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HOLD-UP See NEWSLINES, page 8

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Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 35, Issue 43

20

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CN&R

Vol. 35, Issue 43 • June 21, 2012

1

OPINION

James S. Nagel, MD

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 From This Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

Would you go to a Chiropractor for heart surgery?

12

Downstroke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES The Pulse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

COVER STORY

20

ARTS & CULTURE

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benefiting the Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Robert Speer Managing Editor Melissa Daugherty Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Calendar/Special Projects Editor Howard Hardee News Editor Tom Gascoyne Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine G.K. LaPado Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, Jovan Johnson, J. Jay Jones, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, Sean Murphy, Mazi Noble, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Matt Siracusa, Scott Szuggar, Karl Travis, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Kyle Emery, Dane Stivers Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Design Manager Kate Murphy Design Melissa Arendt, Brennan Collins, Priscilla Garcia, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Manager Alec Binyon Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino, Robert Rhody Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Advertising Coordinator Jennifer Osa Events Intern Alina Chavera

Office Manager Jane Corbett Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Sharon Conley, Shannon Davis, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Cassy Vaioleti-Matu Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (250 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

New revenues are needed It’s a minor miracle that Chico city government has managed to

Oh, (expletive deleted) ’em all! O million words on a variety of subjects, mostly political. Unless you know me, you can’t imagine the restraint I’ve

tive deleted) rat’s nest on his head, I have no recourse but to resort to expletives. And if you can look at the faces of Scott Walker, exercised in writing all those words with nary an expletive. Paul Ryan or Eric Cantor without wanting to When I get worked up, I can become unleash a barrage of curses, then there just a little injudicious in my choice of lanmight be something (expletive deleted) guage, resorting to cuss words my mothwrong with you. er tried to discourage me from using. Her The middle class has lost something like admonishments didn’t work, nor did the 40 percent of its wealth since this recession advice of teachers who said that well-edu- hit back when Bush was in office. Eight cated people didn’t succumb to cursing. years of his misrule put the nation trillions of All those attempts to get me to keep a dollars in debt while enriching the richest civil tongue in my head failed. In fact, (expletive deleted) 1 percent beyond the the older I get, the more I’m inclined to wildest dreams of pashas and kings. Corpoby pepper my conversation with expletives. rate CEOs like Jamie Dimon were favored Jaime O’Neill I can’t even read the paper or with billions in no-interest governwatch the (expletive deleted) The older I get, ment bailouts when Bush & Co. The author is a news without employing lanwas in charge, and those guys are frequent contributor guage most often heard in the more I’m still eating high on the (expletive to the CN&R. His brothels or treatment centers hog with the Obama previous guest inclined to pepper deleted) for people suffering from administration. comment, “A soonBut even with all the Wall to-have can’t wait,” Tourette’s Syndrome. my conversation I know I should have more Street foxes in Obama’s hen appeared in the with expletives. self-control, but when I see house, there’s still no question that May 10 issue. people like Mitt Romney talka (expletive deleted) Romney ing about privatizing the educational sysadministration would be worse. The guy who tem, I go (expletive deleted) crazy. ran Bain Capital ain’t likely to care what ails When that nitwit Donald Trump starts people far removed from money and power, a talking about Obama’s birth certificate, fact that ought to be obvious to any (expletive and journalists interview him as though deleted) idiot in any (expletive deleted) lanhe has an actual brain under that (expleguage used to say it. Ω ver the last decade, I’ve written more than a

4 CN&R June 21, 2012

survive the recession without gutting programs or dangerously weakening police and fire protection. Other communities have either gone bankrupt (Vallejo), are close to bankruptcy (Stockton) or have considered it (Merced, Lincoln, Hercules). Chico not only has survived intact, it’s balanced its budget throughout the recession—despite the loss of millions of dollars in revenues. To do so, the city has had to reduce staffing by more than 70 positions, or 16 percent of the workforce. It has also reduced services, become creative in allocating resources, and deferred ongoing maintenance expenses into the future. This can’t go on indefinitely. As Assistant City Manager John Rucker told the City Council during its all-day budget meeting Tuesday (June 16), “Staff is stretched pretty thin in each department.” So far the public hardly notices, he said, but inside City Hall everyone is feeling the pressure to do more with less. And it could get worse. As usual, the state is facing a huge budget shortfall. This time the Democratic majority in the Legislature is counting on passage of Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax measure in November. But if that doesn’t pass, trigger cuts will immediately hit local K-12 schools, Chico State and Butte College and ripple through the local economy. This dire situation no doubt is what led Councilman Andy Holcombe to say, “I’m the lone voice in the wilderness on this, but I really think our city should take another look at new revenues.” Addressing conservatives’ adamant refusal to consider new taxes, he said, “You get what you pay for. And people simply are not paying enough right now.” Unfortunately, the effort to pass a local tax measure broached several months ago by a group of community leaders has been put on hold, so as not to compete with the governor’s measure. In the meantime, council members and others who agree that new revenues are needed should get behind that initiative. It’s not ideal, and long-term pension reforms are much needed, but it’s the only viable option right now to stop the bleeding in state government—and, by extension, in city government. Ω

A time to celebrate We were glad to hear that the local chapter of the California

Nurses Association had decided to scale back a planned picketing of the grand opening celebration of the new Magnolia Patient Tower at Enloe Medical Center, which is being held Saturday, June 23, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The picketing was designed to call attention to labor negotiations that the nurses say have stalled and the fact that the union’s contract with Enloe has expired, but, as the nurses realized, it would have injected a negative element into what is meant to be a joyful community celebration. As chapter President David Welch told the CN&R, Enloe’s nurses are as thrilled about the new tower as anyone. But the celebration was too good an opportunity for letting members of the community know about the negotiations to pass up, so the union members will be leafleting instead of picketing, which is fine. Chico is blessed to have a hospital that is such an integral part of the community, a nonprofit run by citizen volunteers and accountable to the community, one that doesn’t put profits ahead of people. This is an increasingly rare situation. Completion of the new tower is testament to the Chico region’s appreciation for their hospital. It wouldn’t have been built without the many contributions of money and time from local residents. We congratulate Enloe CEO Mike Wiltermood and his staff and all the volunteers on a job well done. Ω


FROM THIS CORNER by Robert Speer roberts@newsreview.com

Unconstructive criticism President Obama and the Chico City Council have something in common: They’re both being blamed for a phenomenon over which they have only limited control—the health of the economy. In Obama’s case, he’s being held responsible for the sluggishness of the recovery from the worst recession in modern history. The economy may be improving, but not as fast as we’d like, and Obama is getting the rap, especially from Mitt Romney. Why people think Romney would do a better job is beyond me. For an example of the kind of criticism the City Council is getting in this election year, check out Councilman Bob Evans’ letter on page 6 of this issue. It’s a polite but pointed missive—Evans is a nice guy, but he’s also up for re-election—attacking an editorial in last week’s issue of the CN&R that urged readers to look at the city’s newly issued Sustainability Indicators Report to see the positive impacts the city’s focus on sustainability is having. The essence of Evans’ message is that, in this time of daunting financial challenges to the city, the council—meaning its liberal majority, not him and fellow conservative Mark Sorensen—is doing too little in the way of economic development. The implication is that the majority’s interest in creating a sustainable community is somehow a drag on or distraction from the need to “help our economy grow.” Evans charges specifically that the council has failed to discuss economic development at its regular meetings, and that five of 12 meetings of the Economic Development Committee have been cancelled because, according to an unnamed source, “they had nothing to discuss.” Well, OK. But does that mean nothing is being done? Or is Evans just making political hay? City Manager Dave Burkland, in his June 19 budget memo to the council, paints a different picture. Burkland writes that the local economy “continues to show signs of meaningful business recovery and growth,” and that “significant job creation is also occurring through new businesses in Chico,” as well as expansion of existing businesses. Meanwhile, the city is implementing its Economic Development Action Plan, which has as its highest priorities expanding high-speed Internet, bringing in commercial air service and developing infrastructure financing. The city is also reaching out to the business community, and, according to Burkland’s memo, “relationships with the business community and our economic-development partners are as close and collaborative as they have ever been.” The city’s “focus on creating the right climate for business is paying off as employers and property owners are getting the attention and guidance they need from City staff,” Burkland writes, “and regulatory processes are being reviewed for improvements to make sure they are predictable and efficient.” Sounds like the city is doing a pretty good job, no? Like Romney, Evans doesn’t say what he’d do differently. If he’s got a plan to “foster new revenue sources to fund the services our residents expect,” as he writes in his letter, he doesn’t say what it is. Where’s the beef, Bob?

Robert Speer is editor of the CN&R.

Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

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Yes, ban the bags Re “Bagging the plastic bag” (Newslines, by Tom Gascoyne, June 14): Bagging the plastic bag really is an uncomfortable shift for some people. But it is a necessary evil. We the people found a need to have “bags”; we the people now see the need to eliminate the bags that are creating an eyesore on our beautiful California landscape. I have recently been traveling from Northern California to Southern California by train and bus. The garbage-filled plastic bags lining the railroad tracks and fences bordering the tracks, freeways, irrigation ditches and roads in between are disheartening and shameful. We would do good to ban the use of plastic bags in our community, most definitely. MARY H. MASCORRO Chico

Failed by their humans Re “Out of control” (Newslines, by Katy Noah, June 14): Here is another example of irresponsible dog owners whose animals have caused great bodily harm to an innocent victim. The Sheriff’s Office and Animal Control should be held responsible for not acting on Ms. LoRusso’s numerous complaints. It appears they assumed she was not telling the truth about the dogs’ behavior and the owners’ lack of compliance in restraining their animals. This woman was asking for intervention, and our public authorities were not forthcoming with that action. What is your duty to the citizens you are paid to protect? What if it had been one of the children? You should all be ashamed for your lack of concern and action. My best wishes go to Ms. LoRusso for a complete recovery. My sympathy goes out to the two dogs who may not have a future due to all the humans who failed them. ELAINE RADFORD Paradise

Good pay for government work Re “‘Wake-up call’ on reform” (Editorial, June 14): Your readers might find my research on the subject interesting. Just Google “City of Chico employee salaries” and you can do it too. I found that we Chico citizens are paying some former employees $166,800 in retirement! Wow. I found part-time clerical-type employees making $44,000 per year. I started adding up the salaries of full-time employees to get an average, starting with last names ending in A, and I made it through G. By then I felt so sad and hurt that I had to quit. The city of Chico pays full-time employees with last names ending in A through G an average of $78,500. (The percapita income in Chico is $21,382.) I came to Chico in 1972 because I found the surroundings, the mountains, the lakes, LETTERS continued on page 6

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Re “A revealing city report” (Editorial, June 14): In its editorial, the CN&R applauds the City Council’s focus on sustainability over economic development. I disagree. When the state confiscated $500,000 of our vehicle license fees, dissolved the redevelopment agency (a $8.5 million hit to Chico) and decimated funding for higher education (a $77 million projected loss to our local economy), Chico’s economic underpinnings changed forever. Since these events, the city has suffered continued downsizing, including police and fire (remember the temporary closure of Fire Station 5?). Funding for our library, for critical nonprofits, the arts community and for road repairs are all decimated. Let’s not forget that 10,500 citizens are still suffering because Chico’s unemployment remains above 12 percent. Finally, do you realize there are almost 400 fewer businesses operating in Chico than just two years ago? Does this sound like the council’s emphasis on sustainability is creating jobs? So how has the council responded to this new economic reality? Well, in 2011, the Economic Development Committee cancelled five of 12 meetings because they had “nothing to discuss,” and the City Council never placed “economic development” or “jobs” on its regular agenda, not even once, nor have they appeared on our agendas in 2012. If you believe, like me, that we must foster new revenue sources to fund the services our citizens expect, then it’s vital our council help our local economy grow. This will do more than anything else to restore Chico to the healthy, vibrant and safe community we all want. BOB EVANS Chico

“If you believe, like me, that we must foster new revenue sources to fund the services our citizens expect, then it’s vital our council help our local economy grow.”

—Bob Evans

watched in disbelief as the students choose from hamburgers, cheeseburgers, pizza and chicken nuggets five days a week, every week. They may also selected from raw vegetables, which most children do not choose; fruit, which most children choose; and white milk or chocolate milk, which most children choose. So a standard lunch for a child in the CUSD is a processed entrée low in nutritional value, a few pieces of fruit, and chocolate milk. Mr. Enserro, you may be a chef, but you exhibit very little creativity when it comes to providing our children with nourishing, delicious, freshly prepared food. Yes, money is a factor, but other school districts have the same funds to work with and have somehow managed to prepare meals made from scratch using commodity foods at a price equivalent to or less than the processed food that you currently use. The decision-makers in these districts strive to provide their students with nutrient-dense meals in which every calorie counts. Our children in Chico deserve nothing less. JEAN WALTERS, M.S., R.D. Chico

Let people decide on GMOs

Re “GMO labeling up to the voters” (Downstroke, June 14): We the people have the right and the privilege to decide what goes on our tables and how it was processed before it got there. GMOs Where’s the creativity? need to stay out of our kitchens, out Re “Catching up with chef Enserro” (Greenways, by Christine G.K. of our gardens. If we are one of the U S developed I N E S S U Snations E O N Lthat Y don’t LaPado, May 24):N E W S & R E V I E W Bfew DESIGNER ISSUE DATE ACCT. EXEC. require alert labeling, then we need As a retired dietician and BG 07.23.09 to get with it! LJG grandmother of two children FILE NAME DATE Kudos to REV. Pamm Larry. Keep up attending school in the CUSD, I IRONMOUNTAINTLEATHER072309R2 05.21.09 the great work. Now let’s all get occasionally visit my grandchiland vote on this very important SELECTION) dren during lunch, and I haveUSP (BOLDout

Editor’s note: Mr. Evans is a member of the Chico City Council. He is up for re-election in November.

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Noise ordinance will be abused Re “Enough with the noise!” (Guest comment, by Neal Wiegman, June 7): What you are proposing is going to be abused and lead to a hostile law enforcement relationship with college students. You only need to look to other cities where strict noise ordinances have been introduced. I recently moved back from Houston, Texas, where a similar ordinance was passed. Not only were residences targeted for citations, but also businesses near residential areas. Businesses that had been in the area for years were receiving multiple citations a night for playing music. DJs were given citations more than they were making for the performances. The police were not required to name the accuser or carry a decibel meter, and would randomly walk neighborhoods listening for loud noises and issue tickets. If you revise this ordinance, it will be abused and change the interpretation of noise to a subjective approach. But the city will get more money. I hope you each weigh the needs of the community with the fairness of the current ordinance and urge the City Council to vote NO. WILLIAM CAPUT Chico

Speaking of pollution… I would like to point out an even more dangerous source of pollution [than noise], namely apartment building air pollution due to neighbors smoking. My downstairs neighbor commences to smoke with her friends at about 11 p.m. shortly after I have retired for the night. Given the recent hot weather, I leave my sliding glass door open. I awake the next morning with a sinus headache and find that my living room smells like an ashtray. Some localities in California have banned apartment smoking. I would urge government officials in Chico to consider a similar ban for the sake of nonsmokers who are subjected to dangerous secondhand smoke. MIKE FARLEY Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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June 21, 2012

CN&R 7


CRITIQUE OF PERIPHERAL CANAL RELEASED

Liza Tedesco (left), general manager of Chico Natural Foods, chats with CNF Membership and Marketing Manager Janae Lloyd at one of the tables in front of the store. To discourage loitering and panhandling, CNF maintains a 20-minute time limit for sitting at its sidewalk tables.

A group called Restore the Delta released a letter June 13 warning U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar that the Obama administration’s support of the installation of tunnels to ship water south is a big mistake. “The $20 to $50 billion, highly controversial project will primarily serve to deliver Sacramento River water, through state and federal pumps, to provide subsidized irrigation water to corporate agricultural operations of the western San Joaquin Valley,” the letter says. Restore the Delta consists of 38 environmental, fishing, consumer and Native American groups, including Chico’s AquAlliance. They also have criticized Gov. Jerry Brown for his support of the project.

PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO

NURSES CANCEL ENLOE PICKETING

This Saturday (June 23) Enloe Medical Center is holding a grand opening celebration for the hospital’s recently completed fivestory patient tower on Magnolia Street between Fifth and Sixth avenues. The ceremonies, which begin at 11 a.m., will include a health fair, an outdoor food court and free tote bags and T-shirts. Earlier this week, Enloe administrators criticized the local nurses’ union, which is in contract negotiations with the hospital, for planning a picket at the same time to bring attention to their cause. In a letter to staff, Enloe CEO Mike Wildermood condemned the picketing and blamed the decision to do so on the “out of town, out of touch union leadership” of the California Nurses Association. In a phone interview Wednesday (June 20), union chapter President David Welch told the CN&R the picketing had been called off, and the nurses would simply be leafleting. “We want to minimize the negative impact,” he explained, “but this was too good an opportunity to let people know about the negotiations to pass up.”

MARKET MANAGER MAKES ABRUPT EXIT

On Friday, June 15, Liz Gardner-Jaqua (pictured) abruptly quit as manager of the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market (CCFM), according to Rob Montgomery, director of publicity for the CCFM. Gardner-Jaqua, who replaced longtime market Manager Terry Givens in January, did not give notice, Montgomery said, and he does not yet know the reason for her abrupt departure. Montgomery said that a meeting of the CCFM board of directors taking place on Wednesday, June 20 (after this paper goes to press), would attempt to “get to the root of what’s going on.” In the meantime, CCFM assistant managers will oversee the CCFM’s markets in Chico, Oroville and Paradise. “This is midseason. It couldn’t have happened at a worse time,” Montgomery said. 8 CN&R June 21, 2012

Natty dread

PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

Chico Natural Foods copes with panhandlers, shoplifters and its first armed robbery

I year-old transient named Todd Anthony Wilkins was arrested at the Vagabond Inn after n the late afternoon of June 7, a 33-

fleeing the Chico Natural Foods (CNF) cooperative on Main Street on foot after being observed by an off-duty employee stealing a bottle of by Christine G.K. beer. Wilkins was still in possesLaPado sion of the beer and the concealed knife he had brandished christinel@ newsreview.com in the direction of the employee who confronted him before calling the Chico Police Department. Wilkins’ beer burglary is the latest in a string of unsavory events that the natural-foods cooperative has had to deal with, such as an increase in shoplifting and aggressive panhandling, the theft of almost all of the store’s fleet of shopping carts in a matter of a few weeks, and people passing out on the front sidewalk. This writer—a member and regular shopper at Chico Natural Foods—has been conContact the fronted on several occasions of co-op: Chico Natural late by brazen panhandlers Foods cooperative (some who lurk in the nearby is located at 818 Chevron gas-station parking Main St. Go to lot before pouncing) and http://chico recently witnessed an apparnatural.com/ or call 891-1713 to ently homeless man quickly learn more about load all of his belongings into the store. a cart and run off as fast as he

could down the street. “I’ve been here 11 years, and this is the first armed robbery I’ve seen,” said CNF General Manager Liza Tedesco of the Wilkins incident. She acknowledged that “repetitive panhandling, people in their wheelchairs passed out in front, or people just passed out,” as well as “tons of shoplifting,” are ongoing problems. “I think it always increases in the summer when the weather is good,” offered Janae Lloyd, CNF’s membership and marketing manager, of panhandling and shoplifting at the store. She added that the popular health-food co-op is “in a great location, in a position between the Jesus Center and the [downtown] plaza and downtown, between the public spaces where [potential problem persons] can hang out for a long time.” One observer commented that this particular part of Main Street was known as “the homeless highway.” “We’re a traceable connection between some of the Jesus Center and Torres Shelter services, and the plaza,” Tedesco said, adding that she believes the struggling economy is a contributing factor to the increased number of people panhandling and such. The problems at CNF are shared

by other members of the Downtown Chico Business Association (DCBA), Tedesco pointed out. “On March 6, we

had a DCBA membership meeting, and the topic was business trespassing,” she said. “A lot of the downtown businesses experience significant impacts to their businesses through challenging behaviors.” The agenda from that meeting indicates a focus on “gather[ing] feedback from downtown business owners on unwanted behaviors and level of urgency for resolution” as well as identifying “potential strategies and next steps the DCBA, [the] city of Chico and service providers can explore to address identified concerns.” Tedesco and Lloyd noted, though, that some downtown businesses—such as higher-end boutiques and specialty shops—have less continuous foot traffic than does Chico Natty, as the store is affectionately known. “At our store, [the unwanted behaviors are] more visible because we’re a more active business,” Lloyd said. “We’re a hub. We have people coming in and out of our doors all day long every day from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.” Tedesco said she met approximately two months ago with City Manager Dave Burkland. “We spent some time talking about the negative impacts [of panhandlers, etc.] and the cost of the impacts,” she said. “We discussed the annual costs that the store incurs mitigating those challenging behaviors. We [at Chico Natural Foods] estimated it’s about $11,000 a year that we spend on the floor manager and the front-end


manager and the staff [to deal with these behaviors].” “And that’s labor—that’s not property,” Lloyd said. “Our floor managers work hard to keep track of the amount of time people spend sitting at the tables out front,” she added. CNF maintains a 20-minute time limit to discourage troublesome activities. “We spend a significant amount of time [dealing with difficult behaviors] because we have a lot of compassion,” said Lloyd, “because with every incident we try to be respectful and kind and find solutions—rather than just say, ‘Get out of here’—by asking, ‘Is there someone we can call?’ [or] ‘Can we walk you to the Jesus Center?’” “We listen to their stories,” Tedesco said. “I sat with one woman and her two dogs for about half an hour, listening to how she could not find services because of her dogs. … She was really struggling.” “We also try to keep track through physical reports of every incident that we have. We have a binder where [employees] write down incidents that we have,” said Lloyd. The binder has been in use for the past three years. “We needed a way to keep consolidated track of these issues so we can respond appropriately and fairly,” Tedesco said. “Using that, I can go out to an individual and say, ‘We’ve had this conversation three times—on this date, this date and this date. The first time I told you this was an issue; now it’s a problem.’ “We’ve spent almost $3,000 on purchasing shopping carts that are now gone,” she added. “We just spent close to a thousand dollars on new ones. It’s what I consider part of our operating expenses now.”

