, 6-7:30pm through 2/26. Free. Chico Area Recreation District (CARD), 545 Vallombrosa Ave., (530) 895-4711, www.chicorec.com.

ag Un VIVA!: A gathering (with Reage-appropriate activities and pizza) for kids and teens dealing with cancer in their families. Call to register. Sa, 2/2, 1-4pm. The Free. Enloe Fountain Building, 251 Cohasset Rd., (530) 332-3856. Sto lea wildlife tours. Rain canWILDLIFE VIEWING: Guided cels. Sa, 12:30pm; Su, 12:30pm through 2/3. $4. Gray Lodge Wildlifeso Area, 3207 Rutherford Rd. in Gridley, (530) 846-7505. Ex WRITING GROUP: All writers welcome. Bring paper, a pen and writing toCo share. F, 3:30-5pm. Free. 100th Hey, Fiction Wanna get entry? Chic Volunteer Davidson ACADEMY FOR MENTORS:wThe Butte County Sheriff’s Office is seeking volunteers to mentor rehabilitoward tho tating offenders. Volunteers must be 25 years old, pass a background Fiction 59 t check, have a driver’s license, car registration and insurance and easily Saturday, reached via phone. F Mentors will be instructed during a one-day academy. Through Gallery. 2/23. Contact for info, (530) 538-7822. Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water quality testing and more. Ongoing; check Friends of Bidwell Park web site for dates and locations. Ongoing. Call for location, (530) 8914671, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


Breakfasts from

CHOW

Around the World Chico’s newest Breakfast Cafe featuring dishes from 7 countries and the US.

Ocean breeze New shop brings fresh—and sustainable— seafood to Chico

Huevos Montulenos

3221 Esplanade • 891-4500 Mon – Fri 7am – 11am, Sun 8am – 1pm

1/2 off Entree Buy 1 Entree + 2 drinks and receive the 2nd Entree of equal or lesser value 1/2 off

“W

ait! Go back,” I said, looking

over my shoulder as Colette motored Pierre down Forest Avenue the other day. We had just spent the afternoon shopping for aprons at The Galley. “What?” she said. “A new fish market. by Let’s check it out.” Henri Colette turned around, Bourride parked in front of the Chico Fish Market’s big glass windows featuring hand-lettered signs (“Get your OMG-3s here!” “Fresh Fish!” “From Boat To Store!”), and we Chico Fish stepped inside. Market Displayed on crushed ice 1141 Forest Ave, behind a long counter were suite 10 898-9800 gorgeous steaks, fillets and www.chicofish whole fish—salmon, rockmarket.com fish, Petrale sole, sturgeon, Hours: and ahi—along with mussels, Monday-Friday, clams, oysters, and a variety 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; of shrimp and prawns. A Saturday, woman was chatting with a 10 a.m.-2 p.m. customer as she weighed a large crab on the counter-top scale. To her left, a man was cutting slices off a huge mahi-mahi fillet. Behind them four large tanks crawled with live crabs and lobsters. Tony and Rosalia Flores moved to Chico from Monterey seven years ago and opened the Chico Fish Market in November—Rosalia’s father managed the original construction of the Monterey Bay Aquarium. They make three or four trips a week to the coast—Monterey, San Francisco and Bodega Bay—to buy fish off the boats or from brokers, who have it shipped fresh from other harbors along the Pacific Ocean, including in Mexico and Washington state. They’ll happily suggest ways to prepare your fish, and several seafood cookbooks are on display on tables in the store. And thankfully, the Chico Fish Market sells only sustainable fish—Rosalia recently refused a customer’s request for Chilean sea bass, pointing out the species’ decimation from overfishing. No doubt most readers heard about the 489pound Pacific bluefin tuna that sold last month for $1.7 million to a seafood broker from Japan, where the fish’s rich belly fat, or o-toro, sells for up to $100 a bite in sushi restaurants.

(Not valid with delivery. Exp 02/27/13)

Chico Fish Market co-owner Tony Flores holds up a California yellowtail amberjack.

We Deliver!

Authentic Chinese Cuisine 2201 Pillsbury RD. Suite 100, Chico, CA 95926 (In Almond Orchard Shopping Center)

530.345.8862 • 530.345.3927

PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

The three species of bluefin—Atlantic, Pacific, and Southern (Pacific)—are among dozens of fish that have all declined dramatically in recent years, due to overfishing (legal and illegal), mostly of juvenile fish, and slap-on-thewrist fines for the few poachers who do get caught. According to a report issued earlier this month by the International Scientific Committee for Tuna and Tuna-Like Species in the North Pacific Ocean, the Pacific bluefin population is down to 4.6 percent of its pre-fished stock! Fortunately, environmental groups are taking action. Seafood Watch, for example, through the Monterey Bay Aquarium, advises consumers about what they can do to keep seafood sustainable and publishes frequently updated lists of recommended fish products (ahi, for example) and which ones to avoid (bluefin, definitely). That evening we enjoyed the first of our sustainable selections from Chico Fish Market—ahi steaks. I made my famous sesame-seed seared recipe, and they were absolutely delicious. And the next night, Colette dipped a sturgeon fillet into a scrambled egg, coated it in panko, and fried it in soy sauce and butter. Even better. We’ve also tried the Chico Fish Market’s Petrale sole and mahi-mahi, both sautéed simply in butter and dressed with salt and pepper and a squeeze of fresh lemon. We’ve been delighted with the quality and freshness every time. Visit chicofishmarket.com for the “catch of the day.” For more information on sustainable seafood consumption, visit Seafood Watch at montereybayaquar ium.org, where you can download a pocket-sized card with lists of “Best Choices,” “Good Alternatives,” and “Avoid.” Find Henri Bourride on Facebook (or visit this story on the CN&R website) for recipes for Henri’s SesameSeed Seared Ahi Steaks as well as Claudio’s Famous Cioppino, then head to Chico Fish Market and pick up your supplies. Ω

Join us at Johnnie’s for the Big Game. Bring in your Johnnie's breakfast receipt and receive a FREE APPETIZER during the game. Breakfast served Everyday from 7am to 11am

4th & Salem in Downtown Chico (530) 893-3100 www.hoteldiamondchico.com

Restaurant & Lounge January 31, 2013

CN&R 27


6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

Final Week! Bill Murray

HYDE PARK ON HUDSON Thur/Fri 8:15pm • SaT 2:15 & 8:15pm Sunday 2:15 only • mon-ThurS 6pm (1/7) STarTS Friday one Week. 7 academy nominaTionS including BeST picTure. Ben aFFleck

ARGO

Fri 6pm • SaT 4pm and 6pm Sunday 4pm only • mon-ThurS 7:45pm

www.PageantChico.com

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

IN

S HOWTIMES G OOD F RI 2/1 - T HUR 2/7

BULLET TO THE HEAD [R]

 12:35 2:45 4:55 7:05 *9:25PM

HYDE PARK ON THE HUDSON [R]

12:55 3:00 5:05 7:10 *9:20PM

WARM BODIES

 12:40 2:55 5:05 7:15 *9:40PM

[PG-13]

HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS [R] PARKER

 IN : 12:45 5:20 7:20 *9:35PM  IN 2D: 3:05PM  12:50 3:45 6:45 *9:25PM

[R]

SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK [R]

1:00 3:55 6:45 *9:30PM

LINCOLN

12:25 3:20 6:15 *9:10PM

[PG-13]

FREE FAMILY FLIX WE BOUGHT A ZOO [PG]

MADAGASCAR 3

SAT & SUN: 10:00AM

SAT & SUN: 10:00AM

*L ATE S HOWS

EUROPE’S MOST WANTED [PG]

ON

Grim fairytale

F RI & S AT O NLY

A LL S HOWS B EFORE 6PM ARE B ARGAIN M ATINEES  I N D I C AT E S N O P A S S E S A C C E P T E D

California Regional Theater Presents: In Partnership with

FEBRUARY 8TH - 17TH 15.50 each Students under 18 & Seniors 65+

Come to nibble at your sweet little house.

$

18.50 each Advanced Tickets $

A portion of the ticket sales goes to Torres Community Shelter

1-800-722-4522 www.CRTSHOWS.com

MAMA (Digital) (PG13) 12:05PM 2:35PM 5:00PM 7:25PM 9:50PM

DJANGO UNCHAINED (Digital) (R) 12:40PM 4:25PM 8:00PM

MOVIE 43 (Digital) (R) 12:35PM 2:55PM 5:15PM 7:35PM 9:55PM

GANGSTER SQUAD (Digital) (R) 1:20PM 7:30PM♥♦ HANSEL AND GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS (3D) (R) 12:50PM 2:00PM 3:10PM 5:30PM 7:50PM 10:15PM HANSEL AND GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS (Digital) (R) 11:40AM 4:20PM 6:40PM 9:00PM HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 12:45PM 4:20PM 7:55PM IMPOSSIBLE, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 11:35AM 2:20PM 5:00PM 7:40PM 10:20PM LES MISERABLES (Digital) (PG-13) 4:05PM♦ 10:10PM♦ LINCOLN (Digital) (PG13) 12:20PM 3:35PM 6:50PM 10:05PM

PARKER (Digital) (R) 11:05AM 1:50PM 4:35PM 7:20PM 10:05PM SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (Digital) (R) 11:00AM 1:45PM 4:30PM 7:15PM 10:00PM WARM BODIES (Digital) (PG13)12:30PM 2:55PM 5:30PM 8:00PM 10:30PM ZERO DARK THIRTY (Digital) (R) 12:10PM 3:35PM 7:00PM 10:25PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) - JOSH GROBAN LIVE: ALL THAT ECHOES (Digital) (PG) Mon. 2/4 ONLY 7:30PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) - Met Opera: Maria Stuarda Encore (Digital) (NR) Wed. 2/6 ONLY 6:30PM

Showtimes listed w/ ♥ NOT shown Mon. 2/4. Showtimes listed w/ ♦ NOT shown Wed. 2/6.

