Page 1

WEIRD WORLD OF BLOWFLY See MUSIC FEATURE, page 26

A NEW SAGA See NEWSLINES, page 8

ABS OF

SCHEELE See HEALTHLINES, page 19

CUPCAKE BOSSES See CHOW, page 30

PAGE PAGE Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

22

Volume 36, Issue 13

Wednesday, November 21, 2012


JUST AROU ND FROM THE F THE CORNER AIRGROUN DS

NOW OPEN IN ChICO corner of lassen & cohasset on your way to the airport

beautiful new bathroom & kitchen displays

granite countertops | FL FLooring | caBinets | instaLLation

FREE! In HomE ConsultatIon • • • •

professional designers on staff best prices quality material on time completion

FREE

Delivery & Set Up Disposal of Old Mattress

NEW AGAIN K I TC H E N & B AT H

YOUR REMODELING RESOURCE 2502 PARK AVENUE • CHICO • 899.2888 Mon – Fri 8:30-5pm • Sat 10-4pm

All work done by Rico Construction, Lic #908865

2 CN&R November 21, 2012

48 Month Financing no interest

La Dolce Piazza • 3217 Cohasset #120 891-3582 • furniturechico.com


CN&R

chico’s best

Hand-Crafted Leather Goods

Vol. 36, Issue 13 • November 21, 2012

OPINION

Purses · Bags · Wallets · Hats · Jackets · Vests

34

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 From This Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Belts · Slippers · Skirts · Tops · Knives Motorcycle Gear, Glasses & Goggles

NEWSLINES Downstroke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

804 Broadway • Downtown Chico • 342‑4788

GREENWAYS

HEALTHLINES The Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

17

COVER STORY

22

ARTS & CULTURE Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Scene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 In The Mix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

REAL ESTATE

39

CLASSIFIEDS

41

BACKSTOP From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Robert Speer Managing Editor Melissa Daugherty Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Calendar/Special Projects Editor Howard Hardee News Editor Tom Gascoyne Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Mazi Noble, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Kyle Emery, Stephanie Geske, Melanie MacTavish, Kjerstin Wood Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Design Manager Kate Murphy Design Melissa Arendt, Priscilla Garcia, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Osa Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino, Robert Rhody Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

General Manager Alec Binyon Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Sharon Conley, Shannon Davis, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Receptionist Kendra Gray Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (250 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

THINK FREE.

EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

DOWNTOWN CHINATOWN f f u s g St n i ck o t S r ! u

e r a ith C

Yo

w

HUNDREDS OF STOCKING STUFFERS TO CHOOSE FROM

unique Gifts incRedible PRices Food Clothing Home Decor Jewelry Toys & More

House of Rice

338 Broadway • Chico 530 -893-1794 Open Mon-Sat 10-5:30 November 21, 2012

CN&R 3


Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

A necessary ostracism What does it mean to belong to a fraternity or sorority?

Rearrange the seats in Congress WI was hoping our two reigning political parties could work across party lines. Instead, the gridlock between the

hen I started my book, Down to Earth, in 2011,

Republicans and Democrats persisted. With the re-election of President Obama and the closeness of the popular vote, maybe both parties will realize the futility of maintaining this lack of progress. Our country is in serious trouble, with the economy showing the effects of unemployment, an unstable stock market, rising debt, and especially Congress’ stalemate. The aisle separating the parties is so by rigid that they’re more like two isles. The Dick Cory gap between them is full of sharks. Congressmen and women who support biparThe author is a tisan bills have been either ostracized or retired science blackballed as traitors. Pacts have been teacher and school signed to say no to any bills proposed by administrator. He has the opposing party. lived in Chico This partisanship has contributed to since 1963. the continuing recession. The fact that these good-for-nothing politicians keep getting elected is testimonial to our flawed political system. As a friend reminded me, “The incumbent with the most financial backing always wins.” Maybe this isn’t 100 percent accurate, but there were few changes in the recent election. 4 CN&R November 21, 2012

Both parties have made promises to work cooperatively during the next term. We’ll see. Concessions may come at a high price. The Republicans, led by House Speaker John Boehner, have said they will consider new taxes, if cuts in Medicare are included. Is this like a closeout sale where no reasonable offer is refused? This is a ticklish tradeoff. President Obama says he will not change his intention to add taxes and reduce writeoffs for the rich. Much negotiation lies ahead before middle ground can be found. Still, I’m hopeful. The design of Congress’ seating arrangement would be a good start. In American classrooms, the old design with the seats in parallel rows has been changed to facilitate communication between teacher and students. Students learn better when they have better access to their teacher and classmates. Leaders of our country should investigate these innovative seating arrangements. Instead of an aisle separating the two parties, opposing parties should be seated next to one another. Open cooperative discussion must rule. Isn’t that what the founding fathers wanted? Bills should be written together so that the president can sign them knowing he has the consensus of the legislators. We must talk with each other rather than at one another. Ω

That, in essence, is what Chico State President Paul Zingg asked during his meeting last Thursday (Nov. 15) with about 400 members of campus Greek organizations. He was thinking of 21-year-old Mason Sumnicht, a Sigma Pi pledge who, even as Zingg was speaking, was dying at Enloe Medical Center. On Nov. 4, while celebrating his 21st birthday, Sumnicht drank enough alcohol to cause such severe brain damage that he could be kept alive only by artificial means. When those were removed, he died. Where were his friends? His fraternity brothers? How could they let something like this happen? Zingg, visibly angry, wanted to know. “It is not enough at vigils and memorials to proclaim, ‘No brother left behind,’ when you stand by idly and watch a brother gulp down 21 shots for his 21st birthday, and let him pass out in his own vomit, and then at some point, when you realize that he’s not responsive, to call 911,” the president said. This is personal for Zingg. When a student dies in this way, he’s the one to whom devastated family members turn for answers. They ask him the same question he asked the Greeks: How could you let this happen? Some people complain that his decision to suspend all Greek organizations penalizes the innocent as well as the guilty. But that’s a failure to understand the larger problem. It’s not that some fraternities are less responsible than others, or that some are guilty and others are innocent. The problem is that there’s a culture of binge drinking among young people, including university students. They not only tolerate it; they often encourage it. People will continue to die from alcohol overdoses unless and until the rest of us make irresponsible drinking so shameful that people will avoid it out of a desire not to be ostracized from the group. President Zingg has ostracized the Greeks. They deserve it—and will continue to deserve it until they change their ways. Ω

Why Romney lost Of all the events that took place during the presidential election,

perhaps the most telling took place after the votes were counted. That’s when Mitt Romney, in a conference call with big-dollar donors, attributed his loss to President Obama’s having followed the “old playbook” of giving special-interest groups—meaning African Americans, Hispanics, young people and women—certain “gifts” that attracted their votes. According to The New York Times, he mentioned “free contraceptives” for “college-age women” and the DREAM Act for Hispanics. He said Obamacare that allowed young people to remain on their parents’ health insurance plan until age 26 “was a big gift,” as was forgiveness of college loan interest for young people. His comments echoed those he made early in the campaign to a similar group of wealthy backers, when he said, in effect, that 47 percent of Americans were moochers who paid no income tax. Instead of seeing the growing groups—Hispanics and young people, especially young women—as vital parts of the American organism with needs government rightly should address, Romney saw them with the mind of a salesman, as interest groups for sale to whoever was able to give them the most “gifts.” As Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, like Romney a Republican, later said, “If you want to be liked by the voters, you have to like the voters.” Romney, whose entire life has been spent among the wealthy and privileged, didn’t like the voters, and they knew it. Ω


FROM THIS CORNER by Robert Speer roberts@newsreview.com

Starting to reinvest One of the surprises of the recent election locally was the easy passage of Measure E, the $78 million Chico school construction bond measure. Many of us who remember the battle over the similar $48.7 million bond measure passed in 1998 doubted this one would fly. For one thing, it took three tries before voters approved the earlier measure. Later, there was resentment that the district decided not to use the money to build a new high school, as was originally intended, and didn’t go back to the voters with its new plan to upgrade the existing high schools. Plus, $78 million is a lot of money, and this time around the district didn’t clearly state how it was to be spent, which is a major reason why the Chico EnterpriseRecord refused to endorse the measure. And yet it passed resoundingly, with 64.3 percent of the vote. Go figure. The CN&R supported Measure E, with slight reservations. We didn’t hold it against the district that it had used the previous bond money to build new classrooms and facilities at the existing high schools. They were needed and are serving students well. We’re also aware that many of Chico’s older schools, especially its elementary schools, are greatly in need of upgrades and improvement. Roofs and pipes leak, heaters and air conditioners are antiquated, and classrooms built decades ago can’t handle modern technology—which, incidentally, the district doesn’t have nearly enough of. And we’re glad to see that the district’s Board of Trustees is moving forward to establish an oversight committee to make sure the public is involved in deciding on spending priorities. Our one concern was that the district might use socalled “capital appreciation bonds,” which are long-term, deferred-interest bonds that can end up costing as much as 10 times their value in interest. We’re pleased that the board voted unanimously last week to avoid such bonds. Chico has a long tradition of excellence in education, and this measure will enable it to be maintained. With, in addition, the passage of Proposition 30 and the improving state economy, the public schools in Chico are moving out of the doldrums and looking toward a brighter future. They’re not alone: Voters up and down the state said yes to school funding measures on Nov. 6, passing 14 of 22 parcel taxes and 85 of 106 construction bonds. Parcel taxes, which require two-thirds approval for passage, have the advantage of being able to go directly into a district’s general fund to be used for whatever purpose is deemed necessary. Construction bonds, which require 55 percent approval, can be used only for building, upgrading or improving facilities. This kind of electoral success is nothing new for local measures. For a long time now Californians have trusted local officials to spend their money wisely, saving their distrust for Sacramento. But passage of Proposition 30 suggests even that is changing, as people understand that we’ve cut enough services and it’s time to reinvest in California.

Robert Speer is editor of the CN&R.

Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

Prayer’s healing power Re “Christian Science healing: another view” (Letters, by Kenneth Stringer, Nov. 8): In response to Kenneth Stringer’s comments regarding my healing of stomach cancer, and his denouncement of the healing practice of Christian Science: One can only feel compassion for one who lost his young sister to pneumonia, as his parents relied on Christian Science prayer. Mr. Stringer appears not to have considered, however, that many children die each year under medical treatment. It is also true that many children have been healed through Christian Science prayer, after medical doctors had deemed their cases hopeless. Among other healings I’ve experienced over the years were those of a badly abscessed tooth, burns, and an acute kidney/bladder infection. Muscle and joint pain which had caused severe immobility were also healed. I did receive medical help some years ago when I had experienced severe female hemorrhaging. I was given blood transfusions and am very grateful for the help given me. With persistent prayer, that problem was healed without further medical assistance. I have great respect for those in the medical profession who have dedicated their lives to alleviating human suffering. I have simply found that turning to God in prayer has been a very effective and reliable source for healing.

It’s time to beThankful! The News & Review Office will be

CLOSED Thursday and Friday, Nov. 22–23

“I resolve to live life to the fullest!”

SUSAN STILLWELL Chico

We’re in this together Re “Confessions of a ‘taker’” (Guest comment, by Jaime O’Neill, Nov. 15): Didn’t Newton say that if he could see farther than those who came before him, it was because he stood on their shoulders? The rich who worked for their wealth— the Steve Jobses of the world—were able to achieve success in part because of the culture that they grew up in. How many engineers who work for Apple were trained in public schools? How many Apple products incorporated discoveries paid for by the public? I’m not a 1 percenter, but I’m wealthier than most folks, and I know that I didn’t get where I am only because I worked hard— although I have worked hard and I continue to do so. We are in this together, a fact that some of the super-rich either haven’t learned or deny as a way of puffing themselves up. Either way, they are less than the Newtons of history, but that’s not a surprise. MURRAY SUID Inverness

Missed communication Re “Who’s got the iPod?” (Newslines, by Stephanie Geske, Oct. 4): We [Chico Cash Exchange] have never, nor would we ever, knowingly purchase or loan on stolen items. We question any customer who brings in anything that looks or seems suspicious. LETTERS continued on page 6

Fitness

FREE VIP Pass or ZERO Enrollment Now Open in Chico • 1026 Skyway (Near the Home Depot, behind Scrubbs Car Wash)

1-800-589-5040 November 21, 2012

CN&R 5


continued from page 5

RECYCLE

THIS PAPER. O’Neil G. Dennis Attorney at Law

• Family Law • Criminal • Juvenile 1339 Esplanade • Chico 95926

(530) 343-1010

www.chicodivorcelaw.com

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

O’Neil G. Dennis . A Professional Corporation

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” You Pay ONLY when we win

B E T S Y H . A L B E RT S Attorney at Law Over 18 years of experience

530.893.8387 976 Mangrove, Chico

Upon the purchase of George Marley’s iPod, we asked the seller where she got the iPod, and she provided us with a convincing story. When Mr. Marley came in to pick up the iPod, it was on police hold, leaving us unable to release it to him or anyone else. We always act in complete accordance with the law, and we work very hard to cooperate with local law enforcement and bring criminals to justice. Your author failed to get our side of the story, not because we did not want to talk to her, but because she failed to return our calls or do research on pawn shop laws. This article is so far from the truth that it should be considered a fictional piece, rather than an act of news reporting. We have been working hard with our association, the California Pawnbrokers Association (CAPA), to educate the public and mandate laws that will be beneficial for victims. We want to bring justice to the criminals in our community and reunite the victims with their property. Unfortunately there are many buyers who will never report to law enforcement: flea markets, Craigslist, non-compliant antique and second-hand dealers, and private buyers. Articles like this one overlook all the successes we have had in solving police cases and arresting criminals. If anyone has additional questions about the laws regarding pawn shops or the best ways to recover stolen property, we would happily educate. DANIELLE BATHA-BENGTSON Chico

Editor’s note: We applaud Chico Cash Exchange for its proactive efforts. However, it is incorrect to say the story’s author didn’t get its side of the story because she failed to return calls. She called the store several times and even visited it on one occasion, but was unable to speak to a person who could answer her questions.

“Proposition 30’s passage only assures the hiring of even more bureaucrats into an already grossly obese state government.”

—Chad Wozniak

understand the power of science and believe in what it teaches us about the natural world, past and future. I know the earth is billions of years old, that evolution is a fact and global warming is real. As a student of history, I know that from 1946 to 1976 the top marginal tax rate was at least 70 percent and that our economy was healthier during those years than it has been since. As a human being, I am thrilled that there are three more states where my gay and lesbian friends can be treated as fully human and their relationships recognized as equal. I believe that women have a right to control their own bodies— and know that the best way to reduce abortion is to make contraception widely available. I know that part of the reason I have what I have is that a quality, tax-supported public education was available for me, and I believe today’s young people should have the same. And so I’m not a Republican. DAVID WELCH Chico

Four modest proposals

Proposition 30’s passage only assures the hiring of even more bureaucrats into an already grossly obese state government. Don’t be naïve enough to think the new taxes will be spent on education— that doesn’t grow the kleptocracy’s power base. Students, your tuition will go up anyway—mark my word. Have you ever heard Gov. Medfly-Receivership propose cuts Why I’m not a Republican in the bureaucracy to pay for eduConservatives seem fixated on the cation? Huh-uh. false idea that people voted for Why should college students Obama only because they “want pay higher tuition to help support something for nothing.” Let me these unproductive people? Calioffer an alternative perspective. fornia’s government is the most I’m a 61-year-old white man. expensive, most inefficient, most I’ve never been without a job for wasteful and most abusive of any any length of time since getting state. The bloated my first paper route at age 10. I’ve bureaucracy/kleptocracy has been married for 39 years and become numerous enough to have a paid-for house and a decent decide elections, and the officials n e wfund. s & rSounds e v i e w like b u sI i n e s s uthey s e osupport n ly retirement and get elected are ought to be a Republican, right? merely fronts for and ambrubber-stamdesigner ss issUe dATe 03.03.11 ACCT eXeC But, as a registered nurse, I pers of their rapacity. FiLe nAMe lawofficesofbh030311r2 reV dATe new 6 CN&R November 21, 2012

please carefully review your advertisement and verify the following: Ad size (CoLUMn X inChes) speLLing nUMbers & dATes

They are the ultimate special interest group. You want to solve California’s budget problems? Dispossess this kleptocracy. Four proposals: First, calculate funding needed to provide places for all well-prepared high schoolers, free, at all state institutions of higher education; and for K-12 education including reduced class sizes, arts, sports. Second, deduct that amount from state employee pay (except firemen, emergency responders and peace officers) through pay cuts and layoffs as needed. Third, lay off redundant administrators in the CSU and UC systems and cut others’ pay. Fourth, require anyone getting a state paycheck (except firemen, emergency responders and peace officers) to report their employment to the registrar of voters, and prohibit them from voting in state elections. CHAD WOZNIAK Chico

An eye-opening insert I would like to commend the Chico News & Review for the special insert in the Oct. 18, 2012, publication. The insert discussed depression and suicide. I appreciate the CN&R’s dedication to fighting stigma, especially for those individuals with mental disorders. The stories shared showed empathy and understanding of the struggles these individuals have experienced. I work for a behavioral-health agency, specifically dealing with crisis services. Too often I meet individuals who are ashamed of their disorder and have few supporters in their lives. This insert hopefully helped the community have a better understand of what it may be like to walk in these individuals’ shoes. The CN&R should be recognized for their efforts in awareness. REIDUN GILBERT Chico


Who is your local hero? Asked at Chico City Plaza

Sarah Marsha student

Upgrade Your Home Today Trade in or upgrade your home today. Your land equity is your down payment. Financing available, even for challenged credit.

There is a better way to get cash.

Several floor models to choose from!

CHICO CASH EXCHANGE

26 Sale Lane • Red Bluff

Pawn • Gold Buyer • Check Cashing

Build · Sell · Finance

20th & Park Ave. • Chico 892-2222 chicocashexchange.com

(off Antelope, behind Applebee’s)

(530) 529–2191 www.ClaytonRedBluff.com

Lic. 0402-0994

I would say, even though she’s not here anymore, Linda Keeler. She’s a sportspsychology teacher from Chico State. She directed me in the path of going to grad school for sports psychology, and inspired me for what I want to do for a career.

Personal Injury, Criminal & DUI Defense Real Estate & Family Law • Reasonable Fees • Constant Communication • Aggressive, Responsive Representation • Free Initial Consultation

Jacqueline Johnson student

GLOVES

WITH PURCHASES OVER $4999

100’S OF NEW STYLES ARRIVING DAILY!

NEW STYLES - LARGE SELECTION

FUN NEW STYLES

CLOGSR

COSIMA

Thad Winzenz, a yo-yo grandmaster. He started the Chico Yo-Yo Company. And what he does is, if there are kids who are some of the best [yo-yoers] out there, he will fund them to go to different contests ... What makes him a hero is he gives these kids help.

FREE

HUGE THANKSGIVING SALE!

CHANNING

music teacher

Michael M. Rooney

CLASSIC TALL

Carson Auld

934-HELP • 343-LAWS • 527-HELP Just Results • RooneyLawFirm.com

Supervising Attorney

ADIRONDACK

Dr. Scott Roberts, the [Chico State Exercise Kinesiology-Physiology Department] head. He’s inspired me to follow my dreams and do missionary work in Africa. He really cares for his students and wants us to follow our dreams and not just go into grad school.

WOMEN & KIDS RAIN BOOTS

HOBBIE

Leslie Howard teacher

Ron Reed. He’s done marvelous things; he is the champion defense lawyer of kids at the juvenile detention center. He’s almost single-handedly organized the program of drilling wells in Africa. He’s a fantastic person; everything he does makes the world a better place.

A5341

Reg $49.99

NOW $24.99

NOW IN!

HEEL & SOLE SHOE

708 Mangrove Ave. (in the Safeway Shopping Center) Chico 899-0780 Prices good thru 12/31/12 • While supplies last Open 7 Days, Mon.–Sat. 10am–8pm, Sun. 10am–6pm

We carry NARROWS & WIDES

www.heelandsoleshoes.com

November 21, 2012

CN&R 7


Sharon Liu-Bettencourt, Umran Haji and Alex Scott are leading the student-generated effort to publish The Saga Independent (below) for the Pleasant Valley High School community.

GAS PRICES DIP, RECORD STILL IN REACH Chico’s gas prices have decreased dramatically since peaking at $4.52 a gallon on Oct. 10. The average price of gas in Chico fell by 12.3 cents last week to $3.64 a gallon, 5.3 cents lower than rates on the same day last year, according to GasBuddy.com. The state average has fallen from an all-time high of $4.67 a gallon on Oct. 8 to the current average of $3.75. But Patrick DeHann, an analyst for GasBuddy.com, thinks the nation will still see record-high rates over the holiday. “While gasoline prices have dropped in the last month and a half, the national average will still come close to breaking a record—the highest ever national average for Thanksgiving,” DeHaan said.

PHOTO BY ROBERT SPEER

GRANT TO BUOY CHILD SAFETY

The Butte County Public Health Department will use a new $101,700 grant to fund a program aimed at reducing child injuries and fatalities from automobile accidents. The funds will be used to hold free car-seat classes, fittings and community checkups overseen by certified child-passenger safety technicians. Butte County will also conduct 32-hour courses to train more of these technicians locally. Auto accidents are the leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 13, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Statistics from 2010 indicate 40 percent of children killed in car crashes were not properly restrained with seatbelts or car seats. Parents and caregivers can find inspections and fittings or register for classes at the Butte County Public Health website (go to www.buttecounty.net/publichealth to learn more) or by calling 895-6565. The grant was provided by the California Office of Traffic Safety.