He’s had ‘a really good run’ Oroville administrator welcomes challenge of running Compton

It’s a long way from rural Oroville to Compton, in the heart of the greater Los Angeles metro region, but Oroville’s city administrator, G. Harold Duffey, is eager to make the move. Duffey, who is widely credited with turning Oroville city government around, will be leaving his position July 23 with a year remaining on his contract to become Compton’s city manager. He points out that the tenure of a city administrator is rarely longer than five years. “No one ever thought I would retire here,” he said. “I never alluded to that.” While Oroville made some significant strides during his two-year tenure, Duffey refuses to take any credit. “Oroville had all the basic skills going for it when I got here. I merely came in and tweaked them.” He says the role of a city administrator is to make the visions of the community come alive, and that’s what he tried to do. He says when he first got to Oroville there was a misapprehension that the city was broke and couldn’t accomplish anything. “There was this negative attitude, and yet it wasn’t justified,” he said. “Oroville has had a balanced budget for the last two years and has $6.9 million in uncommitted cash. That’s certainly not broke.” Getting the council to accept that fact was one of Duffey’s goals. He believes he got them to embrace the fact that as a council they can do more, and as a city they can be more.

“I really wanted to provide more

staff training and support [after the June 7 robbery],” said Tedesco. “We have used Tim Truby [former Chico P.D. community services officer who was reassigned to patrol due to budget cuts] on four separate occasions; he’s been our theft and robbery education resource. But when I contacted him to do an allstaff training in response to this [robbery]—for stress, for support—he said his services had been terminated.” Lloyd and Tedesco are confident that the eight centrally monitored video cameras installed at CNF early this year are helping to keep the situation in check. “It’s our priority to make this a comfortable space to enjoy the experience of shopping,” said Tedesco. “Because we are an active hub, it’s occasionally dimmed by bad behavior,” Lloyd said. “We’ll continue to work for solutions. [DCBA Executive Director] Heather Keag is extremely responsive— she’s great. I think she will move the process forward for all the downtown businesses.” Ω

One project in particular that had been talked about for a decade but never moved forward was idea of building a whitewater park in the Feather River as a tourist attraction. “When I heard about that one, I said let’s get it done, let’s see if it can be a reality.” Recent studies indicate that the whitewater park can in fact happen, and Duffey is hopeful the council won’t drop the ball on the project. Another project he pushed was the Gateway Development Project, which the City Council just this week moved forward.

PHOTO BY KATY NOAH

Professionally and personally, Duffey

said he feels positive about his time in Oroville, but that’s not to say everything was perfect. His biggest complaint is with the form of government—city administrator instead of city manager. The difference is that a city administrator reports to the council right alongside the department heads, whereas a city manager hires and supervises the department heads. “With a city manager system, it doesn’t matter who is related to whom, or if someone on the council likes them or not; management of department heads is totally up to the city manager,” Duffey explained. An example of how that can be a problem occurred when the council let the city planner go, despite Duffey’s efforts to keep him on board. “When that happened, I lost my momentum,” Duffey said. “I think the city lost momentum too.” That’s one of the reasons why he’s looking forward to moving to Compton. “I won’t have that problem,” he said. “I’ll be able to create my own team, and ultimately I’ll be responsible for whatever happens.” Pay-wise, it’s a step up, too. Duffey’s new contract gives him $205,000 annually plus a

SIFT|ER You gonna eat that? A fairly substantial percentage of Americans are fat, according to a 2011 GallupHealthways survey of 190 cities and metro areas. At least 15 percent of residents in 187 of the places polled are obese. Boulder, Colo., came in first in the ranking with only 12.1 percent of its population weighing in as fat, while a robust 38.8 percent (190th in the rankings) of the folks living in the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas, metro area tip the scale as overweight. The obesity level, or body mass index, is based on the participant’s reported height and weight. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a goal of cities reaching a 15 percent obesity rate in the United States. Chico (23.2 percent) ranked 51st while Redding (29 percent) came in at a much heftier 142nd. The five least-obese city/metro areas: • Boulder, Colo.: 12.1 percent • Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Conn.: 14.5 • Fort Collins-Loveland, Colo.: 14.6 • Barnstable Town, Mass.: 15.9 • Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-Goleta, Calif.: 16.4

G. Harold Duffey’s last day as Oroville city administrator is July 23.

The five-most obese city/metro areas: • McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas: 38.8 percent • Binghamton, N.Y.: 37.6 • Huntington-Ashland, W.Va., Ky., Ohio: 36.0 • Rockford, Ill.: 35.5 • Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas: 33.8

Source: http://www.livescience.com/18886-obese-cities-list-2011.html

vehicle allowance of $650 a month. This is a significant increase from the $144,000 he’s paid in Oroville. He grew up in Southern California, so he is familiar with the demographics of Los Angeles. “I find it fascinating to work with a multi-cultural community,” he said, adding that he’s looking forward to moving from a city of 15,000 people to one with more than 100,000 residents. “Understanding who people are means I can do more.” Historically Compton was a largely African-American community, but that’s changed in recent years and the city is mostly Latino. It offers a challenge much like the one Oroville offered, however. “It’s a city that projects negativity,” Duffey explained. “I hope to turn that around.” City Council members are disappointed that Duffey is leaving. Mayor Linda Dahlmeier said Duffey’s time in Oroville turned the page for the city. “Now we’re ready to start writing a new chapter.” Councilman David Pittman said he’s not surprised that a well-educated, highly experienced professional like Duffey would stay for only a few years. And Councilwoman Thil Wilcox said that, although she didn’t always agree with Duffey, she was sad to see him go. “I hoped he would at least stay to finish out his contract, but unfortunately he’s not going to.” Duffey has made a vast difference in Oroville, Councilwoman Cheri Bunker said, adding that with him as administrator the city made great strides in making Oroville a better place to live. “A part of that was helping secure the city’s future by assisting in bringing in several new businesses like Marshall’s and Petco.” Duffey said he will miss Oroville. He also said he was “pleasantly” surprised at how welcomed he felt by the people of Oroville when he arrived two years ago. “This is an amazing city with so many resources that can be used for so many different projects. “It’s never been boring; I always loved coming to work,” he said. “I think we had a really good run.” —KATY NOAH katychicago@ymail.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 June 21, 2012

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CN&R 9


continued from page 9

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In the afternoon portion of a marathon budget session Tuesday (June 19), the Chico City Council approved recommended cuts to community organizations, the arts and economic-development projects for the 2012-13 fiscal year. The overall budget, as proposed by City Manager Dave Burkland and the council’s Finance Committee, slashes city operational spending by about $3 million, from $83,836.309 to $80,780,029, in an effort to remain solvent and balanced in the face of tax and other revenue losses and the state’s dissolution of local redevelopment agencies. The council will vote on the final budget July 3. Most of the savings will come from leaving vacated positions open, including four in the Police Department, two of them officers. The budget will pay, however, to keep on four officers whose federal grant is running out at the end of the year, newly hired Police Chief Kirk Trostle told the council. Funding for the arts and community agencies comes from the city’s general fund and an allotted 15 percent of the federal community development block grant (CDBG). Housing and Neighborhood Services Director Sherry Morgado, who delivered the report on community agency spending, explained this year’s CDBG was cut by 12 percent, compounding the loss of money available for these programs. The council approved spending $220,103 from the general fund, 98 percent of last year’s allocation, to assist 18 community agencies. The vote was 5-0, with Mayor Ann Schwab and Councilwoman Mary Goloff abstaining because they work for Chico State’s Community Action Volunteers in Education. “The general fund is meant for core services, and I view the type of services these agencies provide as being core services to our community,” Councilman Andy Holcombe said. Councilman Bob Evans disagreed with Holcombe’s view of core services, saying his was more limited to safety and roads, but agreed the agencies provided needed services “cheaper than the city could do it.” Art Projects Coordinator Mary Gardner presented the Arts Commission’s recommended allocations

to organizations and individual artists reflecting Burkland’s proposed 12 percent cut plus a $1,500 donation from artist Christine Jennings. Jennings, Gardner explained, was a two-time recipient of a mini grant from the city and wanted to give back to the community. Just as one returned grant gave the budget a boost, questions about another returned grant—from artist Janice Porter, who was unable to use $2,000 due to illness—fueled

Most of the savings will come from leaving vacated positions open, including four in the Police Department, two of them officers. the afternoon’s only controversy, which bled into the discussion about funding economic development and tourism. Monica McDaniel-Berg read a letter to Burkland on behalf of the Chico Arts Foundation explaining the Upstate Community Enhancement Foundation would be disqualified from an already approved $12,000 matching grant from the California Arts Council if it did not receive an equal amount from the city. The proposed budget allots the group $10,000 for the 2013 Artoberfest marketing campaign. The letter further suggested Porter’s returned grant could be used to make up the difference. A handful of community members spoke about the importance of Artoberfest to the local economy. Goloff said she didn’t disagree with the suggestion, or with Artoberfest’s value, but questioned whether it set a bad precedent for organizations to apply for matching grants

City Manager David Burkland, who plans to retire in August, pitched his last budget to the City Council on June 19. PHOTO BY KYLE EMERY

based on what they expected to receive from the city rather than what could actually be provided. “My question is whether a grant application was submitted indicating there would be a $12,000 match from the city before you knew there would be a $12,000 match,” Goloff said to Debra Lucero, UCEF director. Lucero said the organization received $20,000 last year, and she wrote the grant the same way she has since Artoberfest began seven years ago. Mayor Ann Schwab added, “I think there’s a roomful of people here who have received less money than they anticipated receiving this year as opposed to last year who would also like to position themselves to get more but weren’t able to do that.” The proposed arts funding passed the council unanimously. The council also eventually passed the proposed spending of $110,000 on economic development and tourism—with an addendum that Porter’s returned grant be redirected to UCEF—by a vote of 5-2. Evans used his no vote to express his disappointment that spending in this area was decreased by 34 percent. Councilman Mark Sorensen gave the other no vote. “I’m voting no not because I’m against economic development but because I’m for economic development,” Evans said. “Of all the categories we’re giving money out to, this is the one that’s got payback. Cutting spending like that is not sending the right message to local businesses, that we are serious about economic development.” —KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com


Talking with Trostle Kirk Trostle gets nod as Chico’s new police chief

Chico has a new police chief. Last week Chico City Manager Dave Burkland announced he was appointing Capt. Kirk Trostle (rhymes with “postal”) to the position recently vacated by the retiring Mike Maloney. That appointment was approved by the City Council Tuesday (June 19). A search for a new chief following Maloney’s announcement last December, generated few qualified candidates, and Trostle was named interim chief in April and agreed to take on the permanent position soon after. During a brief interview at the June 19 all-day City Council budget meeting, Trostle said that while the job presents a challenge in these tough economic times, he very much likes the city staff and the Chico community. “It’s a kick in the pants,” said the upbeat and personable new chief. “We have quality staff, and that is what makes the place so wonderful to work for. And then I enjoy the community and the different philosophical ideas we have here. And then you have forums that are created for us to have discussions and creative input. That’s a value to me.” He said he is looking to serve in the position for a minimum of four years. Trostle, 48, grew up in Redding, where his father was a business manager and his mother was a medical assistant. He attended Enterprise High School, where he played basketball. “It’s the Killer Bees, baby,” he said with a mock grin and clenched fist, recalling his time playing for the Enterprise Hornets. His foray into law enforcement was sparked during his high school years. As far as his family is aware, he is the only member ever to become a cop. The impetus came at church, where he met a police officer who sparked his interest in the law, he said. “After a couple ride-alongs and then after I graduated high school, I became a Redding police cadet,” he said. “Having had that experience, I pursued an administrative justice degree at Shasta College and then came to Chico State and got my public administration degree.” While at Chico State he also enrolled in the Army ROTC and was commissioned as a second lieutenant with the Army Corps of Engineers. From there he was hired as a deputy sheriff by the Butte County Sheriff’s Office. “That is where I started my law enforcement career,” he said. “I served there for about 14 years, including time on the bomb squad and doing patrol and detective work.” In 1994 Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey hired him away from the sheriff. He made his way up to the rank of an assistant chief in the investigations bureau. In an April interview Ramsey described Trostle as “very approachable and friendly. He is no pushover, but I have kidded him in the past that as a cop he’d just as soon hug someone as shoot them.” Kirk Trostle, Chico’s new police chief, “enjoys spending time with his family, riding his horse, golfing and playing drums,” according to a press release from City Manager Dave Burklend. PHOTO BY KYLE EMERY

Quality Piano Rentals & sales In 2006, at the age of 42, he became assistant chief of police for the city of Oroville. Two years later he was promoted to chief. Then, in 2010, when former Chico Police Capt. John Rucker became the assistant city manager, Trostle applied for that job. “I knew there was great opportunity here with the diverse community,” he said. “And this is a larger organization with bigger opportunities for much more experience.” He and his wife, Patricia, who was recently hired as principal of Chico Country Day School, have lived in Paradise since 1988. “But most of my time has been spent in either Oroville or Chico,” he said. “Basically I sleep in Paradise, and the rest of my time is spent down here.” Trostle acknowledged that, in the current

economy, the new job could be daunting. “I think the most significant challenge is the staffing,” he said. “Everybody is affected by that, but when we are looking at one supervisor and six officers, which is minimum staffing per shift, that is a challenge.” He said that on the night before this interview, starting at about 6:30, the station received a domesticviolence call, followed a few minutes later by a notice of a suicide by hanging, a drunk-in-public call, a fight in downtown and a mental-health call. “That was all in a matter of 12 to 15 minutes, and all those things happened at once,” he said. “It’s trying to prioritize what it is we deal with—violence first, and then we work our way down.” Currently the city has 73 officer positions, of which two are vacant because of budget cuts. “Hopefully as revenues increase we’ll be able to get those two positions funded,” he said with a sense of optimism before returning to the budget meeting. —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

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CN&R 11


THE PULSE STATE HOSPITALS FINED

The California Department of Public Health has fined 13 state hospitals a total of $825,000 for lapses in patient safety and care. Some of the penalties were the result of incidents in which hospital personnel left foreign objects inside patients during surgery, improperly monitored a full-term, viable infant—leading to the child’s death—and sexually assaulted one patient, according to The Associated Press. The hospitals facing penalties include Chinese Hospital in San Francisco, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, and Kaiser Foundation hospitals in Oakland, San Diego and San Francisco. State hospitals are required to inform state regulators of all significant patient injuries and must pay $50,000 for a first violation, $75,000 for a second and $100,000 for a third and all subsequent violations.

CANCER RATES MIXED, BUT MORTALITY DROPS New cases of cancer are decreasing in adults and increasing in children statewide, though survival rates are improving across the board, according to a new report. The California HealthCare Foundation found new cancer cases among adults dropped from 456 per 100,000 adults in 1989 to 413 per 100,000 adults in 2009, according to California Watch. Meanwhile, new cancer cases among children rose from 15.4 cases per 100,000 children to 17.3 cases per 100,000 children. However, the mortality rate decreased by 22 percent among adult cancer patients and by 50 percent among children battling cancer. Tina Clarke Dur, of the Cancer Prevention Institute of California, attributed the decrease in adult cancer to efforts to curb California’s smoking rates. Racial disparities remain, as blacks were found 30 to 90 percent more likely to die from cancers of all types than whites.

IT’S NEVER TOO LATE TO QUIT

It’s never too late to quit smoking, even for lifelong smokers past the ages of 60, 70 and 80, a new study finds. Researchers from the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg looked at data from 17 studies that followed smokers for periods ranging from three to 50 years, according to the Los Angeles Times. The studies showed the longer someone was classified as a “former smoker,” as opposed to “current smoker,” the more their risk of premature death dropped. In accompanying commentary, Dr. Tai Hing Lam of the University of Hong Kong found quitting was linked to a 21 percent decrease in the risk of premature death for people in their 60s and quitting reduced that risk by 27 percent and 24 percent for people in their 70s and 80s, respectively. “The hazardous effects of smoking persist even in old age,” the authors wrote. “Even older people who smoked for a lifetime without negative health consequences should be encouraged and supported to quit smoking.” 12 CN&R June 21, 2012

HEALTHLINES

Feeding on fear Young woman’s battle with flesh-eating bacteria has people scared, but local health official says not to worry by

Meredith J. Graham meredithjgraham@gmail.com

University of West Georgia student Aimee Copeland (inset) contracted necrotizing fasciitis from a running river over which she was zip-lining. However, local health officials say there is little cause for concern when recreating in places such as this Big Chico Creek swimming area.

Wabout Aimee Copeland, the beautiful young Georgia woman who contracted hen word spread last month

necrotizing fasciitis, the world watched in horror as she lost several limbs to the disease and nearly died. Necrotizing fasciitis is more commonly known as flesh-eating bacteria, an illness whose name alone is enough to inspire fear in the strongest among us. Despite the recent media hoopla surrounding the disease, however, there is little to fear, says Dr. Mark Lundberg, health officer with Butte County Public Health. Necrotizing fasciitis, NF for short, is indeed deadly, but the likelihood of catching it is extremely small, he said. And aside from normal advice about hand-washing and general sanitation, there’s not much one can do to steer clear of it. In fact, NF is most often caused by something we associate with strep throat—group A streptococcus. “There are millions of cases of group A streptococcus in our country each year, and several million of those are strep throat,” Lundberg said during a recent phone interview. “When the bacteria is in the wrong place at the wrong time a person gets necrotizing fasciitis.” The fact of the matter is, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the strep A bacterium often exists in our bodies without any symptoms. It’s present all over the world, including right here in Butte County. “The bacteria is here—it’s the same bacteria that can cause skin infections, strep throat infections. The bacteria is in our county,” Lundberg confirmed. But he cautioned that Butte County is not in the minority and in no way should people be afraid of catching the flesh-eating bacteria. For those unfamiliar with the story, Copeland, a 24-year-old University of West Georgia student, was spending a weekend with friends and, in a zip-line adventure gone wrong, the line snapped. She fell into the Little Tallapoosa River, gashing her leg on a rock in the process. In the days that followed the accident

CN&R FILE PHOTO

Copeland’s health rapidly declined. Her flesh wound had turned into something much worse, the entry point for deadly bacteria. A website was created and Copeland’s father started a blog (go to www.aimeecopeland.com to see both) chronicling his daughter’s condition. Immediately following the accident, the site reports, she was taken to the hospital, where they stapled a large gash in her leg closed. She was given pain medication and antibiotics and sent home. Within days she’d worsened and, after several more trips to the hospital, was finally diagnosed with NF. She’s since had her leg amputated to the thigh and her other foot and both hands removed. “I was watching her case for a while and it makes me nervous because I know it could happen to anyone,” Lundberg said. “It happens more often in someone who has a reason to be immune-compromised. But even healthy people under certain circumstances can have this terrible infectious disease occur.”

Copeland, by most standards, was not someone who ordinarily should be concerned about getting seriously ill from strep A. And that’s precisely why her story has inspired so much public interest—and fear. That, coupled with the scary-sounding term “flesh-eating bacteria,” has resulted in media outlets around the world reporting about the unusual disease. Necrotizing fasciitis, which spreads rapidly, kills soft tissue in the process, earning it the “flesheating” moniker. “We all feel a little vulnerability when we see a healthy young woman hanging on to her life by a thread,” offered Lundberg. In Copeland’s case, she actually

contracted NF through a bacterium found in the water called Aeromonas hydrophila that entered her body through the gash in her leg. While similar cases have been reported, the majority of NF infections are caused by group A streptococcus.

APPOINTMENT A JOINT DINNER Feather River Hospital’s popular “Dinner with the Doctor” series continues at the Chico Seventh-day Adventist Chuch (1877 Hooker Oak Ave.) on Thursday, June 21, at 6 p.m. Helmuth Jones, M.D., will present a lecture on joint pain following dinner. The lecture is free, while dinner costs $8. Call 876-7154 to reserve a space or for more information.

HEALTHLINES continued on page 15


A Man of the Heart Poets may muse upon the

such infections in several patients since

incomprehensible depths of the human

he began using the machine just eight

heart, but Dr. Deepak Khanna has a

months ago.

pretty good grasp of it. Dr. Khanna

A native of India, Dr. Khanna moved

is a cardiologist at Oroville Hospital

to the United States in 1987 and

and operates the state-of-the-art trans-

received a bachelors’ degree from

esophogeal echocardiogram (TEE)

UC Davis and medical training at St.

imaging system used for advanced

George’s University. He fine-tuned his

analysis of patients’ hearts. The

education in various capacities at

machine was acquired less than a year

Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, West

ago and has taken Oroville Hospital’s

Virginia University, and Mt. Sinai Hospital

heart-analyzing prowess to the next and

in New York City.

highest level. The TEE is essentially an imaging system inserted down one’s food pipe and into his or her stomach for the closest possible view of the heart without breaking skin. Its use generally follows an initial analysis with the simpler transthoracic echocardiogram and produces immediate results which

Poets may muse upon the incomprehensible depths of the human heart, but Dr. Deepak Khanna has a pretty good grasp of it.

can identify a range of maladies and conditions that may slip past other

Today, Dr. Khanna remains committed to his field and has sub-specialized in

gadgetry. “The transesophageal echo-

interventional cardiology. His ability to

cardiogram allows us to better visualize

use the TEE brings him one step closer to

the heart’s structures and better assess

the fixture of the human body that drew

your heart valves and make sure that

him into medicine in the first place.

they are healthy,” Dr. Khanna explains.