28 CN&R January 31, 2013

H flicks that are nearly impossible to grade. It does deliver what the title promises, but nothing more. After breaking into ansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters is one of those

a gingerbread house and whacking the witch who tried to serve them up as dinner (a diet of sweets must get old after a while), the Grimm’s fairy-tale characters grow up to become fearless witch by Craig Blamer hunters. And that’s pretty much all there is to the movie. Hansel (Jeremy Renner) and Gretel (Gemma Arterton) suit up in fetish gear and strap on their steampunk arsenal and go hunting ugly women across the landscape of Middle Ages Germany (you can tell it’s Middle Ages ’cause everyone goes to bed at “nightfall”). Granted, Renner and Arterton (trivia: apparHansel & Gretel: Witch ently, Arterton was born with extra fingers, Hunters which would have gotten her lovely ass burned Starring Jeremy as a witch in this time period, or in current-day Renner and Arizona and New Mexico) seem to be having Gemma Arterton. Directed by fun, and it’s always nice to see Famke Janssen Tommy Wirkola. back on screen, although here most of her time Cinemark 14, is spent hidden beneath CGI make-up in her Feather River role as an evil witch. The cinematography is Cinemas and lovely and the action sequences are competent Paradise Cinema enough, but the trouble is, it’s all empty calo7. Rated R. ries. Our two bounty hunters take on witches. Then they vogue a little before killing more witches. Rinse, lather and repeat. As written and directed by Tommy Wirkola, who brought us the Nazi-zombie cult nonsense Poor Dead Snow, there’s enough filler here to deliver the minimum feature-film requirement of about 80 minutes (not counting credits), and Fair that’s it. Although there’s a narrative choppiness that suggests that maybe the movie was cut down by the studio to allow an extra showGood ing per day at the multiplexes. Subplots are dragged in and then left unresolved. Maybe it was just a very lazy script that got the green light to ride the tails of Abraham Lincoln: Very Good Vampire Hunter. There’s also a tonal inconsistency to the flick. While the majority of the time it plays as Excellent a loopy PG-13, it’s broken up with jarring

2

friday 2/01 – THUrSday 2/07 BULLET TO THE HEAD (Digital) (R) 12:25PM 3:05PM 5:25PM 7:45PM 10:15PM

A very uninteresting update of classic folk tale

2/1 Tommy Emmanuel 2/6 Cirque Mechanics 2/7 Whose Live Anyway? 2/12 Juan de Marcos & the Afro-Cuban Stars

2/14 Russian National Orchestra 2/17 Eric Bibb & Habib Koité 2/20 Paco Peña: Flamenco Vivo 2/27 Calder Quartet 3/3 African Children’s Choir 3/9 Yuval Ron Ensemble 3/14 Lula Washington 3/16 Rhythm of the Dance 3/20 Wynton ynton nt n Marsalis Marsa Mar M arsa ar rsa JLCO OCancelled

3/22 H4ê<k$3ª]0 All shows at Laxson Auditorium California State University, Chico

TICKETS - (530) 898-6333 or CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM

1

2

3

4

5

bursts of graphic mayhem. It does come off kind of cartoony, being CGI and all, but it’s still disconcerting for a movie that otherwise plays like a very polished Syfy Channel offering. And there’s also the tone-deaf humor. A few gags do deliver, but mostly the obvious jokes hit the dirt and lie there gasping for breath. (Will Ferrell served as one of the producers, so maybe that explains it.) Ultimately, Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters isn’t boring. It’s just not interesting. Ω

To the core and back Rust and Bone

5

Ends tonight, Jan. 31. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

by Juan-Carlos Selznick This prize-winning French/Belgian

drama from Jacques Audiard (The Prophet) has an outstanding performance from Marion Cotillard (Oscar-winner for La Vie en Rose) in it, but what makes it particularly dazzling is its daring and electrifying combination of conflicting qualities. Both ferociously physical and emotionally delicate, it is a surprisingly dynamic mélange of domestic melodrama, sidelong love story, and scattershot social document. It’s got bare-knuckle kickboxing, orca choreography, a 5-year-old kid who’s very much “at risk,” and a double amputee fighting her way back to something like a full range of the very vigorous physical activity to which she was previously accustomed. While there’s plenty of opportunity for melodramatic excess in all that, Audiard’s directorial approach—rough-edged and elliptical—gives the brutal and lurid aspects of the tale their due without ever letting them overwhelm the action—or the audience. Sensationalism is underplayed, and in its place we get an


evolving array of glimpsed insights into vital undercurrents in the characters’ lives—their contradictions, potentials, unspoken passions, etc. Cotillard plays Stephanie, the lead whale trainer at a SeaWorld-like exhibit in the south of France. After losing her legs in a work-related incident, she seeks out the thuggish Belgian bouncer (Matthias Schoenaerts) who had once rescued her from a late-night brawl at a dance club. The picture actually begins with the Belgian, nicknamed “Ali,” taking his small son, Sam (Armand Verdure), away from his drug-addicted mom and fleeing south to Antibes where they will live

Reviewers: Craig Blamer and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Bullet to the Head

A Washington, D.C., detective (Sung Kang) and a hitman (Sly Stallone) share a common enemy, so naturally they team up to exact revenge. Extreme revenge! Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated. R.

The Impossible

Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star in this re-telling of the story of the 2004 tsunami through the eyes of a family vacationing on the beach in Thailand during the devastation. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Warm Bodies

In a post-zombie-apocalypse world, a young zombie (Nicholas Hoult) spares the brains of pretty human (Teresa Palmer), which leads to a Romeo-and-Juliet-style interspecies romance. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated. PG-13.

Re-opening this week

4

Argo

In the midst of the 1980 Iranian hostage crisis, CIA agent Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck) is attempting to spirit six Americans hiding in the Canadian embassy out of Iran. And the tension is only heightened by the outlandishness of Mendez’s scheme—he and the six escapees will exit Iran disguised as a Canadian film crew. That scheme adds a second, curiously complementary element to the story—Mendez must set up an actual production company as a supporting cover story for the film-crew disguise. The coverstory movie becomes a sci-fi epic called Argo which might be filmed in Iranian locations. The movie angle adds a rich level of ironic comedy to director Affleck’s own production, which thereby also becomes a dark, barbed comedy-drama about the business of making movies. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Now playing

2

Gangster Squad

The closing credits, done as a series of vintage postcards, have an artfulness unmatched in what precedes them. The setting is Los Angeles circa 1949, the plot has a true crime basis, the cast is stellar (Josh Brolin, Sean Penn, Ryan Gosling, etc.), and the vintage cars and the retro sets and costumes are very spiffy. But director Ruben Fleischer (Zombieland), with no help from Will Bealls’ hackneyed script, makes a sloppy, absurdly violent hash of even the best possibilities for pulpy excess. Penn has the plum role of gangster Mickey Cohen, but the apoplectic grotesquerie of his performance does him and the film no credit. Brolin and Gosling are wasted as the top vigilante cops, and female leads Emma Stone and Mireille Enos seem oddly miscast. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

with Ali’s hard-pressed sister, Anna (Corinne Masiero). He finds work there, as a security guard and as kickboxer. As its title perhaps suggests, Rust and Bone seems concerned above all with the dilemmas of passionately fleshy humanity in a world that is increasingly mechanized and metallic. And its climactic paradox arrives at about the time that we see that the woman with metal bones in her prosthetic legs might be a more complete human being than the athletically resourceful guy who’s still got all of his parts. And that too could change. Ω

2

Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —C.B.