STONE STILL AHEAD AFTER UPDATE

Butte County’s Elections Office updated the results of the general election on Monday (Nov. 19), and the preliminary figures seem to be holding steady in the case of the Chico City Council race. Mayor Ann Schwab (pictured) is sitting comfortably in the lead with 15,015 votes. She is followed by Tami Ritter, whose vote tally is up to 13,172, and Sean Morgan, who garnered 11,801 votes. Randall Stone is still holding on to the remaining open seat with 11,546 votes, a 222vote lead over Andrew Coolidge. Meanwhile, the bid for the District 4 Senate seat vacated by Doug LaMalfa (who won a congressional seat in the election) is still in question. Currently, 2nd District Assemblyman Jim Nielsen is ahead with 50.1 percent of the total vote count. To avoid a run-off between the two top finishers, Nielsen needs to maintain a 50 percent-plus-one final vote tally. Michael “Mickey” Harrington is in second place, with 27.6 percent of the vote. Final results were expected after the CN&R’s deadline. 8 CN&R November 21, 2012

A saga of independence These Pleasant Valley High School journalists refuse to let their campus paper die

L Tuesday (Nov. 13) at Pleasant Valley High School, with hundreds of students milling about unch hour was in full swing last

the campus, their chattering voices creating waves of sound. Suddenly a klaxon sounded, and the voice by Robert of Assistant Principal Renee Speer Spaggiari came over the loudspeaker announcing a “code roberts@ newsreview.com red” drill and ordering students to proceed immediately to the nearest classroom. I was sitting at a desk in one of those classrooms, interviewing three student journalists about their effort to save their campus Papers in newspaper, The Saga, when the decline: alert sounded, and a room that Statewide, there had been otherwise empty sudare nearly 200 denly filled with bodies. fewer high The drill, which ended after schools with about 15 minutes, was a journalism reminder that last May both programs than 10 years ago, a PVHS and Chico High School 14 percent drop. were on lockdown for several High school hours in response to a possible journalism course suicide situation. enrollment These are the kinds of events dropped 20 percent, while student journalists live for. Like state total all journalists, they’re constantly student on the lookout for stories, and enrollment grew crisis situations make for comby 24 percent. pelling stories. Enrollment in Unfortunately, Chico High’s college journalism programs is up, newspaper, the Red and Gold, however. ceased publication a few years

ago after more than a century in operation, leaving the 47-year-old The Saga as the only high-school paper in Chico. Then, at the end of the 2011-12 school year, PV Principal John Shepherd announced that beginning with this academic year he was pulling the plug on the printed newspaper and going strictly to an online version of The Saga. In a phone interview, Shepherd told the CN&R he had good reasons for doing so: Students would no longer have to spend time selling ads to pay for printing and would be freed up to write more stories, one of the main goals of the Saga class. And, in conversations with local business people and educators, he was told that digital was “the future of media delivery” and students would be better served by mastering the skills it demanded than by publishing a print version of The Saga. What he failed to understand, the students I interviewed told me, was how important it was to them to create a tangible finished ink-onpaper product they could be proud of. An online version was just not the same. So they decided to take matters into their own hands.

The result is The Saga Indepen-

dent, a newspaper “spearheaded, organized, written, edited, financed, published and distributed entirely by PV students,” as Umran Haji, who serves as its features and copy editor, writes in a Nov. 2 front-page article, “The Saga rises from the ashes.” The paper—so far it’s the only issue published, but the second is in the works—is a substantial achievement, a 16-page broadsheet filled with news, opinion, photo essays and sports stories. The hardest part, Editor-in-Chief Alex Scott said during our interview, was setting up a production facility—they borrowed his father’s home office—and obtaining the tools such as a software design program. Then, of course, they had to write and edit the stories, take the pictures, design the paper together, get it printed and then distribute it on campus. When I met with Alex, Umran and News Editor Sharon Liu-Bettencourt, I was struck but not surprised by their passion for the project. All three have caught the journalism bug, a fever I’ve had for more than 30 years. They love making newspapers together.


“It’s our football,” Sharon said. “It’s to us like football is to others,” meaning something they do as a team that they’re proud of. Their goal is to put out one more issue this semester and three the following semester, Alex said. Now that they have a paper in hand, they can sell ads for upcoming issues and cover the $400 printing cost for the 1,200 copies. They’re not opposed to the online version of The Saga, and in fact several of the nine or 10 students behind The Saga Independent also work on the online publication. What they don’t understand is why the school doesn’t do both. Most newspapers also have an online version, they note, and in fact PV had both last year, “and it worked pretty well,” Alex said. Students are more likely to read the print version than go online to the website, they believe. They realize, though, that the online version is more timely than their newspaper, and they’re adjusting accordingly. Future issues will have more feature stories and less breaking news, giving them longer shelf life. The switch to online, Principal

Shepherd said, was part of an overall plan to organize several classes, including The Saga, around digital production of various kinds. He sees that as a way into the future for many students. But he also senses the “team spirit,” as he put it, behind the effort to make a traditional campus newspaper and the joy its creators take in its production. And he agrees that selling ads is good training, even if it does take time away from writing stories. But he remains convinced that the The Saga online is a better platform. Currently he’s exploring the development of an application that would give PV students “immediate access to the information and news they would need on a daily basis.” He’d also like to set up a program to send out teasers once a week or twice a month alerting students to stories in the online Saga. These improvements, he’s convinced, will increase readership significantly. In the meantime, he’s supportive of Alex and his enterprising friends at The Saga Independent. In recent days he’s met with them to clarify some issues regarding distribution on campus, telling them he’s happy to let them pass out the paper. The only restriction is that they can’t do so inside classrooms. There’s a quotation from Sharon in Umran’s “Saga rising from the ashes” story that conveys the passion the students feel toward The Saga Independent. “There are so many cool things we obtained from working together on a print newspaper,” she told him. “We really wanted to keep that tradition going, and we wanted our underclassmen to get the same experience we had.” Ω

Déjà vu

Chico State’s Greek community reacts as President Paul Zingg suspends the entire system effective immediately.

Chico Greeks on notice— again

PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

s 21-year-old Sigma Pi pledge Mason ACenter, Sumnicht lay dying at Enloe Medical disconnected from life support after a

Nov. 4 binge-drinking episode left him unresponsive and suffering brain damage, Chico State University President Paul Zingg announced that all Greek life on campus was suspended indefinitely. Zing delivered the message to about 400 of Chico State’s 1,200-member Greek community last Thursday (Nov. 15) at the Bell Memorial Union. The college is home to 26 fraternities and sororities, all of which will receive instructions on how to be reinstated at the beginning of next semester. There was a strong dramatic element to the assembly, as those in attendance were given no information other than that the president was making an important announcement concerning Greek organizations; murmurs of disciplinary actions against specific organizations and further scrutiny of the system rippled through the crowd beforehand, but it seems few suspected all Greek activity would be halted. Vice President for Student Affairs Drew Calandrella spoke first, citing a number of incidents in the last year as cause for the meeting, including alcohol policy violations, physical assaults, alleged sexual assaults and allegations of hazing, including three this semester within a 30-day period. “Many of you are exemplars of what Greek life and what Greek organizations are supposed to be,” Calandrella said. “But I think you also know that the kind of behaviors I’ve mentioned can, in one fell swoop, knock out everything on the positive side of the ledger.” Before introducing Zingg, Calandrella

said the actions of wayward Greeks reflected negatively on the whole campus community and foreshadowed Zingg’s announcement: “This meeting marks a new chapter in Greek life on this campus.” Zingg began by comparing the meeting to one held with the Greek community seven years earlier, following the death of 21-year-old fraternity pledge Matt Carrington, who suffered cardiac dysrhythmia during a bizarre initiation rite requiring him to drink copious amounts of water. The groups were put on notice back then as well. “I called you together for one simple question,” he said, his voice rising to an angry tone. “Have you read your charters? Have you read that stuff about brotherhood, sisterhood, civility, respect, citizenship and scholarship? About responsibility?” The president’s voice cracked with emotion as he continued, alluding to Sumnicht, who would die later that day: “It is not

SIFT|ER Money and ballot measures On Oct. 31, just before the Nov. 6 election, at a time when the controversy surrounding $11 million in Arizonan “mystery money” was at its peak, California Common Sense released a report analyzing ballot-measure spending-data trends for the previous decade, from 2000 through May 2012. Here are some of its findings: Total amount spent on propositions: $2.3 billion Amount spent on top five ballot measures: $556 million (25 percent of total) Percentage of donations smaller than $1,000: 2.3 percent Amount of donations average ballot measure attracted: $13.5 million Amount six measures regulating industry taxes attracted: $307 million Number of donors who contributed at least $1.5 million: 185 Percentage of donated money that came from outside California: 17

enough at vigils and memorials to proclaim no brother left behind when you stand by idly and watch a brother gulp down 21 shots for his 21st birthday, and let him pass out in his own vomit, and then at some point when you realize that he’s not responsive to call 911.” Zingg alluded to other incidents in which police and fire officials have been showered with glass bottles responding to parties at Greek houses, after Greeks themselves called for assistance. He gave an analogy of airlines having to ground all planes for inspection if even one plane is suspect before delivering his knockout blow. “Effective immediately, this entire Greek system is suspended,” he said, as many students in attendance released an audible gasp and many women began to cry. “Effective immediately we will reset, review and think about our future together. “The system has to rise and fall on the commitment of all its members.” Calandrella spoke again, explaining what suspension meant: no socials, no recruiting, and Greek letters on houses would have to be covered or removed. He said a process by which chapters can be reinstated will be laid out when students returned for spring semester. “Some may not come back; some may not want to come back,” he continued. “Part of what you will learn is that some of the regulations will have changed, they will have become tighter, and that the standards will have been raised. And you may not like those, but let me be very clear: They’re not negotiable.” On Monday (Nov. 19), Joe Wills, Chico State’s public affairs director, said new guidelines are still being hammered out. Since the president addressed students the day before the beginning of Thanksgiving break, there has been no mass communication to chapter officials as of yet. Wills did say violations of the suspension would be taken very seriously. “If any group refuses to comply, that sends us a very clear message,” he said. “That would give us the indication that there is a group that doesn’t intend to or want to return, and that would have serious repercussions on their attempt to get reinstated.” —KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com

Source: California Common Sense, www.cacs.org

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 November 21, 2012

CN&R 9


Low Cost Acupuncture

Step back in time to 1929

~ SLIDING SCALE ~ Private & Community Walk-ins Welcome Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Bill Nichols L.Ac. Most insurance accepted Massage available

Bi-Plane Flights

Experience the thrill with a friend. Gift Certificates available

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 (corner of West 2nd Ave) 530.342.2895 • 10am–4pm M–F or by Appt AmericanChi.net

Schooler Flying Co.

Call for details (530) 899–0110

COMFORT & STYLE

For the Holidays ...and more Downtown Chico 345-4880

Clark Road Paradise 872-0812

THE NORTH VALLEY’S #1 LOCATION FOR

BUYING & SELLING

•RARE COINS •SILVER DOLLARS •GOLD & SILVER EAGLES

•MAPLE LEAFS •KRUGERRANDS •GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY •10-24 KT SCRAP GOLD

•STERLING SILVER •PLACER GOLD •US PAPER CURRENCY

SINCE 1987

CHICO COIN & JEWELRY 894–5436 1414 Park Ave, Suite 108 Chico, CA 95928 www.ChicoCoin.com

MON-FRI 10AM-5PM ~

WE DO ESTATE APPRAISALS SE HABLA ESPANOL

SMOG CHECK

winterization

check

2995

$

continued from page 9

A night to remember Holocaust survivor tells her story of horror and hope during Pleasant Valley High performance hen she was 10 years old, W Yanina Cywinska was a slave at the Nazis’ infamous Auschwitz

concentration camp. Her job was to drag dead bodies out of a gas chamber. Her horror was compounded the day she realized the corpse she was pulling out by the legs was that of her mother. “Please mom, wake up, I know you can do it!” she pleaded. “Wake up and let’s go home!” A fellow prisoner, Greta, admonished her to keep working lest she meet her mother’s fate. “You’re whining—there’s nothing she can do!” Greta yelled, which prompted the child to continue her grim duties. This was but one of the atrocities recounted Thursday, Nov. 15, by Cywinska (pronounced YuhZIN-skuh) during “Avoiding Future Holocausts: A Night to Remember” at the Chico Unified School District’s Center for the Arts on the Pleasant Valley High School campus. Several hundred attendees watched this powerful and inspiring event featuring Cywinska and dozens of PV students who acted, recited, danced and played music with the aim of remembering the atrocity and preventing future holocausts. Actors dramatized tense holocaust-era moments, such as the recital of a love letter by a Jewish ghetto prisoner who longed for the days before he was forced by his Nazi captors to wear the Star of David as a yellow patch on all clothing. The production was devised and coordinated by PV English teacher Amy Besnard. “This is an amazing representation of what real teaching and learning can be,” she said before the show. At various times during the event, pairs of students read passages from the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights, created after World War II,

BatterY raDiator Jeff Sponsler

Jim Luther

heatinG SYSteM

A&T AuTo CAre • 3106 espl AnAde • (530) 10 CN&R November 21, 2012

894– 5850

Holocaust survivor Yanina Cywinska autographs copies of her book. PHOTO BY VIC CANTU

which forbids abuses such as genocide, slavery and torture. Student Katie Van Patten both wrote and acted in some of the scenes, including one dramatizing the Japanese mass rape and genocide in the Chinese city of Nanking during the second Sino-Japanese War. “It was a very moving, but difficult subject to cover,” Van Patten said afterward. Cywinska’s 20-minute

speech was the most powerful of the performances. She recounted two harrowing escapes from Nazi execution. Her Polish, non-Jewish family was captured by the Nazis for stockpiling weapons and literally going underground, living in sewers as part of the Polish resistance. Cywinska was separated from her family and forced with other prisoners over five days without food or water to dig an enormous ditch that was to serve as their own mass grave. She recalled that, while lined up along the ditch, she stepped behind a mother and baby to support them as they stumbled. Her maneuver shielded her from the firing squad’s bullets, allowing her to fall unharmed into the grave. She escaped only to be recaptured and sent to Auschwitz with her family. In the gas chamber she held her father’s hand as he died with the others. She passed out but somehow survived the gas—it was carbon monoxide, not the Zyklon B ordinarily used—and was secretly resuscitated by an inmate.

Her spirit, she said, triumphed after the war, when she went on to fulfill her dreams of becoming an actress and ballerina. Cywinska’s talk elicited several standing ovations. “I’ve been crying for about an hour now,” exclaimed one woman. Students added to the emotion by occasionally gracing the stage in pairs under a spotlight and recounting genocides elsewhere, such as Rwanda, Cambodia, China, Guatemala and Sudan. Additionally, a piano solo offered the theme from Steven Spielberg’s movie Schindler’s List. It was followed by a violin and piano duet. The most elaborate performance featured 30 students gracefully acting out, through gesturing and dance, scenes of despair, capture and ultimate triumph. In the show’s finale, students of PV’s welding class presented Cywinska with a 2-foot-long, gold-metallic Star of David emblazoned with the phrase “Gone but not forgotten.” The theater lobby showcased World War II artifacts and tables encouraging healing and remembrance. One urged attendees to fill out a short pledge listing how they would prevent future holocausts. Approximately 100 of the forms were pasted on the lobby’s wall; they contained phrases such as “I’ll prevent bullying at my school” or “I’ll educate others about the Holocaust.” “The show brought tears to our eyes,” said Monica Pinckney, whose children attended PV. After the performance Cywinska happily talked with attendees and signed copies of her autobiographical book, Sugar Plum Nut. “I have lots of hope because of this program,” she said. “Please take care of America. It’s the only game in town for keeping justice in the world.” —VIC CANTU


fun in the snow!

Child support

RENTALS

Did council candidate violate city ordinance?

W

ith the vast majority of ballots counted, it’s all but certain that Sean Morgan has gained a seat on the Chico City Council. Morgan, a business owner, Chico State management instructor and self-described fiscal conservative, raised $38,661 and spent $36,093, more than any of the other 10 candidates who ran for the four open seats. But included in those contributions was $500 each from three children under the age of 15. The contributions came from the chilRecently elected City Council member Sean Morgan. dren of David and Sharon Purser, who also PHOTO BY MELANIE MacTAVISH each contributed $500 to Morgan’s campaign. According to the city’s municipal code, it inadvertent? I don’t know. I don’t have the $500 is the limit a donor can give: “During facts of the case.” the four-year period immediately preceding Tara Stock, a spokesperson for the FPPC, a municipal election which is held for the said the matter is up to the city. purpose of electing one or more members of “The commission does not interpret or the City Council, no candidate at that election shall accept from any person a contribu- enforce local campaign ordinances,” she said. “The city attorney would be the best tion or contributions which, in total, exceed person to contact.” the sum of five hundred ($500.00) dollars.” Sharon and David Purser also gave According to state law, California Code money to candidate Andrew Coolidge, but 85308(b): “A contribution made by a child only $100 between them. They listed themunder 18 years of age is presumed to be a selves on the contribution report as “selfcontribution from the parent or guardian of employed manufacturing representative.” the child.” The Pursers’ appreciation and support of Morgan said he is aware of the fact Morgan was probably best explained in a letminors contributed to his campaign. ter to the editor from David Purser published “I understand the allegations,” he said. in the Chico Enterprise-Record on Sept. 23. “When this came in we checked to see what It read in part: “Two is the rule. We are years ago I was very close to the “We are very close to the away on business [Purser] family. The while my family [Purser] family. The kids kids worked on the was vacationing in worked on the campaign, campaign, so we put Hawaii. On that their name on [a so we put their name on vacation was the contribution report] [a contribution report] Morgan family. and put it in. We and put it in.” Sean Morgan called wouldn’t have done me in the middle of –Sean Morgan it otherwise. We kept the night to say they it all aboveboard.” had been evacuated He said when the contributions were and he had my family safely on a hillside to made, he checked with his treasurer, Karli avoid the incoming tsunami. Olsen, to make sure they were allowed. “While I feared for everyone’s safety, I Olsen assured him they were. knew that in my absence I could trust Sean When asked about the state law that says to care for my family like it was his own. I kids’ contributions are presumed to be from know Sean will do the same thing for the the parents or guardians of the child, Olsen city of Chico. said, “The word ‘presumed’ does not mean “We need more officers on the street prothat they are [from the parents]. We checked tecting our great way of life. Let’s get people the facts. The rules say it’s OK.” running the city who feel likewise.” On Tuesday, (Nov. 20) just before the City Attorney Lori Barker said the CN&R deadline, Olsen said they had decidmatter “could be an issue under the city’s ed to return the three contributions. campaign contribution limits. I don’t know “The whole thing with minors is really a the facts and have gotten no calls. If there gray area,” she said. “We followed all the was a violation, the money is simply contribution rules the way they were written. returned to the contributor.” Barker said she did not know whether the We have to move beyond what’s really a small matter of $1,500 and avoid any sugstate Fair Political Practices Commission gestion of doing something wrong.” (FPPC) had been contacted. She said the state code does indeed affect the city code. —TOM GASCOYNE “I don’t know if this was accidental. Was tomg@newsreview.com

CRoSS CouNTRy BoArdIng PACkAgES

Snow Shoe DowNhiLL

$1 1 per day

$25 per day

$15 per day

$30 per day

TuNE uP Stone Grind, Edge, Wax $45 Belt Grind, Edge, Wax $35 Edge & Wax $15

LowEST PRiCES guARANTEED

698 Mangrove Ave. (In Safeway Plaza) 894-1110 • ChicoSportsLtd.net Mon-Sat 9:30-7p, Sun 10-6

CHICO 357 EAST PARK AVE. 530-342-3589 OROVILLE 2013 LINCOLN BLVD. 530-534-6556 “IF YOU WELD IT, PAINT IT, FIX IT OR AIR IT UP, WE’VE GOT WHAT YOU NEED”

$

699.60

$

1,048.21

$

1,587.84

$

1,265.50

Motor Guard Air Filter Sold Separately

20 MODELS AVAILABLE $

1,860.04

Starting at $90

PRICES GOOD AT OUR CHICO & OROVILLE LOCATIONS THROUGH 12/31/12 November 21, 2012

CN&R 11


Shop

C L O AL GIFT GUIDE

Chikoko Presents the 7th Annual Bizarre Bazaar

Come to Chico’s Alternative Craft Fair on Sat. Dec. 15th and Sun. Dec. 16th from 10-5 at the Chico Women’s Club. Over 25 local artists will be selling innovative wares, high quality unique art and offering a truly local experience. Plus, start the weekend off with a bang, come to the Voom Voom Variety Show on Fri. Dec. 14th for local performances and an amazing raffle of surprises. Doors open at 6 pm, Chico Women’s Club, $5.

Chico’s Own Locally Grown Wines. The Perfect Holiday Gift. Bertagna Son Kissed Vineyards grows only the highest-quality, organic grapes. Meticulous farming in the field and high attention to detail in the winery produces a higher quality product. The wine can be purchased at Chico Natural Foods, S&S Produce, Chico Costco, Raley’s, Safeway, Maisie Jane’s, J&J Cellars, The Olive Pitt, CA Kitchen in Red Bluff and Wagon Wheel Market to list a few. Please see our website for a complete listing. Exclusive wines & Tastings available by appointment.

CHICO WOMEN’S CLUB 592 East 3rd St. Chico • www.chikoko.com

BERTAGNA SON KISSED VINEYARD

3363 Hegan Lane • Chico • (530) 343-8014 www.BertagnaWine.com

Give the “Gift of Pleasure”... Treating your friends, loved ones or employees to a Tui Ná massage at Wendy’s Massage is the ultimate expression of how much they mean to you! Wendy’s ambiance is the perfect place for them to relax, refresh and rejuvenate—a time when all their bodily tensions will melt away. Wendy’s gift cards are wonderful for Birthdays, Holidays and Anniversaries... the perfect way to say— “You’re Special to Me!”

WENDY’S MASSAGE

1351 Mangrove Ave • Chico (530) 342–2222 www.WendysMassageChico.com

For the Lady who is Classy, but wants to be a little Sassy! A women’s clothing and accessory store offering fashionably unique clothes at affordable prices. Beautiful dresses, semi-formal and casual wear ranging in sizes petite to 18. Unique handbags, gift ideas and jewelry are all available. Stop in and visit Tuesday–Friday 10:30am–5:30pm and Saturday 10:30am–3:30pm.

SASSY & CLASSY BOUTIQUE

Mangrove Square Shopping Plaza (Across from Big 5) (530) 899-8312

CN&R’S GIFT GUIDE — A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION 12 CN&R November 21, 2012

NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY

PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISE-


Tasty Gift Ideas Voted Chico’s Best Asian Cuisine, Best TakeOut and Oroville’s Best Restaurant, Tong Fong Low offers a delicious dining experience. Stuff your loved ones holiday stockings with Gift Certificates for this popular, locally owned and operated restaurant. Tong Fong Low wishes everyone good health and happy dining! Catering available.

TONG FONG LOW

2075 East 20th St, Suite 100 • Chico (530) 898-1388 2051 Robinson Ave • Oroville (530) 533-1488

Ornaments to Treasure Everyone loves pulling out boxes of ornaments each Season and reminiscing about each treasured piece. C&J has thousands of unique and beautiful ornaments that will make memorable gifts for friends, family... or yourself! From vintage glass to woodsy owls, glittering icicles to speckled mushrooms, let Christian & Johnson trim your tree! C&J has been decorating the Holidays in Chico since 1907.

The Urban Laundry gift that always fits! Want to get a gift for that fashionista on your list, but don’t know what size or color, brand or fit? Urban Laundry has you covered. Gift cards are available in any amount, and they never expire or go down in value. Urban Laundry stocks stylish stuff for guys and gals from TOMS, True Religions, Free People, RVCA and more. Stop by and say hi!

URBAN LAUNDRY/URBAN SOLE

CHRISTIAN & JOHNSON

222 Main St • Chico • (530) 345–2444 228 Main St • Chico • (530) 809–1553 UrbanLaundry.com • UrbanSole.com

250 Vallombrosa Avenue #100 Chico, CA 95926 (530) 891-1881 www.ChristianAndJohnson.com

Perfect For the Night Rider

Brew Your Own Right At Home The Chico Home Brew Shop is the place to go for all of your brewing and winemaking needs. We carry beer and wine makers equipment, ingredients, books, soda extract, cheese making ingredients, bottles, caps, corks, spouts, growlers, labels and much more. We are happy to answer any questions you may have too! Come by today! Open Tuesday-Saturday 10am-5pm.