“With state-of-the-art equipment like

He adds that the TEE is a machine that

the TEE, we can provide better care to our

not all hospitals have and that it can also

patients at risk of having infection of the

detect structural heart diseases like atrial

heart valves as well as determining the

septal defect, ventricular septal defect, or

danger of a stroke,” Dr. Khanna says.

any other defects that the transthoracic

When Oroville Hospital’s lead

echo imaging system may be unable to

cardiologists takes pictures of your

identify.

body’s most poetically alluring and

“The TEE may also detect heart

physiologically complex muscular

abnormalities that can cause strokes

organ, the images are crystal

and can also diagnose infections of

clear.

the heart, in which aggressive bacteria invade the heart valves and cause leaks and malfunctioning.” Dr. Khanna says the TEE has detected

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CN&R 13


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HEALTHLINES

continued from page 12 Know the signs:

According to the CDC, NF is one of the most severe but least common “invasive” strep A diseases (strep throat is considered noninvasive). In all, there are between 9,000 and 11,500 invasive strep A cases in the United States each year and, of those, only about 6.5 percent are NF. Of NF cases, about 20 percent result in death. “Invasive [strep A] infections occur when the bacteria get past the defenses of the person who is infected,” the CDC reports on its website. “This may occur when a person has sores or other breaks in the skin that allow the bacteria to get into the tissue, or when the person’s ability to fight off the infection is decreased because of chronic illness or an illness that affects the immune system.” Because NF comes on quickly, it can be difficult to diagnose and catch early. When it attacks from the inside, like it did in Copeland’s case, it can lead to sudden gangrene, and amputation becomes necessary. Fortunately, Copeland’s condition was upgraded last week from critical to serious. When stories like Copeland’s put a pretty face on such a devastating disease, it’s only natural for people to get scared. In many ways, seeing a smart, healthy young woman face the possibility of death and ultimately lose her limbs reminds people of their own mor-

These are some of the early symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis, according to the National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation: • Usually a minor trauma or other skin opening has occurred (the wound does not necessarily appear infected). • Some pain in the general area of the injury, often dispropo tionate to the injury. • Flu-like symptoms, such as diarrhea, nausea, fever, confusion, dizziness, weak ness and general malaise. Visit www.nnff.org for more on NF symptoms and treatment.

tality. But just because it could happen to anybody is no reason to put life on hold, Lundberg says. “Don’t change your life regarding this infection,” he advised. “Enjoy the outdoors. Do things that make you healthy and happy. The only thing you can do is be reasonable about how you address symptoms. People should be active but vigilant about signs of disease that are progressing. That woman [Copeland] did the right thing—she kept going back [to the hospital]. Keep going back if the treatment isn’t working. “I really don’t think we can be petrified by fear,” Lundberg concluded. “Sometimes fear is more of a disease and causes more harm than the disease itself.” Ω

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CN&R 15


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS

COAL-FIRED PLANT GETS THE BOOT

California’s Department of Water Resources will not renew a lease with the coal-burning Reid Gardner Power Station in Moapa Valley, Nev., as part of a recently released climate action plan. The department aims to cut carbon emissions to 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, and the Reid Gardner plant, which has served the State Water Project (the water system that diverts water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta), accounts for one-fourth of DWR’s total emissions, according to The Sacramento Bee. Water Resources will purchase more energy from renewable energy sources, the California Independent System Operator and Lodi Energy Center, a natural gas plant beginning operations this summer. Reid Gardner had accounted for about 10 to 15 percent of DWR’s energy for the past 30 years. The contract with the company expires in 2013.

Fracking around

PLANET HEADED FOR IRREVERSIBLE DAMAGE

The United Nations warned of irreversible damage to the planet in its fifth Global Environment Outlook (GEO-5) report, which was released two weeks prior to the Rio+20 Earth Summit in Brazil. The summit, which will be held June 20-22 and is expected to draw 50,000 participants, including environmentalists, scientists, and representatives of governments and companies, will focus on the U.N. Environmental Program’s three-year review of the planet’s health, according to The Christian Science Monitor. The report found that significant progress has been made in only four of the 90 most important worldwide environmental goals—eliminating ozone-depleting substances, phasing out lead in gasoline, increasing access to water and research into marine pollutants. Population growth, urbanization and natural resource consumption are pushing the planet past a tipping point that will cause a “planetary-scale critical transition” to a new environment, according to the journal Nature. “If current patterns of production and consumption of natural resources prevail and cannot be reversed and ‘decoupled,’ then governments will preside over unprecedented levels of damage and degradation,” said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner.

STATE ESTABLISHES UNDERWATER PARKS

A network of underwater parks adopted during a unanimous vote of the California Fish and Game Commission earlier this month will protect some of California’s most iconic ocean locales. The new protections—the first of their kind in the United States—connect with an existing network and were designed by local fishermen, divers, tribes, business owners and conservationists, according to Indybay.org. The underwater parks are along coastal stretches from Mendocino to the Mexican border, including La Jolla, Big Sur, Point Reyes and the remote Lost Coast. “We are poised to return California’s marine resources to the sustainable abundance we all once enjoyed,” said Richard Rogers, a Fish and Game commissioner. 16 CN&R June 21, 2012

Fracking expert Dave Garcia recently returned from a conference in Sacramento looking at the future of the controversial gas- and oil-drilling method in California. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO

Controversial gas- and oil-drilling method is under increasing scrutiny in the state of California by

Christine G.K. LaPado christinel@ newsreview.com

Dtime he showed the widely acclaimed 2010 documentary film Gasland—which ave Garcia recalled the first

looks at the effects of natural-gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale located beneath New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia—at a March 2011 house party hosted by the local Yahi Group of the Sierra Club. “I realized then basically how big of an issue this is, and how dangerous it is,” he said of hydraulic fracturing—or “fracking”—the controversial method of gas extraction that is the primary focus of the film. Garcia has since screened the film several times, including at the Pageant Theatre and at a November 2011 California Student Sustainability Coalition conference at Chico State, at which he spoke in place of the film’s director, Josh Fox, who was double-booked. It was Gasland that gave the general public those signature disturbing images of residents of Dimock, Pa., lighting their tap water on fire as a result of the high amount

of methane present in it due to contamination from fracking chemicals that had seeped into nearby groundwater. In addition to being fingered in more than 1,000 documented cases of water contamination nationwide, according to the Center for Biological Diversity, and related health problems, fracking has also been implicated in a number of earthquakes, such as the dozen in Ohio that made international news earlier this year. Air pollution—such as that created by toxic petroleum hydrocarbons emitted from fracking wells in Garfield County, Colo.—is another serious concern. Since that Sierra Club house party, Garcia—former chairman of the local chapter of the Sierra Club, ex-board member of the Butte Environmental Council, and a retired California State Park ranger—has become

Join the discussion:

Go to http://tinyurl.com/frackshop to find out more about upcoming Department of Conservation workshops at which hydraulic fracturing and the development of regulations to govern the practice will be discussed. One of these workshops will take place in Sacramento on July 25.

the go-to guy in the Chico area for information related to fracking, largely due to his tireless efforts to learn as much as possible about this means of extracting increasingly difficult-to-access pockets of oil and natural gas by high-pressure injection of a mixture of enormous amounts of water, numerous unspecified chemicals and sand deep underground. Garcia recently returned from a day-long conference in Sacramento, hosted by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and attended by representatives from a number of prominent environmental groups, at which the main topic of discussion was the future of fracking in California. Yes, California. Contrary to what some might think, the practice of fracking is not limited to the eastern states and Colorado, Texas, Utah and Wyoming. It is alive and well in the Golden State—and has been for some time. Fracking has been going on in California since the 1950s, according to an article published in the Sacramento News & Review (see “Fracking in Sacramento: Gasland cometh?” Aug. 25, 2011). Though mostly confined to the southern counties of Kern, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Ventura, fracking is also taking place in Monterey County (the Monterey Shale is


rich in extractable subterranean resources) and Sacramento County. Closer to home, Denver-based gas and oil company Venoco Inc. operates fracking wells “in the Grimes gas fields in Sutter County and Willows field in Glenn County,” as SN&R correspondent Cosmo Garvin wrote in March of this year (see “Oh, frack!” March 29, 2012). Though there is no evidence of fracking taking place in Butte County, Garcia is concerned about the encroachment of fracking concerns into the North State. “Fracking is currently producing most of the natural gas [in this country], because they’re going after areas that were previously unattainable,” Garcia said. “Currently, oil and gas companies are going throughout California approaching farmers and other rural people and trying to buy their mineral rights.” Garcia said that when he appeared on a call-in show last year on local community radio station KZFR, “this farmer [from Colusa County] called me up and said Venoco wanted to buy his mineral rights and he said, ‘no.’” Despite the apparent lack of

fracking here in Butte County, “the big issue is, ‘Is the water here in

ECO EVENT GO MUDSKIPPIN’ Athletes and spectators alike are welcome to attend the annual Mudskipper Race, held at Meadowbrook Ranch (15424 Skyway in Magalia) on Saturday, June 23, at 8 a.m. It’s a biking and running race in which two partners must conquer obstacles including a balance beam, stacks of hay, a mud pit and monkey bars. There will be an advanced course, a basic course and a youth course for all ages and fitness levels. Proceeds benefit the playground project at Pine Ridge School. Race registration is $30 in advance, $40 the day of the race. Go to http://tinyurl.com/6s5pvd2 to register.

Northern California safe?’” said Garcia. Not only might nearby fracking operations cause contaminated wastewater to pollute Northern California’s increasingly indemand groundwater, but the need for water to frack a well is so high—roughly from 500,000 to 5 million gallons or more of fresh water per well—that Garcia is also concerned that it is just a matter of time before local water is purchased and trucked away for use by

UNCOMMON SENSE Clean it with vodka! Wondering what to do with the cheap vodka left over from Uncle Oleg’s last visit? Don’t toss it out! The same virtues that make vodka a favorite drink everywhere from St. Petersburg to spring break parties—it’s easily mixed and high in alcohol content—make it perfect for a number of household uses, and it’s less toxic than most chemical alternatives. Here’s a quick list of vodka’s lesser-known uses. As a cleaner: Mix vodka and water in a 50/50 solution and keep it in a spray bottle to use for common household cleaning and disinfecting. In greater concentrations, it can be used for anything from shining chrome, glass and porcelain (dab some on a cloth and scrub) to removing mold (spray on mold, let sit for 15 minutes, then scrub away with a toothbrush). As a laundry freshener: Spritz some vodka/water mix on your clothes instead of Febreze or similar chemical cleaners, then hang to dry in a wellventilated area. Like vinegar (another excellent cleaning alternative), vodka kills odor-causing bacteria, but doesn’t leave a scent when dry. As a pain reliever: Aside from its obvious pain-killing usage and effects, you can make a soothing, natural herb salve to mellow your aches and pains without imbibing. Just put some fresh lavender flowers in a jar, fill it with vodka, seal and let sit in the sun for three days. Strain the mixture through a coffee filter and you’ll be left with a homemade tincture. Vodka also is reputedly effective in healing poison ivy, and soothing jellyfish stings. Go to www.cleaningwithvodka.com for more precise uses and directions.

frackers, as is done in such places as Fort Lupton, Colo. In November 2011, the Denver Post reported that “[o]il and gas drillers have bought at least 500 million gallons of water this year from cities for use in hydraulic fracturing” in the Fort Lupton area. In drought-stricken Texas—the Lone Star state is big on fracking— “oil companies are outbidding the farmers for water” to use to frack wells, said Garcia. Garcia is a supporter of Assembly Bill 591, the “transparency bill” co-sponsored by California Assemblymen Bob Wieckowski and Roger Dickinson currently in committee in the state Senate that would require oil and gas companies to disclose what chemicals are being used to frack a well, as well as when and where fracking is taking place and how the wastewater will be handled (evaporation pools, sometimes unlined, are one method on record, as is sending the toxic water to wastewater treatment plants, which are not equipped to process some of the additives, such as heavy metals and radioactive isotopes). Presently, well permits are issued with no such stipulations. (While FracFocus.com, an industry website launched in April 2011, provides some disclosure of information on fracking operations, participation is strictly voluntary, and limited.) “I would like to see a moratorium on fracking, to find out more about it,” Garcia offered. The state of New York placed a moratorium on fracking in 2010. “But I would really like to see it banned, like Vermont [and, more recently, Alabama] just did.” Ω more GREENWAYS continued on page 18

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CN&R 17

H


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G

THE

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HEAD IN THE SAND DOESN’T GET YOU OUT OF THE WOODS Did I just mix

metaphors? Forgive me. But it’s true that ignoring a problem won’t solve it, and it certainly won’t help things to deny that the problem even exists in the first place, as climate-change deniers are doing when it comes to global warming, for instance. Fresh on the heels of the recent alarming news that heat-trapping atmospheric CO2 in the Arctic registered 400 parts per million (ppm)— higher than at any time in the last 800,000 years—comes the news that the Earth “is reaching a ‘tipping point’ in climate change that will lead to increasingly rapid and irreversible destruction of the global environment unless its forces are controlled by concerted international action,” as San Francisco Chronicle Science Editor David Perlman reported recently. Referring to a scientific analysis recently published in the journal Nature, Perlman cited “[u]nchecked population growth, the disappearance of critical plant and animal species, the over-exploitation of energy resources and the rapidly warming climate” as “combining to bring mounting pressure on the Earth’s environmental health.” These combined forces are poised to have Where’s a poor polar bear the impact of “previous major changes … in the supposed to go when the ice planet’s history that triggered mass extinctions melts? Seriously. and expansions, and produced completely new worldwide environments.” The most recent example of such a change, said Perlman, was “the sporadic end of the last ice age that began 14,000 years ago and shifted rapidly from warm to cold and then back to warm again over a few thousand years.” During that period of time, half of the planet’s large animal life became extinct and the human population spread to all continents. Among other things in the scientists’ report: The Earth’s human population is currently growing at such a rapid rate (projected to be 9 billion people or more by 2050, and as high as 27 billion by the end of the 21st century) that we are in increasing danger of running out of resources. A “state shift”—a radical transformation—in the Earth’s environment may indeed already be underway.

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Nani Teves told me about a cool, no-cost hike that BCCER is hosting on Saturday, June 23. This day-long Pilgrimage to the Headwaters of Big Chico Creek was originally planned for last November but had to be rescheduled due to snowy weather. The eight-mile, moderate hike will begin at the scenic lake at Camp Lassen in Butte Meadows and will continue upstream along a restored meadow. “From the meadow, we’ll be traveling along logging roads within Sierra Pacific Industries property and Forest Big Chico Creek: Hike to the source. Service lands to the PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY main spring where Big Chico Creek originates,” wrote Teves in an email. “The hike is a great chance to see where it all begins, to observe the creek in a different landscape and to take a moment and appreciate all that creek provides us on a daily basis.” Meet at the Highway 32 Park and Ride in Chico at 8 a.m. on June 23 to caravan and carpool to Butte Meadows (return at around 4 p.m.). Go to www.bigchicocreek.org for more info. Call 892-2196 or email coordinator@big chicocreek.org to sign up for the hike—BCCWA is asking participants to sign up in advance. EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM


June 21, 2012

CN&R 19


Preserving Our

1. Big Chico Creek Canyon and Salmon Hole. 2. Pile of forgotten debris in Upper Park. 3. Park director Dan Efseaff shows off re-routing on

Nature

Bidwell Park gives a lot to Chico, and it’s time we gave back story and photos by

Jason Cassidy

I

It turns out that this 3,670-acre heart beating in the center of my life—and the lives of all Chicoans—is not in the best of health, and the majority of the tens of thousands of locals who benefit mentally, physically and financially from Bidwell Park’s presence, myself included, are not taking notice. This park is where we go when we go outside. It’s where we walk, hike, bike, swim and seek shelter from summer heat. It is what the city, the university, 20 CN&R June 21, 2012

Observatory.

6. Dead star thistle stalks post-prescribed burn. 7. Friends of Bidwell Park’s Susan Mason with bags of removed star thistle.

8. Efseaff and flourishing purple needle grass.

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jasonc@newsreview.com

’ve been lucky enough to have spent the last 11 years living in a duplex on Vallombrosa Avenue with a front-porch view of one of Bidwell Park’s groves of towering oaks. I’ve spent many gratifying hours running and hiking the park’s trails, and I’ve very much enjoyed my time living in its comforting shadow. So, one Saturday in June, I went out and hiked its 12-mile length with a plan of crafting a sort of love poem to the park. But I changed I my mind.

Middle Trail.

4. Bootleg trails scarring Monkey Face. 5. Native seedlings near Chico Community

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realtors and rental companies gush over when bragging about Chico. It adds thousands of dollars to the value of every home in its vicinity. It is our great escape, and it’s right in our back yard. It’s probably what made you stay and what’s kept you from leaving. It is, for most locals, Chico’s No. 1 feature. And, for most users, the park’s needs might not be readily apparent. You go for a bike ride through the park and nothing seems wrong. It’s still beautiful. It’s still shady. Everything seems to be adequately maintained. But ask a member of Chico’s Park Division or someone from the small but devoted core of park volunteers, and you’ll find that the enormous job of maintaining the huge park and its facilities is only one part of the equation. Factor in budget cuts and staff reductions, and add to that the uphill battle of trying to undo decades of neglected infra-

P

2

park healthy. Looking at things through their eyes has made me begin to change my frame of reference, and to start to see the needs of the park instead of just how it meets mine.

Big park, little money

structure, miles of poorly designed trails, ecological deterioration, infestations of invasive plants and outdated and crumbling facilities, and you get a potential disaster in the making. So, even though I did go on my hike, and it was lovely and gratifying, I also talked to some of the people working hard to keep the

On a recent Saturday morning, my wife, Connie, dropped me off at 7:30 a.m. at Green Gate, the trailhead for 10-Mile House Road, just off Highway 32, for my big hike. It’s less than a 10-mile drive from downtown Chico, but this eastern section of the park is wild and huge and feels completely removed from the city. I was virtually alone in nature for the first five-plus miles of my hike, encountering only six bikers or hikers from Green Gate to the park’s northeastern bound-

ary and turning around, crossing Big Chico Creek, and catching Yahi Trail all the way to the Diversion Dam and Bear Hole. Much of Upper Park was not part of the 1,900-plus acres that Annie Bidwell gave to the city for Bidwell Park. The whole side of the canyon opposite where I was hiking the Yahi Trail, 1,420 acres of land south of Big Chico Creek, was purchased by the city and annexed to the park in 1995. The new parkland on the South Rim side increased the size of the park by more than 60 percent, and yet due to budget cuts that continue to decimate public agencies (the park’s budget was reduced by $50,000 this year), Chico actually has a smaller park staff for 2011-12 than before the extra acres were added. In the 2011 Annual Park Division Report, there’s a comparison between today and the 1988-89 fiscal year,

when the total area of managed park land (including many smaller city parks) in Chico was less than 2,500 acres. There were 14 people on the Park Division staff then, and now, 23 years later, when Chico’s population has grown by nearly 40 percent and the total acres for which the department is responsible increased by more than 1,800 (to 4,317 acres), the staff has been reduced to what amounts to 12 full-time positions (not counting the city’s urban forester and street-tree maintenance staff). That’s one director, one park analyst/volunteer coordinator, four rangers (two seasonal, two full time) and eight maintenance workers (one supervisor, two senior crew, and five workers splitting a mixture of full-time and sea-

sonal hours) to take care of Bidwell Park (minus the parks and facilities managed by CARD, the Chico Area Recreation District), as well as many of the other parks and open spaces around town, including the City Plaza, Children’s Playground, Verbena Fields and many of the creekside greenways.

Trails to nowhere It was dizzying to stand at the cliff’s edge trying to snap photos of turkey vultures as they launched from their marked “soaring area” over the black Lovejoy basalt formations piled on the “BIDWELL PARK” continued on page 22

By the numbers Stats and comparisons on Chico’s parks Bidwell Park’s rank, by size, among municipal parks in the United States: 14 Bidwell Park’s rank, by size, among municipal parks in California: 3 Original acres donated for Bidwell Park by Annie Bidwell in 1905: 1,903 Current number of acres of Bidwell Park: 3,670 Total acres of parkland in Chico managed by the city’s Park Division: 4,317 Acres of parkland per 1,000 residents in U.S. cities (national median): 12.4 Acres of parkland per 1,000 residents in Chico: 41 Visits to Lassen Volcanic National Park in 2011: 351,269 Visits to Redwood National Park in 2011: 380,167 Estimated annual visits to Bidwell Park: 1,158,571 Paid park maintenance hours in 2011: 13,598 Volunteer hours donated in 2011: 17,501 Park Division’s operating budget, fiscal year 2011-12: $1,876,903 Cash donations to Park Division: $13,483 In-kind donations to Park Division (includes $241,439 Proposition 84 grant for trails and vegetation management): $245,439

Sources: City of Chico, Park Division 2011 Annual Report, and National Park Service Public Use Statistics Office June 21, 2012

CN&R 21


Preserving Our

1. Big Chico Creek Canyon and Salmon Hole. 2. Pile of forgotten debris in Upper Park. 3. Park director Dan Efseaff shows off re-routing on

Nature

Bidwell Park gives a lot to Chico, and it’s time we gave back story and photos by

Jason Cassidy

I

It turns out that this 3,670-acre heart beating in the center of my life—and the lives of all Chicoans—is not in the best of health, and the majority of the tens of thousands of locals who benefit mentally, physically and financially from Bidwell Park’s presence, myself included, are not taking notice. This park is where we go when we go outside. It’s where we walk, hike, bike, swim and seek shelter from summer heat. It is what the city, the university, 20 CN&R June 21, 2012

Observatory.

6. Dead star thistle stalks post-prescribed burn. 7. Friends of Bidwell Park’s Susan Mason with bags of removed star thistle.

8. Efseaff and flourishing purple needle grass.

4

M I D D L E PA R K

8

3 1

U

6

jasonc@newsreview.com

’ve been lucky enough to have spent the last 11 years living in a duplex on Vallombrosa Avenue with a front-porch view of one of Bidwell Park’s groves of towering oaks. I’ve spent many gratifying hours running and hiking the park’s trails, and I’ve very much enjoyed my time living in its comforting shadow. So, one Saturday in June, I went out and hiked its 12-mile length with a plan of crafting a sort of love poem to the park. But I changed I my mind.