A Haunted House

Marlon Wayans stars in this spoof of the Paranormal Activity franchise. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

4

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

The Hobbit hits all the expected marks as a very short dude with big hairy feet, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), is drafted by wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and 12 … no, 13 dwarves for a quest to reclaim a conquered kingdom. And retrieve some gold. Lots of gold. And of course there’s lots of walking in single file as the camera swoons across the New Zealand landscapes. And the 3-D is swell. The iconic battle of riddles between Bilbo and Gollum was fantastically realized, and the motion-capture technology is top of the game here, with Andy Serkis’ froggy li’l critter breathing real air. One has to appreciate the attention to detail director Peter Jackson and his crew put into realizing his overall vision. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

Hyde Park on Hudson

A historical comedy starring Bill Murray as President Franklin D. Roosevelt who, while King George VI and Queen Elisabeth are in the U.S. visiting his estate, is becoming increasingly involved with his distant cousin, Margaret Stuckley. Pageant Theatre and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

2

Les Misérables

I’ve never seen the stage version of Les Mis or even heard anything from the soundtrack. So, here I’m judging this on its own terms—as a musical film, not as the Broadway show. And as a film, it was easily the worst thing I saw at the multiplex in 2012. On the other hand, the rest of the audience seemed genuinely moved. People were sobbing by the end, and a good chunk gave it an ovation when it faded to black. (For what that’s worth.) But for me, it was pure torture. Nothing but the rudiments of Victor Hugo’s classic multifaceted novel remain, a synopsis of which serves only as life-support for two and a half hours of sung-through elevator musical. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

5

Lincoln

The new Abe Lincoln picture from Steven Spielberg and Tony Kushner is an historical epic of a quality that is exceptionally rare in American movies. Kushner’s brilliant script focuses on Lincoln and his contemporaries and on the complex political maneuvering involved in getting slavery abolished, via the Thirteenth Amendment, in the first four months of the war’s final year, 1865. There’s a fresh, canny mixture of docudrama and dramatic entertainment throughout, and a wonderfully trenchant and diverse cast (especially Daniel Day-Lewis in the title role) provides vivid foreground and background alike in this unusual and complex version of Spielbergian spectacle. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

accepting applications for kindergarten 2013

4

Mama

Mama just killed a man … or two, or three. Because Mama is a supernatural entity who is very protective of a couple of young girls she’s taken under her wing in a spooky ol’ cabin in the woods. Mama is also very jealous, which later creates some problems for the girls’ real-life uncle and hottie girlfriend when the children are discovered after spending five years forgetting their social skills and the couple adopt the two feral kids. And they don’t yet know about Mama, who follows the kids back to civilization and keeps an eye on them from the nursery closet and from under the bed. A PG-13 horror film that manages to be effectively scarier than its R-rated contemporaries. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

School tours weekly through the first week of February Kindergarten Applications due February 8, 2013 at 3pm

K-8 WALDORF-METHODS PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL

Movie 43

450 W. East Ave • Chico

A dozen short films by a dozen directors each interconnected by a plot surrounding a trio of kids on the hunt for a notorious banned film. Starring everyone. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

(530) 879–7483 www.BlueOakCharterSchool.org

Parker

Jason Statham stars as the title character, an honorable thief who enlists the help of a sexy real estate agent (Jennifer Lopez) to help him get back at the gang of thieves who turned on him and left him for dead during a heist. Based on Flashfire, one of the later books in Richard Starks Parker series. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

5

Rust & Bone

Ends tonight, Jan. 31. See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

4

Silver Linings Playbook

Pat Solitano (Bradley Cooper) is returning to his blue-collar neighborhood in Philadelphia after a court-mandated stay in a mental institution. He’s determined to make amends for the violent incident that got him institutionalized in the first place—as well as separated from his wife and fired from his job as a schoolteacher. But making amends is not going to be easy, due in no small part to the fact that the family abode is a bit of a madhouse. The lively onscreen results for writerdirector David O. Russell look like a romantic comedy of an unusually brash and farcical sort. And the heart of both the comedy and the drama becomes evident via Pat’s offbeat collision with a recently widowed Goth/punk gal named Tiffany (a terrific Jennifer Lawrence). Cinemark 14 and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

5

$

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5

Zero Dark Thirty

Zero Dark Thirty is, in most respects, a story (but not necessarily the story) of the hunt for Osama bin Laden. Director Kathryn Bigelow establishes a general tone of historical reportage early on, and much of the film plays out as a CIA/military procedural. The details of a decade-long search come to us in pell-mell bits and pieces. An agent named Maya (Jessica Chastain) plays the key behind-the-scenes role in all this, and it’s chiefly through her that the search story takes on some dramatic coherence and immediacy. Even with the story’s outcome known in advance, Zero Dark Thirty is a riveting and unusually suspenseful tale through all of its 157-minute running time. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

(530) 809-0370 | Corner of 9th & Wall Mon-Sat 10am-7:45pm | Sun 10am-6pm January 31, 2013

CN&R 29


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 1|31—WEDNESDAY 2|6 SLEEP LADY

THE BROTHERS COMATOSE: F, 2/1, 8pm. $5.

Can I say damn? Because damn! San Diego’s Sleep Lady makes a huge and beautiful sound. At first, it sounds like the mostly instrumental five-piece is conjuring up an atmospheric soundtrack similar to bands like Explosions in the Sky, but as you get into their new album, So Long Lonely Ghost, you hear that they are casting a wider net—picking up crunchy metal and heavy psychedelia—from which to feed their noise. Locals West by Swan will complement the show tonight, Jan. 31, at Café Coda, with their similar approach. Pageant Dads will open.

31THURSDAY BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

midnight. Lynns Optimo, 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473.

THE HOT TODDIES: A rowdy all-girl surfpop band out of Oakland. Lucy Smith and Michael Cannon of the Pub Scouts open. Th, 1/31, 7:30pm. $5. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

IMPROV JAM: Open jam with Michael

Gaughan. Th, 5-8pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

LAST STAND: A stand-up comedy openmic. Th, 8-10pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

LOREN FREEMAN: Native American narra-

tive and music with Loren Freeman. Th, 1/31, 8pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St., (530) 894-3033, www.hasbeans.com.

MATTEO PLAYS FILM SCORES: Classical guitarist Matteo plays film scores and light classics. Th, 6pm. Free. Angelos Cucina Trinacria, 407 Walnut St.; (530) 899-9996.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

THE RETROTONES: Classic rock and country on the patio. Th, 1/31, 6-9pm. Free. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

SLEEP LADY: Th, 1/31, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

1FRIDAY BASSMINT: An ongoing weekly electronic dance music party. This week: PsyFi and Hypha. F, 2/1, 9:30pm. $3. Peking Chinese Restaurant, 243 W Second St Chico; (925) 451-5035.

BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

midnight. Lynn’s Optimo, 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

COUNTRY NIGHT: Live country music with Rancho Mars. F, 5-8pm. Free. Towne Lounge, 327 Main St.; (530) 896-0235.

FEVER FRIDAYS: The weekly dance party and DJ showcase kicks off with DJ Colleen Shannon, a former Playboy model and self-anointed “world’s sexiest DJ.” F, 2/1, 9pm. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

AS ARTIFACTS: A most heavy send-off for local metal outfit A Holy Ghost Revival as they begin their tour with the Bay Area’s As Artifacts. Life Forms and A Plague Upon Her open. F, 2/1, 9pm. $5. Origami Lounge, 7th and Cherry Streets.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.; (530) 343-7718.

RECKONING: Grateful Dead covers turned bluegrass. F, 2/1, 7pm. $5. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

RUPERT DUNCAN BAND: A country music party band playing covers and a handful of originals in the brewery. F, 2/1, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

TOMMY EMMANUEL: A Chico favorite, the renowned fingerstyle guitar virtuoso will showcase his album Little By Little, as well as play favorites from his vast repertoire. F, 2/1, 7:30pm. $24-$36. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St.

AS ARTIFACTS

Friday, Feb. 1 Origami Recording Lounge SEE FRIDAY

LA PLEBE: A Spanish-speaking punk and ska act out San Francisco. Local punks Severance Package, The Pushers and Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise open. F, 2/1, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 345-7672.

MOTIFS: Old-school R&B, country, oldies

and a dash of comedy in the lounge. F, 2/1, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

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your local get out of jail free card Liberty Cab

898-1776

$150 to the Sacramento Airport!

30 CN&R January 31, 2013

CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperformances.com.

2SATURDAY ACOUSTIC MUSIC JAM: A jam hosted by Butte Folk Music Society and led by local musician Steve Johnson. First Sa of every month, 2-5pm. Free. Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery, 130 Main St.; (530) 345-4128.

HATEBREED: A blend of thrash metal and hardcore punk, Hatebreed has shared bills with the likes of Slayer, Avenged Sevenfold and Disturbed. Shadows Fall, Dying Fetus, The Contortionist and Chico’s own Armed For Apocalypse open. Sa, 2/2, 7pm. $19. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St.; (530) 898-1497; www.jmaxproductions.net.


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 PYRX: Party-oriented hip-hop, reggae and punk. Potluck, Twisted Strategies and DJ Rudedawg open. Tickets available at Blaze ‘N J’s (236 West 9th St.). Sa, 2/2, 9pm. $7. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

SUMMER OF 69: A tribute to ’80s and ’90s hitmaker Bryan Adams in the brewery. Sa, 2/2, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

TRADITIONAL DANCE CLUB: Traditional

dance with music by the Applebutter Band. Refreshments provided. Sa, 2/2, 7-10pm. $6-$7. VFW, 1901 Elgin St. Corner of Elgin & Lincoln in Oroville; (530) 533-5052.

THE BROTHERS COMATOSE

It’s feelin’ like festival season up in Café Coda as S.F. folk-rockers The Brothers Comatose bring their bluegrass-tinged sound to the small stage to match their resonant voices with the lush harmonies of Chico’s The Railflowers this Friday, Feb. 1.

3SUNDAY JAZZ: Weekly jazz. Su, 4-6pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

MARK GROWDEN: Charismatic Bay Area

singer/songwriter Mark Growden is joined by locals Mandalyn May and Jonathan Huffman for a Groundhog Day show at the gallery. Sa, 2/2, 8pm. $5-$10 (sliding scale). Manas Art Space, 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

MOTIFS: Old-school R&B, country, oldies and a dash of comedy in the lounge. Sa, 2/2, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

NORTHERN HEAT: Live classic rock and

country. Sa, 2/2, 9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning; (530) 528-3500; www.rollinghills casino.com.