THE CHICO HOME BREW SHOP

1570 Nord Ave, Chico (530) 342-3768

Pushing out over 250 lumens in overdrive mode, the TSL-250+ from Serfas commands your attention on the road or on the darkest mountain trail. The light features a unique user replaceable battery. With additional batteries available for purchase, you can charge up an extra, slide it into your pocket, and ride all night long! This lightweight, compact light includes a handlebar mount, helmet mount, USB Charger, and Wall Charger adapter. The TSL-250+ is available right now at Pullins Cyclery, providing cyclists with everything they need and expert service since 1918. Pullins Cyclery has been voted Best Bike Shop by CN&R readers seventeen times.

PULLINS CYCLERY

801 Main St. • Chico (530) 342-1055 www.pullinschico.com

CN&R’S GIFT GUIDE — A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION November 21, 2012

CN&R 13


MORE

Shop

LOCAL

GIFT IDEAS

The Perfect Place to Relax and be Pampered Relax...Relax...Relax... After you’ve worn yourself ragged holiday shopping wouldn’t it be nice to relax...relax...relax...in your Perfection Pools Hot Tub! Caldera Spas pays a great deal of attention to the styling for just that reason. Caldera Spas’ elegant, organic style delights your senses with flowing lines, sculpted jet recesses, ergonomic controls, beautiful lighting and soothing sounds. Stop by Perfection Pools today, mention this ad, and receive a free $500 accessories package.

PERFECTION POOLS & SPAS

172 E. 20th St. Chico • (530) 895-0437 perfectionpoolsandspas.com

Chico’s newest day spa has opened just in time for the Holidays! Sweetwater Day Spa is offering a special Holiday Spa Package from now until December 31st. The package includes: • Signature Spa Facial • Relaxation Massage • Spa Pedicure all for just $129! Gift Certificates are also available, gift wrapped and ready for giving! Check out the website for a list of additional services and products available for men and women and to take a photo tour of the spa.

SWEETWATER DAY SPA

1031 Village Lane • Chico (530) 894-7722 (spaa) • www.sweetwaterchico.com

Enjoy a True Chico Tradition Shubert’s Homemade Ice Cream & Candy has been a Chico tradition for over 75 years! Homemade Boxed Chocolates, Peanut Brittle, English Toffee and Divinity are just a few treats our families have come to look forward to during the holidays. Pre-order Snowballs now! The perfect holiday dessert! Don’t forget your Shubert’s Mints this season! No holiday celebration would be complete without them!

SHUBERT’S ICE CREAM & CANDY

178 East 7th Street • Chico • (530) 342-7163 www.shuberts.com

GIFT CARD California Sunshine in a Bottle Share the rich, golden elegance of the AWARD WINNING Butte View olive oils. Pure, light and delicate – experience the wonderful aromas and distinctive accents that make each hand crafted oil truly unique and excellent. 250ml/500ml. Available in Chico at Maisie Jane’s, Made in Chico, S&S Produce, in Oroville at Collins & Denny Market & Wagon Wheel Market and in Paradise at Noble Orchard.

You Will Make Someone Very Happy... When you treat them to lovely evening at Red Tavern. A gift certificate is an easy way to show someone how much they mean to you. Your thoughtful gift will let them enjoy a relaxing night of great food that only the Red Tavern can provide. If you are planning the company holiday party or the annual family get together you can’t go wrong by letting the Red Tavern take care of all the details. Red Tavern also provides the perfect place to get away from the hectic Holiday rush.

RED TAVERN

1250 Esplanade • Chico • (530) 894–3463 www.redtavern.com

BUTTE VIEW OLIVE COMPANY

2950 Louis Ave. • Oroville, CA (530) 534-8320 • www.butteview.com

CN&R’S GIFT GUIDE — A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION 14 CN&R November 21, 2012


90 MPG!

eets r t s ou 5th

E

h teak

S

The KYMCO Agility 50 is a quality built entry level scooter that is unmatched in the industry. With a smooth, quiet 4-stroke 49 cc engine, front disc brake, low seat height and short wheelbase the Agility 50 creates a riding experience suited for everyone. Check out the convertible buddy seat that doubles as a rider backrest when flipped into the up position. The Agility 50 is a compact, nimble little scooter with plenty of underseat storage that would make an excellent addition to any garage. MSRP $1,49900.

ard

C Gift

CHICO MOTORSPORTS

1538 Park Ave. Chico • (530) 345-5247 chicomotorsports.com

Flavorful Holiday gifts Want to share 5th Street Steakhouse with a friend or family member? Gift cards make it simple. Great for the holidays, birthdays, anniversaries and company parties. 5th Street Steakhouse food tastes great on any occasion!

Atlas 10 Series Trail Walking Snowshoes, Poles & Tote

5TH STREET STEAKHOUSE

345 West 5th St. • (530) 891-6328 5thstreetsteakhouse.com

A winter walk has never been so simple!. It’s the perfect gift for the outdoor enthusiast or adventurer. The new 10 Series features the new Wrapp™ Comfort binding for the ultimate in comfort and ease of use. Built for comfort and maneuverability, you’ll feel content snowshoeing all day long. Wrap it all up in the Atlas Deluxe snowshoe tote bag that stores and transports your snowshoes and pole, offering ventilated, reinforced protection.

MOUNTAIN SPORTS

176 E. 3rd Street • Downtown Chico (530) 345-5011 • Open Daily

Keep Her Warm This Winter...

Holiday Gift Packages

with cold weather hats, gloves and scarves from Chico Sports LTD. Choose from name brands like Columbia, Northface, Dakine, Seirus and more. She’ll appreciate your thoughtfulness in the selection of these fashionable, functional winter necessities. Sports LTD also carries cold weather clothing and outerwear. You’ll find waterproof windbreakers, jackets for snow and rain, fleece, base layers, socks...everything she will need to keep her warm and dry from her head to her toes.

This year give gifts from the heart. Personalize your holiday gifts with your child’s art work or a special photo. Andy’s Embroidery will print your photo or artwork on selected items and will add text at no additional cost. Gift packages start at $16.95. All work is done in house to ensure quality and fast turnaround. Andy’s Embroidery is family owned, celebrating their 24th year in business. Stop by their shop on Wall St. to shop the wide variety of options.

SPORTS LTD.

698 Mangrove Ave • Chico (530) 894–1110 ChicoSportsLtd.net

ANDY’S EMBROIDERY

820 Wall Street • Chico • (530) 893–3316 www.andysembroidery.com

CN&R’S GIFT GUIDE — A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION November 21, 2012

CN&R 15


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Little Red Hen Park & Garden supervisor Ruben Rivera checks on cauliflowers in raised beds.

RENEWABLE-ENERGY PLAN A GO

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) took a big step toward meeting state-mandated renewable-energy requirements on Nov. 8 by approving energy-procurement plans for California’s largest utilities. Pacific Gas and Electric, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas and Electric have begun soliciting bids to meet renewable-energy procurement guidelines under the state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) law, according to a CPUC press release. The RPS requires investorowned utilities, electricity service providers and community-choice aggregators to increase use of renewable energy sources to 33 percent of total procurement by 2020. On the same day, the CPUC also approved $2 billion in funding for energy-efficiency programs across the state during 2013-2014.

The hundreds of tiles that make the Wall of Hope were painted by the developmentally disabled over the last decade as part of a Little Red Hen project.

CAP-AND-TRADE KICKOFF

California’s landmark cap-and-trade market began on Nov. 14 as carbon-emission allowances were auctioned off to dozens of oil refiners, cement manufacturers and other major polluters. The market is a key component of AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, which aims to force companies to cut greenhouse gases or purchase allowances, according to The Sacramento Bee. While supporters maintain the market will allow businesses flexibility in their approach to reducing emissions, business coalitions like the AB 32 Implementation Group believe the market will become a severe burden on state businesses, particularly in 2015 when refineries will have to purchase more credits to cover greenhousegas emissions from vehicles. The auction offers more than 62 million allowances, each representing the right to emit one ton of carbon, with the minimum bid set at $10 a ton. Ninety percent of emission allowances will be free for the first two years, but the percentage of handouts will decrease after that period.

GREEN BUD AIN’T SO GREEN

Though public support for the recreational use of marijuana is reportedly on the rise, pot cultivation and distribution remains detrimental to the environment. Pot presents a host of environmental issues including high energy costs for indoor growing, irresponsible forest clearing, illegal stream diversions, and fertilizer and pesticide runoff that can kill wildlife and stimulate blue-green algae blooms, according to Grist. And that’s not to mention the high cost of transportation—most reefer is shipped hundreds of miles from production to customer. Some experts believe many growers in Colorado and Washington—both of which voted recently to legalize recreational marijuana use—will opt to cultivate indoors even during summer months, to avoid prosecution by the Federal Drug Administration. PHOTO COURTESY OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

16 CN&R November 21, 2012

Growing hope Little Red Hen’s new space provides an outdoor classroom for the developmentally disabled

story and photos by

Claire Hutkins Seda

VPark & Garden may have to engage their imaginations a bit to keep up with the

isitors to the new Little Red Hen

space’s supervisor and go-to man, Ruben Rivera. “This one’s going to be a peacock. This one, it’s going to be a mermaid!” said Rivera with a laugh, pointing to two massive cement blocks sticking out of the ground—objects found in the once-empty lot now known as the Park & Garden. Three Little Red Hen employees worked nearby, pick-axing the hard-packed, rocky soil around another cement monolith toward the front of the garden, preparing the area for an “archeological garden” featuring a sand pit for digging up pretend artifacts and “prehistoric plants” like the gingko biloba trees lined up behind the workers.

The monolith is “going to be a dinosaur sculpture—we’re going to have four dinosaur heads, one on each side,” Rivera said with a smile. The prehistoric garden is just one of many inventive ideas that make this two-acre garden and outdoor classroom unique in Chico. Some, like an operating mini train that will loop the interior of the park, are still just ideas. But others are ready to use, like the rainbow reading bench, where children can gather to read stories; the Wall of Hope, made of hundreds of tiles painted by developmentally disabled children over the last 10 years; and the very productive raised-bed vegetable gardens. “It’s a place where classrooms, and children with developmental disabilities, can come and safely explore and play,” explained Pam Parrish, nursery manager at Little Red Hen. The Park & Garden is the brainchild of Little Red Hen’s founder and executive director, Teresa Wolk Hayes. Hayes started the Little Red Hen organization with the mission of providing Chico’s

developmentally disabled with educational and employment opportunities; the nonprofit employs about 85 developmentally disabled adults, including more than a dozen at the Park & Garden. Fulfilling that mission began with the Little Red Hen nursery on East Eighth Street, which opened in 2000, and its associated greenhouse on East Ninth Street. Little Red Hen also has a gift shop on East 20th Street, and the Kids & Kitchen shop, the Park & Garden and the Vintage Shop— all three off of East Avenue. (The brandnew Little Red Hen Vintage shop, right around the corner from the Park & Garden, had its grand opening just last week, and also features an online Etsy.com shop.)

More info:

The Little Red Hen Park & Garden is located at 971 East Avenue. Call 828-4181 or go to http://www.parkandgarden.org/ to learn more.


ECO EVENT The Park & Garden inhabits an old lot next to Spiteri’s Deli. Two and a half years ago, “the Spiteri family came to me to say they had some land” that they wanted to allow Little Red Hen to use for free, explained Hayes. “Our job is just to make it look beautiful.” While all of Little Red Hen’s

ventures have provided employment opportunities for the developmentally disabled, the Park & Garden takes it a step further. Although Chico classrooms have been enjoying field trips to the nursery for years, the Park & Garden takes the “therapeutic” garden experiences of “getting them to touch the soil, sticking their hands in the soil, watering,” and other basic nursery work to the next level by creating a dedicated space for play and learning, said Hayes. “We had one really tough group of severely handicapped [students from a Chico school], and we just couldn’t have them at the nursery because it was just so much work,” said Hayes. This fall, they began visiting the Park & Garden’s enclosed, private space instead. They are one of the first groups to

RUN BEFORE YOU GOBBLE A great way to simultaneously enjoy nature, help a good cause, and ensure you’ll be hungry for Thanksgiving dinner: Participate in the Run for Food, a 5K run and walk in Lower Bidwell Park beginning at One-Mile Recreation Area at 9 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 22. The run is a benefit for the Jesus Center’s efforts to provide meals and shelter for Chico’s homeless individuals. Registration fees range from $20 to $30; go to www.runforfood.com or call 624-6932 for info.

Christmas Ornaments plus

unique Nativites Handlown Glass by Mike shaw Gourdes by Cladia Howell One of a Kind Gifts

493 East Ave. Suite 1 · Chico · (530) 345-3063 · Open Tue-Sat 11am-5pm

Comfort is...Giving a gift that will last try out the space. Once more of the stations are completed—and once the program’s kinks are worked out, said Hayes—the Park & Garden will be used regularly and widely for classrooms throughout the whole community, hopefully starting this coming spring. Several of Little Red Hen’s internal programs, like its Community Sprouts program, already use the space. Community Sprouts helps “mostly kids with autism who have a hard time going out into the community … practice skills in the community,” said Hayes. “The Sprouts, when the weather is good,

UNCOMMON SENSE Don’t waste the turkey! The proverbial “everybody” uses leftover Thanksgiving turkey to make sandwiches the next day, and maybe a pot of soup, right? Here’s a recipe for something a little different to make from your leftover bird: Turkey-broccoli quiche Ingredients: 1 9-inch pie shell, unbaked 3/4 cup chopped fresh broccoli 2 tablespoons finely chopped onion 1 tablespoon butter 3/4 cup chopped cooked turkey 1/2 cup shredded Gruyere or Swiss cheese 3 eggs 1 1/4 cups half-and-half 1 teaspoon curry powder 1/2 teaspoon salt In a large skillet over medium-low heat, cook broccoli and onion, stirring frequently, until tender. Drain. Sprinkle broccoli, onion, turkey and cheese into pie shell. In a medium bowl, beat eggs slightly, then beat in half-and-half, curry powder and salt. Pour egg mixture over turkey-and-broccoli mixture. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 325° and continue baking for about 20 to 25 minutes, or until a knife inserted in center comes out clean.

Source: About.com’s Southern Food section

they come out. And they’ll have more of a presence as [Rivera and Little Red Hen workers] keep on building,” Parrish said. Other programs, like Butte County Office of Education’s Regional Occupation Program (ROP) class offered through CARD, are already using the space to provide students with the opportunity to gain valuable job skills like landscaping, building, and gardening. Staff members of all the Little Red Hen stores and the nursery also have benefits—they can join Rivera for workshops to learn about growing vegetables, and they get to take home all the veggies that grow in the gardens. Developmentally disabled people “have the highest rate of issues that are related to poor eating habits, [like] obesity,” Hayes noted. “The Park & Garden has 13 planter beds, [which is] a way to teach disabled adults how to eat locally, how to eat better, and how to grow their own food.” Any extra vegetables—Rivera is a Master Gardener, and consequently, the vegetable beds are overflowing with tomatoes, kale, cauliflower, broccoli, parsley and more, even in mid-November—don’t go to waste. “The Park & Garden distributes food to any organization that serves disabled adults,” said Hayes. Amazingly, Hayes and Rivera are already planning a new arm to the Park & Garden, where children can have their own raised garden beds, with “planter beds that are on their level,” said Hayes, along with additional children-centered sensory- and water-play features. The massive project continues to grow, aided by the big imaginations and hearts of the Little Red Hen staff. Rivera summed it up: “Chico doesn’t have anything quite like this.” Ω

THE INNOVATORS OF COMFORT™

RECEIVE $200 OFF* a Stressless® recliner when you donate $50 to charity. Save $400

– on p urch Stres ase of Eagle sless ® or Win g* select co lors on ly

Stressless® Eagle / Wing

November 21 - January 14 You can make everyone a lot more comfortable this holiday season. For a limited time, when you donate $50 to charity you will receive $200 OFF the purchase price of a Stressless® recliner or $400 OFF the purchase of select Eagle or Wing recliners. Stressless® living is the perfect combination of comfort, function and style. Our patented Plus™ system provides you with optimum head and lumbar support in any position, while the Glide system keeps your body in perfect balance. Give yourself the ultimate gift of comfort and see why charity begins at home. Learn more here.

Stressless® is proudly endorsed by the American Chiropractic Association.

(530) 892–1905

(530) 891–3582

(between 3rd and 5th avenues)

(in La Dolce Piazza)

1341 mangrove ave. chico

3217 Cohasset Rd. Ste 120 • Chico

November 21, 2012

CN&R 17


RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

G

THE

reen HOUSE

by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

MORE REFLECTIONS ON PROP. 37 The issue of labeling GMO food is not going

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

Volunteers Needed Earn a FREE computer! Call Payton for details at 895-4175

Seniors on Medicare now qualify to purchase a computer from $100-$200 COMPUTERS FOR CLASSROOMS

530-895-4175

315 Huss Drive, Chico Open 9-5 Weekdays Open to low-income families such as Medi-Cal, Section 8 Housing, Healthy Families, Free or Reduced lunch qualified and SSDI. Cash sales only. CFC is Microsoft Registered Refurbisher and R2-Certified Recycler. All hard drives are wiped completely or destroyed.

iscount at

D Draw your

th

ETWEEN B E V A S

TIPS FOR THE PRESIDENT In view of the fact that Barack Obama will be

IRE OFF ENTASE FOR PURCH12-2013 ALL 20 CTS PRODU

% 0 3 0 1 IDAY SALE

, 2012

vember 25 R F through No K w o C N TS . A le a BL in the store is on s RODUC -2012 P Everything

10

FF 20 O % 0 7 30

e Parking Hastle-Fre / / e e ff o // Free C Wrapping Free Gift

.4032

.891 9 // 530 9 y w H 13600 18 CN&R November 21, 2012

GMO-FREE COUNTY In happier GMO-focused election news, on Nov. 6 the

voters of San Juan County, Wash., overwhelmingly passed Proposition 2012-4, which makes it against the law to grow or propagate genetically modified plants or animals within the county limits. Violators are subject to penalties and the destruction of their GMO-laden goods.

S E H G S G U N I H V A S Y A HOLID e register.

to go away just because Big Food & Pesticides managed (barely) to squash it during the recent election. As Zack Kaldveer (pictured), the Bay Area-based assistant media director for the Yes on 37 campaign, wrote to me recently, “A grassroots coalition that gathered 1 million petitions in just 10 weeks to place Proposition 37 on the ballot came three points away from defeating the world’s largest pesticide and junk food corporations and their $45 million war chest. “The fundamental, democratic right to know what’s in the food we eat and feed our children isn’t going anywhere,” Kaldveer said. “This food movement has just begun, and while a $1 million a day in deceptive ads bankrolled by companies like Monsanto and DuPont was just enough to keep consumers in the dark this time around, it won’t be enough next time. Zack Kaldveer, the Bay Area-based “The more people understand what assistant media director for the Yes on the ramifications of genetically engi37 campaign, is confident that the neered foods are—to our health, our movement to know what’s in our food environment, and to the future of our “has just begun.” food supply—the greater the support PHOTO COURTESY OF ZACK KALDVEER there will be for a simple label.”

serving a second term as president of the United States, Huff Post Green ran a story recently titled “Mr. President: 5 Ways to Salvage Your Environmental Legacy,” by Kieran Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity. “To be blunt, when it came to tackling the most important environmental issues of our age, President Obama’s first term was a disappointment,” wrote Suckling. Hence, Suckling’s Top-5 to-do list for President Obama: “Address climate change and ocean acidification.” Suckling observes that “there is no crisis bigger than the one that’s rapidly transforming the world’s climate and oceans. … Left unchecked, climate change threatens millions of people around the globe and countless species already on the brink of extinction.” “Stem the extinction crisis.” The world’s animals and plants “are going extinct at an astonishing rate, up to 10,000 times faster than normal in some cases,” noted Suckling. “Unfortunately federal agencies in charge of saving endangered species have yet to respond on a scale that meets the speed and magnitude of this massive loss.” “Keep politics out of the Endangered Species Act and other vital environmental laws.” Suckling points out “a growing movement in Congress to cripple” the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act. “Safeguard our public lands, wild places and the Arctic.” “In the face of urban sprawl, habitat loss, population growth and a consumption-driven economy,” the nearly 650 million acres of federal land, such as national parks and wildlife refuges, are in danger. Additionally, Suckling puts the finger on “profit-driven companies that want to mine, graze, log, bulldoze and drill them into oblivion.” “Embrace a newer, cleaner energy.” Noting that “fossil fuels are a huge part of what’s got us into this mess in the first place,” Suckling wants the United States’ focus shifted to renewable energy, such as solar, wind and geothermal. Go to http://tinyurl.com/preztips to read the entire article.

EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES Jake Scheele, the friendly, tenacious owner-operator of Freestyle Fitness, who has as one of his numerous quotable mottoes, “If your muscles don’t shake, you didn’t train with Jake.”

MARKETING OBAMACARE

In response to President Obama’s re-election, California will spend nearly $90 million next year on marketing and outreach efforts for the state’s health-benefit exchange. The Affordable Care Act requires states to launch online insurance marketplaces by 2014, with about 4.4 million Californians expected to use the exchange by the end of 2016, according to the Los Angeles Times. State officials are also pushing to finalize a federal-grant proposal for continued funding in preparation for the exchange’s launch, which includes building networks of health-care providers, negotiating rates and designing health-care plans that comply with the exchange’s benefit guidelines. “The election removes what was really the last distraction from focusing on the job, which is to get millions of Californians enrolled in health coverage,” said Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California.

Muscling people around

Inset: Freestyle Fitness’ unpretentious exterior.

OF PILLS THAT KILL

A California lawmaker intends to introduce a bill that would require state coroners to report all prescription-drug-related deaths. Currently, prescription-drug-related deaths are reported only to the Medical Board of California if “gross negligence” is suspected of the physician, according to the Los Angeles Times. In reaction to the Times’ analysis of the 3,733 prescription-drug overdoses in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego and Ventura counties from 2006 to 2011, Sen. Curren Price (D-Los Angeles) announced Nov. 12 he would pen legislation aimed at increased accountability. In 47 percent of the overdose cases, a drug prescribed by a physician was identified as a contributing cause or the sole cause of death. The board sent a report to the state Legislature on Nov. 1 that suggested reporting all prescription-drug deaths would allow the board to “determine if the prescribing physician was treating in a correct and appropriate manner.”