Middle Trail.

4. Bootleg trails scarring Monkey Face. 5. Native seedlings near Chico Community

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E

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P A

R

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5

7

realtors and rental companies gush over when bragging about Chico. It adds thousands of dollars to the value of every home in its vicinity. It is our great escape, and it’s right in our back yard. It’s probably what made you stay and what’s kept you from leaving. It is, for most locals, Chico’s No. 1 feature. And, for most users, the park’s needs might not be readily apparent. You go for a bike ride through the park and nothing seems wrong. It’s still beautiful. It’s still shady. Everything seems to be adequately maintained. But ask a member of Chico’s Park Division or someone from the small but devoted core of park volunteers, and you’ll find that the enormous job of maintaining the huge park and its facilities is only one part of the equation. Factor in budget cuts and staff reductions, and add to that the uphill battle of trying to undo decades of neglected infra-

P

2

park healthy. Looking at things through their eyes has made me begin to change my frame of reference, and to start to see the needs of the park instead of just how it meets mine.

Big park, little money

structure, miles of poorly designed trails, ecological deterioration, infestations of invasive plants and outdated and crumbling facilities, and you get a potential disaster in the making. So, even though I did go on my hike, and it was lovely and gratifying, I also talked to some of the people working hard to keep the

On a recent Saturday morning, my wife, Connie, dropped me off at 7:30 a.m. at Green Gate, the trailhead for 10-Mile House Road, just off Highway 32, for my big hike. It’s less than a 10-mile drive from downtown Chico, but this eastern section of the park is wild and huge and feels completely removed from the city. I was virtually alone in nature for the first five-plus miles of my hike, encountering only six bikers or hikers from Green Gate to the park’s northeastern bound-

ary and turning around, crossing Big Chico Creek, and catching Yahi Trail all the way to the Diversion Dam and Bear Hole. Much of Upper Park was not part of the 1,900-plus acres that Annie Bidwell gave to the city for Bidwell Park. The whole side of the canyon opposite where I was hiking the Yahi Trail, 1,420 acres of land south of Big Chico Creek, was purchased by the city and annexed to the park in 1995. The new parkland on the South Rim side increased the size of the park by more than 60 percent, and yet due to budget cuts that continue to decimate public agencies (the park’s budget was reduced by $50,000 this year), Chico actually has a smaller park staff for 2011-12 than before the extra acres were added. In the 2011 Annual Park Division Report, there’s a comparison between today and the 1988-89 fiscal year,

when the total area of managed park land (including many smaller city parks) in Chico was less than 2,500 acres. There were 14 people on the Park Division staff then, and now, 23 years later, when Chico’s population has grown by nearly 40 percent and the total acres for which the department is responsible increased by more than 1,800 (to 4,317 acres), the staff has been reduced to what amounts to 12 full-time positions (not counting the city’s urban forester and street-tree maintenance staff). That’s one director, one park analyst/volunteer coordinator, four rangers (two seasonal, two full time) and eight maintenance workers (one supervisor, two senior crew, and five workers splitting a mixture of full-time and sea-

sonal hours) to take care of Bidwell Park (minus the parks and facilities managed by CARD, the Chico Area Recreation District), as well as many of the other parks and open spaces around town, including the City Plaza, Children’s Playground, Verbena Fields and many of the creekside greenways.

Trails to nowhere It was dizzying to stand at the cliff’s edge trying to snap photos of turkey vultures as they launched from their marked “soaring area” over the black Lovejoy basalt formations piled on the “BIDWELL PARK” continued on page 22

By the numbers Stats and comparisons on Chico’s parks Bidwell Park’s rank, by size, among municipal parks in the United States: 14 Bidwell Park’s rank, by size, among municipal parks in California: 3 Original acres donated for Bidwell Park by Annie Bidwell in 1905: 1,903 Current number of acres of Bidwell Park: 3,670 Total acres of parkland in Chico managed by the city’s Park Division: 4,317 Acres of parkland per 1,000 residents in U.S. cities (national median): 12.4 Acres of parkland per 1,000 residents in Chico: 41 Visits to Lassen Volcanic National Park in 2011: 351,269 Visits to Redwood National Park in 2011: 380,167 Estimated annual visits to Bidwell Park: 1,158,571 Paid park maintenance hours in 2011: 13,598 Volunteer hours donated in 2011: 17,501 Park Division’s operating budget, fiscal year 2011-12: $1,876,903 Cash donations to Park Division: $13,483 In-kind donations to Park Division (includes $241,439 Proposition 84 grant for trails and vegetation management): $245,439

Sources: City of Chico, Park Division 2011 Annual Report, and National Park Service Public Use Statistics Office June 21, 2012

CN&R 21


“BIDWELL PARK” continued from page 21

canyon floor below. As I continued down the Yahi Trail, that dramatic, lush landscape in Big Chico Creek Canyon was a contrast to the dry grasslands ahead. Before I knew it the trail was pulling me away from the edge of the cliff, then disappearing altogether in a field choked with prickly star thistle, forcing me to smash a painful impromptu path through the grassland and brush until I picked up the Yahi again several hundred yards later. “We have an assemblage of trails; we don’t really have a trail system,” said Park and Natural Resource Manager Dan Efseaff. It’s been a couple of weeks since my big hike, and I’ve joined the affable park director for a tour of a mile-long section of Middle Trail that has been undergoing extensive rehabilitation by a California Conservation Corps crew thanks to a grant funded by Proposition 84. “For example, we have a lot of linear trails going deep into the park, not a whole lot of sanctioned connecting trails. And people want that. They want to have different loops and not go straight out one trail and come back the same,” Efseaff continued, explaining the organization of Middle and Upper Park trails. In addition to attempting to meet the varied needs of the hikers, runners and bikers who use it, the work on Middle Trail is first and foremost intended to address the long-running issue of drainage and the erosion it causes. “The park used to have a lot of jeep trails, and back in the day the idea was that you needed to create fire breaks, so they’d use dozers. There are problems associated with those; some of that is being addressed by the trail work.” At one yet-to-be-tended bend, Efseaff

pointed out the berm created when the dozers originally carved the old road, essentially creating a river bank to hold water on the trail. But along the rerouted sections, with the berms sliced away and gentle switchbacks and dips replacing the formerly straight sections, it was plain to see how the water could now flow down the slope of the hillside and across the trail onto the meadows below. “It really needed some rehabilitation work back in the day, and we’re suffering the consequences of actions 50 to 60 years ago.” Another area of concern with the trails are the bootlegs created as shortcuts (or by hikers looking for official trails). The most notorious examples Efseaff pointed out were the many lines cut into the hillside leading up to the popular Monkey Face rock formation—none of which is an official trail. “We have a lot of fall-line trails; that’s trails that go straight down the hill, and that’s capturing water in the winter and turning them into creeks, basically. Water on the trails is the worst thing you can have, and that’s most of our trails.” Muddy trails not only degrade and erode topsoil that washes away down the trails, the mess also leads trail-goers to seek alternate routes, which just widens the mud puddles and creates even more erosion. “The folks using the trails [on Monkey Face] have a different ethic than people way deep in the park, hiking to Salmon Hole or something,” Efseaff said, referring to the casual hikers who don’t understand the consequences—damaged vegetation, increased soil erosion, scarring the natural landscape—of stamping out new, un-planned trails. “In a lot of respects we need to institute a land ethic for people. People love the park, but they don’t know what to do.”

Alien invaders It took about five lazy hours for me to hike from Green Gate to the shade on the south side of Horseshoe Lake. During the hot months, the landscape in every direction around this section of Middle Park can be pretty unforgiving. Everything is exposed and dry, all yellow, brown and … light turquoise? These patches of color are actually one park problem that even the most casual visitor is sometimes painfully aware of. The invasive plant known as yellow star thistle—with its pale bluish-green stems and spiky yellow heads—is all over the North State, not just Bidwell Park, and it is just one of the many invasive species that, if you knew what you were looking for, you’d see how they have taken over many large sections of Bidwell Park. “Hand-pulling really works if you’re consistent at it,” said Friends of Bidwell Park’s Susan Mason as she showed me how to remove star thistle. I’m the one volunteer to join the long-time park advocate and invasive-plant expert on a warm Friday morning for invasive-plant removal at a dry section of recently mowed grassland beside Parking Lot A in Middle Park. As I branched out on my own, the work of clearing stray star thistle from one tiny corner of the field was very satisfying. “I identified about 30 spots where it was sort of in a confined area, and I made up a little spreadsheet,” Mason said. “I keep track of how many I’m pulling from each area, so when I come back the next year, then I know what I’ve done.” In a PowerPoint presentation she designed for the Park Division, the opening slide defines an invasive as “[a] plant with traits that allow it to invade, persist and

L O W E R

dominate pre-existing biological communities.” Basically, the good plants are being beaten out by the bad ones. In Upper and Middle Park, in addition to yellow star thistle along the trails and grasslands, Spanish and French broom are encroaching upon the waterways. And in Lower Park, thickets of Himalayan blackberry and tree-choking English and Algerian ivy create huge fire hazards, while privet trees, initially planted intentionally at Five Mile, Caper Acres and along Highway 99, are constantly repopulated due in part to birds spreading the seeds eaten from trees located on private properties near the park. Volunteers have taken huge strides in removing invasives from the park, and the Park Division’s program of rotating prescribed burns, followed by herbicide application and the planting of native grasses, is starting to show results as well. Back up the road from a fresh burn next to Horseshoe Lake, Efseaff drove me to where Wildwood Trail meets the road by the diversion channel to show off a patch that has been worked on for two years. Like a proud father, he pulled back and admired a long stalk of golden-hued purple needle grass. “This is two years of growth. Next year, if we get a good rainfall year, that thing will fill up this whole space. There won’t be a whole lot of opportunity for annuals like star thistle and other things to get in there,” he said, adding, “It’s really good cover for wildlife, there’s a lot of insects that utilize the grass; quail and dove love the seed.” For comparison, Efseaff points to the other side of the chain-link fence right next to the field, along the sides of a channel that are completely overrun with star thistle.

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9. Rasta-inspired graffiti and a trash-strewn picnic area.

10. Invasive ivy and blackberries crowding out park natives.

11. A hot day at Sycamore Pool.

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22 CN&R June 21, 2012

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Die, star thistle, die! Join the posse and help run yellow star thistle out of Bidwell Park

hile there is a park rule that reads, “No person shall destroy, injure, cut, or take any W natural condition of the landscape,” the Bidwell Park & Playground Commission recently made a single exception for park visitors when it comes to Centaurea solsti-

tialis, or yellow star thistle. The prickly pest flowers May to September, so now is the time to squat down and clear the trails with the help of the Park Division’s easy how-to guide: • Wear heavy gloves. Star thistle has sharp thorns, and plant toxins can soak into the skin (the chemicals are not known to harm humans but can be tasted on the hands). • To hand-pull, grasp the plant at the base of the stem and pull steadily, straight up. If you can’t pull the plant, cut it or twist it off at the base. As an annual plant most of the taproot can be left in the ground.

• Small plants can be pulled and the larger ones cut off at ground level with pruners or a sharp hoe. • Cut plants should be bagged and discarded in a trashcan, but also can simply be placed in areas off trail where other yellow star thistle already exists. Do not place in compost green waste cans and do not place cut yellow star thistle where the plant does not already exist. “You get a sense of what could be if we didn’t do anything,” he said.

Loving the park to death As I reached Wildwood Avenue, I started to hear the shrieks, shouts and splashes of kids playing in the water at the Five-Mile pool. As I ambled the last five miles beneath the thick canopy of Lower Park, the same scene replayed itself all along Big Chico Creek as it flowed toward Bidwell Mansion. Winding back and forth between paths on each side of the creek I came upon dozens of smaller versions of the same scene: families parked for the afternoon at creekside picnic sites, groups of friends taking advantage of pools in the bends of creeks, the massive picnic and pool party around Sycamore Pool at One-Mile. Altogether, counting the freewheeling Chico Bicycle Music Fest gathering at Cedar Grove, there were probably somewhere between 750 and 1,000 people in the park between the Five- and One-Mile swimming holes on this warm Saturday afternoon. According to the Park Division’s 2011 report, it’s estimated that there are more than a million visits to Bidwell Park annually. That’s more than the number of visits to Redwood and Lassen Volcanic national parks combined. Effseaff says that the park is more than a local

draw, that people from all over the North State are coming as well. And a look at the breakdown of the Park Division’s maintenance hours shows that workers have to spend the bulk of on-theground hours just keeping up with usage demands by cleaning, mowing, blowing and repairing facilities. “It can be up to two hours a day of us screwing down boards, replacing boards,” Efseaff said about time spent just on daily Caper Acres inspections. “It’s kind of like you have the car that’s well past its age and it’s nickel-and-diming you.” “[And] our restrooms are probably the oldest average age in the state. And we don’t have a very good mechanism in place for rehabilitating or replacing them. … We really have a need for 50 years or more of backlog of projects that need to be done.” Given the current budget climate, and the fact there are no funds specifically earmarked for Bidwell Park, the Park Division isn’t likely to get a financial boost any time soon. And while I would argue that the park provides services so invaluable to Chico’s citizens that a modest tax dedicated to Bidwell Park’s health is a no-brainer, no one should hold their breath that an elected official will propose one any time soon.

Citizen stewards “Not everybody can go out and spend 10 hours a week, but everybody who comes to the park, they can spend 15 minutes once in a while picking up trash,” Mason suggested. It is incredible what a huge impact volunteers have already had on the park. In 2011, the amount of time donated was impressive: Between the 6,901 volunteer hours with Park Watch and the 10,474 hours of work done by the Park Division’s volunteer program and Friends of Bidwell Park (as well as other community and volunteer groups) on invasive-plant removal, native planting, litter pick-up, trail work, there was the equivalent of $400,000 worth of donated work. But the bulk of the time is put in by a core of roughly 300 people, barely a ripple in this city of more than 86,000. There is potential for a very significant impact if even a fraction of that number gets involved and joins the volunteer ranks. “When we started [Friends of Bidwell Park] the only volunteer thing was people could pick up trash on Earth Day, and there was monthly trail maintenance. Now, most of the volunteer hours are, except for Park Watch, for vegetation-management projects. There’s probably 20 times as much volunteerism as there was 10 years ago. But, you know, we were starting from a base of 10 volunteers.” To help facilitate an effective and organized approach to utilizing volunteers, and to reduce the burden on staff, the Park Division has implemented a volunteer team-leader program. “The idea is to give them the training to where they can just run with a project,” Efseaff said. They’ve had one training session, and signed up about at dozen very enthusiastic leaders. Additionally, if someone isn’t able to volunteer, both he and Mason suggested donating money directly to the Park Division. When asked what message he’d like to send to Chicoans who want to help out, in addition to volunteering, Efseaff suggested people follow park rules—everything from staying on official trails to bagging and disposing of your dog’s poop, and to take a part in the parks process. His department and the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission are in the process of developing both a trails plan and a natural-resources-management plan for Bidwell Park, and he urged that people “get educated on the park and give us input, [and help] give us a good framework for moving forward.” With one whole hour of weed-pulling with Mason under my belt, I’ve just barely started giving back to the park. But, it was still extremely gratifying. “We pulled 1,501 star-thistle plants,” Mason said as she jotted down our results in her log. And when I consider the fact that, if those two garbage bags of prickly corpses would’ve been allowed to grow they would’ve spread millions more yellow star-thistle plants across the park’s landscape, it motivates me to want to do much more for the park. Ω

Make it your park There are many ways to volunteer and be involved Chico Park Division’s Volunteer Program The Park Division provides several volunteer opportunities: Park Watch, weeding, oak regeneration sites, litter control, painting, trail maintenance and the Adopt-a-Site program. Contact volunteer coordinator Lise SmithPeters for info: lspeters@ci.chico.ca.us or 896-7831. Invasive plant removal Friends of Bidwell Park coordinates its own volunteers, largely via weekly invasive-reduction efforts. Get your gloves, closed-toe shoes and water ready and check out the group’s calendar at www.friends ofbidwellpark.org for the next workday. Chico Creek Nature Center Volunteer docents, animal caretaker assistants and weeding in native-plant garden. Visit www.bid wellpark.org or call 891-4671 for more info. Others working in the park Big Chico Creek Watershed Alliance: www.bigchicocreek.org Chico Cat Coalition: www.chicocatcoalition.org or 8941365 and catcoalition@hotmail.com Kids and Creeks: www.kidsandcreeks.org Streaminders: www.streaminders.org The Stream Team: www.the streamteam.org or call 342-6620 Give money Donations to the city can be earmarked for Bidwell Park or for specific projects (like upgrading Caper Acres playground). Call the Park Division for details, 896-7800. Go to a park meeting The Bidwell Park and Playground Commission meets at 6:30 pm. the last Monday of the month in Chico City Council chambers, 421 Main St. Meetings are open to the public and agendas are posted online at www.chico.ca.us (click on “Meetings & Agendas”).

June 21, 2012

CN&R 23


Arts & Culture Playing with art

THIS WEEK Art, right in his face! PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

21

THURS MÁNÁS exhibit asks—and answers—the question: ‘What happened to the magic?’

T his body toward a viewer. He is grinning, lurching forward; his large, wooden clog shoes are

he wiry, heavily tattooed man angles

making careful, wide steps directly into her space. Before he crashes into her he switches directions, swerves to by Willow focus his attention on another, his Sharkey pace deliberate and comically slow. He appears to be hitting a gongdrum, slung across his chest, with a REVIEW: stuffed-animal fish. His gait and Honey Moon Baby Blanket , showing posture contort, and he keeps up a through July 27 constant stream of incantatory babat MÁNÁS Art ble. With his patched leather and Space. cloth attire, and wild, roaming eyes, he manifests as a vividly alive halMÁNÁS Art Space lucinogenic flash. He is a mixture 1441-C Park Ave. of fantasy and human, a chimera 588-5183 sprung into the flesh before our www.facebook.com own shifting view. /manasartspace This portion of a performance given by David “Dragonboy” Sutherland at the recent opening of his new art gallery and venue, MÁNÁS, marked the tone of the inaugural collective show, Honey Moon Baby Blanket. It was warm, unruly and overwhelming, rich in sensory experience. Dragonboy’s moniker suits him well; there is a precocious and sweet boyishness to his performances, but they’re persistently accompanied by fire-breathing qualities that tip them toward wicked. His gestures come so close to intimidating, but they mean, rather, to evoke and impart healing. He reminds one of mythological figures like the Slavic folklore archetype Baba Yaga, in some incarnations a cantankerous wretch, in others a holder of wisdom and direction. As he soon explained, the performance mimicked particular cultural rituals where hitting a gong with a fish would “clear bad chi.” This gesture was offered freely to his viewers, alongside a poem performance asking the troubled question “What happened to the magic?” Honey Moon and the launching of MÁNÁS may well be seen as endeavors to find, create and

24 CN&R June 21, 2012

provide magic for the local art audience. MÁNÁS is a collaborative and collective effort, one opening itself to the public in particular forms. As the brainchild of Sutherland and lovely art socialite Christine “Seamonster” Fulton, the project is a bit fanciful and idiosyncratic. The back patio of the multi-room south Chico space (also home to the Rise Yoga Movement studio) boasts “the largest outdoor chalkboard in the North State,” with a large brick wall painted over in blackboard paint. Gallerygoers were happily taking advantage of it at the opening, contributing their own chalky illustrations, marking and embedding their individualized presence, even temporarily. Creating a task that can be taken up and responded to by the viewer is often a tactic of art that places itself in the tradition of “social-practice art,” whereby the kinetic and emotional investments of the public are seen as essential elements to art “working.” An alignment with this tradition becomes particularly apparent at a booth where “Bags of Junk” were being sold for $5 apiece. The bags, hosting varied contents culled from the private possessions of Dragonboy, Seamonster and friends, can be purchased throughout the run of the show and patrons are encouraged to use the items within to make an art object which will be displayed in the gallery at a forthcoming exhibition. In the “Bags of Junk” project, and the varied works on display, many elements enter into play: a delicate mix of private and public possession; finding and making; and the activity of the artist’s hand. How much imagination or activity is required for anyone to enter into art’s particular languages? How responsible should anyone be to participate? With performance, sculpture, photography and public-reliant pieces, Honey Moon Baby Blanket—a title that evokes the power of the sensual and spills out as a list of random meaninglessness—submits much for our consideration. But it may also inspire one to participate, to varying degrees, in the special world-making happening in this new, exceptional, imaginative place. Ω

Special Events EMPIRCIAL MAGAZINE RIBBON-CUTTING: The literary and current affairs magazine hosts a

ribbon-cutting ceremony. RSVP required. Th, 6/21, 5:30pm. Free. Empirical Magazine; 142 W. Second Street Suite B; (530) 899-8077.

FAMILY NIGHT OUT: A combination of Movies in the Park and Neighborhood Night Out with music by Rube and the Rhythm Rockers and a showing of the animated film Despicable Me in addition to food, games, face painting and crafts. Th, 6/21, 6pm. Free. DeGarmo Park; The Esplanade & Eaton Rd.

FRUGAL HOUSE WEEKEND FUNDRAISER: Designers and design students use furniture and decor items donated or purchased through thrift shops to give a home a stylish new look. Opening night (Thursday) begins at 6 p.m. and includes music by Decades and Los Caballitos de la Cancion, food and a no-host bar. On Friday and Sunday, items inside the house are up for sale with proceeds benefiting the North State Symphony. 6/21-6/23. $15-$35. Creek Haven Vineyard Estate, 2915 Kennedy Avenue B, (530) 898-5984, www.northstate symphony.org.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. This week: X-Quisyte Hip Hop Dance Club, original rock and blues with the Mill Creek Blues Band, classical and contemporary Spanish guitar with Saturday’s Son and more. Th, 6-9pm. Prices vary. Downtown Chico; www.downtown chico.net.