NUDE & TRUE: A recently formed indiepop duo out of Paradise. Casing the Promisedland, local Ben Tietz’s constantly evolving musical project, and Sacramento acts Golden Youth and Brolly open. Sa, 2/2, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 5669476; www.cafecoda.com.

4MONDAY 1ST MONDAY JAZZ: WAYNE SHORTER: The monthly jazz showcase. This month: Rocky Winslow, Greg D’Augelli, Eric Peter, Robert Delgardo and Jonathan Stoyanoff perform music by Wayne Shorter. M, 2/4, 7pm. $10. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

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FIDDLE GROUP WORKSHOP: Instruction and shared music to encourage musicians to perform in groups. Call for more info. M, 2/4, 7-9pm; M, 2/18, 79pm. $2.50. Bolts Antique Tool Museum, 1650 Broderick St. in Oroville; (530) 282-3205; www.boltsantiquetools.com.

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

MOOD: SWING TRIO: A guitar, clarinet and violin ensemble plays jazz and Brazilian music. M, 2/4, 6:30-8:30pm. Free. Bellachinos Espresso & Panini Cafe, 800 Bruce Rd. 600; (530) 8922244.

5TUESDAY

6WEDNESDAY HOSPICE BENEFIT CONCERT: Knight, Autumn Electric, ANYCRA and Jack Knight perform with proceeds to benefit Butte Home Health and Hospice. W, 2/6, 7pm. $5. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

JAZZ TRIO: Every Wednesday with Carey

Robinson and company. W, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, tin pan alley, jazz and more.

NEW MONSOON Tuesday, Feb. 5 Sierra Nevada Big Room SEE TUESDAY

W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St. Upstairs from The Beach.

MIDNIGHT BLUES SOCIETY: An open blues jam—bring your own axe. First W of every month, 7pm. Free. Nash’s

Restaurant, 1717 Esplanade; (530) 8961147; www.nashsrestaurantchico.com.

OPEN MIC: All ages welcome. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

SWING DANCE WEDNESDAY: Every Wednesday night, swing dancing lessons 8-10pm. W, 8-10pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

WAY OUT WEST: A weekly country music

showcase with The Blue Merles. W, 79pm. Opens 1/30. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

BELLY DANCE CLASS: Weekly belly dance

with BellySutra. Tu, 6-7pm. Opens 2/5. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

NEW MONSOON: A boot-stomping dance band taking cues from The Allman Brothers, The Grateful Dead and Southern rock. Tu, 2/5, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierra nevada.com/bigroom.

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January 31, 2013

CN&R 31


Hey, Chico musicians! A Holy Ghost Revival A Plague Upon Her A.L.O. Aamir Malik Aaron Jaqua Abe Nesbitt Aberrance Adrian Afiction Alan Rigg Trio Alli Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co. Alternators Amarok Animal Cruelty Anna Meehan Armed For Apocalypse Astronaut Atreum Aubrey Debauchery Audiotherapy Ayrian Badger Baghdad Batteries Beards & Broads Beat Concrete Becca Hogue Beltain Big Mo & The Full Moon Band Big Slim Big Wide Room Biggs Roller Billy the Robot Bionix Black Fong Blood Cabana Bogg Born Into This Boss 501 Bran Crown Brass Hysteria! Broken Rodeo Bunny Milk Cannon & The Lion of Judah Band Caraway Carey Robinson Trio Carly Ann Casing the Promisedland Castless, The CD ENT Chad Bushnell Band Charlie Robinson Cheatin’ Hearts Chico Jazz Collective Chingado Chris Keane Chris Schadt Band Chuck Epperson Jr. Band Chuck’s Place C-Loc Clouds on Strings Cody K & The Thundertrain Express Cold Blue Mountain Color Me Plaid Constant Grey Count Funkula Crashed Giraffe Crazygrass Cris Kenyon Damage Overload Daniel Vera Danny Cohen Dave Elke Trio David Ennis Dead Man’s Hand

SCENE Jamie Keshet’s “Key to the Castle” quilt. Inset: Leandra Courter’s poplar and copper “Llave.” PHOTOS BY MARYROSE LOVGREN

N O U O Y

Deedee Vest Dena Moes Dirty Menace Disorderly Event DJ Whitlock DMJ Dr. Becky Sagers, Ph.D. Dream Team DVS Dylan’s Dharma Elliot James Engraved in Armor Envelope Peasant & The Scientific Orchestra Epitaph of Atlas Eric Peter Esoteric Every Hand Betrayed Evin Wolverton Eyere Eyes Feather River Singers Fera Fight Music Filthy Luke Frankie Doppler’s Nuclear Sunrise French Reform Furlough Fridays Gentleman’s Coup Geoff Baker Goat Good Probs Gordy Ohliger the Banjo-ologist Gravybrain Hail the Sun HangTree Ha’Penny Bridge Hearses Heather Michelle Helm of Cerberus Himp C Hobilly M.F. Holly Taylor Hooliganz, The Horse Fight Hush Icko Sicko In Reach Inside Strait Into the Open Earth Io Torus Ira Walker Jay Decay Jazz X-Press JBiz Jeff Pershing Band Jim Brobeck Joe Goodwin John Seid & Larry Peterson John Trenalone Johnny & The Bootleggers Jon Hartle$$ Jorge Jonze JP Gutierrez Julian Ruck Karma Kings Kasm Kate Tansey Kezwik King Cotton Jazz Band King Hopeton KO-DE-AK KWMP Kyle Williams Laurie Dana Lexi Bakkar

Lisa Langley Lish Bills Logan 5 Logan Dunn Lorna Kingdon & Chris Wood Los Caballitos de La Cancion Los Papi Chulos Band Low Flying Birds Lynguistix Lyrical Vision Mad Bob Howard Make it So MaMuse Mandy Jo & The Holy Mackerel Mark Johnson Marked for Death Master Lady Michelin Embers Mike Comfort Mike Z Mikey Stacks Minetaka/LaPado Duo Missoula Flood Mom & Dad Month of Sundays Mossy Creek Mr. I Nate Pendery Nina Loco Nolan & Emma Northern Comfort Northern Traditionz Nothing Left Now Here Jazz Ensemble Nude and True Oil Panic Pageant Dads Perpetual Drifters Phillip Zabala Pintlifter Present Time Pub Scouts Pyrx Reckoning Resonate Resonators Reverse Order Rich & Kendell Rock Ridge Bluegrass Band Rock Scarz Rube and the Rhythm Rockers Ruby Hollow Band Ryan Davidson Salsa Bella Sapphire Soul Sarah Watson Sean Thompson Season of the Witch Second Hand Smoke Severance Package Shankers She Fetus

Shout Bamalama Sick Bird Simple Science Skip Culton Skyliners Sleestak Some Kind of Sorcerer Sorin Soul Butter Soul Union Spark ’n’ Cinder Spiff & Bullet SS Frank Star Thistle Wall Station House SteelFX Steve Cook Trio Strange Habits Surrogate Swamp Daddy Swamp Zen Symbio Taunis Year One Teeph The Amy Celeste Band The Blue Hippies The Blue Merles The Cause The Chrome The Deaf Pilots The Ember Switch The Hallelujah Junction The Hambones The LoLos The Magnificent Sevens The Mercantiles The Noetics The Oisters The Pushers The Railflowers The Remainder The River Red The Sad Bastards The Shimmies The Suspects The Vanity Theory Thee Yule Logs Thomas Fogg Three Fingers Whiskey Tip Makhno Tome of Goetia Top Dolla Tripship Twisted Strategies TyBox Voltare Waltzsaulsnakenstein West By Swan Wolfthump Zabaleen

E R A LIST? E H T The 2013 Chico Area Music Awards are coming!

32 CN&R January 31, 2013

If you are a local musician (or you know a local musician) who should be on the list of potential artists for this year’s Chico Area Music Awards, send an email to cnrcammies@gmail.com today!

Unlocking art Keys were the inspiration for latest MÁNÁS group show

Dworks? I mean, the nuts and bolts of the thing? I recently was o you know how a key

waved over to the couch where my husband lay readby ing and watching MaryRose videos from the Lovgren comfort of his supine position. “Look at this,” he said in hushed tones. I looked. It REVIEW: BTW … Have You was a short, Seen My Keys? , looped animation now showing at of a key with its MÁNÁS Art Space familiar toothy through March 8. profile sliding into a cutaway of MÁNÁS Art Space a lock. The teeth 1441c Park Ave moved forward 588-5183 and pushed up litwww.facebook.com/ tle pins until they manasartspace all lined up just so to reveal a gap in the lock that allowed the whole situation to turn. The universe, I thought, is trying to tell me something, for this knowledge came on the heels of learning that the MÁNÁS Art Space was about to have its reception for a show centering around, you guessed it, keys. BTW … Have You Seen My Keys? is the fourth in the gallery’s series of themed open-entry art shows all centering around a physical object or theme. (Previous