CLINTON’S COACHELLA CURE

Former President Bill Clinton has tackled the issue of health inequalities in California’s Coachella Valley through the William J. Clinton Foundation. The Clinton Health Matters Initiative—which will also be launched in Little Rock, Ark.—will attempt to reduce preventable diseases and reduce health disparities associated with income, race and education, according to media reports. The foundation has partnered with General Electric, Tenet Healthcare and Verizon, all of which will begin or expand wellness programs—such as farmers’ markets, no-cost exercise classes, smoking-cessation programs and walking groups—for their workforces. Clinton’s foundation has taken a similar approach to childhood obesity, partnering with beverage companies to eliminate sugary beverages from schools. Health disparities and preventable illness “are robbing people of a lot of good years. We can’t let that continue,” Clinton said.

Freestyle Fitness’ energetic leader bumps it out of the box story and photos by

Catherine Beeghly

Y going in order to find Freestyle Fitness.

ou have to know where you’re

At the rear of a nondescript industrial complex just past Hegan Lane on the Midway, and behind Chico Honda Motorsports, a small sign lets visitors know they’ve arrived at the 3,900-square-foot warehouse that houses Jake Scheele’s fitness center. Inside, the high-ceilinged space is packed with hundreds of fitness props—all sorts of free weights, punching bags, rowing machines, stair climbers, grappling dummies, kettlebells, and cardioand gravity-training machines. “If you’ve seen it on TV, I probably have it here,” quipped Scheele in a recent interview. Posters of celebrities, like that of reggae musician Bob Marley, and one of Marilyn Monroe reclining on a bench press, create a colorful collage of inspirations on the surface of the gym’s walls. Freestyle Fitness is a boxing gym for those who want to go box; for others—like those who attend “Freestyle Friday”

class—it’s a motivating place to go to stay in shape. Freestyle Fitness offers “unlimited training,” which means that students (as members are called) can put together any combination of classes they desire. “It’s an old-school gym with modernday training techniques and contraptions,” offered Scheele. The likeable 32-year-old looks and sounds like the kind of guy who motivates people to get in shape. At 5 feet 9 inches tall, he is muscular and friendly, and a huge smile takes over his face as he enjoys jokes with staff and students. His voice

bellows throughout the space during classes—insistent, but not unpleasant—like a Shakespearean actor’s: “Come on! One more! OK! You gotta earn it to burn it! Great!” “Putting Chico’s fat on the hit list” is— fittingly—the club’s slogan. Members commonly refer to it as “the fitness factory” or simply “the factory.” At Scheele’s gym, clients won’t find the artificial waterfalls or other fancy amenities present at other fitness venues. There’s HEALTHLINES continued on page 20

APPOINTMENT ADOPT THIS FILM! Adoption Choices of Northern California will present a screening of Somewhere Between, a moving documentary that chronicles the journeys of four teenage adoptees, at the Pageant Theatre (351 E. Sixth St.) on Friday, Nov. 30, at 5:30 p.m. The film will explore themes of family and self-identity. Go to www.ac-nc.org and select “events” for ticket information.

November 21, 2012

CN&R 19


DESIGNER

JEN_PU

You’ll Leave Relaxed Swedish • Relaxing• Deep Tissue

HEALTHLINES

continued from page 19

Oriental Massage

NO.

IT IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org REP

JLD

CNR ISSUE

10.23.08

1HR RELAXATION MASSAGE ONLY $35 1HR SWEDISH ONLY $45 Cannot be combined with other offers.

1722 Mangrove, Ste 38 • (530) 636–4368 2540 Esplanade, Ste 6 • (530) 899–0888

FILE NAME RAPE CRISIS INTERV. & PREV.

Curious about acupuncture? TRY IT FOR FREE!

Book online with coupon code CNR or bring in this ad for a free treatment. Regular Fee $15-35, pay what you can.

740 Flume St (In the Blue Building) 345-5566 • PinwheelChico.com Walk-ins Welcome • Tue & Wed 1–7 • Thu 1–5 • Fri & Sat 9–2

Birth Control

Pregnancy Tests 530.891.1911 Free and low cost reproductive health care for women and men! All Birth Control Methods | Pregnancy Testing | Morning After Pill HIV Screening | STI Testing and Treatment | Men’s Health Services Abortion Services | Women’s Health Services | Adoption Services Women’s Health Specialists

1469 Humboldt Rd. Suite 200 Chico, California 95928 cawhs.org confidential, compassionate and nonjudgmental

lf to Treat yourse to es up gift certificat

75% ! F F O www.newsreview.com

20 CN&R November 21, 2012

a distinct feeling the people who go there are serious about exercise—one can hear students breathing hard and practically feel them concentrating. Conveniently, small-group classes can easily occupy one section of the warehouse space without being distracted by what other people in the room are doing. More than 170 classes are offered per month, in such things as sports conditioning, cross training, boxing and mixed martial arts. One particularly popular class that’s tough—but brings students results—is boot camp, an intense, cross-training session in which the instructor often shouts commands like a military officer. All in all, Scheele has more than 100 students at his intimate, no-frills gym, and he knows them all by name. “Here you’re in a small-group setting, not on your own,” said Scheele. “Everything is structured for you. You’re not doing the same things over and over; you’re learning new things. [And] you come [to classes] whenever you want.” Scheele likes to change things up for variety: “I have five instructors, and I like to bring [them] in as different trainers, to take my basic ideas and throw a spin on it, a twist. I love that.” His explanation of the dues schedule is notably out of the ordinary. “It’s ‘pay what you can afford.’ If you can’t afford it, you can clean the gym. Or bring dinner,” said Scheele. “I barter for goods and services. I have probably 20 students who are business owners, and they promote me. Everyone helps each other out. Chico is a very special area, where people actually give a damn about you, and I hope we don’t lose that.” Scheele grew up in Modesto,

one of four brothers always active in sports. He started weightlifting at age 13, taking up mixed martial arts at 16. He played baseball for Barstow College. “I got Most Improved Player in 2003!” Scheele bragged with a grin. Scheele moved to Butte County in 2006 to finish a college degree. A year later, he was alarmed to discover his weight was up to 220 pounds. “I was in an environment that was not healthy,” he said. “I just really wanted to get back into fitness, where people had the same goals and passions I did.” Even though it meant quitting

college, Scheele followed his love of fitness, starting in an entry-level position. “I got a job at the front desk of a gym. In a year, I lost 50 pounds doing their boot-camp program—and then started teaching it,” he said. In June 2010, he opened his own business, Freestyle Fitness. “The first six months I was doing it out of my truck in public parks, or [offering] personal training in people’s houses,” Scheele recalled. Because he was able to attract and maintain a following of clients, he rented a 600-square-foot room on the bottom floor of a barn. “I outgrew the space in 10 months, and I also had two storage units full of fitness equipment.” It’s been a little more than a year since Freestyle Fitness moved into its current location, and Scheele has dreams of expanding. In fact, he and Eddie Cole, Freestyle Fitness’ striking “fightteam” manager, have visions of Cole’s son, 13-year-old Zaden Cole, taking over a teaching role someday. Scheele struggles slightly

when asked to explain the key to his business success. “Word of mouth, I guess,” he said. “You take care of people—that’s central— whether they’re 8 or 80. I work [personally] with everyone, and

Freestyle connection:

Freestyle Fitness is located at 11128 Midway, Ste. 5. Go to www.facebook.com/pages/ Freestyle-Fitness-ChicoCa/193620650657320 to find Freestyle Fitness on Facebook.

figure out how we can help them. … This is not an elitist place, where you have to look or be a certain way.” Scheele has particularly enjoyed working with young people and their families. “Teens come in and they can get that bond with their parents, and it builds their confidence,” he noted. “Not all girls excel in sports, and it’s great for teenage girls to come in here and box, or whatever. It doesn’t matter how they look, or what they weigh. That is so important at that age. “I have a mother and daughter who ran a half marathon together—to see the girl’s confidence is amazing. “I hope I never have to go to another job interview, or a staff meeting,” offered Scheele, who was able to quit a job as a bar bouncer when he became a fitness trainer. “Here, you can see hundreds of people coming through the doors every day. Fitness just makes me happy.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE OMG, you’re having a baby! “Morning sickness may be caused by a change in your hormones. Try eating crackers or dry cereal. Eat small meals often. Don’t go without eating.” That’s just one example of the kind of health tips for moms and babies (as well as dads and health-care providers)—during and after pregnancy—available from text4baby, a free service provided by National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. Visit www.text4baby.org and enter your due date and cell number, and three times a week you’ll receive a new bit of advice or information catered to the specific point in your pregnancy, with no charges to your phone bill, such as: “Your baby is growing a lot! Baby is now the size of a lime & can open its mouth & move its tiny hands.” Or, “It’s time for baby’s 1-month Dr.’s visit. Your baby had blood tests right after she was born. At this visit, ask your Dr. for the results.” Additionally, you will also receive free alerts any time there’s timely baby-related news—health scares, product recalls, etc.


A Commitment to Service Dr. Randell Skau is an attending physician. The son of Christian missionaries, he was born and raised in India. He came to the United States when he was 12, settling for a time in the state of Washington, until his parents returned to missionary work. After completing his medical education and surgical training, Dr. Skau spent 10 years in Nigeria. Oroville has been his home for four years, but his passport hasn’t been gathering dust. Dr. Skau and his wife, a family-medicine physician, regularly participate in medical missions to locations as far and wide as Fiji and Ethiopia. Travel has shaped him not only as a person but also as a doctor. “The problems you see in those places are problems we don’t face here,” Dr. Skau says. “I’m a general surgeon, so I don’t normally treat medical problems, but out there you’re an all-around doctor—you have to treat everything. “I’ve delivered babies. I’ve treated TB [tuberculosis]. I’ve been called on to do neurosurgery. I did a lot of orthopedic surgery. “That’s the fun, but it’s also the challenge. It expands your way of thinking about things.” Four years after completing his surgical residency, he answered the call to practice medicine in Africa. He treated patients and trained young physicians. For six of the ten years, Dr. Skau also served as

the hospital’s medical director, “which meant I basically did everything,” he says. “I was in charge of all the accounting, pharmacy, janitorial, making sure that the construction we did was done right—all of that.”

“Oroville Hospital has a culture of caring, commitment, community, and service.” It wasn’t always glamorous. He didn’t make the money he could have made in the United States. His rewards came in other forms. “I’m just giving back, helping people, serving people to have a better life.” Dr. Skau finds similar satisfaction at Oroville Hospital. “This is absolutely one of the best places, and I’ve worked in a lot of places,” he says. “I find it to be a strong community where people are committed to service, committed to making the lives of other people better, and committed to excellence. “Oroville Hospital has a culture of caring, commitment, community, and service. I really appreciate that.”

2767 Olive HigHway • OrOville, Ca • (530) 533-8500 ‎

2767 Olive HigHway • OrOville, Ca • (530) 533-8500 ‎ November 21, 2012

CN&R 21


Alfred Koala PHOTO BY VIC CANTU

Our local heroes Five community members deserving of our thanks

M

ost families have traditions surrounding

Saving lives through donations

Janice Walker

the Thanksgiving holiday. Here at the

“In 2004, I literally prayed that God would give me something to do to make a difference in the lives of others,” said Janice Walker. Shortly after, Walker inquired about Project S.A.V.E. (Salvage All Valuable Equipment), the local nonprofit that collects used medical and dental equipment and supplies from area hospitals, clinics, organizations and individuals, and ships them around the world to countries in need. At the time of Walker’s inquiry, Project S.A.V.E.—which was founded in 1996 by local physician and artist Phyllis Cullen—had gone defunct. The Enloe Foundation-sponsored program, however, was merely in need of someone

Chico News & Review we celebrate this

time of year by giving thanks for certain local folks. We’ve asked around for nominees, and this year we’ve chosen five individuals whose stories show a generosity of spirit worthy of recognition. These are people who stand out by doing extraordinary things for their fellows, either locally, or in several cases, on the other side of the world. We thank them for their time and dedication to volunteering, and for making Chico and beyond a better place to live. Happy Thanksgiving.

22 CN&R November 21, 2012

Life-saving donations:

To volunteer at Project S.A.V.E. or to inquire about receiving a donation of a wheelchair or other needed medical equipment, call 332-7915. Project S.A.V.E. accepts donations of usable medical supplies on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. until noon at its warehouses in the East & 32 Mini Storage at 2553 Highway 32. Go to www.chicoprojectsave.org to learn more.

Janice Walker PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

to take the reins and move forward with distributing all of the “bags and bags,” as Walker put it, of medical supplies that had accumulated inside the Project S.A.V.E. office at 229-B West Fifth Ave. “I had no idea what it involved,” said Walker, who volunteered to become the nonprofit’s director. “What I saw was good, usable medical supplies that needed to be put to good use.” Since Walker came on board as director in September 2004, Project S.A.V.E. has sent “the equivalent of 98 20-foot sea containers of goods to 40 different countries,” she said. On the long list of recipients of everything from hospital beds and “C-arm” X-ray units, to laryngoscopes and Band-Aids, are the countries of Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Haiti, Guatemala, Papua New Guinea, the Republic of Georgia and the Philippines, and 13 African nations, including Tanzania, where Walker traveled on a humanitarian mission with several other Chicoans in 2009 to personally deliver much-needed medical supplies to village clinics and hospitals that would otherwise have had to do without. Donations come from a variety of sources, including Enloe Medical Center, Feather River Hospital, Oroville Hospital and BloodSource (“They give us their outdated supplies, such as blood tubings … and 4-by-4 gauze bandages”). Project S.A.V.E. also donates items such as wheelchairs and bedside commodes to needy local people through Butte Home Health & Hospice and Enloe HomeCare & Hospice, as well as in response to phone calls from private individuals: “If somebody needs something, all they have to do is call the office.” Walker’s voice becomes emotional when she speaks of the lives that she has been told have been saved because of Project S.A.V.E., such as that of one particular little girl in Papua New Guinea whose doctor said she would have bled to death if not for the sutures provided by the Chico nonprofit: “Your heart just melts when you know you have sent something that saves the life of an individual.” “The project works with all volunteer staffing, including the many workers who come in on Saturday mornings to load these giant containers for shipment,” noted Leslie Johnson, the local attorney and co-founder of the local ACLU chapter who nominated Walker. “The equipment and supplies are all donated, and many of these items would have ended up in a Dumpster if not rescued and passed along to Project S.A.V.E. “Project S.A.V.E. freely collaborates with many other organizations, often making their equipment and supplies available at no charge to other nonprofits willing to raise the funds to ship them to another country. “Janice Walker is a true Chico hero.”

Aiding African families

Alfred Koala

Chico’s Alfred Koala is doing his best to save the lives of dozens of the world’s poorest people. He is the founder of the nonprofit Feeding Nations Through Education (FNTE), which gives aid and teaches sustainable-living practices to the starving citizens of one of the most destitute nations on earth: West Africa’s Burkina Faso. In 2007 Koala, an impoverished native of that country’s village of Thyou, scraped up enough money to fly to New York to enroll at Chico State. Knowing almost no English or geography, he first asked people at the airport for a taxi to Chico. After learning how much that would cost, he took a bus. His father died soon after his arrival, which prompted his dedication to help his fellow countrymen, who were dying of AIDS, disease and starvation. The 32-year-old, who recently graduated from Chico State with a degree in business administration, devised a revolutionary plan designed to help those in need to help themselves in perpetuity. About once a year his group awards five starving Burkina Faso families a “life-care package”: two oxen with a plow and enough rice to get the family through the year to the three-month rainy growing season. They also get access to a veterinarian for the oxen and training in growing crops, which previously had been planted by hand using crude, footlong sticks. Families in Burkino Faso average 12 members each and suffer, on average, one or two deaths annually from starvation or sickness. Since Koala implemented his plan in 2009, only one member of the 10 awarded families has died: his own brother, who succumbed to complications from HIV. One of the beauties of Koala’s program is that each family must invest the profits from its excess crops every three years

Feed the world:

Go to www.FeedingNations.org to learn more about Feeding Nations Through Education.

into sending another of its children to school. “Our plan has worked beyond expectations, with each family sending their first child to school after only two years,” Koala beamed. “They all have food, the kids are healthier, and none of them are starving.” Since many of the villagers were also dying from drinking out of the contaminated, hand-dug well or polluted river, Koala brought a Chico delegation there in 2011 and built a sturdy, cement well and trained the locals in its upkeep and maintenance. He also brought 1,300 pairs of glasses, and his Sacramento optometrist, Dr. Larry Morse, taught the villagers self-eyecare. In keeping with his main focus of “education as gold,” this year Koala purchased 50 acres to build a school for the village’s seventh- to 12thgraders, their first

Thomasin Saxe PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

ever. In December he will award a third set of five families their life-care packages. He plans on expanding FNTE to the rest of his native country, as well as to the impoverished neighboring countries of Niger, Mali and Chad. Koala has earned many awards and academic honors, including the Chico Mayor’s Award and Chico State’s President’s Advisory Board Award for outstanding community service. Throughout it all Koala remains grateful and inspired. “I am very thankful and love the Chico community with all my heart,” he said. “Let’s get together and change the world.” —VIC CANTU

Anything for art

Thomasin Saxe

Like most of the people we highlight in this Local Heroes issue, Thomasin Saxe shies away from the spotlight. In fact, one of the first things the longtime Chico arts supporter said upon sitting down for a conversation is that we should instead highlight “HEROES” continued on page 24

—CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

November 21, 2012

CN&R 23


Alfred Koala PHOTO BY VIC CANTU

Our local heroes Five community members deserving of our thanks

M

ost families have traditions surrounding

Saving lives through donations

Janice Walker

the Thanksgiving holiday. Here at the

“In 2004, I literally prayed that God would give me something to do to make a difference in the lives of others,” said Janice Walker. Shortly after, Walker inquired about Project S.A.V.E. (Salvage All Valuable Equipment), the local nonprofit that collects used medical and dental equipment and supplies from area hospitals, clinics, organizations and individuals, and ships them around the world to countries in need. At the time of Walker’s inquiry, Project S.A.V.E.—which was founded in 1996 by local physician and artist Phyllis Cullen—had gone defunct. The Enloe Foundation-sponsored program, however, was merely in need of someone

Chico News & Review we celebrate this

time of year by giving thanks for certain local folks. We’ve asked around for nominees, and this year we’ve chosen five individuals whose stories show a generosity of spirit worthy of recognition. These are people who stand out by doing extraordinary things for their fellows, either locally, or in several cases, on the other side of the world. We thank them for their time and dedication to volunteering, and for making Chico and beyond a better place to live. Happy Thanksgiving.

22 CN&R November 21, 2012

Life-saving donations:

To volunteer at Project S.A.V.E. or to inquire about receiving a donation of a wheelchair or other needed medical equipment, call 332-7915. Project S.A.V.E. accepts donations of usable medical supplies on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. until noon at its warehouses in the East & 32 Mini Storage at 2553 Highway 32. Go to www.chicoprojectsave.org to learn more.

Janice Walker PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

to take the reins and move forward with distributing all of the “bags and bags,” as Walker put it, of medical supplies that had accumulated inside the Project S.A.V.E. office at 229-B West Fifth Ave. “I had no idea what it involved,” said Walker, who volunteered to become the nonprofit’s director. “What I saw was good, usable medical supplies that needed to be put to good use.” Since Walker came on board as director in September 2004, Project S.A.V.E. has sent “the equivalent of 98 20-foot sea containers of goods to 40 different countries,” she said. On the long list of recipients of everything from hospital beds and “C-arm” X-ray units, to laryngoscopes and Band-Aids, are the countries of Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Haiti, Guatemala, Papua New Guinea, the Republic of Georgia and the Philippines, and 13 African nations, including Tanzania, where Walker traveled on a humanitarian mission with several other Chicoans in 2009 to personally deliver much-needed medical supplies to village clinics and hospitals that would otherwise have had to do without. Donations come from a variety of sources, including Enloe Medical Center, Feather River Hospital, Oroville Hospital and BloodSource (“They give us their outdated supplies, such as blood tubings … and 4-by-4 gauze bandages”). Project S.A.V.E. also donates items such as wheelchairs and bedside commodes to needy local people through Butte Home Health & Hospice and Enloe HomeCare & Hospice, as well as in response to phone calls from private individuals: “If somebody needs something, all they have to do is call the office.” Walker’s voice becomes emotional when she speaks of the lives that she has been told have been saved because of Project S.A.V.E., such as that of one particular little girl in Papua New Guinea whose doctor said she would have bled to death if not for the sutures provided by the Chico nonprofit: “Your heart just melts when you know you have sent something that saves the life of an individual.” “The project works with all volunteer staffing, including the many workers who come in on Saturday mornings to load these giant containers for shipment,” noted Leslie Johnson, the local attorney and co-founder of the local ACLU chapter who nominated Walker. “The equipment and supplies are all donated, and many of these items would have ended up in a Dumpster if not rescued and passed along to Project S.A.V.E. “Project S.A.V.E. freely collaborates with many other organizations, often making their equipment and supplies available at no charge to other nonprofits willing to raise the funds to ship them to another country. “Janice Walker is a true Chico hero.”