Theater KISS ME KATE: A musical based on

Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew with plenty of laughs and memorable tunes. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 6/24. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

TWENTIETH CENTURY: The story of an egomaniacal Broadway director who attempts to persuade his former chorus girl—now a movie star—to return to the stage. Th-Sa,

7:30pm; Su, 2pm through

6/24. $12-$16. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Poetry/Literature BOOK CLUB MEETING: A meeting to discuss Birth 2012 and Beyond: Humanity’s Great Shift to the Age of Conscious Evolution. Th, 6/21, 6:30pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books; 830 Broadway St.; (530) 894-8115.

22

FRI

Special Events FRUGAL HOUSE WEEKEND FUNDRAISER: See Thursday. Creek Haven Vineyard Estate, 2915 Kennedy Avenue B, (530) 898-5984, www.northstatesymphony.org.

THE PRETTY THINGS PEEPSHOW: A girly road show with sword swallowing, knife juggling, a straight jacket escape and traditional burlesque. F, 6/22, 8pm. $12-$15. El Rey Theatre; 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727; www.pretty thingspeepshow.com.

Music FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: SAPPHIRE SOUL: The weekly concert series continues with the smooth, soulful blues of Sapphire Soul. F, 6/22, 7-8:30pm. Free. Chico City Plaza; 400 Main St.

JIM HALSEY & THE NIGHTHAWKS: Live country music as part of Feather River Recreation and Park District’s rural concert series. F, 6/22, 6:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Grange; 9 Lumpkin Rd. in Feather Falls; (530) 533-2011.

KZFR BOCCE BALL TOURNAMENT Sunday, June 24 Chico Raquet Club & Resort

SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS tables, tennis courts, lawn games and more. A silent auction and live music will follow the conclusion of the tournament with a no-host bar for adults. Su, 6/24, 10am. $5-$10. Chico Raquet Club & Resort; 1629 Manzanita Ave.; (530) 895-1881.

Art Receptions HISTORY OF TANK HOUSES: Jan Holman, a Patrick Ranch Museum historian, will lecture in honor of the 18-month Water Tank House calendar. A reception with the calendar’s artists will follow. Su, 6/24, 2pm. Free. Chico Museum; 141 Salem St.; (530) 891-4336.

Theater KISS ME KATE: See Thursday. Chico Theater

PRETTY THINGS PEEP SHOW Friday, June 22 El Rey Theatre

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

SUMMER SOLSTICE DANCE PARTY: A celebration of the long days of summer with music, dancing, food and refreshment. Call for more info. Sa, 6/23, 8-11pm. $7-$15. GRUB Cooperative; 1525 Dayton Rd.; (530) 892-0807.

Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

TWENTIETH CENTURY: See Thursday.Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

26

WINE TASTING: A wine tasting including live music

Theater KISS ME KATE: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

TWENTIETH CENTURY: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

23

SAT

Special Events FRUGAL HOUSE WEEKEND FUNDRAISER: See Thursday. Creek Haven Vineyard Estate, 2915 Kennedy Avenue B, (530) 898-5984, www.northstatesymphony.org.

MAGNOLIA PATIENT TOWER GRAND OPENING: The doors of Enloe Medical Center’s new patient tower and surgery center will open for public tours. Festivities will include a health fair with screenings, giveaways, a food court and a drawing for a Jake Early Magnolia Tower print. Sa, 6/23, 11am-3pm. Free. Enloe Medical Center; 1531 Esplanade; (530) 332-7300; www.enloe.org/events.

MUDSKIPPER RACE: A biking and running race in which two partners must conquer obstacles like a balance beam, stacks of hay, a mud pit and monkey bars. There will be an advanced course, a basic course and a youth course and a luncheon to follow. Proceeds benefit the playground project at Pine Ridge School. Go online to register and for more info. Sa, 6/23, 8am. $30-$50. Meadowbrook Ranch; 15424 Skyway in Magalia; http://tinyurl.com/ 6s5pvd2.

SLOW FOOD: A showcase of locally produced food and wine. Sa, 6/23, 6:30pm. $20. Farwood Bar & Grill; 705 Fifth St. in Orland; (530) 865-9900.

with Holly Taylor and Eric Peter Jazz Duo, hors d’oeuvres, a chocolate fountain and a spectacular view. Sa, 6/23, 3-6:30pm. $20-$25. Grey Fox Vineyards; 90 Grey Fox Ln. in Oroville; (530) 589-3920; http://NVADG.org.

Music THE GRANDNESS OF OPENING: A musical celebration of the coffee joint’s new ownership with music by MaMuse, Evin Wolverton, Wolfthump and more. Sa, 6/23, 4-9pm. Free. Empire Coffee; 434 Orange St. Between 4th & 5th in Train Car; (530) 899-8267.

Theater KISS ME KATE: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

TWENTIETH CENTURY: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Auditions THE DIVINERS AUDITION: Auditions for The

Diviners, a drama set in a small farming community during the Great Depression. Director is looking for men from late-teens to 60s, women from late-teens to 50s and one boy in his mid-to-late teens. Sa, 6/23, 1pm. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse; 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise; (530) 877-5760; www.totr.org.

24

SUN

Special Events KZFR BOCCE BALL TOURNAMENT: KZFR’s annual fundraiser will include access to the swimming pool, sand volleyball court, ping-pong

TUES

Poetry/Literature GEORGE KEITHLEY PRESENTATION: A lecture and book signing with George Keithley, a celebrated poet and former Chico State professor who authored The Donnor Party. Tu, 6/26, 7pm. Free. Lyon Books; 121 W. Fifth St.; (530) 891-3338; www.lyonbooks.com.

27

WED

Special Events COMEDY NIGHT: Weekly comedy night on Wednesdays inside Spirits Lounge at Gold Country Casino. W, 8pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.gold countrycasino.com.

Theater OFF THE CUFF: Bi-monthly improvisational performances. Every other W, 7:30pm. $5 advance/$8 door. Blue Room Theatre; 139 W First St.; (530) 895-3749; www.blueroom theatre.com.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 32

SUMMER SOLSTICE DANCE PARTY Saturday, June 23 GRUB Cooperative

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Art 1078 GALLERY: Interpreting Structures, two artists who take different approaches to address either cultural or personal interpreation within structural form. Through 6/30. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

ANGELOS CUCINA TRINACRIA: Sal Casa Gallery, some of Sal Casa’s early work depicting classic Sicilian culture. Ongoing. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: A Sense of Place, an exhibition of works by Phyllis Cullen and the California Fiber Artists. Through 6/23. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9 gallery.com.

BOHO: Stay Up Fly On, artwork by Christian

Garcia. Ongoing. 225 Main St. D, (530) 8953282.

BUSTOLINIS DELI & COFFEE HOUSE: Holly

Siemens, new works. Through 6/30. Gallery hours are Closed Sunday. 800 Broadway St., (530) 892-1790.

CAFE FLO: Skateboard Art, by local Maia Illa.

Through 6/30. 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre, (530) 514-8888, http://liveatflo.weebly.com.

CHICO ART CENTER: Salon des Refuses, an exhibition of “refused” works on display in the lobby gallery. Through 6/23. Contemporary Woman 6, a juried exhibition of 66 works by 40 contributing artists. Art Center. Through 6/23. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO CITY MUNICIPAL CENTER: Joel Collier

Photography, a display of Joel Collier’s photography on all three floors of the City Municipal Center building. Through 7/13. 411 Main St. City Hall, (530) 896-7200.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Dragonflies and Damselflies, a photo exhibit by Robert Woodward. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

EMPIRE COFFEE: Windows, photos by Kyle Delmar, displayed in such a fashion as to create the illusion of reality. Through 6/30. 434 Orange St. Between 4th & 5th in Train Car, (530) 899-8267.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Current exhibits, by Northern California artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Currently featuring watercolors by Amber Palmer. Ongoing. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS AND APPRAISALS:

Oaxacan Huipiles & Prints, Brightly colored Huipils woven by Guatemalan women, telling stories of their heritage. Also exhibiting etchings depicting Mexican wrestlers, folklore and mythologies by Charles Barth. Through 7/28. Free. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.jamessnidlefinearts.com.

NAKED LOUNGE TEA AND COFFEEHOUSE:

Reconstructed, original artworks by Andy Greer. Through 6/30. Gallery hours are Open daily. 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

ORLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS & GALLERY:

Beautiful Impressions, paintings and prints by Jon Shult and sculpture by Tamara Bonet. Through 6/23. 431 Colusa St. Bottom floor of Orland Laurel Masonic Lodge Building in Orland.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Celebrating the

Figure, an exhibition of of pastels, chalk, pencil, water color, acrylic paints and various inks from 12 local artists. Through 6/30. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 345-3063.

SATORI COLOR & HAIR DESIGN: Gitta Brewster, 13 locally-created paintings on display. Through 7/15. 627 Broadway St. 120.

THE VAGABOND ROSE GALLERY & FRAMING: Will Chiapella Photography, “lost” B&W film images and digital photographs from abroad on display. Through 7/31; Tu, 7/31, 10am-5pm. 236 Main St., (530) 343-1110.

Call for Artists ART INSPIRED BY CHICO: The Chico Museum is planning a multi-media exhibit (including poetry, art, videos, sculptures, textiles and music) of original creations inspired by Chico. Go online for submission guidelines. Through 7/1. Chico Museum, 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.org.

CHICO ICONS: An exhibit that will focus on the endangered, fragile and precious aspects of our natural and man-made environment in Chico. Go online for a full prospectus. Through 6/30. Avenue 9 Gallery, 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, http://tiny url.com/d3b8jgg.

Museums BOLTS ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Kitchen

Gadgets, a new display featuring kitchen gadgets past and present. M-Sa, 10am3:45pm; Su, 11:45am-3:45pm. $2 adults/kids free. 1650 Broderick St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497, www.boltsantiquetools.com.

CHICO MUSEUM: The Bicycle:Life on Two

Wheels, an exhibition that will explore world of cycling, from the history of the bicycle, the science of staying upright and the benefits of riding. F through 6/22. $2-$3. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Summer Exhibits, Exhibits exploring the California grizzly bear, an interactive video exhibit and a display of photographs of wildflowers and their pollinators running all summer. Through 8/10, 9am-1pm. $3-$5. Contact Gateway Science Museum (530) 898-4121, www.gatewayscience.org.com for details on this exhibit. 625 Esplanade.

Chico’s poet laureate George Keithley is one of Chico’s most celebrated writers—having won multiple awards and been featured in such publications as EDITOR’S PICK Harper’s and The New York Times—and this Tuesday, June 26, at Lyon Books, the retired Chico State professor will be reading from one of his most celebrated works, 1972’s The Donner Party. Keithley’s epic poem retells the story of the ill-fated pioneers and was once a national Book of the Month Club selection, and has been adapted as a play and a musical.

—JASON CASSIDY June 21, 2012

CN&R 25


THINK FREE.

BULLETIN BOARD Community BEGINNER / RECOVERY MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE: A weekly beginning mountain bike course to work on fitness, technical skills and confidence. Th, 6-7:15pm through 10/25. Free. North Rim Mountain Adventure Sports, 178 E. Second St., (530) 345-6980, http://northrim adventure.com.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.butte county.net.

CHICO STORY HOUR: Community members will share their stories of adventure in this monthly installment. Sa, 6/23, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books, 830 Broadway St., (530) 8948115.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle,

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

drop your mind, free your feet and your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, 891-6524.

DINNER WITH THE DOCTOR: Feather River Hospital’s popular series continues with Helmuth Jones, M.D., who will present a lecture on joint pain following dinner. Call to reserve a space. Th, 6/21, 6pm. $8 for dinner. Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1877 Hooker Oak Ave., (530) 876-7154.

DOULA MINI-WORKSHOP: A workshop illustrating the birthing services five local doulas offer. Call for more info. Third and First Th of every month, 7-8pm. Free. La Casita Primera Preschool, 2035 Esplanade, (530) 592-7887.

EVENING STROLLS IN UPPER BIDWELL PARK: Learn about Bidwell Park’s geology, history, biology and native peoples. Meet at the Rod and Gun Club parking lot. Sa, 5-8:30pm through 6/30. Free. Bidwell Park, (530) 895-3730, www.upperpark.net.

FARMERS MARKET - CHICO STATE: The Organic Vegetable Project’s weekly sale of freshpicked greens of chard, kale, cabbage, flowers, herbs, veggies, farm-fresh eggs and more in the campus plaza. W, 11am-2pm. Chico State, W. First St. Plumas Hall.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods,

honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers Market, municipal parking lot on Second and Wall streets, (530) 893-3276.

FARMERS MARKET: OROVILLE: Produce and fresh food vendors with local crafts and food booths. Sa, 7:30am-noon through 11/17. Free. Oroville Farmers Market, Montgomery & Myers, Municipal Auditorium Parking Lot Montgomery & Myers in Oroville, (530) 8795303.

GOLF FOR VETERANS: A program to help combat veterans socialize with other veterans on the links. Ongoing. Free. Call for details, (530) 8998549.

IDENTITY THEFT: HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF: Find out the numerous ways people lose their identify and how you can protect yourself. Sa,

6/23, 12-2pm. Panighettis Eatery, 2760

Esplanade 100, (530) 865-5120, www.panighet tis.com.

FOLK DANCING: Teaching during the first hour, followed by request dancing. No partners

necessary. Call for more information. F, 8pm through 6/29. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

THE ORANGES CLOCKWORK: A documentary covering how the Jaffa Orange of Palestine has become a symbol of the country’s escalating conflict with Israel. Tu, 6/26, 7pm. Free. Chico Peace and Justice Center, 526 Broadway, (530) 228-1344, www.chico-peace.org.

SELF-DEFENSE WORKSHOP Monday, June 25 Azad’s Martial Arts Family Center SEE COMMUNITY

SELF DEFENSE WORKSHOP: Basic defense against common attacks, open to all ages and experience levels. M, 6/25, 6pm. Free. Azads Martial Arts Family Center, 313 Walnut St. 150 Corner of Walnut and 4th St., (530) 892-2923, www.azadsmartialarts.com.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 895-4707.

TEEN DAY CAMP: Teens entering grades 7-9 are invited to participate in two one-week sessions of ongoing stewardship and habitat restoration efforts. Call for more info. Through 6/29, 8am-1pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwell park.org.

For Kids DAY CAMP FOR KIDS: Hosted by Oroville’s YMCA, this day camp is intended to get kids outside and to begin developing healthy life-long habits. Call for more info. M-F, 6:30am-6pm through 8/17. Call for fees. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St. in Oroville, (553) 533-9622, www.orovilleymca.org.

LET YOUR COLORS SHINE: A three-day program for children whose loved ones are battling cancer, incorporating games, art projects and sharing time. Go online for registration information and a complete schedule. Through 6/21, 10am-2pm. Feather River Cancer Center, 5629 Canyon View Dr. in Paradise, http://tiny url.com/ckrec9g.

SEWING, KNITTING & CRAFTS CLASSES FOR KIDS: Classes for kids hosted by Earth Girl Art. Go online for class schedule. Ongoing. Earth Girl Art, 3851 Morrow Ln., (530) 354-2680, www.earthgirlart.com.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water quality testing and more. Ongoing; check Friends of Bidwell Park web site for dates and locations. Ongoing. Call for location, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS IN BIDWELL PARK: Volunteers will remove invasive weeds from the restoration site and help water native plants. Meet at the north end of Caper Acres. Call for more info. F, 9-11:30am through 6/22. Free. Bidwell Park One Mile Recreation, Woodland Ave., (530) 896-7831, http://tiny url.com/c426rbo.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental-health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. Next to Long’s Drugstore in Paradise, 8727085.

26 CN&R June 21, 2012

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


CHOW

Shake it up with a remix Quick tips for clearing out your liquor cabinet in the summer PHOTO BY SCOTT FELDSTEIN (VIA FLICKR)

I that is summer, you’re bound to host a shindig and hear, “What n the endless partying

can I bring?” The easiest, and most lucrative, answer is by always, Matthew Craggs “Booze.” craggs.matthew@ gmail.com Unfortunately, what you imagine your guests will bring—Sierra Nevada Torpedo, Milagro tequila, Johnny Walker Black—never quite matches what actually shows up. By the end of summer, your overflowing liquor cabinet looks like a clearance rack in the booze aisle. Never fear, with a bit of creativity you can clean things out and make room for the next bottle, or box, of gifted wine. From confusion to infusion Who can resist buying the 1.75 liter of Smirnoff when it’s only $2 more than the 750ml version? Problem is you’re always left wondering what to do with 1.75 liters of vodka. Try turning boring vodka into myriad flavors by infusing it with other ingredients—fruit, vegetables, herbs or spices. For fruits and vegetables, expose the flesh by peeling and removing any skins that may add a sour taste, such as orange rinds. Throw in herbs and spices whole. Stronger flavors, such as citrus, cinnamon or rosemary, need to sit only for a few days. Subtler flavors, such as pear, peach or hibiscus, will take at least one or two weeks. Taste along the way, and when you’re happy with the result strain off the liquid and enjoy. Or how about a chili vodka? Remove the seeds from one Thai chili and add to 375ml of vodka. Let sit for three days, taste, strain and then mix up a sweet and spicy

chili martini by combining 1 oz. chili vodka and 1 oz. peach juice in a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a martini glass and garnish with a peach slice or by sugaring the rim. Punch-out Popular in colonial times, punch is a perfect way to get rid of the last dregs of a rum collection. Mix and match flavored rums, light and dark rums, fruit and fruit juices to make a big self-serve bowl of punch. Note: If you wouldn’t mix it in a fruit salad—say lemon and peaches—don’t mix it in the punch. For the adventurous, take a shot at Warp Core Breach (a drink at Las Vegas’ now-closed Star Trek Experience, inspired by a foggy drink from an episode of Deep Space 9), which is sure to lower your shields right before you crash into the planet. Mix the following in a large punch bowl: 9 oz. light rum 7 oz. lemon rum 3 oz. dark rum 3 oz. spiced rum 3 oz. Chambord black raspberry liqueur 2 oz. Bacardi 151 60 oz. Açaí and passion-fruit sports drinks, such as Vitamin Water or SoBe Lifewater. Add additional sports drink to taste. Serve in cups full of ice. For the full experience, carefully add a chunk of dry ice to the punch bowl. (Warning: Don’t drink any dry ice.) Makes 10 servings. Extra flavor, less money Even if you don’t drink, chances are you have a half-empty bottle

of green olives buried in the fridge. You can transform this popular garnish for martinis into something special and clean out your liquor cabinet at the same time. Vermouth-soaked olives sell for twice the price of green olives at the store, but with a little patience, you can make them at home. Place the olives in a canning jar, cover in vermouth, and let sit for a few weeks. Infuse extra flavor by adding chilis or rosemary to the mix before tucking them away to soak. They’re good enough to eat by themselves but you could also chop them up with some garlic, capers, anchovies and lemon to make a martini-inspired tapenade. Or try out this “Martini Pork” pork-chop recipe. 2 pork chops 1/2 small onion, chopped 1 cup mushrooms, sliced 1 garlic clove, minced 5–8 green olives soaked in sweet vermouth, chopped 1 Tbsp. sweet vermouth 1 cup chicken stock 1/2 tsp. corn starch 1/4 cup half-and-half 1 Tbsp. each: fresh thyme, sage, parsley Heat oil in a skillet. Season pork with salt and pepper and brown on either side; remove from pan. Add the onions, mushrooms, garlic and olives and sauté until mushrooms are soft, 2–3 minutes. Add vermouth, stirring until almost evaporated. Add stock, corn starch and half-and-half. Stir and bring to a boil. Add the pork back into the pan, reduce heat and cook, covered, at a low simmer, for approximately 15 minutes. Ω

w w w. g r e e n l i f e e c o f e s t . o r g No Waste Event - Bring your own gear! Cups, Plates, etc...

June 21, 2012

CN&R 27


6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

ends monday!

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

HugH Dancy, Maggie gyllenHaal JonatHan Pryce, Felicity Jones

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER  DAILY: IN  DAILY:

IN

starts friday Jane FonDa

peace, love & misunderstanding nigHtly 6:30PM excePt sunDay sunDay Matinee 4PM

IN

[PG]

DAILY: 12:35 2:45 4:50 7:05 9:25PM

SEEKING A FRIEND FOR THE END OF THE WORLD [R] ROCK OF AGES [PG-13] THAT'S MY BOY [R] MADAGASCAR 3: IN

DAILY

IN

Welcome to the jungle

: 12:30 5:10 7:25PM 2D: 2:50 9:35PM

MOONRISE KINGDOM [PG-13]

DAILY

[R]

: 12:35 7:25 9:45PM 2D: 2:55 5:10PM

BRAVE

 DAILY: IN  DAILY:

tHurs-sat & Mon 8:20PM, sun Matinee 2PM

IN

S HOWTIMES G OOD F RI 6/22- T HUR 6/28

 DAILY: 1:15 3:20 5:25 7:30 9:35PM

 DAILY: 1:00 3:55 6:45 9:30PM  DAILY: 1:20 4:15 7:00 9:35PM

EUROPES MOST WANTED [PG] : 1:15 5:25 7:30PM 2D: 3:20 9:35PM

FREE SUMMER KIDS MOVIE SERIES SHREK

(PG)

Tuesday 6/26 @ 10:00AM

A LL S HOWS B EFORE 6PM ARE B ARGAIN M ATINEES  INDICATES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

Pregnant? Need Help?

Rock pose: take number 42

NO.