themes have included the color green, plain coffee bags, and gallery-provided bags-o-junk.) To participate, artists were provided with several random keys on a key chain, along with instructions and a few ideas. Over the next six or so weeks, participants were to use the keys as inspiration for a work of art. The actual presence of a key in the final piece wasn’t necessary. Neither were entries limited to static works like paintings, collages and quilts: Key-inspired performances were also welcome at the opening reception. The randomness of the keys mirrored the diversity of the participants, which is “one of the best parts of the show,” according to David “Dragonboy” Sutherland, who co-owns and manages MÁNÁS with Christine “Seamonster” Fulton. Artists include “little kids, older established artists, and people who have never hung art before.” Indeed, many of the artists were on hand for the reception, which included familiar local faces, children and couples strolling through the gallery. Some of the artists did incorporate keys prominently within their piece. Jamie Keshet’s lovely quilt, “Key to the Castle,” embraces the key concept literally, her goldenhued piece displaying a silver key prominently on a blue, cave-like door. Sarah Campbell’s “feather

lite” is a mosaic in sea-foamed hues with a lock and hanging key below a winged dove. And then, of course, there is Leandra Courter’s “Llave,” a child-sized copper key wrapped in copper wire hanging tantalizingly from the ceiling, just begging for an even larger lock to appear. Other pieces were less focused on keys than on using them as inspiration. Sutherland and local artist Dylan Tellesen joined forces to create four mixed-media pieces, including “Sexy LBJ Beast,” a rumpus with a black Shmoo-like character frolicking with several possibly key-inspired orange creatures in a sea of rainbows. Local musician Sean Harrasser created an enormous and intricate watercolor pencil ocean scene titled “Transformation” that simply holds its keys and keychain on a tiny push pin in the upper left corner. The rest of the work is devoted to bird, dragon and sea-horse-like creatures swimming in a sea so finely penciled that it almost seems like cloth. The next themed show at MÁNÁS will be Reflections on our American Heritage. For a donation of $5, participants get to select a unique book from the American Heritage series for use in creating their own work of art. Pick up your book at the gallery. Submission drop-off week is Ω March 13-16.


Ride the Void

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Holy Grail Prosthetic Records Holy Grail has a lot of style—the band’s denim-clad press shots look like pullouts from a circa-’86 Rip magazine—but the L.A. thrash five-piece has substance, too. Actually, if you close your eyes and listen you might still think Reagan was king and New Coke was a good idea. While there has been a fistful of young paleo-metallers popping up in recent years, Holy Grail soars above the rest, having made a name for itself with 2010’s Crisis in Utopia. On its sophomore release, Ride the Void, the band again straddles the line between ’80s American thrash and 21st-century death-metal, blending perverse technical ability, aggro intensity and singalong melodies. “Bestia Triumphans” displays those attributes within the first three seconds, and Ride the Void doesn’t let up from there. “Too Decayed to Wait” and “Take It to the Grave” are bona fide headbangers, with precision amplified by crystalline production. Eli Santana and Alex Lee divvy up plenty of galloping rhythms and dual guitar solos, and vocalist James-Paul Luna takes his register to otherworldly heights. Even if this so-called thrash revival is fleeting, it sure is fun. I mean, how often does a legitimate metal band have to think about a hook?

MUSIC

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Blind Pig Records Like a lot of Mississippi bluesmen, Magic Slim moved to Chicago where, as a teenager, he got a gig playing bass with the iconic Magic Sam (who gave the young Morris Holt his nom de guitar). Ten years later Slim got his own band together and has since released nearly a score of albums on a handful of labels, primarily Chicago’s Blind Pig Records and Austria’s Wolf Records. Slim is a large man with a voice to match and his no-nonsense approach to the blues has made him—at 74—one of the genre’s elder and still-vital statesmen. He and his quartet work their way through a catalog of classics, among them Roy Brown’s “Hard Luck Blues” (“Rocks is my pillow, cold ground is my bed”) and Albert King’s “Matchbox Blues” (“I dreamed I got lucky and I woke up cold in hand”). Other items include Muddy Waters’ relaxed “Champagne and Reefer” (helluva combo!); Detroit Jr.’s exuberant job kiss-off “I Got Money” (“I got money, I ain’t goin’ to work today”); with Denise LaSalle’s slinky “Someone Else Is Steppin’ In” tossed in for variety. Slim’s got a few originals, and “Sunrise Blues,” his saga of lost love, finds him missing his baby at sunrise. Another welcome addition to the Magic Slim catalog.

MUSIC

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CN&R 33

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ARTS DEVO Jason Cassidy â&#x20AC;˘ jasonc@newsreview.com

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS

IT BEGINS School is back and so are all the groovy jams, metalcore

and DJ dance parties that will fill up local stages and calendars from now through the end of spring. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all there and everyone knows where to find it. But, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like me, and you want a little more variety and to tickle more than two brain cells at once over the next few months, here are several unique, Arts DEVO-approved options for fairly Jäger-free ways to be stimulated in Chico.

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Plus Live Bands on Friday and Saturday! 3 Alverda Dr., Oroville, CA 95966 Info: 530-533-3885 featherfallscasino.com 0867%(:,7+9$/,','72385&+$6($/&2+2/Â&#x2021;$//5,*+765(6(59('Â&#x2039;))&

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â&#x20AC;˘ Jan. 31, 7:30 p.m.: EEliterate Friends of The Bookstore, at Blue Room Theatre. Another benefit for The Bookstore, this one a theater-andmusic variety show that includes Martin Chaviraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original Glorious Tales of Olde Chico: Chapter 8: Attack on Bidwell Mansion, among other shorts and songs. â&#x20AC;˘ Jan. 31, 8 p.m.: San Diegoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sleep Lady swings a wrecking ball of beautiful noise into CafĂŠ Coda. West by Swan and The Pageant Dads open. â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 2, 8 p.m.: Mark Growden, Mandalyn May and Jonathan Huffman at MĂ NĂ S Art Space. â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 6-March 13, noon: Hive Dwellers Lunchtime Sci-Fi flicks series. As part of its Infinity and Beyond: Humanityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quest to Explore Space exhibit, Chico Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum of Anthropology is hosting free showings of vintage sci-fi films (bring a sack lunchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;refreshments provided). First up: Flash Gordonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Trip to Mars (Feb. 6). â&#x20AC;˘Feb. 10-13, 7:30 p.m.: The Last Man on Earth, at Lost on Main. Four showings of Craig Blamerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (loose) stage adaptation of the Vincent Price film. â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 16., 7 p.m.: The Love Seat Diaries, at 1078 Gallery. Local experimental goofballs The Pageant Dads wrote and will perform this interactive comedy-musical about four fathers of beauty-pageant daughters, trying to help one of their own find true love for Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. â&#x20AC;˘ March 1, 7:30 p.m.: Composer Paul Dresher at Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall. As part of the Chico State Music Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annul New Music Symposium, Dresher will come to town with his frequent collaborator, Joel Davel, and his invented instruments (including his 16-feet-long, four-stringed Quadrachord) for a multi-genre, experimental performance. â&#x20AC;˘ March 6-12: 12 Ophelias at Chico Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wismer Theatre. Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ophelia lands in Appalachia with Rude Boy Hamlet and brothel-owner Gertrude for a surreal summer of sex and song. â&#x20AC;˘ March 14, 7:30 p.m.: Remembering Doc Remembering Doc. Watson at the Sierra Nevada Big Room. The music of the recently departed folk legend is celebrated by two of his longtime sidemenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;David Holt and T. Michael Colemanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and American acoustic-guitar wiz Bryan Sutton. â&#x20AC;˘ March 28, 8 p.m.: Choices: Glitter Wizard at Monstros Pizza or Hive Dwellers (featuring Calvin Johnson) at CafĂŠ Coda. â&#x20AC;˘ April 4-14: Lord of the Flies, at the Blue Room.

ALL YOUR FANTASIES WILL COME TRUE Just a quick reminder to all my sexy readers that this column will be transformed for the Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day issue (Feb. 14) into Arts DEVOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Groovy, Funky, Stanky Sex-Advice Column. Send your questions, letters or fan fiction to jasonc@newsreview.com by Feb. 8.

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BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

50 KINDRED COURT • ChICO

OPEN

HOUSE

CENTURY 21 JEFFRIES LYDON Sat. 2-4

2570 Durham Dayton Hwy (X St: Teal) 3 Bd / 2.5 Ba, $499,000. Mark Reaman 228-2229

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1

134 W. Tonea Way (X St: Esplanade) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 2478 sq. ft. $339,000 Frankie Dean 840-0265 / Ron Kelly 521-3629

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

69 Brenda Drive (X St: Forest Avenue) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1811 sq. ft. $249,900 John Wallace 514-2405 / Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Imagine living close to Bidwell Park on just over an acre! This is a primo location that is tucked away and makes you feel like you are out in the country, but in just minutes you could be anywhere in Chico. The ground floor of the main house has an all inclusive feel with the kitchen, dinning room, and the living room. Upstairs there is a very nice bonus spot that would be perfect for an office or craft area. There was a porch that was over the studio which was removed but could be rebuilt to make a very nice area. Also, the laundry is upstairs along with all of the bedrooms and two bathrooms. The studio is attached to the main house on the ground level. It is spacious and has a nice ... Read Morelarge bathroom and closet and tile floors. Outside, the yard is fully fenced there is plenty of space for a boat, RV or any other toys.