Aiding African families

Alfred Koala

Chico’s Alfred Koala is doing his best to save the lives of dozens of the world’s poorest people. He is the founder of the nonprofit Feeding Nations Through Education (FNTE), which gives aid and teaches sustainable-living practices to the starving citizens of one of the most destitute nations on earth: West Africa’s Burkina Faso. In 2007 Koala, an impoverished native of that country’s village of Thyou, scraped up enough money to fly to New York to enroll at Chico State. Knowing almost no English or geography, he first asked people at the airport for a taxi to Chico. After learning how much that would cost, he took a bus. His father died soon after his arrival, which prompted his dedication to help his fellow countrymen, who were dying of AIDS, disease and starvation. The 32-year-old, who recently graduated from Chico State with a degree in business administration, devised a revolutionary plan designed to help those in need to help themselves in perpetuity. About once a year his group awards five starving Burkina Faso families a “life-care package”: two oxen with a plow and enough rice to get the family through the year to the three-month rainy growing season. They also get access to a veterinarian for the oxen and training in growing crops, which previously had been planted by hand using crude, footlong sticks. Families in Burkino Faso average 12 members each and suffer, on average, one or two deaths annually from starvation or sickness. Since Koala implemented his plan in 2009, only one member of the 10 awarded families has died: his own brother, who succumbed to complications from HIV. One of the beauties of Koala’s program is that each family must invest the profits from its excess crops every three years

Feed the world:

Go to www.FeedingNations.org to learn more about Feeding Nations Through Education.

into sending another of its children to school. “Our plan has worked beyond expectations, with each family sending their first child to school after only two years,” Koala beamed. “They all have food, the kids are healthier, and none of them are starving.” Since many of the villagers were also dying from drinking out of the contaminated, hand-dug well or polluted river, Koala brought a Chico delegation there in 2011 and built a sturdy, cement well and trained the locals in its upkeep and maintenance. He also brought 1,300 pairs of glasses, and his Sacramento optometrist, Dr. Larry Morse, taught the villagers self-eyecare. In keeping with his main focus of “education as gold,” this year Koala purchased 50 acres to build a school for the village’s seventh- to 12thgraders, their first

Thomasin Saxe PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

ever. In December he will award a third set of five families their life-care packages. He plans on expanding FNTE to the rest of his native country, as well as to the impoverished neighboring countries of Niger, Mali and Chad. Koala has earned many awards and academic honors, including the Chico Mayor’s Award and Chico State’s President’s Advisory Board Award for outstanding community service. Throughout it all Koala remains grateful and inspired. “I am very thankful and love the Chico community with all my heart,” he said. “Let’s get together and change the world.” —VIC CANTU

Anything for art

Thomasin Saxe

Like most of the people we highlight in this Local Heroes issue, Thomasin Saxe shies away from the spotlight. In fact, one of the first things the longtime Chico arts supporter said upon sitting down for a conversation is that we should instead highlight “HEROES” continued on page 24

—CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO-BREGLIA

November 21, 2012

CN&R 23


“HEROES” continued from page 23

Gwen Curatilo PHOTO BY ROBERT SPEER

A life in song

Gwen Curatilo

another local arts maven, Christine “Sea Monster” Fulton. “Christine is a doll. I’d rather you wrote about her. Get her before she’s 63,” she said. With all due respect to Fulton (a busy artist and co-director of MÁNÁS Art Space), she still has a lot of hours to put in before getting to Saxe’s level of service to Chico’s arts community—service that garnered her a Mayor’s Award on Oct. 2 “for her work as a patron, volunteer, and curator.” Besides, Fulton is the one who nominated Saxe as a local hero! “She’ an absolute Chico treasure,” Fulton gushed. Since moving to Chico in 1975 to work as a financial-aid adviser (followed by stints in the publishing department and directing special projects for the College of Humanities and Fine Arts) at Chico State, Saxe has been an integral part of some of Chico’s most vital and productive arts organizations: member of the 1078 Gallery since its inception in 1981; board member for the Blue Room Theatre for several years (back when it was called Chico Creek Theatre Festival); and since 2005, she’s also served on the board of the 1078. Additionally, before she retired from Chico State in 2010, Saxe was, at various times, publisher of the school’s now-defunct Arts & Letters magazine, organizer of the University Film Series and curator for the Humanities Center Gallery (which she started in 1999). Saxe is a beloved fixture in the local arts scene, one who (despite her modesty) brings

24 CN&R November 21, 2012

her attractive personality and honest warmth and enthusiasm to her interactions—whether she’s sharing ideas about art with patrons and artists or sweating out the details of organizing a function with fellow board members. “I just love being around it,” she said, adding that she relishes in her role as “a producer and a supporter,” especially when it comes to being around the artists and fun-makers—“all those outrageous people” like Fulton, or even her artist/filmmaker son Jesse Karch (who lives in New York City)—who are motivated to create and perform for the sake of the art, not money. “I’m just drawn to the purity.” The bulk of Saxe’s donated time these days is to the 1078 Gallery. In addition to sitting on the board since 2005 (when she was asked to help write a grant that ended up saving the gallery from folding), Saxe is currently the exhibitions committee chairwoman as well a member of the gallery’s film, finance and site committees. Since joining, Saxe and her fellow board members have accomplished a lot—moving the gallery to its beautiful new building and establishing it as a hub for all forms of original artistic expression (music, theater, literature, film, in addition to the visual arts). This year the 1078 celebrated its 31st anniversary. “That’s a pretty long run for a nonprofit,” Saxe said. “Mostly on the shoulders of volunteers all this time.” —JASON CASSIDY

Gwen Curatilo will be 80 years old on her next birthday, Pearl Harbor Day, but if she’s slowing down any it’s hard to tell. She’s a woman of boundless enthusiasm— for opera and singing, which she taught at Chico State for 23 years; for art, which fills every available space in her Durham home; and for people, with whom she remains deeply engaged as a teacher, hospice volunteer and arts supporter—and she fills her days with joyful activity. She began her career as a featured soprano with the San Francisco Opera Company, playing key roles in major operas (Madama Butterfly, La Bohème) and touring the

world as a performer. But then she married and, eager to raise a family with her husband, Joe, turned her back on stage fame and took a teaching job at Chico State, eventually becoming head of the Opera Workshop. She turned it into one of the most successful training programs on the West Coast, graduating students who went on to excellent careers in music or teaching. She did so in part by raising significant amounts of money for scholarships that attracted superior students from around the state. One of the ways she located those students was by taking her university charges on

Zoe Willingham PHOTO BY HOWARD HARDEE


traveling performance tours (“I even got a bus driver’s license!” she says) to high schools up and down the state. She urged any interested students to contact her and told them about the financial aid that was available. I once accompanied the group on one of those trips, to Biggs High School, where her talented and playfully creative students delighted their farm-town audience. Perhaps her most famous fundraising creation was the annual Opera Ball, which for many years was the premier social event in Chico. She made opera fun, even for people who thought they didn’t like it. She retired from teaching in 1999, and her beloved Joe died of cancer the following year. He received hospice care, and she was so impressed by it she soon signed up as a patient-care volunteer, bringing her “youthful spirit” and “many different talents and interests,” as Enloe Hospice charge nurse Anna Marinelli put it, to caring for the dying. She continues giving private voice lessons, but she teaches two students in the Chico Children’s Choir at no charge. She also opens her house to the choir several times a year to host fundraising parties and retreats (the kids love the swimming pool!). “I have a house full of bodies,” she says, giggling. It’s a beautiful house, and she opens it often. A couple of months ago she held a fundraiser for the Museum of Northern California, lassoing some of her voice students to perform and cooking for the 20 guests herself. She’s held similar fundraisers for other groups. I’ve been writing about Chico and Chicoans for more than 30 years, and I’ve never met anyone who has given more to this community than Gwen Curatilo has. She has shared her passion for music and love of the arts unstintingly, and she’s done it with such grace and charm that she’s made it seem almost effortless. —ROBERT SPEER

Teenage wonder

Zoe Willingham

Chico High School senior Zoe Willlingham isn’t a typical 17-year-old girl. She enthusiastically speaks of things like “stepping outside of school for learning” and the “intoxicating pride and energy” that come with community activism. Willingham becomes visibly excited when she gets rolling on issues she feels passionate about (and there are quite a few). For someone not yet old enough to vote, she has been astonishingly active in the community—she hosts two radio shows on KZFR Community Radio, regularly volunteers with the Chico Peace & Justice Center, and serves as the editor-in-chief for Chico High’s student-run literary magazine, Seven-Eighths Under Water. Willingham was most recently

involved with the local “Right to Know GMO” campaign; she described Proposition 37’s defeat as “devastating.” “For me, it’s not so much about GMOs and how they’re going to give you cancer or infertility,” she said during a recent interview. “It’s a consumer-rights issue, and it ties into a much bigger picture in my mind—checking corporate power.” One of Willingham’s KZFR shows, Issues International, sticks to the same broad-scope approach. The program reports on specific world affairs (particularly underreported human-rights abuses), but always strives to provide contextual information as well. “We like to give background,” she said. “A lot of the conflicts in foreign countries have these histories behind them, and American audiences don’t have the benefit of that background.” Her other show, Underwater Air, is an extension of Seven-Eighths Under Water. The hour is devoted to “playing with language,” sharing author bios and reading short works. When considering her work with the Chico Peace & Justice Center—which has involved volunteering for fundraising events, editing their monthly newsletter, Peaceful Action, and assisting in countermilitary recruiting efforts—Willingham is mindful of something more meaningful than padding college applications and job résumés. “I wanted my volunteer experience to be something worthwhile to me,” she said. “Because I’m so passionate about socialjustice issues, when I have an assignment I try to turn it into something that’s really of personal value to me.” So, why does she care so much? Willingham related her difficult experience as a fourth-grader. “Girls can be really mean at that age,” she said. “I was feeling a little lonely, I didn’t know what to do with myself. So, my mother suggested I read The Legacy of Luna by Julia Butterfly Hill.” The detailed account of Hill’s 738 consecutive days in a redwood tree to prevent the clear-cutting of an ancient grove inspired Willingham greatly, prompting her to seek causes of her own to champion. “It showed how just one person could give something to their community and the world just by caring,” she said. “Small things can really add up.”

You should be getting it once a week.

—HOWARD HARDEE

On stands every Thursday November 21, 2012

CN&R 25


Arts & Culture Like a fly to the honies

THIS WEEK

Gettin’ dirty downtown with the original nasty rapper, Blowfly

Athrough a familiar funk beat last Wednesday, 73-year-old Clarence Reid

22

s his band bumped and chikked The Blowfly was buzzing

at the Towne Lounge. donned a sequined mask and matching cape PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH next to a pool table in the by makeshift backstage area at Ken Smith the Towne Lounge. Age hasn’t slowed the ’Fly down. He’s whip Reid wrote the song “Chicken kens@ newsreview.com Yellow,” in 1975, though most peo- smart and his voice is as strong as ever, even better now imbued with a soulful old-man’s rasp. He ple would probably recognize it as interacted with the audience, cracking jokes and Neneh Cherry’s “Buffalo Stance” lavishing some women with over-the-top lascivi(1988). Drummer Tom Bowker ousness. The CN&R’s own photo intern—Melanie announced this as the man himself, REVIEW: MacTavish—was personally serenaded with a transformation complete, shuffled Blowfly, filthy version of the soul classic “You are Everything.” and strutted to take his place front Wednesday, Nov. 14, at the For all that people have taken from him, Blowfly and center. Towne Lounge. has borrowed a bit back in the form of satirical send“And he never saw a penny! ups. These included takes on Michael Jackson Let’s get some reparations for the (“Ben” and a version of “Beat It” that Weird Al Blowfly!” Bowker yelled as the band segued into couldn’t sing without bursting into flames), The another oft-sampled riff and the crowd of mostly Clash (“Should I Stay or Should I Go”) and R. Kelly 20-somethings complied with Blowfly’s simple, (“I Believe I Can Fly”). Things would get out of sung demand: “Shake your ass!” hand fast if I mentioned the titles or lyrics of Blowfly has been Reid’s alter ego since 1971, Blowfly’s versions, but if you just rhyme something when he released the legendary (and legendarily with slang terms for anatomy, sex acts or wanton dirty) party record The Weird World of Blowfly. The women you’re likely on the right track. He even low-rent comic book costume and moniker were reworks one of his old classics as Reid (“Chicken meant to disguise his identity as a successful soul/R&B songwriter and performer who collaborat- Hawk”) into the Blow-flied “Dirty Chicken.” “You girls know what a chicken hawk is?” he ed with the likes of Sam and Dave, Betty Wright and asked some women down front before kicking off Joe Tex. Forty years on, though still revered for the the song with a squawk and a dance. “Y’all are straighter songs written as Reid, the XXX-rated chickens … and a chicken hawk eat and fucks you Blowfly is the better known persona. chickens!” Blowfly has been sampled by dozens of artists, Blowfly’s set lasted more than an hour, in which influenced thousands and is, according to some, the time he related lyrical details about copulating with father of rap music. Weird World predates the Sugeveryone and everything from Condoleezza Rice to arhill Gang’s Rapper’s Delight—the first rap album Godzilla. The man has stamina. to hit the mainstream—by more than half a decade. He saved some of the best for last, including a Though Blowfly has never stopped working and has hilarious song called “Blowfly’s ABCs” and one recorded nearly 30 albums, poor management, of his biggest hits, “Dirty Rapp.” The crowd never music-business chicanery and uncredited theft have stopped dancing and laughing and the sex-crazed left him uncompensated and largely unknown. septuagenarian never skipped a beat. The band, Which brings us back to the Towne Lounge last complete with three-piece horn section, was week, and the rare chance to see a living legend at tighter than a … well, that can also be left to the eye-level. Though a far cry from The Apollo, the imagination. Lounge was a perfect venue for a Blowfly show. It’s Here’s to hoping the Blowfly buzzes back soon. old school, earthy and a touch on the seedy side, just In the meantime, check out the excellent 2010 doculike the man himself. And though he was playing for mentary The Weird World of Blowfly. Ω only a few dozen people, Blowfly didn’t hold back. 26 CN&R November 21, 2012

THANKSGIVING CALENDAR Due to scheduling changes that may occur around the holidays, please confirm listed times and details with venue.

24

THURS

SAT

Special Events

Special Events

RUN FOR FOOD 5K: A 5K run/walk through Bidwell Park to benefit the Jesus Center’s efforts to feed and shelter Chico’s homeless individuals. Th, 11/22, 9am. $20-$30. One Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park; (530) 624-6932; www.run forfood.com.

23

FRI

Theater HOORAY FOR HOLYWOOD: NUNSET BLVD: A new musical comedy written by Jerry Miller that follows the Sisters of Our Lady of Kankakee as they try to save their beloved orphanage and order by going Hollywood. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 12/8. No show on Thanksgiving. $16$18. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

HOMETOWN CHRISTMAS: A holiday celebration in Forbestown with carolers, food, crafts, cos-

tumed folk and Father Christmas. Sa, 11/24, 11am-7pm. Prices vart. Yuba Feather

Museum/Gold Trader Flat, 19096 New York Flat Rd. in Forbestown.

ORLAND CRAFT FAIR: Handcrafted works from

250 vendors. Sa, 11/24, 10am-5pm; Su, 11/25, 11am-5pm. Prices vary. Glenn County Fairgrounds, 221 E. Yolo St. in Orland, (530) 865-1168.

MICKEY HART

Wednesday, Nov. 28 Paradise Performing Arts Center SEE WEDNESDAY (11/28), MUSIC


FINE ARTS Art

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

27

TUES

UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES Tuesday, Nov. 27 Ayres 106, Chico State

SEE TUESDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

25

SUN Music PARROTT FAMILY CHRISTMAS PROGRAM: Featuring hand bells, chimes and vocal renditions of new and traditional Christmas music. Sa, 11/24, 2 & 7pm. $10. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise; (530) 872-8454; www.brownpapertickets.com.

Theater HOORAY FOR HOLYWOOD: NUNSET BLVD: See Friday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Special Events BOY SCOUT CHRISTMAS TREE LOT: Proceeds from tree sales help send scouts to camp and fund monthly outings and community service projects. Su, 11/25, 10am. $40. Chico Nut Company, 2020 Esplanade, (530) 891-5556.

HEATHENS & THIEVES: A screening of the western noir drama co-directed by Chico native Megan Peterson and shot in Northern California, with a question-and-answer session to follow. Su, 11/25, 4pm. $8. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727.

HOMELESS: ISSUES AND RESPONSES: A discus-

sion on issues related to homeless in Chico. Su, 11/25, 1-2pm. Free. Chico Friends Meetinghouse, 1601 Hemlock St. Corner of 16th and Hemlock, (530) 345-3753.

ORLAND CRAFT FAIR: Handcrafted works from

PUNCH BROTHERS Tuesday, Nov. 27 Laxson Auditorium

SEE TUESDAY, MUSIC

250 vendors. Sa, 11/24, 10am-5pm; Su, 11/25, 11am-5pm. Prices vary. Glenn County Fairgrounds, 221 E. Yolo St. in Orland, (530) 865-1168.

Special Events UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES: The Humanities Center at Chico State’s weekly film series. This week: Moonlighting (U.K., 1982). Tu, 11/27, 7:30pm. $3/donation. Ayres 106, Chico State Campus.

Music PUNCH BROTHERS: The New York City-based string quintet specializes in progressive bluegrass, a fresh take on old-time traditional music. Tu, 11/27, 7:30pm. $16-$28. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperformances.com.

28

WED

Music MICKEY HART BAND: Mickey Hart, best known for his decades as an integral member of the Grateful Dead, performs with his band as a partial benefit for KZFR Community Radio. W, 11/28, 6:30pm. $35. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise; (530) 8960706; www.kzfr.org.

1078 GALLERY: Hahn & Hanson, new work by Alan Corkery Hahn and Belinda Hanson on display. Through 11/24. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

ANGELOS CUCINA TRINACRIA: Maria Phillips

Exhibition, large, other-worldly watermedia paintings on display. Ongoing. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: A New Leaf, paintings by Candy Matthews and fine jewelery from Mike and Susi Gillum exploring the beauty of leaves. Through 12/1. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

B-SO SPACE: Here nor There, electronic art

curated by Kate Adams on display. Ongoing. Ayres Hall Room 107 Chico State, (530) 8985331.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Work n

Progress, an exhibit of work by student artist Dennis Wickes. Through 12/6. 3536 Butte Campus Dr. Inside the ARTS Building in Oroville, (530) 895-2208.

CHICO ART CENTER: Small World Small Works, a touring exhibition of small foot-by-foot works from around the world. Through 11/25. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO CITY MUNICIPAL CENTER: Works by

Claudia Steel, an exhibition of etchings, serigraphs, watercolors and oils. Through 1/11, 2013. 411 Main St. City Hall, (530) 8967200.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: I Heart Chico, paintings, poetry, kids’ art, photography, textiles, videos and interactive collaborative exhibits inspired by Chico. Through 1/31, 2013. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

CHICO STATE HUMANITIES CENTER (TRINITY HALL): Gone to Ground, a new series of photographs of bunkers in Albania from photographer Wayne Barrar. Through 11/30. 400 West First St. 100 400 West First Street, (530) 898-6341.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Folk Art & Crafts, local folk art and one-of-a-kind sculptures, dolls and old-world Christmas ornaments. Through 11/30. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 3453063.

TIN ROOF BAKERY & CAFE: Chico landmarks in the Snow, photographs of Chico landmarks in the rare three-inch snowfall of 1987 by Karen Kolb on display. Through 11/30. 627 Broadway St. 170, (530) 345-1362.

THE TURNER PRINT MUSEUM AT CSU: Issues:

Social, Political, Gender, prints exploring a range of issues from English political satire to American social realism. Curator’s talk and reception: Th, 12/6, 5:30 p.m. Through 12/16. 400 W. First St. Meriam Library breezeway, CSU, Chico, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

Call for Artists 2013 ART FIESTA BOOTHS: Artist booths are still available for next spring’s event. Call or email for more info. Through 4/1, 2013. Matador Motel, 1934 Esplanade, (530) 4874553.

GREEN ARTS COMPETITION: Mixed media artwork that answers the question “what does it mean to be green,” with winner based on message, creativity and aesthetic appeal. Top finalists will have their work published on the Associated Students homepage. Ongoing. CSU Chico, 400 West First Street, Yolo Hall Room 178, (530) 898-6677.

Museums GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Fall Exhibits, three exhibits running through the fall semester including “Take Flight,” “Gold Fever: The Untold Stories of the California Gold Rush” and “Third Views, Second Sights: A Rephotographic Survey of the American West.” Through 12/31. $3-$6. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: Victorian Quilts, Historic quilts from early 1800s to 1940s on display. Through 11/30.Veterans Day Exhibit, A display honoring those who serve. Ongoing. 502 Pearson Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8722, www.goldnuggetmuseum.com.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 36

Thanks, and pass the stuffing Whether you’ve succumbed to deep-fried bacon-wrapped-turkey coma while watching the football game (between the, ahem, Redskins and Cowboys), or are enjoying a bird-shaped mold of wheat gluten before EDITOR’S PICK heading out to kick up some leaves during a long stroll through Bidwell Park, we hope that you’re enjoying plenty of time with friends and family this holiday. The CN&R would like to raise a glass and say how grateful we are to all our readers and wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving!

—JASON CASSIDY

November 21, 2012

CN&R 27


Be The Best Gift You’ve Ever Given

Be a Cure buttehumane.org

buttehumane.org

28 CN&R November 21, 2012

Perform Life-saving Medical Treatments

Browse our Mission Inspired Gifts store at Buttehumane.org/gifts


BULLETIN BOARD Community AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Womens Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.butte county.net.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. Next to Long’s Drugstore in Paradise, 8727085.

SOCK THE HOMELESS: A (new) sock drive for the needy in room 607. Donors will be entered into a raffle. Through 12/2. Butte Hall, 400 West First St. Chico State Campus, (530) 898-6204.

BOY SCOUT CHRISTMAS TREE LOT: Proceeds from tree sales help send scouts to camp and fund monthly outings and community service projects. Su, 11/25, 10am. $40. Chico Nut Company, 2020 Esplanade, (530) 8915556.

market in the park serving as a neighborhood collaborative forum focusing on healthy lifestyle promotion, education and access. F, 2-5:30pm through 12/31. Free. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 592-0889, www.cchaos.org.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library

weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.but tecounty.net/bclibrary.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water

EFFECTIVE ADVOCACY FOR ANIMALS: A seminar discussing puppy mills, wildlife protection, factory farms and more. Go online to RSVP. W, 11/28, 7-9pm. Free. TrailBlazer Pet Supply, 1612 Mangrove Ave. Next to Kragen’s, (530) 8921848, http://ow.ly/eLMeU.

Jesus Center’s Bill Such

HOMELESS: ISSUES & RESPONSES Sunday, Nov. 25 Chico Friends Meetinghouse SEE COMMUNITY

EVOLUTIONARY SHIFT NETWORK: Celebrate conscious awakening, connection and examples of the birth of a new “universal humanity.” Su, 67:30pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods,

honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers’ Market, Municipal Parking Lot on Second and Wall streets, (530) 893-3276.

FOLK DANCING: Traditional folk dancing, no partners necessary. Call for more info. F, 8pm through 11/30. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor

medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 1-4pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave. Corner of Downing and E. 1st Ave, (530) 5188300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

HOMELESS: ISSUES AND RESPONSES: A discussion on issues related to homeless in Chico. Su, 11/25, 1-2pm. Free. Chico Friends Meetinghouse, 1601 Hemlock St. Corner of 16th and Hemlock, (530) 345-3753.

KNITTING CIRCLE: Knitting kits available for purchase. Sa, 2-4pm through 12/22. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

NED TALKS: A nature education series featuring three speakers each week who will present on a variety of topics with a 15-minute time limit. Call or go online to register. Tu, 7pm through 11/27. $8. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524.

STORYTELLING WORKSHOP: Storytelling tips,

exercises and activities. Su, 11/25, 2-4pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

WILDLIFE VIEWING: Guided wildlife tours. Rain

cancels. Sa, 10am through 2/3; Su, 1pm through 2/3. $4. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, 3207 Rutherford Rd. in Gridley, (530) 846-7505.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water quality testing and more. Ongoing; check Friends of Bidwell Park web site for dates and locations. Ongoing. Call for location, (530) 891-4671, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum, including help with Autumnfest 2012 and the annual Christmas celebration. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Chico Halfway between Chico and Durham, (530) 345-3559.

PAWS SPAY & NEUTER CLINIC: For dogs over 40 pounds. Call or go online for more info. Through 11/30. Butte Humane Society Low Cost Spay & Neuter Clinic, 587 Country Dr., (530) 896-0303, www.chicospayneuter.org.

PEMA CHODRON: A video presentation of Pema

talks followed by discussion and tea. Fourth Sa of every month, 9am-noon. Donations. Sky Creek Dharma Center, 120 Three Oaks Ct., (530) 893-8088, wwww.skycreekdharma center.org.

kids at the

Esplanade House

CHAPMAN FARMERS MARKET: A farmers’

bottle, drop your mind, free your feet and your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, 891-6524.