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Wworld for last year’s Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, and now his crazily good turn as singer Stacee Jaxx in ith his scaling of the tallest building in the

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

DESIGNER

REP

AMB

CNR ISSUE

10.30.08

FILEDESIGNER NAME BIRTHRIGHT JEN_PU

FRIDAY 6/22 – THuRSDAY 6/28 ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER (3D) (R) 12:30PM 1:45PM 3:00PM 5:30PM 6:45PM 8:00PM 10:30PM ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER (Digital) (R) 11:15AM 4:15PM 9:15PM BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 10:35AM 1:25PM 4:15PM 7:05PM 9:55PM BRAVE (3D) (PG) 11:30AM 2:00PM 4:30PM 7:00PM 9:30PM BRAVE (Digital) (PG) 10:15AM 12:45PM 3:15PM 5:45PM 8:15PM MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (3D) (PG) 10:00AM 12:20PM 2:40PM 5:00PM 7:20PM 9:40PM MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (Digital) (PG)11:10AM 1:30PM 3:50PM 6:10PM 8:30PM MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (Digital) (PG-13) 12:50PM (4:00PM*) ( 7:10PM*) 10:20PM MEN IN BLACK 3 (Digital) (PG-13) 11:45AM 2:20PM 4:50PM 7:30PM♠ 10:05PM

PROMETHEUS (3D) (R) 11:05AM 1:55PM 4:45PM 7:35PM 10:25PM PROMETHEUS (Digital) (R) 12:30PM 3:20PM 6:15PM 9:05PM ROCK OF AGES (Digital) (PG-13) 11:15AM 2:05PM 4:55PM 7:45PM 10:35PM SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (Digital) (PG-13) 10:30AM 1:25PM 4:20PM 7:15PM 10:10PM THAT’S MY BOY (Digital) (R) 11:25AM 2:10PM 4:55PM 7:40PM 10:25PM (SUMMER MOVIE CLUBHOUSE) KUNG FU PANDA 2 (Digital) (PG) Wed. & Thurs. only 10:00AM (SPECIAL SHOWING) LINKIN PARK LIVING THINGS CONCERT EVENT (Digital) (R) Mon. 6/25 only 7:30PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) DON GIOVANNI MET SUMMER ENCORE (Digital) (NR) Wed. 6/27 6:30PM (MIDNIGHT SHOWING) TED (Digital) (R) Late Night Thurs. 6/28 12:01AM (MIDNIGHT SHOWING) MAGIC MIKE (Digital) (R) Late Night Thurs. 6/28 12:02AM

Showtimes listed w/(*) NOT shown Wed. 6/27 Showtimes listed w/ ♠ NOT shown Mon. 6/25

the musical movie Rock of Ages, Tom Cruise has transformed himself into Hollywood’s greatest stuntman. It took some big nuts to propel himself off by REP FILE NAME CNR ISSUE jewelry 10.23.08 • radios • blankets antiques Bob Grimm of the Burj Khalifa tower in that harrowing, JLD RAPE •CRISIS INTERV. & PREV. all-time classic sequence, and now he has learned to sing and play some guitar for his latest flick. It’s like he’s going down a list of crazy stuff to do in a movie and just picking them off one by one. Rock of Ages And he’s not just crooning soft ballads. He’s Starring Tom belting out some of the biggest crap rock of the Cruise, Julianne Hough, Diego ’80s with a voice that’s some sort of blessed Boneta, convergence of Axl Rose and Vince Neil. Catherine Cruise can sing! Zeta-Jones and His magnificent rock act is surrounded by a Alec Baldwin. th movie that’s fun, but not nearly as good as him. Directed by Adam Shankman. Adapted from the Broadway play and directed Cinemark 14, by Adam Shankman (Hairspray), the plot is Feather River your typical “girl comes from a small town to Cinemas and make it in Hollywood” story that has been told Paradise Cinema a thousand times before. It’s just never featured th 7. Rated PG-13. Cruise in a fur coat accompanied by a rambunctious, well-dressed baboon. Furniture • Clothing Sherrie Christian (a likeable Julianne Electronic Items Poor Hough), wannabe singer, starts the film out on a bus, getting fellow travelers and even the and more! driver to join her for a rousing rendition of “Sister Christian,” a goofy yet infectious scene Fair that sets the tone for the movie. All of the action winds up at The Bourbon Room where owner Dennis Dupree (a shaggy Alec Baldwin) is trying to avert financial disasGood ter. His last big hope is the final performance 2432 Esplanade • Chico of huge metal band Arsenal before their singer, Store’s Hours: Stacee Jaxx, goes solo. Sherrie gets a job at the Mon. through Sat. Very Good Bourbon thanks to a chance meeting with 9 am to 8 pm Drew Boley (Diego Boneta), another up-andSunday 10 am to 6 pm coming singer trying to make it in the big city. The paint-by-numbers plot assembled by a Excellent team of screenwriters including Justin Theroux

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28 CN&R June 21, 2012

Singing along with Tom Cruise and the crappy music from the ’80s

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(Iron Man 2, Tropic Thunder) is just a place setter for musical numbers featuring tunes by Def Leppard, Pat Benatar, Foreigner, Bon Jovi, etc. There’s an occasional good joke about drinking or puking, but this is mostly a reason for big stars to lip synch admirably to their own vocal tracks. And let it be said that I detest hair rock— deplore it. When characters in this movie talk about the power of rock ’n’ roll, I couldn’t help but think, “Where’s Led Zeppelin or The Who?” This plastic music was all the wow during my teen and college years, a fact that still frightens and disturbs me. Oh sure, the occasional Guns N’ Roses or Leppard song was OK, but holy hell, Poison and Mötley Crüe almost killed me. And Starship? This is the umpteenth movie to use what is easily the worst song ever recorded by anybody, “We Built This City.” Hell, the Muppets had it in their movie last year! The fact that I still enjoyed a movie where this music is prominently featured says a lot for the cast of singers, including Cruise, Russell Brand and Malin Akerman as a Rolling Stone reporter who shares a funny sex scene with Cruise that includes him using her ass as a microphone. A song that has always pissed me off is “Wanted Dead or Alive,” with loser Jon Bon Jovi likening himself to a gunfighter with his oh so burdensome rock career. Yet, when Cruise sings it in this movie, it takes on awesome life. He, quite frankly, puts Mr. Bon Jovi to shame. I can honestly say, this is the first time I’ve enjoyed listening to that particular track. If you go to this movie, go knowing that you will see and hear some amazing stuff from Mr. Cruise. Otherwise, Rock of Ages is just a mildly enjoyable musical goof, sort of like The Beatles Across the Universe movie, but with far crappier songs. Ω


Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush, Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

Turns out Abe wasn’t so honest after all. From his secret diaries we learn that he was actually protecting America from the threat of vampires by killing them and their slave-master allies with his big, bad axe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Brave

Pixar’s latest animated feature tells the story of the fiery Scottish princess Merida who would rather work on her archery skills than follow tradition. Her defiance leads her on a journey that requires her to overcome her fear to reverse a witch’s curse. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Moonrise Kingdom

Writer/director Wes Anderson (Rushmore, Royal Tenenbaums) returns to the screen after a three-year hiatus with this story set on an island off the coast of New England, where two 12-year-olds who have fallen in love run away into the woods, sending the island community into a frenzy. Starring Bruce Willis, Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton and Jason Schwartzman. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Peace, Love & Misunderstanding

Catherine Keener plays an uptight lawyer who takes her two teenagers to the Woodstock farm of her hippie mom (Jane Fonda) for a short vacation that turns into a revealing and enlightening adventure. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World

As an asteroid plunges toward Earth, a man (Steve Carrell) whose wife has left in a panic decides to spend his final days on a road trip to meet his high-school sweetheart, while getting to know his pretty young neighbor (Keira Knightley) along the way. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Now playing

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The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

This good-natured crowd-pleaser from John Madden (Shakespeare in Love; Her Majesty, Mrs. Brown) is primarily a charming field day for a small host of veteran British actors. The story, drawn from a novel by Deborah Moggach, sends a motley assortment of hardpressed Anglo senior citizens off to a cut-rate retirement home in India. Their number includes a grieving widow (Judy Dench), a bickering married couple (Bill Nighy and Penelope Wilton), a much-married lady (Celia Imrie) boldly seeking yet another (preferably wealthy) husband, a retired judge (Tom Wilkinson) who is gay and returning to the scene of his youth, an exultantly randy old gentleman (Ronald Pickup), and a crotchety exnanny (Maggie Smith) who’s getting an outsourced hip replacement. Late-blooming romances mingle with a medley of financial and medical issues. Individual dilemmas get a miscellany of resolutions, but the film as a whole gathers itself around the problems of Sonny (Dev Patel from Slumdog Millionaire), whose courtship of lovely Sunaina (Tena Desae) and amateurish management of the hotel draws the ire of his family and of his domineering mother in particular. Dench is superb and Nighy is a delight, as always. Wilkinson is very good in the one truly somber role. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

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Hysteria

Way back in the seemingly sexually constipated Victorian era, a handsome young doctor (Hugh Dancy) fresh out of medical school seeks a venue for his forward thinking and finds it in the lush parlours of a popular doctor (Jonathan Pryce) who pays his bills by lending a hand to London women suffering hysteria. Hysteria being a euphemism for horny as hell, and lending a hand being, well, just that. Of course, their practice makes perfect and becomes very, very popular. But with only so many fingers between them, carpal tunnel soon rears its ugly hand and by necessity the creation of the vibrator is introduced into the mix. Cut to many, many middle-aged women working on their O-faces while a firebrand suffragette (Maggie Gyllenhaal) is slipped in to spice things up and fulfill the needs of the romcom template. While the execution is clever and witty, it’s still pretty much one joke presented in many ways over the course of the running time. While the Dr. Frankenstein allusions are amusing, Hysteria is just a li’l too self-satisfied for its own good and the constant winking gets wearisome. But mostly it hums along pleasantly enough. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —C.B.

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted

Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Jada Pinkett Smith and the other familiar voices are back for part three in the DreamWorks animated franchise about the mismatched crew of wayward zoo animals trying to find their way back home to New York—this time via a cross-country European adventure disguised as circus animals. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

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Men in Black 3

The sharp-dressed partners are back, going about their comfortable routine of policing the city streets for illegal aliens—of the spaceship kind. But that routine suddenly gets really complicated when Boris “Just Boris” the Animal manages to bust out of an übersecret maximum security prison on the moon and head back to Earth for some payback on the Man in Black responsible for his down time. That man being the taciturn Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones). Of course, this being a summer blockbuster, just ambushing him is sort of uninspired so Boris (Jemaine Clement) cuts a time-fart and goes back to 1968 to kill K. This results in all sorts of nasty butterfly effects being unleashed in the space/time continuum, like giant creatures descending from the sky and eating New York. The agency sends K’s partner, J (Will Smith), back to turn the fan off before the shit hits—with surprisingly amusing results. It’s complicated but not too complicated, seeing as this is a summer popcorner. But it’s a very well-crafted popcorner. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

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Prometheus

Ridley Scott returns to the Alien mythos by delivering with a splattery, slimy analog to 2001: A Space Odyssey. And for the most part, Prometheus at least rises to the visual heights of Kubrick’s epic. It’s just too bad he didn’t tag a solid writer to assemble all of his random cocktail-napkin notes into a cohesive narrative. After an archeologist (Noomi Rapace) dusts off some cave paintings that imply Earth was seeded by ancient astronauts, we have our eponymous spaceship hurtling toward a destination many light years from Earth. There’s some setting up of motifs and underlying metaphors before they arrive a few years later to do some exploring, but they don’t really have anything to do with the narrative other than introducing us to the archaeologist couple’s shipmates: an ice-queen rep for the corporation (Charlize Theron), the captain (Idris Elba) and an assortment of other unlikable crew members. It takes about an hour of exploring the terrain before people start to die, and things soon go from pretty silly to just WTF. But not in a good WTF way. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —C.B.

MO SUM N ND ME EW AY R H -FR O ID UR AY S 9– 1

CHECK OUT GATEWAY’S NEW SUMMER EXHIBITS!

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ADMISSION: MEMBERS – FREE / ADULT – $5.00 / CHILD – $3.00 www.gatewayscience.org BEAR IN MIND: THE STORY OF THE CALIFORNIA GRIZZLY IS AN EXHIBIT ENVOY TRAVELING EXHIBIT DEVELOPED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BANCROFT LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, AND HEYDAY BOOKS, AND IS MADE POSSIBLE BY GENEROUS GRANTS FROM THE WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST FOUNDATION, AND BANK OF THE WEST.

3

Rock of Ages

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

4

Snow White and the Huntsman

This is an engaging and welcome de-Disneyfication of the old fairy tale, grimed-up and pitched at teenage girls while still remaining accessible to everyone else. It has some weaknesses—a little too much gratuitous spectacle and not enough of the villain—but those are flaws only if you walk into it churlishly. Here we have Charlize Theron as wicked ice queen Ravenna, who after seducing then killing the king, locks his daughter, Snow White (Kristen Stewart), up in a dark tower to let the young girl’s beauty rot away. After she blossoms in her cell and manages to escape, a growling huntsman (Chris Hemsworth) is set loose on Snow White’s trail, which also crosses that of a band of ruffian dwarves. Her adventures with the conflicted huntsman and her eight little friends adds seasoning to a rebellious stew that builds up to a Joan of Arc-ian crusade back to Ravenna’s despairing kingdom. Theron sinks her teeth into the role like it’s Shakespeare, and Stewart has an earthy beauty that plays well against medieval despair, and despite the Twilight haters, she handles herself capably here. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

K.D. LANG & THE SISS BOOM BANG LUCINDA WILLIAMS LEFTOVER SALMON RICHARD THOMPSON RUTHIE FOSTER TEXAS TORNADOS

That’s My Boy

Adam Sandler plays an idiot who, while still in his early teens, fathers a kid, names him Han Solo and raises him badly until he turns 18. Twelve years later, pops needs money and tracks down his estranged son (Andy Samberg) for a loan. Hijinks ensue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Still here

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The Avengers

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

JUNE 29, 30 & JULY 1, 2012

JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE MARCIA BALL ◆ JIMMY LAFAVE LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III RUTH MOODY ◆ BLAME SALLY POOR MAN’S WHISKEY CACHE VALLEY DRIFTERS FERRON ◆ RITA HOSKING BROTHERS COMATOSE BROKEDOWN IN BAKERSFIELD MAMUSE ◆ TIM & NICKI BLUHM CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS ◆ MORE...

"5#&"65*'6-#-"$,0",3"/$)t-":50/7*--& Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) www.katewolfmusicfestival.com June 21, 2012

CN&R 29


RECYCLE

THIS PAPER.

YOU’RE WELCOME, EARTH.

SCENE

Yes I said, yes I will Falling for the Celtic Knights of the Sea’s annual Bloomsday fest

Jodi Rives Meir throws herself into Molly’s soliloquy, from Joyce’s Ulysses. PHOTO BY KEILANA DECKER

I never read Ulysses, or even attempted it. As an avid reader of

’m ashamed to admit I’ve

classics with at least some Irish blood, I somehow skipped that preby requisite along Ken Smith the way. I always kens@ figured I’d get to newsreview.com it some day but have thus far been too intimidated to tackle James Joyce’s notoriously thick magnum opus. I found new REVIEW: inspiration to Bloomsday, finally read the presented by the book, considered Celtic Knights of by many to be the Sea at the one of the greatBlue Room, Saturday, est works of EngJune 16. lish literature, in this year’s Blue Room Bloomsday celeTheatre bration at the 139 W. First St. 895-3749 Blue Room. www.blueroom Every June 16 theatre.com Joyce devotees worldwide celebrate the novel with readings, music and dramatic reenactments. June 16 represents both the day in 1904 when the novel takes place as well as Joyce’s first date with his wife to be, Nora Barnacle. With a limited knowledge of the novel gleaned from Trivial Pursuit questions and omnipresent cultural references, I was even a little intimidated attending Bloomsday, fearing I’d be lost among all the knowing references and exposed as an imposter, the equivalent of being made to wear lipstick at The Rocky Horror Show. My fears, of course, were ungrounded. Bloomsday is more than just a celebration of one man

30 CN&R June 21, 2012

and one work, but in a larger sense a celebration of Irish culture. It’s like St. Patrick’s Day for people who read—sans leprechauns, green Budweiser and mounted police. Glasses of Guinness flowed freely among a crowd that spanned generations, and I didn’t witness a single incident of intellectual snobbery leading up to the nearly soldout show. The local Bloomsday celebration is organized by a committee of local Joyce junkies and the Celtic Knights of the Sea, a local non-profit dedicated to Celtic culture. Frank Ficarra, a retired Chico State English instructor who has been involved with the local Bloomsday since its inception, began the evening with a brief address about his own experience with the novel and its importance. Then the first of many musical numbers began, as the 10-member Celtic Knights of the Sea Men’s Choir, many still swinging glasses of the black stuff, sang “The Rising of the Moon,” a ballad about an 18th-century battle between Irish rebels and English occupiers. As the program notes mention, Joyce was a musician himself, and constantly referenced music in his writings. Entire books have been written about the musical allusions in Ulysses, which amount to hundreds of songs and whole passages written to emulate musical forms. Musical pieces running the course of the night ranged from more traditional Irish tunes from the Knights choir to an operatic piece (Scarlatti’s Il Pompeo aria, “O cessate di piagarmi”) by Andrew Hahn and David Dura (piano, vocals). Adding a feminine touch to the mostly masculine voices was Lisa Valentine performing “Young May Moon.” Audience members were guided

through a loose retelling of Ulysses via live dramatic reenactments book-ended by a pre-recorded short film called “A Bar in Chico.” The narrative of this version of Ulysses, which is based on Homer’s Odyssey, had two Chico State lit students, played by Keilana Decker and Kenny Kelly, magically transported into the novel upon entering the back bar at Duffy’s Tavern. The students provide insight into the action as portrayed by Knights and Blue Room vets. Sure it was kitschy and vaguely Magic Schoolbus-esque, but well done and it served a purpose. It introduced the uninitiated while entertaining those more familiar with the book. Another Chico State English professor, Clark Brown, read an original piece he wrote called “Rooftop Ruminations,” and Loki Miller and Steve Swim did a comedic bit called “No, That’s a Bad Thing.” Four students from Chico’s Oliver Academy of Irish Dance— Lindsay Chamberlain, Erica Mendoza, Shannon Tennison and Abby Zuppan—provided the most exciting moments of the night. The young women performed two dances, a slip jig and a reel, that incited the audience to clap along and give them a standing ovation. Bloomsday’s climax came in the form of Jodi Rives Meier’s impassioned performance of Molly Bloom’s soliloquy. In the last 50 pages of the book Molly, the cheating wife of Leopold Bloom, the book’s protagonist, recounts a lifetime of sexual liaisons. By the time Rives Meier reached the book’s final word—“Yes!”—I’d overcome any fear of Ulysses and added it to the top of my summer reading list. By next June 16, I hope to leave Ω the lipstick at home.


Deeper in the Well Eric Bibb Stony Plain

MUSIC

—Miles Jordan

A Dog’s Journey W. Bruce Cameron Forge Books When I read W. Bruce Cameron’s first dog-inspired book, A Dog’s Purpose, a few years ago I fell in love with the sweet story between a dog and his boy. A Dog’s Journey picks up where that book ends in the life cycle of a dog reincarnated many times over to complete its purpose in life. Told in the first person by the dog—at first a lab named Buddy, then a poodlemix named Molly and so on—a very human story quickly unfolds, centered around a girl named Clarity, who clearly needs protection, companionship and, perhaps most of all, the loyalty and unconditional love a good dog can offer. The book is funny at times—“I lay down with a groan, wondering why people always did this: talked about cookies but didn’t give any to a deserving dog.” But Clarity also finds herself in tough situations, and there are nerve-wracking moments when, as a reader, you can pick up on disturbing human behaviors that a dog can’t understand. In the end, both books—but this one more than the last—left me appreciating my dogs and their sweet and sometimes bizarre behaviors a little bit more. Recommended for all dog lovers.

BOOK

—Meredith J. Graham

www.newsreview.com

Eric Bibb is, like his dad, Leon, a folk singer of surpassing merit and has more than 20 CDs out to prove it. Last September he headed down to Pont Breaux, La., (the “Crawfish Capital of the World”) to a bayou-area studio with—as he put it—“a satchel of new songs” where he joined up with six other “musical brothers” to “record a celebration of our shared Americana heritage.” Bibb wrote seven of the 13 songs and hands out some good advice to his daughter on “No Further” (“Stop what you’re doin’, honey, the downward road is steep.”); for all of us on “Movin’ Up” (“Still, we oughta help each other don’t you agree?/ Ain’t nothin’ wrong with good advice for free.”); and ruminations on the nature of music on “Music” (“’Cause music is more than rules or tradition/ I’ll play what I want, don’t need no permission.”). The songs are cheerily rendered with superb assistance from his musical brothers, especially Grant Dermody (harp), studio owner Dirk Powell (who plays a variety of stringed instruments) and Cedric Watson (fiddles). The title track, which Bibb refers to as a “hokey anthem,” advises all of us to work a little harder: “If you want to get at the heart of things you’ve got to look way down deep.”

June 22 t Sapphire Soul Blues, R&B and Soul Sponsored by North Rim Adventure Sports

June 29 tUrban Legend Variety Rock Sponsored by Madison Bear Garden

July 6 tChico Community Band 50+ Member Band Sponsored by Powell’s Sweet Shoppe

July 13 t Dylan’s Dharma Rock & Reggae Sponsored by Fleet Feet Sports

July 20 tDecades Chuck Berry to Lady Gaga Sponsored by Diamond W Western Wear

Little Broken Hearts Norah Jones Blue Note Norah Jones had me from hello. The first time I heard her voice broadcast from a Sacramento jazz station, I was in love. And now, several albums later, here she is with a new album that tweaks her distinctive style a little, but still gives listeners the sultry voice and tasteful piano licks we expect from her. She’s cowritten all the songs here with Brian Burton (aka Danger Mouse), and they’re mostly about the struggle to get over being dumped. Though it strains credibility to think there’s a guy on this planet who would dump Jones, she knows what she’s talking about, proving that even the beautiful, the rich and the abundantly talented are unsheltered from the storms of the heart. Jones manages to avoid the clichés and claim some of this emotional terrain as her own. “It ain’t easy to stay in love when you’re tellin’ lies,” she writes in “Say Goodbye.” And in “She’s 22,” she writes: “She’s 22 and she’s lovin’ you/ and you’ll never know how it makes me blue.” Actually, in a line that naked, we listeners do know. That’s what gifted artists do; they share the pain. If you’re in misery right now, Jones can give you a little company … and sweet solace.