Sat. 1-4

1633 Normal Avenue (X St: 16th Street) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1150 sq. ft. $239,000 Emmett Jacobi 519-6333

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1

1567 East 8th Street (X St: Forest) 2 Bed, 1 Ba, w/ 1 Bed 1 Ba Studio, 1638 sq. ft. $225,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872 / Russ Hammer 501-6830

LIsTED aT: $399,999 Emmett Jacobi | Realtor | Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530) 519-6333 | emmettjacobi.com

Sat. 11-1 & 2-4

77 Lexington Drive (X St: Eaton Road) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1248 sq. ft. $199,900 Carolyn Fejes 966-4457 / Frankie Dean 840-0265

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Big ChiCo Creek estAtes

Beautiful lake ProPerty Pending

$307,385.

4 bed 4 bath on just over an acre off of El Monte Ave. Backs up to the slew. $399k. Call me for more info & to be one of the first to see it!

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530-228-1305 www.GarrettFrenchHomes.com

Call today for more info. www.AtoZchico.com

Brandon Siewert

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in Chico, Orland, Willows.

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

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Spacious 3 bed 2.5 bath Chico home with 2105 sqft. $279,900

3 bed 2 bath home with pool.

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Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Butte Valley

$340,000

3/ 2.5

2158

1194 Gossamer Ln

Chico

$194,000

3/ 2

1126

3227 Summit Ridge Ter

Chico

$615,000

4/ 3

3126

1201 Palm Ave

Chico

$180,000

3/ 2

2317

14075 Kelsey Dr

Chico

$435,000

4/ 3

2541

1660 Arcadian Ave

Chico

$176,500

2/ 1

1007

950 East Ave

Chico

$310,000

2/ 2

3364

2801 Ceres Ave

Chico

$175,000

2/ 1.5

3509 Shadowtree Ln

Chico

$293,000

3/ 2

1975

5 Clara Ln

Chico

$170,000

3/ 1

1193

2819 Hegan Ln

Chico

$265,000

4/ 2

1967

1215 Boucher St

Chico

$159,000

4/ 1

1020

1009 Gateway Ln

Chico

$265,000

3/ 2

1875

2496 Streamside Ct

Chico

$140,000

3/ 2

1473

2118 Shoshone Ave

Chico

$215,000

6/ 3

2160

1324 Purcell Ln

Chico

$115,000

3/ 3

1684

3687 Clark Rd

January 31, 2013

88

CN&R 35


Sponsored by the City of Chico

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HUD-appr awarded oved certification at the en d of classis

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Homebuyer Readiness Workshop Location:

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Quality, Affordable & Friendly Housing apartments

houses Location

Bd/Ba

1165 Olive St

Rent

Dep.

4/2 $1,200

$1,300

Location

801 W. 1st Ave. #1 1163 Olive St #7 1901 ½ Mulberry St

Bd/Ba

Rent

Dep.

Location

2/1 3/1 3/1

$650 $750 $675

$750 $850 $775

684 E. 12th St. #3, 4 939 W. East Ave. # 3, 16 1149 Olive St #10

Bd/Ba

Rent

Dep.

1/1 1/1 2/1

$550 $600 $775

$650 $700 $875

RELIABLE 895-1733 | www.reliableproperty.com Info subject to change. Please do not disturb tenants. We will schedule the appointment.

Beautiful home! 3 bedroom plus bonus den/reading room, 2.5 baths. Home is immaculate inside & out and into the well attended & fenced yard. $339,900

Retreat priced to sell! Nice & large 3bd/ 3ba on 2.5 acres in the pines. $335,000.

Dana W. Miller

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

KATHY KELLY 530-570-7403

DRE# 01860319

KathyKellyC21@gmail.com

Paradise Fully developed lot in Paradise

$12,900

Ad #450

2BR/1BA, 900 Sq. Ft. Only $375/mo Park

$22,000

Ad #448

8/10 of an acre w/well, septic, & power in Camelot $24,000

Ad #409

3 bedroom home Price Reduced to

Ad#445

$264,500

5350 Skyway, Paradise

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Bringing You To

• Canyon Oaks 4 bd/3 ba, 3,200 sq ft, pool, 1 acre, custom $629,000 • 3 bd/4 ba, 2 offices, 1.66 acres, pool, near town $668,000 • Condo, 3 bd/2ba, central Chico $149,000 • New carpet paint 3 bd/2 ba, 1,194 sq ft $188,000 PEND+ING ING 1,443 sq ft plus garage $275,000 • Avenues, bd/2ba, PE3ND NDING • SeniorPE mobile 2 bd/1 ba, 800 sq ft $10,000 NDING • MissionPERanch 3 bd/2.5 ba, 1,837 sq ft, pool $279,000 • Manufactured home on .48 acre w/ studio $159,500 PENDING Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

(530) 872-7653

Paradise@C21SelectGroup.com www.C21Skyway.com 1-800-785-7654

USDA 100% FINANCING AVAILABLE on this new construction! Two plans to choose from & 8 different lots at this price, 3 bed & 2 bath models with a den & 3 car garage. 90-120 day build out, call me for materials list & subdivision information. $280,000

MARK REAMAN 530-228-2229

Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

Jeffries Lydon

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 14, 2013 — January 18, 2013. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

4323 Big Bend Rd

ADDRESS

Concow

$175,000

3/ 2

2314

62 Orchardcrest Dr

Oroville

$129,000

3/ 2

1352

1595 Oak St

Gridley

$148,000

3/ 2

1722

13468 Achilles Ct

Magalia

$201,500

3/ 2.5

1981

2985 Gawthorne Ave

Oroville

$125,000

2/ 1

1041

6471 Marin Ct

Magalia

$120,000

2/ 2

1529

7195 Springtime Trl

Palermo

$305,000

2/ 2

2136

101 Spring Hill Dr

Oroville

$200,000

2/ 1

1340

6755 Belleview Dr

Paradise

$349,000

4/ 4

2834

45 Munson Way

Oroville

$183,000

3/ 2

1907

1526 Big Pine Ln

Paradise

$275,000

3/ 2.5

1728

49 Pinedale Ave

Oroville

$165,000

3/ 2

1066

426 Green Oaks Dr

Paradise

$244,000

3/ 2.5

2035

239 Skyline Blvd

Oroville

$140,000

3/ 1.5

1324

5675 Foster Rd

Paradise

$215,500

5/ 3.5

2761

36 CN&R January 31, 2013

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS


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BUlleTiN BOaRd Butte County Surplus Sale 14 County Center Dr. Oroville, CA Friday, Feb 1, 2013 9 am-2 pm. Items include: Special discount on computers ($60) & on all sizes of file cabinets ($5-$15), a recliner, loveseat, 2 chest freezers $50 ea, $5 desks, $10 office chairs, shelf units, exam table, misc office goods and so much more! Open to the public. Next sale May 3, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE YULE LOGS, THE YULE LOGS MUSIC, YULE LOGS MUSIC at 1824 Magnolia Avenue Unit B Chico, CA 95926. KIRT LIND 357 E 4TH Street #3 Chico, CA 95928. MARTIN P PARKER 1824 Magnolia Avenue Unit B Chico, CA 95926. JACOB SPRECHER 357 E 4TH Street #3 Chico, CA 95928. MAURICE SPENCER TEILMANN 3333 S.E. Taylor Street Portland OR 97124. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KIRT LIND Dated: December 31, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001813 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CHICO BAKING COMPANY at 1829 Devonshire Drive Chico, CA 95928. MEGAN FORREST 1829 Devonshire Drive Chico, Ca 95928. EMILY CAMAREN 342 Mission Sierra Terrace Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: EMILY CAMAREN

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COMMISSARY PARTNERS, CRAZY DOG, ETHEL’S SWEETS at 1043 B W. 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. ETHEL CAHABIT GEIGER 1490 Heritage Oak Drive Chico, CA 95928. JOHN DAVID GEIGER 1490 Heritage Oak Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: JOHN GEIGER Dated: December 5, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001697 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OUTDOOR TOYS CONSULTING INC, OUTDOORS TOYS at 2961 Highway 32 Suite 31 Chico, CA 95973 OUTDOORS TOYS CONSULTING INC 2961 Highway 32 Suite 31 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: OREDA HAGY PRESIDENT Dated: January 4, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000030 Published: January 31, February 7, 14, 21, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as L D GARDNER at 3060 Thorntree Dr. Ste #10 Chico, CA 95973. LACI GARDNER 308 Weymouth Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: LACI GARDNER Dated: November 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001659 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2013