Make Christmas special for the

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.

STARTING MONDAY, NOV. 26 The Chico News & Review invites

community members to stop by our office to choose a name and purchase gifts for an Esplanade House child. Please have wrapped gifts returned to the CN&R office by Wednesday, Dec. 19

★ Be a Special Santa to benefit the children of the Esplanade House, a transitional shelter facility for homeless families. Thank you from:

The Esplanade House and

353 E. 2nd St., Chico • (530) 894-2300

Mon.-Fri., 9am – 5pm

November 21, 2012

CN&R 29


GREAT PIZZA DESERVES GREAT BEER!

NOW ON TAP $ $

2.85 PINT 9.10 PITCHER

964 Mangrove Ave

2027 Forest Ave

2201 Pillsbury Rd

343-4254

342-7265

891-1200

Thank You Chico

198 E. 2nd Ave. 530-809-2304 www.granachico.com

n e p O w No Every Thursday

ed Drink Any Large B$lend 50 only 2

coffee tea pastries ◆

iew.com

srev www.new

30 CN&R November 21, 2012

Motherdaughter baking team saving Chico from cupcake boredom

ake a woman with a master’s degree in

Farm to Table Osteria in Downtown Chico. It’s not too late to reserve the loft for your holiday party.

Super sweets

Tlibrary science, put her together with another woman who is a former longtime corporate-securities

for naming Grana Best New Restaurant 2012

206 Walnut St., Suite A

CHOW

530.809.2157

paralegal, and what do you get? Why, Cupcake Crusader, right? Of course! by Cupcake Crusader, which occuChristine G.K. pies a cozy venue tucked behind LaPadoChico Express Cleaners on East Breglia Avenue, is the boutique cupcakery christinel@ owned and run by Tia Zimmernewsreview.com man—the library scientist—and her mother, Laura Dohojda, who worked in Silicon Valley for many Cupcake years. Crusader Cupcake Crusader also sells its 752 East Ave. delicious, made-from-scratch wares 899-1100 from a big blue food truck bearing www.thecupcake a cartoon likeness of a caped crusader.com female superhero resembling ZimHours: Tues.-Sat., merman. Locals are familiar with 11 a.m.-6 p.m. the artfully converted electrician’s truck from the Thursday Night Market. In fact, Chicoans like the Cupcake Crusader truck and what it sells so much that it came in third place this year in the CN&R’s Best of Chico Readers’ Poll in the Best Meals on Wheels category (behind two taco trucks), even though a cupcake is not technically a “meal.” “I think taste was most important,” said Zimmerman, when asked about the original baking philosophy of the 2-year-old business. “We didn’t want to use any artificial flavorings or anything like that. Everything is made from scratch.” The strawberry cream-cheese frosting topping Cupcake Crusader’s Strawberry Lemon cupcake ($2.50) and the strawberry buttercream icing on the Strawberry Shortcake cupcake ($2), for instance, contain fresh strawberries. “Taste and texture,” added Dohojda (pronounced “Dohoyda”), who unsurprisingly has a long history of baking together with her daughter. “Like Tia said, everything’s from scratch. We bake every day fresh, except Sunday and Monday, which is when we are closed. “Once in a while we’ll get someone in here asking us what mix we use. Aaarrgh! We don’t want anyone to think we do anything from a mix!” Cupcake Crusader—which, incidentally, has a (well-used) drive-thru window for hit-and-

The Cupcake Crusaders: (from left) Laura Dohojda and daughter Tia Zimmerman. PHOTOS BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

run sweet-tooth emergencies—changes its cupcake menu every month, and often features seasonal delights, such as November’s Pumpkin cupcake topped with whipped-cream frosting and cinnamon ($2.50). On the day I visited, which happened to be Election Day, Dohojda and Zimmerman were featuring a festive Funfetti cupcake—vanilla cake with vanilla icing—topped with red, white and blue sprinkles and a tiny American flag. Other cupcakes beckoning me from within Cupcake Crusader’s display case included the marshmallow-frosting-topped S’mores cupcake ($2), the Mocha Caramel Sea Salt cupcake ($2) and the Red Velvet cupcake ($2.50) covered in cream-cheese frosting and dusted with cocoa powder. As I chatted with the likeable duo, I snacked on bites of the glorious-looking, shiny Ganache cupcake ($2.50) they recommended. While the Ganache resembles those familiar chocolate Hostess CupCakes with the chocolate frosting and white-icing squiggle across the top (except that the squiggle across the top is chocolate in the case of the Ganache), it is actually a far cry from that mass-produced snack. The Ganache cupcake is super moist and fresh and scrumptious, the filling is delicate whipped cream instead of a glop of sugar-laden fat (or is that fat-laden sugar?) and the frosting is divinely rich ganache (made with a touch of coffee to bring out the chocolate flavor). And no preservatives, of course. “I like the creativity of cupcakes,” offered Dohojda. Silicon Valley, she noted, was fine in terms of creativity “when it was new and the start-ups were exciting.” But as start-ups grew into bigger, more competitive businesses, Dohojda’s work lost its creative luster. “That’s why we change our menu every month,” said Zimmerman. “We get bored!” Cupcake Crusader also offers catering for events, from baby showers to weddings, as well as cupcakedecorating parties for kids. “We get more customers every day,” marveled Zimmerman, acknowledging that her business did indeed hit the boutiquecupcake wave that has swept large cities across the nation, and is still riding high as the only cupcakery in Chico. “We still get tons of new customers.” Ω


09

ARTS DEVO

10

Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

Authentic South Indian Cuisine

09

10

HEY, THANKS! This year the thankfulness is oozing out of Arts DEVO like

09

so much gravy-and-melted-butter lava overflowing his mountain of mashed potatoes. First, I’m thankful that we caught the smelly hippie douchebag just before he sprayed his musty hippie piss all over the DEVO family car as we were returning from a cozy stroll through the downtown Christmas Preview. He still befouled the perimeter with several bongs worth of his liquid stank while staring slackjawed at the dancing bears circling his head, but I’ll take the fact that he didn’t strip away the paint with his unholy discharge as a minor Christmas miracle. Second, I’m thankful the election season is over so that I don’t have Happy Thanksgiving to listen (as much) to both the liberal and conservative zombies as they moan for each other’s brains. I loathe both sides equally when it comes to their knee-jerk partisanship as they’ve fallen in line with the divisive storytellers who reduce Americans to simply being on either a red or blue side of a line. You should all be more mindful of and thankful for the fact that, in nearly all areas of the country, the lines are much blurrier and more purple in hue. Third, and what I’m actually truly thankful for, is the fact that this Thanksgiving Day marks 20 years since Mrs. DEVO and I were engaged in a cheesy Italian restaurant in Redding. How she said yes to a guy whose most fly article of clothing was a $5 silver (silver!) polyester sweater from Goodwill is still a mystery, a wonderful, enduring mystery.

DIRECTED BY CHICO! Megan Peterson, a former Chico girl who is making good in the TV/film industry in Los Angeles, will be screening her first feature film, Heathens and Thieves, at the El Rey Theatre Sunday, Nov. 25, 4 p.m. The western is about a Chinese rancher and his family fighting off drifters, lawmen and hired guns who are trying to steal gold they believe he’s hiding, and it’s been winning Screen shot from Heathens and Thieves. awards at various film festivals. Peterson, a Pleasant Valley High grad, co-directed the film with John Douglas Sinclair, and the two will be on hand with lead Gwendoline Yeo (pictured with gun) to answer questions after the screening. The film is scheduled to be released on DVD this winter. “ON THE 30TH DAY OF KRAMPUS …” I just remembered that this is the year I planned on riding with Krampus for the holidays. His rambunctious approach to the season and his no-nonsense techniques for getting the wee ones to behave are a lot more fun than the usual caroling and soul-killing trips to Mall Land. Plus, there is no art on the Internet that is more rad than that made featuring images of Krampus. None! And that is reason enough to stock up on chains, beer and bells in time for Krampusnacht!

09

09

10 Lamb & Pakoras, 10 Shrimp, Vegetarian & Non-vegetarian Curries, Tandoori & Biriyani Entrees

09

10

10 2574 Esplanade • 530-899-1055

09

www.thepriya.com • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 09 - 9:30pm Lunch: 11am - 09 2:30pm • Dinner: 5:00pm

10

10

10

10

09

10

If you do your holiday shopping with local merchants this season, you will help to: • Strenghten the local economy • Maintain the unique character of our community and region • Support the businesses that support the CN&R • Grow small businesses who collectively create the most new jobs • Keep sales tax revenue in your community by avoiding online retailers Read our Shop LocaL Gift Guide starting in the November 8 issue of the CN&R for great local gift ideas. Shop our SweetdeaLS store for discounted gift certificates from local retailers to stretch your holiday dollars. LocaL retaiLerS: call your CN&R advertising representative today to share your gift idea with our 90,000 regular readers in the Shop Local Gift Guide.

530-894-2300 Merry Krampusnacht, kiddies! November 21, 2012

09

CN&R 31


32 CN&R November 21, 2012


SCENE Michele Miller stands by her booth at the farmers’ market on a recent chilly Saturday morning. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

Inset: Miller’s close-up of a bee in Bali.

Performed by the

Chico Community Ballet

DEC.

13th-16th Performances:

Thurs., Fri. & Sat. at 7:30 p.m. Sat. & Sun. at 2:00 p.m. Laxson Auditorium CSU, Chico

The picture lady Chico photographer has made a life of sharing her images

M since she was a kid. Spurred by the strong emotions she felt after meetichele Miller has loved photography

ing her uncle’s girlfriend, a New York City-based photographer named Franca Lavorato, Miller got a camera when she was in by junior high school and living in the Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia community of Fallbrook in northern San Diego County. christinel@ newsreview.com “She was exotic, gorgeous, with black hair,” offered Miller of Lavorato, “and I was totally enamored with her and the idea of photography—and I got a camera after that.” The camera, as it turned out, was the perfect way for Miller—who describes her younger self as “really shy,” though one would be hard-pressed to describe the gregarious, likable 48-year-old with that particular adjective—to interact with her world. “I saw life through the lens of a camera,” she said. “It was a way of connecting so I didn’t have to talk. ‘Just look at my pictures’—you know, that sort of thing.” Miller’s long-practiced photographic take on life resulted in the creation of Michele Miller Photography. For the past 10 years, she has been offering her artful photographs—of such things as beaches, bridges, doors, insects and animals—mostly in the form of high-quality handmade photo cards that sell for a modest $5. Her photo-card (and handcraftedearring) booth is a familiar fixture at the Saturdaymorning downtown farmers’ market, and her cards are available locally at the Chico Natural Foods Cooperative, Lyon Books and The Plant Barn. Miller—who is married to local yoga instructor Rex Stromness—has traveled to such exotic places as Bali, Hawaii, Guatemala’s Lake Atitlán, Thailand, the Cook Islands and Costa Rica, as well around the Western United States and Canada, to get the visually interesting photos for which she is becoming known. Her “Life In and Out of Focus” card series features,

among other images, striking close-ups of flowers she has encountered in her travels. One, of a tulip and taken at a distance some photographers might deem too close, is breathtaking in its evocation of the beauty inherent in the flower. Another in the same series, of a bristlecone pine tree perched on extended, twisted roots in Utah’s Bryce Canyon National Park, is so vivid as to almost suggest movement on the part of the creature-like tree. Likewise, photographs in Miller’s “Beautiful Bali,” “Heavenly Hawaii” and “Graphic Guatemala” series zero in on aspects of these locales that the average tourist might not pay studious attention to, such as a beautiful close-up of three pottery bowls, one with lime wedges, one with onion and cilantro, and one with chili powder. Her new “Burning Man 2012: Fertility 2.0” series features alluring shots of the elaborate, imaginative vehicles and sculptures that populate the desert during the popular annual event, as well as close-ups of such things as just the kelly-green-stockinged legs of a person jumping high in the air above the playa. Close-ups are one of Miller’s signature photographic moves. Not one for portraits (“I’m really not a people photographer”), Miller prefers “capturing a part of something” and focusing on the texture of it, as she does in her “I’ve Got Your Number” series—close shots of numbers from “1” on up from house-address signs and other places. Her approach is a classic example of becoming successful by making do with what one has: “I don’t have a wide-angle lens,” said Miller, “so I capture a part of [the subject].” At a recent Saturday farmers’ market, Miller smiled and chatted with locals as they stopped by her booth, some just to say “Good morning!” or “Good to see you!” and others to comb through her turnstiles of cards and even ask advice on what to buy for a particular event or person. Miller thrives on her role as supplier of affordable, creative images that speak to her customers. “I want people to have them because I make so much—I’m very prolific,” she said, smiling. “I’ve got a lot to share.” Ω

Tickets $16-$26 available at University Box Office

898-6333

Wine Tasting

www.chicoperformances.com

Last Thursday of the Month

Thursday, November 29 | 5–7pm The Crystal Room 968 East Ave (next to Quackers) $5 per person Wine supplied by Grocery Outlet – Chico 1. Cartlidge & Browne 2006 Knights Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, Totem Ridge Vineyards, Napa CA. 2. Cartlidge & Browne 2006 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, Totem Ridge Vineyards, Napa CA. 3. Blackstone Limited Release 2009 Malvasia Bianca, Blackstone Winery, Sonoma CA. 4. Genesis 2008 Viognier, Hogue Cellars, Columbia Valley WA. 5. Queen Mary 2 Cunard Private Label 2009 Chardonnay, Wente Family Estates, Livermore CA. 6. Lazy Creek Pinot Noir Limited Release, Lazy Creek Vineyards, Philo CA All money collected to benefit The Butte County Child Abuse Prevention Council

TM

November 21, 2012

CN&R 33


6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

A ROYAL AFFAIR

Fri-Sun 12:30pm & 5pm Mon-Wed 7:45pm Sat/Sun 12:30pm matinee

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED LIFE [PG]

OF

RED DAWN

PI

Fri/Sat 3pm & 7:45pm Sun 3pm only Mon-Wed 6pm

 IN : 1:15 6:55 *9:40PM  IN 2D: 4:05PM  12:55 3:05 5:10 7:15 *9:25PM

[PG-13]

RISE OF THE GUARDIANS [PG] TWILIGHT SAGA

 IN : 12:45 5:15 7:30 *9:45PM  IN 2D: 3:00PM

BREAKING DAWN PART 2 [PG-13]

SMASHED

IN

SHOWTIMES GOOD WED 11/21 - THUR 11/29

FLIGHT

[R]

SKYFALL [PG-13]

WRECK-IT RALPH [PG]

 12:45 3:45 6:45 *9:30PM

Fade to twilight

We will never end.

 12:30 3:35 6:40 *9:40PM  1:00 3:55 6:50 *9:45PM IN : 1:45 7:05 *9:35PM IN 2D: 4:15PM

*L AT E S H O W S O N W E D T H R U S AT O N LY A LL S HOWS B EFORE 6PM ARE B ARGAIN M ATINEES  I N D I C AT E S N O P A S S E S A C C E P T E D

RECYCLE

THIS PAPER. COME CHECK US OUT!

Vampire soap opera comes to a satisfying conclusion

T tent in serving as a pop-culture punchline. Cite it as the poster child for the decline of Western civilization, and you’re

Nov 16 - Jan 15 Located in the center of the Chico Mall near Annie’s Pretzels

he Twilight franchise has always been consis-

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

likely to get a barked “Sparkly vampires!” as an amen. That’s a lot of power given to what’s just a supernatuby ral soap opera for teenage girls—not exactly a Craig Blamer sophisticated demographic. But when you get down to it, it’s no sillier than the Batman franchise. It just doesn’t go for baroque. But if nothing else, Twilight is certainly ubiquitous in our culture. I haven’t touched any of the books or movies, but going into the “final” entry of the series I nonetheless knew The Twilight that it was about morose high-schooler Bella Saga: Breaking (Kristen Stewart) who gets charmed by Dawn, Pt. 2 Edward (Robert Pattinson), a century-old vamStarring Kristen pire who still looks like one of the extras from Stewart, Robert Pattinson and Rebel Without a Cause. Sparks fly, and then he Taylor Lautner. disappears on her. She then takes up with the Directed by Bill werewolf next door (Taylor Lautner) until Condon. Edward storms back and fur flies. Bella Cinemark 14, decides she likes Edward better and has sex Feather River Cinemas and with him, gets knocked up with a mutant baby Paradise Cinema that tears her up pretty good, and Edward has 7. Rated PG-13. to turn her into a vampire to save her from pushing daisies. Other things happen, but I think that’s pretty much all you need to know going into Breaking Dawn, Part 2. Poor So now, vampiress Bella (snerk) is all sunshine and smiles. And she’s got Edward well ’n’ truly whupped. They take runs through the woods and he shows her how to prey. And her Fair new vampire family has fixed them up with a Thomas Kinkade cabin in the woods, so that the newlyweds can have rough vampire sex without annoying anyone. The only dark side Good to these happy days is that their newborn daughter is growing at an alarming rate, and some sinister cabal of bloodsuckers is breathing down their necks over some misunderVery Good standing (not to mention the fact that the drama here is mostly conveyed by eye candies standing around in a posh living room explaining what’s going on). Other vampires drop in to Excellent

3

WEDNESDAY 11/21 – THURSDAY 11/29 ARGO (Digital) (R ) 11:15AM 2:00PM 4:45PM♥ 7:30PM♥ 10:15PM♥ CLOUD ATLAS (Digital) (R ) 11:00AM 2:40PM 6:20PM♠ 10:00PM♠ FLIGHT (Digital) (R ) (10:00AM*) 1:05PM 4:10PM 7:15PM 10:25PM LIFE OF PI (3D) (PG) (10:30AM*) 12:00PM 1:30PM 4:30PM 6:05PM 7:30PM 10:30PM LIFE OF PI (Digital) (PG) 3:00PM 9:05PM LINCOLN (Digital) (PG-13) 12:35PM 3:50PM 7:05PM 10:20PM RED DAWN (Digital) (PG-13) (10:35AM*) 12:55PM 3:15PM 5:35PM 7:55PM 10:15PM RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (3D) (PG) 11:45AM♦ 2:10PM♦ 4:45PM♦ 7:20PM♦ 9:45PM♦ RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (Digital) (PG) (10:30AM*) 1:00PM♦ 3:30PM♦ 6:05PM♦ 8:30PM♦

SKYFALL (Digital) (PG-13) 11:05AM 12:40PM 2:15PM 3:50PM 5:25PM♣ 7:00PM 8:35PM♣ 10:10PM TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (Digital) (PG-13) (10:00AM*) 11:10AM 12:45PM 2:00PM 3:30PM 4:50PM 6:15PM 7:40PM 9:05PM 10:30PM WRECK-IT-RALPH (3D) (PG) 2:00PM 7:10PM WRECK-IT-RALPH (Digital) (PG) 11:25AM 4:35PM 9:50PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) BON JOVI INSIDE OUT (Digital) (PG-13) Tues. 11/27 ONLY 8:00PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) - MET OPERA: THE TEMPEST ENCORE (Digital) (NR)Wed. 11/28 ONLY 6:30PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) - STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION – A CELEBRATION OF SEASON 2 (Digital) (PG) Thurs. 11/29 ONLY 7:00PM

Showtimes listed w/ ( *) shown Wed. 11/21- Sun.11/25 ONLY Showtimes listed w/ ♠ NOT shown Tues. 11/27 Showtimes listed w/ ♦ shown thru Tues. 11/27 ONLY Showtimes listed w/ ♣ NOT shown Wed. 11/28 Showtimes listed w/ ♥ NOT shown Thurs. 11/29

34 CN&R November 21, 2012

11/27 Punch Brothers 12/4 Danú: Christmas in Ireland 12/5 Comedy Pet Theater 12/7 Sweet Honey In The Rock 12/13-16 Nutcracker 1/22 Clint Black Trio 1/23 Golden Dragon Acrobats 1/30 Erth’s Dinosaur Petting Zoo 2/1 Tommy Emmanuel 2/6 Cirque Mechanics 2/7 Whose Live Anyway? 2/12 Juan de Marcos & the Afro-Cuban Stars

2/14 Russian National Orchestra 2/17 Eric Bibb & Habib Koité All shows at Laxson Auditorium CSU, Chico

TICKETS - (530) 898-6333 or CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM

1

2

3

4

5

show support and do parlor tricks to pass the time. Finally, the swishy tribunal shows up on their back 40 and a battle royale explodes all over the snowscape as the vaguely Mormon vampires and their new werewolf friends take on the old-school establishment. Yeah, the subtext isn’t subtle. It’s actually a very well-crafted climax that concludes with a perfectly delivered punch line. And some mutterings that notso-subtly set up the next cycle of sequels. Overall, the material was handled with a lighter touch than I expected, which made some of the absurdities easier to swallow. If nothing else, Breaking Dawn 2 delivers on what it promised. Which when you think about it is pretty damned rare these days. Ω

Note on Thanksgiving-week films: Due to the holiday, it’s possible that not all film listings were posted by press deadline. Please check with theaters for most current schedule. Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Howard Hardee and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Life of Pi

Ang Lee (Brokeback Mountain, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon) directs the adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel about a 16-year-old boy who, after a shipwreck, spends 227 days at sea on a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Red Dawn

A remake of the 1984 film about commies invading a rural U.S. area only to have local high-schoolers take up arms to try and fend them off. This time the commies are North Korean instead of Soviet, the rural area is Washington instead of Colorado and the lead is played by Thor instead of Patrick Swayze. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.