MUSIC

Thanks to Our Community Sponsors:

Tri Counties Bank, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., R.W. Knudsen, Santa Cruz Organic, Recology, Wigibuy 92.7 BOB FM, Thunder 100.7, Power 102, 106.7 ZRock, Fox 20, My TV

—Jaime O’Neill June 21, 2012

CN&R 31


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 6|21—WEDNESDAY 6|27 $1. Paradise Grange Hall; 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise; (530) 873-1370.

REGGAE NIGHT: DJ Triple Tree giving you the best in roots, dub and dance Hall reggae. Th, 6/21, 9pm. $1. Lost on Main; 319 Main St.; (949) 891-3729.

THE STUMPJUMPERZ: The weekly

TROPICAL POPSICLE Tonight, June 21 Origami Lounge SEE THURSDAY

21THURSDAY AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music

round-robin. Third and First Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery; 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

BLACK FONG: Black Fong brings its freaky

funk to the patio. Th, 6/21, 6-9pm. Free. LaSalles; 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

midnight. Lynns Optimo; 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo; 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473.

CHRIS KEENE: Chris Keene of Surrogate ventures out on his lonesome for a solo set. Dustin Ruth opens. Th, 6/21,

8pm. $5. Café Coda; 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

JOHN SEID: John Seid and friends, featuring Larry Peterson and Steve Cook playing an eclectic mix of tunes all night. Th, 6:30-9:30pm. Free. Johnnie’s Restaurant; 220 W. Fourth St. inside Hotel Diamond; (530) 895-1515; www.johnniesrestaurant.com.

MATTEO PLAYS FILM SCORES: Classical guitarist Matteo plays film scores and light classics. Th, 6pm. Free. Angelos Cucina Trinacria; 407 Walnut St.; (530) 899-9996.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria; 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to benefit Earthdance. Refreshments on sale.

First and Third Th of every month, 7pm.

Concerts in the Park series continues with The Stumpjumperz. There will also be food, raffle prizes and children’s activities. Th, 6/21, 6:30-8pm. Free. Riverbend Park; 1 Salmon Run Rd. in Oroville; (530) 533-2011; www.frr pd.com.

TROPICAL POPSICLE: A gloomy, psychedelic lo-fi outfit out of San Diego. Locals The Hambones and Master Lady open. Th, 6/21, 8:30pm. $5. Origami Lounge; 7th and Cherry streets.

22FRIDAY CRASHED GIRAFFE: Female-fronted local rock favoring the filthiest of overdriven guitar tones. Panama Gold and Furlough Fridays open. F, 6/22, 8pm. $5. LaSalles; 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

DECADES: A cover band performing all the number one hits from the ’20s to today. F, 6/22, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort; 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusacasino.com.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: SAPPHIRE SOUL: The weekly concert series continues

with the smooth, soulful blues of Sapphire Soul. F, 6/22, 7-8:30pm. Free. Chico City Plaza; 400 Main St.

GRAVYBRAIN: Funky Fridays continues with one of Chicos best jam bands. DJ Golden Ear opens. F, 6/22, 8pm. $4. Lost on Main; 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffys Tavern; 337 Main St.; (530) 343-7718.

JIM HALSEY & THE NIGHTHAWKS: Live country music as part of Feather River Recreation and Park District’s rural concert series. F, 6/22, 6:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Grange; 9 Lumpkin Rd. in Feather Falls; (530) 533-2011.

JOHN TRENALONE: Jazz and Broadway

standards. F, 6:30-8:30pm through 10/26. Free. Johnnie’s Restaurant; 220

W. Fourth St. inside Hotel Diamond; (530) 895-1515; www.johnniesrestau rant.com.

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: The country-half of local metal/reggae act Esoteric. F, 6/22, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.goldcountry casino.com.

23SATURDAY ALL FIRED UP: A dance band covering classic rock and ’80s hits. Sa, 6/23,

RUM REBELLION: Ahoy! If punks were to

9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino; 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning; (530) 5283500; www.rollinghillscasino.com.

DAMAGE INC: A tribute to early Metallica that leaves out the pioneering metal band’s watered-down radio hits. Sa, 6/23, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

DECADES: A cover band performing all the number one hits from the ’20s to today. Sa, 6/23, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort; 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusa casino.com.

THE GRANDNESS OF OPENING: A musical celebration of the coffee joint’s new ownership with music by MaMuse, Evin Wolverton, Wolfthump and more. Sa, 6/23, 4-9pm. Free. Empire Coffee; 434 Orange St. Between 4th & 5th in Train Car; (530) 899-8267.

take to the seas, their drunken sing-alongs would sound like this. Kasm opens. Sa, 6/23, 8:30pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs; 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 345-7672.

SOLSTICE PARTY: DJ Triple Tree helps bring in the solstice with the best electronic music. Sa, 6/23, 9pm-1:30am. $4. Lost on Main; 319 Main St.; (949) 891-3729.

THE GRANDNESS OF OPENING Saturday, June 23 Empire Coffee

SEE SATURDAY

NOTHERN TRADITIONZ: The country-half of local metal/reggae act Esoteric. Sa, 6/23, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.goldcountry casino.com.

RETRO FUTURE: An 80s/90s dance

party hosted by JPEG. Sa, 6/23, 9pm. Free. Maltese Bar & Taproom; 1600 Park Ave.; (530) 343-4915.

We’ll Take You There Liberty Cab

898-1776

$150 to the Sacramento Airport!

32 CN&R June 21, 2012


NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 OPEN JAM NIGHT: Join the jam. Drum kit, bass rig, guitar amp and PA system are provided, bring your own instruments. All ages until 10. W, 7pm. Free. Italian Garden; 6929 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 876-9988; www.my space.com/theitaliangarden.

PILLARS & TONGUES Monday, June 25 Café Coda

JAZZ: Weekly jazz. Su, 4-6pm. Has Beans

26TUESDAY AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveatflo.weebly.com.

Internet Cafe & Galleria; 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

25MONDAY

DON SHERIDAN: Jazz keyboard. Tu, 5-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveat flo.weebly.com.

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: Carey Robinson hosts a jazz happy hour every Monday. M, 57pm. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveatflo.weebly.com.

PILLARS & TONGUES: Dark, gloomy avant-garde folk-pop from Chicago. Struyf and Pendery, Star Thistle Wall and Cameron Ford open. M, 6/25, 8pm. $5. Café Coda; 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

restaurant. W, 8-11pm. Tortilla Flats; 2601 Esplanade; (530) 345-6053.

SOLO JAZZ: Every Wednesday with Carey

SEE MONDAY

24SUNDAY

SALSA BELLA: Live Salsa music in the

27WEDNESDAY JOHN SEID: An eclectic mix of tunes with John Seid and Larry Peterson. W, 6/27, 5-8pm. Free. Red Tavern; 1250 Esplanade; (530) 894-3463; www.red tavern.com.

Robinson. W, 4-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveat flo.weebly.com.

SWING DANCE WEDNESDAY: Every Wednesday night, swing dancing lessons 8-10pm. W, 8-10pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery; 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

WARNTORN: A melodic death-metal band. If that seems contradictory, get over it. W, 6/27, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs; 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 345-7672.

DJ DANCING CRAZY HORSE: DJ Hot Rod and mechani-

cal bull contest. F, 9pm-1:30am. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

DOWN LO: DJ Ron Dare. Tu, Sa, 9pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

DUFFYS: DJ Lois & DJ Spenny. W, 10pm. $1. Duffys Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

NTS POST EVE Y ONLINE B AT ING R E T IS G E R /chico

KARAOKE

newsreview.c

om

CRAZY HORSE: All-request karaoke. Tu,

FEATHER FALLS: Su, 8pm-midnight. Free.

9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.feather fallscasino.com.

FEATHER FALLS: Tu, 7-11pm. Free. Feather

11pm: on the patio; Sa, 9pm: “That 80s Party”; and Tu, 10pm: DJ. LaSalles, 229 Broadway St., (530) 893-1891.

QUACKERS: Th, 9pm. Free. Quackers

KINGS TAVERN: M, Tu, 8pm. Free. Kings

Lounge, 968 East Ave., (530) 895-3825.

Tavern, 5771 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7100.

LOST ON MAIN: Best and latest reggae

SMOKIE MOUNTAIN: F, Sa, 9pm. Free.

and dancehall. Th, 9pm through 8/23. Lost on Main; 319 Main St.; (530) 8911853.

LASALLES: Su, 9pm. LaSalles, 229 Broad-

LOST ON MAIN: A brand-new electronic

LAST CALL LOUNGE: M, Th, 8pm-midnight.

way St., (530) 893-1891.

DJ crew. Sa, 6/9, 9pm. $3. Lost on Main; 319 Main St.; (949) 891-3729.

Last Call Lounge, 876 East Ave., (530) 895-3213.

MADISON BEAR: Dancing upstairs and on the patio. W-Sa, 9pm. Madison Bear Garden, 316 W. Second St., (530) 8911639, www.madisonbeargarden.com.

Smokie Mountain Steakhouse, 7039 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-3323, www.smokiemtnsteak house.com.

STUDIO INN: With Brandon Hightower. Tu,

9pm-1am. Studio Cocktail Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (530) 343-0662.

LYNNS OPTIMO: F, Sa, 9pm. Lynns Optimo, 9225 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1788.

MONTGOMERY ST.: Tu, 8pm. Free. Montgomery St. Pub, 1933 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 533-0900.

Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com.

LASALLES: Th, 10pm: DJ Mac Morris; Fr,

TORTILLA FLATS: Karaoke en Espanol. Su,

8-midnight. Free. Tortilla Flats, 2601 The Esplanade, (530) 345-6053.

MALTESE: Dirty Talk: LBGT dance Party

w/ DJ2K. F, 9pm-2am through 4/6. Free. Maltese Bar & Taproom, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

MONTGOMERY ST.: W, F Sa, 8pm. Free. Montgomery St. Pub, 1933 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 5330900.

QUACKERS: F, 9pm. Free. Quackers Lounge, 968 East Ave., (530) 8953825.

WARTORN

Wednesday, June 27 Monstros Pizza SEE WEDNESDAY

TACKLE BOX: DJ Shelley. Tu, Su, 6pm. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 East Park Ave., (530) 345-7499.

STEVE MICHAELS IS BACK!

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CN&R 33


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CONGRATULAZIONI SALVATORE “The art, if it exists in whatever we’re doing, is not in what we put in but what we leave out.” The notion 08 that line, a quote by Sal Casa from the opening of a video from vignette on the beloved Chico painter at the Artoberfest website, bears itself out in one of his latest caesin paintings, “The Women,” which was just accepted into the annual Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors in Old Forge, N.Y. 09 (opening in August). The spirited Casa stopped by CN&R H.Q. this week to give us a peek at the painting and explained that the inspiration to do a piece on “the women” came out of a desire to 10 honor his friend and local painter Lois Cohen (who died Feb. 19). After compiling a list of the 50 or 60 prominent female artists from the 1940s and ’50s (both 08 local and international), he realized Detail from Sal Casa’s “The Women” he’d never fit them all on one painting. So, after picking Cohen, he threw the rest in a bowl and just drew enough to fill the canvas, with local printmaker Janet Turner winding up alongside the likes of Frida Kahlo 09 and Helen Frankenthaler. RIGHT THERE IN BLACK AND WHITE It took only 16 weeks for me to recognize Muddle Town. The novel’s cryptic ads—featuring different dramatic-look10 ing characters by Chico artist/author Christian Lovgren with the web address: www.muddletown.com beneath them— ran in the CN&R for three months, and I kept saying, “I probably should go check 08 out.” Well, I finally did, and if the ads that weren’t enough to get you to visit, here’s another reminder to check out Lovgren’s novel “set in a world on the 09 brink of societal collapse [where] Asher Radezlav, a mentally ill, drug addict punk-rocker believes he is witnessing Watch out for Aughblood! events in the media and his dreams that will culminate in the end of the world.” You can read chapter one 10 online, and pick up the book itself at Lyon Books. LATEST ISSUE OF THE FN&R Faithful readers have probably noticed

that CN&R friend and former managing editor Meredith J. Graham, while living the good life in the South of France (go to http://lifelove pastry.blogspot.fr and keep up with her adventures on her blog, La vie, l’amour et la pâtisserie), is still staying digitally connected to the paper with the occasional contribution (see this week’s Healthlines, p. 12). But Graham is not our only Euro connection. Frequent contributor Alastair Bland is on a the motherfrickin’ dream assignment, biking, eating and drinking his way around the continent and writing about it all at for the Smithsonian Magazine blog, Off the Road: The Travel Adventures of a Nomad on the Cheap (go to www.smithsonian/ adventure and follow along vicariously). So far, he’s made his way from Toulouse, France to Andorra (apparently the ugly stepchild of Europe, with outlet stores and McDonald’s dotting the craggy landscape), and his fun, informed and Alastair outside a cave in France. insightful missives—on tasting cheese in the Pyrenees, buying wine by the jug and going on a hike in search of a cave where the French hid from Nazis—are enough to give you a painful case of wanderlust.

MEMORIAL FOR ED This Saturday, June 23, the family of Ed McLaughlin

www.facebook.com/ChicoNewsandReview 34 CN&R June 21, 2012

invites friends to remember the local bicycling advocate, who died last month (May 24), by joining them for an open bike ride starting at One-Mile in Bidwell Park at 8 a.m., and later that afternoon with a celebration/memorial at the Sierra Nevada Big Room, from 3-6 p.m.


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING HOME WEEK OF THE

Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

SmAll, QuieT, Well mAiNTAiNed Complex

822 TEAGARDEN COURT • CHICO

Now Offering

Studios, 1 & 2-Bedroom Units

1 & 2-Bedroom, 1-Bath Units

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University terrace Two Story, 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Townhouses with Small Backyard or One Story, 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Flats All Units Include W/D, D/W, Central Heat/Air, and More BBQ and Cat Friendly, Off Street Parking, Walk to CSU

542 Nord Avenue Call Today (530) 893-1967 uterrace@rsc-associates.com

Ceres Plaza

HUNTINGTON Full Size WaSher/Dryer in each unit, SWimming Pool, garageS available too!

Sizzling DealS & More! Beautiful pool & clubhouse with computer room and pool table 1459 E. Lassen Avenue Call Today (530) 893-3018 cere@rsc-associates.com

2002 Huntington Drive (20th Street near Forest Avenue) CALL TODAY AT (530) 894-2408 huntington@rsc-associates.com

Professionally Managed By rsC assoCiates, inC.

Professionally Managed By rsC assoCiates, inC.

Very nice well maintained West side home in desirable Big Chico Creek Estates subdivision. The 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac. Although you feel like you are farther out of town, you are just moments away from excellent schools, Chico State University, Downtown Chico and grocery stores. It feels like home as soon as you enter. To the left of the entry way there is a very nice living room that offers a cozy and warm feeling. The house has designer paint throughout which adds to the warm ambiance. Moving on to the kitchen, you enter a large dinning room with a wood burning fireplace. The kitchen has been nicely updated with large granite tiles. There is a ton of room in the kitchen considering the ample storage space, counter space and flow. Moving towards the garage, which can be accessed from the kitchen, you enter the washer/dryer misc room. Beyond that there is a two-car garage which has two closets and built-ins for storage and a work bench. There are two good-sized bedrooms and the Master is carpeted. The Master bedroom has a sliding glass door that goes out to the outside patio. The backyard is surrounded by roses and other lush landscaping. You will feel right at home here.

LISTED AT: $309,000 Emmett Jacobi | REALTOR® Century 21 Jeffries Lydon | 530-899-5996 (direct) | 530-519-6333 (mobile)

Professionally Managed By rsC assoCiates, inC.

Amazing Views of Chico

BACK ON THE MARKET

Private setting on 5 acres, just 20 minutes out of Chico. Three bed, two bath. $298,000

3/2 Big Chico creek estates 1736 sq’ on 1/ of an acre!

EMMETT JACOBI

Alice Zeissler

www.AtoZchico.com

Cell 530.519.6333 emmettjacobi.com

518-1872

Homes Sold Last Week

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

403 E Biggs Hwy

Biggs

$400,000

3/ 2.5

2396

266 E 7th Ave

Chico

$175,000

2/ 2

SQ. FT.

836

16 Burney Dr

Chico

$369,000

3/ 2.5

2462

1080 E 8th St

Chico

$160,000

2/ 1

1040

1093 Corino Real Ct

Chico

$301,500

3/ 2

1926

1143 Arcadian Ave

Chico

$155,000

3/ 2

1455

2074 Bidwell Ave

Chico

$262,000

3/ 2.5

2045

1145 Normal Ave

Chico

$155,000

2/ 1

858

3012 California Park Dr

Chico

$257,000

5/ 2

1725

1963 Wild Oak Ln

Chico

$150,000

3/ 1.5

1153

5 Lakeshore Ter

Chico

$250,000

2/ 2

1296

24 Quadra Ct

Chico

$150,000

4/ 2.5

2811

15 Parsley Ln

Chico

$240,000

3/ 2.5

1840

2849 Pennyroyal Dr

Chico

$119,000

2/ 1.5

1103

1063 Verde Dr

Chico

$212,000

3/ 1.5

1152

12059 Andy Mountain Rd

Concow

$178,000

3/ 2

1626

June 21, 2012

CN&R 35


QuALity, AffoRDABLe & fRienDLy housing HOUSES

APARTMENTS Location

Bd/Ba

1149 Olive St #10 2250 Notre Dame Blvd #5 1175 E. 8th St. #5, 6 2360 Durham St. #D

2/1 2/1 1/1 1/1

Rent

Dep.

$675 $700 $500 $400

$775 $800 $600 $500

Location

Bd/Ba

Rent

Dep.

Location

Bd/Ba

Rent

$1550

1154 Neal Dow Ave.

2320 Floral Ave.

3/2 $1050

$1150

1752 Vallombrosa

1/1

$650

$750

1635 Downing Ave.

1/1

$850

1603 Chico River Rd.

6/2 $1800

$1900

$750

2/1.5 $1050

Dep.

9546 Cummings (Durham) 3/1.5 $1450

$1150

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico

RELIABLE

PRoPeRty MAnAgeMent

895-1733 | www.reliableproperty.com Info subject to change. Please do not disturb tenants. We will schedule the appointment.