ficTiTiOUs BUsiNess aTTORNeYs

Dated: December 13, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000557 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IMUA MEDIA at 1459 E Lassen Ave #12 Chico, CA 95973. JOHN JOHNSTON 1459 E Lassen Ave #12 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN JOHNSTON Dated: January 7, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000032 Published: January 10,17,24,31, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THREE GIRLS AND A KITCHEN at 3183 Sespe Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIELLE BLIXT 1027 Mayette Drive Chico, CA 95926. DAVID CHEN 3183 Sespe Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. JEANNIE CHEN 3183 Sespe Creek Way Chico, CA 95973. KIMBERLY LUCE 882 Glenn Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DAVID CHEN Dated: January 8, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000044 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NAKED BONES DUTCH OVEN COOKING at 691 E 3RD Avenue Chico, CA 95926. DESERY JOAN UHOR 691 E 3RD Avenue Chico, CA 95926. MATTHEW DAVID UHOR 691 E 3RD Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: MATT UHOR Dated: December 21, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001779 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SIGNS AND GRAPHIC DESIGN at 158 Commercial Avenue Chico, CA 95973. CHRISTINE A BIEBERLY 18 Baja Court Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD J COLLINS 18 Baja Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CHRISTINE A BIEBERLY Dated: january 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000050 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 14, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CAPITAL EQUITY REAL ESTATE COMPANY at 5 Donner Lane Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTIAN DEL PINO 5 Donner Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTIAN DEL PINO Dated: December 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001752 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the us of the fictitious business name NORTH VALLEY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 1108 Sheridan Avenue Suite B Chico, CA 95926. PAUL COOPER 1875 Auburn Oak Way Chico, CA 95928. SETH THOMAS GODFREY 375 Yarrow Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SETH GODFREY Dated: January 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0001255 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GUITAR CENTER 218 at 2027 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Pkwy Chico, CA 95928. GUITAR CENTER STORES INC 5795 Lindero Canyon Road Westlake Village, CA 91362. State: DELAWARE This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: WESLEY L. MUDDLE VP FINANCE Dated: December 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001755 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LONGEVITY CMT at 2072 E 20th Street #140 Chico, CA 95928. LEON ALLEN 1880 Humboldt Road #3 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LEON S. ALLEN Dated: December 14, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001747 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GT’S HANDYMAN SERVICE AND REPAIR at 541 Shasta Avenue Oroville, CA 95965. GARY JAMES TYLER 541 Shasta Avenue Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GARY TYLER Dated: January 9, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000048 Published: January 17,24,31, February 7, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandonded the use of the fictious business name SIGNS AND GRAPHIC DESIGN at 158 Commercial Avenue Chico, CA 95973. CHARLES WITHUHN 518 W 6th Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHARLES WITHUN Dated: January 10, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0001379 Published: January 24,31, February 7, 14, 2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTH VALLEY PROPERTY MANAGEMNENT at 1108 Sheridan Ave #B Chico, CA 95926. SETH THOMAS GODFREY 375 Yarrow Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SETH GODFREY Dated: January 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000074 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICORENTALLISTINGS.COM, JIBTACK, UNIVERSITYRENTALLISTINGS.COM, USRENTALLISTINGS.COM at 3209 Esplande Suite 140 Chico, CA 95973. VAUGHT, INC PO Box 1192 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN VAUGHT PRESIDENT Dated: December 31, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001806 Published: Januray 24,31 February 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RYNO COMPANY at 3209 Esplande Suite 120 Chico, CA 95973. VAUGHT, INC PO Box 1192 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYAN VAUGHT PRESIDENT Dated: December 20, 2013 FBN Number: 2012-0001772 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BABY BOW-TIQUE at 2777 Eaton Road # 83 Chico, CA 95973. MILO YAMASHIRO 2777 Eaton Road #83 Chico,

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CA 95973. SAMANTHA YAMASHIRO 2777 Eaton Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: SAMANTHA YAMASHIRO Dated: January 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000075 Published: January 24,31 February 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FUSION HOOKA LOUNGE at 245 Walnut St. Suite 190 Chico, CA 95928. BASSAM DAHMA 1749 Eaton Rd #11 Chico, CA 95973. JEANETTE DAHMA 1749 Eaton Rd #11 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JEANETTE DAHMA Dated: January 15, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000071 Published: January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GOLDILOCKS STUDIO at 315 Wall St Suite 11 Chico, CA 95928. JODI KREBS 665 Victorian Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JODI KREBS Dated: January 17, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000084 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ABYSS JEWELRY at 3484 Hackamore Lane Chico, CA 95973. ANGELA J SOUSA 3484 Hackamore Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELA J SOUSA Dated: January 18, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000091 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DIRECTGOV SOURCE at 4250 Keith Lane Chico, CA 95973. JONATHAN JOHNSON 4250 Keith Lane Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHNATHAN JOHNSON Dated: December 20, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001766 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COAST CLASSICS at 4950 Cohasset RD SPC #42 Chico, CA 95973. SERGIO CEJA 1326 Elliot RD Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SERHIO CEJA Dated: January 18, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000087 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2013

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ROOTS RANCH, ROOTS REMEDIES at 3819 Grizzly Creek Road Yankee hill, CA 95965. MICHALE SCOTT ENGLUND 3819 Grizzly Creek Road Yankee Hill, CA 95965. JENNIFER LEE SALMON 3819 Grizzly Creek Road Yankee Hill, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: JENNIFER SALMON Dated: January 22, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000095 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SHEAR MADNESS at 2991 Esplande Suite #140 Chico, CA 95973. LACEY L EPPERSON 3922 High Ridge CT Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LACEY EPPERSON Dated: January 25, 2013 FBN Number: 2013-0000118 Published: January 31, February 7,14,21, 2013

NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LINDA CAROLYN HALL, AKA LINDA C. HALL, AKA LINDA HALL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LINDA CAROLYN HALL AKA, LINDA C. HALL, AKA LINDA HALL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RONALD HALL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: RONALD HALL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 14, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept:Probate Address of the court: Superior Court of California

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County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40504 Attorney for Petitioner: Clayton B. Anderson 20 Independent Circle Chico, CA 95973. Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2013

County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40507 Attorney for Petitioner: Jane E. Stansell 901 Bruce Road Suite 170 Chico, CA 95928. Published: January 24,31, February 7, 2013

County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40509 Attorney for Petitioner: Clayton B. Anderson. 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973. Published: January 31, February 7,14, 2013

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DONNA MARIE TEIFER, AKA DONNA M. TEIFER, AKA DONNA TEIFER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DONNA MARIE TEIFER, AKA DONNA M. TEIFER, AKA DONNA TEIFER. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JOSEPH TEIFER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: JOSEPH TEIFER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 14, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept:McLean Address of the court: Superior Court of California

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARIE THERESA GUTHRIE, AKA MARIA T. GUTHRIE, AKA MARIA GUTHRIE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARIA THERESA GUTHRIE, AKA MARIA T. GUTHRIE, AKA MARIA GUTHRIE. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DEBORAH MEAD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: DEBORAH MEAD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 21, 2013 Time: 1:30pm Dept:TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is herby given that the undersigned intends to sell the property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale online by competitive bidding on the online auction site BidCal.com. This online auction will proceed per regulations from February 12 - February 14, 2013 for sale of said property stored and located at Airport Storage 3158 Thorntree Drive Chico, Butte County, State of California, the following: Unit F15 Mullikin: Futon, bike frames, engine hoist, speakers, air compressor, jack stand, misc. Unit G1-2 Punian: Tools, yard tools, microwaves, household furnishings in boxes, misc. Unit D25 Hedlund: Boxes, bags of misc. I15 boxes, bags, clothing, computer parts, misc. Unit D22 Catren: Furniture, microwave, yard tools, subwoofer, guitars, couch, desk, misc. Unit L15 Smith: Fans, couch, mattress, childrens/baby furniture, misc, bikes, clothing, household. Unit F35 Casada: Bed, furniture, refridgerator, kids toys, bikes, household misc. Unit D27 Berry: Dresser, filing cabinet, kitchen island, washer, dryer, recliner, table, misc. Unit E52 Logan: Yard tools, filing cabinet, mattress, construction misc, desk, furniture. Unit G46 Sibley: Tools, work shop, misc. Unit J73 Hawkins: Dishware, books, clothing, misc. Unit C29: Couch, futon, holiday music, luggage, cabinet, misc.

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this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

RECYCLE THIS PAPER. YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE. 38 CN&R January 31, 2013

Unit E64 Sasamoto: Files, misc boxes, wall art, household misc. Unit H68 Ganzfried: Kitchen misc, bed, couch, wall art, bar chair, misc clothing. Unit F2 Campbell: bike, tv, bed, clothing, cabinet. Unit G35 Rogers: Sporting goods, office equipment, desk, boxspring, frame, misc boxes. Unit L19 Brown: Furniture, boxes, vehicle parts, bike, misc. household. Unit B20 Oxx: Furniture B22Childrens misc, kitchen misc, boxes, books, video game misc. Purchases must be paid for at the time of winning bid per website policies. $50.00 cleaning deposit per unit collected at time of sale. All purchased items sold as is where is and must be removed within 24 hours after the time of sale. Individual sale subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Dated: this 31st day of January and 7th day of February, 2013. BidCal.com, Auctioneer Bond #MS235-69-21. (530)3450840m, Published January 31, February 7, 2013

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ROBIN LANE SHULTZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ROBIN LANE SHULTZ Proposed name: ROBIN LANE WILDE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 1, 2013 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: January 4, 2013 Case Number: 158622 Published: January 24,31, February 7,14, 2013

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ARIES (March 21-April 19):