Rise of the Guardians

A 3D animated-film version of William Joyce’s The Guardians of Childhood kids’ books about a group of famous characters—Jack Frost, Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and the Sandman— who band together to save kids from the nightmares of the Boogeyman. Starring the voices of Alec Baldwin, Hugh Jackman, Jude Law, Chris Pine and Isla Fisher. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

A Royal Affair

Danish film about Christian VII of Denmark, an 18th-century king who suffered from mental illness. This historical drama takes place in the king’s court and tells the story of the love affair between his queen and the royal physician and effect their relationship has on the course of history. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Smashed

Aaron Paul (Breaking Bad) and Mary Elizabeth Winstead star as a hard-partying couple whose marriage is tested when she decides to try and get sober and repair some of the damage her drinking has caused. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Now playing

4

Argo

In 1980, in the midst of the Iranian hostage crisis, a CIA agent organized an undercover caper that was desperate, dazzling and very improbable. In the hands of Ben Affleck and company, that little farrago becomes a riveting, briskly entertaining thriller. There is no shortage of peril and suspense in the basic incident—agent Tony Mendez (Affleck) is attempting to spirit six Americans hiding in the Canadian embassy out of Iran. And the tension is only heightened by the outlandishness of Mendez’s scheme—he and the six escapees will exit Iran disguised as a Canadian film crew. That scheme adds a second, curiously complementary element to the story—Mendez must set up an actual production company as a supporting cover story for the filmcrew disguise. The cover-story movie becomes a sci-fi epic called Argo which might be filmed in Iranian locations. The movie angle adds a rich level of ironic comedy to Affleck’s own production, which thereby also becomes a dark, barbed comedydrama about the business of making movies. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

4

Cloud Atlas

Not the least of Cloud Atlas’s various accomplishments is that, over nearly three hours of moderately unconventional storytelling, it sustains itself as steadily engaging dramatic entertainment. This collaborative hybrid comes from a trio of writer-directors—Tom Tykwer (Run Lola Run) and the Wachowski siblings (The Matrix). Tykwer directed the modern-day sections—the romantic and professional travails of a young, gay composer (Ben Whishaw) in the Britain of the 1930s; the efforts of an investigative reporter (Halle Berry) to expose a corporate energy scandal in 1973; and the present-day misadventures of a slightly addled literary editor (Jim Broadbent) trying to escape confinement in a prison-like nursing home. The Wachowskis directed the 19th Century segment, the shipboard drama of a young businessman (Jim Sturgess) who comes to the aid of a stowaway slave, as well as the two episodes set in the future—in Korea in 2144, a young “fabricant” (Doona Bae) rebels against the socially-engineered regimentation imposed by a high-tech oligarchy; and in 2346 two very different survivor/refugees (Berry and Tom Hanks) try to sort out their respective heritages and destinies. Following those motifs and echoes is one of the quiet pleasures offered by this occasionally clamorous movie. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

4

Flight

own words, “flying.” And it’s apparent early on that he’s right about that in more ways than one: he’s an airline pilot of unusual gifts, and he’s a spectacularly reckless consumer of drugs and alcohol as well. Whitaker practices both kinds of flying more or less interchangeably, and in the course of Flight, a heroic exploit, which is also a lethal misadventure, forces him to face up to the full consequences of who and what he has become. Skillfully scripted by John Gatins, Flight is a rousing, pungent character study, with a fine, nuanced performance from a smoldering Washington. And while it is not the action/disaster epic that its preview trailers might seem to suggest, it does ride a long ways on the energy of its flawed, semitragic protagonist’s daring and swagger. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

5

Lincoln

The new Abe Lincoln picture from Steven Spielberg and Tony Kushner is an historical epic of a quality that is exceptionally rare in American movies. Kushner’s brilliant script focuses on Lincoln and his contemporaries and on the complex political maneuvering involved in getting slavery abolished, via the Thirteenth Amendment, in the first four months of the war’s final year, 1865. That much historical specificity may sound a little daunting—or by some lights, a little too dry—but the Spielberg/Kushner Lincoln is never dull. There’s a fresh, canny mixture of docudrama and dramatic entertainment throughout, and a wonderfully trenchant and diverse cast provides vivid foreground and background alike in this unusual and complex version of Spielbergian spectacle. Daniel Day-Lewis’ reedy and avuncular performance in the title role is a genuinely magnificent spectacle in its own right. Sally Field (as the emotionally divided Mary Todd Lincoln), David Strathairn (as William Seward, Lincoln’s shrewdly droll right hand man and Secretary of State), and Tommy Lee Jones (as the firebrand abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens) make especially strong impressions. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

4

Skyfall

Daniel Craig’s continued development of the James Bond character well beyond its previous dimensions is at the forefront of Skyfall, the first Bond film directed by Sam Mendes (American Beauty). The film’s opening sequence finds Bond botching an attempt to recover a stolen hard drive containing mega-important information (albeit after another stunningly awesome overthe-top chase scene, which has become something of a signature for the rebooted series). From there it’s all womanizing, daydrinking and swallowing handfuls of prescription medication. And when a blearyeyed Bond is put through a series of physical and mental tasks to determine whether he is still fit for service (secret service, that is), we are confronted with a concept entirely foreign—Bond being bad at stuff. He misses practice shots and labors through push-ups and chin-ups, all while looking generally disheveled. The dialogue between Bond and his latest nemesis, Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem), is the most compelling aspect of the film—excluding the scene in which a military helicopter crashes into a Scottish castle. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —H.H.

“The CN&R is the

cornerstone of our maRkeTiNg.”

In Motion Fitness has been advertising with the Chico News & Review since we opened in 1992. Every week the CN&R provides a professional and impressive product that delivers our message with clarity and style. The full color ads really showcase the pools and water features, the palm trees and gardens, the Mediterranean architecture and the bodies In Motion. From kids’ activities to senior programs, the CN&R effectively targets and reaches all demographics. It seems like everybody in Chico views the CN&R. We would highly recommend the CN&R to any business in Chico.” -CARL SOMMER OWNER OF IN MOTION FITNESS

3

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

Wreck-it Ralph

A Wreck-it Ralph (voiced by John C. Reilly) is the villain character in a video game who gets tired of being the bad guy, so he escapes to other games in the arcade in an attempt to be the hero. Also starring the voices of Sarah Silverman, Jayne Lynch and more. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

In the new movie by Robert Zemeckis, Whip Whitaker (Denzel Washington) is, in his

November 21, 2012

CN&R 35


NIGHTLIFE

WEDNESDAY 11|21—WEDNESDAY 11|28 NORTHERN HEAT: Live southern rock. F, 11/23, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort,

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS

3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusacasino.com.

This is how to work up an appetite for Turkey Day, by stuffing your spirit with four bands worth of straight-ahead punk rock at Monstros Pizza, tonight, Nov. 21. Joining locals Fight Music and Born into This on the menu will be L.A. punks The French Exit and the always-in-motion Off With Their Heads, who are finishing up one of their marathon jags before taking a break to release Home, their second disc on Epitaph, due in March of 2013.

THE ROCKHOUNDS: Classic rock covers. F,

11/23, 9pm. Free. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

24SATURDAY CHUCK EPPERSON & ERIC PETER: Funk,

R&B and soul. Sa, 11/24, 9pm. Farwood Bar & Grill, 705 Fifth St. in Orland; (530) 865-9900.

21WEDNESDAY HAPPY JAZZ: A weekly jazz appointment with Shigemni Minetaka on piano and Christine Lapado-Breglia on upright bass. W, 5-7pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St.; (530) 891-9044.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues, country, tin pan alley, jazz and more. W, 7-9pm. Opens 11/21. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St. Upstairs from The Beach.

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS: W, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs, 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 345-7672.

OPEN JAM NIGHT: Join the jam. Drum kit,

ments. All ages until 10. W, 7pm. Free. Italian Garden, 6929 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 876-9988; www.my space.com/theitaliangarden.

ROCKRIDGE BLUEGRASS BAND: One of the North State’s most seasoned traditional bluegrass bands. W, 8:30pm. $5. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St; (530) 514-8888.

SWING DANCE WEDNESDAY: Every Wednesday night, swing dancing lessons 8-10pm. W, 8-10pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

TAINTED LOVE: The popular ‘80s tribute band returns to Gold Country’s stage.

W, 8:30pm. $5. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy. (530) 534-9892; www.goldcountrycasino.com.

22THURSDAY 23FRIDAY

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

CHICO BAILE LATINO: MORE THAN SALSA: Salsa, Merengue, Cumbia and Bachata dance lessons followed by an open social dance. F, 8pm through 11/15. $2$4. The Hub, 685 Manzanita Ct. Inside the Holiday Inn, Chico; (530) 518-9454.

CHRIS GARDNER BAND: A local country-

rock five-piece band in the brewery. F, 11/23, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

COTTONWOOD: Live music in the lounge. F, 11/23, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls

Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

COUNTRY NIGHT: Live country music with Rancho Mars. F, 5-8pm. Free. Towne Lounge, 327 Main St.; (530) 896-0235.

DRIVER: Blues, classic rock and rockabilly. F, 11/23, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 538-4506; www.gold countrycasino.com.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.; (530) 343-7718.

4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.goldcountrycasino.com.

FLAT BUSTED: Live country twang. Sa,

11/24, 9pm. Free. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

MCBRIDE BROTHERS BAND: ‘60s rock

covers. Sa, 11/24, 9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning; (530) 528-3500; www.rollinghillscasino.com.

NORTHERN HEAT: Live southern rock. Sa,

11/24, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort, 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusacasino.com.

COTTONWOOD: Classic rock and

oldies in the lounge. Sa, 11/24, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.feather fallscasino.com.

DRIVER: Blues, classic rock and rockabilly. Sa, 11/24, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino,

BUMP! EDM NIGHT Saturday, Nov. 24 Maltese Taproom SEE SATURDAY

bass rig, guitar amp and PA system are provided, bring your own instru-

THANKS FOR GIVING US YOUR BUSINESS

RECYCLE

THIS PAPER.

Liberty Cab

898-1776

$150 to the Sacramento Airport!

36 CN&R November 21, 2012

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 26 performs with his band as a partial benefit for KZFR Community Radio. W,

CHRIS GARDNER BAND Friday, Nov. 23 Feather Falls Brewing Co.

bass rig, guitar amp and PA system are provided, bring your own instruments. All ages until 10. W, 7pm. Free. Italian Garden, 6929 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 876-9988; www.my space.com/theitaliangarden.

PUNCH BROTHERS: The New York Citybased string quintet specializes in progressive bluegrass, a fresh take on old-time traditional music. Tu, 11/27, 7:30pm. $16-$28. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 8986333; www.chicoperformances.com.

25SUNDAY JAZZ: Weekly jazz. Su, 4-6pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

26MONDAY JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

28WEDNESDAY HAPPY JAZZ: A weekly jazz appointment with Shigemni Minetaka on piano and Christine Lapado-Breglia on upright bass. W, 5-7pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St.; (530) 891-9044.

OPEN MIC: All ages welcome. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

POLECAT

If you’re gonna make “Americana/stomp-grass/world music,” you could hardly pick a better band name than Polecat. The Bellingham, Wash., five-piece plays a lively version of newgrass that is marked by fiery fiddle and the unique inclusion of electric guitar and the driving beat of a full drum set to beef up their rootsy sound. Joining the ’cat Wednesday, Nov. 28, at Café Coda, are local boogie-grass purveyors Low Flying Birds and Chico’s smooth-singing troubadour Kyle Williams.

POLECAT: W, 11/28, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

STEVE JOHNSON: Live acoustic

Americana. W, 11/28, 7-9pm. $3. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

SWING DANCE WEDNESDAY: Every Wednesday night, swing dancing lessons 8-10pm. W, 8-10pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues,

27TUESDAY AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

country, tin pan alley, jazz and more.

W, 7-9pm. Opens 11/21. Free. VIP Ultra

Lounge, 191 E. Second St. Upstairs from The Beach.

MICKEY HART BAND: Mickey Hart, best known for his decades spent as an integral member of the Grateful Dead,

NOW AVAILABLE in Men’s & Women’s Sizes

337 Main St (corner of 4th St. & Main)

Due to scheduling changes that may occur around the holidays, please confirm listed times and details with venue.

1/2 Off

BLACK

FRIDAY

SALE Friday Nov 23th

Furniture • Clothing Electronic Items and more!

Thrifty

Bargain

2432 Esplanade • Chico Store’s Hours: Mon. through Sat. 9 am to 8 pm Sunday 10 am to 6 pm

knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls• knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls

Duffy’s Hoodies

THANKSGIVING CALENDAR

jewelry • radios • blankets • antiques knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls• knick knacks • jewelry • radios • blankets • rugs • dolls

Featuring hand bells, chimes and vocal renditions of new and traditional Christmas music. Sa, 11/24, 2 & 7pm. $10. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise; (530) 8728454; www.brownpapertickets.com.

Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise; (530) 896-0706; www.kzfr.org.

OPEN JAM NIGHT: Join the jam. Drum kit,

SEE FRIDAY

PARROTT FAMILY CHRISTMAS PROGRAM:

11/28, 6:30pm. $35. Paradise

jewelry • radios • blankets • antiques November 21, 2012

CN&R 37


Now Officially Serving Patients of Chico Natural Solutions

Reconstructed: The Best of DJ Shadow DJ Shadow Hip-O After 20 years of sonic experimentation and legendary record-crate digging, DJ Shadow finally serves fans with a “best of” album. This 16-track compilation features fan favorites from throughout his career, including hits from some of Shadow’s genre-bending work with trip-hop supergroup U.N.K.L.E., as well as cuts from his time as one member of hip-hop’s most remarkable underground crews, Quannum collective. It also includes songs from his most recent works. “Redeemed” (from 2011’s The Less You Know, the Better) evokes drifter isolation with dusty vocals and mariachi-like trumpets, MUSIC while “Blood on the Motorway” from the album Private Press (2002) has a palpable melancholy created by the juxtaposition of haunting vocals and cathedral-esque bells. “Organ Donor,” off of Shadow’s much-heralded all-sampled debut, Endtroducing…, gets an extended makeover as Shadow adds an additional 90 seconds of cutting and scratching over the song’s classic beat. “Listen” (featuring ’60s English rock vocalist Terry Reid) is one of two brand-new tracks on the compilation, and the pop-soul tune showcases another facet of one the greatest musical minds of his generation. —Mazi Noble

$50 OFF

with this ad

Chico 1380 Longfellow • Chico 24/7 Verifications - MedEvalsCa.com

Formanism Bruce Forman Trio B4Man Music

50% off g l a s s

p i p e

now through 01/01/13. must present this ad.

glass/water pipes | adult novelties | cigars | hookas | gifts & more

smoke n’ gifts 1380 east ave, ste 112 (inside safeway shopping center)

530.345.0032 m-f 8-8 | sat 9-8 | sun 10-8 38 CN&R November 21, 2012

MUSIC

www.newsreview.com

a n y

With 16 albums to his credit since 1978, guitarist Bruce Forman’s newest CD features him with his current trio—bassist Gabe Noel and drummer Jake Reed—on an intriguing selection of nine originals and two standards. True to his bebopper roots, he’s chosen to reinterpret some standards much as the original beboppers did back in the ’40s; thus we have modern variations of such classics as “Oh, Lady Be Good” (a super-hot rendition known here as “Underdog”), a more relaxed “It Could Happen to You” (aka “Formanism”) and one of my all-time favorites, “Flamingo,” which—after a teasingly coy intro—is given a langorous Latin melt-your-heart treatment. The 56-yearold Forman is an amazingly inventive and tasteful player who gets phenomenal support from his rhythm section, whether playing at speed, e.g. his coruscatingly hot “Obstacle Course,” with some solid soloing by drummer Reed, or on his two very different versions of Toots Theilemans’ classic waltz “Bluesette” (reconfigured as “Bruzette”). In the liner notes Forman writes, “When we played these live sessions we were concerned with the vibe. The mood and the groove.” They obviously nailed it. This is a remarkable disc that, if I were making one, would definitely be on my list of the Top Ten CDs of the Year. —Miles Jordan

Push and Shove No Doubt Interscope Records As someone who grew up on No Doubt, I had high expectations for how the ’90s reggae/ska/punk band’s raw and energetic sound would translate into a more modern, and electronic-leaning, popular-music scene. When “Settle Down,” the sunny first single from the band’s new album was released, I was overjoyed to hear the same upbeat, wild-child attitude in Gwen Stefani’s vocals: “Get, get, get! In line and settle down.” Given that more than a decade has passed since No Doubt released an album of originals, it’s most impressive that they’ve stayed true to their distinct sound while also showcasing the maturity they’ve developed over their hiatus. The regular version of the album features many more slow and melancholy songs than I would have expected, tunes like the mostly acoustic “Undone.” But if you shell out for the deluxe edition you get more of that old funky fun with songs like “Stand and Deliver,” a cover of the classic Adam and the Ants tune, with Stefani mixing things up with her hiccupping ska-style vocals. Overall, a nice blending of No Doubt’s messy, raw early stuff with the big, clean pop sound they’ve developed since going big time. —Kjerstin Wood

MUSIC


butte county living Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Bringing You To

Paradise

Free Real Estate Listings

www.chico.newsreview.com

Find Us Online At:

Quality, Affordable & Friendly Housing

2BR/2BA Nice, light and bright

1296 Sq.Ft. $20,000 Ad #437

2BR/2BA 2008 Great Room Style

1351 Sq.Ft. $74,900 Ad #433

2BR/1BA .49 AC. Move In Ready

1100 Sq.Ft. $ 99,000 Ad # 430

3BR/2BA Private .41 acre lot

1328 Sq.Ft. $139,900 Ad# 442

apartments

houses Location

Bd/Ba

Rent

Dep.

612 W. 2nd Ave 177 E. Francis Willard

2/1 $775 6/2.5 $1550

$875 $1650

Location

801 W. 1st Ave. #1 925 Chestnut St #2

Bd/Ba

Rent

Dep.

Location

2/1 2/1

$600 $700

$700 $800

1163 Olive St #7 1901 ½ Mulberry St

Bd/Ba

Rent

Dep.

3/1 3/1

$750 $725

$850 $825

5350 Skyway, Paradise

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico

RELIABLE 895-1733 | www.reliableproperty.com

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Info subject to change. Please do not disturb tenants. We will schedule the appointment.

(530) 872-7653

Paradise@C21SelectGroup.com www.C21Skyway.com 1-800-785-7654

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com BIG CHICO CREEK ESTATES

Just Listed

7 Savannah Ln. 3bd/2ba. Super clean home on a quiet cul de sac. Brand new roof!

6 Acres of Vacant Land with beautiful view. Close to Chico! $55,000

3 bed 2 bath home with pool.

$269,900

$307,385.

Brandon Siewert

Call today www.AtoZchico.com

(530) 828-4597

for more info. EMMETT JACOBI

Alice Zeissler | 530.518.1872

brandonsiewert.com

Homes Sold Last Week ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

990 El Monte Ave 10 Vallombrosa Cir 23 Walnut Park Dr 846 Coit Tower Way 4243 Shorthorn Dr 1678 Filbert Ave 87 Landmark Dr 25 Noyo Ct 1837 Devonshire Dr 1016 Cordelia Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$600,000 $450,000 $435,000 $429,000 $385,000 $380,000 $358,000 $252,000 $247,000 $239,000

4/ 3 5/ 2.5 4/ 2 4/ 3 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2

SQ. FT.

3364 2444 2541 2110 2140 2412 2543 1585 1320 1589

Cell 530.519.6333 • emmettjacobi.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

9 Hilda Way 6 Avante Way 24 Lakewood Way 1525 Ridgebrook Way 2523 New Heather Way 37 Franciscan Way 3052 Monticello Ln 263 Cavalier Way 4 St Helens Ln 1270 Filbert Ave A

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$225,000 $221,000 $220,000 $215,000 $215,000 $209,500 $205,000 $199,500 $195,000 $185,500

4/ 2 3/ 1.5 4/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 8/ 4

1620 1208 1458 1316 1282 1156 1418 1127 1248 2688

November 21, 2012

CN&R 39


OPEN

hOuSE

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sat. 11-1, 2-4

7 Savannah Lane (X St: W. 11th Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1532 sq. ft. $269,900 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

1497 E. 1st Avenue (X St: Verbena) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1468 sq. ft. $249,900 Michael Prezioso 514-1638

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4

Sat. 2-4

Banner Peak (X St: Bruce Road) New Homes Starting at $269,000 Ed Galvez 990-2054

1099 SIERRA VISTA WAY • CHICO The neighbors love this street. Park location highlight this 50’s rancher. Features include, wood floors under carpet, tile in kitchen and dining area, double deep single car garage with drive thru door, built ins in the 3rd bedroom or office, newer heat and air unit, custom shower, 2 water heaters, 3 sliding glass doors out to the very private back yard. All on a 10,800 sq ft lot. Priced to sell.

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1099 Sierra Vista Way (X St: Downing) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1848 sq. ft. $269,000 Frankie Dean 840-0265 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850 Brandon Siewert 828-4597 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

lISTEd pRICE: $269,000 Steve Kasprzyk | Realtor Associate | Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530) 518-4850 | c21falconer@gmail.com

Spacious living 3bd/ 3ba, 2,782 sq ft, 3 car garage. Park like setting with pool & rose garden. $525,000

Lovely 4bd/ 2ba, 1,830 sq NDING ft ChicoPEhome. $266,500 Nice & large 3bd/ 3ba on 2.5 acres in the pines. $335,000.

Dana Miller

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon (530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

Sat. 11-1, 2-4

KATHY KELLY 530-570-7403

DRE# 01860319

KathyKellyC21@gmail.com

• Mobile on .48 acre, 2 bd/2 ba, 1,296 sq ft with studio $159,500 • Beautiful 3 bd/4 ba, 2- offices, 1.66 acres, pool, 4-car garage, 4-fireplaces. $668,000 • Canyon Oaks, 4 bd/3 ba, 3,200 sq ft, pool, 1 acre $649,999 • Senior Mobile in park, 2 bdd/2 ba, $15,000 • 2.14 Acre Canyon Oaks $149,000 • 1 acre Canyon LD $149,000 SOOaks Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

1244 Magnolia #6 (X St: 2nd Avenue) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 960 sq. ft. $119,900 Sandra Grill 228-3937

Sat. 2-4 1901 Dayton Road #158 (X St: Hwy 32) 2 Bd / 2 Ba, 1248 sq. ft. $15,000 Frankie Dean 840-0265

One owner home on quiet cul-de-sac. 4 bd/3 ba, pool, 3 car garage. $339,500

Jeffries Lydon

MARK REAMAN

M OT IVAT ED !