Bringing You To

PARADISE

2BR/2BA 1248 Sq.Ft. .23 AC, Move-in ready $ 39,900 Ad #340 2BR/2BA 1200 Sq.Ft. Mature landscaping $ 69,995 Ad #387 3BR/3BA 1931 Sq.Ft. Log Home $350,000 Ad #386

3BR/3BA 2400 Sq.Ft. Immaculate, estate location $355,000 Ad #390

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sat. 11-1 2230 Dorado Cerro (X: El Monte) 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2022 sq ft. $419,000 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Sat. 11-1 4243 Shorthorn Drive (X St: Garner) 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bath, 2140 sq. ft. $395,000 Russ Hammer 501-6830 Sat. 11-1, 2-4 115 Zinnia (X St: W. 11th Avenue) 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bath, Pool, 2300 sq. ft. $362,000 Mark Reaman 228-2229

3/2, 1,732 sqft for $225,000

Dana Miller

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

KATHY KELLY 530-570-7403

Sat. 11-1, Sat. 2-4 822 Teagarden Ct ( X St: Winkle) 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1736 sq.ft. $309,000 Paul Champlin 828-2902 Emmett Jacobi 519-6333

Sat 11-1, Sun 11-1 950 Spruce Ave (X St: East 1st Ave) 3 Bedroom, 3 1/2 Bath, 2268 sq.ft. $319,000 Kathy Kelly 570-7403 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

“Vacation” like home on 2.5 acres $335,000

Great home in California Park 4 bd, 2 ba, laminatewood floors, tile kitchen floor. Master w/ large bath & walk-in closet. $308,500

(530)571-7738 (530)570-1184 dmiller@century21chico.com

Sat. 2-4, Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1944 Wisteria Ln (X: Glenwood) 4 Bedrooms, 2 Bath, 1928 sq ft. $342,000 Brandi Laffins 321-9562

DRE# 01860319

KathyKellyC21@gmail.com

Sat 11-1 3283 Mt. Whitney (X: Yosemite) 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1774 sq ft. $285,000 Brandi Laffins 321-9562

19.55 Acres in Orland, $89,000 1 ac building lot, Chico. OWC $150,000 G yard. $185,000 4 bed/2 bth, 1,822 sq ft, PE charmer, NDINlarge Cul de sac Ave’s, 3 bed/4 bth, 2,268 sq ft, pool. $319,000 3 bed/2 bth, +den, nice senior mobile $39,285 2 bed/2 bth, senior mobile in park $17,000 Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

5350 Skyway, Paradise

(530) 872-7653

Paradise@C21SelectGroup.com www.C21Skyway.com 1-800-785-7654

One owner home on quiet cul-de-sac. 4 bd/3 ba, pool, 3 car garage. $362,000 Jeffries Lydon

MARK REAMAN 530-228-2229 Mark.Reaman@c21jeffrieslydon.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of June 4, 2012 — June 8, 2012. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

4870 Lookout Cir

ADDRESS

Forest Ranch

$360,000

4/ 2

2182

11 Casa Loma Way

Oroville

$210,000

2/ 2.5

1968

5473 Cabernet Way

Forest Ranch

$216,000

4/ 2.5

2248

414 Green Oaks Dr

Paradise

$260,000

3/ 2

1928

123 E Gridley Rd

Gridley

$226,000

7/ 3

2955

5941 Debbie Ln

Paradise

$253,000

3/ 2

1867

1735 Blue Heron Ct

Gridley

$177,000

4/ 2.5

2130

3560 Lonnie Ln

Paradise

$252,000

3/ 2

2295

14227 Decatur Dr

Magalia

$146,500

3/ 2

1295

5807 Nielsen Dr

Paradise

$170,000

3/ 2

1478

6514 Tikker Ln

Magalia

$118,000

3/ 2

1098

6329 Lancaster Dr

Paradise

$159,000

3/ 2.5

1773

14866 Klamath Ct

Magalia

$109,000

3/ 2

1742

1366 Elliott Rd

Paradise

$141,000

2/ 2

1824

2446 Villa Vista Dr

Oroville

$399,000

3/ 3

2233

1921 Crandall Way

Paradise

$133,500

2/ 1

997

36 CN&R June 21, 2012


Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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JOHNSON HOUSE OF SOBRIETY

Men and women, a sober living environment, rooms for rent. includes utilities. Resident mgr. Stacy 530-520-5248

GENERAL Career Training: AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214 Help Wanted!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN)

APARTMENT RENTALS

ALTERNATIVE HEALING CHICO CANNABIS CLUB joel.castle@yahoo.com Average ounces $150. Caregivers available. $15 lifetime memberships 530-354-8665

ATTORNEYS HEALTH/PERSONALS/ MISCELLANEOUS: WERE YOU IMPLANTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEBIBRALLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? Have you had this lead replaced, capped or did you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

GENERAL All Steel Buildings Factory Deals Ask for Discounted Sizes Limited Inventory, Can erect Source#1JJ 530-579-2920

Remodeled 3bd Apt. Located off W 22nd. $700/mo. Call 530-895-1212

HOME RENTALS HOUSE FOR RENT 4 Bed/2 Bath, 1400sqft, 3079 Helena Way, north Chico, nice area, 2 car garage. Alfredo, 570-9479.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WESTERN PACIFIC CAFE AND CATERING at 2191 High St. Oroville, Ca 95966. AMANDA CORONA, 2925 S Villa Ave. Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: AMANDA CORONA Dated: May 8, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000707 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as L2 SPORTS CARDS AND MEMORABILIA at 2711 Lowell Dr. Chico, CA 95973. LANCE HARLAN LOPER, 2711 Lowell Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: LANCE LOPER Dated: May 1, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000666 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WINTER CONSULTING at 975 Filbert Ave. Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT STERLING WINTER, 975 Filbert Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: SCOTT WINTER Dated: April 30, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000659 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BLUE OVAL CHEVRON, BLUE OVAL FOODMART at 1025 Nord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. GURINDER SHILLON 1865 Rose River Ave. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: GURINDER DHILLON Dated: May 29, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000791 Published: June 7,14,21,28 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BASKIN ROBBINS

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OF CHICO, BASKIN ROBBINS ON MANGROVE at 668 Mangrove Ave. Chico, CA 95926. GURINDER S DHILLON, 1865 Rose River Ave. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: GURINDER DHILLON Dated: May 29, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000792 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SYNERGY HEALTH AND WELLNESS at 225 Main St. Suite M, Chico, CA 95926. TAMARA STOVER, 713 Grand Teton Way, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: TAMARA A STOVER Dated: May 11, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000720 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HANDOZER DISTRIBUTING at 2954 Hwy 32 #1300, Chico, CA 95973. MIKE T GROSBERG, 3168 Aloha Lane, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: MIKE GROSBERG Dated: May 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000777 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HITSVILLE DEVELOPMENT at 125 W 3rd St. #250, Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTOPHER MORRIS, 706 Parkwood Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Christopher Morris Dated: June 7, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000847 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRISM at 1435 Arbutus Ave. Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTIAN SPENCER, 1435 Arbutus Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: CHRISTIAN SPENCER Dated: April 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000644 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIGTASIA OLD WORLD FRUITS at 379 Stilson Canyon Rd. Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTY LOU STRAUCH, JAMES E STRAUCH, 379 Stilson Canyon Rd. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: JAMES E STRAUCH Dated: June 5, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000821 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as 12 VOLT TATTOO at 194 E 8th St. Chico, CA 95928. KAREN ACKER, ZACHARY ACKER, 730 Picaso Lane, Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: ZACHARY ACKER Dated: June 6, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000832 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICOICHI RAMEN at 243 W 9th St. Chico, CA 95928. WATANABE HILLS INC, 180 Honey Run Rd. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: REIKO WATANABE Dated: June 5, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000819 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PURE JUJU at 40 Jillian Lane #1, Chico, CA 95973. AMY BENITEZ, 40 Jillian Lane #1, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: AMY BENITEZ Dated: June 7, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000837 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name WEEKEND WEARHOUSE at 225 Main St. Suite T, Chico, CA 95928. DAN TORRES, 3148 Coronado Rd. Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an individual. Signed: DAN TORRES Dated: June 1, 2012 FBN Number: 2010-0000993 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KAIA FIT CHICO at 2700 Hegan Lane, #106, Chico, CA 95928. LAURA C GILMORE, 75 Skymountain Circle, Chico CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: LAURA C GILMORE Dated: May 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000776 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CONSONANTS AND VOWELS RECORDINGS at 11 Cloud Ct. Chico, CA 95928. ROBIN ALISE BACIOR, 1364 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926. JILLIAN ROSE PUTNAM-SMITH 2450 Maxwell Ave. Oakland, CA 94601. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: Jillian Putnam-Smith Dated: May 7, 2012 FBN Number: 2011-0000019 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MOUNTAIN SPIRIT YOGA at 16713 Catalyst Way Forest Ranch, CA 95942. NAN ELIZABETH CLUTE, 16713 Catalyst Way, Chico, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: NAN CLUTE Dated: April 3, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000516 Published: June 14,21,28, July 5, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as YOGANICALLY, YOGANICALLY GROWN at 1390 E 9th St. #130, Chico, CA 95928. KRISTIANA DELCARLO LOPEZ, 846 Coit Tower Way, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: KRISTIANA D LOPEZ Dated: May 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000788 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TIGER LILLY PRODUCTIONS at 1390 E 9th St. #130, Chico, CA 95928. Kristiana Delcarlo Lopez, 846 Coit Tower Way, Chico, CA 95928. Christine Louise Macshane, 1964 Zachary Ct. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: KRISTIANA D LOPEZ Dated: May 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000787 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A SECOND LOOK at 5810 Pentz Rd. Paradise, CA 95969. ANNE RUSSELL, 5810 Pentz Rd. Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ANNE RUSSELL Dated: May 29, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000798 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PCMD PC TREATMENT CENTER at 2117 Esplanade, Chico, CA 95926. NICOLETTE BATTENFIELD, 355 E Lassen Ave. #5, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Nicolette Battenfield Dated: May 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000782 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOMENICS SEPTIC SERVICE at 12360 Meridan Rd. Chico, Ca 95973. ROBERT PERKINS, 12360 Meridan Rd. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ROBERT E PERKINS Dated: June 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000899 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KOKORO UNIVERSAL MARTIAL ARTS at 2145 Park Ave. #1, Chico, CA 95928. KOKORO UNIVERSAL MARTIAL ARTS INC, 9 Keystone Ct. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KEVIN D ATKINSON Dated: June 11, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000871 Published: June 21,28, JUly 5,12, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SHOW LOVE THRIFT SHOP at 1405 Park Ave. Chico, CA 95928. TERRI LEE BLESSING, 933 Benson Dr. Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: TERRI BLESSING Dated: May 30, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000802 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012

NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MICHAEL VINCENT MURASKO TO all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MICHAEL VINCENT MURASKO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: Michael W. Murasko in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: Michael W. Murasko be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 12, 2012 Time: 1:30pm Dept: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40265 Attorney for petitioner: Charles A. Pinney III 12526 High Bluff Dr. #300 San Diego CA 92130 (858)755-7502 Published: June 7,14,21, 2012 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DAN JAMES COOK TO all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DAN JAMES COOK A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BOBBIE NELL COOK in the Superior Court of Califor-

CLASSIFIEDS

CONTINUED ON 38

June 21, 2012

CN&R 37


nia, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: Michael W. Murasko be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 12, 2012 Time: 1:30pm Dept: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR Attorney for petitioner: Richard S. Matson 1342 Esplanade Suite A Chico, CA 95926 (530)343-5373 Published: June 14,21,28, 2012 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage facility act (B&P code 21770 et sec) the undersigned will sell the contents of units: MALIA LAMPKIN, dressers, mattresses, boxes, chair, table, tote, back-packs. VIDAL ROJAS, desk, bed frame, chairs, boxes, clothes. To the highest bidder on: July 7, 2012 Beginning at 12:00pm. Sale to be held at: Extra Storage, 2298 Park Ave. Chico, Ca 95928. Published: June 21,28, 2012 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California selfstorage facility act: (B&P code 21770 et.sec.) the undersigned will sell the contents of:

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38 CN&R June 21, 2012

TIFFNY SMITH, xmas decor, household items, home repair items. MIKE SHERNICK, tool chest, washer/dryer, fridge, kitchen table set, misc furniture. DAVID DRAKE, holiday decor, washer/dryer, pool cues, large storage bins. MATT ROSSETTA, electric dryer,desk w/chair, telescope, misc. electronics ROSA SALINAS, love seat, dresser, dryer, coffee table. To the highest bidder on: July 7, 2012 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Extra Storage 3160 Olive Hwy, Oroville, CA 95966 Published: June 21,28, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KIMBERLY JOYCE SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KIMBERLY JOYCE SMITH Proposed name: KIMBERLY JOYCE KOHN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: May 21, 2012 Case Number: 156807 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DAVID ALLEN KOSS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name to DANIELLE ALLENA KOSS. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 13, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: May 23, 2012 Case Number: 156721 Published: May 31, June 7,14,21, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BOB YANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BOB YANG Proposed name: GEORGE W. YOUNG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

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Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 20, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: May 22, 2012 Case Number: 156826 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JENELLE LYNN POSPISIL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JENELLE LYNN POSPISIL Proposed name: SOPHIA LYNN RIVERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 27, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: May 22, 2012 Case Number: 156962 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LEAH HOPSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Abenie Kaitlyn Lenee Hopson Proposed name: Abenie Kaitlyn Lenee Derose THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 6, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: May 21, 2012 Case Number: 156819 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DAVID HALPAINY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DAVID HALPAINY Proposed name: DAVID KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 20, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: May 21, 2012 Case Number: 156134 Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ELIZABETH GREGG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: GABRIELLA ROSE KUMOR Proposed name: GABRIELLA ROSE GREGG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 10, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: June 12, 2012 Case Number: 156798 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LEIGH DANIELLE GRAVETTE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LEIGH DANIELLE GRAVETTE Proposed name: LEIGH DANIELLE YOUNG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is

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scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 3, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: June 12, 2012 Case Number: 157017 Published: June 21,28, July 5,12, 2012

SUMMONS CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 CHILDS NAME: DGD Case Numbers: J-35568 To: CHAD RISER and anyone claiming to be a parent of DGD born on September 21, 2001 at Enloe Hospital, Chico, CA. A hearing will be held: Date: August 23, 2012 at 8:30 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is Superior Court of California, County of Butte,

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Juvenile Branch 1 Court Street, Oroville, CA 95965. At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminates your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Dated: May 25, 2012 Signed: Kimberly Flener Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: MARCELLA E MASTELLER aka MARCELLA WOOD, aka MARCELLA E EDENS, aka MARCY MASTELLER, aka MARCY EDENS YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT

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BUREAU, A CORP. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services

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Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF BUTTE, 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alfred W Driscol III 1339 The Esplanade Chico, CA 95926 (530)345-8472 Dated: October 21, 2011 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 155003 NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. As the person sued under the fictitious name of: aka MARCELLA WOOD, aka MARCELLA E EDENS, aka MARCY MASTELLER, aka MARCY EDENS. Published: June 7,14,21,28, 2012

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ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Swans, geese, and ducks molt all of their flight feathers at once, which means they may be unable to fly for several weeks afterwards. We humans don’t do anything like that in a literal way, but we have a psychological analog: times when we shed outworn self-images. I suspect you’re coming up on such a transition, Aries. While you’re going through it, you may want to lie low. Anything resembling flight— launching new ventures, making big decisions, embarking on great adventures—should probably be postponed until the metamorphosis is complete and your feathers grow back.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 2011 car

traffic began flowing across Jiaozhou Bay Bridge, a newly completed span that joins the city of Qingdao with the Huangdao District in China. This prodigious feat of engineering is 26.4 miles long. I nominate it to serve as your prime metaphor in the coming weeks. Picture it whenever you need a boost as you work to connect previously unlinked elements in your life. It may help inspire you to master the gritty details that’ll lead to your own monumental accomplishment.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An apple starts

growing on its tree in the spring. By early summer, it may be full size and as red as it will ever be. To the naked eye, it appears ready to eat. But it’s not. If you pluck it and bite into it, the taste probably won’t appeal to you. If you pluck it and hope it will be more delicious in a few weeks, you’ll be disappointed. So here’s the moral of the story, Gemini: For an apple to achieve its potential, it has to stay on the tree until nature has finished ripening it. Keep that lesson in mind as you deal with the urge to harvest something before it has reached its prime.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Dear Rob: In

one of your recent horoscopes, you implied that I should consider the possibility of asking for more than I’ve ever asked for before. You didn’t actually use those words, but I’m pretty sure that’s what you meant. Anyway, I want to thank you! It helped me start working up the courage to burst out of my protective and imprisoning little shell. Today I gave myself permission to learn the unknowable, figure out the inscrutable, and dream the inconceivable. — Crazy Crab.” Dear Crazy: You’re leading the way for your fellow Cancerians. The process you just described is exactly what I advise them to try in the coming weeks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Picture yourself

moving toward a building you haven’t seen before. Trust the initial image that leaps into your imagination. What type of path are you on? Concrete or dirt or brick or wood? Is it a long, winding way, or short and direct? Once you arrive at the front door, locate the key. Is it under a mat, or in your pocket or somewhere else? What does the key look like? Next, open the door and go inside to explore. Where have you arrived? See everything in detail. This is a test that has no right or wrong answers, Leo—similar to what your life is actually bringing you right now. The building you’ve envisioned represents the next phase of your destiny. The path symbolizes how you get here. The key is the capacity or knowledge you will need.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): My first poetry

teacher suggested that it was my job as a poet to learn the names of things in the natural world. She said I should be able to identify at least 25 species of trees, 25 flowers, 25 herbs, 25 birds, and eight clouds. I have unfortunately fallen short in living up to that very modest goal, and I’ve always felt guilty about it. But it’s never too late to begin, right? In the coming weeks, I vow to correct for my dereliction of duty. I urge you to follow my lead, Virgo. Is there any soul work that you have been neglecting? Is there any part of your life’s mission that you have skipped over? Now would be an excellent time to catch up.

Slow glide

by Rob Brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here’s my nomi-

nation for one of the 10 Biggest Problems in the World: our refusal to control the pictures and thoughts that pop into our minds. For example, I can personally testify that when a fearful image worms its way into the space behind my eyes, I sometimes let it stimulate a surge of negative emotions rather than just banish it or question whether it’s true. I’m calling this is to your attention, Libra, because in the weeks ahead you’ll have more power than usual to modulate your stream of consciousness. Have you ever seen the bumper sticker that says, “Don’t believe everything you think”? Make that your mantra.

story and photo by Howard Hardee howardh@newsreview.com

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the hands

of a skilled practitioner, astrology can help you determine the most favorable days to start a new project or heat up your romantic possibilities or get a tattoo of a ninja mermaid. Success is of course still quite feasible at other times, but you might find most grace and ease if you align yourself with the cosmic flow. Let’s consider, for example, the issue of you taking a vacation. According to my understanding, if you do it between now and July 23, the experiences you have will free your ass, and—hallelujah!—your mind will then gratefully follow. If you schedule your getaway for another time, you could still free your ass, but may have to toil more intensely to get your mind to join the fun.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

What is your most hateable and loveable obsession, Sagittarius? The compulsion that sometimes sabotages you and sometimes inspires you? The longing that can either fool you or make you smarter? Whatever it is, I suspect it’s beginning a transformation. Is there anything you can do to ensure that the changes it undergoes will lead you away from the hateable consequences and closer to the loveable stuff? I think there’s a lot you can do. For starters: Do a ritual—yes, an actual ceremony—in which you affirm your intention that your obsession will forever after serve your highest good and brightest integrity.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): As

someone who thrives on simple organic food and doesn’t enjoy shopping, I would not normally have lunch at a hot dog stand in a suburban mall. But that’s what I did today. Nor do I customarily read books by writers whose philosophy repels me, and yet recently I have found myself skimming through Ayn Rand’s The Virtue of Selfishness. I’ve been enjoying these acts of rebellion. They’re not directed at the targets that I usually revolt against, but rather at my own habits and comforts. I suggest you enjoy similar insurrections in the coming week, Capricorn. Rise up and overthrow your attachment to boring familiarity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

ancient Chinese book of divination known as the I Ching speaks of “catching things before they exit the gate of change.” That’s what happens when a martial artist anticipates an assailant’s movement before it happens, or when a healer corrects an imbalance in someone’s body before it becomes a fullblown symptom or illness. I see this as an important principle for you right now, Aquarius. It’s a favorable time to catch potential disturbances prior to the time they exit the gate of change. If you’re alert for pre-beginnings, you should be able to neutralize or transform brewing problems so they never become problems.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Neurophysiologists say that singing really loudly can flush away metabolic waste from your cerebrum. I say that singing really loudly can help purge your soul of any tendency it might have to ignore its deepest promptings. I bring these ideas to your attention, Pisces, because I believe the current astrological omens are suggesting that you do some really loud singing. Washing the dirt and debris out of your brain will do wonders for your mental hygiene. And your soul could use a boost as it ramps up its wild power to pursue its most important dreams.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of June 21, 2012

Watching a turkey vulture float effortlessly over Table Mountain or Big Chico Creek seemingly without moving a feather can be a mesmerizing experience. For those who wonder what it would feel like to soar silently on updrafts in the summer heat, Table Mountain Aviation Glider Operations is your best bet. Pilot Garrick “Garry” Lee and his team of aviation enthusiasts began offering rides out of Oroville Municipal Airport in April, towing a two-man glider behind a prop plane and releasing it thousands of feet above Butte County. On the slow coast back to ground—which can take up to 35 minutes—passengers are offered a bird’seye view of the region, including the Sutter Buttes and, perhaps most impressive, Lake Oroville Dam. Go to http://tmaglider.com for more information, including rates.

How safe is the glider? The gilder is probably safer than a power plane. We can slow it down to where we’re still flying at 35 mph. You’ve got 52 feet of wingspan there—that’s a lot of force that creates lift. It’s what I train my pilots in because if they ever have an engine out, your plane becomes a glider.

Why did you base the operation out of Oroville instead of Chico? Because there is no control tower [in Oroville], and there’s a lot more scenery around Oroville. There’s a lot of diverse topography I can point out to people and give them a geological perspective to whatever they’re looking at.

What do you like to point out to passengers? We give them a large area to look at, but especially with the water diversion system that flows into the Forebay. It’s really interesting to see how the whole water system works for farming from the air. All of that water is put there for farming, but of course the byproduct is going to be recreation.

How high do you take the glider? The glider ride we normally give will be between 3,500 and 4,000 feet, and that will get us as far as [Oroville] Dam. The best ride available is the one that goes past the dam. We have to go about a mile high for that one, and it lasts about 35 to 40 minutes. I slow the glider down quite a bit over the lake to give people time to take pictures and take it all in.

What do you hope people will get out of the experience? The bottom line is, we’re out there to have fun. Everyone out there, they’re just enthusiastic about getting people to enjoy flying. That’s the whole idea.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter himself@anthonypeytonporter.com

Snails Because I live on Earth, there are lots of other living things near—not to mention on and in—me. Some of these beings I’ve been conditioned to think of as beneficial, like the bacteria in my digestive tract that permit me to live, or not. Some, like the snails in my garden, I’ve come to think of as a nuisance and, so, deserving of death. I don’t approve of wanton killing. I’m not sure what “wanton” means, unnecessary I guess. Necessary for what? So when there are holes in the red cabbages and snail tracks all around, what’s my course of action? I know I do not want my peppers to go the way of the broccoli last year, weak and gasping from the very slow attacks of the snail armada. I tried the beer ploy, where you put out shallow containers of beer, which the snails can’t resist and then drown in a stupor, getting what they deserve and leaving me out of the picture, it being no fault of mine if the slimy things have so little control over their own impulses as to drown in the embodiment of their weakness. I put a jar cap filled with beer level

with the soil, like I’d read, just as a snail was approaching, no kidding, and the snail oozed around it, like it was offended and couldn’t wait to get past. I was crushed, my faith in the Internet shaken, the snails swaggering round the cabbages and gathering at the dark damp base of the walnut tree. Now I think the problem is my reluctance to kill snails on sight and be done with it, the way I used to. Ahimsa is making me a sissy. I was a city boy, and I don’t know squat about farm animals and casual life and death, and I’ve killed some insects and frogs and worms and maybe a snake or two and once a rat whose luck ran out, but by the time I encountered snails I was eating more consciously, and I’m sure you know what a pain that can be. I’ve watched snails explode with salt and apparently ignore diatomaceous earth, but I didn’t want to crush them. What a wimp. What to do with the snails? I could relocate them to the wild, or at least to the guys down the alley. Is that fair? Is fair necessary? Fair is necessary, and I think fair in this case requires eating the snails, so that’s what I’m gonna do, maybe. Organic escargots in garlic butter. Sustainable, too. June 21, 2012

CN&R 39


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HEALTH-FOOD BUZZIN’ LIKE AN ALIEN PAGE 20 BY JASON CASSIDY Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly Volume35,Issue43 Thursday,June 21,2012 Se...

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