“Wageni ni baraka” is a Swahili proverb that means “guests are a blessing.” That’s not always true, of course. Sometimes guests can be a boring inconvenience or a messy burden. But for you in the coming weeks, Aries, I’m guessing the proverb will be 98 percent correct. The souls who come calling are likely to bestow unusually fine benefits. They may provide useful clues or missing links you’ve been searching for. They might inspire you to see things about yourself that you really need to know, and they might even give you shiny new playthings. Open your mind and heart to the unexpected blessings.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I feel my

fate in what I cannot fear,” said Theodore Roethke in his poem “The Waking.” I invite you to try out that perspective, Taurus. In other words, learn more about your destiny by doing what makes you feel brave. Head in the direction of adventures that clear your mind of its clutter, and mobilize your gutsy brilliance. Put your trust in dreams that inspire you to sweep aside distracting worries.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s the first

ever Blemish Appreciation Week—for Geminis only. One of the best ways to observe this holiday is to not just tolerate the flaws and foibles of other people, but to also understand them and forgive them. Another excellent way to celebrate is to do the same for your own flaws and foibles: Applaud them for the interesting trouble they’ve caused and the rousing lessons they’ve taught. I may be joking a little about this, but I’m mostly serious. Be creative and uninhibited as you have fun with the human imperfections that normally drive you crazy.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When I turn

my psychic vision in your direction, I see scenes of heavy rain and rising water, maybe even a flood. I’m pretty sure this has a metaphorical rather than literal significance. It probably means you will be inundated with more feelings than you’ve experienced in a while. Not bad or out-ofcontrol feelings, just deep and enigmatic and brimming with nuance. How to respond? First, announce to the universe that you will be glad and grateful to accept this deluge. Second, go with the flow, not against it. Third, promise yourself not to come to premature conclusions about the meaning of these feelings; let them evolve.

lEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I want to know more

about you” may be the most potent sentence you can utter in the coming week. If spoken with sincere curiosity, it will awaken dormant synergies. It will disarm people who might otherwise become adversaries. It will make you smarter and work as a magic spell that gives you access to useful information you wouldn’t be able to crack open with any other method. To begin the process of imbuing your subconscious mind with its incantatory power, say “I want to know more about you” aloud 10 times right now.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): My hotel was

nice, but the neighborhood where it was located seemed sketchy. As I returned to my room after a jaunt to the convenience store, I received inquiries from two colorfully dressed hookers whose sales pitches were enticingly lyrical. I also passed a lively man who proposed that I purchase some of his top-grade meth, crack or heroin. I thanked them all for their thoughtful invitations but said I wasn’t in the mood. Then I slipped back into my hotel room to dine on my strawberry smoothie and blueberry muffin as I watched HBO. My experience could have something in common with your immediate future, Virgo. I suspect you may be tempted with offers that seem exotic and adventurous but are not really that good for you. Stick to the healthy basics, please.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A West Coast DJ named Shakti Bliss wrote a remarkable status update on her Facebook page. Here’s an edited excerpt: “In the past 24 hours, I did yoga in a bathtub, hauled furniture by

Happy feet

by Rob Brezsny myself in the rain, got expert dating advice from an 11-year-old, learned the Lindy Hop, saw a rainbow over the ocean, had thriftstore clothes stolen out of my car by a homeless man, made a magic protection amulet out of a piece of cardboard, was fed quinoa soup by the buffest 50-year-old South African woman I’ve ever met, bowed to a room full of applause, and watched two of my favorite men slow dance together to Josephine Baker singing in French.” I suspect that you Libras will be having days like that in the coming week: packed with poetic adventures. Are you ready to handle more than the usual amount of stimulation and excitement?

story and photo by Shannon Rooney

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Thomas

Jefferson, third President of the United States, called himself a Christian. But he also acknowledged that there weren’t any other Christians like him. He said he belonged to a sect consisting of one person—himself. While he admired the teachings of Jesus Christ, he had no use for the supernatural aspects of the stories told in the New Testament. So he created his own version of the Bible, using only those parts he agreed with. Now would be an excellent time for you to be inspired by Jefferson’s approach, Scorpio. Is there a set of ideas that appeals to you in some ways but not in others? Tailor it to your own special needs. Make it your own. Become a sect of one.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Everyone is a damn fool for at least five minutes every day,” said writer Elbert Hubbard. “Wisdom consists in not exceeding the limit.” Judging from my personal experience, I’d say that five minutes is a lowball figure. My own daily rate is rarely less than half-an-hour. But the good news as far as you’re concerned, Sagittarius, is that in the coming weeks you might have many days when you’re not a damn fool for even five seconds. In fact, you may break your alltime records for levels of wild, pure wisdom. Make constructive use of your enhanced intelligence!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Most

human beings have an absolute and infinite capacity for taking things for granted,” said Aldous Huxley. If that’s true, Capricorn, it’s important that you not act like a normal human being in the next few weeks. Taking things for granted would be a laziness you can’t afford to indulge. In fact, I think you should renew your passion for and commitment to all your familiar pleasures and fundamental supports. Are you fully aware of the everyday miracles that allow you to thrive? Express your appreciation for the sources that nourish you so reliably.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Poet

Jacob Nibengenesabe was a member of the Swampy Cree, a First Nation tribe in Canada. He wrote shamanic poems from the point of view of a magical trickster who could change himself into various creatures. In one poem, the shapeshifter talked about how important it is to be definite about what he wanted. He wrote: “There was a storm once / That’s when I wished myself / into a turtle / but I meant on land! / The one that carries a hard tent / on his back. / I didn’t want to be floating!” By the end of the poem, the shapeshifter concluded, “I’ve got to wish things exactly! / That’s the way it is / from now on.” I hope that will be the way it is from now on for you, too, Aquarius. Visualize your desires in intricate, exact detail. For example, if you want to be a bird for a while, specify what kind.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): As you sleep,

you have at least a thousand dreams every year. But if you’re typical, you may recall only a few of them. Doesn’t that bother you? To be so ignorant of the stories your subconscious mind works so hard to craft? To be out of touch with what the Iroquois call “the secret wishes of your soul”? Now is an excellent time to develop a stronger relationship with your dreams, Pisces. It’s high time to explore the deeper strata of your life’s big mysteries.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of January 31, 2013

A reflexologist is someone who specializes in massaging the feet and hands (and sometimes ears), and as owner/operator of Happy Feet Reflexology, Liz Daniels is applying the art to help relieve stress for the people of Chico. She says that reflexology sessions make feet feel “tingly, alive, they have energy, they feel like the circulation is complete, they’re not too hot and not too cold … they feel like you do when you get out of a full-body massage. But when I work on your feet, I am actually working on your whole body from head to tail.” Like an acupuncturist, Daniels employs principles of Chinese medicine, working off the idea that energy meridians (or channels) pass from the soles of our feet up through the organ systems of the body, and that massaging one area can impart benefits to another. Visit happyfeetreflexology.net for more info, or call 321-6897 to schedule an appointment.

By massaging the feet, what exactly are you doing? I’m breaking up any of the calcium polyps that are at the nerve endings, moving them around so they can get washed out ... opening up the blood vessels, getting the energy flowing. Our chi [vital force] is best when our energy is flowing. I work from the toes to the heel. Every once in a while I’ll feel an area that feels blocked—either it’s puffy or there’s something hard underneath the skin, and I can kind of work it out. I focus on these places and work them until they’re better. I always give water or tea to people during the session, so there’s a washing out, to help remove the toxins.

Can you describe a reflexology session? I work out of my home, which is a peaceful environment. I make it as relaxing as possible. I start people out with putting their feet on a salt block, which draws out toxins. Then they get to soak in a footbath a bit. Then I have them slip back into their chair, and that’s their time [while I massage their feet]. Some people fall asleep, others unload. Some go from talking to dozing off. I never make anyone get up right away. They can just get up easily when they’re ready to. I try to make people feel comfortable the whole time they’re here.

What do you do with your free time? I am involved in Chico Permaculture [Guild], the West Lindo Avenue Community Garden, Northern CA [Counties] Time Bank. I work in the park as a crew leader and I volunteer at Laxson [Auditorium] as an usher. My favorite thing to do is to be at the Saturday farmers’ market. I’m going to add reiki [energy healing] to my repertoire.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter himself@anthonypeytonporter.com

Dating A couple of months after I graduated to widowerhood, a friend of mine in Minneapolis sent me a link to a dating website. I have good friends who have been together for many years and who met that way. I can understand how it could work just fine. I tried a personal ad once in Chicago in the early ’80s and once in the Twin Cities, with poor results, and I know that’s not much of a sample. I’m not looking. I was curious, though, so I signed up, and let me tell you, there are a lot of women on the hunt between Sacramento and Redding, which is where most of my candidates live. Every day I get an email with nine little profile pictures of women, usually of her though sometimes obscuring her face, which I don’t quite get. One woman’s picture was of only the top half of her face. Why would she do that? Maybe she has a beard. Most of the images are slapdash snapshots and don’t do their subjects any favors, which is good. Give me the truth right away. With each picture is the woman’s screen name, home city and age. So far they’ve been mostly in their 50s and 60s, which makes sense, now and then a 40- or 70-something,

and once a lost 38. Now and then there’s a picture of an obviously younger woman that’s apparently how she still thinks of herself. I don’t want to fool anybody, though, and I think I’d use the ugliest photo of me I could manage, so if we picked each other maybe she’d be pleasantly surprised. For the compatibility questions, I was to answer for myself and also say what I’d want my date to pick. So I could value appearance and want my date to value personality. Some criteria, like smoking or drinking, could be reasonable starting points for winnowing the crop. Others might easily be irrelevant. I’ve been involved with women with children and, believe me, whether a relationship would be hindered by having children at home depends entirely on the children in question. All that’s academic, because I’m not ready to take an online plunge like that. I don’t know that I’ll ever be. So far the whole process feels too strange and removed to be engaging, but I’m not ruling it out. I love women and enjoy their company. That’s been true forever and has nothing to do with my emotional state. Maybe I’ll put that in my profile, except I’m not looking. January 31, 2013

CN&R 39


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