530-228-2229 Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of November 5, 2012 — November 9, 2012. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

1536 Spruce Ave 1581 East Ave 555 Vallombrosa Ave 20 22 Wrangler Ct 1915 Indiana St 1815 Greenhead Ct 1830 Indiana St 745 Flyway Ct 130 Spruce St 6493 Hollywood Rd 40 CN&R November 21, 2012

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

Chico Chico Chico Chico Gridley Gridley Gridley Gridley Gridley Magalia

$170,000 $155,000 $142,500 $130,000 $197,000 $185,000 $178,500 $123,500 $109,500 $212,000

2/ 1 3/ 2.5 2/ 1 2/ 1 4/ 2.5 4/ 2.5 4/ 2 3/ 2 4/ 1.5 3/ 2

988 1478 902 1027 2538 2538 2245 1504 2151 1762

13937 Andover Dr

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Magalia

$169,000

3/ 2

1397

157 Acacia Ave

Oroville

$180,000

3/ 1.5

1924

523 Hillcrest Ave

Oroville

$175,000

3/ 2

1340

718 Pomona Ave A/b

Oroville

$125,000

6/ 2

2203

206 Redbud Dr

Paradise

$315,000

3/ 2

2187

5684 Little Grand Canyon Dr

Paradise

$208,000

2/ 2.5

1858

2181 Stearns Rd

Paradise

$200,000

3/ 2

1746

5172 Edgewood Ln

Paradise

$154,500

2/ 1

1040


Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

aPaRTMeNT ReNTals ChicoApts.com

Pine Tree Apts 893-8616 Oak Meadow Apts 898-1450 Mission Ranch 892-0400 Villa Risa 636-4622 Built, Owned & Managed by MWSproperties.com

HOMe ReNTals

classics 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

Nice Home For Rent 4bd / 2ba all electric in the country. $3000/mo. 530-899-0618

ficTiTiOUs BUsiNess

scHOOls aNd TRaiNiNG ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenduraOnline.com (AAN CAN) EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists. For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

iNsTRUMeNTs fOR sale Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900

MUsiciaN seRVices Record your own album on CD at a quality home studio. Call Steve 530-824-8540

THeRaPeUTic MassaGe Full Body Massage For Men $25 Call Lee CMT 893-2280 Shower Available

Massage By John

$25 special. Full-body Massage for Men. In-Calls, Out-Calls Now avail. By Appointment. CMT, 530-680-1032

Relaxing Massage

in a warm tranquil studio. w/ Shower, $35 deal. Appts. 530-893-0263 11am-8pm

GeNeRal $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214 Help Wanted!! Make $1000 a week mailing brocures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa.com (AAN CAN)

laNd 20 ACRES FREE bUY 40 - gET 60 ACRES. $0 dOWN, $168/MONTH. MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN)

ROOMs fOR ReNT

www.newsreview.com

NEW inventions and product IDEAS WANTED! Free info & confidential consultation on your idea at DAVISON. Call toll free at 1-800-428-5116 Today. Fee-based service. (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundres of online listings with phots and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

JOHNSON HOUSE OF SOBRIETY

more jobs online

GeNeRal

Men, women & women w/ children, a sober living environment, rooms for rent. includes utilities. 530-520-5248

more real estate online

www.newsreview.com

WaNTed TO BUY CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FREE FLOW TECH at 278 Vail Dr. Chico, CA 95973. NICK KOEHLER, 9 Roxanne Ct. Chico, CA 95928. JEREMY MCCARTHY, 278 Vail Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: NICK KOEHLER Dated: August 7, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001165 Published: August 16,23,30, September 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ENLOE REGIONAL CANCER CENTER at 265 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER 1531 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MYRON E. MACHULA Dated: September 27, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001386 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CHICO ENDOSCOPY CENTER LLC at 888 Lakeside Village Commons Chico, CA 95928. ENLOE MEDICAL CENTER 1531 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: MYRON E. MACHULA Dated: October 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2007-0001979 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DISCOVERY PLACE at 790 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. MICHELLE WINDES 790 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHELLE WINDES Dated: October 17, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001486 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012

DO YOU NEED TO PUBLISH

A LEGAL NOTICE? We’re the best deal in town! FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT NAME CHANGE / PETITION / SUMMONS

Call 894-2300 ext. 2204 for rates and information.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name OLD CROW ESTATE SERVICES at 852 Wisonsin St Chico, CA 95928. PAUL SHUY 1916 Laburnum Chico, CA 95926. TAMMARA ASKEA 852 Wisconsin St Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TAMMARA ASKEA Dated: October 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000240 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OLD CROW ESTATE SERVICES at 852 Wisconsin St Chico, CA 95928. TAMMARA ASKEA 852 Wisconsin St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: TAMMARA ASKEA Dated: October 23, 2012 FBN Number 2012-0001525 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WACI at 273 E. 2nd Ave Chico, CA 95926. WINSTON COLGAN 273 E. 2nd Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: WINSTON COLGAN Dated: October 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001533 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO HOMES REAL ESTATE SALES INCORPORTED at 2571 California Park Drive Suite 200 Chico, CA 95928. SANDI BAUMAN 2571 California Park Drive Suite 200 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SANDI BAUMAN Dated: October 22, 2012 FBN No.: 2012-0001516 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A GREENER CLEAN at 3805 Addys Ln Oroville, CA 95965. GARY MIDDLETON 3805 Addys Ln Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GARY MIDDLETON Dated: October 15, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001476 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT - OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name BEAUTY SQUARED at 240 Main ST #140 Chico, CA 95928. E AND V SQUARED GROUP LLC 240 Main ST #140 Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SHUHUA LUO Dated: October 17, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001191 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEAUTY SQUARED at 240 Main ST #140 Chico, CA 95928. DKNJ INTERNATIONAL CORP 4091 Bresee Ave Baldwin Park, CA 91706. This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed: SHUMING CAO Dated: October 17, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001492 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FRANK WATTERS AND MARY ANNE HOUX CHILDREN’S FUND at 13 Victoria Way Chico, CA 95926. BUTTE COUNTY CHILD ABUSE COUNCIL 13 Victoria Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed: MARGIE RUEGGER Dated: October 24, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001526 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NOR CAL MEAT AND SEAFOOD at 3549 Esplande #443 Chico, CA 95973. WILLIAM L BILLINGSLEY 286 1ST Avenue Chico, CA 95926. TONY K MUNROE 3549 Esplande #443 Chico, CA 95926. EDWARD SKAGGS 1487 East First Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership.

this legal Notice continues

Signed: TONY MUNROE Dated: October 30, 2012 FBN Number 2012-0001549 Published: November 8,15,22,29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as VICTORIA;S PIANO STUDIO at 11 Integrity Ct Oroville, CA 95965. VICTORIA HIEB-SWIGER 11 Integrity Ct Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Victoria Hieb-Swiger Dated: October 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001536 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TOP TIER at 1712 Hemlock St Chico, CA 95928. VINCENT GIACOMO COMMENDATORE 1712 Hemlock St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Vincent Commendatore Dated: October 15, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001473 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012

classifieds

CONTINUED ON # 42

November 21, 2012

CN&R 41


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EARTHEN URN at 1837 Norman Ave #1 Chico, CA 95928. KEVIN REGAN 1837 Norman Ave #1 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: KEVIN REGAN Dated: November 2, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001564 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVAN’S EXPERT TREE SERVICE at 2225 Norte Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. TREVOR W. EVANS 2225 Norte Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Trevor W. Evans Dated: November 2, 2012 FBN Number: 2012: 0001566 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REBECCA’S REMEDIES at 2394 Durham St Durham, CA 95938. REBECCA LYNN YARROW 2394 Durham St. Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: REBECCA YARROW Dated: October 24, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001498 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OLOFAT ONE BITE BBQ at 1040 Windsor Way Chico, CA 95926. SIGRAH BILLYOS 1040 Windsor Way Chico, Ca 95926. SCOTT SUZUKI 1050 Columbus Avenue #14 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SCOTT SUZUKI Dated: November 5, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001576 Published: November 8,15,22 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CANOPY HAIR STUDIO at 1245 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA M. WALKER 23 San Ramon Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: REBECCA M. WALKER Dated: October 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001429 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OROVILLE CAB COMPANY at 1388 Longfellow Ave Ste 14 Chico, CA 95927. BYRON J CHARLES SHOBAR 69 Jackie Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: BYRON SHOBAR Dated: October 30, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001533 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LITTLE SISTER at 1447 Bel Air Drive Paradise, CA 95969. Patricia White 1447 Bel Air Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by

this Legal Notice continues

an individual. Signed: Patti White Dated: October 12, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001462 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE HEMLOCK APARTMENTS at 1750 Humboldt Rd Chico, CA 95928. IRIS M. RING 871 Birdhaven Ct Lafayette, CA 94549. TERRANCE O. RING 871 Birdhaven Ct. Lafayette, CA 94549. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: IRIS AND TERRANCE RING Dated: October 31, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001561 Published: November 15,22,29 December 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GO GREEN CHICO CARPET CLEAN at 1167 Peninsula Drive Chico, CA 95928. DAVID WIKUM 1167 Peninsula Drive Chico, CA 95928. CANDICE WILLIAMS 1167 Peninsula Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed; DAVID WIKUM Dated: November 8, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001588 Published: November 22,29, December 6,13, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTHPOINT AUTOMOTIVE at 4950 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. PAUL STEINMETZ 1850 Villas Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: PAUL STEINMETZ Dated: October 15, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001467 Published: November 22,29 December 6,13, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MYSTIC ROOTS BANDS, STAY POSITIVE PRODUCTIONS, STAY POSITIVE SOUND at 738 Picaso Ln Chico, CA 95926. DAYNA WYMAN 738 Picaso Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: DAYNA WYMAN Dated: November 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001596 Published: November 21,29, December 6,13, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MARIO’S WEED AND PEST at 1485 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. Michelle Burns-Hammack 1485 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. Mario Jimmy Thompson 1485 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: MARIO JIMMY THOMPSON Dated: November 6, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001582 Published: November 21,29, December 6,13, 2012

42 CN&R November 21, 2012

December 8, 2012. Beginning at 12:00pm. Sale to be held at: Extra Storage 2298 Park Ave. Chico, CA 95928 Published: November 21,29, 2012

NOTICES LIEN SALE 12/4/12 10AM AT 727 CEDAR ST., CHICO Ã96 POLAR CF# 5255NZ HIN# PLE07218A696 LGTH: 00809 Ã 96 POLAR CF# 5254NZ HIN#PLE07215A696 LGTH: 00809 Ã 97 FETHR LIC# 4BP2541 VIN# 4FGL12100VA153624 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE: Saturday 11/24/12 at 12:00pm at Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, 893.2109, Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units of household or personal items and boxes, leather couches, dressers, bed frame, mattresses, wooden cabinets, holiday d‚cor, and other misc. items not specified will be sold. Silent auction.The unit numbers and names are: Unit 229: David Brantley Sr. Unit 447: James Esh Unit 219: Candace Carby Unit 244: John Silvera Unit 078: Shelly Byrd Unit 087A: David Krause Unit 527: Barbara Moore Unit 030: Steve Anthiety Unit 404: Cherie Higgs Unit 336: Rent A Center Unit 211: Rent A Center Unit 384: Rent A Center Unit 306: Rent A Center Unit 075: Rent A Center Unit 301: Rent A Center NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage facility act (B&P code 21770 et.sec.) the undersigned will sell the contents of: Erik Hellman, large power toys, fishing poles, love seat, desk, entertainment center. Lewis Steisberger, MP-3 dock, tools, fridge, toys, furniture, electronics. Edith Guerro, folding room divider, shelving units, deep fryer. Kyndra Couloures, love seat, speakers, bike, toys, tools, home decor. To the highest bidder on: December 8, 2012 Beginning at 1:00pm. Sale To be held at: Extra Storage 3160 Olive Hwy Oroville, CA 95966 Published: November 21,29, 2012 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage facility act (B&P code 21770 et sec) the undersigned will sell the contents of units: Dawn Credell, misc. household items. Braxton Jackson, misc. household items To the highest bidder on: December 8, 2012. Beginning at 2:00pm. Sale to be held at: Extra Storage 60 E. Grand Ave Oroville, CA 95965. Published: November 21,29, 2012 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage act: (B&P code 21770 et.sec.) the undersigned will sell the contents of: Lillian Willyard, furniture, clothes, household items. Richard Rawls, bags of clothes, stuffed animals. Anthony Nava, clothing, bicycles, bike parts. To the highest bidder on:

this Legal Notice continues

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TAMMY BUSHYHEAD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LILLIANA JAELYNN RIVERA Proposed name: LILLIANA JAELYNN PEZQUEDA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 30, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L. M Lean Dated: October 24, 2012 Case Number: 158110 Published: November 1,8,15,22, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner GARY L WILLIAMS JR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELIZABETH KRISTINE WAGONER Proposed name: ELIZABETH KRISTINE WILLIAMS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 14, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: A The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: November 6, 2012 Case Number: 157857 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner FRANCES LOUISE WALL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: FRANCES LOUISE WALL Proposed name: PEACE KANUNA MANO

this Legal Notice continues

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 21, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is:

this Legal Notice continues

Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: November 7, 2012 Case Number: 158253 Published: November 22,29, December 6,13, 2012

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT DEANNA J. TRISDALE You are being sued. Petitioner’s name is: JOHN H. TRISDALE You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a

this Legal Notice continues

Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp)

this Legal Notice continues

at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court One Court St. Oroville, CA 95965 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: JOHN H. TRISDALE 1523 7th Street, Oroville, CA 95965. Signed: Kimberly Flener Dated: November 14, 2012 Case Number: FL042128 Published: November 21,29, December 6,13, 2012

To place an adult ad, call (530)894-2300 ext.5 ENTERTAINMENT SUNNY’S!

The North State’s Largest Selection of HOT, Sexy Ladies! More ROOMS! More Privacy! More Fun! Discrete, Private, Convenient Location! Shower Shows, Sensual Massage, Private Shows, Lap Dances, Double Trouble, and MUCH More! (Chico) See Our Awesome Website www.sunnysgirls.com

343-3594

CHICO

EYE CANDY

We have blondes, redheads, brunettes. Ages 19-25 Fetish Shows Double Trouble www.chicoeyecandy.net

530-321-5763

MARQUISE GIRLS

16 yrs Of Top Quality Hottest Girls Guaranteed Bachelor/B-day/Any Last Minute Strip Parties! Double Trouble Shows XXX Grad Parties We are Hiring We Bring the Show to You!

899-7173

New Website: www.marquisegirls.com

ESCORTS *Playful Playmate* I got what you want & I am waiting for you to come & get it. Absolute Satisfaction Katt 530-513-2390

SENSUAL TOUCH Magical Massage

Men, come feel the magic of all new magical hands. Ladies, we have Rico for your pleasure. Here for a short time! See them before they leave. Call for an appt. now. 530-354-0341

AFTERNOON DELIGHTS

Wishing U happy holidays. All sessions 1/2 price Special Nov 1st to Jan 2nd. 11am-7pm. Daily 588-4474

PHONE ENTERTAINMENT CALL SEXY SINGLES ON QUEST! Live Local Chat Try us FREE! 18+ 916-282-2300 530-760-1010 www.questchat.com


“Don’t think about making art, just get it done,” said Andy Warhol. “Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” I encourage you to adopt that minimanifesto for your own purposes in the coming weeks, Aries. If you’re not an artist, simply substitute the appropriate phrase for “making art.” It could be “creating interesting relationships,” “exploring exotic lands,” “changing corrupt political institutions,” “fixing environmental problems” or even “making money.” The main point is: Focus on doing what drives your quest for meaning, and forget about what people think of it.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A Jungian

writer whose name I have unfortunately misplaced made the following observations: “In a man’s psyche, the unconscious is experienced as chaotic, filled with violent and irrational processes of generation and destruction. But to a woman’s psyche, the unconscious is a fascinating matrix of sacred images and rituals which in their wildly contradictory meanings express the secret unity of all life.” After analyzing the astrological omens, I suspect that you Taurus men now have an unprecedented opportunity to experience your unconscious as women do. As for you Taurus women: You have the chance to get a vivid, visceral understanding of how true this description of the female unconscious is.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Let’s talk about the Decision. I’m referring to the Choice you have been dancing around and fretting about and analyzing to death. By my estimate, there are at least 15 different solutions you could pursue. But just seven of those solutions would meet the requirements of being intelligent, responsible and fun. Of those seven, only four would be intelligent, responsible, fun and enduring. Of those four, only two would be intelligent, responsible, fun, enduring and the best for all concerned. I suggest you opt for one of those two.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m not nec-

essarily asserting that you need to edit yourself, Cancerian. Only you can decide that. But I will state unequivocally that if there is in fact any editing needed, now would be a good time to do it. You will have extra insight about what aspects of your life might benefit from being condensed, corrected and fine-tuned. It’s also true that the rectifications you do in the coming weeks will be relatively smooth and painless. So look into the possibilities, please. Should you calm your blame reflex? Downsize a huffy attitude? Shed some emotional baggage?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): How many times

have you been in love, Leo? Just once or twice? Or have you dived into the depths of amorous togetherness again and again over the years? Whatever the case may be, I bet you have strong ideas about the nature of passionate romance and profound intimacy. That’s natural and normal. But I’m going to ask you to temporarily forget everything you think you know about all that stuff. I invite you to become innocent again, cleansed of all your mature, jaded, hopeful and resentful thoughts about the game of love. In my astrological opinion, there’s no better way for you to prepare for what will come next.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A medical-

research journal reported on a British woman who accidentally swallowed a felt-tip pen. It lay there in her stomach for 25 years. When surgeons finally removed it, they were surprised to find it still worked. I am not suggesting that anything remotely as exotic or bizarre will be happening to you, Virgo. I do suspect, though, that you will soon have an experience with certain metaphorical resemblances to that event. For example, you may retrieve and find use for an element of your past that has been gone or missing for a long time.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Sapiosexual” is

a relatively new word that refers to a person who is erotically attracted to intelligence. Urban Dictionary gives an example of how it might be used: “I want an incisive, inquisitive, insightful, irreverent mind. I want someone for whom philosophical discussion is foreplay. … I decided all that means [is] that I am sapiosexual.” In the coming weeks, Libra, I suspect you will be closer to fitting this definition than you’ve ever been before. The yearning that’s rising up in you is filled with the need to be stimulated by brilliance, to be influenced by wisdom, to be catalyzed by curiosity.

by Shannon Rooney Meagan Fischer, 22, attended a Nonviolent Communication (NVC) workshop when she was just 16. “It just made perfect sense to me,” she said, referring to a communication style often serving as a conflict-resolution process. She joined an NVC study group, and now she’s working toward becoming a certified NVC trainer. A member of NorCal NVC, she will host a telesummit session for Bay NVC (baynvc.org) on Nov. 27, and “It’s not too late join.” Go to www.meaganmalachite.com and norcalnvc.org for more info.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 2007, the

band the White Stripes did a tour of Canada. One of their final gigs was outdoors in St. John’s, Newfoundland. The band came onstage, played one note—a C-sharp—and declared the performance over. It was the briefest rock show in history. Judging from the current astrological omens, Scorpio, I’m thinking it would be a good time for you to do some almost equally pithy things. You have the potential to be extremely concise and intense and focused in all you do. I urge you to fulfill that potential. Pack every speech, gesture and action with a concentrated wealth of meaning.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your

redesigned thrust-vectoring matrix is finally operational. Love those new nozzles! Moreover, you’ve managed to purge all the bugs from your cellular-tracking pulse, and your high-resolution flux capacitor is retooled and as sexy as a digitally remastered simulation of your first kiss. You’re almost ready for takeoff, Sagittarius! The most important task left to do is to realign your future shock absorbers. No more than a week from now, I expect you to be flying high and looking very, very good.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The plot twists will be intriguing. The actors may be unpredictable, even erratic. Blossoming and decay will be happening simultaneously, and the line between wisdom and craziness could get blurry. There’s not nearly enough room in this little horoscope to describe the epic sweep of the forces working behind the scenes. Are you willing to confront uncanny truths that other people might regard as too unruly? Are you brave enough to penetrate to the depths that others are too timid to look at, let alone deal with? I hope you are, Capricorn, because that will give you the power to ultimately emerge from the drama with your integrity shining and your intelligence boosted.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Psychologists have done studies that suggest we subconsciously adopt the qualities of fictional characters we read about or see in movies. That’s not a problem if those characters are smart, ethical, highly motivated people whose ideals are similar to ours. But if the heroes of the stories we absorb are jerks who treat others badly and make messes wherever they go, our imitative urges may lead us astray. Right now is a crucial time for you to be extra careful about the role models you allow to seep into your imagination. You’re especially susceptible to taking on their attributes. I say, be proactive: Expose yourself intensely to only the very best fictional characters who embody the heights you aspire to reach.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “The fates

guide him who will; him who won’t, they drag,” so said the ancient Greek philosopher Seneca, and now I’m passing it on to you. It’s an excellent time for you to think about the issue. Ask yourself: Have you been cooperating with fate so that it has maximum power to shepherd you? Have you been working closely with fate, giving it good reasons to consistently provide you with useful hints and timely nudges? Or have you been you avoiding fate, even resisting it out of laziness or ignorance, compelling it to yank you along? Spend the next few weeks making sure your relationship with fate is strong and righteous.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEAGAN FISCHER

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Young communicator

by Rob Brezsny

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of November 21, 2012

others with things like mediation and selfconnection.

What is NVC?

What do you do locally with NVC?

It’s a set of principles and a consciousness, based on the work of Marshall B. Rosenberg— a process that just really reframes the way we think about the world, and it connects us to a deeper truth that is transcendent of “right and wrong” thinking, which can help us not only solve external conflicts, but also internal conflicts. Just using the process stimulates personal and spiritual growth because it encourages deep introspection.

I’m on the steering committee and teaching team for NorCal NVC. I teach classes and workshops [and] am available for one-on-one support. We do free intros. The next one is on Nov. 25 at the Butte County Library in Chico at 6:30 p.m.

What has been your experience? First, it set me free to accept myself. Before NVC, I didn’t really honor my own emotions. Next, it helped me see everyone’s innocence and inspired me to get more creative about conflicts. Sometimes conflicts are just a matter of misunderstandings or a lack of creativity. NVC addresses that. It’s given me a much deeper sense of support with people in my NVC community, and I’m able to support

Why did you want to become a certified trainer? I wanted to teach NVC from the moment I started to learn it. When I was in my first group, I started mediating with friends right away. I had a lot of successful mediations.

What’s your vision? Starting next month, I’m joining the Living Light Studio, a collective of women who all work privately. I will offer private support sessions, mediation and NVC classes. NorCal NVC is continuing to offer more classes and workshops (the next eight-week class starts Dec. 7).

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter himself@anthonypeytonporter.com

John Bidwell I recently went on a Native American Historical Walk on the Chico State campus. I’d heard and read a little about the history of Chico and John and Annie Bidwell, but not much. I ran across the party line just after we moved here, namely that John Bidwell, a brave soldier and noble human being, pretty much created Chico out of the wilderness, planting thousands of trees and being nice to the Indians in the process. John was a goon in the Mexican-American war and rose to the rank of major; he was a Major goon. Later he became a General goon in the California militia. A school principal in his late teens, he was an early invader on the California Trail, a lucky gold miner, and the recipient of large land grants near what is now Chico. He was also a politician— California senator, U.S. congressman, and Prohibition Party candidate for president. The talk on the walk was mostly the usual litany of aggression against Native Americans in every way possible. For a while the Indians weren’t disappearing fast enough to satisfy state government so, as a capitalist institution, it began paying for Native American scalps as a way of encouraging people to kill them, social engineering with a vengeance.

When John Bidwell bought Rancho Arroyo Chico the thousands of people who lived there were more or less part of the deal, and he used them as workers on his ranch. He doesn’t seem to have been without compassion for Native Americans and was rumored to have had an Indian wife and child before Annie showed up, which seems reasonable if unproven. John Bidwell was smart and gutsy, and he didn’t miss many chances to increase his fortune and power. He got the local Native Americans to opt out of the Federal Indian Treaty of 1851 and to stay and work for him rather than move to the reservation where they were being promised provisions from the federal government. He didn’t come through with what he’d promised, though, and he wrote to national politicians opposing the treaty, which was never ratified by the U.S. Senate or the California Legislature, leaving the Mechoopda Maidu and other California Indians in the trick bag. Many tribes are still not officially recognized and miss out on the rights and privileges that go along with that recognition. John Bidwell also introduced buffalo grass and casaba melons to California and was influential in the anti-hydraulic-mining movement. I was prepared to judge Bidwell harshly, but I don’t think I will. He was just quite a guy. November 21, 2012

CN&R 43


C-2012-11-22  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you